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Sample records for underlying obesogen-associated obesity

  1. Sibutramine promotes amygdala activity under fasting conditions in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmanns, Kerstin M; Heldmann, Marcus; Daul, Susanne; Klose, Silke; Rotte, Michael; Schäfer, Michael; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Münte, Thomas F; Lehnert, Hendrik

    2012-06-01

    Sibutramine, a centrally-acting selective monoamine reuptake inhibitor, has been used as an appetite suppressant drug in obesity. To gain insight into the central nervous actions of sibutramine, brain responses to pictures of food items after sibutramine vs placebo application were assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in obese women. In a randomized double-blind crossover design, 10 healthy obese women (BMI 31.8-39.9 kg/m(2)) received 15 mg/d of sibutramine vs placebo for 14 d. Obese participants, and a group of 10 age-matched normal weight controls, viewed pictures of food items and control objects in hungry and satiated states while lying in the MR scanner. The paradigm followed a block design. In obese participants, fMRI measurements were conducted prior and after two weeks of daily sibutramine or placebo administration, whereas control participants were scanned only at one point in time. Upon food item presentation, obese participants showed increased brain activity in areas related to emotional and reward processing, perceptual processing, and cognitive control as compared to normal weight controls. Sibutramine exerted a divergent satiety-dependent effect on amygdala activity in obese participants, increasing activity in the hungry state while decreasing it under conditions of satiation. Our results demonstrate a modulatory influence of sibutramine on amygdala activity in obese women which may underlie the appetite suppressant effects of the drug.

  2. Altered Decision-Making under Risk in Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Navas

    Full Text Available The negative consequences of energy dense foods are well known, yet people increasingly make unhealthy food choices leading to obesity (i.e., risky decisions. The aims of this study were: [1] to compare performance in decision-making tasks under risk and under ambiguity between individuals with obesity, overweight and normal weight; [2] to examine the associations between body mass index (BMI and decision-making, and the degree to which these associations are modulated by reward sensitivity.Seventy-nine adults were recruited and classified in three groups according to their BMI: obesity, overweight and normal-weight. Groups were similar in terms of age, education and socio-economic status, and were screened for comorbid medical and mental health conditions. Decision-making under risk was measured via the Wheel of Fortune Task (WoFT and decision-making under ambiguity via the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT. Reward sensitivity was indicated by the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ.Individuals with obesity made riskier choices in the WoFT, specifically in choices with an expected value close to zero and in the propensity to risk index. No differences were found in IGT performance or SPSRQ scores. BMI was associated with risk-taking (WoFT performance, independently of reward sensitivity.Obesity is linked to a propensity to make risky decisions in experimental conditions analogous to everyday food choices.

  3. Overweight and obesity may lead to under-diagnosis of airflow limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Çolak, Yunus; Marott, Jacob Louis; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of obesity has increased during the last decades and varies from 10-20% in most European countries to approximately 32% in the United States. However, data on how obesity affects the presence of airflow limitation (AFL) defined as a reduced ratio between forced expirato......-diagnosis and under-treatment of COPD among individuals with overweight and obesity....

  4. Severe childhood obesity: an under-recognised and growing health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Rosara; Eneli, Ihuoma

    2015-11-01

    Childhood obesity is a serious and urgent public health problem. In the last 10 years, there has been a concerted effort in the USA and globally to develop and implement educational, medical and public health interventions designed to attenuate its growth. The success of these efforts was probably responsible for the plateau in the prevalence rate of childhood obesity noted in the last two years. While the attenuation of the overall prevalence of childhood obesity is promising, data from the same cohort reveal a concerning upward trend in the number of children with severe obesity. The consequences of severe childhood obesity can be devastating. When compared to their moderately obese peers, children with severe obesity are at greater risk for adult obesity, early atherosclerosis, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, fatty liver disease and premature death. The determinants for severe obesity include the same lifestyle, environmental, familial and societal risk factors reported for overweight or obesity. While all these risk factors must be screened for, genetic influences are distinct considerations that may have greater bearing especially with early-onset obesity. Treatments for severe childhood obesity include lifestyle intervention, specialised low-calorie diets and bariatric surgery. Outcomes of these treatments vary, with bariatric surgery clearly the most successful of the three for both short-term and long-term weight loss. Severe obesity in children and adolescents remains a challenging health condition. The enormous medical, emotional and financial burden these children and their families endure signals an urgent need to further investigate and standardise treatment modalities and improve outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Obesity, metabolic profile, and inhibition failure: Young women under scrutiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catoira, N P; Tapajóz, F; Allegri, R F; Lajfer, J; Rodríguez Cámara, M J; Iturry, M L; Castaño, G O

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of obesity, as well as evidence about this pathology as a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia in the elderly, is increasing worldwide. Executive functions have been found to be compromised in most studies, although the specific results are dissimilar. Obese young women constitute an interesting study and intervention group, having been found to be unaffected by age and hormonal negative effects on cognition and considering that their health problems affect not only themselves but their families and offspring. The objective of the present study was to compare the executive performance of obese young women with that of a healthy control group. A cross-sectional study was done among premenopausal women from a public hospital in Buenos Aires. The sample comprised 113 participants (32 healthy controls and 81 obese women), who were evaluated for depressive and anxiety symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and executive functioning (Trail-Making Test B, Stroop Color and Word Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and verbal fluency test). Statistical analysis was done by using the SPSS version 20.0 software. Among executive functions, a significant difference was found between groups in inhibition (pobese group, there was a negative slightly correlation between this cognitive test and 2h post-load glucose level. Inhibition was decreased in our obese young women group, and glucose/lipid metabolism may be involved in this association. The cognitive impairment is comparable with that described in addictive conditions. Our conclusions support the concept of multidisciplinary management of obese patients from the time of diagnosis. Detecting and understanding cognitive dysfunction in this population is essential to providing appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too ... what's considered healthy for his or her height. Obesity happens over time when you eat more calories ...

  7. Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, B L; Westerterp, K R; Loos, R J F

    2012-01-01

    programming for obesity via epigenetic changes in response to a 'Western diet' results in production of lipid-poor milk and metabolically efficient pups, contributing to the perpetuation of obesity throughout generations. Evolutionary insight from comparative physiology and ecology indicates that over...... generations activity-induced energy expenditure has remained the same compared to wild mammals, that energy balance might be dependant on protein balance, while the function of taste changed from detection of poison or energy to social drinking and social behaviour. At present, the impact of assortative...

  8. Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Camilla Schmidt; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2014-01-01

    A new report provides compelling evidence of the high prevalence of overweight and obesity throughout the world. The prevalence has increased since 1980, but at different rates across ages, times and locations. Studies exploring the causes of these differences could aid development of effective...

  9. [Prevalence of overwight and obesity among children under five years in Peru 2007-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajuelo-Ramírez, Jaime; Miranda-Cuadros, Marianella; Campos-Sánchez, Miguel; Sánchez-Abanto, José

    2011-06-01

    To estimate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children under five in Peru in the years 2007-2010 and to describe according to geographical areas, poverty levels, maternal education, breastfeeding, child age, sex and birth weight. continuous (repeated cross-sectional) multistage, random sampling survey from the universe of children under five-years and pregnant women living in Peru, divided into five geographical areas. Out of 3,669 children, 50.3% were males (Lima N=680, Remaining Coast N=763, Urban Sierra N=719, Rural Sierra N=699, Jungle N=808) having their weight and height measured according to international standards. The national prevalence of overweight and obesity was 6.9%, with Metropolitan Lima (10.1%) as the highest and in the Jungle (2.6%) as the lowest. Age, sex, geographical area and birth weight were identified as risk factors through multiple logistic regression. overweight and obesity are higher in Lima, during the first year of age and when birth weight is more than 2.5 Kg.

  10. Obesity.

    OpenAIRE

    Callaway, C W

    1987-01-01

    Obesity is not a single disease, but a variety of conditions resulting from different mechanisms and associated with various types and degrees of risks. To determine who should lose weight, how much weight should be lost, and how to undertake weight loss, the following types of information are needed: personal-demographic data, developmental patterns, family history, energy balance, body composition/fat distribution, psychological/behavioral measures, endocrine/metabolic measures, complicatio...

  11. Metabolic consequences and vulnerability to diet-induced obesity in male mice under chronic social stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bartolomucci

    Full Text Available Social and psychological factors interact with genetic predisposition and dietary habit in determining obesity. However, relatively few pre-clinical studies address the role of psychosocial factors in metabolic disorders. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated in male mice: 1 opposite status-dependent effect on body weight gain under chronic psychosocial stress; 2 a reduction in body weight in individually housed (Ind male mice. In the present study these observations were extended to provide a comprehensive characterization of the metabolic consequences of chronic psychosocial stress and individual housing in adult CD-1 male mice. Results confirmed that in mice fed standard diet, dominant (Dom and Ind had a negative energy balance while subordinate (Sub had a positive energy balance. Locomotor activity was depressed in Sub and enhanced in Dom. Hyperphagia emerged for Dom and Sub and hypophagia for Ind. Dom also showed a consistent decrease of visceral fat pads weight as well as increased norepinephrine concentration and smaller adipocytes diameter in the perigonadal fat pad. On the contrary, under high fat diet Sub and, surprisingly, Ind showed higher while Dom showed lower vulnerability to obesity associated with hyperphagia. In conclusion, we demonstrated that social status under chronic stress and individual housing deeply affect mice metabolic functions in different, sometime opposite, directions. Food intake, the hedonic response to palatable food as well as the locomotor activity and the sympathetic activation within the adipose fat pads all represent causal factors explaining the different metabolic alterations observed. Overall this study demonstrates that pre-clinical animal models offer a suitable tool for the investigation of the metabolic consequences of chronic stress exposure and associated psychopathologies.

  12. Metabolic Consequences and Vulnerability to Diet-Induced Obesity in Male Mice under Chronic Social Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Cabassi, Aderville; Govoni, Paolo; Ceresini, Graziano; Cero, Cheryl; Berra, Daniela; Dadomo, Harold; Franceschini, Paolo; Dell'Omo, Giacomo

    2009-01-01

    Social and psychological factors interact with genetic predisposition and dietary habit in determining obesity. However, relatively few pre-clinical studies address the role of psychosocial factors in metabolic disorders. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated in male mice: 1) opposite status-dependent effect on body weight gain under chronic psychosocial stress; 2) a reduction in body weight in individually housed (Ind) male mice. In the present study these observations were extended to provide a comprehensive characterization of the metabolic consequences of chronic psychosocial stress and individual housing in adult CD-1 male mice. Results confirmed that in mice fed standard diet, dominant (Dom) and Ind had a negative energy balance while subordinate (Sub) had a positive energy balance. Locomotor activity was depressed in Sub and enhanced in Dom. Hyperphagia emerged for Dom and Sub and hypophagia for Ind. Dom also showed a consistent decrease of visceral fat pads weight as well as increased norepinephrine concentration and smaller adipocytes diameter in the perigonadal fat pad. On the contrary, under high fat diet Sub and, surprisingly, Ind showed higher while Dom showed lower vulnerability to obesity associated with hyperphagia. In conclusion, we demonstrated that social status under chronic stress and individual housing deeply affect mice metabolic functions in different, sometime opposite, directions. Food intake, the hedonic response to palatable food as well as the locomotor activity and the sympathetic activation within the adipose fat pads all represent causal factors explaining the different metabolic alterations observed. Overall this study demonstrates that pre-clinical animal models offer a suitable tool for the investigation of the metabolic consequences of chronic stress exposure and associated psychopathologies. PMID:19180229

  13. A Behavioral Genetic Model of the Mechanisms Underlying the Link Between Obesity and Symptoms of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patte, Karen A; Davis, Caroline A; Levitan, Robert D; Kaplan, Allan S; Carter-Major, Jacqueline; Kennedy, James L

    2016-01-21

    The ADHD-obesity link has been suggested to result from a shared underlying basis of suboptimal dopamine (DA); however, this theory conflicts evidence that an amplified DA signal increases the risk for overeating and weight gain. A model was tested in which ADHD symptoms, predicted by hypodopaminergic functioning in the prefrontal cortex, in combination with an enhanced appetitive drive, predict hedonic eating and, in turn, higher body mass index (BMI). DRD2 and DRD4 markers were genotyped. The model was tested using structural equation modeling in a nonclinical sample (N = 421 adults). The model was a good fit to the data. Controlling for education, all parameter estimates were significant, except for the DRD4-ADHD symptom pathway. The significant indirect effect indicates that overeating mediated the ADHD symptoms-BMI association. Results support the hypothesis that overeating and elevated DA in the ventral striatum-representative of a greater reward response-contribute to the ADHD symptom-obesity relationship. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. [Perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant patient undergoing cesarean section under general anesthesia - case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevides, Márcio Luiz; Brandão, Verônica Cristina Moraes; Lovera, Jacqueline Ivonne Arenas

    2016-01-01

    The increased prevalence of obesity in the general population extends to women of reproductive age. The aim of this study is to report the perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant woman, body mass index > 50 kg/m(2), who underwent cesarean section under general anesthesia. Pregnant woman in labor, 35 years of age, body mass index 59.8 kg/m(2). Caesarean section was indicated due to the presumed fetal macrosomia. The patient refused spinal anesthesia. She was placed in the ramp position with cushions from back to head to facilitate tracheal intubation. Another cushion was placed on top of the right gluteus to create an angle of approximately 15° to the operating table. Immediately before induction of anesthesia, asepsis was carried out and sterile surgical fields were placed. Anesthesia was induced in rapid sequence, with Sellick maneuver and administration of remifentanil, propofol, and succinilcolina. Intubation was performed using a gum elastic bougie, and anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. The interval between skin incision and fetal extraction was 21 minutes, with the use of a Simpson's forceps scoop to assist in the extraction. The patient gave birth to a newborn weighing 4850 g, with Apgar scores of 2 in the 1(st) minute (received positive pressure ventilation by mask for about 2 minutes) and 8 in the 5(th) minute. The patient was extubated uneventfully. Multimodal analgesia and prophylaxis of nausea and vomiting was performed. Mother and newborn were discharged on the 4(th) postoperative day. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant patient undergoing cesarean section under general anesthesia - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevides, Márcio Luiz; Brandão, Verônica Cristina Moraes; Lovera, Jacqueline Ivonne Arenas

    2016-01-01

    The increased prevalence of obesity in the general population extends to women of reproductive age. The aim of this study is to report the perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant woman, body mass index >50kg/m(2), who underwent cesarean section under general anesthesia. Pregnant woman in labor, 35 years of age, body mass index 59.8kg/m(2). Cesarean section was indicated due to the presumed fetal macrosomia. The patient refused spinal anesthesia. She was placed in the ramp position with cushions from back to head to facilitate tracheal intubation. Another cushion was placed on top of the right gluteus to create an angle of approximately 15° to the operating table. Immediately before induction of anesthesia, asepsis was carried out and sterile surgical fields were placed. Anesthesia was induced in rapid sequence, with Sellick maneuver and administration of remifentanil, propofol, and succinilcolina. Intubation was performed using a gum elastic bougie, and anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. The interval between skin incision and fetal extraction was 21min, with the use of a Simpson's forceps scoop to assist in the extraction. The patient gave birth to a newborn weighing 4850g, with Apgar scores of 2 in the 1st minute (received positive pressure ventilation by mask for about 2min) and 8 in the 5th minute. The patient was extubated uneventfully. Multimodal analgesia and prophylaxis of nausea and vomiting was performed. Mother and newborn were discharged on the 4th postoperative day. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant patient undergoing cesarean section under general anesthesia - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Luiz Benevides

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The increased prevalence of obesity in the general population extends to women of reproductive age. The aim of this study is to report the perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant woman, body mass index >50 kg/m2, who underwent cesarean section under general anesthesia. Case report: Pregnant woman in labor, 35 years of age, body mass index 59.8 kg/m2. Cesarean section was indicated due to the presumed fetal macrosomia. The patient refused spinal anesthesia. She was placed in the ramp position with cushions from back to head to facilitate tracheal intubation. Another cushion was placed on top of the right gluteus to create an angle of approximately 15° to the operating table. Immediately before induction of anesthesia, asepsis was carried out and sterile surgical fields were placed. Anesthesia was induced in rapid sequence, with Sellick maneuver and administration of remifentanil, propofol, and succinilcolina. Intubation was performed using a gum elastic bougie, and anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. The interval between skin incision and fetal extraction was 21 min, with the use of a Simpson's forceps scoop to assist in the extraction. The patient gave birth to a newborn weighing 4850 g, with Apgar scores of 2 in the 1st minute (received positive pressure ventilation by mask for about 2 min and 8 in the 5th minute. The patient was extubated uneventfully. Multimodal analgesia and prophylaxis of nausea and vomiting was performed. Mother and newborn were discharged on the 4th postoperative day.

  17. Fruit Fiber Consumption Specifically Improves Liver Health Status in Obese Subjects under Energy Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Cantero, Irene; Abete, Itziar; Monreal, J. Ignacio; Martinez, J. Alfredo; Zulet, M. Angeles

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease (NAFLD) is associated with obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome (MS). This study aimed to evaluate the influence of two energy-restricted diets on non-invasive markers and scores of liver damage in obese individuals with features of MS after six months of follow-up and to assess the role of fiber content in metabolic outcomes. Seventy obese individuals from the RESMENA (Reduction of Metabolic Syndrome in Navarra) study were evaluated at...

  18. The discordant pleasures of everyday eating: Reflections on the social gradient in obesity under neo-liberalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, Paul; Peacock, Marian; Blackburn, Joanna; Smith, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Despite widespread epidemiological evidence of a social gradient in obesity, there has been less attention focused on understanding this from a sociological perspective. Furthermore, whilst pleasure is an obvious feature of contemporary cultural representations of food and eating, this has not figured prominently in sociological understandings of the social gradient. Using qualitative data from biographical interviews conducted with adults living in materially deprived parts of South Yorkshire (UK) we introduce the idea of discordant pleasure in relation to everyday eating as a way of shedding light on the social gradient in obesity. We highlight in particular, the ways in which materially deprived individuals who were defined as obese described the tensions between the pleasures of eating and the struggles for bodily control, alongside the affective dimensions - frustration and shame - that this process engendered. We draw on Berlant's work on lateral and interruptive agency to make sense of these accounts, suggesting that classed agency and discordant pleasure are important dimensions in understanding the social gradient in obesity under neoliberalism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanisms underlying center of pressure displacements in obese subjects during quiet stance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priano Lorenzo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective the aim of this study was to assess whether reduced balance capacity in obese subjects is secondary to altered sensory information. Design cross sectional study. Subjects 44 obese (BMI = 40.6 ± 4.6 kg/m2 , age = 34.2 ± 10.8 years, body weight: 114,0 ± 16,0 Kg, body height 167,5 ± 9,8 cm and 20 healthy controls (10 females, 10 males, BMI: 21.6 ± 2.2 kg/m2, age: 30.5 ± 5.5 years, body weight: 62,9 ± 9,3 Kg, body height 170,1 ± 5,8 cm were enrolled. Measurements center of pressure (CoP displacements were evaluated during quiet stance on a force platform with eyes open (EO and closed (EC. The Romberg quotient (EC/EO was computed and compared between groups. Results we found statistically significant differences between obese and controls in CoP displacements (p 0.08. Conclusion the increased CoP displacements in obese subjects do not need an hypothesis about altered sensory information. The integration of different sensory inputs appears similar in controls and obese. In the latter, the increased mass, ankle torque and muscle activity may probably account for the higher CoP displacements.

  20. Use of high-flow nasal cannula in obese patients receiving colonoscopy under intravenous propofol sedation: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chan Lee

    Full Text Available Intravenous sedation during colonoscopy has become the standard practice in the United States given its higher patient satisfaction and procedural quality. This practice is not free of side effects as a significant proportion of patients undergoing this procedure tend to have respiratory depression and desaturation events. Obesity, as it relates to higher levels of body mass index (BMI has a positive correlation with the incidence of hypoxemia. During colonoscopy High flow nasal cannula (HFNC may potentially improve oxygen performance in patients receiving colonoscopy under intravenous sedation. Here we present 3 cases of patients undergoing adjunctive oxygen therapy with HFNC during colonoscopy with intravenous sedation. We found patients to have lower number of desaturation events and were satisfied with their experience. Keywords: High BMI (body mass index, HFNC (high-flow nasal cannula, Colonoscopy, Intravenous sedation, Obesity

  1. Fruit Fiber Consumption Specifically Improves Liver Health Status in Obese Subjects under Energy Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero, Irene; Abete, Itziar; Monreal, J Ignacio; Martinez, J Alfredo; Zulet, M Angeles

    2017-06-28

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease (NAFLD) is associated with obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome (MS). This study aimed to evaluate the influence of two energy-restricted diets on non-invasive markers and scores of liver damage in obese individuals with features of MS after six months of follow-up and to assess the role of fiber content in metabolic outcomes. Seventy obese individuals from the RESMENA (Reduction of Metabolic Syndrome in Navarra) study were evaluated at baseline and after six months of energy-restricted nutritional intervention (American Heart Association (AHA) and RESMENA dietary groups). Dietary records, anthropometrical data, body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and routine laboratory measurements were analyzed by standardized methods. Regarding liver status, cytokeratin-18 fragments and several non-invasive scores of fatty liver were also assessed. The RESMENA strategy was a good and complementary alternative to AHA for the treatment of obesity-related comorbidities. Participants with higher insoluble fiber consumption (≥7.5 g/day) showed improvements in fatty liver index (FLI), hepatic steatosis index (HIS), and NAFLD liver fat score (NAFLD_LFS), while gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and transaminases evidenced significant improvements as a result of fruit fiber consumption (≥8.8 g/day). Remarkably, a regression model evidenced a relationship between liver status and fiber from fruits. These results support the design of dietary patterns based on the consumption of insoluble fiber and fiber from fruits in the context of energy restriction for the management of obese patients suffering fatty liver disease.

  2. Three months of resistance training in overweight and obese individuals improves reactive balance control under unstable conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemková, Erika; Kyselovičová, Ol'ga; Jeleň, Michal; Kováčiková, Zuzana; Ollé, Gábor; Řtefániková, Gabriela; Vilman, Tomáš; Baláž, Miroslav; Kurdiová, Timea; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcová, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Contrary to static and dynamic balance, there is a lack of scientific evidence on the training induced changes in reactive balance control in response to unexpected perturbations in overweight and obese individuals. This study evaluates the effect of 3 months of resistance and aerobic training programs on postural responses to unexpected perturbations under stable and unstable conditions in the overweight and obese. A group of 17 overweight and obese subjects, divided into two groups, underwent either resistance or aerobic training for a period of 3 months (3 sessions per week). Prior to and after completing the training, they performed the load release balance test while standing on either a stable or unstable surface, with eyes open and closed. Peak posterior center of pressure (CoP) displacement, and the time to peak posterior CoP displacement during a bipedal stance on a foam surface with eyes open (17.3%, p = 0.019 and 15.4%, p = 0.029) and eyes closed (15.0%, p = 0.027 and 13.2%, p = 0.034), decreased significantly. In addition, the total anterior to posterior CoP displacement, and the time from peak anterior to peak posterior CoP displacement, both with eyes open (18.1%, p = 0.017 and 12.2%, p = 0.040) and eyes closed (16.3%, p = 0.023 and 11.7%, p = 0.044), also significantly decreased. However, after completing the resistance training, the parameters registered while standing on a stable platform, both with eyes open and closed, did not change significantly. The group that underwent an aerobic training also failed to show any significant changes in parameters of the load release balance test. Three months of resistance training in overweight and obese subjects improves reactive balance control in response to unexpected perturbations under unstable conditions, both with and without visual cues. Due to the fact that this unstable load release balance test was found to be sensitive in revealing post-training changes, it would be suitable for implementing in

  3. [Surveys on the status and associated factors of overweight and obesity of rural children under 7 year-old in Gansu Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hongli; Li, Zhilan; Ma, Guoyan; Liu, Hong; Xie, Pengmin; Jin, Na

    2011-01-01

    To understand the status and associated factors of overweight and obesity of rural children under 7 year-old in Gansu province. A total of 9390 rural children under 7 year-old and their mothers in 4 counties in Gansu province were selected by stratified random cluster sampling method and screened for overweight or obesity by BMI. All data were input by using a double entry method with EPI data 3.0 software and analyzed statistically by Excel/SPSS 10.0 software. The detection rate of overweight in rural children under 7 in Gansu province was 8.2% (male 8.7%, female 7.9%), the detection rate of obesity was 6.1% (male 6.4%, female 5.8%). The independent risk factors for overweight and obesity were birth weight > or = 4000 g and living in scattered lifestyle. The risks of overweight and obesity in rural children are rather high, more attention should be paid to children aged from 9 month to 2 years. Reducing the rate of birth weight > or = 4000 g and scattered lifestyle in children can make some contribution to the prevention of obesity and overweight.

  4. Obesity under affluence varies by welfare regimes: the effect of fast food, insecurity, and inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offer, Avner; Pechey, Rachel; Ulijaszek, Stanley

    2010-12-01

    Among affluent countries, those with market-liberal welfare regimes (which are also English-speaking) tend to have the highest prevalence of obesity. The impact of cheap, accessible high-energy food is often invoked in explanation. An alternative approach is that overeating is a response to stress, and that competition, uncertainty, and inequality make market-liberal societies more stressful. This ecological regression meta-study pools 96 body-weight surveys from 11 countries c. 1994-2004. The fast-food 'shock' impact is found to work most strongly in market-liberal countries. Economic insecurity, measured in several different ways, was almost twice as powerful, while the impact of inequality was weak, and went in the opposite direction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Parent-related mechanisms underlying the social gradient of childhood overweight and obesity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, P; Hooley, M; Skouteris, H; Williams, J

    2016-09-01

    Low socio-economic status (SES) is a significant risk factor for childhood overweight and obesity (COWOB) in high-income countries. Parents to young children buffer and accentuate social and cultural influences, and are central to the development of this disease. An understanding of the parent-related mechanisms that underlie the SES-COWOB relationship is needed to improve the efficacy of prevention and intervention efforts. A systematic review of relevant literature was conducted to investigate the mechanisms by which levels of SES (low, middle and high) are associated to COWOB, by exploring mediation and interaction effects. Six electronic databases were searched yielding 5155 initial records, once duplicates were removed. Studies were included if they investigated COWOB, SES, parent-related factors and the multivariate relationship between these factors. Thirty studies were included. Factors found to be mediating the SES-COWOB relationship or interacting with SES to influence COWOB were categorized according to an ecological systems framework, at child, parent, household and social system level factors. High parent body mass index, ethnicity, child-care attendance, high TV time (mother and child), breastfeeding (early weaning), food intake behaviours and birthweight potentially mediate the relationship between SES and COWOB. Different risk factors for COWOB in different SES groups were found. For low SES families, parental obesity and maternal depressive symptoms were strong risk factors for COWOB, whereas long maternal working hours and a permissive parenting style were risk factors for higher SES families. None of the studies investigated parental psychological attributes such as attitudes, beliefs, self-esteem and so on as potential mechanisms/risk factors. Families from different SES groups have different risk and protective factors for COWOB. Prevention and intervention efforts may have improved efficacy if they are tailored to address specific risk factors

  6. Identifying nutrients that are under-reported by an automated 24-hour dietary recall method in overweight and obese women after weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underreporting of energy intake by 15-50% is a common problem in dietary assessment. Evidence suggests overweight/obese respondents are more likely to under-report than normal weight. This study compared Automated Self-Administered 24-hour recall (ASA24)-reported dietary intake to true intake in ove...

  7. Modulation of leptin, insulin, and growth hormone in obese pony mares under chronic nutritional restriction and supplementation with ractopamine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buff, Preston R; Johnson, Philip J; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Ganjam, Venkataseshu K; Messer Iv, Nat T; Keisler, Duane H

    2006-01-01

    Horses fed beyond their nutritional requirement and that are physically inactive will develop obesity, which is often accompanied by insulin resistance and heightened risk of laminitis. The use of pharmacologic agents in combination with nutritional restriction may promote weight loss in obese horses unable to exercise because of laminitic pain. This study shows that reducing feed intake of brome grass hay to 75% of ad libitum intake in obese pony mares reduces body weight without induced exercise. Additional supplementation of ractopamine hydrochloride for 6 weeks resulted in a tendency for increased weight loss. Subsequent modulation of obesity-associated hormones, leptin and insulin, as a result of caloric restriction was observed.

  8. Effect of Metformin and Flutamide on Anthropometric Indices and Laboratory Tests in Obese/Overweight PCOS Women under Hypocaloric Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mania; Golsorkhtabaramiri, Masoumeh; Esmaeilzadeh, Sedigheh; Ghofrani, Faeze; Bijani, Ali; Ghorbani, Leila; Delavar, Moloud Agajani

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of metformin and flutamide alone or in combination with anthropometric indices and laboratory tests of obese/overweight PCOS women under hypocaloric diet. This single blind clinical trial was performed on 120 PCOS women. At the beginning, hypocaloric diet was recommended for the patients. After one month while they were on the diet, the patients were randomly divided in 4 groups; metformin (500 mg, 3/day), flutamide (250 mg, 2/day), combined, metformin (500 mg, 3/day) with flutamide (250 mg, 2/day) and finally placebo group. The patients were treated for 6 months. Anthropometric indices and laboratory tests (fasting and glucose-stimulated insulin levels, lipid profile and androgens) were measured. A one-way ANOVA (Post Hoc) and paired t-test were performed to analyze data. A p ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. After treatment, reduction in weight, BMI, hip circumference was significantly greater in the metformin group in comparison to other groups (pPCOS women under hypocaloric diet.

  9. Examination of food reward and energy intake under laboratory and free-living conditions in a trait binge eating subtype of obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle eDalton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Trait binge eating has been proposed as a ‘hedonic subtype’ of obesity characterised by enhanced food liking and wanting, and a preference for high-fat sweet foods in the laboratory. The current study examined the influence of trait binge eating in overweight or obese women on eating behaviour under laboratory and free-living conditions over a 48-hour period.Methods: In a matched pairs design, 24 overweight or obese females (BMI: 30.30 ± 2.60kg/m2; Age: 25.42 ± 3.65yrs with high or low scores on the Binge Eating Scale were divided into one of two groups; Obese Binge (O-B and Obese Non-binge (O-NB. Energy intake was assessed using combined laboratory energy intake measures and 24-hour dietary recall procedures. Liking and wanting were assessed using the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire.Results: There was a significant association between overall energy consumed, and energy consumed from snack foods under laboratory and free-living conditions. O-B exhibited a greater preference for sweet snack foods in their laboratory and free-living eating behaviour. These findings were supported by greater laboratory-based measures of wanting and craving for this food type in O-B. In addition, O-B consumed significantly more energy than their estimated daily energy requirements in the laboratory suggesting that they over-consumed compared to O-NB.Conclusions: The measurement concordance between laboratory and free-living based energy intake supports the validity of laboratory-based test meal methodologies Variation in trait binge eating was associated with increased craving and wanting for high-fat sweet foods and overconsumption in the laboratory. These findings support the use of trait binge eating as a common hedonic subtype of obesity and extend the relevance of this subtype to habitual patterns of energy intake.

  10. Effects of a psychological intervention on the quality of life of obese adolescents under a multidisciplinary treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila R.M. Freitas

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The inclusion of a psychological counseling component in multidisciplinary treatment for adolescent obesity appears to provide benefits observed for improved QOL as compared with treatment without psychological counseling.

  11. Cultural Variables Underlying Obesity in Latino Men: Design, Rationale and Participant Characteristics from the Latino Men's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Johnsen, Lisa; Craven, Meredith; Nava, Magdalena; Alonso, Angelica; Dykema-Engblade, Amanda; Rademaker, Alfred; Xie, Hui

    2017-08-01

    Overweight and obesity are associated with significant health problems and rates of obesity are high among Latino men. This paper describes the design, rationale and participant characteristics of the key demographic variables assessed in an NIH-funded study (R21-CA143636) addressing culture and several obesity-related variables (diet, physical activity, and body image) among Mexican and Puerto Rican men using a community-based participatory research framework. Participants completed objective measures (height, weight, body fat, hip, waist), a health and culture interview, a diet questionnaire, and used an accelerometer to measure their level of physical activity. A total of 203 participants completed the measures and the health and culture interview and 193 completed all study components. Puerto Ricans were older than Mexicans (p cultural factors into a community participatory obesity intervention for Latino men.

  12. [Estimated glucose disposal rate in patients under 18 years of age with type 1 diabetes mellitus and overweight or obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo Atance, Enrique; Ballester Herrera, M José; Giralt Muiña, Patricio; Ruiz Cano, Rafael; León Martín, Alberto; Giralt Muiña, Juan

    2013-01-01

    To assess the estimated glucose disposal rate (eGDR), insulin dose, and lipoprotein profile in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and overweight or obesity as compared to children with T1DM and normal weight. A total of 115 patients (aged 5-16 years) with T1DM on intensive insulin therapy were recruited. The following parameters were measured: weight, height, body mass index, waist and hip circumference, insulin dose, eGDR, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood pressure, and lipoprotein profile. Results were stratified by sex and age. No significant differences were found in eGDR between children with normal weight, overweight, and obesity. However, obese children older than 11 years had lower eGDR values (9.3±1.3 vs 10.1±0.8 mg kg(-1)min(-1); poverweight and obese children, especially in IU/m2/day (37.7 vs 36.1 vs. 29.4 respectively; poverweight and normal weight (106.5 vs 91.7 vs 91.5mg/dL respectively; pdiabetic patients with overweight or obesity, specially in IU/m2/day. Obese children with T1DM had a lipoprotein profile of cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors Associated With Pneumonia Among Overweight and Obese Under-Five Children in an Urban Hospital of a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Shahunja MBBS

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, there are no data on the role of overweight and obesity in childhood pneumonia. We sought to determine that impact of overweight and obesity in such children. In this retrospective chart analysis, we enrolled hospitalized children aged 6 to 59 months in the Dhaka Hospital of the icddr,b, Bangladesh (International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, from January 2010 to June 2014. Children with pneumonia having overweight and obesity (body mass index Z score [BMIZ] >2.00 constituted cases (n = 25, and those who had pneumonia without overweight and obesity (BMIZ −2.00 to 2.00 constituted controls (n = 75. Controls were 3-fold of the cases and were randomly selected. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data of the cases and the controls were compared. The cases more often had diarrhea and dehydration (36% vs 12%, P = .013, hypoxemia (SpO2 < 90% in room air; 28% vs 7%, P = .009 on admission, and required to change antibiotics (32% vs 11%, P = .023 during hospitalization compared to the controls. However, in logistic regression analysis the cases were independently associated with diarrhea (P < .001 and hypoxemia (P = .024 on admission. Our data suggest that overweight and obesity in children with pneumonia is prone to be associated with hypoxemia on admission, which may guide clinicians in promptly managing pneumonia in order to evade its ramification in such children. However, future research with larger samples is imperative to consolidate or refute our observation.

  14. Obesity: Pathophysiology and Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity presents a major health hazard of the 21st century. It promotes co-morbid diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, and osteoarthritis. Excessive energy intake, physical inactivity, and genetic susceptibility are main causal factors for obesity, while gene mutations, endocrine disorders, medication, or psychiatric illnesses may be underlying causes in some cases. The development and maintenance of obesity may involve central pathophysiological mechanisms such as impaired brain circuit regulation and neuroendocrine hormone dysfunction. Dieting and physical exercise offer the mainstays of obesity treatment, and anti-obesity drugs may be taken in conjunction to reduce appetite or fat absorption. Bariatric surgeries may be performed in overtly obese patients to lessen stomach volume and nutrient absorption, and induce faster satiety. This review provides a summary of literature on the pathophysiological studies of obesity and discusses relevant therapeutic strategies for managing obesity.

  15. OPEN about obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissner, L; Troiano, R P; Midthune, D

    2007-01-01

    frequency questionnaires (FFQ), doubly labelled water (DLW) and urinary nitrogen (UN) assessments. RESULTS: In obese and non-obese subgroups, FFQ yielded lower energy and protein intake estimates than 24HR, although biomarker-based information indicated under-reporting with both dietary instruments. Gender...... differences in obesity-related bias were noted. Among women, the DLW-based energy requirement was 378 kcal greater in obese than in non-obese groups; the FFQ was able to detect a statistically significant portion of this extra energy, while the 24HR was not. Among men, the DLW-based energy requirement was 485...... kcal greater in the obese group; however, neither FFQ nor 24HR detected this difference in energy requirement. Combining protein and energy estimates, obese men significantly over-reported the proportion of energy from protein using the 24HR, but not with the FFQ. In obese women, no significant...

  16. The Role of Underlying Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity in Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: A growing body of evidence indicates an association between air pollution exposure and metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We have recently demonstrated that an acute exposure to ozone in metabolically normal rat strains produces h...

  17. Effects of a psychological intervention on the quality of life of obese adolescents under a multidisciplinary treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila R.M. Freitas

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To investigate the effects of multidisciplinary treatment with and without psychological counseling on obese adolescents' self-reported quality of life. Methods: Seventy-six obese adolescents (15.87 ± 1.53 y were allocated into psychological counseling group (PCG; n = 36 or control group (CG; n = 40 for 12 weeks. All participants received the same supervised exercise training, nutritional and clinical counseling. Participants in PCG also received psychological counseling. QOL was measured before and after 12 weeks of intervention by Generic Questionnaire for the Evaluation of Quality of Life (SF-36. Results: The dropout rate was higher in GC (22.5% when compared with PCG (0.0% (p < 0.001. After 12 weeks, participants from PCG presents lower body weight, relative fat mass and higher free fat mass (p < 0.001 for all compared to GC. QOL improved among adolescents from both groups (p < 0.05, however, a better QOL was reported from those adolescents enrolled in PCG. Conclusion: The inclusion of a psychological counseling component in multidisciplinary treatment for adolescent obesity appears to provide benefits observed for improved QOL as compared with treatment without psychological counseling.

  18. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data has established increasing adiposity as a risk factor for incident asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and asthma are incompletely understood. In the present paper, we review current knowledge of possible mechanisms mediating the observed...... association between obesity and asthma....

  19. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Diamant, Zuzana; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant impact on asthma incidence and manifestations. The purpose of the review is to discuss recent observations regarding the association between obesity and asthma focusing on underlying mechanisms, clinical presentation, response to therapy and effect...... of weight reduction. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical and epidemiological studies indicate that obese patients with asthma may represent a unique phenotype, which is more difficult to control, less responsive to asthma medications and by that may have higher healthcare utilization. A number of common comorbidities...... have been linked to both obesity and asthma, and may, therefore, contribute to the obese-asthma phenotype. Furthermore, recently published studies indicate that even a modest weight reduction can improve clinical manifestations and outcome of asthma. SUMMARY: Compared with normal-weight patients, obese...

  20. Addressing the common pathway underlying hypertension and diabetes in people who are obese by maximizing health: the ultimate knowledge translation gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Elizabeth; Lomi, Constantina; Bruno, Selma; Awad, Hamzeh; O'Donoghue, Grainne

    2011-03-06

    In accordance with the WHO definition of health, this article examines the alarming discord between the epidemiology of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and obesity and the low profile of noninvasive (nondrug) compared with invasive (drug) interventions with respect to their prevention, reversal and management. Herein lies the ultimate knowledge translation gap and challenge in 21st century health care. Although lifestyle modification has long appeared in guidelines for medically managing these conditions, this evidence-based strategy is seldom implemented as rigorously as drug prescription. Biomedicine focuses largely on reducing signs and symptoms; the effects of the problem rather than the problem. This article highlights the evidence-based rationale supporting prioritizing the underlying causes and contributing factors for hypertension and T2DM, and, in turn, obesity. We argue that a primary focus on maximizing health could eliminate all three conditions, at best, or, at worst, minimize their severity, complications, and medication needs. To enable such knowledge translation and maximizing health outcome, the health care community needs to practice as an integrated team, and address barriers to effecting maximal health in all patients. Addressing the ultimate knowledge translation gap, by aligning the health care paradigm to 21st century needs, would constitute a major advance.

  1. Addressing the Common Pathway Underlying Hypertension and Diabetes in People Who Are Obese by Maximizing Health: The Ultimate Knowledge Translation Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Dean

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the WHO definition of health, this article examines the alarming discord between the epidemiology of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and obesity and the low profile of noninvasive (nondrug compared with invasive (drug interventions with respect to their prevention, reversal and management. Herein lies the ultimate knowledge translation gap and challenge in 21st century health care. Although lifestyle modification has long appeared in guidelines for medically managing these conditions, this evidence-based strategy is seldom implemented as rigorously as drug prescription. Biomedicine focuses largely on reducing signs and symptoms; the effects of the problem rather than the problem. This article highlights the evidence-based rationale supporting prioritizing the underlying causes and contributing factors for hypertension and T2DM, and, in turn, obesity. We argue that a primary focus on maximizing health could eliminate all three conditions, at best, or, at worst, minimize their severity, complications, and medication needs. To enable such knowledge translation and maximizing health outcome, the health care community needs to practice as an integrated team, and address barriers to effecting maximal health in all patients. Addressing the ultimate knowledge translation gap, by aligning the health care paradigm to 21st century needs, would constitute a major advance.

  2. New Approaches in Obesity Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. de Niet

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObesity has become a global epidemic among all age groups. A number of countries have even experienced a notable shift from under- to over nutrition in youngsters or a double burden of both malnutrition and obesity. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines overweight and obesity as

  3. Is obesity a disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šumarac-Dumanović Mirjana 0000-0002-6216-6650

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a complex entity that can have many causes, such as endocrine (like thyroid dysfunction or hyperfunctioning of the suprarenall gland-Cushing’s syndrome but often obesity is from a combination of inactivity and overeating. On the other side, there are genetic factors that produce a tendency to overweight even with the consumption of what would be for most people an appropriate number of calories. Whether the causes are hormonal, genetic or reside in the brain (its reward system or the circuitry that underlies habit, perception of portion size, the choice of food... is often difficult to sort out. Proponents contend that obesity is a disease because it meets the definition of disease. Obesity decreases life expectancy and impairs the normal body functions, also it can be caused by genetic factors. Opponents contend that obesity is not a disease because it is a preventable risk factor for other diseases. Obesity is the result of eating too much as well as it is caused by exercising too little. Formaly disease or condition obesity is associated with a variety of diseases such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases and certain cancers, and may also be responsible for high rates of morbidity and mortality. Understanding the pathophysiology of obesity has grown significantly over the last few decades. Pathogenetic mechanisms in obesity and in the development of comorbidities that accompany obesity exhibit many of the characteristics of inflammatory processes. A key role in the pathogenesis of obesity could play the immune system. Despite identifying many critical players in these processes and finding new therapeutic modalities in the fight against obesity, treatment of obesity is still a great challenge and mostly with not-so-successful outcomes.

  4. Characterizing ingestive behavior through licking microstructure: Underlying neurobiology and its use in the study of obesity in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alexander W

    2018-02-01

    Ingestive behavior is controlled by multiple distinct peripheral and central physiological mechanisms that ultimately determine whether a particular food should be accepted or avoided. As rodents consume a fluid they display stereotyped rhythmic tongue movements, and by analyzing the temporal distribution of pauses of licking, it is possible through analyses of licking microstructure to uncover dissociable evaluative and motivational variables that contribute to ingestive behavior. The mean number of licks occurring within each burst of licking (burst and cluster size) reflects the palatability of the consumed solution, whereas the frequency of initiating novel bouts of licking behavior (burst and cluster number) is dependent upon the degree of gastrointestinal inhibition that accrues through continued fluid ingestion. This review describes the analysis of these measures within a context of the behavioral variables that come to influence the acceptance or avoidance of a fluid, and the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie alterations in the temporal distribution of pauses of licks. The application of these studies to models of obesity in animals is also described. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Eating meals before wheel-running exercise attenuate high fat diet-driven obesity in mice under two meals per day schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Yuta; Ikeda, Yuko; Kamagata, Mayo; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-06-01

    Mice that exercise after meals gain less body weight and visceral fat compared to those that exercised before meals under a one meal/exercise time per day schedule. Humans generally eat two or three meals per day, and rarely have only one meal. To extend our previous observations, we examined here whether a "two meals, two exercise sessions per day" schedule was optimal in terms of maintaining a healthy body weight. In this experiment, "morning" refers to the beginning of the active phase (the "morning" for nocturnal animals). We found that 2-h feeding before 2-h exercise in the morning and evening (F-Ex/F-Ex) resulted in greater attenuation of high fat diet (HFD)-induced weight gain compared to other combinations of feeding and exercise under two daily meals and two daily exercise periods. There were no significant differences in total food intake and total wheel counts, but feeding before exercise in the morning groups (F-Ex/F-Ex and F-Ex/Ex-F) increased the morning wheel counts. These results suggest that habitual exercise after feeding in the morning and evening is more effective for preventing HFD-induced weight gain. We also determined whether there were any correlations between food intake, wheel rotation, visceral fat volume and skeletal muscle volumes. We found positive associations between gastrocnemius muscle volumes and morning wheel counts, as well as negative associations between morning food intake volumes/body weight and morning wheel counts. These results suggest that morning exercise-induced increase of muscle volume may refer to anti-obesity. Evening exercise is negatively associated with fat volume increases, suggesting that this practice may counteract fat deposition. Our multifactorial analysis revealed that morning food intake helps to increase exercise, and that evening exercise reduced fat volumes. Thus, exercise in the morning or evening is important for preventing the onset of obesity.

  6. Effect of magnesium ion supplementation on obesity and diabetes mellitus in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats under excessive food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2013-01-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have found that magnesium ion (Mg²⁺) is related to obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there have been almost no reports on the effects of a combination of excessive food intake and Mg²⁺ supplementation on metabolic syndrome and various blood tests values for diabetes mellitus. In this study, we investigated changes in body weight and blood test values for diabetes mellitus of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, a model for human type 2 diabetes mellitus via metabolic syndrome, under conditions of combined excessive food intake and Mg²⁺ supplementation. The rats received Mg²⁺ supplementation by drinking magnesium water (Mg²⁺; 200 mg/l). No significant differences were observed in the levels of food or water intake between OLETF rats drinking purified water (PW) or magnesium water (MW). Type 2 diabetes mellitus with metabolic syndrome developed at 30 weeks of age, and the body weights and plasma insulin levels of OLETF rats at 60 weeks of age were lower than those of normal rats. The plasma glucose (PG) levels in 38-week-old OLETF rats drinking MW were significantly lower than in those of rats drinking PW, while the body weights and the levels of triglycerides (TG) and insulin of 38-week-old MW-drinking OLETF rats were significantly higher than those of their PW-drinking counterparts. On the other hand, the decreases in body weight and insulin levels in 60-week-old OLETF rats were suppressed by MW supplementation. The present study demonstrates that Mg²⁺ supplementation delays the development of diabetes mellitus in OLETF rats under conditions of excessive food intake. In addition, obesity and high blood TG levels were observed in OLETF rats receiving Mg²⁺ supplementation in conjunction with excessive food intake.

  7. Hypothalamic dysfunction of the thrombospondin receptor α2δ-1 underlies the overeating and obesity triggered by brain-derived neurotrophic factor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeira, Joshua W; Felsted, Jennifer A; Teillon, Sarah; Daftary, Shabrine; Panessiti, Micaella; Wirth, Jena; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Rios, Maribel

    2014-01-08

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, are critical components of the neural circuitry controlling appetite and body weight. Diminished BDNF signaling in mice results in severe hyperphagia and obesity. In humans, BDNF haploinsufficiency and the functional Bdnf Val66Met polymorphism have been linked to elevated food intake and body weight. The mechanisms underlying this dysfunction are poorly defined. We demonstrate a chief role of α2δ-1, a calcium channel subunit and thrombospondin receptor, in triggering overeating in mice with central BDNF depletion. We show reduced α2δ-1 cell-surface expression in the BDNF mutant ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), an energy balance-regulating center. This deficit contributes to the hyperphagia exhibited by BDNF mutant mice because selective inhibition of α2δ-1 by gabapentin infusion into wild-type VMH significantly increases feeding and body weight gain. Importantly, viral-mediated α2δ-1 rescue in BDNF mutant VMH significantly mitigates their hyperphagia, obesity, and liver steatosis and normalizes deficits in glucose homeostasis. Whole-cell recordings in BDNF mutant VMH neurons revealed normal calcium currents but reduced frequency of EPSCs. These results suggest calcium channel-independent effects of α2δ-1 on feeding and implicate α2δ-1-thrombospondin interactions known to facilitate excitatory synapse assembly. Our findings identify a central mechanism mediating the inhibitory effects of BDNF on feeding. They also demonstrate a novel and critical role for α2δ-1 in appetite control and suggest a mechanism underlying weight gain in humans treated with gabapentinoid drugs.

  8. Hypothalamic Dysfunction of the Thrombospondin Receptor α2δ-1 Underlies the Overeating and Obesity Triggered by Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeira, Joshua W.; Felsted, Jennifer A.; Teillon, Sarah; Daftary, Shabrine; Panessiti, Micaella; Wirth, Jena; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, are critical components of the neural circuitry controlling appetite and body weight. Diminished BDNF signaling in mice results in severe hyperphagia and obesity. In humans, BDNF haploinsufficiency and the functional Bdnf Val66Met polymorphism have been linked to elevated food intake and body weight. The mechanisms underlying this dysfunction are poorly defined. We demonstrate a chief role of α2δ-1, a calcium channel subunit and thrombospondin receptor, in triggering overeating in mice with central BDNF depletion. We show reduced α2δ-1 cell-surface expression in the BDNF mutant ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), an energy balance-regulating center. This deficit contributes to the hyperphagia exhibited by BDNF mutant mice because selective inhibition of α2δ-1 by gabapentin infusion into wild-type VMH significantly increases feeding and body weight gain. Importantly, viral-mediated α2δ-1 rescue in BDNF mutant VMH significantly mitigates their hyperphagia, obesity, and liver steatosis and normalizes deficits in glucose homeostasis. Whole-cell recordings in BDNF mutant VMH neurons revealed normal calcium currents but reduced frequency of EPSCs. These results suggest calcium channel-independent effects of α2δ-1 on feeding and implicate α2δ-1–thrombospondin interactions known to facilitate excitatory synapse assembly. Our findings identify a central mechanism mediating the inhibitory effects of BDNF on feeding. They also demonstrate a novel and critical role for α2δ-1 in appetite control and suggest a mechanism underlying weight gain in humans treated with gabapentinoid drugs. PMID:24403154

  9. [The pharmacotherapy of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budai, Kinga Anna; Mirzahosseini, Arash; Noszál Béla; Tóth, Gergő

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is considered the most concerning and blatantly visible--yet most neglected--public health problem by the WHO. The steadily increasing number of overweight and obese people has reached 2.3 billion and 700 million worldwide, respectively. Obesity is a complex condition, one that presents serious health risks with respect to type 2 diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and hypertension, therefore controlling the global obesity epidemic decreases not only health problems, but also expenditure. The underlying cause of obesity is a metabolic disorder of genetic, central nervous system or endocrine etiology that manifests in increased nutritional intake and/or decreased physical activity ultimately leading to excessive lipogenesis. The natural treatment of obesity, that is often advised, is comprised of healthy lifestyle choices, namely low-calorie diet and exercise. However, the pharmaceutic treatment of obesity is just as important; having a better compliance rate, anti-obesity drugs also improve quality of life and patient-care outcome concerning accompanying diseases. In most countries only one drug is currently available against obesity: orlistat, which is a specific and irreversible lipase inhibitor. One of the reasons for the scarce number of anti-obesity drugs is the complex pathomechanism involved in obesity. Interference with the intricate biochemical processes that govern alimentation may lead to widespread adverse effects. The advances of the field however, have prompted novel drug leads. In the past few years FDA has approved new drugs for the treatment of obesity, recently liraglutide in 2014. The approval of drug combinations, such as phentermine/topiramate and bupropion/naltrexone are also noteworthy, the components of which have been previously approved, but not necessarily for obesity as main indication. Furthermore, there are many anti-obesity drug candidates currently in clinical phase trials, with promisingly modest adverse effect profiles; hence

  10. Phytochemicals in regulating fatty acid β-oxidation: Potential underlying mechanisms and their involvement in obesity and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Sekhon-Loodu, Satvir; Mantso, Theodora; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I

    2016-09-01

    Excessive accumulation of fat as the result of more energy intake and less energy expenditure is known as obesity. Lipids are essential components in the human body and are vital for maintaining homeostasis and physiological as well as cellular metabolism. Fatty acid synthesis and catabolism (by fatty acid oxidation) are normal part of basic fuel metabolism in animals. Fatty acids are degraded in the mitochondria by a biochemical process called β-oxidation in which two-carbon fragments are produced in each cycle. The increase in fatty acid β-oxidation is negatively correlated with body mass index. Although healthy life style, avoiding Western diet, dieting and strenuous exercise are the commonly used methods to lose weight, they are not considered a permanent solution in addition to risk attenuation of basal metabolic rate (BMR). Pharmacotherapy offers benefits of weight loss by altering the satiety and lowering absorption of fat from the food; however, its side effects may outweigh the benefits of weight loss. Alternatively, dietary phytochemicals and natural health products offer great potential as an efficient weight loss strategy by modulating lipid metabolism and/or increasing BMR and thermogenesis. Specifically, polyphenols such as citrus flavonoids, green tea epigallocatechin gallate, resveratrol, capsaicin and curcumin, have been reported to increase lipolysis and induce fatty acid β-oxidation through modulation of hormone sensitive lipase, acetyl-coA carboxylase, carnitine acyl transferase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1. In this review article, we discuss selected phytochemicals in relation to their integrated functionalities and specific mechanisms for weight loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sleep and eating in childhood: a potential behavioral mechanism underlying the relationship between poor sleep and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Julia; Dube, Laurette; Thibault, Louise; Gruber, Reut

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our study was to examine the associations between sleep and eating behaviors. Specifically, we examined associations between sleep duration and continuity with behaviors that promote eating regardless of true physiologic hunger state including emotional (food intake in response to emotional distress) external (eating in response to the sight or smell of food), and restrained eating (a paradoxical behavior; food intake is initially reduced to lose or maintain body weight, but followed by increased consumption and binge eating). Fifty-six children (29 boys; 27 girls) ages 5 to 12 years participated in the study. Mean age was 7.7±1.9 years, and average body mass index (BMI) was within the healthy range (17.8±4.3 kg/m(2)). Sleep duration, continuity and schedule were assessed using actigraphy and self-reports. The Child Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire-modified version (DEBQ-M) was used to examine levels of emotional, external and restrained eating in the children. Associations between the sleep and eating behaviors were examined using partial correlations and multiple regression analyses. External eating score was negatively associated with sleep duration; emotional eating score was associated with lower levels of sleep continuity; and restrained eating score were associated with a later sleep start and later bedtime. Short sleep duration and poor sleep continuity were associated with higher levels of eating behaviors shown to be associated with increased food intake. Therefore, sleep loss may be associated with diminished self-regulation of appetite in children, increasing the risk for overeating and obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Behavioral treatment of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Táki Athanássios Cordas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Great population studies do not confirm the hypothesis that atypical personality of obese would exist. Obeses in the generalpopulation do not present more psychological disturbs thanthe ones that are not obeses. Obeses adolescents and adultsare discriminated in their academic and professional lifes. Thissocial, cultural, economic and affective impoverishment seemsto be directly related to the gravity of their obesity, what means,higher the ICM (Index of Corporal Mass, bigger are thepsychological problems. This abandonment contributes to thebig risk of unchain psychiatric pictures as depression, anxyetdisturbs, drugs and alcoholic excessive consumption andalimentary disturbs. Obeses of the general population do notpresent more psychological or psychiatric symptoms than theclinical population of obeses (obeses under treatment, presentmore clinical and psychiatric problems, mainly compulsoryalimentary standards. Some studies indicate that there is alinear relation between the ICM and the highest frequency ofalimentary compulsory behavior or bulimic episode. Thepsychiatric patients negative body perception added to theirother negative perceptions about their performance in searchingsocial interaction increase the trend to the isolation. Thepsychiatric picture presence in the bariatric surgery preoperatoryin a III degree overweight pacient has not to be facedas absolute surgery counter indication since such procedurecan be the difference between giving a better life quality orwaiting for a potentially lethal complication. We cannot forgetthat the obesity itself, due to the common associatedcomorbidyties, loads a great lethality potential. The surgerycounter-indication could be relative, it depending on how muchthe psychiatric disturbs interfere on the treatment andconditioned to the rigorous psychiatric control in the anteriorand post surgical period.

