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Sample records for underlying neuropathic pain

  1. [Pathophysiology of neuropathic pain: molecular mechanisms underlying central sensitization in the dorsal horn in neuropathic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Hiroki; Noguchi, Koichi

    2012-11-01

    Neuropathic pain syndromes are clinically characterized by spontaneous pain and evoked pain (hyperalgesia and allodynia). The optimal treatment approach for neuropathic pain is still under development because of the complex pathological mechanisms underlying this type of pain. The spinal cord is an important gateway thorough which peripheral pain signals are transmitted to the brain, and sensitization of the spinal neurons is one of the important mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain. Central sensitization represents enhancement of the function of neuronal circuits in nociceptive pathways and is a manifestation of the remarkable plasticity of the somatosensory nervous system after nerve injury. This review highlights the pathological features of central sensitization, which develops because of (1) injury-induced abnormal inputs from primary afferents, (2) increase in the excitability of dorsal horn neurons, and (3) activated glial cell-derived signals.

  2. Neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Re

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is the expression of a dysfunction or primary lesion of a nerve in the peripheral or central nervous system, or both, rather than the biological signal transmitted by the nerve following peripheral nociceptor activation. It represents about 20% of all painful syndromes, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5%, however is actual incidence is hard to pinpoint due to the difficulties encountered in distinguishing it from chronic pain, of which it represents a significant percentage, on account of the not infrequent concurrence of conditions. It is crucial to recognise the variety of symptoms with which it can present: these can be negative and positive and, in turn, motor, sensitive and autonomic. In public health terms, it is important to emphasise that the diagnosis of neuropathic pain does not in most cases require sophisticated procedures and does not therefore weigh on health expenditure. In clinical practice, a validated scale (the LANSS is mentioned is useful for identifying patients presenting neuropathic pain symptoms. Therapy is based on three categories of medication: tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptics and opioids at high doses: neuropathic pain has a bad reputation for often resisting common therapeutic approaches and responding less well that nociceptor pain to monotherapy. Therapeutic strategies are all the more adequate the more they are based on symptoms and therefore on the pain generation mechanisms, although the recommendations are dictated more by expert opinions that double-blind randomised trials.

  3. Activated microglia in the spinal cord underlies diabetic neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Couture, Réjean; Hong, Yanguo

    2014-04-05

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common chronic medical condition. Approximately 30% of diabetic patients develop neuropathic pain, manifested as spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia. Hyperglycemia induces metabolic changes in peripheral tissues and enhances oxidative stress in nerve fibers. The damages and subsequent reactive inflammation affect structural properties of Schwann cells and axons leading to the release of neuropoietic mediators, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-nociceptive mediators. Therefore, diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP) shares some histological features and underlying mechanisms with traumatic neuropathy. DNP displays, however, other distinct features; for instance, sensory input to the spinal cord decreases rather than increasing in diabetic patients. Consequently, development of central sensitization in DNP involves mechanisms that are distinct from traumatic neuropathic pain. In DNP, the contribution of spinal cord microglia activation to central sensitization and pain processes is emerging as a new concept. Besides inflammation in the periphery, hyperglycemia and the resulting production of reactive oxygen species affect the local microenvironment in the spinal cord. All these alterations could trigger resting and sessile microglia to the activated phenotype. In turn, microglia synthesize and release pro-inflammatory cytokines and neuroactive molecules capable of inducing hyperactivity of spinal nociceptive neurons. Hence, it is imperative to elucidate glial mechanisms underlying DNP for the development of effective therapeutic agents. The present review highlights the recent developments regarding the contribution of spinal microglia as compelling target for the treatment of DNP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. How diagnostic tests help to disentangle the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms in painful neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truini, Andrea; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain, ie, pain arising directly from a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory afferent pathway, manifests with various symptoms, the commonest being ongoing burning pain, electrical shock-like sensations, and dynamic mechanical allodynia. Reliable insights into the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms come from diagnostic tests documenting and quantifying somatosensory afferent pathway damage in patients with painful neuropathies. Neurophysiological investigation and skin biopsy studies suggest that ongoing burning pain primarily reflects spontaneous activity in nociceptive-fiber pathways. Electrical shock-like sensations presumably arise from high-frequency ectopic bursts generated in demyelinated, nonnociceptive, Aβ fibers. Although the mechanisms underlying dynamic mechanical allodynia remain debatable, normally innocuous stimuli might cause pain by activating spared and sensitized nociceptive afferents. Extending the mechanistic approach to neuropathic pain symptoms might advance targeted therapy for the individual patient and improve testing for new drugs.