  13. Obesity and Pediatric Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughns, Janelle D; Conklin, Laurie S; Long, Ying; Zheng, Panli; Faruque, Fahim; Green, Dionna J; van den Anker, John N; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2018-05-01

    There is a lack of dosing guidelines for use in obese children. Moreover, the impact of obesity on drug safety and clinical outcomes is poorly defined. The paucity of information needed for the safe and effective use of drugs in obese patients remains a problem, even after drug approval. To assess the current incorporation of obesity as a covariate in pediatric drug development, the pediatric medical and clinical pharmacology reviews under the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act of 2007 and the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2012 were reviewed for obesity studies. FDA labels were also reviewed for statements addressing obesity in pediatric patients. Forty-five drugs studied in pediatric patients under the FDA Amendments Act were found to have statements and key words in the medical and clinical pharmacology reviews and labels related to obesity. Forty-four products were identified similarly with pediatric studies under FDASIA. Of the 89 product labels identified, none provided dosing information related to obesity. The effect of body mass index on drug pharmacokinetics was mentioned in only 4 labels. We conclude that there is little information presently available to provide guidance related to dosing in obese pediatric patients. Moving forward, regulators, clinicians, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider situations in drug development in which the inclusion of obese patients in pediatric trials is necessary to facilitate the safe and effective use of new drug products in the obese pediatric population. © 2018, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  14. Effects of hyperinsulinemia under the euglycemic condition on calcium and phosphate metabolism in non-obese normotensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, K; Higashiura, K; Nakagawa, M; Masuda, A; Shiiki, M; Miyazaki, Y; Ise, T; Fukuoka, M; Hirata, A; Iimura, O

    1995-12-01

    The effect of acute insulin infusion on the metabolism of calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) was examined in 17 healthy subjects. They were hospitalized and kept on a constant diet for 5 days, and an euglycemic hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp was applied. Synthetic human insulin was infused at the rate of 40 mU/m2/min for 2 hr, and glucose was also infused to maintain basal glucose levels of each subject. The control study was performed in 8 of the 17 subjects, into whom 10% xylitol was infused for 2 hr at the rate of 100 ml/hr. The plasma insulin concentrations were 7.94 +/- 0.35 and 62.3 +/- 14.3 mU/liter before and after the glucose clamp technique, but serum free Ca ion was increased significantly (p UCaV) was significantly higher after the glucose clamp than the control study. Fractional excretion of Ca (FECa) was increased significantly (p < 0.05), and urinary excretion of P (UPV) and fractional excretion of P (FEP) were decreased significantly (p < 0.05) under the hyperinsulinemic condition. The results suggested that, under the conditions of euglycemic hyperinsulinemia by glucose clamp technique, insulin increased the serum free Ca ion, and as a result, PTH was suppressed. Decreased PTH might induce calciuresis and enhance tubular P reabsorption under hyperinsulinemia. Insulin increased serum free Ca ion might relate to the vasodilating action of insulin by its decrease of intracellular free Ca ion in vascular smooth muscle.

  15. Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuca, Sevil Ari, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book aims to provide readers with a general as well as an advanced overview of the key trends in childhood obesity. Obesity is an illness that occurs due to a combination of genetic, environmental, psychosocial, metabolic and hormonal factors. The prevalence of obesity has shown a great rise both in adults and children in the last 30 years.…

  16. [ProSeal™laryngeal mask in normal weight and obese patients : oxygenation under pressure-controlled ventilation and different end-expiratory pressures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, K; Gerlach, M; Bornträger, C

    2011-10-01

    Most of the data on combining pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) come from studies with an endotracheal tube (ETT) whereas data on utilization of PEEP with a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) are limited. The LMA-ProSeal® (PLMA) forms a more effective seal of the airway than the LMA-Classic™ (CLMA). The application of PEEP when PCV is used with the PLMA could have an impact on oxygenation in adult patients. For this study 148 patients with an mean age of 44 years (range18-65 years) and mean weight of 86 kg (range 49-120 kg) were recruited in 2 groups: group N ((Normal)): body-mass index (BMI) cmH(2)O, 5 cmH(2)O or 8 cmH(2)O PEEP. An arterial blood gas sample was taken 50 min after induction of anesthesia under an inspiratory oxygen fraction (F(I)O(2)) of 0.3. In the first part partial oxygen pressure (p(a)O(2)) under 0 cmH(2)O was compared with p(a)O(2) under 5 cmH(2)O and in the second part p(a)O(2) under 5 cmH(2)O was compared with p(a)O(2) under 8 cmH(2)O. A significant difference was set as pcmH(2)O. Both findings are in contrast to findings of studies using an ETT which suggests that higher pressures (40 cmH(2)O) are needed for recruitment of collapsed alveoli and higher PEEP (10 cmH(2)O) is needed to produce a clinically significant improvement in oxygenation in obese patients. The results of this study support data showing that the consequences of bronchopulmonary airway reactions known to occur with an ETT are less pronounced or absent when an LMA is used.

  17. Male Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiess, Wieland; Wagner, Isabel V; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Körner, Antje

    2015-12-01

    Many cross-sectional analyses and longitudinal studies have examined the association between adiposity and pubertal development. In addition, the impact of an increased fat mass on reproduction and fertility in human obese men and in male animal models of obesity has been studied. A trend toward earlier pubertal development and maturation in both sexes has been shown, and the notion that obese boys might progress to puberty at a slower pace than their nonobese peers can no longer be substantiated. Impaired fertility markers and reduced reproductive functions have been observed in obesity. Obesity affects both pubertal development and fertility in men. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Obesity Prevalence Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obesity Causes & Consequences CDC Reports Improvement in Childhood Obesity among Young Children Participating in WIC Data & Statistics Adult Obesity Facts Childhood Obesity Facts Data, Trends and ...

  19. Maternal Obesity: Consequences and Prevention Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Yanikkerem

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat that it may have an adverse effect on health, leading to life expectancy and increased health problems. In keeping with the general international trend of rising prevalence of obesity, maternal obesity prevalence is rising. According to WHO, the prevalence of obesity in pregnancy ranges from 1.8 to 25.3%. Maternal obesity has been identified to be a risk factor for maternal and perinatal mortality. The aim of this article was reviewed in research about maternal obesity in Pubmed, which published between 2009 and 2010. 7 reviews and 13 studies was examined and they presented under this headings: impacts of maternal obesity in pregnancy, obstetric outcomes of maternal obesity, postpartum outcomes of maternal obesity, impact of maternal obesity on breastfeeding, impact of maternal obesity on procedure of anomaly scan and risk determination, maternal obesity and fetal complications, impact of maternal obesity on Apgar scores, obesity and infertility, pregnancy following bariatric surgery, long term effects of obesity, management of maternal obesity. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(3.000: 353-364

  20. Resting-State Brain and the FTO Obesity Risk Allele: Default Mode, Sensorimotor, and Salience Network Connectivity Underlying Different Somatosensory Integration and Reward Processing between Genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivo, Gaia; Wiemerslage, Lyle; Nilsson, Emil K.; Solstrand Dahlberg, Linda; Larsen, Anna L.; Olaya Búcaro, Marcela; Gustafsson, Veronica P.; Titova, Olga E.; Bandstein, Marcus; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Benedict, Christian; Brooks, Samantha J.; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene are linked to obesity, but how these SNPs influence resting-state neural activation is unknown. Few brain-imaging studies have investigated the influence of obesity-related SNPs on neural activity, and no study has investigated resting-state connectivity patterns. We tested connectivity within three, main resting-state networks: default mode (DMN), sensorimotor (SMN), and salience network (SN) in 30 male participants, grouped based on genotype for the rs9939609 FTO SNP, as well as punishment and reward sensitivity measured by the Behavioral Inhibition (BIS) and Behavioral Activation System (BAS) questionnaires. Because obesity is associated with anomalies in both systems, we calculated a BIS/BAS ratio (BBr) accounting for features of both scores. A prominence of BIS over BAS (higher BBr) resulted in increased connectivity in frontal and paralimbic regions. These alterations were more evident in the obesity-associated AA genotype, where a high BBr was also associated with increased SN connectivity in dopaminergic circuitries, and in a subnetwork involved in somatosensory integration regarding food. Participants with AA genotype and high BBr, compared to corresponding participants in the TT genotype, also showed greater DMN connectivity in regions involved in the processing of food cues, and in the SMN for regions involved in visceral perception and reward-based learning. These findings suggest that neural connectivity patterns influence the sensitivity toward punishment and reward more closely in the AA carriers, predisposing them to developing obesity. Our work explains a complex interaction between genetics, neural patterns, and behavioral measures in determining the risk for obesity and may help develop individually-tailored strategies for obesity prevention. PMID:26924971

  1. Diagnostic value of daily fluctuations in the free form of testosterone and cortisol in men with obesity and metabolic syndrome under the age of 50 years

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Kuznetsova; A. S. Adamchik; N. P. Goncharov; G. V. Katsiya

    2016-01-01

    The important pathogenetic link of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) in men are disorders of testosterone production in the testes and adrenal adrenal cortisol production. Тestosterone deficiency and functional hypercortisolism have a mutual influence on each other. Comprehensive assessment of testosterone and cortisol balance and identify their daily variability in the saliva may improve the diagnosis of hormonal disorders in men with obesity and MS. In the present study, by comparative an...

  2. The association between childcare and risk of childhood overweight and obesity in children aged 5 years and under: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, Goiuri; McNamara, Aoife E; Lindsay, Karen L; Scully, Helena A; Horan, Mary H; Gibney, Eileen R; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to systematically review the published evidence on the relationship between the type of childcare and risk of childhood overweight or obesity. The databases PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and EMBASE were searched using combinations of the various search terms to identify eligible observational studies published between 2000 and May 2016 in English. Fifteen publications from 7 countries matched the inclusion criteria. The most commonly reported childcare arrangements were centre-based (e.g. crèche) and informal care (e.g. relatives, neighbours, friends). Informal care was most frequently associated with an increased risk of childhood overweight and obesity. Associations were also found for other lifestyle variables such as low maternal education, high birth-weight, maternal employment, ethnicity, maternal overweight/obesity and father's Body Mass Index (BMI). The relationship between childcare and childhood overweight/obesity is multi-faceted with many aspects linked to childhood adiposity, in particular the age of initiation to care, type of care (i.e. informal care) and shorter breastfeeding duration were related with infant adiposity. • Lifestyle factors during early years affect health outcomes in adulthood, particularly in children with low birth weight. • Pre-school stage influences children's body composition and growth. What is new: • This is the first systematic review of observational studies examining the association between childcare and childhood overweight and obesity in preschool children. • 'Informal' care is linked to early introduction to solid foods, less physical activity and obesity.

  3. Childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinehr, Thomas; Wabitsch, Martin

    2011-02-01

    As childhood obesity is associated with premature death in adults, a research is critical. This review focuses on the recent proceedings concerning genesis, prevention, and treatment. Identifying genetic variants in well phenotyped small cohorts of extremely obese children (e.g., the search for copy number variants in obesity-associated large chromosomal deletions) confirmed afterwards in large population-based studies is a new promising genetic approach to understand the disposition to obesity. A further important finding is that obesity of mothers predisposes their offsprings to obesity by epigenetic, prenatal effects. Therefore, prevention programs targeting parents even before pregnancy should be developed. Prevention programs in kindergarten and schools without involving the parents failed to fight against the obesity epidemic. A new promising prevention approach is to change the environment (e.g., ban on sugar drinks in schools). Therapy of choice in already obese children is lifestyle intervention. Again, including their parents is crucial for success. However, this kind of intervention is only suitable for families motivated to change their lifestyle habits. Especially in extremely obese adolescents, additional therapeutic approaches such as drugs and bariatric surgery have to be considered. Even if of knowledge of childhood obesity improves every year, many questions concerning prevention and treatment remain still open. Future longitudinal research has to focus on which children will benefit from which kind of intervention to develop specific therapies.

  4. Pediatric Obesity: It's Time for Prevention before Conception Can Maternal Obesity Program Pediatric Obesity?

    OpenAIRE

    Zach Ferraro; Kristi B. Adamo

    2008-01-01

    Global increases in obesity have led public health experts to declare this disease a pandemic. Although prevalent in all ages, the dire consequences associated with maternal obesity have a pronounced impact on the long-term health of their children as a result of the intergenerational effects of developmental programming. Previously, fetal under-nutrition has been linked to the predisposition to pediatric obesity explained by the adiposity rebound and ‘catch-up’ growth that occurs when a chil...

  5. Obesity vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Mariana P

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is one of the largest and fastest growing public health problems in the world. Last century social changes have set an obesogenic milieu that calls for micro and macro environment interventions for disease prevention, while treatment is mandatory for individuals already obese. The cornerstone of overweight and obesity treatment is diet and physical exercise. However, many patients find lifestyle modifications difficult to comply and prone to failure in the long-term; therefore many pa...

  6. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Dabal Laila

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is becoming a major medical concern in several parts of the world, with huge economic impacts on health- care systems, resulting mainly from increased cardiovascular risks. At the same time, obesity leads to a number of sleep-disordered breathing patterns like obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS, leading to increased morbidity and mortality with reduced quality of life. OHS is distinct from other sleep- related breathing disorders although overlap may exist. OHS patients may have obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea with hypercapnia and sleep hypoventilation, or an isolated sleep hypoventilation. Despite its major impact on health, this disorder is under-recognized and under-diagnosed. Available management options include aggressive weight reduction, oxygen therapy and using positive airway pressure techniques. In this review, we will go over the epidemiology, pathophysiology, presentation and diagnosis and management of OHS.

  7. Latest data on obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Fousteris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic and morbid disease which has reached epidemic dimensions nowadays, becoming the springboard for the emergence of other unfavorable metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. In 2014 overweight and obese people in the world were estimated at 2.022 billion while prediction for 2025 is to reach 2.693 billion. Regarding the statistical data from Greece, we should note that overweight and obese individuals are estimated at 5.266 million for 2014. Obesity is a systemic disease with significant impact on human health, such as increased incidence of type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis ( knee, hip, cancers (mostly breast and endometrium for women and colon and kidney for men, cognitive disorders (dementia, Alzheimer's, mood disorders (anxiety, depression, emotional eating disorders, sleep apnea syndrome, cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, stroke and increased incidence of all-cause mortality, reducing in this patern the overall life expectancy. The underlying pathophysiological disorders of obesity are complex and mostly not understood well. The main disorder is the disturbance of the human energy balance when intake calories are more than the calories consumed, thus an excess of energy is generated daily, which is stored by the body in the form of triglycerides in adipose tissue of the body. On the other hand, weight loss is very important since even moderate weight loss significantly reduces the comorbidities of obesity. For the treatment of obesity, we have dietary interventions (hypocaloric diets, very low calorie diets, special diets, exercise interventions, pharmacological interventions (Orlistat, Liraglutide, Naltrexone / Boupropion, Phentermine / Topiramate, Lorcaserin and bariatric surgery (gastric banding, gastric Roux-en-Y by pass, sleeve gastrectomy. Despite all these, obesity remains an unsolved problem of our time with unmet needs that need combined global awareness from both the scientific community

  8. The epigenetics of obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal nutrition at the time of conception and during pregnancy is considered a factor for individual differences in having obesity. The mechanisms underlying this association are likely partially epigenetic in nature, but pinning down the exact nature, location, and timing of these changes remain...

  9. Diagnostic value of daily fluctuations in the free form of testosterone and cortisol in men with obesity and metabolic syndrome under the age of 50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kuznetsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The important pathogenetic link of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS in men are disorders of testosterone production in the testes and adrenal adrenal cortisol production. Тestosterone deficiency and functional hypercortisolism have a mutual influence on each other. Comprehensive assessment of testosterone and cortisol balance and identify their daily variability in the saliva may improve the diagnosis of hormonal disorders in men with obesity and MS. In the present study, by comparative and correlation analysis assessed the circadian rhythm of cortisol and testosterone production in young and middle age men, finding the relationship between the concentration of these hormones in the morning and evening portions of saliva with the changes of anthropometric, hemodynamic and metabolic parameters. The study involved 35 patients with MS, 16 – with overweight and obesity without the MS and 19 – with normal body weight. In men with obesity and MS found a violation of the circadian rhythm of testosterone production. Evening saliva testosterone showed a close correlation with the parameters of the MSome and clinical symptoms of androgen deficiency, as well as a more pronounced decrease with age. Circadian rhythm of cortisol production was not violated, but cortisol was significantly increased in the evening portion of saliva in patients with obesity and MS. MS was associated not only with an increase in the concentration of free salivary cortisol in the evening hours, but with lower cortisol levels in the batch of saliva collected in the morning, which is consistent with other studies.

  10. Childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, M A; Shield, J P H

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity continues to increase worldwide. Its presence is associated with significant adverse effects on health including an increased propensity to type II diabetes, cardiovascular, respiratory, and liver disease. In the vast majority of children, obesity is lifestyle-related, yet there is a dearth of evidence on how to best develop effective prevention and treatment strategies. This review outlines the importance of childhood and adolescent growth on long-term health, the definitions used to define obesity in children (along with up-to-date prevalence data), causes and consequences, and aspects of prevention and management.

  11. Stereotypes Can “Get Under the Skin”: Testing a Self-Stereotyping and Psychological Resource Model of Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Luis M.; Paredez, Stefanie M.

    2014-01-01

    The authors draw upon social, personality, and health psychology to propose and test a self-stereotyping and psychological resource model of overweight and obesity. The model contends that self-stereotyping depletes psychological resources, namely self-esteem, that help to prevent overweight and obesity. In support of the model, mediation analysis demonstrates that adult Hispanics who highly self-stereotype had lower levels of self-esteem than those who self-stereotype less, which in turn predicted higher levels of body mass index (overweight and obesity levels). Furthermore, the model did not hold for the referent sample, White participants, and an alternative mediation model was not supported. These data are the first to theoretically and empirically link self-stereotyping and self-esteem (a psychological resource) with a strong physiological risk factor for morbidity and short life expectancy in stigmatized individuals. Thus, this research contributes to understanding ethnic-racial health disparities in the United States and beyond. PMID:25221353

  12. d-Allulose supplementation normalized the body weight and fat-pad mass in diet-induced obese mice via the regulation of lipid metabolism under isocaloric fed condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngji; Han, Hye Jin; Kim, Ae-Hyang; Choi, Ji-Young; Cho, Su-Jung; Park, Yong Bok; Jung, Un Ju; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-07-01

    A number of findings suggest that zero-calorie d-allulose, also known as d-psicose, has beneficial effects on obesity-related metabolic disturbances. However, it is unclear whether d-allulose can normalize the metabolic status of diet-induced obesity without having an impact on the energy density. We investigated whether 5% d-allulose supplementation in a high fat diet(HFD) could normalize body fat in a diet-induced obesity animal model under isocaloric pair-fed conditions. Mice were fed an HFD with or without various sugar substitutes (d-glucose, d-fructose, erytritol, or d-allulose, n = 10 per group) for 16 wk. Body weight and fat-pad mass in the d-allulose group were dramatically lowered to that of the normal group with a simultaneous decrease in plasma leptin and resistin concentrations. d-allulose lowered plasma and hepatic lipids while elevating fecal lipids with a decrease in mRNA expression of CD36, ApoB48, FATP4, in the small intestine in mice. In the liver, activities of both fatty acid synthase and β-oxidation were downregulated by d-allulose to that of the normal group; however, in WAT, fatty acid synthase was decreased while β-oxidation activity was enhanced. Taken together, our findings suggest that 5% dietary d-allulose led to the normalization of the metabolic status of diet-induced obesity by altering lipid-regulating enzyme activities and their gene-expression level along with fecal lipids. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Cancer and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Cancer and obesity Overweight and obesity are associated with cancer Language: ... a cancer associated with overweight and obesity. Problem Obesity is a leading cancer risk factor. What’s happening? ...

  14. Obesity, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iantorno, M; Campia, U; Di Daniele, N; Nistico, S; Forleo, G B; Cardillo, C; Tesauro, M

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in obese individuals. Obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to originate from disruption in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, impair vascular homeostasis and lead to endothelial dysfunction. An altered endothelial cell phenotype and endothelial dysfunction are common among all obesity-related complications. A crucial aspect of endothelial dysfunction is reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. A systemic pro-inflammatory state in combination with hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress and activation of the renin angiotensin system are systemic disturbances in obese individuals that contribute independently and synergistically to decreasing NO bioavailability. On the other hand, pro-inflammatory cytokines are locally produced by perivascular fat and act through a paracrine mechanism to independently contribute to endothelial dysfunction and smooth muscle cell dysfunction and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in obese individuals. The promising discovery that obesity-induced vascular dysfunction is, at least in part, reversible, with weight loss strategies and drugs that promote vascular health, has not been sufficiently proved to prevent the cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. In this review we discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying inflammation and vascular damage in obese patients.

  15. Obesity management: Update on orlistat

    OpenAIRE

    Drew, Belinda S; Dixon, Andrew F; Dixon, John B

    2007-01-01

    Belinda S Drew, Andrew F Dixon, John B DixonCentre for Obesity Research and Education, Monash University, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Over the past 20 years obesity has become a worldwide concern of frightening proportion. The World Health Organization estimates that there are over 400 million obese and over 1.6 billion overweight adults, a figure which is projected to almost double by 2015. This is not a disease restricted to adults – at least 20 million children under the age of 5 y...

  16. Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic and Lipidomic Analyses of the Effects of Dietary Platycodon grandiflorum on Liver and Serum of Obese Mice under a High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Min Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify metabolites involved in the anti-obesity effects of Platycodon grandiflorum (PG in high-fat diet (HFD-fed mice using mass spectrometry (MS-based metabolomic techniques. C57BL/6J mice were divided into four groups: normal diet (ND-fed mice, HFD-fed mice, HFD with 1% PG extract-fed mice (HPGL, and HFD with 5% PG extract-fed mice (HPGH. After 8 weeks, the HFD group gained more weight than the ND group, while dietary 5% PG extract attenuated this change. The partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA score plots showed a clear distinction between experimental groups in serum and liver markers. We also identified 10 and 32 metabolites in the serum and liver, respectively, as potential biomarkers that could explain the effect of high-dose PG added to HFD-fed mice, which were strongly involved in amino acid metabolism (glycine, serine, threonine, methionine, glutamate, phenylalanine, ornithine, lysine, and tyrosine, TCA cycle (fumarate and succinate, lipid metabolism (linoleic and oleic acid methyl esters, oleamide, and cholesterol, purine/pyrimidine metabolism (uracil and hypoxanthine, carbohydrate metabolism (maltose, and glycerophospholipid metabolism (phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylethanolamines, lysophosphatidylcholines, and lysophosphatidylethanolamines. We suggest that further studies on these metabolites could help us gain a better understanding of both HFD-induced obesity and the effects of PG.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of antioxidant enzymes CAT and SOD affect the outcome of clinical, biochemical, and anthropometric variables in people with obesity under a dietary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Guerrero, César; Parra-Carriedo, Alicia; Ruiz-de-Santiago, Diana; Galicia-Castillo, Oscar; Buenrostro-Jáuregui, Mario; Díaz-Gutiérrez, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of antioxidant enzymes CAT, GPX, and SOD are involved in the etiology of obesity and its principal comorbidities. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of aforementioned SNPs over the output of several variables in people with obesity after a nutritional intervention. The study included 92 Mexican women, which received a dietary intervention by 3 months. Participants were genotyped and stratified into two groups: (1) carriers; mutated homozygous plus heterozygous (CR) and (2) homozygous wild type (WT). A comparison between CR and WT was done in clinical (CV), biochemical (BV), and anthropometric variables (AV), at the beginning and at the end of the intervention. Participants ( n  = 92) showed statistically significant differences ( p  T GPX1 (rs1050450), - 251A>G SOD1 (rs2070424), and - 262C>T CAT (rs1001179). (B) Only CR showed statistically changes ( p  T CAT (rs7943316) and 47C>T SOD2 (rs4880). The dietary intervention effect was statistically significantly between the polymorphisms of 47C>T SOD2 and BMI, SBP, TBARS, total cholesterol, and C-LCL ( p  T CAT (rs7943316) and SBP, DBP, total cholesterol, and atherogenic index ( p  CAT enzymes.

  18. Childhood obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, Berit L; Koplan, Jeffrey; Lissner, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Despite progress toward assuring the health of today's young population, the 21(st) century began with an epidemic of childhood obesity. There is general agreement that the situation must be addressed by means of primary prevention, but relatively little is known about how to intervene effectively....... The evidence behind the assumption that childhood obesity can be prevented was discussed critically in this roundtable symposium. Overall, there was general agreement that action is needed and that the worldwide epidemic itself is sufficient evidence for action. As the poet, writer, and scholar Wittner Bynner...

  19. Preclinical models for obesity research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Barrett

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-dimensional strategy to tackle the global obesity epidemic requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that underlie this complex condition. Much of the current mechanistic knowledge has arisen from preclinical research performed mostly, but not exclusively, in laboratory mouse and rat strains. These experimental models mimic certain aspects of the human condition and its root causes, particularly the over-consumption of calories and unbalanced diets. As with human obesity, obesity in rodents is the result of complex gene–environment interactions. Here, we review the traditional monogenic models of obesity, their contemporary optogenetic and chemogenetic successors, and the use of dietary manipulations and meal-feeding regimes to recapitulate the complexity of human obesity. We critically appraise the strengths and weaknesses of these different models to explore the underlying mechanisms, including the neural circuits that drive behaviours such as appetite control. We also discuss the use of these models for testing and screening anti-obesity drugs, beneficial bio-actives, and nutritional strategies, with the goal of ultimately translating these findings for the treatment of human obesity.

  20. Childhood Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Narang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The global epidemic of childhood and adolescent obesity and its immediate as well as long-term consequences for obese individuals and society as a whole cannot be overemphasized. Obesity in childhood and adolescence is associated with an increased risk of adult obesity and clinically significant consequences affecting the cardiovascular and metabolic systems. Importantly, obesity is additionally complicated by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, occurring in up to 60% of obese children. OSA, which is diagnosed using the gold standard polysomnogram (PSG, is characterised by snoring, recurrent partial (hypopneas or complete (apneas obstruction of the upper airway. OSA is frequently associated with intermittent oxyhemoglobin desaturations, sleep disruption, and sleep fragmentation. There is emerging data that OSA is associated with cardiovascular burden including systemic hypertension, changes in ventricular structure and function, arterial stiffness, and metabolic syndromes. Thus, OSA in the context of obesity may independently or synergistically magnify the underlying cardiovascular and metabolic burden. This is of importance as early recognition and treatment of OSA in obese children are likely to result in the reduction of cardiometabolic burden in obese children. This paper summarizes the current state of understanding of obesity-related OSA. Specifically, this paper will discuss epidemiology, pathophysiology, cardiometabolic burden, and management of obese children and adolescents with OSA.

  1. Are there healthy obese?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griera Borrás, José Luis; Contreras Gilbert, José

    2014-01-01

    It is currently postulated that not all obese individuals have to be considered as pathological subjects. From 10% to 20% of obese people studied do not show the metabolic changes common in obese patients. The term "healthy obese" has been coined to refer to these patients and differentiate them from the larger and more common group of pathological obese subjects. However, the definition of "healthy obese" is not clear. Use of "healthy obese" as a synonym for obese without metabolic complications is risky. Clinical markers such as insulin resistance are used to identify this pathology. It is not clear that healthy obese subjects have lower morbidity and mortality than pathologically obese patients. According to some authors, healthy obese would represent an early stage in evolution towards pathological obesity. There is no agreement as to the need to treat healthy obese subjects. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Childhood Obesity: Trends and Potential Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Patricia M.; Butcher, Kristin F.

    2006-01-01

    The increase in childhood obesity over the past several decades, together with the associated health problems and costs, is raising grave concern among health care professionals, policy experts, children's advocates, and parents. Patricia Anderson and Kristin Butcher document trends in children's obesity and examine the possible underlying causes…

  3. Hormones and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Loss Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Obesity September 2017 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Durga ... Resources Mayo Clinic MedlinePlus NIDDK (NIH) What is obesity? Obesity is a chronic (long-term) medical problem ...

  4. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Also known as Pickwickian Syndrome What ... your neck is larger than normal. Complications of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome When left untreated, OHS can cause ...

  5. The effects of soy isoflavones on obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørgaard, Anne; Jensen, Lotte

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decades, the prevalence of obesity and related diseases has increased rapidly in the Western world. Obesity is a disorder of energy balance and is associated with hyper-insulinemia, insulin resistance, and abnormalities in lipid metabolism, and it is one of the most important risk...... and daidzein can be obtained in high levels in humans under certain nutritional conditions, and epidemiologic and laboratory data suggest that these compounds could have health benefits in human obesity. This review will focus on the latest results of research on isoflavones and their effect on obesity in cell...

  6. Management of obesity in adult Asian Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Behl

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity in India is increasing and ranges from 8% to 38% in rural and 13% to 50% in urban areas. Obesity is a risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease and many cancers. In Asian Indians excess abdominal and hepatic fat is associated with increased risk for T2DM and cardiovascular disease. There is higher risk for development of obesity related non-communicable diseases at lower body mass index levels, compared to white Caucasians. Despite being a commonly encountered medical problem, obesity poses challenges in treatment. Many Indian physicians find themselves to be lacking time and expertise to prepare an appropriate obesity management plan and patients experience continuous weight gain over time despite being under regular medical supervision. In this article, we outline approaches to obesity management in ‘real life mode’ and in context to Asian Indian patients.

  7. Thiamin deficiency in people with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Jennifer C; Arundel, Cherinne; Chawla, Lakhmir S

    2015-03-01

    Although obesity has been viewed traditionally as a disease of excess nutrition, evidence suggests that it may also be a disease of malnutrition. Specifically, thiamin deficiency was found in 15.5-29% of obese patients seeking bariatric surgery. It can present with vague signs and symptoms and is often overlooked in patients without alcohol use disorders. This review explores the relatively new discovery of high rates of thiamin deficiency in certain populations of people with obesity, including the effects of thiamin deficiency and potential underlying mechanisms of deficiency in people with obesity. The 2 observational studies that examined the prevalence in preoperative bariatric surgery patients and gaps in our current knowledge (including the prevalence of thiamin deficiency in the general obese population and whether the current RDA for thiamin meets the metabolic needs of overweight or obese adults) are reviewed. Suggestions for future areas of research are included. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Obesity-Related Hypertension: Focus on Leptin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Camilla Lundegaard

    Background: Hypertension is a leading cause of death worldwide. Population studies have shown that at least two-thirds of hypertension incidence can be attributed directly to overweight and obesity. The underlying mechanisms linking obesity to hypertension are not clear. Various factors have been...... suggested to play a role in obesity-related hypertension such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the sympathetic nervous system, inflammation, insulin resistance, physical inactivity, and abnormal production of adipocytokines. Of all adipocytokines, leptin and adiponectin have received most...... attention and both hormones are considered as candidate intermediaries between adipose tissue and overweight and obesity-related disorders. Objectives: To study obesity-related hypertension with special focus on the hormone leptin. As obesity-related hypertension is multifactorial, other biological systems...

  9. Childhood Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wellness Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Childhood Overweight and Obesity: Helping Your Child Achieve a Healthy Weight Childhood Overweight and Obesity: Helping Your Child Achieve a Healthy ...

  10. Risk factors for obesity in Chinese adults. Highlights and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Guasheng

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is now one of the public health concerns in China. Many factors are contributing to obesity. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear. As it is hard to cure it once obesity occurs, the most effective and encouraging strategies is prevention. Risk factors should be identified in order to develop prevention strategies

  11. Why Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, George A

    2015-01-01

    As Erwin Chargaff observed, "Scientific autobiography belongs to a most awkward literary genre," and mine is no exception. In reviewing my scientific life, I contrast the nutritional influences that would have existed had I been born 100 or 200 years earlier than I actually was. With this background, I trace the influences on my formative years in science beginning in high school and ending as a postdoctoral fellow in Professor E.B. Astwood's laboratory, when my directional sails were set and obesity was the compass heading. With this heading, the need for organized national and international meetings on obesity and the need for a scientific journal dealing with obesity as its subject matter became evident and occupied considerable energy over the next 30 years. The next section of this memoir traces the wanderings of an itinerant academic who moved from Boston to Los Angeles and finally to Baton Rouge. The influence of Sir William Osler's idea that there is a time for education, a time for scholarship, a time for teaching, and time to retire has always been a guide to allocating time ever since I was an intern at Johns Hopkins Hospital. It was in Baton Rouge that the final phase began: I agreed to become the first full-time executive director of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, a decision that changed my life. The article ends with a quotation from Tennessee Williams that reflects the theater, which has given me so much pleasure over the years: "There is a time for departure even when there's no certain place to go."

  12. Ovarian hormones and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeners, Brigitte; Geary, Nori; Tobler, Philippe N; Asarian, Lori

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is caused by an imbalance between energy intake, i.e. eating and energy expenditure (EE). Severe obesity is more prevalent in women than men worldwide, and obesity pathophysiology and the resultant obesity-related disease risks differ in women and men. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Pre-clinical and clinical research indicate that ovarian hormones may play a major role. We systematically reviewed the clinical and pre-clinical literature on the effects of ovarian hormones on the physiology of adipose tissue (AT) and the regulation of AT mass by energy intake and EE. Articles in English indexed in PubMed through January 2016 were searched using keywords related to: (i) reproductive hormones, (ii) weight regulation and (iii) central nervous system. We sought to identify emerging research foci with clinical translational potential rather than to provide a comprehensive review. We find that estrogens play a leading role in the causes and consequences of female obesity. With respect to adiposity, estrogens synergize with AT genes to increase gluteofemoral subcutaneous AT mass and decrease central AT mass in reproductive-age women, which leads to protective cardiometabolic effects. Loss of estrogens after menopause, independent of aging, increases total AT mass and decreases lean body mass, so that there is little net effect on body weight. Menopause also partially reverses women's protective AT distribution. These effects can be counteracted by estrogen treatment. With respect to eating, increasing estrogen levels progressively decrease eating during the follicular and peri-ovulatory phases of the menstrual cycle. Progestin levels are associated with eating during the luteal phase, but there does not appear to be a causal relationship. Progestins may increase binge eating and eating stimulated by negative emotional states during the luteal phase. Pre-clinical research indicates that one mechanism for the pre-ovulatory decrease in eating is a

  13. Pediatric Obesity: It’s Time for Prevention Before Conception Can Maternal Obesity Program Pediatric Obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Ferraro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Global increases in obesity have led public health experts to declare this disease a pandemic. Although prevalent in all ages, the dire consequences associated with maternal obesity have a pronounced impact on the long-term health of their children as a result of the intergenerational effects of developmental programming. Previously, fetal under-nutrition has been linked to the predisposition to pediatric obesity explained by the adiposity rebound and ‘catch-up’ growth that occurs when a child born to a nutrient deprived mother is exposed to the obesogenic environment of present day. Given the recent increase in maternal overweight/obesity (OW/OB our attention has shifted from nutrient restriction to overabundance and excess during pregnancy. Consideration must now be given to interventions that could mitigate pregravid body mass index (BMI, attenuate gestational weight gain (GWG and reduce postpartum weight retention (PPWR in an attempt to prevent the downstream signaling of pediatric obesity and halt the intergenerational cycle of weight related disease currently plaguing our world. Thus, this paper will briefly review current research that best highlights the proposed mechanisms responsible for the development of child OW/OB and related sequalae (e.g. type II diabetes (T2D and cardiovascular disease (CVD resulting from maternal obesity.

  14. Pediatric Obesity: It's Time for Prevention before Conception Can Maternal Obesity Program Pediatric Obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Ferraro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Global increases in obesity have led public health experts to declare this disease a pandemic. Although prevalent in all ages, the dire consequences associated with maternal obesity have a pronounced impact on the long-term health of their children as a result of the intergenerational effects of developmental programming. Previously, fetal under-nutrition has been linked to the predisposition to pediatric obesity explained by the adiposity rebound and ‘catch-up’ growth that occurs when a child born to a nutrient deprived mother is exposed to the obesogenic environment of present day. Given the recent increase in maternal overweight/obesity (OW/OB our attention has shifted from nutrient restriction to overabundance and excess during pregnancy. Consideration must now be given to interventions that could mitigate pregravid body mass index (BMI, attenuate gestational weight gain (GWG and reduce postpartum weight retention (PPWR in an attempt to prevent the downstream signaling of pediatric obesity and halt the intergenerational cycle of weight related disease currently plaguing our world. Thus, this paper will briefly review current research that best highlights the proposed mechanisms responsible for the development of child OW/OB and related sequalae (e.g. type II diabetes (T2D and cardiovascular disease (CVD resulting from maternal obesity.

  15. Pathways linking obesity to health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangshin

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is a well-recognized risk factor for impaired health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Nevertheless, few studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying the obesity-HRQOL associations. In this study, we explored potential mediators of the associations between obesity and HRQOL. Body mass index (BMI), an indicator of obesity, and HRQOL data were available for the 34,565 individuals 20 years of age and older participating in the cross-sectional Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2012. HRQOL was measured by the EuroQol five-dimension descriptive system. Path analysis was performed to assess the contributions of obesity-related diseases and self-rated health (SRH) on the relationships between obesity and HRQOL. In men, obesity was negatively associated with HRQOL through diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia and positively associated with HRQOL through SRH. These opposite indirect effects offset one another and produced a non-significant association between obesity and HRQOL in men. However, in women, obesity was directly associated with HRQOL and indirectly associated with HRQOL through diabetes mellitus and SRH. Since these associations were in the same negative direction, the negative obesity-HRQOL association was clearly observed in women. Obesity was negatively associated with HRQOL through obesity-related diseases in both genders. However, in men, the positive association between obesity and SRH resulted in a non-significant association of obesity with HRQOL.

  16. Health risks associated with obesity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    annaline

    systemic hypertension are usually associated with severe cases.64. The exact mechanisms underlying the relationship between obesity and sleep apnoea are still unclear. It may be related to the effect of fat deposition on airway anatomy or changes in upper airway function.62 Weight loss has been shown to be associated ...

  17. Systems and WBANs for Controlling Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maali Said Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available According to World Health Organization (WHO estimations, one out of five adults worldwide will be obese by 2025. Worldwide obesity has doubled since 1980. In fact, more than 1.9 billion adults (39% of 18 years and older were overweight and over 600 million (13% of these were obese in 2014. 42 million children under the age of five were overweight or obese in 2014. Obesity is a top public health problem due to its associated morbidity and mortality. This paper reviews the main techniques to measure the level of obesity and body fat percentage, and explains the complications that can carry to the individual's quality of life, longevity and the significant cost of healthcare systems. Researchers and developers are adapting the existing technology, as intelligent phones or some wearable gadgets to be used for controlling obesity. They include the promoting of healthy eating culture and adopting the physical activity lifestyle. The paper also shows a comprehensive study of the most used mobile applications and Wireless Body Area Networks focused on controlling the obesity and overweight. Finally, this paper proposes an intelligent architecture that takes into account both, physiological and cognitive aspects to reduce the degree of obesity and overweight.

  18. Paradoxical Effects of Fruit on Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya P. Sharma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is exponentially increasing regardless of its preventable characteristics. The current measures for preventing obesity have failed to address the severity and prevalence of obesity, so alternative approaches based on nutritional and diet changes are attracting attention for the treatment of obesity. Fruit contains large amounts of simple sugars (glucose, fructose, sucrose, etc., which are well known to induce obesity. Thus, considering the amount of simple sugars found in fruit, it is reasonable to expect that their consumption should contribute to obesity rather than weight reduction. However, epidemiological research has consistently shown that most types of fruit have anti-obesity effects. Thus, due to their anti-obesity effects as well as their vitamin and mineral contents, health organizations are suggesting the consumption of fruit for weight reduction purposes. These contradictory characteristics of fruit with respect to human body weight management motivated us to study previous research to understand the contribution of different types of fruit to weight management. In this review article, we analyze and discuss the relationships between fruit and their anti-obesity effects based on numerous possible underlying mechanisms, and we conclude that each type of fruit has different effects on body weight.

  19. Obesity and dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinfeld, Noah S

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a number of dermatoses. It affects cutaneous sensation, temperature regulation, foot shape, and vasculature. Acanthosis nigricans is the most common dermatological manifestation of obesity. Skin tags are more commonly associated with diabetes than with obesity. Obesity increases the incidence of cutaneous infections that include: candidiasis, intertigo, candida folliculitis, furunculosis, erythrasma, tinea cruris, and folliculitis. Less common infections include cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, and gas gangrene. Leg ulcerations, lymphedema, plantar hyperkeratosis, and striae are more common with obesity. Hormonal abnormalities and genetic syndromes (Prader-Willi) are related to obesity and its dermatoses; however, cellulite is not related to obesity.

  20. Psychological perspectives in obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Roldus Andy Bunga

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Obesity has become a leading public health concern. Over 1 billion people are now overweight or obese, and the prevalence of these conditions is rising rapidly. Psychological aspects of obesity are so important, psychological assessments and interventions have become an integral part of a multidisciplinary approach to treating obesity. Multiple environmental, genetic, neuro-endocrinological, and psychosocial factors contribute to the development of obesity. Though there are many d...

  1. Effect of Obesity on Arch Index in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Sameer Ganu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive increases in weight bearing forces caused by obesity may negatively affect the lower limbs and feet but minimal research has examined the long-term loading effects of obesity on the musculoskeletal system, particularly in reference to the feet. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of obesity on medial longitudinal arch of foot in young adults. Method: 60 subjects, 30 obese & 30 non obese were assessed for height & weight using standard technique. Radiographic images under static condition were used for calculating the arch index. Result: The arch index of obese subjects was significantly lower than the non obese subjects & there is a negative correlation between the BMI & the arch index. Conclusion: These results suggests that obesity lowers the medial longitudinal arch of foot.

  2. Criteria for EASO-collaborating centres for obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigos, Constantine; Hainer, Vojtech; Basdevant, Arnaud; Finer, Nick; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth; Micic, Dragan; Maislos, Maximo; Roman, Gabriela; Schutz, Yves; Toplak, Hermann; Yumuk, Volkan; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is recognised as a global epidemic and the most prevalent metabolic disease world-wide. Specialised obesity services, however, are not widely available in Europe, and obesity care can vary enormously across European regions. The European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO, www.easo.org) has developed these criteria to form a pan-European network of accredited EASO-Collaborating Centres for Obesity Management (EASO-COMs) in accordance with accepted European and academic guidelines. This network will include university, public and private clinics and will ensure that the obese and overweight patient is managed by a holistic team of specialists and receives comprehensive state-ofthe-art clinical care. Furthermore, the participating centres, under the umbrella of EASO, will work closely for quality control, data collection, and analysis as well as for education and research for the advancement of obesity care and obesity science. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Obesity Paradox in the Course of Cerebrovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzecka, Anna; Ejma, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Obesity remains an important risk factor of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, it has been observed that increased body fat and body mass index predicted longer survival after the occurrence of a cardiovascular event. This observation has been named the obesity paradox. Initially, the term obesity paradox referred to the observation of the better outcome of cardiovascular diseases, such as heart failure and coronary heart disease, in obese patients as compared to underweight and normal-weight patients. Recently, similar, although fewer, observations confirm the occurrence of the obesity paradox in patients with acute cerebrovascular diseases. The underlying reasons for the protective effects of excessive body fat tissue against the consequences of acute cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are poorly understood. The effect of preconditioning may be associated with the obesity paradox. The issue of the correlation between obesity and better survival of patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases still remains largely unexplored. Debates for and against the obesity paradox continue.

  4. Prevalencia de sobrepeso y obesidad en niños menores de cinco años en el Perú 2007-2010 Prevalence of overwight and obesity among children under five years in Peru 2007-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Pajuelo-Ramírez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos. Estimar la prevalencia de sobrepeso y obesidad en niños menores de cinco años en el Perú durante los años 2007 a 2010 y describir su distribución de acuerdo con ámbitos geográficos, niveles de pobreza, edad, educación de la madre, lactancia materna exclusiva, sexo y peso al nacer. Materiales y métodos: Se realizó una encuesta continua (transversal repetida, por muestreo aleatorio multietápico, del universo de niños menores de cinco años y gestantes residentes en el Perú, dividido en cinco ámbitos geográficos. Las mediciones antropométricas se efectuaron de acuerdo con metodología estándar internacional. Resultados: Se estudiaron 3 669 niños menores de cinco años, de ellos 50,3% fueron niños. En Lima Metropolitana residían 680; 763 en el resto de costa; 719 en la sierra urbana, 699 en la sierra rural y 808 en la selva. La prevalencia nacional de sobrepeso y obesidad es 6,9%, con la mayor prevalencia, en Lima Metropolitana (10,1% y con menor prevalencia en la selva (2,6%. Mediante regresión logística múltiple se identificaron como factores asociados a la edad, el sexo, el ámbito geográfico y el peso al nacer. Conclusiones: Los factores asociados con sobrepeso y obesidad son la procedencia de Lima Metropolitana, el primer año de vida, el sexo masculino y el peso al nacer mayor a 2,5 kg.Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children under five in Peru in the years 2007-2010 and to describe according to geographical areas, poverty levels, maternal education, breastfeeding, child age, sex and birth weight. Materials and methods: continuous (repeated cross-sectional multistage, random sampling survey from the universe of children under five-years and pregnant women living in Peru, divided into five geographical areas. Results: Out of 3,669 children, 50.3% were males (Lima N=680, Remaining Coast N=763, Urban Sierra N=719, Rural Sierra N=699, Jungle N=808 having their weight and height

  5. Headache and obesity in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Christopher B; Scher, Ann I; Recober, Ana; Peterlin, B Lee

    2014-05-01

    Childhood obesity and headache are both significant health concerns that often have a marked impact both personally and socially, that if not addressed can carry over into adulthood. For many individuals, these effects may be magnified when obesity and headache are seen in conjunction. It is this overlap between obesity and headache in children, as well as similarities in the known mechanism of action for feeding and headache, which led to a suspected association between the two. Unfortunately, although recent studies have supported this association, only a limited number have been conducted to directly address this. Furthermore, despite rising rates of childhood obesity and headache, the associated medical comorbidities, and the significant financial cost for these conditions, there is a relative void in studies investigating treatment options that address both underlying conditions of obesity and headache in children.

  6. Gut Microbiome and Obesity: A Plausible Explanation for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmiguel, Claudia; Gupta, Arpana; Mayer, Emeran A

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disorder that results in excessive accumulation of adipose tissue. Although obesity is caused by alterations in the energy consumption/expenditure balance, the factors promoting this disequilibrium are incompletely understood. The rapid development of new technologies and analysis strategies to decode the gut microbiota composition and metabolic pathways has opened a door into the complexity of the guest-host interactions between the gut microbiota and its human host in health and in disease. Pivotal studies have demonstrated that manipulation of the gut microbiota and its metabolic pathways can affect host's adiposity and metabolism. These observations have paved the way for further assessment of the mechanisms underlying these changes. In this review we summarize the current evidence for possible mechanisms underlying gut microbiota induced obesity. The review addresses some well-known effects of the gut microbiota on energy harvesting and changes in metabolic machinery, on metabolic and immune interactions and on possible changes in brain function and behavior. Although there is limited understanding on the symbiotic relationship between us and our gut microbiome, and how disturbances of this relationship affects our health, there is compelling evidence for an important role of the gut microbiota in the development and perpetuation of obesity.

  7. Gut Microbiome and Obesity: A Plausible Explanation for Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmiguel, Claudia; Gupta, Arpana; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disorder that results in excessive accumulation of adipose tissue. Although obesity is caused by alterations in the energy consumption/expenditure balance, the factors promoting this disequilibrium are incompletely understood. The rapid development of new technologies and analysis strategies to decode the gut microbiota composition and metabolic pathways has opened a door into the complexity of the guest-host interactions between the gut microbiota and its human host in health and in disease. Pivotal studies have demonstrated that manipulation of the gut microbiota and its metabolic pathways can affect host’s adiposity and metabolism. These observations have paved the way for further assessment of the mechanisms underlying these changes. In this review we summarize the current evidence for possible mechanisms underlying gut microbiota induced obesity. The review addresses some well-known effects of the gut microbiota on energy harvesting and changes in metabolic machinery, on metabolic and immune interactions and on possible changes in brain function and behavior. Although there is limited understanding on the symbiotic relationship between us and our gut microbiome, and how disturbances of this relationship affects our health, there is compelling evidence for an important role of the gut microbiota in the development and perpetuation of obesity. PMID:26029487

  8. Obesity Stigma and Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruh, Sharon M; Nadglowski, Joe; Hall, Heather R; Davis, Sara L; Crook, Errol D; Zlomke, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are escalating in epidemic proportions in the United States. Individuals with overweight and obesity are often reluctant to seek medical help, not only for weight reduction but also for any health issue because of perceived provider discrimination. Providers who are biased against individuals with obesity can hinder our nation's effort to effectively fight the obesity epidemic. By addressing weight bias in the provider setting, individuals affected by obesity may be more likely to engage in a meaningful and productive discussion of weight. Providers need to be the go-to source for obesity-focused information on new and emerging treatments.

  9. Obesity-induces Organ and Tissue Specific Tight Junction Restructuring and Barrier Deregulation by Claudin Switching

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Rah, Bilal; Bastola, Dhundy; Dhawan, Punita; Singh, Amar B.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity increases susceptibility to multiple organ disorders, however, underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The subclinical inflammation assisted by obesity-induced gut permeability may underlie obesity-associated co-morbidities. Despite eminent clinical significance of the obesity led gut barrier abnormalities, its precise molecular regulation remains unclear. It is also unknown whether barrier deregulations, similar to the gut, characterize other vital organs in obese individuals. The clau...

  10. Erectile dysfunction and central obesity: an Italian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Corona

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED is a frequent complication of obesity. The aim of this review is to critically analyze the framework of obesity and ED, dissecting the connections between the two pathological entities. Current clinical evidence shows that obesity, and in particular central obesity, is associated with both arteriogenic ED and reduced testosterone (T levels. It is conceivable that obesity-associated hypogonadism and increased cardiovascular risk might partially justify the higher prevalence of ED in overweight and obese individuals. Conversely, the psychological disturbances related to obesity do not seem to play a major role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related ED. However, both clinical and preclinical data show that the association between ED and visceral fat accumulation is independent from known obesity-associated comorbidities. Therefore, how visceral fat could impair penile microcirculation still remains unknown. This point is particularly relevant since central obesity in ED subjects categorizes individuals at high cardiovascular risk, especially in the youngest ones. The presence of ED in obese subjects might help healthcare professionals in convincing them to initiate a virtuous cycle, where the correction of sexual dysfunction will be the reward for improved lifestyle behavior. Unsatisfying sexual activity represents a meaningful, straightforward motivation for consulting healthcare professionals, who, in turn, should take advantage of the opportunity to encourage obese patients to treat, besides ED, the underlying unfavorable conditions, thus not only restoring erectile function, but also overall health.

  11. Obesity management: Update on orlistat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda S Drew

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Belinda S Drew, Andrew F Dixon, John B DixonCentre for Obesity Research and Education, Monash University, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Over the past 20 years obesity has become a worldwide concern of frightening proportion. The World Health Organization estimates that there are over 400 million obese and over 1.6 billion overweight adults, a figure which is projected to almost double by 2015. This is not a disease restricted to adults – at least 20 million children under the age of 5 years were overweight in 2005 (WHO 2006. Overweight and obesity lead to serious health consequences including coronary artery disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, heart failure, dyslipidemia, hypertension, reproductive and gastrointestinal cancers, gallstones, fatty liver disease, osteoarthritis and sleep apnea (Padwal et al 2003.Modest weight loss in the obese of between 5% and 10% of bodyweight is associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk profiles and reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes (Goldstein 1992; Avenell et al 2004; Padwal and Majumdar 2007. Orlistat, a gastric and pancreatic lipase inhibitor that reduces dietary fat absorption by approximately 30%, has been approved for use for around ten years (Zhi et al 1994; Hauptman 2000. There is now a growing body of evidence to suggest that Orlistat assists weight loss and that it may also have additional benefits. The aim of this review is to provide a brief update on the current literature studying the efficacy, safety and significance of the use of Orlistat in clinical practice.Keywords: obese, weight, diet, orlistat, hypertension, cholesterol

  12. Obesity and government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Scott; Zvenyach, Tracy

    2016-10-01

    Despite much effort, obesity prevalence and disease severity continues to worsen. The purpose of this review is to describe the leading government supported food and nutrition interventions and policies to prevent and address obesity in the USA. The review also summarizes obesity interventions and policies that the government plays a role in, but further development is warranted. The government's role in obesity has largely focused on interventions and policies such as national surveillance, obesity education and awareness, grant-based food subsidy programs, zoning for food access, school-based nutrition programs, dietary guidelines, nutrition labeling, and food marketing and pricing policies. The government has played a lesser role in obesity interventions and policies that provide access to evidence-based obesity care to people affected by the disease. Given the magnitude of the obesity epidemic, the government should explore multiple evidence-based interventions and policies across prevention and clinical care.

  13. Overweight and Obesity Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of young children were considered to have extreme obesity. Among children and youth ages 6 to 11, about 1 ... Children and Adolescents 3,5 The prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents 2 to 19 years increased between ...

  14. Defining Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Defining Adult Overweight and Obesity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... weight for a given height is described as overweight or obese. Body Mass Index, or BMI, is ...

  15. Personality Characteristics And Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asthana Sunita

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: Whether certain personality characteristics of obese women make them prone towards psychological problem? Objective: To assess certain personality characteristics of obese women. Study design: Cross-sectional community based study. Setting: Affluent localities of Varanasi city. Participants: Women above 15 years of age. Statistical Analysis: Mean, S.D and ‘t’ test. Results: On 16 PF scale obese women were found more reserved, critical, depressed, worried and troubled than the non-obese women. Obese also manifested subsequently less felling of contentment, happiness satisfaction with life experiences, low sense of achievement on PGI Well-Being. Obese women showed more distress and apprehension over their negative evaluation and distressed with day to day Conclusion: Obese women evidenced significantly more neurotic than non- obese women.

  16. Childhood obesity. Treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Katharine

    2005-09-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent overweight and obesity is rapidly increasing and is associated with morbidity, both medical and psychosocial. Obesity is unlikely to resolve spontaneously. It is important that health professionals can assess obesity and initiate an action plan. The evidence base for what works best in the management of child and adolescent overweight and obesity is limited. It is uncertain whether protocols from clinical research trials can be translated into primary care. Dietary change, with an emphasis on lower fat intake and smaller portion size, should be commenced. There should be an increase in physical activity and a decrease in sedentary behaviours, combined with behavioural change and parental involvement. These are the elements of a lifestyle intervention. In the severely obese adolescent with obesity-related co-morbidity, the use of very low-energy diets and anti-obesity agents could be considered. Bariatric surgery may be indicated in carefully selected, older, severely obese adolescents.

  17. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000085.htm Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some ...

  18. Obesity and health (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity increases a person's risk of illness and death due to diabetes, stroke, heart disease, hypertension, high cholesterol, and kidney and gallbladder disease. Obesity may increase the risk for some types of ...

  19. [Epidemiology of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhr, M

    1977-05-15

    In the GDR about 20% of the males and 40% of the females were estimated to be obese. In the country obesity is more spread than in the town. Increased disablement of obese persons leads to reduction of the national income. With higher expenses for nutrition the frequency of obestiy increases. Hypophages and hyperphages are differently distributed in persons with normal weight and obese ones, so that the average establishments do not reflect the differentiated situation in nutrition. Obesity correlates with the type of structure; with increasing obesity dominate pyknomorphous tendencies of growth. Also in normal weight pyknomorphous persons have a higher proportion of fat. We should speak of obesity in such a case, when, taking into consideration biological differentiations, the normal proportion of the fat in the body is increased by more than 1/3. For epidemiological serial examinations the degrees of relative weight basing on optimum weight are a favourable basis for the classification of obesity.

  20. Disability and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Information For… Media Policy Makers CDC Employees and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Disability and Obesity Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Overweight and obesity are both ...

  1. Allegheny County Obesity Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Obesity rates for each Census Tract in Allegheny County were produced for the study “Developing small-area predictions for smoking and obesity prevalence in the...

  2. Endocrine Disruptors and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, Philippa D

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this review was to summarise current evidence that some environmental chemicals may be able to interfere in the endocrine regulation of energy metabolism and adipose tissue structure. Recent findings demonstrate that such endocrine-disrupting chemicals, termed "obesogens", can promote adipogenesis and cause weight gain. This includes compounds to which the human population is exposed in daily life through their use in pesticides/herbicides, industrial and household products, plastics, detergents, flame retardants and as ingredients in personal care products. Animal models and epidemiological studies have shown that an especially sensitive time for exposure is in utero or the neonatal period. In summarising the actions of obesogens, it is noteworthy that as their structures are mainly lipophilic, their ability to increase fat deposition has the added consequence of increasing the capacity for their own retention. This has the potential for a vicious spiral not only of increasing obesity but also increasing the retention of other lipophilic pollutant chemicals with an even broader range of adverse actions. This might offer an explanation as to why obesity is an underlying risk factor for so many diseases including cancer.

  3. OSTEOARTHRITIS AND OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Strebkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review highlights the impact of obesity on the development, progression, and severity of osteoarthritis (OA and discusses treatments for obesity in this disease. Weight loss in obese patients with OA is shown to lead to a reduction in clinical manifestations. Despite a great deal of performed investigations of the impact of non-drug therapy for obesity (diet, physical activity, their results are contradictory and call for further investigation

  4. Anesthetizing the obese child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anette; Lenz, Katja; Abildstrøm, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing. The focus of this review is the special anesthetic considerations regarding the perioperative management of obese children. With obesity the risk of comorbidity such as asthma, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and diabetes increases...... drugs. This has important implications on how to estimate the optimal drug dose. This article offers a review of the literature on definition, prevalence and the pathophysiology of childhood obesity and provides suggestions on preanesthetic evaluation, airway management and dosage of the anesthetic...

  5. Obesity and kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra da; Bentes, Ana Carla Sobral Novaes; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco; Matos, Sheila Maria Alvim de

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Obesity has been pointed out as an important cause of kidney diseases. Due to its close association with diabetes and hypertension, excess weight and obesity are important risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Obesity influences CKD development, among other factors, because it predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis and focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis. Excess weight and obesity are associated with hemodynamic, structural and histological rena...

  6. Economics and obesity policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, J L

    2017-06-01

    This paper elucidates the challenges surrounding the economics of some popular obesity-related policy proposals. Solid economic justifications for anti-obesity policies are often lacking, and evidence suggests policies like fat and soda taxes or restrictions on food stamp spending are unlikely to substantively affect obesity prevalence. In short, many of the same factors that make obesity such a complicated and multifaceted issue extend to the economic analysis of public health policies.

  7. Childhood Obesity: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, John J.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent research evidence, largely from systematic reviews, on a number of aspects of childhood obesity: its definition and prevalence; consequences; causes and prevention. The basis of the body mass index (BMI) as a means of defining obesity in children and adolescents is discussed: a high BMI for age constitutes obesity. In…

  8. Childhood environment and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    US children are at risk for developing childhood obesity. Currently, 23% of children ages 2–5 are overweight or obese, i.e., at or above the 85th percentile. This prevalence becomes even higher as children age, with 34% of children ages 6–11 being overweight or obese. Ethnic minority children are at...

  9. [Endocrine function in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Castro, Paula; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Brandón-Sandá, Iria; Cordido, Fernando

    2011-10-01

    Obesity is associated to significant disturbances in endocrine function. Hyper insulinemia and insulin resistance are the best known changes in obesity, but their mechanisms and clinical significance are not clearly established. Adipose tissue is considered to be a hormone-secreting endocrine organ; and increased leptin secretion from the adipocyte, a satiety signal, is a well-established endocrine change in obesity. In obesity there is a decreased GH secretion. Impairment of somatotropic function in obesity is functional and may be reversed in certain circumstances. The pathophysiological mechanism responsible for low GH secretion in obesity is probably multifactorial. There are many data suggesting that a chronic state of somatostatin hypersecretion results in inhibition of GH release. Increased FFA levels, as well as a deficient ghrelin secretion, probably contribute to the impaired GH secretion. In women, abdominal obesity is associated to hyperandrogenism and low sex hormone-binding globulin levels. Obese men, particularly those with morbid obesity, have decreased testosterone and gonadotropin levels. Obesity is associated to an increased cortisol production rate, which is compensated for by a higher cortisol clearance, resulting in plasma free cortisol levels that do not change when body weight increases. Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic factor, and has been found to be decreased in obese people. In obesity there is also a trend to increased TSH and free T3 levels. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Childhood Obesity Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NCHS) data brief [PDF-705KB] The prevalence of obesity among children aged 2 to 5 years decreased significantly from ... 2292-9. Top of Page Prevalence of Childhood Obesity among Young Low-Income WIC Children in the United States, 2014 Obesity disproportionally affects ...

  11. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ali, Zarqa; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma....

  12. Rats prone to obesity under a high-carbohydrate diet have increased post-meal CCK mRNA expression and characteristics of rats fed a high-glycemic index diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eChaumontet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that rats prone to obesity exhibit an exaggerated increase in glucose oxidation and an exaggerated decline in lipid oxidation under a low-fat high-carbohydrate (LF/HC diet. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms involved in these metabolic dysregulations. After a one week adaptation to laboratory conditions, 48 male Wistar rats were fed a LF/HC diet for 3 weeks. During weeks 2 and 3, glucose tolerance tests (GTT, insulin tolerance tests (ITT and meal tolerance tests (MTT were performed to evaluate blood glucose, plasma and insulin. Glucose and lipid oxidation were also assayed during the GTT. At the end of the study, body composition was measured in all the rats, and they were classified as carbohydrate resistant (CR or carbohydrate sensitive (CS according to their adiposity. Before sacrifice, 24 of the 48 rats received a calibrated LF/HC meal. Liver, muscle and intestine tissue samples were taken to measure mRNA expression of key genes involved in glucose, lipid and protein metabolism. ITT, GTT and MTT showed that CS rats were neither insulin resistant nor glucose intolerant, but mRNA expression of CCK in the duodenum was higher and that of CPT1, PPARα and PGC1α in liver were lower than in CR rats. From these results, we make the hypothesis that in CS rats, CCK increased pancreatic secretion which may favor a quicker absorption of carbohydrates and consequently induces an enhanced inhibition of lipid oxidation in the liver leading to a progressive accumulation of fat preferentially in visceral deposits. Such a mechanism may explain why CS rats share many characteristics observed in rats fed a high glycemic index diet.

  13. Obesity Reduces Cognitive and Motor Functions across the Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanming; Chan, John S. Y.; Ren, Lijie; Yan, Jin H.

    2016-01-01

    Due to a sedentary lifestyle, more and more people are becoming obese nowadays. In addition to health-related problems, obesity can also impair cognition and motor performance. Previous results have shown that obesity mainly affects cognition and motor behaviors through altering brain functions and musculoskeletal system, respectively. Many factors, such as insulin/leptin dysregulation and inflammation, mediate the effect of obesity and cognition and motor behaviors. Substantial evidence has suggested exercise to be an effective way to improve obesity and related cognitive and motor dysfunctions. This paper aims to discuss the association of obesity with cognition and motor behaviors and its underlying mechanisms. Following this, mechanisms of exercise to improve obesity-related dysfunctions are described. Finally, implications and future research direction are raised. PMID:26881095

  14. Obesity Prevention and Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Eleanor R; Olson, Alexandra; DiFazio, Marc; Cassidy, Omni

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is widespread, associated with several physical and psychosocial comorbidities, and is difficult to treat. Prevention of obesity across the lifespan is critical to improving the health of individuals and society. Screening and prevention efforts in primary care are an important step in addressing the obesity epidemic. Each period of human development is associated with unique risks, challenges, and opportunities for prevention and intervention. Screening tools for overweight/obesity, although imperfect, are quick and easy to administer. Screening should be conducted at every primary care visit and tracked longitudinally. Screening tools and cutoffs for overweight and obesity vary by age group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neighborhoods and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jennifer L; Macinko, James

    2008-01-01

    This review critically summarizes the literature on neighborhood determinants of obesity and proposes a conceptual framework to guide future inquiry. Thirty-seven studies met all inclusion criteria and revealed that the influence of neighborhood-level factors appears mixed. Neighborhood-level measures of economic resources were associated with obesity in 15 studies, while the associations between neighborhood income inequality and racial composition with obesity were mixed. Availability of healthy versus unhealthy food was inconsistently related to obesity, while neighborhood features that discourage physical activity were consistently associated with increased body mass index. Theoretical explanations for neighborhood-obesity effects and recommendations for strengthening the literature are presented.

  16. NEURAXIAL ANESTHESIA and OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur sahin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the serious condition that commonly effects health in modern age. It was reported that obesity was three-fold increased in the last three decades. According to the statement by World Health Organisation in 2005, 700 million people will be estimated obese in 2015. While neuraxial anesthesia is a commonly used technique in the worldwide, the process may have difficulties in obese patients. In this review, the pathophysiological changes and challenges in neuraxial anesthesia procedure in obesity were assessed with current literatures. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 234-236

  17. Obesity management: update on orlistat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Belinda S; Dixon, Andrew F; Dixon, John B

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 20 years obesity has become a worldwide concern of frightening proportion. The World Health Organization estimates that there are over 400 million obese and over 1.6 billion overweight adults, a figure which is projected to almost double by 2015. This is not a disease restricted to adults - at least 20 million children under the age of 5 years were overweight in 2005 (WHO 2006). Overweight and obesity lead to serious health consequences including coronary artery disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, heart failure, dyslipidemia, hypertension, reproductive and gastrointestinal cancers, gallstones, fatty liver disease, osteoarthritis and sleep apnea (Padwal et al 2003). Modest weight loss in the obese of between 5% and 10% of bodyweight is associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk profiles and reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes (Goldstein 1992; Avenell et al 2004; Padwal and Majumdar 2007). Orlistat, a gastric and pancreatic lipase inhibitor that reduces dietary fat absorption by approximately 30%, has been approved for use for around ten years (Zhi et al 1994; Hauptman 2000). There is now a growing body of evidence to suggest that Orlistat assists weight loss and that it may also have additional benefits. The aim of this review is to provide a brief update on the current literature studying the efficacy, safety and significance of the use of Orlistat in clinical practice.

  18. Obesity and nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, R; Karppelin, M; Syrjänen, J

    2013-09-01

    The prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) is a major goal in modern healthcare. Intrinsic, patient-related factors may contribute to the risk of HCAIs. To review the association between obesity and the risk and outcome of HCAIs. A PubMed search of relevant studies on obesity and nosocomial infections and obesity and dosing of antimicrobials. Search terms were: 'obesity', 'infection', 'nosocomial infection', 'surgical site infection', 'critical care unit', 'bacteremia', 'urinary tract infection', 'health care associated infection'. Obesity has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of HCAIs in several studies. The association is most clear in cardiac, vascular, orthopaedic and gastrointestinal surgery. Body mass index (BMI) data are frequently recorded in patients undergoing surgical and invasive procedures. The recording of BMI data is not systematic in the literature and in many studies median BMI of the control group or reference group (normal weight) also indicates overweight or obesity. Thus, clear BMI cut-offs for increased infection risk cannot be determined. Obesity is frequently associated with underdosing of antimicrobials in both prophylaxis and treatment of HCAIs. Studies indicate that obesity affects the pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial drugs. However, there are no dosing recommendations for antimicrobial use in obesity. Obesity increases the risk of nosocomial infections and is frequently associated with underdosing of antimicrobials in both prophylaxis and treatment of HCAIs. A challenge in future hospital hygiene prevention lies in our capacity to combat obesity epidemics. © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hormonal contraception and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Katharine B; Edelman, Alison B

    2016-11-01

    The rising rate of overweight and obesity is a public health crisis in the United States and increasingly around the globe. Rates of contraceptive use are similar among women of all weights, but because contraceptive development studies historically excluded women over 130% of ideal body weight, patients and providers have a gap in understanding of contraceptive efficacy for obese and overweight women. Because of a range of drug metabolism alterations in obesity, there is biologic plausibility for changes in hormonal contraception effectiveness in obese women. However, these pharmacokinetic changes are not linearly related to body mass index or weight, and it is unknown what degree of obesity begins to affect pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamics processes. Overall, most studies of higher quality do not demonstrate a difference in oral contraceptive pill effectiveness in obese compared with non-obese women. However, data are scant for women in the highest categories of obesity, and differences by progestin type are incompletely understood. Effectiveness of most non-oral contraceptives does not seem to be compromised in obesity. Exceptions to this include the combined hormonal patch and oral levonorgestrel emergency contraception, which may have lower rates of effectiveness in obese women. The purpose of this review is to summarize evidence on contraceptive use in women with obesity, including differences in steroid hormone metabolism, contraceptive effectiveness, and safety, compared with women of normal weight or body mass index using the same methods. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  20. Obesity and kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Bezerra da Silva Junior

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity has been pointed out as an important cause of kidney diseases. Due to its close association with diabetes and hypertension, excess weight and obesity are important risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD. Obesity influences CKD development, among other factors, because it predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis and focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis. Excess weight and obesity are associated with hemodynamic, structural and histological renal changes, in addition to metabolic and biochemical alterations that lead to kidney disease. Adipose tissue is dynamic and it is involved in the production of "adipokines", such as leptin, adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, transforming growth factor-β and angiotensin-II. A series of events is triggered by obesity, including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis and hypertension. There is evidence that obesity itself can lead to kidney disease development. Further studies are required to better understand the association between obesity and kidney disease.

  1. Dyslipidemia: Obese or Not Obese-That Is Not the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsen, David H; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2016-12-01

    Purpose of review: It is becoming increasingly clear that some obese individuals do not develop dyslipidemia and instead remain healthy, while some normal weight individuals become dyslipidemic and unhealthy. The present review examines the similarities and differences between healthy and unhealthy individuals with and without obesity and discusses putative underlying mechanisms of dyslipidemia. The presence of dyslipidemia and compromised metabolic health in both lean and obese individuals suggests that the obese phenotype per se does not represent a main independent risk factor for the development of dyslipidemia and that dyslipidemia, rather than obesity, may be the driver of metabolic diseases. Notably, adipose tissue dysfunction and ectopic lipid deposition, in particular in the liver, seems a common trait of unhealthy individuals.

  2. Unraveling the genetics of human obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Mutch

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of modern molecular biology tools in deciphering the perturbed biochemistry and physiology underlying the obese state has proven invaluable. Identifying the hypothalamic leptin/melanocortin pathway as critical in many cases of monogenic obesity has permitted targeted, hypothesis-driven experiments to be performed, and has implicated new candidates as causative for previously uncharacterized clinical cases of obesity. Meanwhile, the effects of mutations in the melanocortin-4 receptor gene, for which the obese phenotype varies in the degree of severity among individuals, are now thought to be influenced by one's environmental surroundings. Molecular approaches have revealed that syndromes (Prader-Willi and Bardet-Biedl previously assumed to be controlled by a single gene are, conversely, regulated by multiple elements. Finally, the application of comprehensive profiling technologies coupled with creative statistical analyses has revealed that interactions between genetic and environmental factors are responsible for the common obesity currently challenging many Westernized societies. As such, an improved understanding of the different "types" of obesity not only permits the development of potential therapies, but also proposes novel and often unexpected directions in deciphering the dysfunctional state of obesity.

  3. Diminished hepatic insulin removal in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, I.; Salvador, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Arraiza, M.C.; Goena, M.; Barberia, J.J.; Moncada, E.

    1986-01-01

    Peripheral insulin and C-peptide levels during oral glucose load were measured in 20 obese and 23 normal weight nondiabetic subjects. The fasting C-peptide to insulin molar ratios (Cp/I), as well as the relation between incremental areas of the two polypeptides (ACp-AI)/ACp, were used as relative measures of the hepatic insulin extraction (HIE). The insulin and C-peptide basal levels as well as incremental areas under plasma curves were higher in the obese subjects (P<0.001). HIE was lower in obeses than in controls assessed in the fasting state (P<0.05), as well as after glucose load (P<0.001). Nevertheless, obeses and controls with similar insulin fasting levels showed identical hepatic insulin extraction in fasting or after glucose load. HIE was independent of obesity degree, but was related to insulin basal levels (r=-0.60, P<0.01). This study suggests the hypothesis that the decreased hepatic insulin extraction in obeses is a result of the chronically increased insulin delivery to the liver and is not a consequence of obesity, although a contributory role cannot be ruled out

  4. Genetic association studies of obesity in Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yako, Y Y; Echouffo-Tcheugui, J B; Balti, E V; Matsha, T E; Sobngwi, E; Erasmus, R T; Kengne, A P

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is increasing in Africa, but the underlying genetic background largely remains unknown. We assessed existing evidence on genetic determinants of obesity among populations within Africa. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched and the bibliographies of retrieved articles were examined. Included studies had to report on the association of a genetic marker with obesity indices and the presence/occurrence of obesity/obesity trait. Data were extracted on study design and characteristics, genetic determinants and effect estimates of associations with obesity indices. According to this data, over 300 polymorphisms in 42 genes have been studied in various population groups within Africa mostly through the candidate gene approach. Polymorphisms in genes such as ACE, ADIPOQ, ADRB2, AGRP, AR, CAPN10, CD36, C7orf31, DRD4, FTO, MC3R, MC4R, SGIP1 and LEP were found to be associated with various measures of obesity. Of the 36 polymorphisms previously validated by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) elsewhere, only FTO and MC4R polymorphisms showed significant associations with obesity in black South Africans, Nigerians and Ghanaians. However, these data are insufficient to establish the true nature of genetic susceptibility to obesity in populations within Africa. There has been recent progress in describing the genetic architecture of obesity among populations within Africa. This effort needs to be sustained via GWAS studies. © 2015 World Obesity.

  5. Assessment of perioperative minute ventilation in obese versus non-obese patients with a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Jaideep H; Cattano, Davide; Brayanov, Jordan B; George, Edward E

    2017-04-26

    Monitoring the adequacy of spontaneous breathing is a major patient safety concern in the post-operative setting. Monitoring is particularly important for obese patients, who are at a higher risk for post-surgical respiratory complications and often have increased metabolic demand due to excess weight. Here we used a novel, noninvasive Respiratory Volume Monitor (RVM) to monitor ventilation in both obese and non-obese orthopedic patients throughout their perioperative course, in order to develop better monitoring strategies. We collected respiratory data from 62 orthopedic patients undergoing elective joint replacement surgery under general anesthesia using a bio-impedance based RVM with an electrode PadSet placed on the thorax. Patients were stratified into obese (BMI ≥ 30) and non-obese cohorts and minute ventilation (MV) at various perioperative time points was compared against each patient's predicted minute ventilation (MV PRED ) based on ideal body weight (IBW) and body surface area (BSA). The distributions of MV measurements were also compared across obese and non-obese cohorts. Obese patients had higher MV than the non-obese patients before, during, and after surgery. Measured MV of obese patients was significantly higher than their MV PRED from IBW formulas, with BSA-based MV PRED being a closer estimate. Obese patients also had greater variability in MV post-operatively when treated with standard opioid dosing. Our study demonstrated that obese patients have greater variability in ventilation post-operatively when treated with standard opioid doses, and despite overall higher ventilation, many of them are still at risk for hypoventilation. BSA-based MV PRED formulas may be more appropriate than IBW-based ones when estimating the respiratory demand of obese patients. The RVM allows for the continuous and non-invasive assessment of respiratory function in both obese and non-obese patients.

  6. The Impact of Obesity and Exercise on Cognitive Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, John S. Y.; Yan, Jin H.; Payne, V. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major concern in the aging population and degrades health, motor functions and cognition in older adults. The effects of obesity are pervasive and challenging to health-care systems, making this a widespread and critically important public health dilemma. In this review, we examine the relationship between obesity, cognitive aging, and related dysfunctions. Potential neural mechanisms underlying such relationship are described. We propose that cost-effective exercises can be empl...

  7. Molecular Epidemiology Investigation of Obesity and Lethal Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    compelling evidence linking obesity to aggressive prostate cancer, but the underlying causes of this relationship are unclear. In this study we used whole...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0250 TITLE: Molecular Epidemiology Investigation of Obesity and Lethal Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ericka...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular Epidemiology Investigation of Obesity and Lethal Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0250

  8. Comparison of thermogenic sympathetic response to food intake between obese and non-obese young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T; Miyawaki, C; Ue, H; Kanda, T; Yoshitake, Y; Moritani, T

    2001-02-01

    Sympathetic nervous system abnormality in humans is still a matter of debate. The present study was designed to examine diet-induced autonomic nervous system activity and metabolic change in obese and non-obese young women. Sixteen age- and height-matched obese and non-obese young women participated in this study. Sympathovagal activities were assessed by means of our newly developed spectral analysis procedure of heart-rate variability during the resting condition and after mixed-food ingestion (480 kcal). Energy expenditure was also measured under these two conditions. There was no significant difference in any of the parameters of the heart-rate variability between the obese group and control group during the resting condition. In the control group, both absolute values (221.5 +/- 54.5 vs. 363.8 +/- 43.7 ms2, p frequency component and global sympathetic nervous system index (1.46 +/- 0.19 vs. 3.26 +/- 0.61, p food ingestion compared with the values obtained after resting condition. However, no such sympathetic response was found in the obese group. Energy expenditure increased in the two groups after the meal, but the magnitude of the increase above the preprandial resting condition was significantly greater in the control group than in the obese group (11.2 +/- 2.3 vs. 6.7 +/- 0.8%, p food intake, which might be related to lowered capacity of thermogenesis and the state of obesity.

  9. Adipocyte aminopeptidases in obesity and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alponti, Rafaela Fadoni; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2015-11-05

    This study checked the existence of a diverse array of aminopeptidase (AP) enzymes in high (HDM) and low (LDM) density microsomal and plasma membrane (MF) fractions from adipocytes of control, monosodium glutamate obese and food deprived rats. Gene expression was detected for ArgAP, AspAP, MetAP, and two AlaAP (APM and PSA). APM and PSA had the highest catalytic efficiency, whereas AspAP the highest affinity. Subcellular distribution of AP activities depended on metabolic status. Comparing catalytic levels, AspAP in HDM, LDM and MF was absent in obese and control under food deprivation; PSA in LDM was 3.5-times higher in obese than in normally fed control and control and obese under food deprivation; MetAP in MF was 4.5-times higher in obese than in food deprived obese. Data show new AP enzymes genetically expressed in subcellular compartments of adipocytes, three of them with altered catalytic levels that respond to whole-body energetic demands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [The shame cycle in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, B

    2016-12-01

    In Western countries obesity is currently a major public health issue. Part of a complex system, it should not be studied alone. Yet it is often seen only as the result of qualitatively and/or quantitatively deviant dietary-intake and is seldom questioned as a symptom in the psychoanalytic sense, i.e. as a part of a package that makes sense. The purpose of this article is to highlight the importance of shame in the psyche of obese subjects as "subjective backup". The author questions the experience of shame in obese subjects as the cornerstone of this symptom in the psychoanalytic sense. While reporting a clinical case, the author notes the occurrences of shame in the discourse of the patient. The subsequent analysis is presented based on the transferential and counter-transferential relationship. To carry out this study, the author drew on a device supporting catharsis. The author addresses successively: the complaint of obese subjects and the effect of shame, their shame as the alpha and omega of bulimic crises and lastly their body as a work of art by building a monstrosity. The author concludes with the social dimension of shame and how it is part of the symptom of body transformation in obese subjects. It appears that pathological shame reveals a difficulty to maintain a sense of existence. For this reason, it seems important to consider this effect and to establish a framework for the emergence of the latter in the consultations of patients with eating disorders. Under these conditions, the patient is able, on the pedestal of shame, to voice his shame of being and to support a subjectivity. Copyright © 2016 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychosocial aspects of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Varsha

    2006-01-01

    Obese patients have many physical limitations and much psychiatric burden to overcome. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in the obese is similar to those with normal weight. However, in obese patients seeking treatment there is an increased prevalence (40-60%) of psychiatric morbidity, most commonly depression. It is difficult to separate the effects of depression on obesity and, on the contrary, the neuroendocrine changes associated with stress and depression may cause metabolic changes that predispose and perpetuate obesity. The stigma associated with obesity causes bullying in school as well as childhood psychiatric morbidity. Prejudice is not limited to the general public but exists among health professionals too. This chapter discusses the treatment of depression in obesity and the psychiatric evaluation of the pre-bariatric surgery patient. Education of society, starting with schools and including healthcare professionals will reduce bias and stigma as well as assist this vulnerable group of patients to seek help for their obesity and the many problems that come with it. Given that by the year 2025 obesity will be the world's number one health problem with the US leading the way, it is very important that we pursue preventive measures as well as encourage research for treatments of obesity.

  12. Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, and Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Fujihara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities and is defined as the presence of three or more of the following factors: increased waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high fasting glucose. Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifested in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Adipose tissue, particularly visceral fat, is an important metabolic tissue as it secretes systemic factors that alter the immunologic, metabolic, and endocrine milieu and also promotes insulin resistance. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross-talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, adipocytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and progression. This paper synthesizes the evidence on key molecular mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link.

  13. Obesity and bipolar disorder: synergistic neurotoxic effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Celina S; Carvalho, André F; Mansur, Rodrigo B; McIntyre, Roger S

    2013-11-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a disabling and chronic neuropsychiatric disorder that is typified by a complex illness presentation, episode recurrence and by its frequent association with psychiatric and medical comorbidities. Over the past decade, obesity has emerged as one of many comorbidities generating substantial concern in the BD population due to important prognostic implications. This comprehensive review details the bidirectional relationship between obesity and BD as evidenced by alterations in the structure and function of the central nervous system, in addition to greater depressive recurrence, cognitive dysfunction and risk of suicidality. Drawing on current research results, this article presents several putative mechanisms underlying the synergistic toxic effects and provides a framework for future treatment options for the obesity-BD comorbidity. There is a need for more large-scale prospective studies to investigate the bidirectional relationships between obesity and BD.

  14. [Nonsurgical management of obesity in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilliot, Didier; Roché, Gaelle; Mohebbi, Halle; Sirvaux, Marie-Aude; Böhme, Philip; Ziegler, Olivier

    2010-09-01

    General practitioners are placed in an ideal position to manage obesity. First, they have to consider the motivation of the obese patient to change his habits. When the patient is not motivated to loss weight, their role is to identify and treat co-morbidities, to evaluate the risk related to the obesity and to establish a therapeutic diagnosis to evaluate motivation and ability to change. If the patient is motivated, the therapeutic choices have to be adapted individually to each patient. An inadequate management may not only result in a failure but may increase obesity. The objectives in obesity treatment are to achieve weight loss in order to reduce health risk as far as possible, to maintain that weight loss, to restore quality of life. Goals and methods must be realistic. Even a modest weight loss (5-10 % of initial weight) will improve health indices in an obese patient. Dietary treatment and physical activity are fundamental to the management of obesity. Compliance with the diet is the major problem, especially during the phase of weight maintenance after the excess weight loss has been lost. Initial weight reduction depends on the level of energy deficit and weight maintenance on compliance to a low fat diet and a physical activity programme. Cognitive behavioural approaches should be an integral part of the management of a chronic disease. This treatment is very useful to improve body image, self-esteem, management of stress and control of disordered eating patterns. A psychotherapeutic approach is often necessary, especially when the obesity is psycho-determined. Obesity drugs should be used for carefully selected patients, as an adjunct to diet therapy and lifestyle modifications, under medical supervision. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Human obesity and endothelium-dependent responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campia, Umberto; Tesauro, Manfredi; Cardillo, Carmine

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is an ongoing worldwide epidemic. Besides being a medical condition in itself, obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to stem from multiple abnormalities in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, disrupt vascular homeostasis by causing an imbalance between the NO pathway and the endothelin 1 system, with impaired insulin-stimulated endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Importantly, emerging evidence suggests that the vascular dysfunction of obesity is not just limited to the endothelium, but also involves the other layers of the vessel wall. In particular, obesity-related changes in medial smooth muscle cells seem to disrupt the physiological facilitatory action of insulin on the responsiveness to vasodilator stimuli, whereas the adventitia and perivascular fat appear to be a source of pro-inflammatory and vasoactive factors that may contribute to endothelial and smooth muscle cell dysfunction, and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease. While obesity-induced vascular dysfunction appears to be reversible, at least in part, with weight control strategies, these have not proved sufficient to prevent the metabolic and cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. While a number of currently available drugs have shown potentially beneficial vascular effects in patients with obesity and the metabolic syndrome, elucidation of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying vascular damage in obese patients is necessary to identify additional pharmacologic targets to prevent the cardiovascular complications of obesity, and their human and economic costs. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21895631

  16. Sleep and Obesity: A focus on animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavanji, Vijayakumar; Billington, Charles J.; Kotz, Catherine M.; Teske, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid rise in obesity prevalence in the modern world parallels a significant reduction in restorative sleep (Agras et al., 2004; Dixon et al., 2007; Dixon et al., 2001; Gangwisch and Heymsfield, 2004; Gupta et al., 2002; Sekine et al., 2002; Vioque et al., 2000; Wolk et al., 2003). Reduced sleep time and quality increases the risk for obesity, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear (Gangwisch et al., 2005; Hicks et al., 1986; Imaki et al., 2002; Jennings et al., 2007; Moreno et al., 2006). A majority of the theories linking human sleep disturbances and obesity rely on self-reported sleep. However, studies with objective measurements of sleep/wake parameters suggest a U-shaped relationship between sleep and obesity. Studies in animal models are needed to improve our understanding of the association between sleep disturbances and obesity. Genetic and experimenter-induced models mimicking characteristics of human obesity are now available and these animal models will be useful in understanding whether sleep disturbances determine propensity for obesity, or result from obesity. These models exhibit weight gain profiles consistently different from control animals. Thus a careful evaluation of animal models will provide insight into the relationship between sleep disturbances and obesity in humans. In this review we first briefly consider the fundamentals of sleep and key sleep disturbances, such as sleep fragmentation and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), observed in obese individuals. Then we consider sleep deprivation studies and the role of circadian alterations in obesity. We describe sleep/wake changes in various rodent models of obesity and obesity resistance. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms linking sleep disturbances with obesity. PMID:22266350

  17. Obesity and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Kirsten Riis; Andersen, Malene Lundgren; Schantz, Anne Louise

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As obesity is an increasing problem among fertile women, it is crucial that specialists involved in the treatment of these women be aware of the risks of complications and know how to deal with them. Complications associated with obesity in pregnancy are gestational diabetes mellitus......, hypertensive disorders, and thromboembolic complications. Complications associated with obesity in labor are augmentation, early amniotomy, cephalopelvic disproportion, cesarean section, and perioperative morbidity. Complications associated with obesity in children are macrosomia, shoulder dystocia, small...... for gestational age, late fetal death, and congenital malformations, especially neural tube defects. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to review the potential complications associated with obesity and pregnancy. RESULTS: Obesity is associated with a higher risk of all reviewed complications except small for gestational age....

  18. Genetics of Childhood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major health problem and an immense economic burden on the health care systems both in the United States and the rest of the world. The prevalence of obesity in children and adults in the United States has increased dramatically over the past decade. Besides environmental factors, genetic factors are known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have revealed strongly associated genomic variants associated with most common disorders; indeed there is general consensus on these findings from generally positive replication outcomes by independent groups. To date, there have been only a few GWAS-related reports for childhood obesity specifically, with studies primarily uncovering loci in the adult setting instead. It is clear that a number of loci previously reported from GWAS analyses of adult BMI and/or obesity also play a role in childhood obesity.

  19. Obesity and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Kirsten Riis; Andersen, Malene Lundgren; Schantz, Anne Louise

    2004-01-01

    , hypertensive disorders, and thromboembolic complications. Complications associated with obesity in labor are augmentation, early amniotomy, cephalopelvic disproportion, cesarean section, and perioperative morbidity. Complications associated with obesity in children are macrosomia, shoulder dystocia, small......BACKGROUND: As obesity is an increasing problem among fertile women, it is crucial that specialists involved in the treatment of these women be aware of the risks of complications and know how to deal with them. Complications associated with obesity in pregnancy are gestational diabetes mellitus...... for gestational age, late fetal death, and congenital malformations, especially neural tube defects. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to review the potential complications associated with obesity and pregnancy. RESULTS: Obesity is associated with a higher risk of all reviewed complications except small for gestational age....

  20. Obesity in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Aaron; Wood, Ken

    2007-04-01

    To review literature germane to the care of critically ill obese patients with emphasis upon the pathophysiology of obesity and its impact on clinical management. Obesity continues to be a health epidemic of the industrialized world, and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Chronic obesity results in derangements in cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic function. Drug administration may be effected depending on the lipophilicity of the molecule administered. The ability to gain vascular access is often impaired because of large body habitus and should be aided with ultrasound guidance. The fidelity of blood pressure monitoring can also be adversely affected, necessitating the use of direct intraarterial monitoring. Obesity has pathophysiologic effects upon all major organ systems. A thorough knowledge of these effects and specific intensive care unit-related issues are necessary for clinicians to anticipate common complications and provide timely and effective treatment for the obese intensive care unit patient.

  1. Pediatric obesity. An introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children's health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children's environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. [Obesity and free inquiry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutnowski, M

    2006-09-01

    The W.H.O. identifies obesity as one of the ten leading health risk factors. Obesity is a worldwide non-infectious pandemic with dramatic consequences, and its usual treatment comes generally to a failure. One may wonder if our therapeutic proposal is adequate, instead of speaking about the lack of willpower of our patients. The explanation of weight gain should not be reduced to a caloric balance. Obese people may have other physiological characteristics than lean ones. Examples are quoted.

  3. Obesity and contraception: controversy?

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg RD; Cardamone SC; Murthy AS

    2012-01-01

    Rebecca D Goldberg, Stefanie C Cardamone, Amitasrigowri S MurthyDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Obesity is increasing worldwide and is affecting the reproductive health of women. Contraceptive considerations are difficult in obese women given concerns about efficacy and comorbid conditions. Once surgical treatment of obesity has occurred and weight loss initiated, fertility risks increase and unintended pregnancy can ...

  4. Thrombospondin1 deficiency reduces obesity-associated inflammation and improves insulin sensitivity in a diet-induced obese mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhang Li

    Full Text Available Obesity is prevalent worldwide and is associated with insulin resistance. Advanced studies suggest that obesity-associated low-grade chronic inflammation contributes to the development of insulin resistance and other metabolic complications. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 is a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein that is up-regulated in inflamed adipose tissue. A recent study suggests a positive correlation of TSP1 with obesity, adipose inflammation, and insulin resistance. However, the direct effect of TSP1 on obesity and insulin resistance is not known. Therefore, we investigated the role of TSP1 in mediating obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance by using TSP1 knockout mice.Male TSP1-/- mice and wild type littermate controls were fed a low-fat (LF or a high-fat (HF diet for 16 weeks. Throughout the study, body weight and fat mass increased similarly between the TSP1-/- mice and WT mice under HF feeding conditions, suggesting that TSP1 deficiency does not affect the development of obesity. However, obese TSP1-/- mice had improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin sensitivity compared to the obese wild type mice. Macrophage accumulation and inflammatory cytokine expression in adipose tissue were reduced in obese TSP1-/- mice. Consistent with the local decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, systemic inflammation was also decreased in the obese TSP1-/- mice. Furthermore, in vitro data demonstrated that TSP1 deficient macrophages had decreased mobility and a reduced inflammatory phenotype.TSP1 deficiency did not affect the development of high-fat diet induced obesity. However, TSP1 deficiency reduced macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue and protected against obesity related inflammation and insulin resistance. Our data demonstrate that TSP1 may play an important role in regulating macrophage function and mediating obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. These data suggest that TSP1 may serve as a

  5. Social influence and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Ross A

    2010-10-01

    To review a selection of research published in the last 12 months on the role of social influence in the obesity epidemic. Recent papers add evidence to previous work linking social network structures and obesity. Social norms, both eating norms and body image norms, are identified as one major source of social influence through networks. Social capital and social stress are additional types of social influence. There is increasing evidence that social influence and social network structures are significant factors in obesity. Deeper understanding of the mechanisms of action and dynamics of social influence, and its link with other factors involved in the obesity epidemic, is an important goal for further research.

  6. [Nutrigenomics and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palou, A; Bonet, M L; Picó, C; Rodríguez, A M

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disorder affected by multiple genetic and environmental factors, in particular nutrients, and their interrelationships. Increasing knowledge of the genes and molecules involved in the development of obesity is paving the way for new methods of obesity control. In this sense, Nutrigenomics--which represents a new approach in nutrition research that joints the application of powerful functional genomics technologies, bioinformatics and molecular biology with more traditional methodologies--may orientate the design and development of new functional foods for obesity, based on the scientific knowledge of the impact of specific nutrients on the mammalian body weight control system and their mechanisms of action.

  7. Controversies in Obesity Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Karandish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The markedly high prevalence of obesity contributes to the increased incidence of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea, and heart disease. Because of high prevalence of obesity in almost all countries, it has been the focus of many researches throughout the world during the recent decades. Along with increasing researches, new concepts and controversies have been emerged. The existing controversies on the topic are so deep that some researches argue on absolutely philosophical questions such as “Is obesity a disease?” or “Is it correct to treat obesity?” These questions are based on a few theories and real data that explain obesity as a biological adaptation and also the final results of weight loss programs. Many people attempt to lose weight by diet therapy, physical activity and lifestyle modifications. Importantly, weight loss strategies in the long term are ineffective and may have unintended consequences including decreasing energy expenditure, complicated appetite control, eating disorders, reducing self-esteem, increasing the plasma and tissue levels of persistent organic pollutants that promote metabolic complications, and consequently, higher risk of repeated cycles of weight loss and weight regain. In this review, major paradoxes and controversies on obesity including classic obesity paradox, pre-obesity; fat-but-fit theory, and healthy obesity are explained. In addition, the relevant strategies like “Health at Every Size” that emphasize on promotion of global health behaviors rather than weight loss programs are explained.

  8. [Obesity in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-Torres, Javier; González-Izquierdo, José Jesús; Barrera-Cruz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Excess body weight (overweight and obesity) is currently recognized as one of the most important challenges of public health in the world, given its size, speed of growth and the negative effect it has on the health of the population that suffers. Overweight and obesity significantly increases the risk of chronic no communicable diseases, premature mortality and the social cost of health. An estimated 90 % of cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus attributable to overweight and obesity. Today, Mexico is second global prevalence of obesity in the adult population, which is ten times higher than that of countries like Japan and Korea. With regard to children, Mexico ranks fourth worldwide obesity prevalence, behind Greece, USA and Italy. In our country, over 70 % of the adult population, between 30 and 60 years are overweight. The prevalence of overweight is higher in men than females, while the prevalence of obesity is higher in women than men. Until 2012, 26 million Mexican adults are overweight and 22 million obese, which represents a major challenge for the health sector in terms of promoting healthy lifestyles in the population and development of public policies to reverse this scenario epidemiology. Mexico needs to plan and implement strategies and action cost effective for the prevention and control of obesity of children, adolescents and adults. Global experience shows that proper care of obesity and overweight, required to formulate and coordinate multisectoral strategies and efficient for enhancing protective factors to health, particularly to modify individual behavior, family and community.

  9. Obesity and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Kirsten Riis; Andersen, Malene Lundgren; Schantz, Anne Louise

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As obesity is an increasing problem among fertile women, it is crucial that specialists involved in the treatment of these women be aware of the risks of complications and know how to deal with them. Complications associated with obesity in pregnancy are gestational diabetes mellitus...... for gestational age, late fetal death, and congenital malformations, especially neural tube defects. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to review the potential complications associated with obesity and pregnancy. RESULTS: Obesity is associated with a higher risk of all reviewed complications except small for gestational age....

  10. Genes and diet in obesity-related type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, F.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) of ?30, and type 2 diabetes is rising rapidly worldwide. It is therefore important to study the underlying, etiologic mechanisms of obesity and type 2 diabetes to gain insight into their development, which could eventually lead to

  11. Obesity and asthma : current knowledge and future needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Diamant, Zuzana; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    Purpose of review Obesity has significant impact on asthma incidence and manifestations. The purpose of the review is to discuss recent observations regarding the association between obesity and asthma focusing on underlying mechanisms, clinical presentation, response to therapy and effect of weight

  12. INTRODUCTION Obesity is one of the most important preventable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several reasons have been proffered, including a decreased renal filtration surface, which may lead to renal sodium retention11. Obesity also causes insulin resistance with resultant hyperinsulinaemia, and insulin enhances tubular reabsorption of sodium11. Under stress, psychological problems arise in obese patients.

  13. Prevalence of and factors associated with overweight and obesity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of and factors associated with overweight and obesity among nursery school children aged 3-6 years in Eldoret Municipality. ... world is already grappling with a proportionately high burden of obesity in children, with the developing countries experiencing a double burden of under nutrition and over nutrition.

  14. Overweight and Obesity (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Overweight and Obesity KidsHealth / For Parents / Overweight and Obesity ... be at risk for substance abuse How Are Overweight and Obesity Defined? Body mass index (BMI) uses ...

  15. Evaluation of the overweight/obese child--practical tips for the primary health care provider: recommendations from the Childhood Obesity Task Force of the European Association for the Study of Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer L; Farpour-Lambert, Nathalie J; Nowicka, Paulina

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents is on the rise. The majority of overweight or obese children are treated by primary health care providers including paediatricians, family practitioners, dieticians, nurses, and school health services - and not by specialists. The majority...... Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO). We have attempted to use an evidence-based approach while allowing flexibility for the practicing clinician in domains where evidence is currently lacking and ensuring that treating the obese child involves the entire family as well....... of obese children have no underlying medical disorder causing their obesity yet a significant proportion might suffer from obesity-related co-morbidities. This text is aimed at providing simple and practical tools for the identification and management of children with or at risk of overweight and obesity...

  16. Pediatric Obesity-Related Asthma: The Role of Metabolic Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakanthi, Nandini; Greally, John M; Rastogi, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    The burden of obesity-related asthma among children, particularly among ethnic minorities, necessitates an improved understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms. Although obesity is an independent risk factor for asthma, not all obese children develop asthma. Several recent studies have elucidated mechanisms, including the role of diet, sedentary lifestyle, mechanical fat load, and adiposity-mediated inflammation that may underlie the obese asthma pathophysiology. Here, we review these recent studies and emerging scientific evidence that suggest metabolic dysregulation may play a role in pediatric obesity-related asthma. We also review the genetic and epigenetic factors that may underlie susceptibility to metabolic dysregulation and associated pulmonary morbidity among children. Lastly, we identify knowledge gaps that need further exploration to better define pathways that will allow development of primary preventive strategies for obesity-related asthma in children. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Can merely learning about obesity genes affect eating behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar-Nimrod, Ilan; Cheung, Benjamin Y; Ruby, Matthew B; Heine, Steven J

    2014-10-01

    Public discourse on genetic predispositions for obesity has flourished in recent decades. In three studies, we investigated behaviorally-relevant correlates and consequences of a perceived genetic etiology for obesity. In Study 1, beliefs about etiological explanations for obesity were assessed. Stronger endorsement of genetic etiology was predictive of a belief that obese people have no control over their weight. In Study 2, beliefs about weight and its causes were assessed following a manipulation of the perceived underlying cause. Compared with a genetic attribution, a non-genetic physiological attribution led to increased perception of control over one's weight. In Study 3, participants read a fictional media report presenting either a genetic explanation, a psychosocial explanation, or no explanation (control) for obesity. Results indicated that participants who read the genetic explanation ate significantly more on a follow-up task. Taken together, these studies demonstrate potential effects of genetic attributions for obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Maternal Obesity on Fetal Programming: Molecular Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Caterina; Edlow, Andrea G.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity has become a worldwide epidemic. Obesity and a high-fat diet have been shown to have deleterious effects on fetal programming, predisposing offspring to adverse cardiometabolic and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Although large epidemiological studies have shown an association between maternal obesity and adverse outcomes for offspring, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Molecular approaches have played a key role in elucidating the mechanistic underpinnings of fetal malprogramming in the setting of maternal obesity. These approaches include, among others, characterization of epigenetic modifications, microRNA expression, the gut microbiome, the transcriptome, and evaluation of specific mRNA expression via quantitative reverse transcription polmerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in fetuses and offspring of obese females. This work will review the data from animal models and human fluids/cells regarding the effects of maternal obesity on fetal and offspring neurodevelopment and cardiometabolic outcomes, with a particular focus on molecular approaches. PMID:26337113

  19. Genetics of pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, Melania; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2012-07-01

    Onset of obesity has been anticipated at earlier ages, and prevalence has dramatically increased worldwide over the past decades. Epidemic obesity is mainly attributable to modern lifestyle, but family studies prove the significant role of genes in the individual's predisposition to obesity. Advances in genotyping technologies have raised great hope and expectations that genetic testing will pave the way to personalized medicine and that complex traits such as obesity will be prevented even before birth. In the presence of the pressing offer of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services from private companies to estimate the individual's risk for complex phenotypes including obesity, the present review offers pediatricians an update of the state of the art on genomics obesity in childhood. Discrepancies with respect to genomics of adult obesity are discussed. After an appraisal of findings from genome-wide association studies in pediatric populations, the rare variant-common disease hypothesis, the theoretical soil for next-generation sequencing techniques, is discussed as opposite to the common disease-common variant hypothesis. Next-generation sequencing techniques are expected to fill the gap of "missing heritability" of obesity, identifying rare variants associated with the trait and clarifying the role of epigenetics in its heritability. Pediatric obesity emerges as a complex phenotype, modulated by unique gene-environment interactions that occur in periods of life and are "permissive" for the programming of adult obesity. With the advent of next-generation sequencing techniques and advances in the field of exposomics, sensitive and specific tools to predict the obesity risk as early as possible are the challenge for the next decade.