  5. Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Plan for an Opioid Emergency Access and Attitudes Globally Arthritis Survey Understanding Clinical Trials Resource Guide ... Guide Tension increases pain. This five-minute relaxation exercise can help you let go of physical stress ...

  6. Placebo, nocebo, and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vase, Lene; Skyt, Ina; Hall, Kathryn T

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, the apparent increase in placebo responses in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropathic pain have complicated and potentially limited development and availability of new effective pain medication. Placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia effects are well described in nociceptive and idiopathic pain conditions, but less is known about the magnitude and mechanisms of placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, placebo treatments have primarily been used as control conditions for active agents under investigation in RCTs and these placebo responses are typically not controlled for the natural history of pain and other confounding factors. Recently, mechanistic studies that control for the natural history of pain have investigated placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain in their own right. Large placebo analgesia but no nocebo hyperalgesic effects have been found, and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. Here we review placebo and nocebo effects and the underlying mechanisms in neuropathic pain and compare them with those of nociceptive and idiopathic pain. This allows for a novel discussion on how knowledge of psychological, neurobiological, and genetic factors underlying well-controlled placebo effects may help improve the information that can be obtained from and potentially restore the utility of RCTs.

  7. Melanocortins and Neuropathic Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrinten, Dorien Henriëtte

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (pain initiated by a lesion or dysfunction of the nervous system) is characterised by symptoms such as allodynia (pain due to a stimulus that does not normally provoke pain) and hyperalgesia (an increased response to a stimulus that is normally painful). It constitutes a major

  8. Event-related cortical processing in neuropathic pain under long-term spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Ralf; Capelle, H Holger; Flor, Herta; Krauss, Joachim K

    2015-01-01

    Several mechanisms were suggested in the past to explain the beneficial effect of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in patients suffering from neuropathic pain. Little is known about potential supraspinal mechanisms. In this study cortical signaling of patients with neuropathic pain and successful long-term treatment with SCS was analyzed. Observational study. University hospital, neurosurgical department, outpatient clinic for movement disorders and pain, institute for cognitive and clinical neuroscience. Nine patients with neuropathic pain of a lower extremity with a lasting response to chronic SCS were included. Cortical activity was analyzed using event-related potentials of the electroencephalogram after non-painful and painful stimulation. Each patient was tested under the effect of long-term SCS and 24 hours after cessation of SCS. Cortical areas involved in the peaks of evoked potentials were localized using a source localization method based on a fixed dipole model. Detection threshold and intensity of non-painful stimulation did not differ significantly on both sides. Pain threshold was significantly lower on the neuropathic side under the effect of SCS (P = 0.03). Bilateral pain thresholds were significantly lower (P = 0.03 healthy side, P = 0.003 neuropathic side) in 5 patients with increased pain after cessation of SCS. Under the effect of SCS cortical negativities (N1, N2, N3) and positivities (P1) demonstrated bilaterally comparable amplitudes. After cessation of SCS, decreased threshold for peripheral stimulation resulted in lowered negativities on both sides. The positivity P1 was differentially regulated and was reduced more contralateral to the unaffected side. N2 was localized at the sensory representation of the leg within the homunculus. The main vector of P1 was localized within the cingular cortex (CC) and moved more anteriorly under the effect of SCS. The exact time span that SCS continues to have an effect is not known. However, due to patient

  9. Neuropathic pain in primary care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The operative difference is that neuropathic pain represents a delayed, ongoing response to damage that is no longer acute ... Postsurgical pain (including post- mastectomy and phantom limb pain). Spinal cord injury pain ... Management of neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain tends to exhibit a relatively poor response.

  10. Pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Debra B; Love, Georgette

    2004-12-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain are complex but are gradually coming to light. Agents that have been found effective in a variety of neuropathic pain conditions include drugs that act to modulate (a) sodium or calcium channels, (b) N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, (c) norepinephrine or serotonin reuptake, (d) opioid receptors, and (e) other cellular processes. Clinical trials have primarily evaluated these treatments for postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy, the two most common types of neuropathic pain. Nonetheless, the identification of effective treatment regimens remains challenging, often because multiple mechanisms may be operating in a given patient giving rise to the same symptom. Alternatively, a single mechanism may be responsible for multiple symptoms. Currently available diagnostic tools are inadequate to determine the best treatment using a mechanism-based model. Clinically, drug treatment of neuropathic pain is often a matter of treatment trials. This article presents a summary of available clinical information on first-line and lesser-known treatments for neuropathic pain.

  11. Neuropathic pain - Current concepts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Neuropathic pain (NP) represents a common and diverse group of disorders with peripheral and/or central nervous system damage or dysfunction. ... It is estimated that as many as one in five adults with chronic pain will have ... in daily activities and an association with depression and sleep disturbances.16,18 In a.

  12. [Nocioceptive pain, neuropathic pain and pain memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Homs, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Pain is a cognitive evaluation. Its appearance in the new functional image systems is promising. Nocioceptive pain, usually acute or persistent, is useful to prevent animals from getting injured. Chronic pain is disease per se: It is due to a sensitisation phenomena and pain memory with an important relationship with emotions. Neuropathic pain is a neurological symptom due to a somatosensorial system dysfunction. In this case, axonal ectopic generation of impulses and synaptic hyperexcitability occurs. In persistent cases, sensitisation phenomenon and memory of pain appear together with neuropathic pain. Pain treatment should be physiopathologicaly orientated. Pain units, specialized in analgesic treatment and some invasive techniques, are usually competent in the treatment of nocioceptive pain. Neuropathic pain should have a neurologic diagnosis and treatment. But neurologist need to be more and more interested in the chronic pain related with memory and sensitisation: better knowledge of the cerebral mechanisms in this phenomenon can add to this pathology in our field.

  13. Placebo, nocebo, and neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Vase, Lene; Skyt, Ina; Hall, Kathryn T.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the apparent increase in placebo responses in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropathic pain have complicated and potentially limited development and availability of new effective pain medication. Placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia effects are well described in nociceptive and idiopathic pain conditions, but less is known about the magnitude and mechanisms of placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, placebo treatments have prim...

  14. Differential diagnosis of neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Bykov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is an acute or chronic pain caused by damage to or dysfunction of the peripheral and/or central nervous system. Neuropathic pain is a direct sequel of damage to or disease of the somatosensory nervous system. The paper presents the definition, international diagnostic criteria, clinical and diagnostic features, and causes of neuropathic pain syndrome, differences between nociceptive and neuropathic pain, the classification of major neuropathic pain syndromes, and the DN4 questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain. It shows a substantial clinical and pathophysiological similarity of neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia and gives preliminary diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia. The differential diagnosis of neuropathic, nociceptive, and psychogenic pain and the determination of the level of damage to the nervous system and a leading pathogenetic mechanism of neuropathic pain syndrome require not only meticulous clinical examination of the sensory sphere, but also neurophysiological examination including electroneuromyography, somatosensory evoked potential recording, quantitative sensory testing, and, in a number of cases, neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging or morphological (intraepidermal nerve fiber density examination verification of injury somatosensory afferents. 

  15. Managing neuropathic pain in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Moore

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the somatosensory system such as neuropathic pain are common in people with chronic neurologic and musculoskeletal diseases, yet these conditions remain an underappreciated morbidity in our veterinary patients. This is likely because assessment of neuropathic pain in people relies heavily on self-reporting, something our veterinary patients are not able to do. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex phenomenon, and concepts related to it are frequently not addressed in the standard veterinary medical curriculum such that veterinarians may not recognize this as a potential problem in patients. The goals of this review are to discuss basic concepts in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, provide definitions for common clinical terms used in association with the condition, and discuss available medical treatment options for dogs with neuropathic pain. The development of neuropathic pain involves key mechanisms such as ectopic afferent nerve activity, peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, impaired inhibitory modulation, and activation of microglia. Treatments aimed at reducing neuropathic pain are targeted at one or more of these mechanisms. Several drugs are commonly used in the veterinary clinical setting to treat neuropathic pain. These include gabapentin, pregabalin, amantadine, and amitriptyline. Proposed mechanisms of action for each drug, and known pharmacokinetic profiles in dogs are discussed. Strong evidence exists in the human literature for the utility of most of these treatments, but clinical veterinary-specific literature is currently limited. Future studies should focus on objective methods to document neuropathic pain and monitor response to therapy in our veterinary patients.