  20. Obesity-Related Hormones in Low-Income Preschool-Age Children: Implications for School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alison L.; Lumeng, Carey N.; Delproposto, Jennifer; Florek, Brian; Wendorf, Kristin; Lumeng, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying socioeconomic disparities in school readiness and health outcomes, particularly obesity, among preschool-aged children are complex and poorly understood. Obesity can induce changes in proteins in the circulation that contribute to the negative impact of obesity on health; such changes may relate to cognitive and emotion…

  1. Hypothalamic obesity after treatment for craniopharyngioma: the importance of the home environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijneke, Ruud W. H.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.; de Boer, Nienke Y.; van Zundert, Suzanne; van Trotsenburg, Paul A. S.; Stoelinga, Femke; van Santen, Hanneke M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hypothalamic obesity after treatment for craniopharyngioma is a well-recognized, severe problem. Treatment of hypothalamic obesity is difficult and often frustrating for the patient, the parents and the professional care-giver. Because hypothalamic obesity is caused by an underlying medical

  2. Obesity and breastfeeding: The strength of association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Cuppari, Caterina; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Filippelli, Martina; Trovato, Antonio; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Arrigo, Teresa

    2015-06-01

    Obesity and attendant co-morbidities are an emergent problem in public health. Much attention has focused on prevention, especially during the perinatal period. Breastfeeding is considered a possible protective factor for obesity in childhood, influencing gene-neuroendocrine-environment-lifestyle interaction. Therefore, breastfeeding and its longer duration are probably associated with lower development of childhood obesity. Through human milk, but not formula, the child assumes greater bioactive factors contributing to immunological, endocrine, development, neural and psychological benefits. Contrarily, other studies did not confirm a critical role of breast milk. Confounding factors, especially maternal pre-pregnancy overweight, may influence breastfeeding effects. This review summarises what is known about the possible relationship between breastfeeding and prevention of obesity development. Breastfeeding appears to represent a protective factor for obesity in childhood, although evidence is still controversial and underlying mechanisms unclear. Further research is needed to improve knowledge on overweight/obesity and breastfeeding. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Advertising and obesity: a behavioral perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, Janet; Gendall, Philip

    2006-06-01

    Concern over the levels of obesity observed in Western countries has grown as researchers forecast a rapid growth in the medical care that a progressively more obese population will require. As health workers deal with increased incidences of diabetes and other obesity-related disorders, policymakers have examined the factors contributing to this problem. In particular, advertising that promotes high fat and high sugar products to children has come under increasing scrutiny. Advertisers have rejected claims that advertising contributes to obesity by arguing that it cannot coerce people into purchasing a product, and does not affect primary demand. This reasoning overlooks the role advertising plays in reinforcing and normalising behavior, however, and it assumes that only direct causal links merit regulatory attention. Ehrenberg's "weak" theory suggests advertising will support unhealthy eating behaviors, while the wide range of sales promotions employed will prompt trial and reward continued consumption. This article presents an alternative analysis of how marketing contributes to obesity and uses behavior modification theory to analyse the "fast-food" industry's promotions. We also review the New Zealand government's response to obesity and suggest policy interventions that would foster healthier eating behaviors.

  4. Effects of Dietary l-Arginine on Nitric Oxide Bioavailability in Obese Normotensive and Obese Hypertensive Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly Giam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity related hypertension is a major risk factor for resistant hypertension. We do not completely understand the mechanism(s underlying the development of obesity related hypertension which hinders the development of novel treatment strategies for this condition. Data from experimental studies and small clinical trials indicate that transport of l-arginine, the substrate for nitric oxide (NO, and subsequent NO production are reduced in obesity induced hypertension. Reduced NO bioavailability can induce hypertension via multiple mechanisms. Mirmiran et al. recently analyzed data from a large population study and found that the association between dietary l-arginine and serum nitrate and nitrite was weakened in obese hypertensive subjects compared to obese normotensives. These data suggest that l-arginine dependent NO production is impaired in the former group compared to the latter which may represent a novel mechanism contributing to hypertension in the setting of obesity.

  5. Impaired response to deep inspiration in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Clyde; Desai, Alpa; Togias, Alkis

    2011-01-01

    Deep inspirations modulate airway caliber and airway closure and their effects are impaired in asthma. The association between asthma and obesity raises the question whether the deep inspiration (DI) effect is also impaired in the latter condition. We assessed the DI effects in obese and nonobese nonasthmatics. Thirty-six subjects (17 obese, 19 nonobese) underwent routine methacholine (Mch) challenge and 30 of them also had a modified bronchoprovocation in the absence of DIs. Lung function was monitored with spirometry and forced oscillation (FO) [resistance (R) at 5 Hz (R5), at 20 Hz (R20), R5-R20 and the integrated area of low-frequency reactance (AX)]. The response to Mch, assessed with area under the dose-response curves (AUC), was consistently greater in the routine challenge in the obese (mean ± SE, obese vs. nonobese AUC: R5: 15.7 ± 2.3 vs. 2.4 ± 2.0, P < 0.0005; R20: 5.6 ± 1.4 vs. 1.4 ± 1.2, P = 0.027; R5-R20: 10.2 ± 1.6 vs. 0.9 ± 0.1.4, P < 0.0005; AX: 115.6 ± 22.0 vs. 1.5 ± 18.9, P < 0.0005), but differences between groups in the modified challenge were smaller, indicating reduced DI effects in obesity. Given that DI has bronchodilatory and bronchoprotective effects, we further assessed these components separately. In the obese subjects, DI prior to Mch enhanced Mch-induced bronchoconstriction, but DI after Mch resulted in bronchodilation that was of similar magnitude as in the nonobese. We conclude that obesity is characterized by increased Mch responsiveness, predominantly of the small airways, due to a DI effect that renders the airways more sensitive to the stimulus. PMID:21700888

  6. Obesity: Current and Potential Pharmacotherapeutics and Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, Vidya; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic that contributes to a number of health complications including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. Pharmacotherapeutic strategies to treat obesity are urgently needed. Research over the past two decades has increased substantially our knowledge of central and peripheral mechanisms underlying homeostatic energy balance. Homeostatic mechanisms involve multiple components including neuronal circuits, some originating in hypothalamus and brain stem, as well as peripherally-derived satiety, hunger and adiposity signals that modulate neural activity and regulate eating behavior. Dysregulation of one or more of these homeostatic components results in obesity. Coincident with obesity, reward mechanisms that regulate hedonic aspects of food intake override the homeostatic regulation of eating. In addition to functional interactions between homeostatic and reward systems in the regulation of food intake, homeostatic signals have the ability to alter vulnerability to drug abuse. Regarding the treatment of obesity, pharmacological monotherapies primarily focus on a single protein target. FDA-approved monotherapy options include phentermine (Adipex-P®), orlistat (Xenical®), lorcaserin (Belviq®) and liraglutide (Saxenda®). However, monotherapies have limited efficacy, in part due to the recruitment of alternate and counter-regulatory pathways. Consequently, a multi-target approach may provide greater benefit. Recently, two combination products have been approved by the FDA to treat obesity, including phentermine/topiramate (Qsymia®) and naltrexone/bupropion (Contrave®). The current review provides an overview of homeostatic and reward mechanisms that regulate energy balance, potential therapeutic targets for obesity and current treatment options, including some candidate therapeutics in clinical development. Finally, challenges in anti-obesity drug development are discussed. PMID:27773782

  7. Maternal obesity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devlieger, Roland; Benhalima, Katrien; Damm, Peter

    2016-01-01

    , the prevalence of maternal obesity varies from 7 to 25% and seems strongly related to social and educational inequalities. Obesity during pregnancy represents an important preventable risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes and is associated with negative long-term health outcomes for both mothers...

  8. Obesity and physical activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. k.westerterp@hb.unimaas.nl OBJECTIVES: Three aspects of obesity and physical activity are reviewed: whether the obese are inactive; how the activity level can be increased; and which are the effects of an increase in physical

  9. The Obesity Epidemic

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-18

    Learn about obesity and the community initiatives taking place to prevent and reduce this epidemic.  Created: 7/18/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity.   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  10. Carbohydrate intake and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, R.M.; Seidell, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased rapidly worldwide and the importance of considering the role of diet in the prevention and treatment of obesity is widely acknowledged. This paper reviews data on the effects of dietary carbohydrates on body fatness. Does the composition of the diet as related

  11. Obesity Treatment Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ianosi Edith

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a disease with severe health consequences and increased risk of mortality. The most commonly used criteria to assess the presence and the severity of obesity are body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio and the presence of the health conditions caused or worsened by obesity. Worldwide obesity has more than doubled in the last 4 decades. Obesity is the second of the leading preventable causes of death worldwide (after smoking. Obesity has a plurifactorial pathogenesis. The central perturbation consists in the imbalance between calories intake and calories consumption (by inappropriate diet and sedentary lifestyle. Identification of all the ethiological factors is important for treatment and prophylaxis. Weight loss benefits are multiple and important: improvement in glicemic control and in plasma lipid levels, blood presure control, obstructiv sleep apneea reduction, improvement in management of daily activities and profesional performances, increase quality of life, reduction in mortality. Overweight or obese patient will complete a diagnostic and a treatment program. Treatment of obesity claims a targeted multidimensional therapy: weight and lifestyle management, diet, sustained physical activity in daily life, exercise, decrease life stressors, smoking cessation, drug therapy, bariatric surgery psichological, familial and social suport. Weight loss program must be carefully planned, adapted to the patient’s abilities and comorbidities and supervised by a nutritionist and a physiotherapist.

  12. Obesity and the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is rising progressively, even among older age groups. By the year 2030 to 2035 over 20% of the adult US population and over 25% of the Europeans will be aged 65 years or older. The predicted prevalence of obesity in Americans, 60 years and older was 37% in 2010. The

  13. Treatment of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uli, Naveen; Sundararajan, Sumana; Cuttler, Leona

    2008-02-01

    To provide an overview of treatments for childhood obesity, highlighting recent advances and recommendations. The three main treatment modalities are lifestyle interventions, medications, and bariatric surgery. Recent data support the short-term effectiveness of lifestyle interventions, and show that continued behavioral intervention increases the likelihood of a sustained effect for up to 2 years. New studies and regulatory decisions on medications for obesity (including orlistat, sibutramine, and metformin) are discussed. Emerging data suggest substantial weight loss after bariatric surgery in morbidly obese adolescents but also indicate adverse effects. An expert panel recently provided guidelines that alter definitions of obesity and offer a framework for obesity management. These guidelines are compared with others, and integrated recommendations presented. While primary prevention of childhood obesity is important, broadly effective methods to do so are not yet available. Given the large population of obese children and the risks they face, an emphasis on treatment is also critical. We suggest a staged approach, emphasizing early intervention and lifestyle changes. We also suggest limiting bariatric surgery to selected adolescents in Institutional Review Board-approved research studies. Health-policy interventions can facilitate both prevention and treatment of childhood obesity.

  14. Androgens and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Carolyn A; McLachlan, Robert I

    2010-06-01

    As testosterone levels are frequently reduced in obesity, an understanding of the relationship between serum testosterone and adiposity is necessary in the clinical evaluation of these men, in particular when considering testosterone therapy. Population and interventional data suggest a bi-directional relationship exists between testosterone and obesity in men, with lower total testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (and to a lesser extent free testosterone) levels than their nonobese peers; obesity having an impact at least as important as ageing. Abnormalities in the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis are seen with increasing obesity. Weight loss in massive obesity increases testosterone levels but its role in mild-moderate obesity is unclear. Testosterone supplementation reduces total body fat in hypogonadal and ageing men although the effects on regional fat distribution are less well described. Favourable changes in total body fat and regional fat distribution suggest a potential role for testosterone in obesity. However, lifestyle advice to achieve sustained weight loss should be the mainstay of management. Obese men with confirmed androgen deficiency can be offered treatment, whereas in those with low-normal testosterone levels more research is needed.

  15. Endocrine system and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburn, Doyle D; Reed, Mary Jane

    2010-10-01

    Obesity is associated with significant alterations in endocrine function. An association with type 2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia has been well documented. This article highlights the complexities of treating endocrine system disorders in obese patients. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Sedentary behaviour and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Margot; Tremblay, Mark S

    2008-06-01

    This article examines sedentary behaviours (television viewing, computer use and reading) in relation to obesity among Canadian adults aged 20 to 64 years. The analysis is based on 42,612 respondents from the 2007 Canadian Community Health Survey Cross-tabulations were used to compare the prevalence of obesity by time engaged in sedentary behaviours. Multiple logistic regression models were used to determine if associations between sedentary behaviours and obesity were independent of the effects of sociodemographic variables, leisure-time physical activity and diet. Approximately one-quarter of men (25%) and women (24%) who reported watching television 21 or more hours per week were classified as obese. The prevalence of obesity was substantially lower for those who averaged 5 or fewer hours of television per week (14% of men and 11% of women). When examined in multivariate models controlling for leisure-time physical activity and diet, the associations between time spent watching television and obesity persisted for both sexes. Frequent computer users (11 or more hours per week) of both sexes had increased odds of obesity, compared with those who used computers for 5 or fewer hours per week. Time spent reading was not related to obesity.

  17. Obesity: A Bibliographic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Beth

    2012-01-01

    The study of obesity is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field. The community college library shelves should contain two types of resources. First, several kinds of reference materials, and second, a host of broader materials that place the discussion of obesity within a cultural framework. This overview is divided into two major…

  18. Severe childhood obesity matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, O.H.

    2014-01-01

    To date, obesity represents a major public health challenge. Obesity is at any age a concern but in pediatric populations it is particularly alarming because of its immediate biomedical and psychosocial consequences and the expectation that it will lead to an increase in morbidity and mortality and

  19. The genetics of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    All definitions of the metabolic syndrome include some form of obesity as one of the possible features. Body mass index (BMI) has a known genetic component, currently estimated to account for about 70% of the population variance in weight status for non-syndromal obesity. Much research effort has be...

  20. [Obesity and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Soo-Young; Myung, Seung-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Obesity worldwide is constantly increasing. Obesity acts as an independent significant risk factor for malignant tumors of various organs including colorectal cancer. Visceral adipose tissue is physiologically more important than subcutaneous adipose tissue. The relative risk of colorectal cancer of obese patients is about 1.5 times higher than the normal-weight individuals, and obesity is also associated with premalignant colorectal adenoma. The colorectal cancer incidence of obese patients has gender-specific and site-specific characteristics that it is higher in men than women and in the colon than rectum. Obesity acts as a risk factor of colorectal carcinogenesis by several mechanisms. Isulin, insulin-like growth factor, leptin, adiponectin, microbiome, and cytokines of chronic inflammation etc. have been understood as its potential mechanisms. In addition, obesity in patients with colorectal cancer negatively affects the disease progression and response of chemotherapy. Although the evidence is not clear yet, there are some reports that weight loss as well as life-modification such as dietary change and physical activity can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. It is very important knowledge in the point that obesity is a potentially modifiable risk factor that can alter the incidence and outcome of the colorectal cancer.

  1. Updates on obesity pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Amanda; Apovian, Caroline M

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic, relapsing disease that necessitates a multidisciplinary approach to management. Behavioral changes are the foundation to management, but adjunctive therapy is often warranted, including pharmacologic therapies and/or bariatric surgery. Until recently, treatment options included only short-term therapy (≤12 weeks), and paths beyond that schedule were challenging, as knowledge of the biology of obesity was lacking. With increased recognition of obesity as a chronic, complex medical disease, newer agents have been approved as long-term therapy, and the cornerstone of treatment is chronic behavior and lifestyle change. In the last decade, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved several new weight loss medications for the chronic management of obesity. In this review paper, we provide the latest updates on obesity pharmacotherapy. The main areas we will cover include (1) pharmacological management of obesity, (2) a review of FDA-approved weight loss medications, (3) comanagement of obesity and its metabolic sequelae (type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia), and (4) obesity-centric prescribing for mental illness, neurological disorders, and contraceptive planning. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Pharmacological management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Amanda; Apovian, Caroline M

    2017-04-28

    Current management of obesity includes three main arms: behavioral modification, pharmacologic therapy, and bariatric surgery. Decades prior, the only pharmacological agents available to treat obesity were approved only for short-term use (≤ 12 weeks) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, in the last several years, the FDA has approved several medications for longer term treatment of obesity. This highlights the important progression that we, as a society, better appreciate now the chronicity and complexity of obesity as a disease. Also, availability of more medication options gives healthcare providers more possibilities to consider in the management of obesity. Medications for obesity can be simply categorized as FDA approved short-term use (diethylproprion, phendimetrazine, benzphetamine, and phentermine) and long-term use (orlistat, phentermine/topiramate ER, lorcaserin, naltrexone/bupropion ER and liraglutide). Additionally, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is commonly seen in patients with obesity and necessitates consideration of pharmacological options that do not hinder patients' weight loss. Finally, weight-centric prescribing is also an important component to pharmacological management of obesity. It warrants that healthcare providers thoroughly review their patients' medication lists to determine if any of these agents could be contributing to weight gain.

  3. Obesity and Dyslipidemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, Remco; Monajemi, Houshang; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2008-01-01

    The alarming and still increasing prevalence of obesity and associated cardiovascular risk raises much concern. The increase in cardiovascular risk depends to a significant extent on the changes in lipid profiles as observed in obesity These changes are decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol

  4. Epidemiology of obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidell, Jacob C

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate in many parts of the world. In White populations living in the west and north of Europe, Australia, and the United States, the prevalence of obesity is similarly high in men and women. In countries with relatively low gross national

  5. Canine and feline obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøe, Peter; Palmer, Clare; Corr, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen a drastic increase in the rates of overweight and obesity among people living in some developed nations. There has also been increased concern over obesity in companion animals. In the latest article in Veterinary Record's series on One Health, Peter Sandøe and colleagues...

  6. The relation between childhood obesity and adenotonsillar hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daar, Ghaniya; Sarı, Kamran; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Ede, Hüseyin; Aydın, Reha; Saydam, Levent

    2016-02-01

    symptoms is prominent especially in children under 7 years of age, but its impact on the development of childhood obesity is still controversial. Our results revealed a possible relation between adenotonsillar hypertrophy and obesity rates. Further studies on larger populations should be planned to better define the real impact of adenotonsillar hypertrophy in obese children.

  7. DNA methylation in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Pokrywka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of overweight and obese people is increasing at an alarming rate, especially in the developed and developing countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, and in consequence for premature death. The development of obesity results from the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors, which include sedentary life style and abnormal eating habits. In the past few years a number of events accompanying obesity, affecting expression of genes which are not directly connected with the DNA base sequence (e.g. epigenetic changes, have been described. Epigenetic processes include DNA methylation, histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, as well as non-coding micro-RNA (miRNA synthesis. In this review, the known changes in the profile of DNA methylation as a factor affecting obesity and its complications are described.

  8. Personalized nutrition and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lu

    2014-08-01

    The past few decades have witnessed a rapid rise in nutrition-related disorders such as obesity in the United States and over the world. Traditional nutrition research has associated various foods and nutrients with obesity. Recent advances in genomics have led to identification of the genetic variants determining body weight and related dietary factors such as intakes of energy and macronutrients. In addition, compelling evidence has lent support to interactions between genetic variations and dietary factors in relation to obesity and weight change. Moreover, recently emerging data from other 'omics' studies such as epigenomics and metabolomics suggest that more complex interplays between the global features of human body and dietary factors may exist at multiple tiers in affecting individuals' susceptibility to obesity; and a concept of 'personalized nutrition' has been proposed to integrate this novel knowledge with traditional nutrition research, with the hope ultimately to endorse person-centric diet intervention to mitigate obesity and related disorders.

  9. Obesity and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Safi, Zain A; Polotsky, Alex J

    2015-05-01

    Over the recent decades, the prevalence of obesity in the United States has increased to epidemic proportions to more than 35% of adults, along with an increased risk of a number of health conditions, including hypertension, adverse lipid concentrations, and type 2 diabetes. The relationships between menopausal transition, weight gain, and obesity are reported but incompletely understood. The association between menopause and these measures has been the subject of many studies, along with examining their effect on reproductive hormones and menopausal symptoms. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is published in the literature on this subject and examine it through: (1) the possible impact of obesity on the timing of menopause; (2) the effect of obesity on menopausal symptoms and reproductive hormones around the time of menopause; and (3) the effect of menopause on obesity, weight gain, and body composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Predisposition to Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nanna Julie; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2012-01-01

    predisposed to future obesity. The purpose of this paper is to review interventions on obesity prevention published during the past year, and to examine if interventions targeting predisposed groups or individuals seem more efficient in preventing obesity than studies targeting general populations. Among 15......Obesity prevention should remain a priority, even if there is some suggestion that the epidemic may presently have reached a stable level. However, previous interventions have not been effective in preventing overweight and obesity, and at the same time studies suggest that some subgroups are more...... identified studies, 7 targeted predisposed children or adolescents. More of the studies targeting predisposed individuals were able to show significant effects than the studies targeting general populations. Most studies targeting predisposed defined the predisposition based on ethnicity or socioeconomic...

  11. Obesity in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard

    Background: The obesity epidemic has led to an increase in obese women of childbearing age. This gives cause for concern because prepregnancy obesity is associated with a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The newly established Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) has a size that permits...... an investigation of the association between maternal obesity and rare, but important outcomes, for which more insight is needed, such as fetal death, subtypes of preterm birth, and neonatal mortality. The low participation rate of 30% to the DNBC may, however, raise new questions related to the validity...... of the findings, so we also carried out a study of the consequences of this selection on the estimates of relative risk.Studies of maternal obesity: Within the DNBC we examined the association between prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and the risk of fetal death (n=54,505), subtypes of preterm birth (n=62...

  12. Obesity and Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is more prevalent in obese compared with normal weight subjects. Our aim has been to review current knowledge of the impact of obesity on asthma severity, asthma control, and response to therapy.Several studies have shown that overweight and obesity is associated with more severe asthma...... and impaired quality of life compared with normal weight individuals. Furthermore, obesity is associated with poorer asthma control, as assessed by asthma control questionnaires, limitations in daily activities, breathlessness and wheezing, use of rescue medication, unscheduled doctor visits, emergency...... department visits, and hospitalizations for acute asthma. Studies of the impact of a high body mass index (BMI) on response to asthma therapy have, however, revealed conflicting results. Most studies show that overweight and obesity is associated with less favorable response to asthma therapy with regard...

  13. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant negative impact on asthma control and risk of exacerbations. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent studies evaluating the effects of weight reduction on asthma control in obese adults. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical studies have shown that weight...... reduction in obese patients is associated with improvements in symptoms, use of controller medication, and asthma-related quality of life together with a reduction in the risk for severe exacerbations. Furthermore, several studies have also revealed improvements in lung function and airway responsiveness...... reduction in obese adults with asthma leads to an overall improvement in asthma control, including airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Weight reduction should be a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with asthma....

  14. The gut microbiota and its relationship to diet and obesity: New insights

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Siobhan F.; Murphy, Eileen F.; Nilaweera, Kanishka; Ross, Paul R.; Shanahan, Fergus; O’Toole, Paul W.; Cotter, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity develops from a prolonged imbalance of energy intake and energy expenditure. However, the relatively recent discovery that the composition and function of the gut microbiota impacts on obesity has lead to an explosion of interest in what is now a distinct research field. Here, research relating to the links between the gut microbiota, diet and obesity will be reviewed under five major headings: (1) the gut microbiota of lean and obese animals, (2) the composition of the gut microbiota...

  15. Refeeding hypertension in dietary obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernsberger, P.; Nelson, D.O.

    1988-01-01

    A novel model of nutritionally induced hypertension in the rat is described. Dietary obesity was produced by providing sweet milk in addition to regular chow, which elicited a 52% increase in caloric intake. Despite 54% greater body weight gain and 139% heavier retroperitoneal fat pads, 120 days of overfeeding failed to increase systolic pressure in the conscious state or mean arterial pressure under urethan anesthesia. In contrast, mild hypertension developed in intermittantly fasted obese animals. The first 4-day supplemented fast was initiated 4 wk after the introduction of sweet milk, when the animals were 47 g overweight relative to chow-fed controls. Thereafter, 4 days of starvation were alternated with 2 wk of refeeding for a total of 4 cycles. A rapid fall in systolic blood pressure accompanied the onset of supplemented fasting and was maintained thereafter. With refeeding, blood pressure rose precipitously, despite poststarvation anorexia. Blood pressure tended to rise slightly over the remainder of the realimentation period. After the 4th supplemented fast, hypertension was sustained during 30 days of refeeding. Cumulative caloric intake in starved-refed rats fell within 2% of that in chow-fed controls. Refeeding hypertension appeared to be due to increased sympathetic nervous activity, since (1) cardiac β-adrenergic receptors were downregulated, as indicated by a 40% decrease in the maximum binding of [ 3 H]dihydroalpranolol; and (2) the decrease in heart rate as a result of β-blockade was enhanced. Refeeding hypertension in the dietary obese rat may be a potential animal model for some forms of human obesity-related hypertension

  16. Modern aspects of diagnosis, treatment and prevention of obesity in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.D. Saltanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a topical medical and social problem. Prevalence of obesity is increasing among children. The number of children under 5 years of age with overweight and obesity in the world is 44 millions. Obesity in childhood is a risk factor for the development of severe concomitant pathologies. Childhood obesity is an important prognostic factor for obesity in adults. Measures to prevent and treat childhood obesity should be directed not only to the child, but also to the whole family. To prevent obesity, excessive calorie intake should be limited. To increase the effectiveness of preventing obesity among children, we should combine reduction of energy intake with an increased physical activity. Lifestyle modification (correction of nutrition, exercise and behavioral therapy is the main method of treating children’s obesity. Introduction of school programs that increase physical activity and optimize the nutrition improve the effectiveness of treatment for childhood obesity. In case of ineffectiveness of lifestyle modification, pharmacotherapy may be prescribed. Orlistat is a medication for the treatment of obesity in children. The effectiveness of pharmacotherapy is enhanced when it is combined with integrated programs of lifestyle modification. Bariatric surgery should be used in cases of morbid obesity or failure of non-surgical treatment. Surgical treatment leads to body mass index decrease, improvement of concomitant diseases and quality of life. Bariatric surgery also has a risk of side effects, which requires continuous monitoring of complications. For the treatment and prevention of obesity, children need a multidisciplinary approach involving different specialists.

  17. [Obesity and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron'ko, N D; Zak, K P

    2013-12-01

    New literature data and the results of own researches concerning the role of excessive body weight and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans are presented in the analytical review. Inaccordance with current insights, obesity and type 2 diabetes are considered diseases of inflammatory nature, characterized by systemic chronic low-grade inflammation, where different kinds of cytokines are cardinally involved. Unfavourable life style, i.e. excessive, high-energy, and irrational nutrition--an excessive consumption of animal fats and foods containing the high amount of glucose and starch with an insufficient use of high fiber vegetables, fish and vitamin D, and also sedentary, inactive life style leads to adipocyte hypertrophy and migration of M1 macrophages into the adipose tissue (AT). As a result, there is a low-grade inflammation accompanied by an increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, etc.), adipokines (leptin, resistin, visfatin etc.) and chemokines (CCL2, CCL5, CCL26 and CX3C). Under the influence of these cytokines, on the one hand, IR "is emerged", and on the other--there is apoptosis of the β-cells, that should be followed by the occurrence of clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes. However, there is also the opposite system in humans, protecting the organism from the development of type 2 diabetes, and including an increase in the formation of M2 macrophages and the increased formation of secretion of antidiabetic cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, etc.) and adiponectin.

  18. Maternal obesity alters fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and associated DNA methylation in mesenchymal stem cells from human infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen E. Boyle

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: These data suggest that greater infant adiposity is associated with suppressed AMPK activity and reduced lipid oxidation in MSCs from infants born to mothers with obesity and may be an important, early marker of underlying obesity risk.

  19. Neighborhoods, Schools and Obesity: The Potential for Place-Based Approaches to Reduce Childhood Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Elbel

    Full Text Available A common policy approach to reducing childhood obesity aims to shape the environment in which children spend most of their time: neighborhoods and schools. This paper uses richly detailed data on the body mass index (BMI of all New York City public school students in grades K-8 to assess the potential for place-based approaches to reduce child obesity. We document variation in the prevalence of obesity across NYC public schools and census tracts, and then estimate the extent to which this variation can be explained by differences in individual-level predictors (such as race and household income. Both unadjusted and adjusted variability across neighborhoods and schools suggest place-based policies have the potential to meaningfully reduce child obesity, but under most realistic scenarios the improvement would be modest.

  20. Overweight, obesity and underweight profile among adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adolescent overweight and obesity has more than quadrupled in the last three decades. This has been shown to co-exist with under nutrition. Associated social burden of these nutrition-related disorders including effect on self esteem, body image and economic morbidity should be of concern if a healthy and ...

  1. Childhood Obesity and the Right to Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ó Cathaoir, Katharina Eva

    2016-01-01

    on the CRC with a more systematic basis for advising and assessing preventive measures taken by states. Moreover, while the interim report envisages a central role for states in childhood obesity prevention, it pays inadequate attention to their obligations under international human rights law. It is hoped...

  2. Obesity and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Ejder Apay

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity; a state of being 20% over one’s normal weight due to excessive fat; that is, it is defined as the accumulation of too much fat in the body. The rate of obesity in the world has elevated. In the last two decades, it is considered that there have been increases in the rates of the obesity with changes in the socio-economic state and nutritional habits in Turkey as well as in modern western countries. The increase of the obesity is a matter of concern but the aspect which is much more matter of concern is in the increase of obesity in women at the reproductive age or gradually increasing rate of being overweight. If the pregnant woman is obese, most of the physiological changes occurring during pregnancy may be various. During their childbearing years, obese women are at an increased risk for pregnancy-induced hypertension, gestational diabetes, labour induction, caesareans births, and failed vaginal birth following to caesarean. Nurses should have the knowledge to adapt the care they provide according to this knowledge and encourage the pregnant women to acquire behaviours which will improve their health. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(4.000: 345-350

  3. Testosterone and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, D M; Jones, T H

    2015-07-01

    Testosterone is a key hormone in the pathology of metabolic diseases such as obesity. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased fat mass (particularly central adiposity) and reduced lean mass in males. These morphological features are linked to metabolic dysfunction, and testosterone deficiency is associated with energy imbalance, impaired glucose control, reduced insulin sensitivity and dyslipidaemia. A bidirectional relationship between testosterone and obesity underpins this association indicated by the hypogonadal-obesity cycle and evidence weight loss can lead to increased testosterone levels. Androgenic effects on enzymatic pathways of fatty acid metabolism, glucose control and energy utilization are apparent and often tissue specific with differential effects noted in different regional fat depots, muscle and liver to potentially explain the mechanisms of testosterone action. Testosterone replacement therapy demonstrates beneficial effects on measures of obesity that are partially explained by both direct metabolic actions on adipose and muscle and also potentially by increasing motivation, vigour and energy allowing obese individuals to engage in more active lifestyles. The degree of these beneficial effects may be dependent on the treatment modality with longer term administration often achieving greater improvements. Testosterone replacement may therefore potentially be an effective adjunctive treatment for weight management in obese men with concomitant hypogonadism. © 2015 World Obesity.

  4. Underestimation of Adolescent Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttenheim, Alison M.; Gol, Noreen; Pebley, Anne R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies assessing the validity of adolescent self-reported height and weight for estimating obesity prevalence have not accounted for potential bias due to non-response in self-reports. Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the implications of selective non-response in self-reports of height and weight for estimates of adolescent obesity. Methods The authors analyzed 613 adolescents ages 12-17 from the 2006-08 Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey, a longitudinal study of Los Angeles County households with an oversample of poor neighborhoods. Obesity prevalence estimates based on (1) self-report, (2) measured height and weight for those who did report, and (3) measured height and weight for those who did not report were compared. Results Among younger teens, measured obesity prevalence was higher for those who did not report height and weight compared to those who did (40% vs. 30). Consequently, obesity prevalence based on self-reported height and weight underestimated measured prevalence by 12 percentage points (when accounting for non-response) vs. 9 percentage points (when non-response was not accounted for). Results were robust to the choice of difference child growth references (i.e,, CDC vs. International Obesity Task Force). Discussion Adolescent obesity surveillance and prevention efforts must take into account selective non-response for self-reported height and weight, particularly for younger teens. Results should be replicated in a nationally-representative sample. PMID:23636345

  5. Obesity and blood cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djordje S. Popovic

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is the result of excessive accumulation of adipose tissue, and positive energy balance is the dominant cause of obesity. Obesity has reached pandemic proportions and represents a major global health issue. It contributes to the development of several major illnesses, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and various types of cancer. Excessive accumulation of visceral adipose tissue results in its altered secretory function. Hyperinsulinemia, lipid disorders, and chronic inflammation follow, providing an ideal environment for the initiation and promotion of cancer. Other disorders which are characteristic of obesity, such as alterations in the function of other endocrine systems and changes in microbiota, could also contribute to the elevated cancer risk. Hematological malignancies are forms of cancer originating from hematopoietic cells including cells of the immune system. Current data suggest a causal relationship between obesity and different forms of hematological malignancies. The major mechanisms linking obesity and blood cancers include changes in the secretion of adipokines and altered insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, and lipid signalling, as well as dyslipidemia and increased inflammatory activity. Identifying and understanding the definite pathways connecting obesity with the onset and progression of different forms of hematological malignancies could enable the implementation of various therapeutic interventions including simple dietary modifications, utilization of wellknown drugs used for other diseases (metformin, statins, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, as well as novel drugs directed against specific cellular targets.

  6. Treatment of adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Katharine S; Lister, Natalie B; Gow, Megan L; Baur, Louise A

    2018-04-13

    The increased prevalence of adolescent obesity and associated short-term and long-term complications emphasize the need for effective treatment. In this Review, we aim to describe the evidence for, and elements of, behaviour management and adjunctive therapies and highlight the opportunities and challenges presented by obesity management in adolescence. The broad principles of treatment include management of obesity-associated complications; a developmentally appropriate approach; long-term behaviour modification (dietary change, increased physical activity, decreased sedentary behaviours and improved sleep patterns); long-term weight maintenance strategies; and consideration of the use of pharmacotherapy, more intensive dietary therapies and bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery should be considered in those with severe obesity and be undertaken by skilled bariatric surgeons affiliated with teams experienced in the medical and psychosocial management of adolescents. Adolescent obesity management strategies are more reliant on active participation than those for childhood obesity and should recognize the emerging autonomy of the patient. The challenges in adolescent obesity relate primarily to the often competing demands of developing autonomy and not yet having attained neurocognitive maturity.

  7. Obesity and dietary behavioural changes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-05-31

    May 31, 2010 ... Keywords: obesity; dietary behavioural changes; weight loss; goal setting; evaluation; non-adherence; diet. Obesity: a growing concern. Obesity is complex because it is clearly a biological, psychological and social phenomenon. The increasing prevalence of obesity in many countries means that it should ...

  8. Diet-induced obesity in zebrafish shares common pathophysiological pathways with mammalian obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimada Yasuhito

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a multifactorial disorder influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Animal models of obesity are required to help us understand the signaling pathways underlying this condition. Zebrafish possess many structural and functional similarities with humans and have been used to model various human diseases, including a genetic model of obesity. The purpose of this study was to establish a zebrafish model of diet-induced obesity (DIO. Results Zebrafish were assigned into two dietary groups. One group of zebrafish was overfed with Artemia (60 mg dry weight/day/fish, a living prey consisting of a relatively high amount of fat. The other group of zebrafish was fed with Artemia sufficient to meet their energy requirements (5 mg dry weight/day/fish. Zebrafish were fed under these dietary protocols for 8 weeks. The zebrafish overfed with Artemia exhibited increased body mass index, which was calculated by dividing the body weight by the square of the body length, hypertriglyceridemia and hepatosteatosis, unlike the control zebrafish. Calorie restriction for 2 weeks was applied to zebrafish after the 8-week overfeeding period. The increased body weight and plasma triglyceride level were improved by calorie restriction. We also performed comparative transcriptome analysis of visceral adipose tissue from DIO zebrafish, DIO rats, DIO mice and obese humans. This analysis revealed that obese zebrafish and mammals share common pathophysiological pathways related to the coagulation cascade and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, several regulators were identified in zebrafish and mammals, including APOH, IL-6 and IL-1β in the coagulation cascade, and SREBF1, PPARα/γ, NR1H3 and LEP in lipid metabolism. Conclusion We established a zebrafish model of DIO that shared common pathophysiological pathways with mammalian obesity. The DIO zebrafish can be used to identify putative pharmacological targets and to test novel drugs for the

  9. [Obesity-hypoventilation syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzenblum, E; Kessler, R; Canuet, M; Chaouat, A

    2008-04-01

    The obesity-hypoventilation syndrome (OHS), or alveolar hypoventilation in the obese, has been described initially as the "Pickwickian syndrome". It is defined as chronic alveolar hypoventilation (PaO2 or =45 mmHg) in obese patients (body mass index>30 kg/m2) who have no other respiratory disease explaining the hypoxemia-hypercapnia. The large majority of obese subjects are not hypercapnic, even in case of severe obesity (>40 kg/m2). There are three principal causes, which can be associated, explaining alveolar hypoventilation in obese subjects: high cost of respiration and weakness of the respiratory muscles (probably the major cause), dysfunction of the respiratory centers with diminished chemosensitivity, long-term effects of the repeated episodes of obstructive sleep apneas observed in some patients. The role of leptin (hormone produced by adipocytes) in the pathogenesis of this syndrome, has been recently advocated. OHS is generally observed in subjects over 50 years. Its prevalence has markedly increased in recent years, probably due to the present "epidemic" of obesity. The diagnosis is often made after an episode of severe respiratory failure. Comorbidities, favored by obesity, are very frequent: systemic hypertension, left heart diseases, diabetes. OHS must be distinguished from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) even if the two conditions are often associated. OSAS may be absent in certain patients with OHS (20% of the patients in our experience). On the other hand obesity may be absent in certain patients with OSAS. Losing weight is the "ideal" treatment of OHS but in fact it cannot be obtained in most patients. Nocturnal ventilation (continuous positive airway pressure and mainly bilevel non invasive ventilation) is presently the best treatment of OHS and excellent short and long-term results on symptoms and arterial blood gases have been recently reported.

  10. Obesity Preserves Myocardial Function During Blockade of the Glycolytic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijon Henrique Salomé de Campos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is defined by excessive accumulation of body fat relative to lean tissue. Studies during the last few years indicate that cardiac function in obese animals may be preserved, increased or diminished. Objective: Study the energy balance of the myocardium with the hypothesis that the increase in fatty acid oxidation and reduced glucose leads to cardiac dysfunction in obesity. Methods: 30-day-old male Wistar rats were fed standard and hypercaloric diet for 30 weeks. Cardiac function and morphology were assessed. In this paper was viewed the general characteristics and comorbities associated to obesity. The structure cardiac was determined by weights of the heart and left ventricle (LV. Myocardial function was evaluated by studying isolated papillary muscles from the LV, under the baseline condition and after inotropic and lusitropic maneuvers: myocardial stiffness; postrest contraction; increase in extracellular Ca2+ concentration; change in heart rate and inhibitor of glycolytic pathway. Results: Compared with control group, the obese rats had increased body fat and co-morbities associated with obesity. Functional assessment after blocking iodoacetate shows no difference in the linear regression of DT, however, the RT showed a statistically significant difference in behavior between the control and the obese group, most notable being the slope in group C. Conclusion: The energy imbalance on obesity did not cause cardiac dysfunction. On the contrary, the prioritization of fatty acids utilization provides protection to cardiac muscle during the inhibition of glycolysis, suggesting that this pathway is fewer used by obese cardiac muscle.

  11. Obesity Preserves Myocardial Function During Blockade of the Glycolytic Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé de, E-mail: dijoncampos@gmail.com [Departamento de Clínica Médica - Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu da Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Leopoldo, André Soares; Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula [Departamento de Esportes - Centro de Educação Física e Desportos da Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Vitória, ES (Brazil); Nascimento, André Ferreira do [Instituto de Ciências da Saúde da Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (UFMT), Sinop, MT (Brazil); Oliveira-Junior, Silvio Assis de [Escola de Fisioterapia da Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Silva, Danielle Cristina Tomaz da [Departamento de Clínica Médica - Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu da Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Sugizaki, Mario Mateus [Instituto de Ciências da Saúde da Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (UFMT), Sinop, MT (Brazil); Padovani, Carlos Roberto [Departamento de Bioestatística, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas da Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Cicogna, Antonio Carlos, E-mail: dijoncampos@gmail.com [Departamento de Clínica Médica - Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu da Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Obesity is defined by excessive accumulation of body fat relative to lean tissue. Studies during the last few years indicate that cardiac function in obese animals may be preserved, increased or diminished. Study the energy balance of the myocardium with the hypothesis that the increase in fatty acid oxidation and reduced glucose leads to cardiac dysfunction in obesity. 30-day-old male Wistar rats were fed standard and hypercaloric diet for 30 weeks. Cardiac function and morphology were assessed. In this paper was viewed the general characteristics and comorbities associated to obesity. The structure cardiac was determined by weights of the heart and left ventricle (LV). Myocardial function was evaluated by studying isolated papillary muscles from the LV, under the baseline condition and after inotropic and lusitropic maneuvers: myocardial stiffness; postrest contraction; increase in extracellular Ca2+ concentration; change in heart rate and inhibitor of glycolytic pathway. Compared with control group, the obese rats had increased body fat and co-morbities associated with obesity. Functional assessment after blocking iodoacetate shows no difference in the linear regression of DT, however, the RT showed a statistically significant difference in behavior between the control and the obese group, most notable being the slope in group C. The energy imbalance on obesity did not cause cardiac dysfunction. On the contrary, the prioritization of fatty acids utilization provides protection to cardiac muscle during the inhibition of glycolysis, suggesting that this pathway is fewer used by obese cardiac muscle.

  12. Pediatric obesity: Current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greydanus, Donald E; Agana, Marisha; Kamboj, Manmohan K; Shebrain, Saad; Soares, Neelkamal; Eke, Ransome; Patel, Dilip R

    2018-04-01

    This discussion reflects on concepts of obesity in children and adolescents in the early 21st century. It includes reflections on its history, definition, epidemiology, diagnostic perspectives, psychosocial considerations, musculoskeletal complications, endocrine complications and principles of management. In addition to emphasis on diet and exercise, research and clinical applications in the second decade of the 21 st century emphasize the increasing use of pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery for adolescent and adult populations with critical problems of overweight and obesity. We conclude with a discussion of future directions in pediatric obesity management. Copyright © 2018 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Psoriasis and Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Skov, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex pathogenesis consisting of a genetic component, immune dysfunction, and environmental factors. It is associated with numerous comorbidities including psoriatic arthritis, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and obesity....... Evidence suggests that obesity is a risk factor for incident psoriasis, aggravates existing psoriasis, and that weight reduction may improve the severity of psoriasis in overweight individuals. Excess body weight may interfere with the medical treatment used in psoriasis and adds to the cardiovascular risk...... profile in these patients, which underscores the importance of effective weight control regimens. In this review we examine the current literature with regard to the association between obesity and psoriasis....

  14. Recent Progress in the Understanding of Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mette Korre; Sandholt, Camilla Helene

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007, discovery of genetic variants associated with general obesity and fat distribution has advanced tremendously through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Currently, the number of robustly associated loci is 190. Even though these loci explain ... in specific tissues have the power to suggest biological mechanisms underlying obesity. Inspired by this, we highlight genes in five loci potentially mechanistically linked to leptin-receptor trafficking and signaling in primary cilia. The clinical application of genetic knowledge as prediction, prevention......, or treatment strategies is unfortunately still far from reality. Thus, despite major advances, further research is warranted to solve one of the greatest health problems in modern society....

  15. Neuropsychiatric comorbidity in obesity: role of inflammatory processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eCastanon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric symptoms are frequent in obesity. In addition to their substantial economic and health impact, these symptoms significantly interfere with the quality of life and social function of obese individuals. While the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying obesity-related neuropsychiatric symptoms are still under investigation and remain to be clearly identified, there is increasing evidence for a role of inflammatory processes. Obesity is characterized by a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that is likely to influence neuropsychiatric status given the well-known and highly documented effects of inflammation on brain activity/function and behavior. This hypothesis is supported by recent findings emanating from clinical investigations in obese subjects and from experimentations conducted in animal models of obesity. These studies converge to show that obesity-related inflammatory processes, originating either from the adipose tissue or gut microbiota environment, spread to the brain where they lead to substantial changes in neurocircuitry, neuroendocrine activity, neurotransmitter metabolism and activity, and neurogenesis. Together, these alterations contribute to shape the propitious bases for the development of obesity-related neuropsychiatric comorbidities.

  16. Childhood obesity: causes and consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Krushnapriya; Sahoo, Bishnupriya; Choudhury, Ashok Kumar; Sofi, Nighat Yasin; Kumar, Raman; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in developed as well as in developing countries. Overweight and obesity in childhood are known to have significant impact on both physical and psychological health. Overweight and obese children are likely to stay obese into adulthood and more likely to develop non-communicable diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a younger age. The mechanism of obesity development is not fully understood and it is believed to be a disorder with m...

  17. The Psychological problems of Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Mašková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to summarize findings of causes and consequences of obesity, the most common health problem in the world. The theoretical part deals with many key issues of obesity, from definition through the epidemiology, etiology and obesity prevention and treatment. However the main topics of this thesis are the psychological characteristics that are associated with obesity. It includes personality factors of obese people, willpower and self-control and specific psychopathology....

  18. Obesity: modern man's fertility nemesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabler, Stephanie; Agarwal, Ashok; Flint, Margot; du Plessis, Stefan S

    2010-07-01

    The obesity pandemic has grown to concerning proportions in recent years, not only in the Western World, but in developing countries as well. The corresponding decrease in male fertility and fecundity may be explained in parallel to obesity, and obesity should be considered as an etiology of male fertility. Studies show that obesity contributes to infertility by reducing semen quality, changing sperm proteomes, contributing to erectile dysfunction, and inducing other physical problems related to obesity. Mechanisms for explaining the effect of obesity on male infertility include abnormal reproductive hormone levels, an increased release of adipose-derived hormones and adipokines associated with obesity, and other physical problems including sleep apnea and increased scrotal temperatures. Recently, genetic factors and markers for an obesity-related infertility have been discovered and may explain the difference between fertile obese and infertile obese men. Treatments are available for not only infertility related to obesity, but also as a treatment for the other comorbidities arising from obesity. Natural weight loss, as well as bariatric surgery are options for obese patients and have shown promising results in restoring fertility and normal hormonal profiles. Therapeutic interventions including aromatase inhibitors, exogenous testosterone replacement therapy and maintenance and regulation of adipose-derived hormones, particularly leptin, may also be able to restore fertility in obese males. Because of the relative unawareness and lack of research in this area, controlled studies should be undertaken and more focus should be given to obesity as an etiolgy of male infertility.

  19. Homeostatic theory of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Marks

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Health is regulated by homeostasis, a property of all living things. Homeostasis maintains equilibrium at set-points using feedback loops for optimum functioning of the organism. Imbalances in homeostasis causing overweight and obesity are evident in more than 1 billion people. In a new theory, homeostatic obesity imbalance is attributed to a hypothesized ‘Circle of Discontent’, a system of feedback loops linking weight gain, body dissatisfaction, negative affect and over-consumption. The Circle of Discontent theory is consistent with an extensive evidence base. A four-armed strategy to halt the obesity epidemic consists of (1 putting a stop to victim-blaming, stigma and discrimination; (2 devalorizing the thin-ideal; (3 reducing consumption of energy-dense, low-nutrient foods and drinks; and (4 improving access to plant-based diets. If fully implemented, interventions designed to restore homeostasis have the potential to halt the obesity epidemic.

  20. Homeostatic theory of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, David F

    2015-01-01

    Health is regulated by homeostasis, a property of all living things. Homeostasis maintains equilibrium at set-points using feedback loops for optimum functioning of the organism. Imbalances in homeostasis causing overweight and obesity are evident in more than 1 billion people. In a new theory, homeostatic obesity imbalance is attributed to a hypothesized 'Circle of Discontent', a system of feedback loops linking weight gain, body dissatisfaction, negative affect and over-consumption. The Circle of Discontent theory is consistent with an extensive evidence base. A four-armed strategy to halt the obesity epidemic consists of (1) putting a stop to victim-blaming, stigma and discrimination; (2) devalorizing the thin-ideal; (3) reducing consumption of energy-dense, low-nutrient foods and drinks; and (4) improving access to plant-based diets. If fully implemented, interventions designed to restore homeostasis have the potential to halt the obesity epidemic.

  1. The obese pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, A H

    2016-09-01

    Weight gain in pregnancy is physiological but if a woman is overweight prior to pregnancy, this will put both women and foetus at risk of adverse complications. Obesity can affect women at all the stages of pregnancy. Obese women can be a cause of reduced fertility as compared to a normal weight woman, and a typical example is of the Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). The incidence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus ,hypertension and preeclamsia is 2-3 folds higher in obesity particularly with a BMI of> 30kg/m2. The chances of thromboembolism, miscarriage, Caesarian - section and stillbirth are increased as well. Perinatal mortality, increased chances of genetic disorders of the foetus and macrosomia are all increased with obesity. To avoid all these complications health education regarding healthy life style and diet with regular moderate intensity exercise is the cornerstone of the management.

  2. Obesity and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranab Baruwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. The prevalence of asthma is around 300 million and is expected to increase another 100 million by 2025. Obesity, on the other hand, also affects a large number of individuals. Overweight in adults is defined when body mass index (BMI is between 25 to 30 kg/m 2 and obesity when the BMI >30 kg/m 2 . It has been a matter of interest for researchers to find a relation between these two conditions. This knowledge will provide a new insight into the management of both conditions. At present, obese asthma patients may be considered a special category and it is important to assess the impact of management of obesity on asthma symptoms.

  3. Reducing Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 90-minute instructional sessions. We Can! is unique among existing youth obesity-prevention initiatives because it focuses its activities and education on parents and caregivers—the primary group influencing children and adolescents. Joining in this effort with the ...

  4. Obesity and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nchs/nhis/shs/tables.htm CHILDREN Percentage of obesity among children and adolescents 6–11 years of age, 2011- ... ADOLESCENTS Percentage of high school students who were overweight, 2015 Black White Black / White Ratio Girls 21. ...

  5. Obesity in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. Both terms mean ... know when a child has obesity or is overweight. Ask your health care provider to check whether ...

  6. Obesity and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hus16.pdf [PDF | 11.14MB] CHILDREN Percentage of obesity among children and adolescents 6-11 years of age, 2011- ... ADOLESCENTS Percentage of high school students who were overweight, 2015 Hispanic White Hispanic / White Ratio Girls 20. ...

  7. Health risks of obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart disease and type 2 diabetes. People with "apple-shaped" bodies (waist is bigger than the hips) ... Obesity Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  8. Homeostatic theory of obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Health is regulated by homeostasis, a property of all living things. Homeostasis maintains equilibrium at set-points using feedback loops for optimum functioning of the organism. Imbalances in homeostasis causing overweight and obesity are evident in more than 1 billion people. In a new theory, homeostatic obesity imbalance is attributed to a hypothesized ‘Circle of Discontent’, a system of feedback loops linking weight gain, body dissatisfaction, negative affect and over-consumption. The Circle of Discontent theory is consistent with an extensive evidence base. A four-armed strategy to halt the obesity epidemic consists of (1) putting a stop to victim-blaming, stigma and discrimination; (2) devalorizing the thin-ideal; (3) reducing consumption of energy-dense, low-nutrient foods and drinks; and (4) improving access to plant-based diets. If fully implemented, interventions designed to restore homeostasis have the potential to halt the obesity epidemic. PMID:28070357

  9. Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2013;62(15):1309–1319. Lloyd LJ, Langley-Evans SC, McMullen S. Childhood obesity and risk of the ... et al. Association of depression and health related quality of life with body composition in children and ...

  10. Pharmacological treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Marcio C; Halpern, Alfredo

    2006-04-01

    This review offers an overview of physiological agents, current therapeutics, as well as medications, which have been extensively used and those agents not currently available or non-classically considered anti-obesity drugs. As obesity - particularly that of central distribution - represents an important triggering factor for insulin resistance, its pharmacological treatment is relevant in the context of metabolic syndrome control. The authors present an extensive review on the criteria for anti-obesity management efficacy, on physiological mechanisms that regulate central and/or peripheral energy homeostasis (nutrients, monoamines, and peptides), on beta-phenethylamine pharmacological derivative agents (fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine, phentermine and sibutramine), tricyclic derivatives (mazindol), phenylpropanolamine derivatives (ephedrin, phenylpropanolamine), phenylpropanolamine oxytrifluorphenyl derivative (fluoxetine), a naftilamine derivative (sertraline) and a lipstatine derivative (orlistat). An analysis of all clinical trials - over ten-week long - is also presented for medications used in the management of obesity, as well as data about future medications, such as a the inverse cannabinoid agonist, rimonabant.

  11. Sexual function and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S H; Wagner, G; Heitmann, B L

    2007-01-01

    function and dysfunction. COMMENTS: Four prospective and seven cross-sectional studies were found describing association between obesity and erectile dysfunction (ED). One cross-sectional study was found describing obesity and female sexual dysfunction (FSD). The prospective studies on ED all demonstrated......OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on the relationship between obesity and sexual function. METHOD: A search in the medical literature from 1966 and onwards was carried out through Medline and Embase for publications on obesity, in combination with Medical Subject Heading words related to sexual...... a direct association and so did five of the seven cross-sectional studies. The single FSD study did not find any relationship. Eight intervention studies on weight loss and sexual difficulties were identified. All included few individuals and results were mixed even if most indicated an increase of sexual...

  12. Obesity and Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 12.4 0.4 Source: High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data. Available at http://nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline . [Accessed 08/18/2017] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY People who are overweight are more likely to ...