  16. Sensory pain qualities in neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Sean; Carroll, Ian; Emir, Birol; Murphy, T Kevin; Whalen, Ed; Dumenci, Levent

    2012-01-01

    The qualities of chronic neuropathic pain (NeP) may be informative about the different mechanisms of pain. We previously developed a 2-factor model of NeP that described an underlying structure among sensory descriptors on the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire. The goal of this study was to confirm the correlated 2-factor model of NeP. Individual descriptive scores from the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were analyzed. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test a correlated 2-factor model. Factor 1 (stabbing pain) was characterized by high loadings on stabbing, sharp, and shooting sensory items; factor 2 (heavy pain) was characterized by high loadings on heavy, gnawing, and aching items. Results of the confirmatory factor analysis strongly supported the correlated 2-factor model. This article validates a model that describes the qualities of neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia. These data suggest that specific pain qualities may be associated with pain mechanisms or may be useful for predicting treatment response. Copyright © 2012 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Neuropathic pain management in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hyde, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    There are difficulties in assessing, managing, and evaluating neuropathic pain in dying children, particularly those with neurological impairment. Neuropathic pain in children often presents differently to how it presents in the adult population. Comprehensive assessment as well as pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions are crucial to its successful management and frequently require input from an interdisciplinary team. Notwithstanding the need for further research, this paper brings together research papers, reviews, and clinical guidelines to present an exploration of existing evidence regarding care for children with neuropathic pain and their families.

  18. Gynecologic management of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Frank F; Hellman, Kevin M; Backonja, Miroslav M

    2011-11-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists often are the initial management clinicians for pelvic neuropathic pain. Although treatment may require comprehensive team management and consultation with other specialists, there are a few critical and basic steps that can be performed during an office visit that offer the opportunity to improve quality of life significantly in this patient population. A key first step is a thorough clinical examination to map the pain site physically and to identify potentially involved nerves. Only limited evidence exists about how best to manage neuropathic pain; generally, a combination of surgical, manipulative, or pharmacologic methods should be considered. Experimental methods to characterize more precisely the nature of the nerve dysfunction exist to diagnose and treat neuropathic pain; however, additional scientific evidence is needed to recommend these options unanimously. In the meantime, an approach that was adopted from guidelines of the International Association for the Study of Pain has been tailored for gynecologic pain. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Under Pressure: Applying Practice-Based Learning and Improvement to the Treatment of Chronic Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapolti, Mihaela; Wu, Cindy; Schuth, Olga A; Hultman, Charles Scott

    2017-10-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain after burn injury may have multiple causes, such as direct nerve injury, nerve compression, or neuroma formation, and can significantly impair quality of life and limit functional recovery. Management includes a team-based approach that involves close collaboration between occupational and physical therapists, plastic surgeons, and experts in chronic pain, from neurology, anesthesia, psychiatry, and physiatry. Carefully selected patients with an anatomic cause of chronic neuropathic pain unequivocally benefit from surgical intervention. Self-reflection and analysis yield improvement in both efficiency and effectiveness when managing patients with burns with chronic neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuropathic sensory symptoms: association with pain and psychological factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaygan M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maryam Shaygan,1 Andreas Böger,2 Birgit Kröner-Herwig11Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Göttingen, Germany; 2Pain Management Clinic at the Red Cross Hospital, Kassel, GermanyBackground: A large number of population-based studies of chronic pain have considered neuropathic sensory symptoms to be associated with a high level of pain intensity and negative affectivity. The present study examines the question of whether this association previously found in non-selected samples of chronic pain patients can also be found in chronic pain patients with underlying pathology of neuropathic sensory symptoms.Methods: Neuropathic sensory symptoms in 306 patients with chronic pain diagnosed as typical neuropathic pain, radiculopathy, fibromyalgia, or nociceptive back pain were assessed using the Pain DETECT Questionnaire. Two separate cluster analyses were performed to identify subgroups of patients with different levels of self-reported neuropathic sensory symptoms and, furthermore, to identify subgroups of patients with distinct patterns of neuropathic sensory symptoms (adjusted for individual response bias regarding specific symptoms.Results: ANOVA (analysis of variance results in typical neuropathic pain, radiculopathy, and fibromyalgia showed no significant differences between the three levels of neuropathic sensory symptoms regarding pain intensity, pain chronicity, pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, and depressive symptoms. However, in nociceptive back pain patients, significant differences were found for all variables except pain chronicity. When controlling for the response bias of patients in ratings of symptoms, none of the patterns of neuropathic sensory symptoms were associated with pain and psychological factors.Conclusion: Neuropathic sensory symptoms are not closely associated with higher levels of pain intensity and cognitive-emotional evaluations in chronic pain patients with underlying pathology of

  1. Inflammatory mediators of neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira Júnior, José Oswaldo de; Portella Junior, Caio Sander Andrade; Cohen, Cláudia Panossian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pro-inflammatory chemical mediators and algogenic substances seem to be confused by the sharing of their actions and by interactions in painful and inflammatory presentation. This study aimed at presenting a review of major inflammatory chemical mediators and place them in neuropathic pain pathophysiology. CONTENTS: Inflammation is the homeostatic response of vascularized tissues to remove harmful agents and restore their normal functions. Nervous system ...

  2. Spinal Gap Junction Channels in Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Young Hoon; Youn, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves or the spinal cord is often accompanied by neuropathic pain, which is a complex, chronic pain state. Increasing evidence indicates that alterations in the expression and activity of gap junction channels in the spinal cord are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Thus, this review briefly summarizes evidence that regulation of the expression, coupling, and activity of spinal gap junction channels modulates pain signals in neuropathic pain states induced...

  3. Botulinum Toxin Type A—A Modulator of Spinal Neuron–Glia Interactions under Neuropathic Pain Conditions

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    Ewelina Rojewska

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain represents a significant clinical problem because it is a chronic condition often refractory to available therapy. Therefore, there is still a strong need for new analgesics. Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A is used to treat a variety of clinical diseases associated with pain. Glia are in continuous bi-directional communication with neurons to direct the formation and refinement of synaptic connectivity. This review addresses the effects of BoNT/A on the relationship between glia and neurons under neuropathic pain. The inhibitory action of BoNT/A on synaptic vesicle fusion that blocks the release of miscellaneous pain-related neurotransmitters is known. However, increasing evidence suggests that the analgesic effect of BoNT/A is mediated through neurons and glial cells, especially microglia. In vitro studies provide evidence that BoNT/A exerts its anti-inflammatory effect by diminishing NF-κB, p38 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in microglia and directly interacts with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. Furthermore, BoNT/A appears to have no more than a slight effect on astroglia. The full activation of TLR2 in astroglia appears to require the presence of functional TLR4 in microglia, emphasizing the significant interaction between those cell types. In this review, we discuss whether and how BoNT/A affects the spinal neuron–glia interaction and reduces the development of neuropathy.

  4. Nurse’s knowledge of neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yavuz Karahan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to determine the levels of information and awareness of the nurses who work on neuropathic pain in the departments of physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology and neurosurgery. A total of 60 nurses (20 per each department who work in the physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology and neurosurgery departments of Beyhekim State Hospital of Konya in Turkey took part in the study. The level of information and awareness of the nurses on neuropathic pain were assessed via a questionnaire prepared by specialists in the light of recent literature. The questionnaire was composed of 30 questions including the definition, symptoms, treatment and management of neuropathic pain. None of 60 nurses participating in the study were given any previous in-service training on neuropathic pain. According to the assessments, 80% of nurses (48 were found not to have sufficient knowledge about definition of neuropathic pain; 83.3% (50 about diseases causing neuropathic pain; 83.3% (50 about symptoms of neuropathic pain; and 90% (54 about management of neuropathic pain. The findings obtained from the nurses of these three departments showed no statistically significant relation. Our findings indicated that the knowledge of participants’ about neuropathic pain who work in these three departments seriously lack of information. Informing nurses about neuropathic pain during in-service training will be an important step towards improving the quality of services provided.