  13. Evaluation of the overweight/obese child--practical tips for the primary health care provider: recommendations from the Childhood Obesity Task Force of the European Association for the Study of Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer L; Farpour-Lambert, Nathalie J; Nowicka, Paulina

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents is on the rise. The majority of overweight or obese children are treated by primary health care providers including paediatricians, family practitioners, dieticians, nurses, and school health services - and not by specialists. The majority...... of obese children have no underlying medical disorder causing their obesity yet a significant proportion might suffer from obesity-related co-morbidities. This text is aimed at providing simple and practical tools for the identification and management of children with or at risk of overweight and obesity...... in the primary care setting. The tips and tools provided are based on data from the recent body of work that has been published in this field, official statements of several scientific societies along with expert opinion provided by the members of the Childhood Obesity Task Force (COTF) of the European...

  14. Childhood Obesity PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-06

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the August 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. The rate of obesity among low-income preschoolers has declined, but one in eight is still obese. This program briefly discusses what can be done.  Created: 8/6/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/6/2013.

  15. Cultivating childhood obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Greene-Martin, DeCleasha

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the levels of obesity in the United States has risen greatly especially amongst children. Doctors, psychologists, and other scientists have been studying the growing problem for years. Implications for childhood obesity not only have enormous physical consequences but emotional repercussions which can affect the child’s academic and social development. A number of factors have been identified as having an effect on these children; family life reveals the grocery store habits o...

  16. Obesity and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on obesity in women and girls. It discusses obesity-related health risks and includes tips to help achieve and maintain a healthy weight.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  17. Maternal obesity and preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Azar Aghamohammadi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a modern day epidemic. The incidence appears to be rapidly increasing in bothdeveloped and developing countries and has become much more obvious in the last decade.Aim& Objective: The present research was done with the aim of studying the effects of obesity definedas a first trimester maternal body mass index >30 on the preeclampsia.Methods: This study was a descriptive-comparative study two hundred fifty singleton pregnancies ofwomen with first trimester BMI >30 who de...

  18. Starches, Sugars and Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Aller, Erik E. J. G.; Abete, Itziar; Astrup, Arne; Martinez, J. Alfredo; van Baak, Marleen A.

    2011-01-01

    The rising prevalence of obesity, not only in adults but also in children and adolescents, is one of the most important public health problems in developed and developing countries. As one possible way to tackle obesity, a great interest has been stimulated in understanding the relationship between different types of dietary carbohydrate and appetite regulation, body weight and body composition. The present article reviews the conclusions from recent reviews and meta-analyses on the effects o...

  19. Pharmacological treatment of obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Mancini, Marcio C.; Halpern, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    This review offers an overview of physiological agents, current therapeutics, as well as medications, which have been extensively used and those agents not currently available or non-classically considered anti-obesity drugs. As obesity - particularly that of central distribution - represents an important triggering factor for insulin resistance, its pharmacological treatment is relevant in the context of metabolic syndrome control. The authors present an extensive review on the criteria for ...

  20. [Obesity and male fertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Ana C; Molina, Rosa I; Ruiz, Rubén D; Fiol de Cuneo, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and male infertility have increased in the last decades; therefore, a possible association between these pathologies has been explored. Studies inform that obesity may affect fertility through different mechanisms, which alltogether could exert erectile dysfunction and/or sperm quality impairment. These include: 1) hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPG) axis malfunction: obese hormonal profile is characterized by reduction of testosterone, gonadotrophins, SHBG and/or inhibin B concentrations (marker of Sertoli cells function) and hyperestrogenemy (consequence of aromatase overactivity ascribed to adipose tissue increase); 2) increased release of adipose-derived hormones: leptin increase could be responsible for some of the alterations on the HPG axis and could also exert direct deleterious effects on Leydig cells physiology, spermatogenesis and sperm function; 3) proinflammatory adipokines augmentation, higher scrotal temperature (due to fat accumulation in areas surrounding testes) and endocrine disruptors accumulation in adiposites, all of these responsible for the increase in testes oxidative stress and 4) sleep apnea, frequent in obese patients, suppresses the nocturnal testosterone rise needed for normal spermatogenesis. Finally, although controversial, all the above mentioned factors could comprise gametes quality; i.e. decrease sperm density and motility and increase DNA fragmentation, probably disturbing spermatogenesis and/or epididymal function. In summary, although obesity may impair male fertility by some/all of the described mechanisms, the fact is that only a small proportion of obese men are infertile, probably those genetically predisposed or morbidly obese. Nevertheless, it is likely that because the incidence of obesity is growing, the number of men with reduced fertility will increase as well.

  1. Iron metabolism in obesity: how interaction between homoeostatic mechanisms can interfere with their original purpose. Part I: underlying homoeostatic mechanisms of energy storage and iron metabolisms and their interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Christiane; Orozco, Mónica; Solomons, Noel W; Schümann, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Adipose tissue plasticity mediated by inflammation is an important evolutionary achievement to survive seasonal climate changes. It permits to store excessive calories and to release them if required, using inflammatory cells to remove the debris. This process is regulated by a complex interaction of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6), adipokines (adiponectin, apelin, liptin), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin) and transcription factors (NF-κB, HIF-1α). Iron mediates electron transfer as an essential component of e.g. myeloperoxidase, hemoglobin, cytochrome C and ribonucleotide reductase. Conversely, unbound iron can catalyze oxidation of lipids, proteins, and DNA. To balance the essential with the potentially toxic function requires an efficient iron homoeostasis. This is mediated by hepcidin's interaction with the iron-exporter ferroportin, to adapt intestinal iron absorption and body iron-sequestration to changes in demand. In addition, the interaction of iron-responsive elements (IRE) and iron-responsive proteins (IRP), the IRE/IRP-mechanism, regulates cellular iron homoeostasis. Obesity-induced inflammation interacts with both these mechanisms and disturbs iron availability by impairing its absorption, and by sequestering it in the reticuloendothelial system. Both mechanisms lead to anemia and reduce physical fitness which, in a vicious cycle, can support the development of pathological obesity. Thus, interaction between these two sets of beneficial regulatory mechanisms can become detrimental in situations of ample calorie supply. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung Mook

    2016-11-01

    Sarcopenia is an age-associated loss of muscle mass and decline in muscle strength; it is common in older adults and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite its prevalence, there is currently no universally adopted definition of sarcopenia. In addition to low muscle mass measurements, recent research has recognized the importance of muscle strength and physical performance. Aging induces changes in body composition, such as an increase in visceral fat and reduced muscle mass. Recently, the new concept of sarcopenic obesity has emerged, reflecting a combination of sarcopenia and obesity. The rapidly increasing prevalence and serious consequences of sarcopenic obesity are recognized as a critical public health risk in the aging society. Sarcopenia and obesity share several pathophysiological mechanisms, and they may potentiate each other. The present paper reviews the definitions and techniques used to measure sarcopenia, as well as the health outcomes of sarcopenic obesity. It also highlights the role of diminished muscle mass and strength in cardiometabolic disease mortality. Additional research may be needed to promote the identification and management of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity in the elderly population.

  3. Underestimation of adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttenheim, Alison M; Goldman, Noreen; Pebley, Anne R

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies assessing the validity of adolescent self-reported height and weight for estimating obesity prevalence have not accounted for, potential bias due to nonresponse in self-reports. The aim of this study was to assess the implications of selective nonresponse in self-reports of height and weight for estimates of adolescent obesity. The authors analyzed 613 adolescents ages 12-17 years from the 2006-2008 Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey, a longitudinal study of Los Angeles County households with an oversample of poor neighborhoods. Obesity prevalence estimates were compared based on (a) self-report, (b) measured height and weight for those who did report, and (c) measured height and weight for those who did report. Among younger teens, measured obesity prevalence was higher for those who did not report height and weight compared with those who did (40% vs. 30%). Consequently, obesity prevalence based on self-reported height and weight underestimated measured prevalence by 12 percentage points (when accounting for nonresponse) versus 9 percentage points (when nonresponse was not accounted for). Results were robust to the choice of difference child growth references. Adolescent obesity surveillance and prevention efforts must take into account selective nonresponse for self-reported height and weight, particularly for younger teens. Results should be replicated in a nationally representative sample.

  4. Childhood obesity case statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Paul W; Caskey, Paul; Heaton, Lisa E; Otsuka, Norman

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this publication is to raise awareness of the impact of childhood obesity on the musculoskeletal health of children and its potential long-term implications. Relevant articles dealing with musculoskeletal disorders either caused by or worsened by childhood obesity were reviewed through a Pub Med search. Efforts to recognize and combat the childhood obesity epidemic were also identified through Internet search engines. This case statement was then reviewed by the members of the pediatric specialty group of the US Bone and Joint Initiative, which represents an extensive number of organizations dealing with musculoskeletal health. Multiple musculoskeletal disorders are clearly caused by or worsened by childhood obesity. The review of the literature clearly demonstrates the increased frequency and severity of many childhood musculoskeletal disorders. Concerns about the long-term implications of these childhood onset disorders such as pain and degenerative changes into adulthood are clearly recognized by all the member organizations of the US Bone and Joint Initiative. It is imperative to recognize the long-term implications of musculoskeletal disorders caused by or worsened by childhood obesity. It is also important to recognize that the ability to exercise comfortably is a key factor to developing a healthy lifestyle and maintaining a healthy body weight. Efforts to develop reasonable and acceptable programs to increase physical activity by all facets of society should be supported. Further research into the long-term implications of childhood musculoskeletal disorders related to childhood obesity is necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Psoriasis and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ali Gürer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has been thought that a strong association exists between metabolic syndrome, specifically obesity, and psoriasis. Obesity is a multifactorial disease affected by both genetic and environmental factors. Adipokines (e.g. leptin secreted by the adipose tissue are believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. The main role of leptin is to adjust metabolism by controlling appetite. Serum leptin levels in patients with severe and moderate psoriasis were found to be higher than in normal control groups. In many similar studies, leptin secretion has been found to stimulate keratinocyte proliferation, which is one of the characteristics of psoriasis. Although many studies showed increased prevalence of obesity in psoriasis patients, few others reported development of obesity in psoriasis patients. Additionally, obesity was found to affect treatment responses not only in classical systemic/topical treatment approaches in psoriasis, but also in newer biological treatments. Overall, increasing epidemiological evidence suggests strong association between obesity and psoriasis, increase in serum leptin levels is thought to have a major role, and weight loss may have significant impact on response to treatment.

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Aline Haas; Costa, Ana Beatriz; Engel, Jéssica Della Giustina; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza

    2018-01-01

    Obesity leads to various changes in the body. Among them, the existing inflammatory process may lead to an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, in turn, can trigger mitochondrial changes, which is called mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, excess nutrients supply (as it commonly is the case with obesity) can overwhelm the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain, causing a mitochondrial dysfunction, and lead to a higher ROS formation. This increase in ROS production by the respiratory chain may also cause oxidative stress, which may exacerbate the inflammatory process in obesity. All these intracellular changes can lead to cellular apoptosis. These processes have been described in obesity as occurring mainly in peripheral tissues. However, some studies have already shown that obesity is also associated with changes in the central nervous system (CNS), with alterations in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and in cerebral structures such as hypothalamus and hippocampus. In this sense, this review presents a general view about mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity, including related alterations, such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis, and focusing on the whole organism, covering alterations in peripheral tissues, BBB, and CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Obesity: Current Global and Russian Trends].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razina, A O; Runenko, S D; Achkasov, E E

    2016-01-01

    The review of literature presents the results of recent epidemiological studies in obese people in Russia and abroad taking into account gender, age, ethnic, social, and geographicalfactors. The increase of obesity prevalence among different population groups including children and adolescents was registered. The risks of health problems associated with overweight and obesity probably leading to disability and mortality were analyzed. It was shown that the energy imbalance played a key role in the etiopathogenesis of obesity among many other factors. This occurs as a consequence of discrepancy between energy consumption and energy discharge especially under the conditions of hypokinesia in all spheres of modern life. Particular attention was paid to the analysis of environmental factors, increasing urbanization, and socio-economic conditions of modern life. The fundamental importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the development of prevention and treatment and rehabilitation programs was accentuated. The attention was paid to the role of economic factors in the development of carbohydrate metabolism disorders. The important role of the goverment was shown in the development of health improvement programs including improvement of the environmental situation, change in anthropogenic environment due to physical activity. The preferred direction of comprehensive programs ofprevention and treatment of obesity were defined including optimization of the motor regime, diet correction, increasing the motivation to healthy lifestyle, physical education and sports, as well as increasing the individual's personal responsibility for their health.

  8. The relationship between obesity and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rabiei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity as a pervasive phenomenon in recent years has the risky consequences on public and oral health and endangers the teeth especially periodontal tissues. This aim of this study was to assess the relationship of oral health (teeth and periodontal tissue with obesity and anthropometric measures such as waist circumference (WC and body mass index (BMI. Materials &Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted on 180 subjects in 3 groups of normal weight, over-weight and obese. Periodontal pocket depth (PPD, bleeding on probing (BOP and Community Periodontal Index (CPI were recorded.  Multivariate logistic regression was also applied after adjusting for the confounding factors. Results: Of 180 subjects, 54, 68 and 58 cases were normal, overweight and obese. 75 and 105 participants were male and female, respectively. Generally, a pocket depth was increased 1.394 times with one unit increase of BMI (OR: 1.394, 95% CI: 0.936-2.077. Dental caries index enhanced to 1.036 with one unit increase of waist circumference (WC (OR: 1.036, 95% CI: 1.001-1.071. One centimeter rise of WC increased CPI up to 0.625 times (OR: 1.122, 95% CI: 0.053-0.078. Conclusion: Obesity even in the absence of underlying systemic diseases can cause the potential risk in oral health.

  9. Under Under Under / Merit Kask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kask, Merit

    2006-01-01

    20. nov. esietendub Kumu auditooriumis MTÜ Ühenduse R.A.A.A.M teatriprojekt "Under" poetess Marie Underist. Lavastajad Merle Karusoo ja Raimo Pass, kunstnik Jaagup Roomet, helilooja Urmas Lattikas, peaosas Katrin Saukas

  10. The meaning of providing caring to obese patients to a group of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilly Souza Marques

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study was performed with six nurses of a public hospital, with the objective to describe their view of the meaning of providing care to obese patients. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured script. The data were organized under themes extracted from the subjects’ statements, after being thoroughly read. Symbolic Interactionism was adopted to interpret the findings. The results from the analysis were organized under the following themes: Being obese is excessive, it is not healthy; Providing care to the obese is a structural issue; Obese patients are troublesome, they require care, no big deal; Providing care to the obese requires teamwork. The grasped meanings can interfere in the care provided. The nurses, however, recognize the need to work as a team to deliver comprehensive care. Making positive changes to the meanings found in this study is possible, thus, contributing to providing prejudice-free nursing care to obese patients. Descriptors: Obesity; Nursing Care; Hospital Care.

  11. Childhood obesity: what can be done to help today's youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Linda L

    2005-01-01

    Childhood obesity is at epidemic proportions in the United States today. This epidemic has created a public health crisis. Although several initiatives are under way to address childhood obesity, including legislative bills before Congress and a call by the National Academy of Sciences for society to band together to stop the rise in the rates of childhood obesity, none of these efforts address what can be done today to help those youth that are considered morbidly obese and who have failed to find solutions with the standard medical treatment plan. This article discusses the use of bariatric surgery as a possible solution, presents a case study to illustrate the impact bariatric surgery can have on youth who are morbidly obese, and defines the pediatric nurse's role in helping to assure that youth are included in the current legislative process.

  12. Persistent Organic Pollutants as Risk Factors for Obesity and Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunxue; Kong, Alice Pik Shan; Cai, Zongwei; Chung, Arthur C K

    2017-11-02

    The rising prevalence of obesity and diabetes cannot be fully explained by known risk factors, such as unhealthy diet, a sedentary lifestyle, and family history. This review summarizes the available studies linking persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to obesity and diabetes and discusses plausible underlying mechanisms. Increasing evidence suggest that POPs may act as obesogens and diabetogens to promote the development of obesity and diabetes and induce metabolic dysfunction. POPs are synthesized chemicals and are used widely in our daily life. These chemicals are resistant to degradation in chemical or biological processes, which enable them to exist in the environment persistently and to be bio-accumulated in animal and human tissue through the food chain. Increasingly, epidemiologic studies suggest a positive association between POPs and risk of developing diabetes. Understanding the relationship of POPs with obesity and diabetes may shed light on preventive strategies for obesity and diabetes.

  13. The Link Between Inadequate Sleep and Obesity in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Perla A

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically over the past decade. Although an imbalance between caloric intake and physical activity is considered a key factor responsible for the increase, there is emerging evidence suggesting that other factors may be important contributors to weight gain, including inadequate sleep. Overall research evidence suggests that inadequate sleep is associated with obesity. Importantly, the strength and trajectory of the association seem to be influenced by multiple factors including age. Although limited, the emerging evidence suggests young adults might be at the center of a "perfect health storm," exposing them to the highest risk for obesity and inadequate sleep. Unfortunately, the methods necessary for elucidating the complex relationship between sleep and obesity are lacking. Uncovering the underlying factors and trajectories between inadequate sleep and weight gain in different populations may help to identify the windows of susceptibility and to design targeted interventions to prevent the negative impact of obesity and related diseases.

  14. Similarities between obesity in pets and children: the addiction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretlow, Robert A; Corbee, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Obesity in pets is a frustrating, major health problem. Obesity in human children is similar. Prevailing theories accounting for the rising obesity rates - for example, poor nutrition and sedentary activity - are being challenged. Obesity interventions in both pets and children have produced modest short-term but poor long-term results. New strategies are needed. A novel theory posits that obesity in pets and children is due to 'treats' and excessive meal amounts given by the 'pet-parent' and child-parent to obtain affection from the pet/child, which enables 'eating addiction' in the pet/child and results in parental 'co-dependence'. Pet-parents and child-parents may even become hostage to the treats/food to avoid the ire of the pet/child. Eating addiction in the pet/child also may be brought about by emotional factors such as stress, independent of parental co-dependence. An applicable treatment for child obesity has been trialled using classic addiction withdrawal/abstinence techniques, as well as behavioural addiction methods, with significant results. Both the child and the parent progress through withdrawal from specific 'problem foods', next from snacking (non-specific foods) and finally from excessive portions at meals (gradual reductions). This approach should adapt well for pets and pet-parents. Pet obesity is more 'pure' than child obesity, in that contributing factors and treatment points are essentially under the control of the pet-parent. Pet obesity might thus serve as an ideal test bed for the treatment and prevention of child obesity, with focus primarily on parental behaviours. Sharing information between the fields of pet and child obesity would be mutually beneficial.

  15. The contribution of genetics and environment to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, David; Nóbrega, Clévio; Manco, Licínio; Padez, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Obesity is a global health problem mainly attributed to lifestyle changes such as diet, low physical activity or socioeconomics factors. However, several evidences consistently showed that genetics contributes significantly to the weight-gain susceptibility. A systematic literature search of most relevant original, review and meta-analysis, restricted to English was conducted in PubMed, Web of Science and Google scholar up to May 2017 concerning the contribution of genetics and environmental factors to obesity. Several evidences suggest that obesogenic environments contribute to the development of an obese phenotype. However, not every individual from the same population, despite sharing the same obesogenic environment, develop obesity. After more than 10 years of investigation on the genetics of obesity, the variants found associated with obesity represent only 3% of the estimated BMI-heritability, which is around 47-80%. Moreover, genetic factors per se were unable to explain the rapid spread of obesity prevalence. The integration of multi-omics data enables scientists having a better picture and to elucidate unknown pathways contributing to obesity. New studies based on case-control or gene candidate approach will be important to identify new variants associated with obesity susceptibility and consequently unveiling its genetic architecture. This will lead to an improvement of our understanding about underlying mechanisms involved in development and origin of the actual obesity epidemic. The integration of several omics will also provide insights about the interplay between genes and environments contributing to the obese phenotype. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Obesity: Update 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Samuele; Tessari, Luca

    2017-01-01

    While psychiatric comorbidities of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been extensively explored, less attention has been paid to somatic conditions possibly associated with this disorder. However, mounting evidence in the last decade pointed to a possible significant association between ADHD and certain somatic conditions, including obesity. This papers provides an update of a previous systematic review on the relationship between obesity and ADHD (Cortese and Vincenzi, Curr Top Behav Neurosci 9:199-218, 2012), focusing on pertinent peer-reviewed empirical papers published since 2012. We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, Ovid, and Web of Knowledge databases (search dates: from January 1st, 2012, to July 16th, 2016). We retained a total of 41 studies, providing information on the prevalence of obesity in individuals with ADHD, focusing on the rates of ADHD in individuals with obesity, or reporting data useful to gain insight into possible mechanisms underlying the putative association between ADHD and obesity. Overall, over the past 4 years, an increasing number of studies have assessed the prevalence of obesity in individuals with ADHD or the rates of ADHD in patients with obesity. Although findings are mixed across individual studies, meta-analytic evidence shows a significant association between ADHD and obesity, regardless of possible confounding factors such as psychiatric comorbidities. An increasing number of studies have also addressed possible mechanisms underlying the link between ADHD and obesity, highlighting the role, among others, of abnormal eating patterns, sedentary lifestyle, and possible common genetic alterations. Importantly, recent longitudinal studies support a causal role of ADHD in contributing to weight gain. The next generation of studies in the field should explore if and to which extent the treatment of comorbid ADHD in individuals with obesity may lead to long-term weight loss, ultimately improving their

  17. Food environment and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Richard; Foster, Gary D

    2014-12-01

    The food environment plays an important and often dominant role in food choice, eating patterns, and ultimately, energy intake. The Obesity Society and the American Society for Nutrition jointly sponsored a series of reviews on topics of interest to both memberships. The goal was to consider the state of understanding on selected issues related to the food environment and obesity and to identify key knowledge gaps. The first article (not necessarily of importance) targeted energy density (ED) and focuses on the role of ED in the regulation of energy intake and body weight. It offers recommendations for prioritizing research. The second article addresses economic factors and examines food and beverage purchases as a function of price changes. It concludes that targeted food taxes and subsidies alone are unlikely to substantially affect obesity. The third article concerns sweetened beverages and points out the difficulty in establishing the strength of the association between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain and obesity. In the fourth article, the contributions of palatability and variety to eating behavior and weight are reviewed. Article five explores the influence of portion size on energy intake and weight management. It finds that consumers generally tend to eat proportionally more as portion size increases. The sixth article focuses on the efficacy and effectiveness of eating frequency manipulations for body weight management and finds that such manipulations have consistently yielded null results. Finally, article seven identifies several limitations of the existing literature regarding neighborhood access to healthy foods. This series of reviews addresses important questions regarding the contribution of the food environment to obesity. Independent of physiological/genetic determinants, factors such as ED, cost, food form, palatability, variety, portion size, eating frequency, and access to healthy food are each evaluated for their role in

  18. OBESITY: OVERVIEW OF AN EPIDEMIC

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Nia; Catenacci, Vicki; Wyatt, Holly R.; Hill, James O.

    2011-01-01

    Despite growing recognition of the problem, the obesity epidemic continues in the U.S., and obesity rates are increasing around the world. The latest estimates are that approximately 34% of adults and 15–20% of children and adolescents in the U.S. are obese. Obesity affects every segment of the U.S. population. Obesity increases the risk of many chronic diseases in children and adults. The epidemic of obesity arose gradually over time, apparently from a small, consistent degree of positive en...

  19. The influence of parental participation on obesity interventions in african american adolescent females: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Michelle; Newman, Susan; Nemeth, Lynne S; Magwood, Gayenell

    2015-01-01

    African American adolescent females have the highest prevalence rates of obesity among those age 18 and under. The long-term health effects and associated comorbidities of obesity within this cohort threaten the health and well-being of a major section of the U.S. population. There is a need to understand the influence of parental support in reducing obesity related health disparities. Using a social ecological framework to explore parental influence on adolescent obesity interventions allows for greater insight into the complex and dynamic influences affecting the lives of African American adolescent females who are obese. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Screen Media Exposure and Obesity in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Thomas N; Banda, Jorge A; Hale, Lauren; Lu, Amy Shirong; Fleming-Milici, Frances; Calvert, Sandra L; Wartella, Ellen

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is one of the best-documented outcomes of screen media exposure. Many observational studies find relationships between screen media exposure and increased risks of obesity. Randomized controlled trials of reducing screen time in community settings have reduced weight gain in children, demonstrating a cause and effect relationship. Current evidence suggests that screen media exposure leads to obesity in children and adolescents through increased eating while viewing; exposure to high-calorie, low-nutrient food and beverage marketing that influences children's preferences, purchase requests, consumption habits; and reduced sleep duration. Some evidence also suggests promise for using interactive media to improve eating and physical activity behaviors to prevent or reduce obesity. Future interdisciplinary research is needed to examine the effects of newer mobile and other digital media exposures on obesity; to examine the effectiveness of additional interventions to mitigate the adverse effects of media exposures on obesity and possible moderators and mediators of intervention effects; to effectively use digital media interventions to prevent and reduce obesity; and to uncover the mechanisms underlying the causal relationships and interactions between obesity-related outcomes and media content, characteristics, and context. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. What the new obesity guidelines will tell us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Donna H; Jensen, Michael D

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the review is to update the reader on the long anticipated Obesity 2, the second iteration of 'Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults: the Evidence Report'. Obesity 2 maintains a focus on primary care practitioners and their patients in an effort to reduce cardiovascular risk. Just as Obesity 1 limited the literature review to the years 1980-1997, Obesity 2 limits the literature under consideration from 1999 to 2011. However, because of the painstaking methodology employed, the scope of the Obesity 2 is of necessity more limited with five critical questions. These deal with risks of overweight and obesity, benefits of weight loss and evaluate three treatment areas - diet, behavioral therapies and surgical therapies. The critical questions inform recommendations in these same areas. Although not comprehensive in scope, the guidance offered in Obesity 2 is backed by stringent approaches to limit bias and assuring rigor, thus producing recommendations one can trust in the areas covered.

  2. Screen Media Exposure and Obesity in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Thomas N.; Banda, Jorge A.; Hale, Lauren; Lu, Amy Shirong; Fleming-Milici, Frances; Calvert, Sandra L.; Wartella, Ellen

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is one of the best-documented outcomes of screen media exposure. Many observational studies find relationships between screen media exposure and increased risks of obesity. Randomized controlled trials of reducing screen time in community settings have reduced weight gain in children, demonstrating a cause and effect relationship. Current evidence suggests that screen media exposure leads to obesity in children and adolescents through increased eating while viewing; exposure to high-calorie, low-nutrient food and beverage marketing that influences children’s preferences, purchase requests, consumption habits; and reduced sleep duration. Some evidence also suggests promise for using interactive media to improve eating and physical activity behaviors to prevent or reduce obesity. Future interdisciplinary research is needed to examine the effects of newer mobile and other digital media exposures on obesity; to examine the effectiveness of additional interventions to mitigate the adverse effects of media exposures on obesity and possible moderators and mediators of intervention effects; to effectively use digital media interventions to prevent and reduce obesity; and to uncover the mechanisms underlying the causal relationships and interactions between obesity-related outcomes and media content, characteristics, and context. PMID:29093041

  3. Biology of obesity and weight regain: Implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Mary Madeline; Gautam, Bibha

    2017-10-01

    Weight loss is recommended as first-line therapy for many chronic illnesses, including obesity. Most patients who do successfully lose weight are unable to maintain their reduced weight. Recent research findings are reviewed and synthesized to explain the biology of obesity, adaptation to weight loss, and weight regain. Weight regain is a common consequence of successful weight loss. Current obesity management strategies fail to take into consideration the underlying genetic and environmental causes of obesity. Available treatment modalities create a negative energy balance that stimulates integrated, persistent neurologic, endocrine, muscle, and adipose tissue adaptation to restore body weight and fat mass, independent of lifestyle changes. Understanding the pathophysiology of obesity and weight loss alters nurse practitioners' responsibilities in caring for patients with obesity. They are responsible for expanding assessment and intervention strategies and offering people with obesity realistic expectations for weight loss and regain. They are obligated to explain weight regain when it occurs to minimize patient frustration. Nurse practitioners have the opportunity to adopt new approaches to patient advocacy, especially in the areas of public policy to improve diagnostic tools and adjunctive therapy for people with obesity. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  4. IMMUNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. R. Gusova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: At present, convincing data on the role of immune system in pathophysiology of obesity are lacking, which makes it necessary to investigate this issue. Aim: To assess metabolic status and characteristics of immune system in patients with overweight and morbid obesity.Materials and methods: One hundred and ninety two patients with overweight and advanced obesity (mean body mass index (BMI 36.8 ± 7.3 kg/m. aged from 19 to 55 years were recruited in to the study. Depending on the grade of obesity, the patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included 84 overweight patients (BMI 27.65 ± 0.17 kg/m., group 2 included 88 patients with obesity grade III (BMI 44.03 ± 0.44 kg/m.. The groups were comparable as to their age and gender. The control group comprised 20 otherwise healthy subjects with normal body weight. Assessments included parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, hemodynamic parameters, immune status including cytokine profile.Results: In patients of both groups abnormalities in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were found, together with changes of hemodynamic parameters which were more advanced with higher degree of obesity. These parameters demonstrated that obesity promotes manifestation of metabolic syndrome. There was remarkable imbalance in pro-inflammatory cytokines. Patients with obesity grade III had a statistically significant (р = 0.05 increase in their serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (6.32 ± 0.49 vs 2.14 ± 0.25, interleukin (IL-4 (7.56 ± 0.44 vs 1.44 ± 0.10, IL-6 (5.39 ± 0.89 vs 2.02 ± 0.16, IL-17 (2.74 ± 0.29 vs 0.59 ± 0.20 both in basal and stimulated conditions, compared to those in patients with overweight and control patients.Conclusion: The study showed that imbalance in immune system increases with an increase of obesity grade. This imbalance implies lymphocyte maturation and differentiation, higher cytotoxicity of immunocompetent cells, over expression of receptors both to

  5. Mood, food, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Minati

    2014-01-01

    Food is a potent natural reward and food intake is a complex process. Reward and gratification associated with food consumption leads to dopamine (DA) production, which in turn activates reward and pleasure centers in the brain. An individual will repeatedly eat a particular food to experience this positive feeling of gratification. This type of repetitive behavior of food intake leads to the activation of brain reward pathways that eventually overrides other signals of satiety and hunger. Thus, a gratification habit through a favorable food leads to overeating and morbid obesity. Overeating and obesity stems from many biological factors engaging both central and peripheral systems in a bi-directional manner involving mood and emotions. Emotional eating and altered mood can also lead to altered food choice and intake leading to overeating and obesity. Research findings from human and animal studies support a two-way link between three concepts, mood, food, and obesity. The focus of this article is to provide an overview of complex nature of food intake where various biological factors link mood, food intake, and brain signaling that engages both peripheral and central nervous system signaling pathways in a bi-directional manner in obesity.

  6. Mood, food, and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minati eSingh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Food is a potent natural reward and food intake is a complex process. Reward and gratification associated with food consumption leads to dopamine (DA production, which in turn activates reward and pleasure centers in the brain. An individual will repeatedly eat a particular food to experience this positive feeling of gratification. This type of repetitive behavior of food intake leads to the activation of brain reward pathways that eventually overrides other signals of satiety and hunger. Thus, a gratification habit through a favorable food leads to overeating and morbid obesity. Overeating and obesity stems from many biological factors engaging both central and peripheral systems in a bi-directional manner involving mood and emotions. Emotional eating and altered mood can also lead to altered food choice and intake leading to overeating and obesity. Research findings from human and animal studies support a two-way link between three concepts, mood, food, and obesity. The focus of this article is to provide an overview of complex nature of food intake where various biological factors link mood, food intake, and brain signaling that engages both peripheral and central nervous system signaling pathways in a bi-directional manner in obesity.

  7. Mood, food, and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Minati

    2014-01-01

    Food is a potent natural reward and food intake is a complex process. Reward and gratification associated with food consumption leads to dopamine (DA) production, which in turn activates reward and pleasure centers in the brain. An individual will repeatedly eat a particular food to experience this positive feeling of gratification. This type of repetitive behavior of food intake leads to the activation of brain reward pathways that eventually overrides other signals of satiety and hunger. Thus, a gratification habit through a favorable food leads to overeating and morbid obesity. Overeating and obesity stems from many biological factors engaging both central and peripheral systems in a bi-directional manner involving mood and emotions. Emotional eating and altered mood can also lead to altered food choice and intake leading to overeating and obesity. Research findings from human and animal studies support a two-way link between three concepts, mood, food, and obesity. The focus of this article is to provide an overview of complex nature of food intake where various biological factors link mood, food intake, and brain signaling that engages both peripheral and central nervous system signaling pathways in a bi-directional manner in obesity. PMID:25225489

  8. Vitamin D in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jennifer S; Bowles, Simon; Evans, Amy L

    2017-12-01

    Vitamin D is essential for bone health, and may also have important functions in immunity and other systems. Vitamin D deficiency is common, and testing and supplementation is increasing. Serum vitamin D is lower in obese people; it is important to understand the mechanism of this effect and whether it indicates clinically significant deficiency. Vitamin D is fat soluble, and distributed into fat, muscle, liver, and serum. All of these compartments are increased in volume in obesity, so the lower vitamin D likely reflects a volumetric dilution effect and whole body stores of vitamin D may be adequate. Despite lower serum vitamin D, obese adults do not have higher bone turnover or lower bone mineral density. Patients undergoing bariatric surgery do have bone loss, and ensuring vitamin D sufficiency in these patients may help to attenuate bone loss. Lower vitamin D in obese people is a consistent finding across age, ethnicity, and geography. This may not always reflect a clinical problem. Obese people need higher loading doses of vitamin D to achieve the same serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D as normal weight.

  9. The "Big Bang" in obese fat: Events initiating obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensveen, Felix M.; Valentić, Sonja; Šestan, Marko; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Polić, Bojan

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with the accumulation of pro-inflammatory cells in visceral adipose tissue (VAT), which is an important underlying cause of insulin resistance and progression to diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). Although the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in disease development is

  10. Overweight, Obesity, and Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back to section menu Healthy Weight Weight and obesity Underweight Weight, fertility, and pregnancy Weight loss and ... section Home Healthy Weight Healthy Weight Weight and obesity Underweight Weight, fertility, and pregnancy Weight loss and ...

  11. Childhood obesity for pediatric gastroenterologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeannie S; Barlow, Sarah E; Quiros-Tejeira, Ruben E; Scheimann, Ann; Skelton, Joseph; Suskind, David; Tsai, Patrika; Uko, Victor; Warolin, Joshua P; Xanthakos, Stavra A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity in childhood is one of the major health issues in pediatric health care today. As expected, the prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities has risen in parallel with that of obesity. Consultation regarding these concomitant diseases and subsequent management by subspecialists, including pediatric gastroenterologists, is now common and has resulted in obesity being recognized as a chronic disease requiring coordination of care. Although medications and even surgery may provide effective, though often temporary, treatments for obesity and its comorbidities, behavioral interventions addressing healthy dietary and physical activity habits remain a mainstay in the obesity treatment paradigm. Therefore, the issue of weight management must be addressed by both general practitioner and subspecialist alike. In this report, we review select aspects of pediatric obesity and obesity-related management issues because it relates in particular to the field of pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology.

  12. Childhood Obesity for Pediatric Gastroenterologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeannie S.; Barlow, Sarah E.; Quiros-Tejeira, Ruben E.; Scheimann, Ann; Skelton, Joseph; Suskind, David; Tsai, Patrika; Uko, Victor; Warolin, Joshua P.; Xanthakos, Stavra A.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity in childhood is one of the major health issues in pediatric health care today. As expected, the prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities has risen in parallel with that of obesity. Consultation regarding these concomitant diseases and subsequent management by subspecialists, including pediatric gastroenterologists, is now common and has resulted in obesity being recognized as a chronic disease requiring coordination of care. Although medications and even surgery may provide effective, though often temporary, treatments for obesity and its comorbidities, behavioral interventions addressing healthy dietary and physical activity habits remain a mainstay in the obesity treatment paradigm. Therefore, the issue of weight management must be addressed by both general practitioner and subspecialist alike. In this report, we review select aspects of pediatric obesity and obesity-related management issues because it relates in particular to the field of pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology. PMID:23282941

  13. Collagen metabolism in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Jensen, L T; Andersen, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of obesity, fat distribution and weight loss on collagen turnover using serum concentrations of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (S-PICP) and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III pro-collagen (S-PIIINP) as markers for collagen turnover...... (r = 0.37; P = 0.004), height (r = 0.27; P = 0.04), waist circumference (r = 0.35; P = 0.007), as well as with WHR (r = 0.33; P = 0.01) and was inversely correlated to age (r = -0.40; P = 0.002). Compared with randomly selected controls from a large pool of healthy volunteers, the obese patients had...... restriction (P obesity and associated with body fat distribution, suggesting...

  14. Causes of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Suzanne M; Aronne, Louis J

    2012-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been rising steadily over the last several decades and is currently at unprecedented levels: more than 68% of US adults are considered overweight, and 35% are obese (Flegal et al., JAMA 303:235-241, 2010). This increase has occurred across every age, sex, race, and smoking status, and data indicate that segments of individuals in the highest weight categories (i.e., BMI > 40 kg/m(2)) have increased proportionately more than those in lower BMI categories (BMI obesity has also occurred in many other countries, and the causes of this increase are not fully understood (Hill and Melanson, Med Sci Sports Exerc 31:S515-S521, 1999).

  15. Obesity and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Damian; Bhattacharya, Siladitya

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in women of reproductive age has increased over the past 30 years. Infertility affects 1 in 7 couples, and female obesity is associated with anovulation. The mechanisms by which excessive fat delays time to pregnancy (TTP) appear rooted in ovulatory problems and direct effects on oocytes, causing poorer embryo development, as well as in effects on the endometrium. Weight loss in women has been shown to improve conception, but not necessarily live birth rates following fertility treatment, and further research in this area is needed. The obesity epidemic has been accompanied by a potential rise in male infertility, which has been attributed to hormonal disturbances and compromised semen parameters.

  16. Obesity, Inflammation and Liver Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Beicheng; Karin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Obesity has become a universal and major public health problem with increasing prevalence in both adults and children in the 21st century, even in developing countries. Extensive epidemiological studies reveal a strong link between obesity and development and progression of various types of cancers. The connection between obesity and liver cancer is particularly strong and obesity often results in liver diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the more severe non-alcohol...

  17. OBESITY : A MODERN DAY PLAGUE

    OpenAIRE

    YADAV, YATENDRA KUMAR

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is the presence of excess body fat. Unfortunately obesity is taken as a mere cosmetic problem and not a medical one. Today obesity is being ‘dealt’ with more by the self-proclaimed fitness experts running the rapidly mushrooming fitness centres rather than by medical professionals. But rather than merely a cosmetic problem, obesity should be viewed as a disease because there are multiple biologic hazards at surprisingly low levels of excess fat With the rapid pace of industrialisation...

  18. The Medical Risks of Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Pi-Sunyer, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is at epidemic proportions in the United States and in other developed and developing countries. The prevalence of obesity is increasing not only in adults, but especially among children and adolescents. In the United States in 2003 to 2004, 17.1% of children and adolescents were overweight, and 32.2% of adults were obese. Obesity is a significant risk factor for and contributor to increased morbidity and mortality, most importantly from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, but ...

  19. Psychological Impact of Severe Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jennifer; Meng, Chelsea; Eng, Anna

    2016-12-01

    The causes of severe obesity are multifactorial and include metabolic, dietary, physical, and psychological aspects. Additionally, the impact of severe obesity affects more than one's physical health. This article attempts to explore the psychological impact of severe obesity specifically in the areas of mood, eating disorders, sleep disturbance, chronic pain, and quality of life. Additionally, obesity treatment options of lifestyle modification and bariatric surgery that include psychological assessment and/or cognitive behavioral intervention are discussed.

  20. Pediatric Obesity: Etiology and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Crocker, Melissa K.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews factors that contribute to excessive weight gain in children and outlines current knowledge regarding approaches for treating pediatric obesity. Virtually all of the known genetic causes of obesity primarily increase energy intake. Genes regulating the leptin signaling pathway are particularly important for human energy homeostasis. Obesity is a chronic disorder that requires long-term strategies for management. The foundation for all treatments for pediatric obesity remain...

  1. Perspectives in obesity and pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mariona, Federico G.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is currently recognized as a health epidemic worldwide. Its prevalence has doubled in the last three decades. Obesity is a complex clinical picture associated with physical, physiologic, hormonal, genetic, cultural, socioeconomic and environmental factors. The rate of obesity is also increasing in the pregnant women population. Maternal obesity is associated with less than optimal obstetrical, fetal and neonatal outcomes. It is also associated with significant adverse long-term effect...

  2. Obesity: modern man's fertility nemesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cabler, Stephanie; Agarwal, Ashok; Flint, Margot; Du Plessis, Stefan S.

    2010-01-01

    The obesity pandemic has grown to concerning proportions in recent years, not only in the Western World, but in developing countries as well. The corresponding decrease in male fertility and fecundity may be explained in parallel to obesity, and obesity should be considered as an etiology of male fertility. Studies show that obesity contributes to infertility by reducing semen quality, changing sperm proteomes, contributing to erectile dysfunction, and inducing other physical problems related...

  3. Obesity and asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Pranab Baruwa; Kripesh Ranjan Sarmah

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. The prevalence of asthma is around 300 million and is expected to increase another 100 million by 2025. Obesity, on the other hand, also affects a large number of individuals. Overweight in adults is defined when body mass index (BMI) is between 25 to 30 kg/m 2 and obesity when the BMI >30 kg/m 2 . It has been a matter of interest for researchers to find a relation between these two conditions. This knowledge will provide a ...

  4. Obesity and Hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Steven; Chidakel, Aaron; Bansal, Rohan

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between obesity and hypogonadism is complicated. The relationship is bidirectional and there are numerous causative and correlative factors on both sides of the equation. Obesity is increasing in prevalence in epidemic proportions. Likewise, we are beginning to see the rapid increase in the incidence of male hypogonadism. It is only recently that we are learning the ways in which these 2 conditions exacerbate each other, and we are only beginning to understand how by treating one of these conditions, we can help to treat the other as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. English obesity policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Signild

    2015-01-01

    Problem definitions constitute a crucial part of the policy process. In 2008 the Labour Government presented a plan to reduce the obesity prevalence in England. Only three years later the Conservative-Liberal Government introduced a plan on the same topic, which it presented as new and innovative....... The aim of this study is to analyse the respective governments' problematisations of obesity and to identify similarities and differences. Despite the different hues of the two governments, the programmes are surprisingly similar. They seek to simultaneously govern and not to govern. They adhere...

  6. Obesity in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Penny Montenegro, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Older people are not exempt of being overweight or obese; in Peru this occurs respectively in 21.4% and 11.9% of the elderly, less than in people of younger age. Overweight and obesity are associated to noncommunicable chronic diseases, and to increase in morbidity and mortality. There is no trustworthy data on the optimum body-mass index in the elderly, but we use both the body-mass index and measurement of the abdominal circumference. Best efforts should be done to prevent this problem befo...

  7. What Causes Overweight and Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are the same age and sex as your child. Healthy lifestyle changes to prevent overweight and obesity If your BMI indicates you are getting close ... is the most common sign of overweight and obesity. ... (BMI) is used to determine if you or your child are underweight, healthy, or overweight or obese. Children ...

  8. Overweight, Obesity, and Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... take. How do I know if I’m overweight or obese? What causes women to become overweight or obese? Does it matter where on my ... weight? What are the health effects of being overweight or obese? What can cause sudden weight loss? ...

  9. Childhood Obesity: Prediction and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael D.

    Obesity in children is a problem both insidious and acute. Childhood obesity has been indicated as a forerunner of adult obesity; it is also an immediate problem for the child. Given the lack of evidence for long term maintenance of any weight loss, this paper investigates the etiology of the disorder as a prelude to prevention. Upon review of the…

  10. Fight Obesity in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsis, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    U.S. health experts declared obesity an epidemic over a decade ago. Schools have tried to implement prevention programs for students, but as budgets shrink, educating students about obesity is increasingly falling to classroom instructors, including science teachers. The good news is that obesity-related classroom activities can be engaging, and…

  11. [Monitoring the prevalence of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Due, P.; Hansen, B.

    2008-01-01

    The Danish Fitness and Nutrition Council has proposed a model to monitor the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Denmark. The model should make it possible to assess whether different initiatives reduce the prevalence of obesity and to gain knowledge on how to prevent obesity. The prevalence...

  12. Pregnancy and obesity: Practical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Duvekot (Hans)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractObesity is presently the most prevalent health threat in the western world, and its influence on general health is rapidly increasing. Obesity has also developed as a major and frequent risk factor for pregnancy complications. Complications often encountered in obese pregnant women are

  13. Obstructive sleep apnoea and obesity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    obesity. The reported association between obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and obesity has resulted in a parallel increase in the incidence of. OSA. ..... population. Chest. 2006;130(3):780-786. 5. Foster GD, Sanders MH, Millman R et al. Obstructive sleep apnea among obese patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care.

  14. Understanding Adult Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obesity Share What You Know to Help Reduce Childhood Obesity Text Description Sisters Together Program Guide Some Myths ... United States. About 1 in 6 children and adolescents ages 2 to 19 are considered to have obesity in the United States. Another 1 in 3 ...

  15. Childhood Obesity. Special Reference Briefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winick, Myron

    This reference brief deals with the problem of childhood obesity and how it can lead to obesity in the adult. Eighty-four abstracts are presented of studies on the identification, prevention, and treatment of obesity in children, focusing on diet and psychological attitudes. Subjects of the studies were children ranging in age from infancy through…

  16. Obesity and pregnancy: mechanisms of short term and long term adverse consequences for mother and child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Patrick M; Shankar, Kartik

    2017-02-08

    Obesity is the most common medical condition in women of reproductive age. Obesity during pregnancy has short term and long term adverse consequences for both mother and child. Obesity causes problems with infertility, and in early gestation it causes spontaneous pregnancy loss and congenital anomalies. Metabolically, obese women have increased insulin resistance in early pregnancy, which becomes manifest clinically in late gestation as glucose intolerance and fetal overgrowth. At term, the risk of cesarean delivery and wound complications is increased. Postpartum, obese women have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, depression, and difficulty with breast feeding. Because 50-60% of overweight or obese women gain more than recommended by Institute of Medicine gestational weight guidelines, postpartum weight retention increases future cardiometabolic risks and prepregnancy obesity in subsequent pregnancies. Neonates of obese women have increased body fat at birth, which increases the risk of childhood obesity. Although there is no unifying mechanism responsible for the adverse perinatal outcomes associated with maternal obesity, on the basis of the available data, increased prepregnancy maternal insulin resistance and accompanying hyperinsulinemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress seem to contribute to early placental and fetal dysfunction. We will review the pathophysiology underlying these data and try to shed light on the specific underlying mechanisms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Rorschach personality characteristics in obesity, eating behaviour and treatment outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Elfhag, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    Obesity is a growing public health problem influenced by several factors. Psychology is essential in the study of obesity. Reasons for behaviour are complex and can be partly inaccessible and difficult to reveal in self-reported information. A performance-based psychological technique such as the Rorschach method enables a study of underlying personality aspects affecting behaviours and can provide data complementary to self-reports. This can be of particular relevance in de...

  18. Obesity Pathogenesis: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael W; Seeley, Randy J; Zeltser, Lori M; Drewnowski, Adam; Ravussin, Eric; Redman, Leanne M; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is among the most common and costly chronic disorders worldwide. Estimates suggest that in the United States obesity affects one-third of adults, accounts for up to one-third of total mortality, is concentrated among lower income groups, and increasingly affects children as well as adults. A lack of effective options for long-term weight reduction magnifies the enormity of this problem; individuals who successfully complete behavioral and dietary weight-loss programs eventually regain most of the lost weight. We included evidence from basic science, clinical, and epidemiological literature to assess current knowledge regarding mechanisms underlying excess body-fat accumulation, the biological defense of excess fat mass, and the tendency for lost weight to be regained. A major area of emphasis is the science of energy homeostasis, the biological process that maintains weight stability by actively matching energy intake to energy expenditure over time. Growing evidence suggests that obesity is a disorder of the energy homeostasis system, rather than simply arising from the passive accumulation of excess weight. We need to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this "upward setting" or "resetting" of the defended level of body-fat mass, whether inherited or acquired. The ongoing study of how genetic, developmental, and environmental forces affect the energy homeostasis system will help us better understand these mechanisms and are therefore a major focus of this statement. The scientific goal is to elucidate obesity pathogenesis so as to better inform treatment, public policy, advocacy, and awareness of obesity in ways that ultimately diminish its public health and economic consequences. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  19. Adaptive and maladaptive cortisol responses to pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soros, Arlette; Zadik, Zvi; Chalew, Stuart

    2008-09-01

    The recent unprecedented increase of childhood obesity has led to an alarming rise in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) among these children. The process underlying the progression from simple obesity to T2D is not well understood. Cortisol is a candidate factor in the pathogenesis of T2D, as it can exacerbate insulin resistance and provoke other disturbances of the metabolic syndrome. The 24-h integrated concentration (IC) of cortisol is suppressed in non-diabetic obese children compared to lean children. This difference in IC-cortisol is not due to changes in cortisol binding globulin or plasma cortisol to cortisone ratio between groups. In obese individuals, IC-cortisol suppression disappears with age after adolescence, which corresponds with increasing occurrence of T2D and other metabolic disorders of obesity. We consider the IC-cortisol levels of lean insulin sensitive children to be metabolically inappropriate for obese insulin resistant children. Thus, we hypothesize that suppression of IC-cortisol is an important adaptive response to obesity (cortisol adaptive suppression) in childhood that prevents pediatric T2D while failure to suppress IC-cortisol (cortisol suppression failure) exacerbates insulin resistance and contributes to the development of T2D. In further support of this hypothesis is early pilot data suggesting that cortisol suppression failure occurs in obese children with impaired fasting glucose levels. The mechanism(s) underlying cortisol adaptive suppression, how and why these mechanism(s) fail are unknown. Elucidation of these mechanisms may lead to interventions to prevent the development of T2D and its complications in obese individuals.

  20. Surgical management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Landa, Samuel; Kannan, Umashankkar; Guajardo, Isabella; Pickett-Blakely, Octavia E; Dempsey, Daniel T; Williams, Noel N; Dumon, Kristoffel R

    2018-02-01

    Obesity is a spreading epidemic associated with significant morbidity and mortality with a prevalence of over 36% worldwide. In the face of a growing epidemic, increasing medical costs, and the disappointing limitations of medical and lifestyle modification bariatric surgery was found to consistently lead to significant weight loss and improvement in obesity-associated comorbidities when compared to non-surgical interventions. Bariatric procedures fall within three basic categories: restrictive procedures, malabsorptive procedures, and procedures that combine both restrictive and malabsorptive mechanisms. Four major procedures are currently performed (most often laparoscopically): Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, adjustable gastric banding, and sleeve gastrectomy. Although the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was the most frequently performed bariatric procedure, the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has since become the most popular. Bariatric surgery currently has similar mortality rates to standard general surgical operations. Morevoer, bariatric surgery reduces mortality by the improvement and remission of obesity-related comorbidities. Newer minimally-invasive weight loss procedures and endoscopic methods continue to evolve as we expand our understanding of the intricacies of obesity and the effects of currently available surgical treatments.

  1. Games and childhood obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videogames can be used to help children change their obesity-related diet and physical activity behaviors. A review of the relevant literature in this special issue of the Games for Health Journal indicated that video games did influence children's adiposity, but only among children who were alread...

  2. Genetics of obesity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2011-12-09

    Dec 9, 2011 ... Body weight regulation and stability depends upon an axis with three interrelated components: food intake, energy expen- diture and adipogenesis, although there are still many un- known features concerning fuel homoeostasis and energy balance. There are 358 studies on obese humans reporting po-.

  3. Physical activity in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MD E.J.M. Wouters; Rinie Geenen

    2011-01-01

    Physical exercise education in overweight and obese patients not only requires knowledge of physical exercise programs, but also knowledge of psychological processes such as cognitions that may hamper adherence to the exercise program and knowledge of social processes, e.g., consciousness of the

  4. Physical activity in obesity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PhD Geenen; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2011-01-01

    Physical exercise education in overweight and obese patients not only requires knowledge of physical exercise programs, but also knowledge of psychological processes such as cognitions that may hamper adherence to the exercise program and knowledge of social processes, e.g., consciousness of the

  5. Drugs ID Obesity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a new attitude to eating. Adjunctive measures aimed at modifying behaviour, such as psychotherapy and group therapy, may help in individual cases. Psychological factors in response to stress would appear to be the basis of some cases of obesity, but the use of psychotropic drugs is limited and for specific indications only.

  6. 435 Case studies Obese

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marinda

    2009-05-22

    May 22, 2009 ... Moreover, we opted to use propofol and remifentanil, which allowed us to achieve rapid induction, operative stability, rapid emergence and uneventful recovery. This anaesthetic agent and adjunct have been reported to be effective for psychopathic patients with malignant syndrome and for extremely obese.