  5. Nurse’s Knowledge of Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuksarac, Seher; Soran, Neslihan; Ordahan, Banu; Tekin, Levent; Basaran, Aynur

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the levels of information and awareness of the nurses who work on neuropathic pain in the departments of physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology and neurosurgery. A total of 60 nurses (20 per each department) who work in the physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology and neurosurgery departments of Beyhekim State Hospital of Konya in Turkey took part in the study. The level of information and awareness of the nurses on neuropathic pain were assessed via a questionnaire prepared by specialists in the light of recent literature. The questionnaire was composed of 30 questions including the definition, symptoms, treatment and management of neuropathic pain. None of 60 nurses participating in the study were given any previous in-service training on neuropathic pain. According to the assessments, 80% of nurses (48) were found not to have sufficient knowledge about definition of neuropathic pain; 83.3% (50) about diseases causing neuropathic pain; 83.3% (50) about symptoms of neuropathic pain; and 90% (54) about management of neuropathic pain. The findings obtained from the nurses of these three departments showed no statistically significant relation. Our findings indicated that the knowledge of participants’ about neuropathic pain who work in these three departments seriously lack of information. Informing nurses about neuropathic pain during in-service training will be an important step towards improving the quality of services provided. PMID:25309714

  6. Neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakipoglu-Yuzer, Guidal F; Atçı, Nermin; Ozgirgin, Nese

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have described pain prevalence, risk factors, pain and medical variables in spinal cord injury (SCI) populations. In this study on traumatic SCI in Turkey, we surveyed the neuropathic pain experiences during in-patient rehabilitation and defined the relationships between neuropathic pain and demographic and SCI characteristics of patients. To survey the neuropathic pain experiences during in-patient rehabilitation in traumatic SCI and to define the relationships between neuropathic pain and demographic and SCI-related characteristics of patients. Descriptive study. Physicial Medicine and Rehabilitation inpatient clinic, Ankara, Turkey Sixty-nine SCI patients as inpatients were included in this descriptive study. All patients demographic and SCI-related characteristics were enrolled. The diagnosis of neuropathic pain was made with the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) Pain Scale. Location of pain and pain description, relation to time and severity according to McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) were enrolled. The neuropathic pain localization was below the lesion level in 67 (97.1%) and at the lesion level in 2 (2.9%) patients. The pain was at the hip and leg regions in 36 (52.2%) patients. The neuropathic pain was defined as burning in 27 (39.1%), aching in 26 (37.7%), sharp in 4 (5.8%), stinging in 3 (4.3%), and cramping in 3 (4.3%). We did not find a significant difference between demographic and SCI-related characteristics and the localization of neuropathic pain for the patients (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference according to pain description by MPQ and pain localization (P > 0.05). We found a significant relationship between the patient's lesion level and the region of pain (P neuropathic pain due to SCI to be mostly below the lesion level with a burning or aching character and we did not find a significant relationship between the demographic and SCI-related characteristics of the patient and the pain

  7. Mechanisms of disease: mechanism-based classification of neuropathic pain - a critical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    Classification of neuropathic pain according to etiology or localization has clear limitations. The discovery of specific molecular and cellular events following experimental nerve injury has raised the possibility of classifying neuropathic pain on the basis of the underlying neurobiological mec...

  8. Topical clonidine for neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzosek, Anna; Woron, Jaroslaw; Dobrogowski, Jan; Jakowicka-Wordliczek, Joanna; Wordliczek, Jerzy

    2015-08-31

    Clonidine is a presynaptic alpha-2-adrenergic receptor agonist used for many years to treat hypertension and other conditions, including chronic pain. Adverse events associated with systemic use of the drug have limited its application. Topical use of drugs is currently gaining interest, as it may limit adverse events without loss of analgesic efficacy. Topical clonidine (TC) formulations have been investigated recently in clinical trials. The objectives of this review were to assess the analgesic efficacy of TC for chronic neuropathic pain in adults and to assess the frequency of adverse events associated with clinical use of TC for chronic neuropathic pain. We searched the Cochrane Register of Studies (CRS) Online (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL)), MEDLINE and EMBASE databases, reference lists of retrieved papers and trial registries, and we contacted experts in the field. We performed the most recent search on 17 September 2014. We included randomised, double-blind studies of at least two weeks' duration comparing TC versus placebo or other active treatment in patients with chronic neuropathic pain. Two review authors extracted data from the studies and assessed bias. We planned three tiers of evidence analysis. The first tier was designed to analyse data meeting current best standards, by which studies reported the outcome of at least 50% pain intensity reduction over baseline (or its equivalent) without use of the last observation carried forward or other imputation method for dropouts, reported an intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis, lasted eight weeks or longer, had a parallel-group design and included at least 200 participants (preferably at least 400) in the comparison. The second tier was designed to use data from at least 200 participants but in cases in which one of the above conditions was not met. The third tier of evidence was assumed in other situations. We included two studies in the review, with a total of 344 participants

  9. Diagnostic challenges of neuropathic tooth pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matwychuk, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    This article presents the clinical characteristics, epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of 2 neuropathic conditions: trigeminal neuralgia and atypical odontalgia. A case report highlights the complexities involved in diagnosing neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is chronic, diverse in quality, difficult to localize and it occurs in the absence of obvious pathology. To avoid multiple, ineffective dental treatments, general practitioners must be familiar with the signs of nonodontogenic sources of tooth pain.