  7. Obesity and Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Celik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is defined as the accumulation of abnormal or excessive fat in fat tissues that substantially disrupt health. The main reasons of obesity are excessive and unbalanced diet and lack of physical activity. Obesity and santral obesity leads to many diseases. Body mass index (weight (kg/lenght (m2 has been used extensively to define categories of body weight. All healthy adults aged 18-65 yr need moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity for a minimum of 30 min on five days each week or vigorous-intensity aerobic activitiy for a minimum of 20 min on three days each week. Also combination of these activities can be performed. It is recommended that muscle strengthening and stretching activities are performed for a minimum of two days each week. Activities of daily living that tend to be light intensity should be added. There are many benefits of regular physical activity and aerobic exercise tranning that are associated with a decrease in cardiovascular mortality. Some risks of the exercises may also be taken into account.

  8. Childhood Obesity: Common Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... no one is to blame for your child’s obesity. Children gain excess weight for a variety of reasons. ... safe and long-term weight-loss success. “My overweight child will ‘grow into’ the excess pounds that ...

  9. Victimization of Obese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sabrina

    2006-01-01

    Peer victimization of obese adolescents has been associated with low self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, social isolation, marginalization, poor psychosocial adjustment, depression, eating disorders, and suicidal ideation and attempts, not to mention poor academic performance. Weight-based peer victimization is defined as unsolicited bullying and…

  10. Obesity in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Cordelie E; Arbabi, Saman; Nathens, Avery B; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-04-01

    The implications of childhood obesity on pediatric trauma outcomes are not clearly established. Anthropomorphic data were recently added to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) Research Datasets, enabling a large, multicenter evaluation of the effect of obesity on pediatric trauma patients. Children ages 2 to 19years who required hospitalization for traumatic injury were identified in the 2013-2014 NTDB Research Datasets. Age and gender-specific body mass indices (BMI) were calculated. Outcomes included injury patterns, operative procedures, complications, and hospital utilization parameters. Data from 149,817 pediatric patients were analyzed; higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly more extremity injuries, and fewer injuries to the head, abdomen, thorax and spine (p values Obese children also had significantly longer lengths of stay and more frequent ventilator requirement. Among children admitted after trauma, increased BMI percentile is associated with increased risk of death and potentially preventable complications. These findings suggest that obese children may require different management than nonobese counterparts to prevent complications. Level III; prognosis study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Introduction: Obesity and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, David R

    2017-04-01

    Women bear the predominant burden of our obesogenic environment, with a higher incidence of obesity than men, more impact on their fertility and success with treatment, and significant maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. In this series, the causes, consequences, and solutions regarding the obesity pandemic, the mechanisms of the effect of obesity on the female and male, the epigenetic consequences of male obesity, the marked effects on perinatal outcomes, and the effects of weight loss before conception and during pregnancy are explored. Lifestyle modifications, in particular a healthy diet and exercise during the 3-6 months before conception and during treatment, should result in better outcomes than requiring weight loss before fertility treatments. Such fundamental changes toward a healthier lifestyle will achieve steady and sustainable weight loss and long-term benefits for general health. The role of bariatric surgery before pregnancy requires careful consideration. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sleep in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Victorova Strueva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of duration and individual characteristics of sleep and chronotype on body weight, eating behavior, anxiety, depression, life quality, metabolic and hormonal parameters of obese patients. Materials and methods: 200 patients with primary obesity were studied: 83 men and 117 women at age from 18 to 61 years old, median age 41,5 years [31,0; 50,0]; body weight 107 kg [94; 128,5], waist circumference 112 cm [102; 124]; neck circumference 41 cm [38; 46], body mass index (BMI 36,9 [32,8; 42,3]. Results: We found an association between sleep duration, chronotype and the emotional eating. Significant sleep reduction (to less than 6 hours was associated with high level of anxiety, depression, emotional eating and insomnia. Younger age, early onset and shorter duration of obesity and brisk weight gain during last is connected to the evening chronotype. The emotional eating associated with hypersomnolence in the absence of statistically significant increase of anxiety and depression in individuals with evening chronotype. Sleep duration and chronotype have no significant effect on the body weight, metabolic, hormonal parameters and the dynamics of body. weight after 7±1 months of treatment of obesity.

  13. New Insights into Obesity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 12. New Insights into Obesity. D D Bansal Ravneet Kaur Boparai. Research News Volume 8 Issue 12 December 2003 pp 92-93. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/12/0092-0093 ...

  14. Behavioral management of obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The behavioral management of obesity is an approach designed to provide individuals with a set of skills that promote a healthier weight. A number of strategies are used to assist individuals in making gradual changes that can realistically be incorporated into their lives. Evidence is promising f...

  15. Dietary determinants of obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huaidong, D.U.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity has become a serious public health problem worldwide, and dietary composition can play a role in its prevention and treatment. However, available literature on the impacts of different dietary factors on weight change is inconsistent, or even conflicting. In this review, we briefly

  16. Emotional Toll of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5yrs Grade School 5-12yrs. Teen 12-18yrs. Young Adult 18-21yrs. Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living ... Size Email Print Share The Emotional Toll of Obesity Page Content Article Body You’ve heard the ...

  17. Obesity and dyslipidemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, Remco; Monajemi, Houshang; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Dyslipidemia associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome is one of the central features contributing to the increased CV risk in these patients. In view of the pandemic of the metabolic syndrome, it is imperative to fully understand the mechanisms leading to the metabolic lipid phenotype

  18. [Pharmacological treatment of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis Barbará, R

    2004-01-01

    The pharmacological treatment of obesity should be considered when cannot be achieved a 10% weight loss with diet therapy and physical activity. The drugs effective in obesity treatment may act by different mechanisms such as reduction in food intake, inhibition of fat absorption, increase of thermogenesis and stimulation of adipocyte apoptosis. At present, we only have two marketed drugs for obesity treatment. Sibutramine is an inhibitor of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonina reuptake which inhibits food intake and increases thermogenesis. Sibutramine administration for a year can induce a weight loss of 4-7%. Its main side effects are hypertension, headache, insomnia and constipation. Orlistat is an inhibitor of pancreatic lipase which is able to block the absorption of 30% of ingested fat. Its administration induces weight loss and reduction of ulterior weight regain. Also, this drug improves hypertension dyslipdaemia and helps to prevent diabetes in 52% of cases when administered over four years. The increase in frequency of stools and interference with vitamin absorption are its main side effects. Glucagon-like peptide 1, which increases insulin sensitivity and satiety, adiponectin and PPAR-gamma agonists which reduce insulin resistance and modulates adipocyte generation are the basis for future therapeutic approaches of obesity. Phosphatase inhibitors induce PPAR-gamma phosphorylation and UCP-1 expression leading to an increase in thermogenesis and reduction in appetite.

  19. Pharmacotherapy for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides-Demos, Lisa L; Proietto, Joseph; McNeil, John J

    2005-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy for the management of obesity is primarily aimed at weight loss, weight loss maintenance and risk reduction, and has included thyroid hormone, amphetamines, phentermine, amfepramone (diethylpropion), phenylpropanolamine, mazindol, fenfluramines and, more recently, sibutramine and orlistat. These agents decrease appetite, reduce absorption of fat or increase energy expenditure. Primary endpoints used to evaluate anti-obesity drugs most frequently include mean weight loss, percentage weight loss and proportion of patients losing >or=5% and >or=10% of initial bodyweight. Secondary endpoints may include reduction in body fat, risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the incidences of diseases such as diabetes mellitus. Most pharmacotherapies have demonstrated significantly greater weight loss in patients on active treatment than those receiving placebo in short-term (obesity in adults. Sibutramine recipients randomised following 6 months' treatment to either sibutramine or placebo demonstrated significantly better weight maintenance at 2 years than those taking placebo (por=10% loss of initial bodyweight in 46% of patients. For patients taking orlistat, weight loss was 2.2 kg greater than those on placebo at 4 years (por=10% loss of initial bodyweight (26.2% and 15.6%, respectively; pobesity through the CNS pathways or peripheral adiposity signals are in early phase clinical trials. Over the next decade the drug treatment of obesity is likely to change significantly because of the availability of new pharmacotherapies to regulate eating behaviours, nutrient partitioning and/or energy expenditure.

  20. Obesity in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaet, David; Schauer, Daniel

    2011-03-17

    About one third of the US population and one quarter of the UK population are obese, with increased risks of hypertension, dyslipidaemia, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoarthritis, and some cancers. Fewer than 10% of overweight or obese adults aged 40 to 49 years revert to a normal body weight after 4 years. Nearly 5 million US adults used prescription weight-loss medication between 1996 and 1998, but one quarter of all users were not overweight. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments in adults with obesity? What are the effects of bariatric surgery in adults with morbid obesity? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 39 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: bariatric surgery versus medical interventions, biliopancreatic diversion, diethylpropion, gastric bypass, gastric banding, mazindol, orlistat (alone and in combination with sibutramine), phentermine, sibutramine (alone and in combination with orlistat), sleeve gastrectomy, and vertical banded gastroplasty.

  1. Obesity, Unemployment, and Earnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Härkönen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the effects of obesity—a clear signal of weight abnormality—on unemployment and earnings among Finnish men and women. Our empirical data consist of the last four waves (waves 4 to 8 of the Finnish section of the European Community Household Panel (ECHP data collected between 1998 and 2001. According to our results, obese women have a significantly higher risk of unemployment (even after controlling for age, level of education and other related factors, than women who are not obese. Furthermore, the generally weaker occupational positions of obese women tend to translate to lower earnings. Overall, obese women are more likely to have weaker labour market attachment  and hold socio-economically weaker positions. Similar results were not found among men. Thus, our results indicate the presence of gender discrimination in the Finnish labour market. In the conclusions we further discuss weight related impacts on succeeding in the labour market, but also its role as a possible risk factor in drifting away from employment. We reflect on this issue as a form of inequality that can have an increasing significance in the future.

  2. Dietary treatment of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Pita Lottenberg

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The fast global increased prevalence of obesity has been classifiedas an epidemics by the World Health Organization. The etiology ofobesity is very complex and involves genetic and environmentalfactors. One of the main factors that trigger obesity is sedentarylife, as well as the great availability of fat-rich foods that present ahigh energy density. According to the NHANES II, although thepopulation has decreased the ingestion of fat, the total consumptionof food has increased. The main factors that influence in choice offood are flavor, followed by cost, convenience and, finally, itsnutritional value. The dietary treatment of obesity should haverealistic goals concerning weight loss rate and amount. It issuggested to prescribe a balanced low-calorie diet, emphasizingmostly the quality of foods by using the food pyramid. Therefore,patients may learn the appropriate criteria to select food and makehealthy choices. The dietary treatment of obesity also includesthe use of behavioral techniques directed at dietary education,thus resulting in choice of healthy foods with adequate energyvalue.

  3. Obesity : a growing problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidell, J C

    Obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m2 or more, is common in many parts of the world, especially in the established market economies, the former socialist economies of Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean and the Middle Eastern Crescent. As many as 250 million people worldwide may

  4. Proteomics analysis of human obesity reveals the epigenetic factor HDAC4 as a potential target for obesity.

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    Mohamed Abu-Farha

    Full Text Available Sedentary lifestyle and excessive energy intake are prominent contributors to obesity; a major risk factors for the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these chronic conditions is of relevant importance as it might lead to the identification of novel anti-obesity targets. The purpose of the current study is to investigate differentially expressed proteins between lean and obese subjects through a shot-gun quantitative proteomics approach using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs extracts as well as potential modulation of those proteins by physical exercise. Using this approach, a total of 47 proteins showed at least 1.5 fold change between lean and obese subjects. In obese, the proteomic profiling before and after 3 months of physical exercise showed differential expression of 38 proteins. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 was among the proteins that were upregulated in obese subjects and then decreased by physical exercise. Conversely, the histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4 was downregulated in obese subjects and then induced by physical exercise. The proteomic data was further validated by qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry in both PBMCs and adipose tissue. We also showed that HDAC4 levels correlated positively with maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 Max but negatively with body mass index, percent body fat, and the inflammatory chemokine RANTES. In functional assays, our data indicated that ectopic expression of HDAC4 significantly impaired TNF-α-dependent activation of NF-κB, establishing thus a link between HDAC4 and regulation of the immune system. Together, the expression pattern of HDAC4 in obese subjects before and after physical exercise, its correlation with various physical, clinical and metabolic parameters along with its inhibitory effect on NF-κB are suggestive of a protective role of HDAC4 against obesity. HDAC4 could therefore represent

  5. Psychological issues in pediatric obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurvinder Kalra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric obesity is a major health problem and has reached epidemiological proportions today. The present paper reviews major psychological issues in pediatric obesity from a developmental perspective. Research and literature has shown that a number of developmental, family, maternal and child factors are responsible in the genesis of pediatric obesity. Family food habits, early developmental lifestyle of the child, parenting, early family relationships and harmony all contribute towards the growth and development of a child. The present review focuses on the role of developmental psychological factors in the pathogenesis of pediatric obesity and highlights the developmental factors that must be kept in mind when evaluating a case of pediatric obesity.

  6. The Future of Pediatric Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Jeff; Emerick, Jill; Saxena, Harshita

    2016-03-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports a steady increase in obesity over the last 30 years. The greatest increase was seen in 15 to 19 year olds, whose obesity prevalence almost doubled from 10.5% to 19.4%. The solution to pediatric obesity requires a multidisciplinary approach addressing cultural norms, technologic advances, and family engagement. Future treatment strategies to combat the obesity epidemic will have to extend beyond the health care provider's office. Behavior modification remains the key component to pediatric obesity prevention and treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Obesity in Scotland: a persistent inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, Elaine; Bromley, Catherine; Millard, Andrew D; Boyd, Allan; Mackie, Phil; McCartney, Gerry

    2017-07-27

    Obesity is a health problem in its own right and a risk factor for other conditions such as cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of overweight and obesity increased in Scotland between 1995 and 2008 with socio-economic inequalities persisting in adults over time and increasing in children. This paper explores changes in the underlying distribution of body mass index (BMI) which is less well understood. Using data from the Scottish Health Survey (SHeS) between 1995 and 2014 for adults aged 18-64 years, we calculated population distributions for BMI for the population overall, and for age, sex and deprivation strata. We used SHeS data for children aged 2-15 years between 1998 and 2014, in addition to data from the Child Health Systems Programme (CHSP) collected from primary one (P1) children in participating local authorities, to describe the overall trends and to compare trends in inequalities by deprivation strata. Amongst adults, the BMI distribution shifted upwards, with a large proportion of the population gaining a small amount of weight between 1995 and 2008 before subsequently stabilising across the distribution. In men the prevalence of obesity showed a linear deprivation gradient in 1995 but over time obesity declined in the least deprived quintile while the remaining four quintiles converged (and stabilised). In contrast, a persistent and generally linear gradient is evident among women for most of the 1995-2014 period. For those aged 2-15 years, obesity increased between 1998 and 2014 for the most deprived 40% of children contrasted with stable trends for the least deprived. The surveillance data for P1 children in Scotland showed a persistent inequality between 2005/06 and 2014/15 though it was less clear if this is widening. The BMI distribution for adults increased between 1995 and 2008 with a large proportion of the population gaining a small amount of weight before stabilising across the distribution. Inequalities in obesity persist for adults

  8. Connecting the obesity and the narcissism epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndromes are major threats to health in both developed and developing countries. This opinion article is a holistic attempt to understand the obesity epidemic, by connecting it to the widespread narcissism in society. The narcissism epidemic refers to an increased prevalence of status-striving individualism and a decreased sense of community, observed in Westerns populations and spreading worldwide. Based on social personality and evolutionary psychology approaches, I speculate that this rise of narcissism underlies a steep social hierarchy resulting in increase of social stress. This social stress markedly affects individuals who are sensitive to social hierarchy dominance due to their personality, yet are relegated at a lower social position. I speculate that over-eating is one major mechanism for coping with this stress, and discuss the possibility that visceral fat may constitute an adaptive behaviour to the lower social hierarchy position, which is perceived as unjust. Connecting the prevalence of obesity to the narcissism epidemic allows for a more thorough examination of factors, which contribute to obesity, which includes early difficult childhood experience, lower rank, and the overall competitive framework of the society. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. The medical risks of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi-Sunyer, Xavier

    2009-11-01

    Obesity is at epidemic proportions in the United States and in other developed and developing countries. The prevalence of obesity is increasing not only in adults, but especially among children and adolescents. In the United States in 2003 to 2004, 17.1% of children and adolescents were overweight, and 32.2% of adults were obese. Obesity is a significant risk factor for and contributor to increased morbidity and mortality, most importantly from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, but also from cancer and chronic diseases, including osteoarthritis, liver and kidney disease, sleep apnea, and depression. The prevalence of obesity has increased steadily over the past 5 decades, and obesity may have a significant impact on quality-adjusted life years. Obesity is also strongly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality as well as cardiovascular and cancer mortality. Despite the substantial effects of obesity, weight loss can result in a significant reduction in risk for the majority of these comorbid conditions. Those comorbidities most closely linked to obesity must be identified to increase awareness of potential adverse outcomes. This will allow health care professionals to identify and implement appropriate interventions to reduce patient risk and mortality. A systematic search strategy was used to identify published literature between 1995 and 2008 that reported data from prospective longitudinal studies of obesity and comorbid medical conditions. This article will review evidence for significant associations of obesity with comorbidities to provide information useful for optimal patient management.

  10. Obesity and infection: reciprocal causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainer, V; Zamrazilová, H; Kunešová, M; Bendlová, B; Aldhoon-Hainerová, I

    2015-01-01

    Associations between different infectious agents and obesity have been reported in humans for over thirty years. In many cases, as in nosocomial infections, this relationship reflects the greater susceptibility of obese individuals to infection due to impaired immunity. In such cases, the infection is not related to obesity as a causal factor but represents a complication of obesity. In contrast, several infections have been suggested as potential causal factors in human obesity. However, evidence of a causal linkage to human obesity has only been provided for adenovirus 36 (Adv36). This virus activates lipogenic and proinflammatory pathways in adipose tissue, improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and hepatic steatosis. The E4orf1 gene of Adv36 exerts insulin senzitizing effects, but is devoid of its pro-inflammatory modalities. The development of a vaccine to prevent Adv36-induced obesity or the use of E4orf1 as a ligand for novel antidiabetic drugs could open new horizons in the prophylaxis and treatment of obesity and diabetes. More experimental and clinical studies are needed to elucidate the mutual relations between infection and obesity, identify additional infectious agents causing human obesity, as well as define the conditions that predispose obese individuals to specific infections.

  11. Obesity, fat distribution and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Renato

    2006-07-20

    In both sexes, obesity, particularly the abdominal obesity phenotype, may impair fertility. This adverse effect appears to be mainly related to disorders of sex hormone secretion and/or metabolism, leading in turn to a condition of relative hyperandrogenism in obese women and of hypotestosteronemia (and, in some cases, a true hypogonadotropic hypogonadism) in obese men. In women, obesity can also play a relevant role in the pathophysiology of hyperandrogenism and metabolic abnormalities which characterize the polycystic ovary syndrome. These hormonal alterations may also play an important role in the pathophysiology of different obesity phenotypes and associated metabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities. Weight loss can improve hormonal abnormalities and fertility rates in both women and men. Erectile dysfunction, which is very common in obese males, can also be improved by lifestyle intervention strategies favouring weight loss.

  12. Psychiatric comorbidity of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalarchian, Melissa A; Marcus, Marsha D

    2012-06-01

    The onset of psychiatric symptoms and disorders is relatively common in childhood, occurring among youths across the weight spectrum. However, available research suggests that certain psychiatric comorbidities are more prevalent in obese children and adolescents than in healthy weight youths. First, we review research on disordered eating, including evidence to suggest that loss of control eating is associated with weight gain and obesity in youths, as well as poor outcome in family-based treatment of paediatric obesity. Second, we highlight evidence on the relationship between depression and obesity, especially in girls. Third, we present data on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly the symptoms of impulsivity and inattention, and childhood obesity. We also consider that some medical conditions and psychotropic medications contribute to weight gain and obesity in children and adolescents. Throughout the review, we emphasize that psychiatric comorbidity may be a cause or consequence of childhood obesity, or they may share common aetiological factors.

  13. A STUDY OF PREVALENCE AND PREDICTORS OF OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY IN HIGH SCHOOL CHILDREN IN WARANGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerasangamesh Moola

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Overweight and obesity represent a rapidly growing threat to the health of population in an increasing number of countries. Indeed, these are now so common that they are replacing more traditional problems such as under nutrition and infectious diseases as the most significant causes of ill health. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was undertaken in 5 schools catering Warangal city. The age groups included in the study were between 5- 15 years of age. Out of 3352 children included in the study, 2188 (65.27% were males and 1164 (34.73% were females. RESULTS 14.4% of the children were obese, and in that, females (17% were slightly more in number than males (13%. Obese children had significantly higher caloric intake than non-obese children. There was a significant relationship between birth weight of the child and development of obesity in the later age. Significant relationship was found between obesity in children and their parental BMI. There was no significant difference in physical activity between obese, overweight and non-obese group. Sedentary behaviour had a significant association with the obese group when compared to the non-obese group. There was a significant relationship between sedentary behaviour with overweight and obesity. Pre-hypertension and hypertension were found to be significantly higher in the obese group when compared to the non-obese group, and in the obese group, this was more predominant in the age group of 11-15 than the 5-10 years age group. CONCLUSION Timely intervention will result in decreased adulthood morbidity and mortality due to obesity in these children

  14. Diet-induced obesity elevates colonic TNF-alpha in mice and is accompanied by an activation of Wnt signaling: a mechanism for obesity-associated colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation associated with obesity may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether the Wnt pathway, an intracellular signaling cascade that plays a critical role in colorectal carcinogenesis, is activated by obesity-induce...

  15. Reversible lacrimal gland-protective regulatory T-cell dysfunction underlies male-specific autoimmune dacryoadenitis in the non-obese diabetic mouse model of Sjögren syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Scott M; Kreiger, Portia A; Koretzky, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are required to maintain immunological tolerance; however, defects in specific organ-protective Treg cell functions have not been demonstrated in organ-specific autoimmunity. Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice spontaneously develop lacrimal and salivary gland autoimmunity and are a well-characterized model of Sjögren syndrome. Lacrimal gland disease in NOD mice is male-specific, but the role of Treg cells in this sex-specificity is not known. This study aimed to determine if male-specific autoimmune dacryoadenitis in the NOD mouse model of Sjögren syndrome is the result of lacrimal gland-protective Treg cell dysfunction. An adoptive transfer model of Sjögren syndrome was developed by transferring cells from the lacrimal gland-draining cervical lymph nodes of NOD mice to lymphocyte-deficient NOD-SCID mice. Transfer of bulk cervical lymph node cells modelled the male-specific dacryoadenitis that spontaneously develops in NOD mice. Female to female transfers resulted in dacryoadenitis if the CD4+ CD25+ Treg-enriched population was depleted before transfer; however, male to male transfers resulted in comparable dacryoadenitis regardless of the presence or absence of Treg cells within the donor cell population. Hormone manipulation studies suggested that this Treg cell dysfunction was mediated at least in part by androgens. Surprisingly, male Treg cells were capable of preventing the transfer of dacryoadenitis to female recipients. These data suggest that male-specific factors promote reversible dysfunction of lacrimal gland-protective Treg cells and, to our knowledge, form the first evidence for reversible organ-protective Treg cell dysfunction in organ-specific autoimmunity. PMID:25581706

  16. Childhood Obesity: Epidemiological and Clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    ELAMIN, Abdelaziz

    2010-01-01

    Primary childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in industrialized countries particularly in North America. Twenty five percent of children and adolescents in the United States are overweight and 14% are obese. However, the prevalence of obesity is alarmingly rising in other less developed parts of the world, like Asia, the Middle East and some parts of Africa. Overweight and obesity in childhood extend to adulthood and the majority of obese children grew as obese adults. Obesity has sig...

  17. Oxidative Stress in Obesity: A Critical Component in Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Marseglia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, a social problem worldwide, is characterized by an increase in body weight that results in excessive fat accumulation. Obesity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and leads to several diseases, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, fatty liver diseases, and cancer. Growing evidence allows us to understand the critical role of adipose tissue in controlling the physic-pathological mechanisms of obesity and related comorbidities. Recently, adipose tissue, especially in the visceral compartment, has been considered not only as a simple energy depository tissue, but also as an active endocrine organ releasing a variety of biologically active molecules known as adipocytokines or adipokines. Based on the complex interplay between adipokines, obesity is also characterized by chronic low grade inflammation with permanently increased oxidative stress (OS. Over-expression of oxidative stress damages cellular structures together with under-production of anti-oxidant mechanisms, leading to the development of obesity-related complications. The aim of this review is to summarize what is known in the relationship between OS in obesity and obesity-related diseases.

  18. Impaired brain energy gain upon a glucose load in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardzinski, Ewelina K; Kistenmacher, Alina; Melchert, Uwe H; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Oltmanns, Kerstin M

    2018-03-06

    There is evidence that the brain's energy status is lowered in obesity despite of chronic hypercaloric nutrition. The underlying mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesized that the brain of obese people does not appropriately generate energy in response to a hypercaloric supply. Glucose was intravenously infused in 17 normal weights and 13 obese participants until blood glucose concentrations reached the postprandial levels of 7 mmol/L and 10 mmol/L. Changes in cerebral adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PCr) content were measured by 31 phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and stress hormonal measures regulating glucose homeostasis were monitored. Because vitamin C is crucial for a proper neuronal energy synthesis we determined circulating concentrations during the experimental testing. Cerebral high-energy phosphates were increased at blood glucose levels of 7 mmol/L in normal weights, which was completely missing in the obese. Brain energy content moderately raised only at blood glucose levels of 10 mmol/L in obese participants. Vitamin C concentrations generally correlated with the brain energy content at blood glucose concentrations of 7 mmol/L. Our data demonstrate an inefficient cerebral energy gain upon a glucose load in obese men, which may result from a dysfunctional glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier or a downregulated energy synthesis in mitochondrial oxidation processes. Our finding offers an explanation for the chronic neuroenergetic deficiency and respectively missing satiety perception in obesity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Combating adolescent obesity: an integrated physiological and psychological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hoor, Gill A; Plasqui, Guy; Schols, Annemie M W J; Kok, Gerjo

    2014-11-01

    Optimizing the approach to combat childhood obesity, we emphasize the importance of combining both biological and psychological knowledge. In such an approach, strength exercises might be an important aspect in the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity. Recent evidence indicates plausible effects of the role of resistance exercise in combating the negative health effects of childhood obesity. When looking at body composition, overweight youngsters do not only have a higher fat mass, but also a higher muscle mass compared with their normal-weight counterparts. With that, they are also stronger and better in exercises wherein the focus is on absolute strength, making them - under the right circumstances - more motivated to engage in resistance exercise and ultimately maintain a physically active lifestyle. More and more children are obese, and obese children become obese adults. One reason that overweight youngsters are not physically active is that they are outperformed by normal-weight youngsters, and one reason they are overweight is because they are not physically active. To combat childhood obesity, strength exercise might be a solution to break the vicious cycle.

  20. Role of taurine in the pathogenesis of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shigeru

    2015-07-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid that is present in mammalian tissues in millimolar concentrations. Taurine is involved in a diverse array of biological and physiological functions, including bile salt conjugation, osmoregulation, membrane stabilization, calcium modulation, anti-oxidation, and immunomodulation. The prevalence of obesity and being overweight continues to rise worldwide at an alarming rate. Obesity is associated with a higher risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and other clinical conditions. Ingestion of taurine has been shown to alleviate metabolic diseases such as hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity in animal models. A global epidemiological survey showed that 24-h urinary taurine excretion, as a marker of dietary taurine intake, was inversely associated with BMI, blood pressure, and plasma cholesterol in humans. In addition, taurine chloramine, an endogenous product derived from activated neutrophils, has been reported to suppress obesity-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in adipocytes. Synthetic activity and concentration of taurine in adipose tissues and plasma have been shown to decrease in humans and animals during the development of obesity, suggesting a relationship between taurine deficiency and obesity. In this review, I summarize the effects of taurine on the progression of obesity in animal models and humans. Furthermore, I discuss possible mechanisms underlying the antiobesity effects of taurine. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Obesity in Korean Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeonghee; Kim, Hye Young; Kim, Jeongseon

    2017-12-08

    Instant coffee mixes that contain sugar and non-dairy creamer account for 80-90% of the total coffee market in Korea. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between coffee consumption and obesity in Korean women. We included 5995 women who participated in a health screening examination at the Korean National Cancer Center between 2007 and 2016. Daily coffee consumption and the use of sugar and creamer in coffee was evaluated using a 106-item food frequency questionnaire. Obesity was assessed by body mass index (BMI), and abdominal obesity was assessed by waist circumference (WC). A multiple logistic regression model was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of obesity according to coffee consumption. After multivariate adjustment, high coffee consumption was positively associated with obesity as measured by BMI (≥3 cups vs. no drinks, OR = 2.52; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.91-3.34; p for the trend coffee consumption and obesity prevalence was not altered by menopause. The amount of coffee with additives consumed per day by Korean women was positively correlated with the prevalence of obesity, but causation cannot be determined due to the cross-sectional nature of the study design. The mechanism underlying the observed relationship is yet to be elucidated.

  2. Investigation Of Obesity-Related Mortality Rates In Delaware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Malcolm J; Wentzien, Derald E; Bautista, Riza C; Gross, Catherine C

    2017-06-01

    As Delaware's adult obesity crisis continues to be a leading public health concern, we evaluated Delaware's 1999-2014 vital records to examine the association between obesity and mortality. We used the Delaware population death records from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) WONDER database and the Delaware Health Statistics Center (DHSC). Together with the vital records, we incorporated Microsoft Excel, SAS (Statistical Analysis System) and GIS (geographic information system) tools to analyze obesity influences from county residence, economic status, education, gender, and race. Using the 15-year (1999-2014) time span with the CDC WONDER database, we observed a statistically significant 28.7% increase in the age-adjusted Delaware obesity-related mortality rates (where obesity was a contributory factor). Furthermore, obesity influenced death counts in all three Delaware counties (New Castle, Kent, and Sussex). Kent County experienced the largest increase (66.0%), followed by New Castle County (47.4%), and Sussex County (25.2%). The DHSC mortality rates for all leading causes of death from 2000 to 2011 indicated relatively stable mortality rates for Delaware. However, using CDC WONDER data, the Delaware mortality rate for obesity as a single underlying cause in 2011 was 56.9% higher than mortality rate in 2000.

  3. Early-life influences on obesity: From preconception to adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The double burden of under- and overnutrition profoundly affects human health globally. According to the World Health Organization, obesity and diabetes rates have almost doubled worldwide since 1980, and, in 2011, more than 40 million children under 5 years of age were overweight. Ecologic factors,...

  4. Obesity and Associated Comorbidities in People and Companion Animals: A One Health Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M; Cunningham, S; Lund, E M; Khanna, C; Naramore, R; Patel, A; Day, M J

    2017-05-01

    This article reviews the biology, prevalence and risks for obesity in people and companion dogs and cats, and explores the links between obesity and diabetes mellitus and cancer across these species. Obesity is a major healthcare problem in both human and veterinary medicine and there is an increasing prevalence of obesity in people and pets. In people and animals, obesity is a complex disorder involving diet, level of physical activity, behavioural factors, socioeconomic factors, environment exposures, genetics, metabolism and the microbiome. Pets and people share a number of obesity-related comorbidities. Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus in people and in cats, but this association is not recognized in dogs. Obesity is a recognized risk factor for a number of human cancers, but there are fewer data available describing this association with canine neoplastic disease. One approach to addressing the problem of obesity is by taking a 'One Health' perspective. Comparative clinical research examining shared lifestyle and environmental risk factors and the reasons underlying species differences should provide new perspectives on the fundamental biology of obesity. One Health programmes involving human healthcare professionals and veterinarians could help address obesity with simple interventions at the community level. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Maternal obesity and increased neonatal adiposity correspond with altered infant mesenchymal stem cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Peter R; Patinkin, Zachary; Shapiro, Allison Lb; De La Houssaye, Becky A; Woontner, Michael; Boyle, Kristen E; Vanderlinden, Lauren; Dabelea, Dana; Friedman, Jacob E

    2017-11-02

    Maternal obesity is a global health problem that increases offspring obesity risk. The metabolic pathways underlying early developmental programming in human infants at risk for obesity remain poorly understood, largely due to barriers in fetal/infant tissue sampling. Utilizing umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (uMSC) from offspring of normal weight and obese mothers, we tested whether energy metabolism and gene expression differ in differentiating uMSC myocytes and adipocytes, in relation to maternal obesity exposures and/or neonatal adiposity. Biomarkers of incomplete β-oxidation were uniquely positively correlated with infant adiposity and maternal lipid levels in uMSC myocytes from offspring of obese mothers only. Metabolic and biosynthetic processes were enriched in differential gene expression analysis related to maternal obesity. In uMSC adipocytes, maternal obesity and lipids were associated with downregulation in multiple insulin-dependent energy-sensing pathways including PI3K and AMPK. Maternal lipids correlated with uMSC adipocyte upregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain but downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Overall, our data revealed cell-specific alterations in metabolism and gene expression that correlated with maternal obesity and adiposity of their offspring, suggesting tissue-specific metabolic and regulatory changes in these newborn cells. We provide important insight into potential developmental programming mechanisms of increased obesity risk in offspring of obese mothers.

  6. Metabolic endotoxemia with obesity: is it real and is it relevant?

    OpenAIRE

    Boutagy, Nabil E.; McMillan, Ryan P.; Frisard, Madlyn I.; Hulver, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with metabolic derangements in multiple tissues, which contribute to the progression of insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. The underlying stimulus for these metabolic derangements in obesity are not fully elucidated, however recent evidence in rodents and humans suggests that systemic, low level elevations of gut derived endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) may play an important role in obesity related, whole-body and tissue specific metabolic perturbations. L...

  7. Unchanged mitochondrial phenotype, but accumulation of lipids in the myometrium in obese pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gam, Christiane Marie Bourgin Folke; Larsen, Lea Hüche; Mortensen, Ole Hartvig

    2017-01-01

    KEY POINTS: Obesity during pregnancy and childbirth is associated with labour dystocia leading to instrumental or operative delivery, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear and insufficient uterine contractility has been suggested. This study examined whether reduced myom...... in obese women. In conclusion no indication of myometrial mitochondrial dysfunction in the isolated state was found, but the observed increase of lipid content might play a role in the pathophysiological mechanisms behind labour dystocia in obese women....

  8. Sex differences in obesity development in pair-fed neuronal lipoprotein lipase deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: These results suggest that the mechanism underlying ERα regulation of body weight interacts with the LPL-dependent lipid processing in the hypothalamus in a sex specific way. ERα could provide the link between brain lipid sensing and sex differences in obesity development. This study has the potential important clinical implication to provide better management for women who suffer from obesity and obesity-related co-morbidities.

  9. Obesity coverage gap: Consumers perceive low coverage for obesity treatments even when workplace wellness programs target BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Elizabeth Ruth; Kyle, Theodore K; Nadglowski, Joseph F; Stanford, Fatima Cody

    2017-02-01

    Evidence-based obesity treatments, such as bariatric surgery, are not considered essential health benefits under the Affordable Care Act. Employer-sponsored wellness programs with incentives based on biometric outcomes are allowed and often used despite mixed evidence regarding their effectiveness. This study examines consumers' perceptions of their coverage for obesity treatments and exposure to workplace wellness programs. A total of 7,378 participants completed an online survey during 2015-2016. Respondents answered questions regarding their health coverage for seven medical services and exposure to employer wellness programs that target weight or body mass index (BMI). Using χ 2 tests, associations between perceptions of exposure to employer wellness programs and coverage for medical services were examined. Differences between survey years were also assessed. Most respondents reported they did not have health coverage for obesity treatments, but more of the respondents with employer wellness programs reported having coverage. Neither the perception of coverage for obesity treatments nor exposure to wellness programs increased between 2015 and 2016. Even when consumers have exposure to employer wellness programs that target BMI, their health insurance often excludes obesity treatments. Given the clinical and cost-effectiveness of such treatments, reducing that coverage gap may mitigate obesity's individual- and population-level effects. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  10. Childhood obesity: causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Krushnapriya; Sahoo, Bishnupriya; Choudhury, Ashok Kumar; Sofi, Nighat Yasin; Kumar, Raman; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in developed as well as in developing countries. Overweight and obesity in childhood are known to have significant impact on both physical and psychological health. Overweight and obese children are likely to stay obese into adulthood and more likely to develop non-communicable diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a younger age. The mechanism of obesity development is not fully understood and it is believed to be a disorder with multiple causes. Environmental factors, lifestyle preferences, and cultural environment play pivotal roles in the rising prevalence of obesity worldwide. In general, overweight and obesity are assumed to be the results of an increase in caloric and fat intake. On the other hand, there are supporting evidence that excessive sugar intake by soft drink, increased portion size, and steady decline in physical activity have been playing major roles in the rising rates of obesity all around the world. Childhood obesity can profoundly affect children's physical health, social, and emotional well-being, and self esteem. It is also associated with poor academic performance and a lower quality of life experienced by the child. Many co-morbid conditions like metabolic, cardiovascular, orthopedic, neurological, hepatic, pulmonary, and renal disorders are also seen in association with childhood obesity.

  11. Childhood obesity: causes and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krushnapriya Sahoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in developed as well as in developing countries. Overweight and obesity in childhood are known to have significant impact on both physical and psychological health. Overweight and obese children are likely to stay obese into adulthood and more likely to develop non-communicable diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a younger age. The mechanism of obesity development is not fully understood and it is believed to be a disorder with multiple causes. Environmental factors, lifestyle preferences, and cultural environment play pivotal roles in the rising prevalence of obesity worldwide. In general, overweight and obesity are assumed to be the results of an increase in caloric and fat intake. On the other hand, there are supporting evidence that excessive sugar intake by soft drink, increased portion size, and steady decline in physical activity have been playing major roles in the rising rates of obesity all around the world. Childhood obesity can profoundly affect children′s physical health, social, and emotional well-being, and self esteem. It is also associated with poor academic performance and a lower quality of life experienced by the child. Many co-morbid conditions like metabolic, cardiovascular, orthopedic, neurological, hepatic, pulmonary, and renal disorders are also seen in association with childhood obesity.

  12. Pediatric Obesity: Looking into Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Malavolti

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of pediatric obesity continues to rise worldwide. Increasing the number of health care practitioners as well as pediatricians with expertise in obesity treatment is necessary. Because many obese patients suffer obesity-associated cardiovascular, metabolic and other health complications that could increase the severity of obesity, it is fundamental not only to identify the child prone to obesity as early as possible, but to recognize, treat and monitor obesity-related diseases during adolescence. This short review outlines the treatment of pediatric obesity that may have applications in the primary care setting. It examines current information on eating behavior, sedentary behavior, and details studies of multidisciplinary, behavior-based, obesity treatment programs. We also report the less common and more aggressive forms of treatment, such as medication and bariatric surgery. We emphasize that health care providers have the potential to improve outcomes by performing early identification, helping families create the best possible home environment, and by providing structured guidance to obese children and their families.

  13. Symposium on Obesity and Asthma –November 2, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Boulet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma and obesity are frequently associated, and obesity has been considered a factor contributing to both an increase in severity of asthma and to its development. The present document summarizes the proceedings of a symposium held in Montreal, Quebec, on November 2, 2006, under the auspices of the Réseau en santé respiratoire du Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec in collaboration with the McGill University – Strauss Severe Asthma Program, Université Laval (Quebec City and Université de Montréal. It includes an overview of the various aspects of the relationships between asthma and obesity with regard to animal models; genetic, hormonal and physiological determinants; influence of comorbidities (eg, sleep apnea syndrome; epidemiology; clinical and psychological features; and management of asthma in the obese population.

  14. Body and health perception for obesity in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Sampaio Florêncio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: To identify the body and health perception and its relationship with obesity in a group of young adults. Methods: This is an analytical study performed on 1,073 young adults from Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, through a questionnaire whose data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and logistic regression. The Ethics Committee approved the study under opinion nº 263.271/ 2013. Results: Results showed that women with obesity tended to perceive their condition more and evidenced greater body dissatisfaction than men. In addition, they were associated with obesity, self-perception of overweight and body satisfaction. Conclusion: Young people with obesity perceive their condition and are dissatisfied with it.

  15. Gender in childhood obesity: family environment, hormones, and genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Amy B; Chernausek, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity among children in the United States represents a pool of latent morbidity. Though the prevalence of obesity has increased in both boys and girls, the causes and consequences differ between the sexes. Thus, interventions proposed to treat and prevent childhood obesity will need to account for these differences. This review examines gender differences in the presentation of obesity in children and describes environmental, hormonal, and genetic factors that contribute to observed gender differences. A search of peer-reviewed, published literature was performed with PubMed for articles published from January 1974 through October 2008. Search terms used were obesity, sex, gender, hormones, family environment, body composition, adiposity, and genes. Studies of children aged 0 to 18 years were included, and only articles published in English were reviewed for consideration. Articles that illustrated gender differences in either the presentation or underlying mechanisms of obesity in children were reviewed for content, and their bibliographies were used to identify other relevant literature. Gender differences in childhood obesity have been understudied partially because of how we define the categories of overweight and obesity. Close examination of studies revealed that gender differences were common, both before and during puberty. Boys and girls differ in body composition, patterns of weight gain, hormone biology, and the susceptibility to certain social, ethnic, genetic, and environmental factors. Our understanding of how gender differences in pediatric populations relate to the pathogenesis of obesity and the subsequent development of associated comorbid states is critical to developing and implementing both therapeutic and preventive interventions.

  16. Determinants of testosterone levels in human male obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekaert, Marlies; Van Nieuwenhove, Yves; Calders, Patrick; Cuvelier, Claude A; Batens, Arsène-Hélène; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Ouwens, D Margriet; Ruige, Johannes B

    2015-09-01

    Testosterone (T) levels are decreased in obese men, but the underlying causes are incompletely understood. Our objective was to explore the relation between low (free) T levels and male obesity, by evaluating metabolic parameters, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) aromatase expression, and parameters of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We recruited 57 morbidly obese men [33 had type 2 diabetes (DM2)] and 25 normal-weight men undergoing abdominal surgery. Fourteen obese men also attended a follow-up, 2 years after gastric bypass surgery (GBS). Circulating T levels were quantified by LC-MS/MS, whereas free T levels were measured using serum equilibrium dialysis and sex hormone-binding globulin, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone by immunoassay. SAT biopsies were used to determine adipocyte cell size and aromatase expression by real-time PCR. Total and free T levels were decreased in obese males versus controls, with a further decrease in obese men with DM2 versus obese men without DM2. There were no differences in aromatase expression among the study groups, and sex steroids did not correlate with aromatase expression. Pearson analysis revealed an inverse association between (free) T and SAT cell size, triglycerides, and HOMA-IR. Multivariate analysis confirmed the inverse association between (free) T and SAT cell size (β = -0.321, P = 0.037 and β = -0.441, P = 0.011, respectively), independent of age, triglycerides, HOMA-IR, obesity, or diabetes. T levels were normalized 2 years after GBS. These data suggest that SAT cell size rather than SAT aromatase expression or parameters of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is related to low T in male obesity, which points to adipose cell size-related metabolic changes as a major trigger in decreased T levels.

  17. Obesity and health system reform: private vs. public responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y Tony; Nichols, Len M

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a particularly vexing public health challenge, since it not only underlies much disease and health spending but also largely stems from repeated personal behavioral choices. The newly enacted comprehensive health reform law contains a number of provisions to address obesity. For example, insurance companies are required to provide coverage for preventive-health services, which include obesity screening and nutritional counseling. In addition, employers will soon be able to offer premium discounts to workers who participate in wellness programs that emphasize behavioral choices. These policies presume that government intervention to reduce obesity is necessary and justified. Some people, however, argue that individuals have a compelling interest to pursue their own health and happiness as they see fit, and therefore any government intervention in these areas is an unwarranted intrusion into privacy and one's freedom to eat, drink, and exercise as much or as little as one wants. This paper clarifies the overlapping individual, employer, and social interest in each person's health generally to avoid obesity and its myriad costs in particular. The paper also explores recent evidence on the impact of government interventions on obesity through case studies on food labeling and employer-based anti-obesity interventions. Our analysis suggests a positive role for government intervention to reduce and prevent obesity. At the same time, we discuss criteria that can be used to draw lines between government, employer, and individual responsibility for health, and to derive principles that should guide and limit government interventions on obesity as health reform's various elements (e.g., exchanges, insurance market reforms) are implemented in the coming years. © 2011 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  18. Food Retailers and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Rosemary A

    2015-03-01

    We live in an 'obesogenic environment' where we are constantly bombarded with choices that encourage us to move less and eat more. Many factors influence our dietary choices, including the expert marketers who advise manufacturers on ways to encourage the population to buy more, especially profitable, palatable 'ultra-processed' foods. Supermarkets themselves have become skilled in manipulating buying behaviour, using their layout and specific product placement as well as advertising to maximise purchases of particular foods. Increasingly, supermarkets push their own 'house' brands. Those marketing fast foods also use persuasive tactics to attract customers, especially children who they entice with non-food items such as promotional or collectable toys. There is no mystery to the increase in obesity: our energy intake from foods and drinks has increased over the same period that energy output has decreased. Obesity has a range of relevant factors, but there is little doubt that marketing from supermarkets and fast food retailers has played a role.

  19. Health consequences of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, Gerald S

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have established that cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including obesity are identifiable in childhood. Childhood risk factors are predictive of adult cardiac risk and even premature death [Franks et al. (2010) N Engl J Med 362:485-493]. In the United States, CV diseases remains the leading causes of death. In fact, heart disease has become the major cause of death worldwide, surpassing undernutrition and infectious diseases, largely related to obesity in childhood [Wang and Lobstein (2006) Int J Pediatr Obes 1:11-25]. The concept that adult heart diseases begin in childhood is an outgrowth of extensive long-term epidemiologic studies in youth, that is, the Bogalusa Heart Study [Berenson et al. (1986) Causation of cardiovascular risk factors in children: Perspectives on cardiovascular risk in early life, Raven Press Books Ltd]. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Psychological consequences of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Roland

    2013-02-01

    Overweight and obesity is associated with a broad variety of stigmatization and discrimination in every day live. Obese people have more difficulties in finding a job, have a lower income, and are less often seen in leadership positions. In society, responsibility for the weight situation in seen as lying by the individuals affected altogether, leading to chronic stress, problems with self esteem and perception of loss of control. As a consequence, there is an increased risk for developing serious psychological problems such as affective and anxiety disorders. As a reaction, coping strategies to deal with the psychological pressure such as dysfunctional eating behavior, binge eating and physical inactivity are used. Females, people belonging to another ethnic or social minority, adolescents and people with eating disorders are considered at increased risk of psychological distress. Psychological vulnerabilities and the consequences of stigmatization need to be considered. Moreover, perceived behavioral control and self esteem are key aspects of to be addressed on the treatment.

  1. Fetal Programming of Obesity: Maternal Obesity and Excessive Weight Gain

    OpenAIRE

    Seray Kabaran

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is an increasing health problem throughout the world. Maternal pre-pregnancy weight, maternal nutrition and maternal weight gain are among the factors that can cause childhood obesity. Both maternal obesity and excessive weight gain increase the risks of excessive fetal weight gain and high birth weight. Rapid weight gain during fetal period leads to changes in the newborn body composition. Specifically, the increase in body fat ratio in the early periods is associat...

  2. Biology of Obesity: Lessons from Animal Models of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keizo Kanasaki

    2011-01-01

    problems, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, respiratory failure, muscle weakness, and cancer. The precise molecular mechanisms by which obesity induces these health problems are not yet clear. To better understand the pathomechanisms of human disease, good animal models are essential. In this paper, we will analyze animal models of obesity and their use in the research of obesity-associated human health conditions and diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  3. Juvenile Obesity, Physical Activity, and Lifestyle Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Or, Oded

    2000-01-01

    Because many obese children become obese adults, the recent rapid increase in juvenile obesity poses a major public health challenge. Enhanced physical activity is a cornerstone in a multidisciplinary approach to preventing and treating juvenile obesity. Giving exercise recommendations focused for obese youth is critical. Cutting down on sedentary…

  4. [Treatment of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basdevant, A

    2002-04-01

    There are three main goals to the treatment of obesity: prevention and treatment of the complications, realistic reduction of excess weight, psychological well-being. Each individual is in a specific clinical situation and interindividual variability is wide so stereotypic therapeutic schemes are of little use. Treatment calls upon physical exercise, dietary counseling, drugs, and exceptionally surgery. Psychological support is an integral part of patient management. Treatment of respiratory complications focuses on preventing thromboembolism and management of sleep apnea syndrome and alveolar hypoventilation.

  5. Microbiota, inflammation and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Yolanda; Moya-Pérez, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between metabolism and immunity play a pivotal role in the development of obesity-associated chronic co-morbidities. Obesity involves impairment of immune function affecting both the innate and adaptive immune system. This leads to increased risk of infections as well as chronic low-grade inflammation, which in turn causes metabolic dysfunction (e.g. insulin resistance) and chronic disease (e.g. type-2 diabetes). Gut microbiota has emerged as one of the key factors regulating early events triggering inflammation associated with obesity and metabolic dysfunction. This effect seems to be related to diet- and obesity-associated changes in gut microbiota composition and to increased translocation of immunogenic bacterial products, which activate innate and adaptive immunity in the gut and beyond, contributing to an increase in inflammatory tone. Innate immune receptors, like Toll-like receptors (TLRs), are known to be up-regulated in the tissue affected by most inflammatory disorders and activated by both specific microbial components and dietary lipids. This triggers several signaling transduction pathways (e.g. JNK and IKKβ/NF-κB), leading to inflammatory cytokine and chemokine (TNF-α, IL-1, MCP1) production and to inflammatory cell recruitment, causing insulin resistance. T-cell differentiation into effector inflammatory or regulatory T cells also depends on the type of TLR activated and on cytokine production, which in turn depends upon gut microbiota-diet interactions. Here, we update and discuss our current understanding of how gut microbiota could contribute to defining whole-body metabolism by influencing diverse components of the innate and adaptive immune system, both locally and systemically.

  6. Dietary determinants of obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Huaidong, D.U.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity has become a serious public health problem worldwide, and dietary composition can play a role in its prevention and treatment. However, available literature on the impacts of different dietary factors on weight change is inconsistent, or even conflicting. In this review, we briefly summarized the mechanisms and influences of several major dietary determinants of weight change, with a focus on their potential in the prevention of weight gain or regain. We discussed the intake of fat, p...

  7. Obesity: an immunometabolic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrani Ray

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, characterized by chronic activation of inflammatory pathways, is a critical factor contributing to insulin resistance (IR and type 2 diabetes (T2D. Free fatty acids (FFAs are increased in obesity and are implicated as proximate causes of IR and induction of inflammatory signaling in adipose, liver, muscle, and pancreas. Cells of the innate immune system produce cytokines and other factors that affect insulin signaling and result in the development of IR. In the lean state, adipose tissue is populated by adipose tissue macrophage of the anti-inflammatory M2 type (ATM2 and natural killer (NK cells; this maintains the insulin-sensitive phenotype because ATM2 cells secrete IL10. In contrast, obesity induces lipolysis and release of pro-inflammatory free fatty acids (FFAs and factors such as chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α which recruit blood monocytes in adipose tissue, where they are converted to macrophages of the highly pro-inflammatory M1-type (ATM1. Activated ATM1 produce large amounts of pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, interleukin 1β (IL-1β, IL-6, leukotriene B4 (LTB4, nitric oxide (NO and resistin that work in a paracrine fashion and cause IR in adipose tissue. In the liver, both pro-inflammatory Kupffer cells (M1-KCs and recruited hepatic macrophages (Ly6Chigh contribute to decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity. The present mini-review will update the bidirectional interaction between the immune system and obesity-induced changes in metabolism in adipose tissue and liver and the metabolic consequences thereof.

  8. Psychosocial Aspects of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Amy R

    2016-01-01

    This article is the sixth in a series of the comorbidities of childhood obesity and reviews psychosocial aspects with a focus on weight-based victimization and discrimination stemming from weight bias and stigma. Outcomes from these bullying and discriminatory experiences are pervasive and impact youth across all settings, including school. Lastly, this article provides recommendations on how to reduce bias and stigma to better serve these students in the school environment. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. Surgery for morbid obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, John M H; Mehta, Samir; Rhodes, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of morbid obesity in the UK population is rising, bringing with it increased levels of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, arthritis and early mortality. The overall cost to the health service is high, and is set to increase over the coming decades as the overweight population ages. Dietary, lifestyle and pharmacological interventions offer at best reasonable, short‐term weight reduction and often fail. Surgical intervention is a safe and effective means of delivering marked long...

  10. Secondary obesity. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M B Babarina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids, prolactin and growth hormone play an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis. Hypercortisolism, hyperprolactinemia and growth hormone deficiency lead to an increase in body weight due to visceral fat accumulation. Mechanisms of development of obesity in various endocrine diseases are different. Adequate correction of hormonal disorders usually is accompanied by a decrease in body weight and the improvement of metabolic parameters.

  11. [Pharmacological therapy of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, Uberto; Vanuzzo, Diego; Vicennati, Valentina; Pasquali, Renato

    2008-04-01

    Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions worldwide and it is correlated with various comorbidities, among which the most relevant are diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases. Obesity management is a modern challenge because of the rapid evolution of unfavorable lifestyles and unfortunately there are no effective treatments applicable to the large majority of obese/overweight people. The current medical attitude is to treat the complications of obesity (e.g. dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases). However, the potential of treating obesity is enormous, bearing in mind that a volitional weight loss of 10 kg is associated with important risk factor improvement: blood pressure -10 mmHg, total cholesterol -10%, LDL cholesterol -15%, triglycerides -30%, fasting glucose -50%, HDL cholesterol +8%. Drug treatment for obesity is an evolving branch of pharmacology, burdened by severe side effects and consequences of the early drugs, withdrawn from the market, and challenged by the lack of long-term data on the effect of medications on obesity-related morbidity and mortality, first of all cardiovascular diseases. In Europe three antiobesity drugs are currently licensed: sibutramine, orlistat, and rimonabant; important trials with clinical endpoints are ongoing for sibutramine and rimonabant. While waiting for their results, it is convenient to evaluate these drugs for their effects on body weight and cardiometabolic risk factors. Sibutramine is a centrally acting serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor that mainly increases satiety. At the level of brown adipose tissue, sibutramine can also facilitate energy expenditure by increasing thermogenesis. The long-term studies (five) documented a mean differential weight reduction of 4.45 kg for sibutramine vs placebo. Considering the principal studies, attrition rate was 43%. This drug not only reduces body weight and waist circumference, but it decreases triglycerides and

  12. Childhood maltreatment and pre-pregnancy obesity: a comparison of obese, overweight, and normal weight pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagl, Michaela; Steinig, Jana; Klinitzke, Grit; Stepan, Holger; Kersting, Anette

    2016-04-01

    Pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity is associated with poor health outcomes for the mother and the child. General population studies suggest that childhood maltreatment is associated with obesity in adulthood. The aim of our study was to examine the association between pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity and a history of childhood abuse or neglect including different stages of severity of abuse and neglect. Three hundred twenty-six normal weight, overweight, or obese pregnant women reported demographic data, height and weight, and general psychological distress at 18-22 weeks of gestation. Childhood maltreatment was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Associations were examined using logistic regression analyses and a reference group of normal weight women. Fifty percent reported a history of abuse or neglect. After adjusting for age, education, income, marital status, and the number of previous children, pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity were strongly associated with severe physical abuse (overweight: OR = 8.33, 95% CI 1.48-47.03; obesity: OR = 6.31, 95% CI 1.06-37.60). Women with severe physical neglect (OR = 4.25, 95% CI 1.23-14.74) were at increased risk of pregnancy overweight. We found a dose-response relationship between physical abuse and pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity. Whereas other studies report an association between childhood maltreatment and pre-pregnancy obesity, this is the first study that found an association between childhood maltreatment and pre-pregnancy overweight. Considering the severe health risks of pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity and the long-term consequences of childhood maltreatment, affected women constitute a subgroup with special needs in prenatal care. Further research is needed to improve the understanding of the underlying mechanisms.

  13. Treatment of adolescents with morbid obesity with bariatric procedures and anti-obesity pharmacological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Um SS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Scott S Um1, Wendelin Slusser2, Daniel A DeUgarte11Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Adolescent obesity is a growing health concern that can have immense physical and psychological impact. Treatment of morbidly obese adolescents should include a multidisciplinary team to address medical comorbidities, diet, physical activity, mental health, and behavior modification. Anti-obesity pharmacologic agents have a limited role in the treatment of adolescents because of concerns with side effects, safety, and efficacy. Orlistat (GlaxoSmithKline, Moon Township, PA is the only approved medication for weight-loss in adolescents. However, it is associated with gastrointestinal side effects and its long-term efficacy is unknown. Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy to treat morbid obesity. However, adolescents must meet rigorous criteria and have appropriate cognitive, psychological, and social clearance before being considered for surgical intervention. Gastric bypass remains the gold standard bariatric operation. The adjustable gastric band is not FDA-approved for use in patients under 18 years of age. Sleeve gastrectomy is a promising procedure for adolescents because it avoids an intestinal bypass and the implantation of a foreign body. Prospective longitudinal assessment of bariatric surgery procedures is required to determine long-term outcomes. In this manuscript, we review the treatment options, efficacy, and impact on quality of life for morbidly obese adolescents.Keywords: bariatric surgery, morbid obesity, weight loss, adolescent

  14. Serum metabolic biomarkers distinguish metabolically healthy peripherally obese from unhealthy centrally obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Weidong; Wang, Yongbo; Pedram, Pardis; Cahill, Farrell; Zhai, Guangju; Randell, Edward; Gulliver, Wayne; Sun, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic abnormalities are more associated with central obesity than peripheral obesity, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study was to identify serum metabolic biomarkers which distinguish metabolically unhealthy centrally obese (MUCO) from metabolically healthy peripherally obese (MHPO) individuals. A two-stage case-control study design was employed. In the discovery stage, 20 individuals (10 MHPO and 10 MUCO) were included and in the following validation stage, 79 individuals (20 normal weight (NW), 30 MHPO, 29 MUCO) were utilized. Study groups were matched for age, sex, physical activity and total dietary calorie intake with MHPO and MUCO additionally matched for BMI. Metabolic abnormality was defined as: 1) HOMA-IR > 4.27 (90(th) percentile), 2) high-density lipoprotein cholesterol  102 cm in men and > 88 cm in women. MUCO individuals had all of these abnormalities whereas MHPO and NW individuals had none of them. A targeted metabolomics approach was performed on fasting serum samples, which can simultaneously identify and quantify 186 metabolites. In the discovery stage, serum leucine, isoleucine, tyrosine, valine, phenylalanine, alpha-aminoadipic acid, methioninesulfoxide and propionylcarnitine were found to be significantly higher in MUCO, compared with MHPO group after multiple testing adjustment. Significant changes of five metabolites (leucine, isoleucine, valine, alpha-aminoadipic acid, propionylcarnitine) were confirmed in the validation stage. Significantly higher levels of serum leucine, isoleucine, valine, alpha-aminoadipic acid, propionylcarnitine are characteristic of metabolically unhealthy centrally obese patients. The finding provides novel insights into the pathogenesis of metabolic abnormalities in obesity.

  15. OBESITY - STRATEGIES FOR THE PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina-Costina LUCA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The last decades there has been characterizes by a worrying rise in obesity among both adults and in children's services. Obesity is considered disease XXI century. Obesity includes a medical field which accumulates a major issue and objective public health in developed countries, a vital prognosis health problem in medical practice and, not least, an aesthetic problem, psychosocial implications. The word comes from the Latin obese, "obesus" = fat, corpulent. Since ancient times, 2,500 years ago, Hippocrates noticed danger overweight "corpulence is not only a disease itself, but is a risk factor." Subsequently, the Indian surgeon Sushruta (VI century BC noted connection between obesity and heart disease. In Europe in medieval and Renaissance, obesity was considered a sign of wealth and prosperity among senior officials.

  16. Pediatric obesity. An introduction ☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children’s health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children’s environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail. PMID:25836737

  17. Adipocyte CREB promotes insulin resistance in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ling; Saberi, Maziyar; Zmuda, Erik; Wang, Yiguo; Altarejos, Judith; Zhang, Xinmin; Dentin, Renaud; Hedrick, Susie; Bandyopadhyay, Gautam; Hai, Tsonwin; Olefsky, Jerry; Montminy, Marc

    2009-03-01

    Increases in adiposity trigger metabolic and inflammatory changes that interfere with insulin action in peripheral tissues, culminating in beta cell failure and overt diabetes. We found that the cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated in adipose cells under obese conditions, where it promotes insulin resistance by triggering expression of the transcriptional repressor ATF3 and thereby downregulating expression of the adipokine hormone adiponectin as well as the insulin-sensitive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative CREB transgene in adipocytes displayed increased whole-body insulin sensitivity in the contexts of diet-induced and genetic obesity, and they were protected from the development of hepatic steatosis and adipose tissue inflammation. These results indicate that adipocyte CREB provides an early signal in the progression to type 2 diabetes.

  18. Chronodisruption and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Attempts to understand the causes of obesity and develop new therapeutic strategies have mostly focused on caloric intake and energy expenditure. Recent studies have shown that the circadian clock controls energy homeostasis by regulating circadian expression and/or activity of enzymes, hormones, and transport systems involved in metabolism. Moreover, disruption of circadian rhythms leads to obesity and metabolic disorders. CONTENT:Regularly alternating periods of light and darkness, such as normally occur with the rising and the setting of the sun, are essential for the maintenance of undisturbed circadian rhythms in all organisms including humans. The light-dark environment, as detected by specialized photoreceptors in the retinas, impacts the endogenous circadian clock in the anterior hypothalamus, the suprachiasmatic nuclei. These nuclei, via both neural and humoral signals, communicate with cells throughout the organism to establish regular circadian rhythms. The introduction of artificial sources of light roughly 150 years ago has significantly undermined the naturally occurring light-dark environment and, likewise, has disturbed circadian rhythms since light is now available at unusual times, i.e., at night. Light at night is known to cause circadian disruption and melatonin suppression. Many potentially pathophysiological consequences of these artificial light-mediated changes, include cancer, cardiovascular diseases, insomnia, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cognitive disorders may be aggravated by the increased exposure to light at night, which is inevitable in well-developed societies that have undergone extensive electrification. SUMMARY: Therefore, it is plausible that resetting of the circadian clock can be used as a new approach to attenuate obesity. Feeding regimens, such as restricted feeding, calorie restriction and intermittent fasting, provide a time cue and reset the circadian clock and

  19. Pediatric obesity. An introduction ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children’s health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric...

  20. Multilevel Determinants of Childhood Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Yen-Jung

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity among US children and adolescents has rapidly increased in the past several decades, and the epidemic of childhood obesity is currently a serious public health concern in the United States. This dissertation consists of three studies examining individual- and neighborhood-level determinants of childhood obesity. The study area was Los Angeles County in California. Our first study examined the effects of maternal employment, individual socioeconomic status (SES), and ...

  1. The Genetics of Pediatric Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Chesi, Alessandra; Grant, Struan F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity among children and adults has notably escalated over recent decades and represents a global major health problem. We now know that both genetics and environmental factors contribute to its complex etiology. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed compelling genetic signals influencing obesity risk in adults. Recent reports for childhood obesity revealed that many adult loci also play a role in the pediatric setting. Childhood GWAS have uncovered novel loci below the detec...

  2. Hypertrophic Obesity and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the past 50 years, scientists have recognized that not all adipose tissue is alike, and that health risk is associated with the location as well as the amount of body fat. Different depots are sufficiently distinct with respect to fatty-acid storage and release as to probably play unique roles in human physiology. Whether fat redistribution causes metabolic disease or whether it is a marker of underlying processes that are primarily responsible is an open question. CONTENT: The limited expandability of the subcutaneous adipose tissue leads to inappropriate adipose cell expansion (hypertrophic obesity with local inflammation and a dysregulated and insulin-resistant adipose tissue. The inability to store excess fat in the subcutaneous adipose tissue is a likely key mechanism for promoting ectopic fat accumulation in tissues and areas where fat can be stored, including the intra-abdominal and visceral areas, in the liver, epi/pericardial area, around vessels, in the myocardium, and in the skeletal muscles. Many studies have implicated ectopic fat accumulation and the associated lipotoxicity as the major determinant of the metabolic complications of obesity driving systemic insulin resistance, inflammation, hepatic glucose production, and dyslipidemia. SUMMARY: In summary, hypertrophic obesity is due to an impaired ability to recruit and differentiate available adipose precursor cells in the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Thus, the subcutaneous adipose tissue may be particular in its limited ability in certain individuals to undergo adipogenesis during weight increase. Inability to promote subcutaneous adipogenesis under periods of affluence would favor lipid overlow and ectopic fat accumulation with negative metabolic consequences. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipogenesis, subcutaneous adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, adipocyte dysfunction.

  3. Early-life influences on obesity: from preconception to adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Mark L; Krawetz, Stephen A; Rizzo, Nico S; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Szymanski, Linda M; Barkin, Shari; Yatkine, Ann; Waterland, Robert A; Mennella, Julie A; Desai, Mina; Ross, Michael G; Krebs, Nancy F; Young, Bridget E; Wardle, Jane; Wrann, Christiane D; Kral, John G

    2015-07-01

    The double burden of under- and overnutrition profoundly affects human health globally. According to the World Health Organization, obesity and diabetes rates have almost doubled worldwide since 1980, and, in 2011, more than 40 million children under 5 years of age were overweight. Ecologic factors, parental genetics and fitness, and the intrauterine environment significantly influence the likelihood of offspring developing the dysmetabolic diathesis of obesity. This report examines the effects of these factors, including preconception, intrauterine and postnatal energy balance affecting programming of transgenerational transmission, and development of chronic diseases later in life-in particular, diabesity and its comorbidities. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. The management of adult obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, C L; Jones, P; Hoffer, L J

    2003-06-01

    Obesity is Canada's most prevalent metabolic disease: one-third of Canadians are obese. It is a major cause of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, and atherosclerosis. The treatment of disease caused by obesity accounts for an estimated 2.4 percent of Canada's health care expenditures for all diseases (1.8 billion dollars in 1997). This article presents a treatment algorithm based on a number of international guidelines and aimed to help physicians play a more active role in the management of adult obesity. Two problems are briefly examined: pregnancy and stopping cigarettes smoking.

  5. Maternal Obesity and Neck Circumference

    OpenAIRE

    Anglim, B.; O'Higgins, Amy; Daly, Niamh; Farren, Maria; Turner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Obese women are more likely to require general anaesthesia for an obstetric intervention than non-obese. Difficult tracheal intubation and oxygen desaturation is more common in pregnancy. Failed tracheal intubation has been associated with an increase in neck circumference (NC). We studied the relationship between maternal obesity and NC as pregnancy advanced in women attending a standard antenatal clinic. Of the 96 women recruited, 13.5% were obese. The mean NC was 36.8cm (SD 1.9) in the obe...

  6. Altered Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Parameswaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The major respiratory complications of obesity include a heightened demand for ventilation, elevated work of breathing, respiratory muscle inefficiency and diminished respiratory compliance. The decreased functional residual capacity and expiratory reserve volume, with a high closing volume to functional residual capacity ratio of obesity, are associated with the closure of peripheral lung units, ventilation to perfusion ratio abnormalities and hypoxemia, especially in the supine position. Conventional respiratory function tests are only mildly affected by obesity except in extreme cases. The major circulatory complications are increased total and pulmonary blood volume, high cardiac output and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Patients with obesity commonly develop hypoventilation and sleep apnea syndromes with attenuated hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responsiveness. The final result is hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension and progressively worsening disability. Obese patients have increased dyspnea and decreased exercise capacity, which are vital to quality of life. Decreased muscle, increased joint pain and skin friction are important determinants of decreased exercise capacity, in addition to the cardiopulmonary effects of obesity. The effects of obesity on mortality in heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have not been definitively resolved. Whether obesity contributes to asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness is uncertain. Weight reduction and physical activity are effective means of reversing the respiratory complications of obesity.

  7. Obesity and female infertility: potential mediators of obesity's impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Darcy E; Moley, Kelle H

    2017-04-01

    The worldwide upward trend in obesity has been dramatic, now affecting more than 20% of American women of reproductive age. Obesity is associated with many adverse maternal and fetal effects prenatally, but it also exerts a negative influence on female fertility. Obese women are more likely to have ovulatory dysfunction due to dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome who are also obese demonstrate a more severe metabolic and reproductive phenotype. Obese women have reduced fecundity even when eumenorrheic and demonstrate poorer outcomes with the use of in vitro fertilization. Obesity appears to affect the oocyte and the preimplantation embryo, with disrupted meiotic spindle formation and mitochondrial dynamics. Excess free fatty acids may have a toxic effect in reproductive tissues, leading to cellular damage and a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Altered levels of adipokines, such as leptin, in the obese state can affect steroidogenesis and directly affect the developing embryo. The endometrium is also susceptible, with evidence of impaired stromal decidualization in obese women. This may explain subfecundity due to impaired receptivity, and may lead to placental abnormalities as manifested by higher rates of miscarriage, stillbirth, and preeclampsia in the obese population. Many interventions have been explored to mitigate the effect of obesity on infertility, including weight loss, physical activity, dietary factors, and bariatric surgery. These data are largely mixed, with few high quality studies to guide us. As we improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity in human reproduction we hope to identify novel treatment strategies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. DEPRESSIVE AND ANXIETY DISORDERS AND THE ASSOCIATION WITH OBESITY, PHYSICAL, AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Leonore M.; Fokkema, Marjolein; van Straten, Annemieke; Lamers, Femke; Cuijpers, Pim; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: There is evidence of more obesity among persons with depressive and depressive and anxiety disorders. However, the nature and the underlying mechanisms of the association are still unclear. This study examines the association between depressive and anxiety disorders and obesity, physical

  9. Meta-Analysis of the Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors Affecting Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide, approximately 42 million children under the age of 5 years are considered overweight or obese. While much research has focused on individual behaviors impacting obesity, little research has emphasized the complex interactions of numerous chemical and non-chemical stres...

  10. Meta-Analysis of the Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors Affecting Childhood Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Worldwide, approximately 42 million children under the age of 5 years are considered overweight or obese. While much research has focused on individual behaviors impacting obesity, little research has emphasized the complex interactions of numerous chemical and non-ch...

  11. Meta-Analysis of Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors Affecting Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood obesity is not a new notion but it is a growing epidemic around the world. There is approximately 42 million children under 5 around the world who are considered overweight or obese and here in the united states that is 12.7 million children between the ages of 2 and 19...

  12. Prevention of surgical wound infection in obese women undergoing cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana; Vinter, Christina Anne; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Obese women undergoing caesarean section are at increased risk of surgical wound infection, which may lead to reduced quality of life, and increased health care cost. The aim is to evaluate the effect of incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy applied prophylactically in obese women under...

  13. Causes and risks for obesity in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genes. Genetics is not the only cause of obesity. To become obese, children must also eat more calories than they need for growth and energy. Obesity may be linked to rare genetic conditions, such as Prader Willi syndrome .

  14. Obesity as a risk factor for malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, K; Lindgren, T H; Koch, C A; Brodell, Robert T

    2016-09-01

    The dramatic increases in incidence of both obesity and many cancers including skin cancer emphasize the need to better understand the pathophysiology of both conditions and their connections. Melanoma is considered the fastest growing cancer and rates of non-melanoma skin cancer have also increased over the last decade. The molecular mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and skin cancer are not clearly understood but emerging evidence points to changes in the tumor microenvironment including aberrant cell signaling and genomic instability in the chronic inflammatory state many obese individuals experience. This article reviews the literature linking obesity to melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer.

  15. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor: Critical Role in Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Associated Comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kleemann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with insulin resistance, disturbed glucose homeostasis, low grade inflammation, and comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is an ubiquitously expressed protein that plays a crucial role in many inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Increasing evidence suggests that MIF also controls metabolic and inflammatory processes underlying the development of metabolic pathologies associated with obesity. This is a comprehensive summary of our current knowledge on the role of MIF in obesity and obesity-associated comorbidities, based on human clinical data as well as animal models of disease.

  16. Prevalence of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders according to Rome III Criteria in Italian Morbidly Obese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Santonicola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between GI symptoms and obesity has yet to be completely clarified. Aim. To determine in a morbidly obese southern Italy adult population the prevalence of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (FGID and its association with the presence of a Binge Eating (BE behavior pattern. Methods. Consecutive obese patients eligible for bariatric surgery and 100 Healthy Controls (HC were recruited. All participants were questioned and scored for the presence of FGID according to Rome III criteria and for the presence or the frequency-intensity of a number of upper and lower GI symptoms. BE behavior pattern was assessed. Results. One-hundred obese patients met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of FGID was similar between obese patients and HC. There was a significant association between obese patients with BE behavior and postprandial distress syndrome (P=0.04. Moreover, a significantly higher frequency-intensity score for epigastric fullness (1.23±0.45 versus 0.35±0.13, P=0.01 was found in obese patients with BE behavior compared to obese patients without. Conclusions. Obese patients with a BE behavior pattern showed a significantly higher prevalence of postprandial distress syndrome. A greater knowledge of the GI symptoms associated with obesity along with the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying will be important in the clinical management of these patients.

  17. Maternal Obesity and Developmental Programming of Metabolic Disorders in Offspring: Evidence from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity and overweight has reached epidemic proportions in the developed world as well as in those countries transitioning to first world economies, and this represents a major global health problem. Concern is rising over the rapid increases in childhood obesity and metabolic disease that will translate into later adult obesity. Although an obesogenic nutritional environment and increasingly sedentary lifestyle contribute to our risk of developing obesity, a growing body of evidence links early life nutritional adversity to the development of long-term metabolic disorders. In particular, the increasing prevalence of maternal obesity and excess maternal weight gain has been associated with a heightened risk of obesity development in offspring in addition to an increased risk of pregnancy-related complications. The mechanisms that link maternal obesity to obesity in offspring and the level of gene-environment interactions are not well understood, but the early life environment may represent a critical window for which intervention strategies could be developed to curb the current obesity epidemic. This paper will discuss the various animal models of maternal overnutrition and their importance in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying altered obesity risk in offspring.

  18. Mapping and annotating obesity-related genes in pig and human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Pier Luigi; Fontanesi, Luca; Piovesan, Damiano; Fariselli, Piero; Casadio, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Obesity is a major health problem in both developed and emerging countries. Obesity is a complex disease whose etiology involves genetic factors in strong interplay with environmental determinants and lifestyle. The discovery of genetic factors and biological pathways underlying human obesity is hampered by the difficulty in controlling the genetic background of human cohorts. Animal models are then necessary to further dissect the genetics of obesity. Pig has emerged as one of the most attractive models, because of the similarity with humans in the mechanisms regulating the fat deposition. Results. We collected the genes related to obesity in humans and to fat deposition traits in pig. We localized them on both human and pig genomes, building a map useful to interpret comparative studies on obesity. We characterized the collected genes structurally and functionally with BAR+ and mapped them on KEGG pathways and on STRING protein interaction network. Conclusions. The collected set consists of 361 obesity related genes in human and pig genomes. All genes were mapped on the human genome, and 54 could not be localized on the pig genome (release 2012). Only for 3 human genes there is no counterpart in pig, confirming that this animal is a good model for human obesity studies. Obesity related genes are mostly involved in regulation and signaling processes/pathways and relevant connection emerges between obesity-related genes and diseases such as cancer and infectious diseases.

  19. Is obesity associated with school dropout? Key developmental and ethnic differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, H. Isabella; Huang, David Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to expand the literature on child obesity and school outcomes by examining associations between obesity and high school dropout, including the role of obesity onset and duration as well as ethnicity. Methods Data on 5066 children obtained between 1986 and 2010 from the child cohort of the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY79) were analyzed. Group-based trajectory analysis identified obesity trajectories from 6-18 years. School completion information from age 14 into young adulthood was used to calculate school dropout. Chi-square and pairwise comparison tests were used to identify significant associations between obesity trajectories and school dropout. Results Adolescents belonging to an increasing trajectory (adolescent-onset obesity) had a higher likelihood of dropping out of high school compared to those belonging to chronic, decreasing (childhood-only obesity), and non-obese trajectories. This association was particularly salient among white adolescents. Conclusions Obesity onset during early adolescence increased risk of high school dropout. White adolescents were particularly vulnerable. Given that early adolescence is marked by significant biological and social changes, future research should seek to identify the underlying processes linking adolescent-obesity and school dropout to decrease school dropout risk among this vulnerable population. PMID:26331748

  20. Pediatric obesity: Causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    XU, SHUMEI; XUE, YING

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric or childhood obesity is the most prevalent nutritional disorder among children and adolescents worldwide. Approximately 43 million individuals are obese, 21?24% children and adolescents are overweight, and 16?18% of individuals have abdominal obesity. The prevalence of obesity is highest among specific ethnic groups. Obesity increases the risk of heart diseases in children and adults. Childhood obesity predisposes the individual to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, hypertensio...

  1. Employment discrimination against obese women in obesity clinic's patients perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara-Gołębiowska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The workplace is one of many areas of life where obese people are unfairly treated. According to the literature obese women are particularly susceptible to discrimination in employment. There is a lack of polish researches of this subject. The main objective of this study was to analyze personal, subjective experiences related to weight bias and discrimination against obese people in the workplace of obese Polish women. The study was carried out in a hospital clinic for obesity management. A total of 420 women with BMI>30, aged 21 to 72, participated in group interviews focused on the weight bias and discrimination against obese people in the workplace. In the group of clinically obese women, 5.3% of subjects had experienced employment discrimination and 10.5% had been victims of verbal and social abuse in the workplace. The most common psycho-physical consequences of the weight stigma were emotional problems, lack of motivation and overeating in response to stress. Weight-based discrimination in the workplace poses a problem in Poland. The weight stigma and occupational discrimination lead to psycho-physical discomfort which exacerbates overeating and obesity.

  2. Hypertension, obesity and central obesity in diabetics and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    Multivariate logistic regression showed that hypertension, central obesity, overweight and obesity, and ethnicity had ... The reason for possible racial difference to cardiovascular risk factors and population awareness to these factors should be studied. [Ethiop. J. Health Dev. 2010 ... A study done 16 years ago on. Ethiopian ...

  3. Reproductive and biochemical changes in obese and non obese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manal Ibrahim Mahmoud

    2014-04-13

    Apr 13, 2014 ... Reproductive and biochemical changes in obese and non obese polycystic ovary syndrome women. Manal Ibrahim Mahmoud a,b,. *, Fawzia Habeeb c. , Khaled Kasim a,d a Family and Community Medicine Department, Medical College, Taibah University, Madinah, Saudi Arabia b Community Medicine ...

  4. Hypertension, obesity and central obesity in diabetics and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes mellitus coexists at a greater frequency with hypertension, obesity, central obesity, dyslipedemia and proteinuria and that markedly increases the risk of atherosclerotic disease. A study was done for a period of four months in Sidama Zone, Southern Ethiopia to compare the prevalence of atherosclerotic risk factors ...

  5. Gut microbiota and sirtuins in obesity-related inflammation and bowel dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhan Shaheen E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is a chronic disease characterized by persistent low-grade inflammation with alterations in gut motility. Motor abnormalities suggest that obesity has effects on the enteric nervous system (ENS, which controls virtually all gut functions. Recent studies have revealed that the gut microbiota can affect obesity and increase inflammatory tone by modulating mucosal barrier function. Furthermore, the observation that inflammatory conditions influence the excitability of enteric neurons may add to the gut dysfunction in obesity. In this article, we discuss recent advances in understanding the role of gut microbiota and inflammation in the pathogenesis of obesity and obesity-related gastrointestinal dysfunction. The potential contribution of sirtuins in protecting or regulating the circuitry of the ENS under inflamed states is also considered.

  6. Psychosocial correlates of adolescent obesity, 'slimming down' and 'becoming obese'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeting, Helen; Wright, Charlotte; Minnis, Helen

    2005-11-01

    (a) To examine how self-reported well-being, weight-related concerns, self-image, peer relationships and psychiatric disorders are associated with obesity at ages 11 and 15 years. (b) To identify and describe those who "slim down" (become nonobese) or "become obese". A cohort of 2127 school pupils was surveyed at ages 11 and 15 years. At each age, those with body mass index above the 95th percentile for age and gender were categorized as obese. Characteristics associated with obesity, "slimming down" and "becoming obese" were examined using ANOVA and chi-square procedures for univariate, and logistic regression for multivariate analyses. At age 11, 9.6% (males) and 10.5% (females) were obese, compared with 10.5% (males) and 11.6% (females) at age 15. "Slimming down" occurred for 3.5% of the total sample, whereas 4.5% "became obese." Obesity was associated with significant but small differences in low mood (males at 11) and self-esteem (males at 11, females at both ages), and reduced rates of behavior disorders (data on psychiatric disorders available only at age 15). Obesity was associated with weight-related worries, dieting, and poor self-rated appearance, but not most measures of peer relationships, except that obese 11-year-olds experienced greater victimization, partly accounting for their poorer well-being. In comparison with the continuously nonobese, those who "became obese" had lower prior self-esteem and greater victimization, but improvements in well-being and relative reductions in victimization by age 15. "Slimming down" was related to neither prior nor subsequent well-being in comparison with continual obesity, but was associated with better age 15 mood in comparison with continual nonobesity. Although overweight was fairly stable, there were shifts in and out of the obese category during adolescence. Obesity during this life-stage, though strongly related to worries about putting on weight and self-report dieting, was associated with only small

  7. Prevalence of overweight, obesity, abdominal obesity and obesity-related risk factors in southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Hu

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of overweight/obesity, abdominal obesity and obesity-related risk factors in southern China.A cross-sectional survey of 15,364 participants aged 15 years and older was conducted from November 2013 to August 2014 in Jiangxi Province, China, using questionnaire forms and physical measurements. The physical measurements included body height, weight, waist circumference (WC, body fat percentage (BFP and visceral adipose index (VAI. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the risk factors for overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity.The prevalence of overweight was 25.8% (25.9% in males and 25.7% in females, while that of obesity was 7.9% (8.4% in males and 7.6% in females. The prevalence of abdominal obesity was 10.2% (8.6% in males and 11.3% in females. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 37.1% in urban residents and 30.2% in rural residents, and this difference was significant (P < 0.001. Urban residents had a significantly higher prevalence of abdominal obesity than rural residents (11.6% vs 8.7%, P < 0.001. Among the participants with an underweight/normal body mass index (BMI, 1.3% still had abdominal obesity, 16.1% had a high BFP and 1.0% had a high VAI. Moreover, among obese participants, 9.7% had a low /normal WC, 0.8% had a normal BFP and 15.9% had a normal VAI. Meanwhile, the partial correlation analysis indicated that the correlation coefficients between VAI and BMI, VAI and WC, and BMI and WC were 0.700, 0.666, and 0.721, respectively. A multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that being female and having a high BFP and a high VAI were significantly associated with an increased risk of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity. In addition, living in an urban area and older age correlated with overweight/obesity.This study revealed that obesity and abdominal obesity, which differed by gender and age, are epidemic in southern China. Moreover

  8. Perceived weight discrimination and obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina R Sutin

    Full Text Available Weight discrimination is prevalent in American society. Although associated consistently with psychological and economic outcomes, less is known about whether weight discrimination is associated with longitudinal changes in obesity. The objectives of this research are (1 to test whether weight discrimination is associated with risk of becoming obese (Body Mass Index≥30; BMI by follow-up among those not obese at baseline, and (2 to test whether weight discrimination is associated with risk of remaining obese at follow-up among those already obese at baseline. Participants were drawn from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal survey of community-dwelling US residents. A total of 6,157 participants (58.6% female completed the discrimination measure and had weight and height available from the 2006 and 2010 assessments. Participants who experienced weight discrimination were approximately 2.5 times more likely to become obese by follow-up (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.58-4.08 and participants who were obese at baseline were three times more likely to remain obese at follow up (OR = 3.20, 95% CI = 2.06-4.97 than those who had not experienced such discrimination. These effects held when controlling for demographic factors (age, sex, ethnicity, education and when baseline BMI was included as a covariate. These effects were also specific to weight discrimination; other forms of discrimination (e.g., sex, race were unrelated to risk of obesity at follow-up. The present research demonstrates that, in addition to poorer mental health outcomes, weight discrimination has implications for obesity. Rather than motivating individuals to lose weight, weight discrimination increases risk for obesity.

  9. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gami, Apoor S; Caples, Sean M; Somers, Virend K

    2003-12-01

    There is a very high prevalence of OSA in obese individuals and a high prevalence of obesity in patients with OSA. The pathophysiology of OSA is intimately linked to obesity. Anatomic and functional considerations of the pharyngeal airway, the CNS, central obesity, and leptin likely interact in the development of OSA in obese individuals. OSA may itself predispose individuals to worsening obesity because of sleep deprivation, daytime somnolence, and disrupted metabolism. The diagnosis of OSA requires the clinician's awareness of its potential to cause a spectrum of acute and chronic neurocognitive, psychiatric, and nonspecific symptoms in patients who may be unaware that their sleep is disturbed. Symptoms and examination findings help predict which obese individuals have OSA, and polysomnography is the gold standard by which to make the diagnosis and assess the effects of treatment. Numerous disease states are associated with both OSA and obesity, and it is becoming clear that the relationships are mediated by complex interrelated mechanisms. Common diseases and disease mechanisms in OSA and obesity suggest that conditions related to obesity may be better managed if patients, particularly those who are morbidly obese, are evaluated and treated for previously undiagnosed OSA. OSA is cured in only specific cases with craniofacial or upper airway surgery, and the general application of UVP is not efficacious. OSA also can be cured with sufficient lifestyle-mediated or surgical weight loss; however, in the absence of long-term weight maintenance, OSA returns with weight gain. Although not curative, nasal CPAP is the initial treatment of choice for most patients because of its noninvasive approach and technical efficacy. It is limited, however, by patient acceptance and long-term compliance. Advances in mask comfort and use of humidified air should increase its acceptance. Future management strategies include newer generations of positive airway devices that

  10. Perceived weight discrimination and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutin, Angelina R; Terracciano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Weight discrimination is prevalent in American society. Although associated consistently with psychological and economic outcomes, less is known about whether weight discrimination is associated with longitudinal changes in obesity. The objectives of this research are (1) to test whether weight discrimination is associated with risk of becoming obese (Body Mass Index≥30; BMI) by follow-up among those not obese at baseline, and (2) to test whether weight discrimination is associated with risk of remaining obese at follow-up among those already obese at baseline. Participants were drawn from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal survey of community-dwelling US residents. A total of 6,157 participants (58.6% female) completed the discrimination measure and had weight and height available from the 2006 and 2010 assessments. Participants who experienced weight discrimination were approximately 2.5 times more likely to become obese by follow-up (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.58-4.08) and participants who were obese at baseline were three times more likely to remain obese at follow up (OR = 3.20, 95% CI = 2.06-4.97) than those who had not experienced such discrimination. These effects held when controlling for demographic factors (age, sex, ethnicity, education) and when baseline BMI was included as a covariate. These effects were also specific to weight discrimination; other forms of discrimination (e.g., sex, race) were unrelated to risk of obesity at follow-up. The present research demonstrates that, in addition to poorer mental health outcomes, weight discrimination has implications for obesity. Rather than motivating individuals to lose weight, weight discrimination increases risk for obesity.

  11. DsbA-L prevents obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance by suppressing the mtDNA release-activated cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic inflammation in adipose tissue plays a key role in obesity-induced insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms underlying obesity-induced inflammation remain elusive. Here we show that obesity promotes mtDNA release into the cytosol, where it triggers inflammatory responses by activating the...

  12. Primary endoscopic therapies for obesity and metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Oberbach, Andreas; Nimgaonkar, Ashish

    2015-09-01

    Endoscopic approaches to obesity may help fulfill the unmet need of over half the US adult population who would benefit from therapy for obesity but are not receiving it. Endoluminal approaches have the potential to be more efficacious than antiobesity medications and have a lower risk-cost profile compared with bariatric surgery. This review outlines the current state of primary endoscopic weight loss and metabolic therapies and sheds light on the challenges faced toward making endoscopic bariatric therapies 'ready for prime time'. Endoscopic approaches to obesity are being increasingly modeled on the proposed mechanisms contributing to the benefits of bariatric surgery.Therapies targeted at the stomach induce weight loss with only a proportional benefit to underlying metabolic disorders.Therapies targeting the proximal small bowel appear to modulate various neurohormonal pathways resulting in an improvement in metabolic profile in excess to that accounted for by weight loss itself. Rigorous scientific assessment of endoscopic approaches to obesity is necessary to allow its integration into the treatment algorithm of obesity. The endoscopic armamentarium against obesity continues to evolve with the endoscopist poised to be a key player in the management of this disease. http://links.lww.com/COG/A12.

  13. Multilevel Interventions Targeting Obesity: Research Recommendations for Vulnerable Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, June; Pratt, Charlotte; Boyington, Josephine; Nelson, Cheryl; Truesdale, Kimberly P; Ward, Dianne S; Lytle, Leslie; Sherwood, Nancy E; Robinson, Thomas N; Moore, Shirley; Barkin, Shari; Cheung, Ying Kuen; Murray, David M

    2017-01-01

    The origins of obesity are complex and multifaceted. To be successful, an intervention aiming to prevent or treat obesity may need to address multiple layers of biological, social, and environmental influences. NIH recognizes the importance of identifying effective strategies to combat obesity, particularly in high-risk and disadvantaged populations with heightened susceptibility to obesity and subsequent metabolic sequelae. To move this work forward, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, in collaboration with the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research and NIH Office of Disease Prevention convened a working group to inform research on multilevel obesity interventions in vulnerable populations. The working group reviewed relevant aspects of intervention planning, recruitment, retention, implementation, evaluation, and analysis, and then made recommendations. Recruitment and retention techniques used in multilevel research must be culturally appropriate and suited to both individuals and organizations. Adequate time and resources for preliminary work are essential. Collaborative projects can benefit from complementary areas of expertise and shared investigations rigorously pretesting specific aspects of approaches. Study designs need to accommodate the social and environmental levels under study, and include appropriate attention given to statistical power. Projects should monitor implementation in the multiple venues and include a priori estimation of the magnitude of change expected within and across levels. The complexity and challenges of delivering interventions at several levels of the social-ecologic model require careful planning and implementation, but hold promise for successful reduction of obesity in vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Childhood obesity: are we missing the big picture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziak, W; Ward, K D; Stockton, M B

    2008-01-01

    Childhood obesity is increasing worldwide, raising alarm about future trends of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. This article discusses what may underlie our failure to respond effectively to the obesity epidemic, and presents a wider perspective for future research and public health agendas. So far targeting individual-level determinants and clinical aspects of childhood obesity has produced limited success. There is growing interest in understanding the wider determinants of obesity such as the built environment (e.g. walkability), social interactions, food marketing and prices, but much needs to be learned. Particularly, we need to identify distal modifiable factors with multiple potential that would make them attractive for people and policymakers alike. For example, walking-biking-friendly cities can reduce obesity as well as energy consumption, air pollution and traffic delays. Such agenda needs to be driven by strong evidence from research involving multi-level influences on behaviour, as well as the study of wider politico-economic trends affecting people's choices. This article highlights available evidence and arguments for research and policy needed to curb the obesity epidemic. The upstream approach underlying these arguments aims to make healthy choices not only the most rational, but also the most feasible and affordable.

  15. Effects of physical exercise on butyrylcholinesterase in obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela M.W. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a 12 week program of physical exercise (PE on butyrylcholinesterase (BChE in obese adolescents. This study compared obese adolescents (N = 54 before and after PE, regarding the relative intensity (RI and activity of different molecular forms (G1, G2, G4 and G1-ALB of BChE found in plasma. Waist circumference (WC and lipid profile were also assessed before and after PE. It was shown that before PE, mean plasma BChE activity was significantly higher in obese than in non-obese adolescents and that it was significantly reduced after PE, becoming similar to that found in non-obese adolescents. Lipid profile and WC also changed in response to PE. These results are consistent with studies that found a correlation between BChE and lipid metabolism and suggest that PE may have led to a physiological regularization of plasma BChE activity. Although mean BChE activity of each isoform was significantly reduced by PE, their RI did not change. This is in accordance with a previous suggestion that this proportion is maintained under factors such as obesity, and may therefore be important for BChE functions.

  16. Effects of physical exercise on butyrylcholinesterase in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Isabela M W; Leite, Neiva; Boberg, Dellyana; Chaves, Thais J; Eisfeld, Gerusa M; Eisfeld, Gisele M; Bono, Gleyse F; Souza, Ricardo L R; Furtado-Alle, Lupe

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a 12 week program of physical exercise (PE) on butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in obese adolescents. This study compared obese adolescents (N = 54) before and after PE, regarding the relative intensity (RI) and activity of different molecular forms (G1, G2, G4 and G1-ALB) of BChE found in plasma. Waist circumference (WC) and lipid profile were also assessed before and after PE. It was shown that before PE, mean plasma BChE activity was significantly higher in obese than in non-obese adolescents and that it was significantly reduced after PE, becoming similar to that found in non-obese adolescents. Lipid profile and WC also changed in response to PE. These results are consistent with studies that found a correlation between BChE and lipid metabolism and suggest that PE may have led to a physiological regularization of plasma BChE activity. Although mean BChE activity of each isoform was significantly reduced by PE, their RI did not change. This is in accordance with a previous suggestion that this proportion is maintained under factors such as obesity, and may therefore be important for BChE functions.

  17. Trimming the fat: obesity and hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, B M; Vogl, D T; Berger, N A; Stadtmauer, E A; Lazarus, H M

    2013-09-01

    Obesity, increasing worldwide, is common in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This complex physiological state may alter the outcome of cancer therapies by many mechanisms including direct effects on pathogenesis, host responses to disease and altered pharmacology of chemotherapy. Obesity has been associated with multiple adverse health outcomes. Reports of obese patients undergoing HCT are challenging to interpret because of the heterogeneity of obesity definitions, underlying diseases, graft sources and chemotherapy regimens employed. Compared with normal-weight patients, it appears that obese patients undergoing allogeneic HCT have a higher risk of non-relapse mortality and inferior survival whereas those receiving autologous HCT appear to have equivalent outcomes. These findings are also difficult to interpret because there is no consistent standard for calculating chemotherapy dose in this group and future studies on specific regimens in this population are urgently needed. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery may be at risk for unexpected events because of impaired nutritional state and altered pharmacokinetics of oral drugs. We recommend that future studies utilize more consistent and biologically relevant definitions of obesity and that the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of specific conditioning regimens be studied. Until more evidence is available, a rationale is presented for dosing based on adjusted body weight. Moreover, recommendations are provided to guide future research efforts based on more definitive measurements of body fat and its distribution available through modern quantitative imaging techniques using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry or magnetic resonance imaging scanning.

  18. Gut Microbiota: From Microorganisms to Metabolic Organ Influencing Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Richard W; Arhire, Lidia; Covasa, Mihai

    2018-05-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between gut microbiota and the host as it pertains to the regulation of energy balance and obesity. The paper begins with a brief description of the gut microbiota environment, distribution, and its unique symbiotic relationship with the host. The way that enviromental factors influence microbiota composition and subsequent impact on the host are then described. Next, the mechanisms linking gut dysbiosis with obesity are discussed, and finally current challenges and limitations in understanding the role of gut microbiota in control of obesity are presented. Gut microbiota has been implicated in regulation of fat storage, as well as gut dysbiosis, thus contributing to the development of obesity, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. However, the underlying mechanisms of these processes are far from being clear and will require complex preclinical and clinical interdisciplinary studies of bacteria and host cell-to-cell interactions. There is a need for a better understanding of how changes in gut microbiota composition can impact energy balance and thus control weight gain. This may represent a promising avenue in the race to develop nonsurgical treatments for obesity. © 2018 The Obesity Society.

  19. Obesity as a Major Risk Factor for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni De Pergola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of cancer cases caused by being obese is estimated to be 20% with the increased risk of malignancies being influenced by diet, weight change, and body fat distribution together with physical activity. Reports from the International Agency for Research into Cancer and the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF have shown that the strongest evidence exists for an association of obesity with the following cancer types: endometrial, esophageal adenocarcinoma, colorectal, postmenopausal breast, prostate, and renal, whereas the less common malignancies are leukemia, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, multiple myeloma, malignant melanoma, and thyroid tumours. To be able to develop novel methods in prevention and treatment, we first must understand the underlying processes which link cancer to obesity. Four main systems have been identified as potential producers of cancer in obesity: insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, sex steroids, and adipokines. Various novel candidate mechanisms have been proposed: chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, crosstalk between tumour cells and surrounding adipocytes, migrating adipose stromal cells, obesity-induced hypoxia, shared genetic susceptibility, and the functional defeat of immune function. Herein, we review the major pathogenic links between obesity and susceptibility to cancer.

  20. The "Big Bang" in obese fat: Events initiating obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensveen, Felix M; Valentić, Sonja; Šestan, Marko; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Polić, Bojan

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is associated with the accumulation of pro-inflammatory cells in visceral adipose tissue (VAT), which is an important underlying cause of insulin resistance and progression to diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). Although the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in disease development is established, the initiating events leading to immune cell activation remain elusive. Lean adipose tissue is predominantly populated with regulatory cells, such as eosinophils and type 2 innate lymphocytes. These cells maintain tissue homeostasis through the excretion of type 2 cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which keep adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) in an anti-inflammatory, M2-like state. Diet-induced obesity is associated with the loss of tissue homeostasis and development of type 1 inflammatory responses in VAT, characterized by IFN-γ. A key event is a shift of ATMs toward an M1 phenotype. Recent studies show that obesity-induced adipocyte hypertrophy results in upregulated surface expression of stress markers. Adipose stress is detected by local sentinels, such as NK cells and CD8(+) T cells, which produce IFN-γ, driving M1 ATM polarization. A rapid accumulation of pro-inflammatory cells in VAT follows, leading to inflammation. In this review, we provide an overview of events leading to adipose tissue inflammation, with a special focus on adipose homeostasis and the obesity-induced loss of homeostasis which marks the initiation of VAT inflammation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The effects of obesity on oesophageal function, acid exposure and the symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggiansah, R; Sweis, R; Anggiansah, A; Wong, T; Cooper, D; Fox, M

    2013-03-01

    Obese patients have an increased risk of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; however, the mechanism underlying this association is uncertain. To test the hypothesis that mechanical effects of obesity on oesophageal function increase acid exposure and symptoms. Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured in patients with typical reflux symptoms referred for manometry and 24 h ambulatory pH studies. Symptom severity was assessed by questionnaire. The association between obesity [WC, body mass index (BMI)], oesophageal function, acid exposure and reflux symptoms was assessed. Physiological measurements were obtained from 582 patients (median age 48, 56% female) of whom 406 (70%) completed symptom questionnaires. The prevalence of general obesity was greater in women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) ; F 23%:M 16%; P = 0.056), however more men had abdominal obesity (WC ≥ 99 cm (M 41%:F 28%; P = 0.001)). Oesophageal acid exposure increased with obesity (WC: R = 0.284, P obese patients. Instead, independent effects of obesity and oesophageal dysfunction on acid exposure were present. Reflux symptoms increased with acid exposure (R = 0.300; P symptom severity in obese patients. Abdominal obesity (waist circumference) is associated with oesophageal dysfunction, increased acid exposure and reflux symptoms; however, this analysis does not support the mechanical hypothesis that the effects of obesity on oesophageal function are the cause of increased acid exposure in obese patients. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. [Obesity, migration and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamay-Weber, Catherine; Shehu-Brovina, Shqipe; Narring, Françoise

    2012-06-13

    Weight management interventions during adolescence are challenging. Migration adds complexity to this problem, making migrant families more vulnerable. Teenagers confront families to new values transmitted by the host society: opulence, junk food, video games. Obesity should not be seen as a single issue of calories-excess, but must be considered as being part of a larger problem, which takes into account the context of the familial and societal life of the migrants. The caregivers must have an overall view of the situation to provide appropriate approaches to weight management.

  3. Translational value of animal models of obesity-Focus on dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osto, Melania; Lutz, Thomas A

    2015-07-15

    A prolonged imbalance between a relative increase in energy intake over a decrease in energy expenditure results in the development of obesity; extended periods of a positive energy balance eventually lead to the accumulation of abnormally high amounts of fat in adipose tissue but also in other organs. Obesity is considered a clinical state of impaired general heath in which the excessive increase in adipose tissue mass may be associated with metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. This review discusses briefly the use of animal models for the study of obesity and its comorbidities. Generally, most studies are performed with rodents, such as diet induced obesity and genetic models. Here, we focus specifically on two different species, namely dogs and cats. Obese dogs and cats show many features of human obesity. Interestingly, however, dogs and cats differ from each other in certain aspects because even though obese dogs may become insulin resistant, this does not result in the development of diabetes mellitus. In fact, diabetes in dogs is typically not associated with obesity because dogs present a type 1 diabetes-like syndrome. On the other hand, obese cats often develop diabetes mellitus which shares many features with human type 2 diabetes; feline and human diabetes are similar in respect to their pathophysiology, underlying risk factors and treatment strategies. Our review discusses genetic and endocrine factors in obesity, discusses obesity induced changes in lipid metabolism and includes some recent findings on the role of gut microbiota in obesity. Compared to research in rodent models, the array of available techniques and tools is unfortunately still rather limited in dogs and cats. Hence, even though physiological and pathophysiological phenomena are well described in dogs and cats, the underlying mechanisms are often not known and studies investigating causality specifically are

  4. Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes and Bone in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jennifer S; Vilaca, Tatiane

    2017-05-01

    In an increasingly obese and ageing population, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and osteoporotic fracture are major public health concerns. Understanding how obesity and type 2 diabetes modulate fracture risk is important to identify and treat people at risk of fracture. Additionally, the study of the mechanisms of action of obesity and T2DM on bone has already offered insights that may be applicable to osteoporosis in the general population. Most available evidence indicates lower risk of proximal femur and vertebral fracture in obese adults. However the risk of some fractures (proximal humerus, femur and ankle) is higher, and a significant number fractures occur in obese people. BMI is positively associated with BMD and the mechanisms of this association in vivo may include increased loading, adipokines such as leptin, and higher aromatase activity. However, some fat depots could have negative effects on bone; cytokines from visceral fat are pro-resorptive and high intramuscular fat content is associated with poorer muscle function, attenuating loading effects and increasing falls risk. T2DM is also associated with higher bone mineral density (BMD), but increased overall and hip fracture risk. There are some similarities between bone in obesity and T2DM, but T2DM seems to have additional harmful effects and emerging evidence suggests that glycation of collagen may be an important factor. Higher BMD but higher fracture risk presents challenges in fracture prediction in obesity and T2DM. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry underestimates risk, standard clinical risk factors may not capture all relevant information, and risk is under-recognised by clinicians. However, the limited available evidence suggests that osteoporosis treatment does reduce fracture risk in obesity and T2DM with generally similar efficacy to other patients.

  5. Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Obesity in Korean Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghee Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Instant coffee mixes that contain sugar and non-dairy creamer account for 80–90% of the total coffee market in Korea. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between coffee consumption and obesity in Korean women. We included 5995 women who participated in a health screening examination at the Korean National Cancer Center between 2007 and 2016. Daily coffee consumption and the use of sugar and creamer in coffee was evaluated using a 106-item food frequency questionnaire. Obesity was assessed by body mass index (BMI, and abdominal obesity was assessed by waist circumference (WC. A multiple logistic regression model was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR of obesity according to coffee consumption. After multivariate adjustment, high coffee consumption was positively associated with obesity as measured by BMI (≥3 cups vs. no drinks, OR = 2.52; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.91–3.34; p for the trend < 0.001 and abdominal obesity as measured by WC (≥3 cups vs. no drinks, OR = 2.11; 95% CI = 1.59–2.79; p for the trend < 0.001. The positive association between daily coffee consumption and obesity prevalence was not altered by menopause. The amount of coffee with additives consumed per day by Korean women was positively correlated with the prevalence of obesity, but causation cannot be determined due to the cross-sectional nature of the study design. The mechanism underlying the observed relationship is yet to be elucidated.

  6. Depressive symptoms in obesity: Relative contribution of low-grade inflammation and metabolic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Ines; Huet, Lison; Dexpert, Sandra; Beau, Cédric; Forestier, Damien; Ledaguenel, Patrick; Aubert, Agnès; Sauvant, Julie; Aouizerate, Bruno; Magne, Eric; Capuron, Lucile

    2018-05-01

    Recent reports suggest that the risk of depressive symptoms in obesity is potentiated in subjects presenting a metabolically unhealthy phenotype. Inflammation is often considered a defining criteria of metabolic health. However, this factor may drive the association of metabolic health with depressive symptoms given its well-known role in the pathophysiology of depression. This study aimed at determining the relative contribution of inflammation and metabolic abnormalities to depressive symptoms in obesity. One-hundred severely obese adults (BMI ≥ 35-40 kg/m 2 ) and 25 non-obese control individuals (BMI symptoms were assessed using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Serum high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was measured as a marker of systemic inflammation. Metabolically unhealthy obesity was defined as obesity associated with two or more metabolic alterations, including low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia, high fasting glucose and hypertension. Total MADRS scores were significantly higher in obese subjects with significant inflammation (hs-CRP ≥ 5 mg/L) compared to those with low inflammation (hs-CRP obese controls. Interestingly, hs-CRP levels significantly predicted MADRS scores in the whole population under study and in the group of obese subjects. Overall, no association was found between MADRS scores and individual metabolic alterations or the composite measure of metabolically unhealthy obesity. Similarly, the association of hs-CRP with MADRS scores in obese patients was not modulated by metabolic health factors. These results indicate that systemic inflammation represents a stronger contributor of obesity-related depressive symptoms than metabolic health per se. This supports the notion that inclusion of inflammation in the definition of metabolically unhealthy obesity drives the association found between poor metabolic health

  7. [Pathophysiology and genetics of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkofler, Hannes; Krempler, Franz; Patsch, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Obesity has become the most prevalent nutritional disorder in post-industrialised societies and it is associated with the development of severe and costly complications such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease or cancer. A large proportion of the risk of obesity is determined by the genetic susceptibility of an individual, but environmental factors conducive for the disorder play an important role in its phenotypic expression. Several candidate genes emerged from studies in animal models of obesity, but human pathophysiology is likely to be more complex. Thus, most cases of human obesity probably result from subtle interactions of susceptibility genes with environmental factors favouring deposition of excess calories as fat. The recent surge of obesity may relate to past evolutionary pressure which favoured selection of mechanisms defending body-weight against caloric restriction rather than against caloric excess. Rapidly developing new techniques in quantitative genetics and growing information from functional genomics will help to understand the interaction of environmental factors with signalling networks that regulate energy metabolism. The role of previously unknown pathways in the aetiology of obesity will be uncovered. The typing of numerous genetic variants will become possible and allow individual risk assessment for obesity and/or its associated disorders. Thus, rational and individually tailored therapies may be developed to combat obesity and its associated disorders.

  8. Probiotics to adolescents with obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøbel, Rikke Juul; Larsen, Nadja; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    The connections between gut microbiota, energy homeostasis, and inflammation and its role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related disorders are increasingly recognized. We aimed to investigate the effect of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33 on a series of biomarkers related to in...... to inflammation and the metabolic syndrome (MS) in adolescents with obesity....

  9. Neural correlates of pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Amanda S; Martin, Laura E; Savage, Cary R

    2011-06-01

    Childhood obesity rates have increased over the last 40 years and have a detrimental impact on public health. While the causes of the obesity epidemic are complex, obesity ultimately arises from chronic imbalances between energy intake and expenditure. An emerging area of research in obesity has focused on the role of the brain in evaluating the rewarding properties of food and making decisions about what and how much to eat. This article reviews recent scientific literature regarding the brain's role in pediatric food motivation and childhood obesity. The article will begin by reviewing some of the recent literature discussing challenges associated with neuroimaging in children and the relevant developmental brain changes that occur in childhood and adolescence. The article will then review studies regarding neural mechanisms of food motivation and the ability to delay gratification in children and how these responses differ in obese compared to healthy weight children. Increasing our understanding about how brain function and behavior may differ in children will inform future research, obesity prevention, and interventions targeting childhood obesity. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Fertility treatment in obese women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, A.M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing worldwide. This has major adverse consequences for health in general and fertility in women in particular. With the increasing number of women in reproductive age being obese, there is also an increasing need for fertility treatment. And with more pregnant women

  11. Obesity and pelvic organ prolapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, U.J.; Kerkhof, M.H.; Leijsen, S.A. van; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to review the data on the relationship of obesity and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). This review is timely and relevant as the prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide, and it is an important risk factor to consider in counseling women on

  12. Obesity in Egyptian School Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa A. Abolfotouh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the relationship between high blood pressure (HBP and obesity in Egyptian adolescents. Methods. A cross-sectional study of 1500 adolescents (11–19 years in Alexandria, Egypt, was conducted. Resting BP was measured and measurements were categorized using the 2004 fourth report on blood pressure screening recommendations. Additional measures included height, weight, and waist and hip circumferences. Obesity was determined based on BMI, waist circumference (WC and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR indicators. Crude and adjusted odds ratios were used as measures of association between BP and obesity. Results. Prevalence rates of prehypertension and hypertension were 5.7% and 4.0%, respectively. Obesity was seen in 34.6%, 16.1%, 4.5%, and 16.7% according to BMI, WHR, WC, and WHtR, respectively. Adjusting for confounders, HBP was significantly associated with overall obesity based on BMI (OR=2.18, 95%, CI=1.38-3.44 and central obesity based on WC (OR=3.14, 95%, CI=1.67-5.94. Conclusion. Both overall obesity and central obesity were significant predictors of HBP in Egyptian adolescents.

  13. Osteoarthritis, obesity and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Leeds, A R; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is widely acknowledged as a risk factor for both the incidence and progression of osteoarthritis, and has a negative influence on outcomes. Loss of at least 10% of body weight, coupled with exercise, is recognized as a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with osteoarthritis...

  14. Decreased Emotional Perception in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giel, Katrin Elisabeth; Hartmann, Armin; Zeeck, Almut; Jux, Anna; Vuck, Alexander; Gierthmuehlen, Petra C Guess; Wetzler-Burmeister, Edda; Sandholz, Angelika; Marjanovic, Goran; Joos, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    There is hardly any empirical evidence on emotion processing by controlled studies in obesity. Participants rated their emotions in response to visual emotional stimuli from the International Affective Picture System. Study 1 compared obese women with normal-weight controls and women with eating disorders. Study 2 compared obese men with normal-weight controls. Obese women had reduced emotional intensity scores for all basic emotions and the mixed emotion sadness-fear. Obese men had reduced scores for all emotions except happiness and disgust; anger showed a trend towards significance. The results were mainly based on ratings from non-depressed obese individuals. Obese men and women scored significantly lower on most basic and mixed emotions. Non-depressed obese subjects seem particularly affected. These new findings must be validated by further study, and longitudinal evaluation after weight loss, e.g. by bariatric surgery, will be of interest. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  15. Childhood obesity, prevalence and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merchant Anwar T

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in developed countries. Twenty five percent of children in the US are overweight and 11% are obese. Overweight and obesity in childhood are known to have significant impact on both physical and psychological health. The mechanism of obesity development is not fully understood and it is believed to be a disorder with multiple causes. Environmental factors, lifestyle preferences, and cultural environment play pivotal roles in the rising prevalence of obesity worldwide. In general, overweight and obesity are assumed to be the results of an increase in caloric and fat intake. On the other hand, there are supporting evidence that excessive sugar intake by soft drink, increased portion size, and steady decline in physical activity have been playing major roles in the rising rates of obesity all around the world. Consequently, both over-consumption of calories and reduced physical activity are involved in childhood obesity. Almost all researchers agree that prevention could be the key strategy for controlling the current epidemic of obesity. Prevention may include primary prevention of overweight or obesity, secondary prevention or prevention of weight regains following weight loss, and avoidance of more weight increase in obese persons unable to lose weight. Until now, most approaches have focused on changing the behaviour of individuals in diet and exercise. It seems, however, that these strategies have had little impact on the growing increase of the obesity epidemic. While about 50% of the adults are overweight and obese in many countries, it is difficult to reduce excessive weight once it becomes established. Children should therefore be considered the priority population for intervention strategies. Prevention may be achieved through a variety of interventions targeting built environment, physical activity, and diet. Some of these potential strategies for intervention in children can be

  16. International Classification of Diseases (ICD-coded obesity predicts risk of incident osteoporotic fracture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuman Yang

    Full Text Available International Classification of Diseases (ICD codes have been used to ascertain individuals who are obese. There has been limited research about the predictive value of ICD-coded obesity for major chronic conditions at the population level. We tested the utility of ICD-coded obesity versus measured obesity for predicting incident major osteoporotic fracture (MOF, after adjusting for covariates (i.e., age and sex. In this historical cohort study (2001-2015, we selected 61,854 individuals aged 50 years and older from the Manitoba Bone Mineral Density Database, Canada. Body mass index (BMI ≥30 kg/m2 was used to define measured obesity. Hospital and physician ICD codes were used to ascertain ICD-coded obesity and incident MOF. Average cohort age was 66.3 years and 90.3% were female. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value for ICD-coded obesity using measured obesity as the reference were 0.11 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.10, 0.11, 0.99 (95% CI: 0.99, 0.99 and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.81, respectively. ICD-coded obesity (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; 95% CI: 0.70, 0.99 and measured obesity (adjusted HR 0.83; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.88 were associated with decreased MOF risk. Although the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC estimates for incident MOF were not significantly different for ICD-coded obesity versus measured obesity (0.648 for ICD-coded obesity versus 0.650 for measured obesity; P = 0.056 for AUROC difference, the category-free net reclassification index for ICD-coded obesity versus measured obesity was -0.08 (95% CI: -0.11, -0.06 for predicting incident MOF. ICD-coded obesity predicted incident MOF, though it had low sensitivity and reclassified MOF risk slightly less well than measured obesity.

  17. International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-coded obesity predicts risk of incident osteoporotic fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lix, Lisa M.; Yan, Lin; Hinds, Aynslie M.; Leslie, William D.

    2017-01-01

    International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes have been used to ascertain individuals who are obese. There has been limited research about the predictive value of ICD-coded obesity for major chronic conditions at the population level. We tested the utility of ICD-coded obesity versus measured obesity for predicting incident major osteoporotic fracture (MOF), after adjusting for covariates (i.e., age and sex). In this historical cohort study (2001–2015), we selected 61,854 individuals aged 50 years and older from the Manitoba Bone Mineral Density Database, Canada. Body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2 was used to define measured obesity. Hospital and physician ICD codes were used to ascertain ICD-coded obesity and incident MOF. Average cohort age was 66.3 years and 90.3% were female. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value for ICD-coded obesity using measured obesity as the reference were 0.11 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.10, 0.11), 0.99 (95% CI: 0.99, 0.99) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.81), respectively. ICD-coded obesity (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; 95% CI: 0.70, 0.99) and measured obesity (adjusted HR 0.83; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.88) were associated with decreased MOF risk. Although the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) estimates for incident MOF were not significantly different for ICD-coded obesity versus measured obesity (0.648 for ICD-coded obesity versus 0.650 for measured obesity; P = 0.056 for AUROC difference), the category-free net reclassification index for ICD-coded obesity versus measured obesity was -0.08 (95% CI: -0.11, -0.06) for predicting incident MOF. ICD-coded obesity predicted incident MOF, though it had low sensitivity and reclassified MOF risk slightly less well than measured obesity. PMID:29216254

  18. Alcohol produces distinct hepatic lipidome and eicosanoid signature in lean and obese[S

    OpenAIRE

    Puri, Puneet; Xu, Jun; Vihervaara, Terhi; Katainen, Riikka; Ekroos, Kim; Daita, Kalyani; Min, Hae-Ki; Joyce, Andrew; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol- and obesity-related liver diseases often coexist. The hepatic lipidomics due to alcohol and obesity interaction is unknown. We characterized the hepatic lipidome due to 1) alcohol consumption in lean and obese mice and 2) obesity and alcohol interactions. In the French-Tsukamoto mouse model, intragastric alcohol or isocaloric dextrose were fed with either chow (lean) or high-fat, high-cholesterol diet (obese). Four groups (lean, lean alcohol, obese, and obese alcohol) were studied. M...

  19. Evolution not Revolution: Nutrition and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Elaine C; Yan, Mary R

    2017-05-20

    The increasing prevalence of obesity over the course of life is a global health challenge because of its strong and positive association with significant health problems such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and some cancers. The complex causes and drivers of obesity include genetic factors, social, ecological and political influences, food production and supply, and dietary patterns. Public health messages and government food and activity guidelines have little impact; the retail food environment has many low-priced, nutrient-poor, but energy-dense products and there is a gap between what an individual knows and what they do. Public health and education services need legislation to mandate supportive environments and promote food literacy. Two New Zealand case studies of proof-of-principle of positive change are described: Project Energize and Under 5 Energize as exemplars of school environment change, and the development of the Nothing Else™ healthier snack bar as an example of working with the food industry. Changes in food literacy alongside food supply will contribute in the long term to positive effects on the future prevalence of obesity and the onset of non-communicable disease. More cross-disciplinary translational research to inform how to improve the food supply and food literacy will improve the health and wellbeing of the economy and the population.

  20. Ketogenic Diet for Obesity: Friend or Foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paoli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions and is a strong risk factor for a number of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and also certain types of cancers. Despite the constant recommendations of health care organizations regarding the importance of weight control, this goal often fails. Genetic predisposition in combination with inactive lifestyles and high caloric intake leads to excessive weight gain. Even though there may be agreement about the concept that lifestyle changes affecting dietary habits and physical activity are essential to promote weight loss and weight control, the ideal amount and type of exercise and also the ideal diet are still under debate. For many years, nutritional intervention studies have been focused on reducing dietary fat with little positive results over the long-term. One of the most studied strategies in the recent years for weight loss is the ketogenic diet. Many studies have shown that this kind of nutritional approach has a solid physiological and biochemical basis and is able to induce effective weight loss along with improvement in several cardiovascular risk parameters. This review discusses the physiological basis of ketogenic diets and the rationale for their use in obesity, discussing the strengths and the weaknesses of these diets together with cautions that should be used in obese patients.

  1. Evolution not Revolution: Nutrition and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Elaine C.; Yan, Mary R.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity over the course of life is a global health challenge because of its strong and positive association with significant health problems such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and some cancers. The complex causes and drivers of obesity include genetic factors, social, ecological and political influences, food production and supply, and dietary patterns. Public health messages and government food and activity guidelines have little impact; the retail food environment has many low-priced, nutrient-poor, but energy-dense products and there is a gap between what an individual knows and what they do. Public health and education services need legislation to mandate supportive environments and promote food literacy. Two New Zealand case studies of proof-of-principle of positive change are described: Project Energize and Under 5 Energize as exemplars of school environment change, and the development of the Nothing Else™ healthier snack bar as an example of working with the food industry. Changes in food literacy alongside food supply will contribute in the long term to positive effects on the future prevalence of obesity and the onset of non-communicable disease. More cross-disciplinary translational research to inform how to improve the food supply and food literacy will improve the health and wellbeing of the economy and the population. PMID:28531097

  2. Prevalence of obesity in Indian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, C; Khan, S A; Ansari, S H; Garg, M

    2010-02-01

    Comparison of two major studies conducted by National family health survey (NFHS-2) in 1998-1999 and NFHS-3 in 2005-2006 shows that prevalence of obesity among Indian women has elevated from 10.6% to 12.6% (increased by 24.52%). The prevalence is more profound in the women of age between 40-49 years (23.7%), residing in cities (23.5%), having high qualification (23.8%), belonging to Sikh community (31.6%) and households in the highest wealth quintile (30.5%). Highest percentage of obese women is found in Punjab (29.9%). Although this number seems small in the international perspective, it is significant because of the sheer size of population in India. While the problem of under-nutrition still exists in many parts of India, the additional burden of obesity due to increasing sedentary lifestyle, junk food habits in some urban and economically sound areas is really alarming. Prevention and control of this serious problem through awareness programmes to adopt diversified nutritional food and healthy lifestyle are strongly recommended.

  3. Ketogenic Diet for Obesity: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions and is a strong risk factor for a number of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and also certain types of cancers. Despite the constant recommendations of health care organizations regarding the importance of weight control, this goal often fails. Genetic predisposition in combination with inactive lifestyles and high caloric intake leads to excessive weight gain. Even though there may be agreement about the concept that lifestyle changes affecting dietary habits and physical activity are essential to promote weight loss and weight control, the ideal amount and type of exercise and also the ideal diet are still under debate. For many years, nutritional intervention studies have been focused on reducing dietary fat with little positive results over the long-term. One of the most studied strategies in the recent years for weight loss is the ketogenic diet. Many studies have shown that this kind of nutritional approach has a solid physiological and biochemical basis and is able to induce effective weight loss along with improvement in several cardiovascular risk parameters. This review discusses the physiological basis of ketogenic diets and the rationale for their use in obesity, discussing the strengths and the weaknesses of these diets together with cautions that should be used in obese patients. PMID:24557522

  4. Ketogenic diet for obesity: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Antonio

    2014-02-19

    Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions and is a strong risk factor for a number of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and also certain types of cancers. Despite the constant recommendations of health care organizations regarding the importance of weight control, this goal often fails. Genetic predisposition in combination with inactive lifestyles and high caloric intake leads to excessive weight gain. Even though there may be agreement about the concept that lifestyle changes affecting dietary habits and physical activity are essential to promote weight loss and weight control, the ideal amount and type of exercise and also the ideal diet are still under debate. For many years, nutritional intervention studies have been focused on reducing dietary fat with little positive results over the long-term. One of the most studied strategies in the recent years for weight loss is the ketogenic diet. Many studies have shown that this kind of nutritional approach has a solid physiological and biochemical basis and is able to induce effective weight loss along with improvement in several cardiovascular risk parameters. This review discusses the physiological basis of ketogenic diets and the rationale for their use in obesity, discussing the strengths and the weaknesses of these diets together with cautions that should be used in obese patients.

  5. Umbilical artery tone in maternal obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glavey Siobhan V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing prevalence of obesity constitutes a major health problem in obstetrics with implications for feto-maternal growth and wellbeing. This study investigated and compared the contractile properties of umbilical arteries excised from obese women, with those excised from women with a normal body mass index (BMI. Methods Sections of umbilical artery were obtained from umbilical cord samples immediately after delivery and mounted for isometric recording in organ tissue baths under physiological conditions. Cumulative additions of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and Prostaglandin F-2alpha (PgF2alpha were added in the concentration range of 1 nmol/L to 10 micromol/L. Control vessels were exposed to Krebs physiological salt solution (PSS only. The resultant effects of each drug addition were measured using the Powerlab hardware unit. Results 5-HT exerted a significant effect on human umbilical artery tone at concentrations of 100 nmol/L, 1 micromol/L, and 10 micromol/L in normal (n = 5; P 0.05. Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that endogenous regulation of umbilical artery tone is altered in association with maternal obesity. This may be linked to the cardiovascular effects of secretory products of adipose tissue, with implications for the feto-maternal circulation.

  6. Phthalate exposure and childhood obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hye Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Phthalates are commonly used as plasticizers and vehicles for cosmetic ingredients. Phthalate metabolites have documented biochemical activity including activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor and antiandrogenic effects, which may contribute to the development of obesity. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that phthalates have significant effects on the development of obesity, especially after prenatal exposure at low doses. Although few studies have examined the effects of phthalate on obesity development in humans, some work has shown that phthalates affect humans and animals similarly. In this paper, we review the possible mechanisms of phthalate-induced obesity, and discuss evidence supporting the role of phthalates in the development of obesity in humans.

  7. Asthma symptoms in obese adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2016-01-01

    . Obese patients, who present with symptoms suggesting a diagnosis of asthma, may have a distinct phenotype or a disease mimicking asthma, likely to have a potentially higher remission rate. And by that, our approach to this group of patients should combine pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies......The association between asthma and obesity is well-described, but not straightforward, and according to current guidelines asthma control is more difficult to achieve in obese patients. The currently available studies evaluating response to pharmacological asthma therapy in obese patients show...... that these patients have an altered, in general less favorable, response to both reliever and controller medication compared to normal weight patients. However, at present, the limited available evidence precludes evidence-based recommendations. The 'obesity-related asthma' phenotype has different characteristics...

  8. Obesity and risk of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Kathrine Agergård; Pedersen, Ole Birger Vesterager; Petersen, Mikkel Steen

    2015-01-01

    prescription of antimicrobials. Obesity was associated with risk of hospital-based treatment for infection (women: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1, 1.9; men: HR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2, 1.9). For specific infections, obesity was associated with increased risk of abscesses (both sexes......), infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (men), and respiratory tract infections and cystitis (women). Similarly, obesity was associated with filled prescriptions of antimicrobials overall (women: HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14, 1.30; men: HR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.33) and particularly......BACKGROUND: It is well known that obesity complicates the course of several diseases. However, it is unknown whether obesity affects the risk of infection among healthy individuals. METHODS: We included 37,808 healthy participants from the Danish Blood Donor Study, who completed a questionnaire...

  9. [Obesity and thinness in painting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller Pérez, Amador

    2004-01-01

    The obesity, serious frequenty sanitary problem, cause of complications that effects to the expectation of life, with aesthetic repercussion and with an increase in the last decades. Admitted the obesity android, gynoide, central or abdominal, wide aesthetic repercussion and physiopathologic like hyperdislipemias, metabolic alterations (diabetes mellitus, etc...), arterial hypertension, column arthrosis and outlying. Ethiopathologics co-factors, sedentariness, genotypic predisposition, endocrine alterations and of the leptina secretion. Illustrative cases of obesity in the painting of those that characteristic models are exposed, from slight grades to intense affecting to both genders. The thinness counterpoint of the obesity, multicausal process, less frequent than the obesity with aesthetic and psychological repercussion. It is the formed aesthetic thinness to the diverse types physiopathologic, without forgetting the constitutional and family form and the anorexy, the serial ones to disasters, wars, famines, etc..., the mystic thinness of saints and ascetics, and the serial one to consuming processes.

  10. Obesity: genome and environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bašić, Martina; Butorac, Ana; Landeka Jurčević, Irena; Bačun-Družina, Višnja

    2012-09-01

    Obesity has become one of the major threats for public health in industrialised world among adults, but also among adolescents and children. It is influenced by the interaction of genes, nutrition, environment, and lifestyle. Environmental and lifestyle risk factors include foetal and lifelong environment, nutrient quality, chemical and microbial exposure, and psychical stress, all of which are important contributing influences. Removing or limiting chemical and pharmaceutical obesogens from human environment could make a difference in the growing epidemic of obesity. Additionally, nutrigenomics describes how modifications in individual diets can improve health and prevent chronic diseases, as well as obesity, by understanding the effects of a genetic profile in the interaction between food and increase in body weight. Furthermore, individual genetic variations in genome represent an individual's predisposition for obesity. Therefore, the use of individual genetic information, avoiding obesogens, and a healthy lifestyle could help to improve the management of obesity and maintain a healthy weight.

  11. biochemical and hormonal studies in obese cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issa, G.I.

    1993-01-01

    The present study was carried out on a total number of 116 obese and 23 non-obese control females. Obesity was assessed mainly by body mass index (BMI). Other skinfold thickness e.g. triceps, subscapular, suprailiac, as parameters of obesity assessment were determined in some obese patients. The degree of obesity was assessed by BMI and categorized as follows: i- Mild obesity, BMI=25-30 Kg/m 2 . ii-Moderate obesity, BMI=31-35 kg/m 2 . iii-severe obesity, BMI= above 35 kg/m 2 . Type of fat distribution was assessed by waist/hip circumference ratio (w/H) as :- i-gynoid (lower body segment obesity). (≤ 0.81) i i- android (upper body segment obesity). (≥0.82)

  12. Common variants in LEPR, IL6, AMD1, and NAMPT do not associate with risk of juvenile and childhood obesity in Danes: a case?control study

    OpenAIRE

    Hollensted, Mette; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Have, Christian Theil; Grarup, Niels; Fonvig, Cilius Esmann; Nielsen, Tenna Ruest Haarmark; Trier, C?cilie; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pedersen, Oluf; Holm, Jens-Christian; S?rensen, Thorkild I A; Hansen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity is a highly heritable disorder, for which the underlying genetic architecture is largely unknown. Four common variants involved in inflammatory-adipokine triggering (IL6 rs2069845, LEPR rs1137100, NAMPT rs3801266, and AMD1 rs2796749) have recently been associated with obesity and related traits in Indian children. The current study aimed to examine the effect of these variants on risk of childhood/juvenile onset obesity and on obesity-related quantitative traits ...

  13. Starches, Sugars and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. J. G. Aller

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The rising prevalence of obesity, not only in adults but also in children and adolescents, is one of the most important public health problems in developed and developing countries. As one possible way to tackle obesity, a great interest has been stimulated in understanding the relationship between different types of dietary carbohydrate and appetite regulation, body weight and body composition. The present article reviews the conclusions from recent reviews and meta-analyses on the effects of different starches and sugars on body weight management and metabolic disturbances, and provides an update of the most recent studies on this topic. From the literature reviewed in this paper, potential beneficial effects of intake of starchy foods, especially those containing slowly-digestible and resistant starches, and potential detrimental effects of high intakes of fructose become apparent. This supports the intake of whole grains, legumes and vegetables, which contain more appropriate sources of carbohydrates associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases, rather than foods rich in sugars, especially in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages.

  14. Obesity: surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesely, Jennifer M; DeMattia, Laure G

    2014-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is a treatment approach for patients for whom multiple attempts at weight loss through lifestyle interventions and/or pharmacotherapy have not been successful. Surgery for obesity management produces greater weight loss than medical therapy alone. Four procedures frequently covered by health insurance are laparoscopic adjustable gastric band, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic vertical sleeve gastrectomy, and biliopancreatic diversion with or without duodenal switch. Current indications for bariatric surgery include a body mass index of 40 kg/m(2) or greater or a body mass index of 35 kg/m(2) or greater with at least one major obesity-associated comorbid condition. Expected weight loss can range from 37% to 79% of excess weight at 2 years after surgery depending on the procedure. Patients must commit to lifelong adherence to dietary supplementation and monitoring of vitamin levels, because nutritional deficiencies are common. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  15. Starches, sugars and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Erik E J G; Abete, Itziar; Astrup, Arne; Martinez, J Alfredo; van Baak, Marleen A

    2011-03-01

    The rising prevalence of obesity, not only in adults but also in children and adolescents, is one of the most important public health problems in developed and developing countries. As one possible way to tackle obesity, a great interest has been stimulated in understanding the relationship between different types of dietary carbohydrate and appetite regulation, body weight and body composition. The present article reviews the conclusions from recent reviews and meta-analyses on the effects of different starches and sugars on body weight management and metabolic disturbances, and provides an update of the most recent studies on this topic. From the literature reviewed in this paper, potential beneficial effects of intake of starchy foods, especially those containing slowly-digestible and resistant starches, and potential detrimental effects of high intakes of fructose become apparent. This supports the intake of whole grains, legumes and vegetables, which contain more appropriate sources of carbohydrates associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases, rather than foods rich in sugars, especially in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages.

  16. Understanding overeating and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhm, Christopher J

    2012-12-01

    The combination of economic and biological factors is likely to result in overeating in the current environment of cheap and readily available food. This propensity is shown using a "dual decision" approach where choices reflect the interaction of a "deliberative" system, operating as in standard economic models, and an "affective" system that responds rapidly to stimuli without considering long-term consequences. This framework is characterized by excess food consumption and body weight, in that individuals prefer both ex-ante and ex-post to eat and weigh less than they actually do, with weight loss attempts being common but often unsuccessful or only partially successful. As in the standard model, weight is related to prices. However, another potentially important reason for rising obesity is that food producers have incentives to engineer products to stimulate the affective system so as to encourage overeating. Data from several sources are used to investigate predictions of the dual decision model, with the evidence providing broad support for at least some irrationality in food consumption. Most importantly, there is little indication that the large secular increases in body mass index have been accompanied by corresponding growth in utility-maximizing weight. One result is that efforts to reduce weight have become more common as obesity has increased. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. TENDINOPATHY AND OBESITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Adham do Amaral E; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Nassif, Paulo Afonso Nunes; Sakuma, Alexandre Kaue; Barros, Wagner Haese

    Tendinopathies and tendon tears account for over 30% of all musculoskeletal consultations. Obesity, which is becoming one of the world´s most prevalent public health issues, may be associated with this condition. To review the literature about tendinopathies and obesity association. This is a descriptive exploratory study using the portal Medline. Literature in English language from 2006 to 2014 were reviewed. The pathogenesis of tendinopathies includes inflammatory, regenerative and degenerative processes that happen simultaneously from early to late phases of the disease. Mechanical stress upon tendons seems to be one of the most important factors to initiate the inflammatory response, but it´s not the only one that can deflagrate it: there are other extrinsic, genetic and metabolic factors that may be involved. Therefore, tendinopathies in obese patients can be due to tendon overload because of the excess of weight, but also because of increased production of pro-inflammatory mediators related to fat tissue such as adipokines. This pro-inflammatory state that obese people can suffer is known as adiposopathy, or sick fat syndrome. Weight loss is associated with decrease in adipokines and improvement of musculoskeletal symptoms. The relation of obesity and tendinopathies is supported by evidences of recent studies, exemplified in this review of literature. As tendinopatias e as fissuras em tendões respondem por 30% de todas as consultas médicas. A obesidade, que está se tornando um dos problemas de saúde pública mais prevalentes no mundo, pode estar associada com esta condição. Revisar a literatura acerca da associação entre obesidade e tendinopatias. Este é um estudo exploratório e descritivo utilizando artigos em língua inglesa do portal médico Medline, do período de 2006 a 2014. Na patogênese das tendinopatias incluem-se elementos inflamatórios, regenerativos e degenerativos que aparecem de maneira simultânea em todos os estágios da doen

  18. High glycemic index foods, overeating, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, D S; Majzoub, J A; Al-Zahrani, A; Dallal, G E; Blanco, I; Roberts, S B

    1999-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically in recent years. However, the role of dietary composition in body weight regulation remains unclear. The purpose of this work was to investigate the acute effects of dietary glycemic index (GI) on energy metabolism and voluntary food intake in obese subjects. Twelve obese teenage boys were evaluated on three separate occasions using a crossover study protocol. During each evaluation, subjects consumed identical test meals at breakfast and lunch that had a low, medium, or high GI. The high- and medium-GI meals were designed to have similar macronutrient composition, fiber content, and palatability, and all meals for each subject had equal energy content. After breakfast, plasma and serum concentrations of metabolic fuels and hormones were measured. Ad libitum food intake was determined in the 5-hour period after lunch. Voluntary energy intake after the high-GI meal (5.8 megajoule [mJ]) was 53% greater than after the medium-GI meal (3.8 mJ), and 81% greater than after the low-GI meal (3.2 mJ). In addition, compared with the low-GI meal, the high-GI meal resulted in higher serum insulin levels, lower plasma glucagon levels, lower postabsorptive plasma glucose and serum fatty acids levels, and elevation in plasma epinephrine. The area under the glycemic response curve for each test meal accounted for 53% of the variance in food intake within subjects. The rapid absorption of glucose after consumption of high-GI meals induces a sequence of hormonal and metabolic changes that promote excessive food intake in obese subjects. Additional studies are needed to examine the relationship between dietary GI and long-term body weight regulation.

  19. Innate lymphoid cells at the interface between obesity and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaere, Laetitia; Ait Yahia, Saliha; Bouté, Mélodie; Audousset, Camille; Chenivesse, Cécile; Tsicopoulos, Anne

    2018-01-01

    Obesity and asthma prevalence has dramatically and concomitantly increased over the last 25 years, and many epidemiological studies have highlighted obesity as an important risk factor for asthma. Although many studies have been performed, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Innate mechanisms have been involved in both diseases, in particular through the recently described innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). ILCs are subdivided into three groups that are defined by their cytokine production and by their master transcription factor expression, in sharp correlation with their T helper counterparts. However, unlike T helper cells, ILCs do not express antigen-specific receptors, but respond to damage-induced signals. ILCs have been found in target tissues of both diseases, and data have implicated these cells in the pathogenesis of both diseases. In particular group 2 ILCs (ILC2) are activated in both the adipose and lung tissues under the effect of interleukin-33 and interleukin-25 expression. However, counter-intuitively to the well-known association between obesity and asthma, ILC2 are beneficial for obesity but deleterious for asthma. This review will examine the roles of ILCs in each disease and recent data highlighting ILCs as a putative link between obesity and asthma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Obesity and psychotic disorders: uncovering common mechanisms through metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Orešič

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary obesity and psychotic disorders are similar with respect to the associated changes in energy balance and co-morbidities, including metabolic syndrome. Such similarities do not necessarily demonstrate causal links, but instead suggest that specific causes of and metabolic disturbances associated with obesity play a pathogenic role in the development of co-morbid disorders, potentially even before obesity develops. Metabolomics – the systematic study of metabolites, which are small molecules generated by the process of metabolism – has been important in elucidating the pathways underlying obesity-associated co-morbidities. This review covers how recent metabolomic studies have advanced biomarker discovery and the elucidation of mechanisms underlying obesity and its co-morbidities, with a specific focus on metabolic syndrome and psychotic disorders. The importance of identifying metabolic markers of disease-associated intermediate phenotypes – traits modulated but not encoded by the DNA sequence – is emphasized. Such markers would be applicable as diagnostic tools in a personalized healthcare setting and might also open up novel therapeutic avenues.

  1. Obesity as malnutrition: the role of capitalism in the obesity global epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jonathan C K

    2012-01-01

    The global obesity epidemic remains poorly understood, partly because it has emerged alongside persisting under-nutrition in many populations. At an abstract level, obesity develops from exposure to the "obesogenic niche," comprising diverse factors predisposing to weight gain. This article first explores how susceptibility to the obesogenic niche is influenced by developmental and life-history experience. Human growth is sensitive to early-life ecological conditions, under the transducing effect of maternal phenotype. Such plasticity is associated with subsequent variability in body composition and metabolism, impacting susceptibility to the obesogenic niche, albeit with heterogeneity across populations. Both nutritional constraint and nutritional excess during early life are associated with variability in relevant molecular pathways. The article then considers the fundamental contribution of capitalist economics to population under-nutrition and over-nutrition. Historically, capitalism contributed to the under-nutrition of many populations through demand for cheap labor. As the limiting factor for economic growth switched to consumption, capitalism has increasingly driven consumer behavior inducing widespread over-nutrition. In populations undergoing nutritional transition, many individuals encounter both under- and over-nutrition within the life course, elevating both susceptibility and exposure to the obesogenic niche. The interactions between global economic forces and nutritional shifts are distributed across generations, and are strongly transduced by maternal effects. The structural connections between undernourished and overnourished worldwide and between under- and over-nutrition within individual life-courses highlight the central role of capitalist economics in the global obesity epidemic. Prevention policies targeting individual behavior have proved ineffective and economic policies are arguably the optimal target for intervention. Copyright © 2012

  2. Effects of ear acupuncture therapy for obesity on the depression of obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Set, Turan; Cayir, Yasemin; Pirim, Asuman Bihter Guven

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is one of the leading health risks worldwide, and depression is among the leading causes of the burden of disease. These disorders are increasingly prevalent as comorbidities. Depressive symptoms are associated with obesity, and are more common in women. To evaluate the effectiveness of ear acupuncture for obesity on the depression of obese women. After baseline testing, 30 eligible patients with body mass index (BMI) >29.9 kg/m(2) were included. The Beck Depression Inventory for Primary Care (BDI-PC) was used to assess changes in depression. BMI was also measured. Patients had six ear acupuncture sessions, every 15 days and were followed up for 3 months. Twenty four patients completed the study. The mean±SD age of patients was 42.9±9.0 years. Their mean±SD BMI was 39.0±4.7 kg/m(2) before acupuncture, decreasing to 37.2±4.3 kg/m(2) after acupuncture therapy (ptreatment. There was no significant correlation between BMI and depression score before acupuncture therapy (p=0.104). After acupuncture therapy, no significant correlation was found between the percentage reduction of BMI and percentage reduction of the depression score (p=0.119). Further research into the effects of ear acupuncture in the management of obesity and depression is justified. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. THE ROLE OF OBESITY SURGERY IN OBESITY TREATMENT IN TURKEY

    OpenAIRE

    KARADAYI, BILGEHAN; KOCKAYA, GUVENC; YENILMEZ, FATMA BETUL; SENER, OLGUN; BEYAN, ASLIHAN

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as “abnormal or excess fat accumulation that may impair health.” To define obesity, the patient’s body weight in kilograms is divided by the square of height in meters to calculate the body mass index (BMI). In Turkey, it has been reported that 34.8% of the population are overweight, 44.2% are of normal weight, and 3.9% are lean in 2012. With respect to gender, 20.9% and 30.4% of the women are obese and overweight, respectively. The ai...

  4. Long-term consequences of obesity on female fertility and the health of the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Suchitra; Neal-Perry, Genevieve

    2017-06-01

    Obesity has reached near epidemic levels among reproductive age women with a myriad of consequences. Obesity adversely affects the maternal milieu by creating conditions that decrease fertility and increase the risk of gestational diabetes, hypertensive disease in pregnancy, fetal growth abnormalities and congenital anomalies. The effects of obesity are not limited to pregnancy. Indeed, beyond the immediate postpartum period, obese women maintain a higher prevalence of insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology underlying the effects of obesity on fertility, pregnancy outcome and health status of offspring. The purpose of this review is to outline proposed models responsible for the short-term and long-term consequences of obesity on fertility and offspring development, and identify knowledge gaps where additional research is needed. Maternal over or under nutrition adversely affect maternal reproductive capacity and pregnancy success. Separate from effects on maternal reproductive function, maternal over or under nutrition may also 'program' fetal pathophysiology through inheritance mechanisms that suggest epigenetic modification of DNA, differential RNA translation and protein expression, or modification of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary axis function through programmed adverse effects on the developing hypothalamic circuitry. The concept of maternal health modifying the risk of developing noncommunicable diseases in the offspring is based on Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis. Of importance, the long-term effects of obesity are not limited to maternal health, but also programs pathophysiology in their offspring. Children of obese gravida are at increased risk for the development of cardiometabolic disease in childhood and throughout adulthood. Future studies directly interrogating mechanisms underlying the risks associated with obesity will allow us to develop interventions and

  5. Relationship between Obesity Indices and Pulmonary Function Parameters in Obese Thai Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkiattikul, Lalida; Sritippayawan, Suchada; Chomtho, Sirinuch; Deerojanawong, Jitladda; Prapphal, Nuanchan

    2015-12-01

    To determine the correlation between various obesity indices and pulmonary function parameters in obese Thai children and adolescents. Obese children and adolescents aged from 8 to 18 y and diagnosed under the criteria of International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) were enrolled. Anthropometric and body composition measurements (bioelectrical impedance analysis) of all eligible participants were recorded. Pulmonary function studies (spirometry and body plethysmography) were also performed on the same day. Forty-five children and adolescents [84 % boys; mean age 11.9 ± 2.4 y; mean BMI 31.8 ± 5.1 kg/m(2); and, mean body mass index (BMI) z-score 3.2 ± 0.5] were studied. Mean body fat percentage, mean fat mass index (FMI), mean fat free mass index, and mean truncal fat percentage were 47.4 ± 10.2 %, 15.2 ± 5.2 kg/m(2), 16.3 ± 3.1 kg/m(2), and 47.7 ± 11.5 %, respectively. Abnormal lung functions were found in 73.2 % of subjects; the most common was decreased functional residual capacity (FRC) (29 cases; 64.4 %). There was a negative correlation between FRC and BMI z-score (r = -0.32; p 0.03), waist-height ratio (r = -0.32; p 0.02), body fat percentage (r = -0.32; p 0.03), FMI (r = -0.36; p 0.02), and truncal fat percentage (r = -0.32; p 0.04). Obese individuals who had FMI > 17 kg/m(2) were 5.7 times more likely to have decreased FRC than those who had lower FMI (95 % CI 1.1-29.7; p 0.016). Decreased FRC was the most common pulmonary function abnormality in obese children and adolescents. BMI z-score, waist-height ratio, body fat percentage, FMI, and truncal fat percentage were all negatively correlated with FRC. FMI had the highest negative correlation. Obese individuals with FMI > 17 kg/m(2) had a 5.7 times increased risk of low FRC. Appropriate planning for respiratory care and follow-up may be required in this population.

  6. Iron status in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowiak-Kulpa, Hanna; Kargulewicz, Angelika; Styszyński, Arkadiusz; Swora-Cwynar, Ewelina; Grzymisławski, Marian

    2017-12-23

    A decreased concentration of iron, and consecutively haemoglobin, ferritin and decreased level of saturated transferrin, were observed in obese individuals more often than in healthy subjects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation are significantly diminished in obese female patients compared to non-obese counterparts, and whether excess adiposity and inflammation were associated with depleted iron. Female patients (n=48) diagnosed with obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m2), aged 18-40 were accepted for the study. A control group (n=30) encompassed normal weight women, aged 18-30. All obese women obtained an individually adjusted dietary plan with an energy content of 1,500 kcal. Blood glucose, insulin, lipids, ferritin, TIBC and iron concentrations were assayed in serum twice, initially and after 8 weeks of dieting. The obese women at the initial evaluation, in comparison to non-obese control women, were characterized by a significantly lower mean red blood cell volume (MCV; 84.2±12.4 vs. 91.3±9.3 fL; piron level (92.6±42.4 vs. 119.8±44.0 μg/dL; piron homeostasis. Weight loss leads to decrease in the CRP level, but it does not change haematologic parameters in the period of 8 weeks.

  7. [Obesity and the immune system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, M; Mazure, R A; Culebras, J M

    2004-01-01

    With an increased prevalence of obesity in developed countries, associated chronic diseases rise in a parallel way. Morbidity secondary to overweight and obesity include type 2 diabetes, dislipemia, hypertension, heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, cholelithiasis, osteoarthritis, heart insufficiency, sleep apnoea, menstrual changes, sterility and psychological alterations. There is also a greater susceptibility to suffer some types of cancer, infections, greater risk of bacteremia and a prolonged time of wound healing after surgical operations. All these factors indicate that obesity exerts negative effects upon the immune system. Immune changes found in obesity and their possible interrelations are described in this article. Changes produced during obesity affect both humoral and cellular immunity. It is known that adipose tissue, together with its role as energy reserve in form of triglycerides, has important endocrine functions, producing several hormones and other signal molecules. Immune response can be deeply affected by obesity, playing leptin an important role. Properties of leptin, alterations of leptin levels in different situations and its changes with different medical and surgical therapies for obesity are described in this article.

  8. Complementary feeding and obesity risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Veit; Theurich, Melissa

    2014-05-01

    This article will summarize recent progress in research in the area of complementary feeding as it relates to childhood obesity. Newly emerged findings demonstrate how research on contributing factors has shifted. Examining nutrient and caloric intakes alone has failed to answer the critical question, 'Why are some children obese, whereas others are not?' Recent research explores parental attitudes, beliefs and parental feeding styles as contributing factors. Studies examining the impact of specific macronutrients on obesity risk may have partially uncovered a link between consistently high protein intakes during infancy and an elevated obesity risk, at least until the second year of life. However, this relationship was not evident in all studies evaluated in a systematic review this year. Childhood obesity is not linked to any specific types of foods or food groups during the complementary feeding period. Adherence to dietary guidelines is associated with increased lean body mass, but not BMI or fat mass. Complementary feeding practices, socioeconomic and other family dynamics at least partially explain obesity risk. As young infants are dependent on adults for nourishment, parental attitudes and beliefs about infant nutrition and actual feeding practices directly influence infant nutritional status. Early nutrition interventions to prevent obesity should take nutrition belief systems, parental feeding styles, socioeconomic and educational status, among other characteristics into consideration.

  9. Moderate and extreme maternal obesity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdelmaboud, M O

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of moderate and extreme obesity among an Irish obstetric population over a 10-year period, and to evaluate the obstetric features of such pregnancies. Of 31,869 women delivered during the years 2000-2009, there were 306 women in the study group, including 173 in the moderate or Class 2 obese category (BMI 35-39.9) and 133 in the extreme or Class 3 obese category (BMI > or = 40).The prevalence of obese women with BMI > or = 35 was 9.6 per 1000 (0.96%), with an upward trend observed from 2.1 per 1000 in the year 2000, to 11.8 per 1000 in the year 2009 (P = 0.001). There was an increase in emergency caesarean section (EMCS) risk for primigravida versus multigravid women, within both obese categories (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in EMCS rates observed between Class 2 and Class 3 obese women, when matched for parity. The prevalence of moderate and extreme obesity reported in this population is high, and appears to be increasing. The increased rates of abdominal delivery, and the levels of associated morbidity observed, have serious implications for such women embarking on pregnancy.

  10. Cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrindle, Brian W

    2015-02-01

    Childhood and adolescent overweight and obesity is an important and increasingly prevalent public health problem in Canada and worldwide. High adiposity in youth is indicated in clinical practice by plotting body mass index on appropriate percentile charts normed for age and sex, although waist measures might be a further tool. High adiposity can lead to adiposopathy in youth, with associated increases in inflammation and oxidative stress, changes in adipokines, and endocrinopathy. This is manifest as cardiometabolic risk factors in similar patterns to those in noted in obese adults. Obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors have been shown to be associated with vascular changes indicative of early atherosclerosis, and ventricular hypertrophy, dilation, and dysfunction. These cardiovascular consequences are evident in youth, but childhood obesity is also predictive of similar consequences in adulthood. Childhood obesity and risk factors have been shown to track into adulthood and worsen in most individuals. The result is an exponential acceleration of atherosclerosis, which can be predicted to translate into an epidemic of premature cardiovascular disease and events. A change in paradigm is needed toward preventing and curing atherosclerosis and not just preventing cardiovascular disease. This would necessarily create an imperative for preventing and treating childhood obesity. Urgent attention, policy, and action are needed to avoid the enormous future social and health care costs associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obesity in youth. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Obesity genes and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Anna C; Denis, Gerald V

    2010-10-01

    The exploding prevalence of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) linked to obesity has become an alarming public health concern. Worldwide, approximately 171 million people suffer from obesity-induced diabetes and public health authorities expect this situation to deteriorate rapidly. An interesting clinical population of 'metabolically healthy but obese' (MHO) cases is relatively protected from T2D and its associated cardiovascular risk. The molecular basis for this protection is not well understood but is likely to involve reduced inflammatory responses. The inflammatory cells and pathways that respond to overnutrition are the primary subject matter for this review. The chance discovery of a genetic mutation in the Brd2 gene, which is located in the class II major histocompatibility complex and makes mice enormously fat but protects them from diabetes, offers revolutionary new insights into the cellular mechanisms that link obesity to insulin resistance and T2D. These Brd2-hypomorphic mice have reduced inflammation in fat that is normally associated with insulin resistance, and resemble MHO patients, suggesting novel therapeutic pathways for obese patients at risk for T2D. Deeper understanding of the functional links between genes that control inflammatory responses to diet-induced obesity is crucial to the development of therapies for obese, insulin-resistant patients.

  12. Predicting adult obesity from childhood obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, M; Llewellyn, A; Owen, C G; Woolacott, N

    2016-02-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to investigate the ability of simple measures of childhood obesity such as body mass index (BMI) to predict future obesity in adolescence and adulthood. Large cohort studies, which measured obesity both in childhood and in later adolescence or adulthood, using any recognized measure of obesity were sought. Study quality was assessed. Studies were pooled using diagnostic meta-analysis methods. Fifteen prospective cohort studies were included in the meta-analysis. BMI was the only measure of obesity reported in any study, with 200,777 participants followed up. Obese children and adolescents were around five times more likely to be obese in adulthood than those who were not obese. Around 55% of obese children go on to be obese in adolescence, around 80% of obese adolescents will still be obese in adulthood and around 70% will be obese over age 30. Therefore, action to reduce and prevent obesity in these adolescents is needed. However, 70% of obese adults were not obese in childhood or adolescence, so targeting obesity reduction solely at obese or overweight children needs to be considered carefully as this may not substantially reduce the overall burden of adult obesity. © 2015 World Obesity.

  13. On how obesity links with osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yusuf, Erlangga

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor of osteoarthritis development and progression. Theoretically, obesity is a factor that can be modified. While obesity epidemic is difficult to reverse because we live in lipogenic environment, personal approach in modify obesity may avail. Therefore, understanding how

  14. Obstetric Performance of Nigerian Obese Parturients | Olayemi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of fetal macrosomia was higher in the obese group (p<0.001). Conclusion: Obesity increased the risk of preeclampsia and fetal macrosomia and operative deliveries. The risk of birth asphyxia and perinatal mortality were not increased by obesity. Key Words: Obesity, Parturient, Maternal, Neonatal, Outcome.

  15. Treating Child Obesity and Associated Medical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprio, Sonia

    2006-01-01

    With American children on course to grow into the most obese generation of adults in history, Sonia Caprio argues that it is critical to develop more effective strategies for preventing childhood obesity and treating serious obesity-related health complications. She notes that although pediatricians are concerned about the obesity problem, most…

  16. Meal frequency and childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschke, André M; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Koletzko, Berthold; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an inverse association between meal frequency and the prevalence of obesity in adulthood. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between meal frequency and childhood obesity. Stature and weight of 4,370 German children ages 5 to 6 years were determined in six Bavarian (Germany) public health offices during the obligatory school entry health examination in 2001/2002. An extensive questionnaire on risk factors for obesity was answered by their parents. Obesity was defined according to sex- and age-specific BMI cut-off points proposed by the International Obesity Task Force. The main exposure was daily meal frequency. The prevalence of obesity decreased by number of daily meals: three or fewer meals, 4.2% [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.8 to 6.1]; four meals, 2.8% (95% CI, 2.1 to 3.7); and 5 or more meals, 1.7% (95% CI, 1.2 to 2.4). These effects could not be explained by confounding due to a wide range of constitutional, sociodemographic, and lifestyle factors. The adjusted odds ratios for obesity were 0.73 (95% CI, 0.44 to 1.21) for four meals and 0.51 (95% CI, 0.29 to 0.89) for five or more meals. Additional analyses pointed to a higher energy intake in nibblers compared with gorgers. A protective effect of an increased daily meal frequency on obesity in children was observed and appeared to be independent of other risk factors for childhood obesity. A modulation of the response of hormones such as insulin might be instrumental.

  17. Association of asthma with obesity among adolescents exposed to environmental tobacco smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsantas, Panagiota; Aguisanda, Francis

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between asthma diagnosis and obesity among adolescents exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). The sample included 28,807 adolescents (13-17 years old) from the National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) (2011-2012). The NSCH is a US cross-sectional telephone survey that included at least one child between the ages of 0 and 17 years residing at a household during the time of the interview. Descriptive statistics were used to describe sample characteristics and assess the prevalence of asthma among adolescents with obesity exposed to ETS. Logistic regression models were built to assess the effect of obesity on asthma diagnosis within the context of ETS exposure. The prevalence of asthma among adolescents was 10.4% and the obesity was 13.2%. Adolescents with obesity exposed to ETS within the home were significantly (p obese (10.9%) residing in similar households. Adjusted odds ratios showed that adolescents with obesity were 2.07 (95% CI, 1.15, 3.70) times more likely to have asthma if they were exposed to ETS inside their homes. The findings indicate that adolescents with obesity are more likely to be diagnosed with asthma if they are exposed to ETS in the household. It is important that the association between obesity and asthma is examined within the context of environmental risk factors in future studies, as this may shed some light to underlying mechanisms between these two serious public health issues.

  18. Obesity-induces Organ and Tissue Specific Tight Junction Restructuring and Barrier Deregulation by Claudin Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Rah, Bilal; Bastola, Dhundy; Dhawan, Punita; Singh, Amar B

    2017-07-11

    Obesity increases susceptibility to multiple organ disorders, however, underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The subclinical inflammation assisted by obesity-induced gut permeability may underlie obesity-associated co-morbidities. Despite eminent clinical significance of the obesity led gut barrier abnormalities, its precise molecular regulation remains unclear. It is also unknown whether barrier deregulations, similar to the gut, characterize other vital organs in obese individuals. The claudin family of proteins is integral to the tight junction (TJ), the apical cell-cell adhesion and a key regulator of the epithelial barrier. Using comprehensive physiological and biochemical analysis of intestinal and renal tissues from high-fat diet fed mice, critical for maintaining metabolic homeostasis, this study demonstrates that profound TJ-restructuring by organ and tissue-specific claudin switching characterize obese organs. Protein expression and cellular distribution were examined. In-silico analysis further highlighted potential association of select claudins, modulated by the obesity, with signaling and metabolic pathways of pathological significance. In vitro studies using Leptin or DCA-treatment suggested causal significance of obesity-induced changes in tissue microenvironment in regulating barrier deregulations in tissue-specific manner. Overall, current findings advances our understanding of the molecular undertakings of obesity associated changes that help predispose to specific diseases and also identifies novel windows of preventive and/or therapeutic interventions.

  19. Serum metabolomics reveals the mechanistic role of functional foods and exercise for obesity management in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Naglaa M; Farag, Mohamed A; Kholeif, Tahani E; Metwally, Nadia S; El-Sheikh, Nora M; El Gendy, Abdel Nasser; Abdel-Hamid, Abdel-Hamid Z

    2017-08-05

    Obesity is one of the independent risk factors for several health problems, leading to metabolic perturbations and for which analytical approaches i.e., "metabolomics" is needed to monitor the underlying metabolic changes. In this study, obesity associated changes were assessed via serum metabolites analysis of obese rats fed on high fat diet. Obese rats were subsequently treated with different functional foods used for obesity management including pomegranate, grapefruit, and red cabbage in parallel to swimming exercise. Serum samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) followed by multivariate data analysis to classify samples and determine if such treatments can help revert obesity related metabolic changes back to normal status. Results led to the identification of several novel metabolites biomarkers for obesity related to lipids, amino acids and central tricarboxylic acid (TCA) pathways. Distinct variations in metabolite levels were recorded in obese rats compared to normal ones including l-aspartic, l-alanine, l-glutamine, l-glycine, phenylethanolamine, α-aminobutyric acid and β-hydroxybutyric acid. Metabolomics approach developed herein provides novel insight onto the metabolic disturbances associated with obesity, which will assist in future drug design that can help mitigate against such changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ginseng and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Although ginseng has been shown to have an antiobesity effect, antiobesity-related mechanisms are complex and have not been completely elucidated. In the present study, we evaluated ginseng’s effects on food intake, the digestion, and absorption systems, as well as liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle in order to identify the mechanisms involved. A review of previous in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that ginseng and ginsenosides can increase energy expenditure by stimulating the adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase pathway and can reduce energy intake. Moreover, in high fat diet-induced obese and diabetic individuals, ginseng has shown a two-way adjustment effect on adipogenesis. Nevertheless, most of the previous studies into antiobesity effects of ginseng have been animal based, and there is a paucity of evidence supporting the suggestion that ginseng can exert an antiobesity effect in humans.