  10. PHARMACOTHERAPY IN ELDERLY NEUROPATHIC PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Eko P

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The incidence of pain increases with age. Neuropathic pain are common in elderly patients and pose challenges in both their diagnosis and treatment. The most common neuropathic pain in elderly are radiculopathy due to foraminal or spinal stenosis, diabetic neuropathy, and postherpetic neuralgia. Pain in the elderly is often unrecognized and undertreated. The main problem with pain in older adults relates to impaired quality of life secondary to pain which may be expressed by depression (including increased suicide risk, anxiety, sleep disruption, appetite disturbance, and weight loss, cognitive impairment, and limitations in the performance of daily activities. Pain management in elderly patients requires a different perspective from that of younger patients. Causes, comorbidities, and responses to both pain and its treatment differ between young healthy and older patients. Effective pain management in elderly patients should include both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies. Pharmacological approaches are the first line of pain management in older person for neuropathic pain. Pharmacologic strategies call for administration of nonopioid analgesics, opioid analgesics, and adjuvant medication. Polypharmacy, drug-drug and drug-disease interactions, age-associated changes in drug metabolism, and the high frequency of adverse drug reactions need to be carefully considered in using medications in this population /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso

  11. AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Central Neuropathic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widerstrom-Noga, Eva; Loeser, John D.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2017-01-01

    ) initiative, invited a working group to develop diagnostic criteria for central neuropathic pain. The criteria for central neuropathic pain that were developed expand upon existing criteria for neuropathic pain and the International Classification of Diseases 11th Revision draft criteria to ensure consistency......: The AAPT chronic central neuropathic pain taxonomy provides a classification for central pain associated with spinal cord injury, stroke, and multiple sclerosis. The diagnostic criteria are organized according to the AAPT multidimensional framework, specifically: 1) core diagnostic criteria, 2) common......Central neuropathic pain, which is pain caused by a lesion or disease of the central somatosensory nervous system, is a serious consequence of spinal cord injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and other conditions affecting the central nervous system. A collaborative effort between the Analgesic...

  12. Analgesic Microneedle Patch for Neuropathic Pain Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xi; Pascual, Conrado; Lieu, Christopher; Oh, Seajin; Wang, Ji; Zou, Bende; Xie, Julian; Li, Zhaohui; Xie, James; Yeomans, David C; Wu, Mei X; Xie, Xinmin Simon

    2017-01-24

    Neuropathic pain caused by nerve injury is debilitating and difficult to treat. Current systemic pharmacological therapeutics for neuropathic pain produce limited pain relief and have undesirable side effects, while current local anesthetics tend to nonspecifically block both sensory and motor functions. Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide released from sensory nerve endings, appears to play a significant role in chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, an analgesic microneedle (AMN) patch was developed using dissolvable microneedles to transdermally deliver selective CGRP antagonist peptide in a painless manner for the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Local analgesic effects were evaluated in rats by testing behavioral pain sensitivity in response to thermal and mechanical stimuli using neuropathic pain models such as spared-nerve injury and diabetic neuropathy pain, as well as neurogenic inflammatory pain model induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Unlike several conventional therapies, the AMN patches produced effective analgesia on neuropathic pain without disturbing the normal nociception and motor function of the rat, resulting from the high specificity of the delivered peptide against CGRP receptors. The AMN patches did not cause skin irritation or systemic side effects. These results demonstrate that dissolvable microneedle patches delivering CGRP antagonist peptide provide an effective, safe, and simple approach to mitigate neuropathic pain with significant advantages over current treatments.

  13. Neuropathic pain: targeting the melatonin MT receptor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuropathic pain is further classified as being either central. (originating from injury to the brain or spinal cord) or peripheral. (originating from injury to the peripheral nerve, plexus, dorsal root ganglion, or root). Neuropathic pain is also classified on the basis of the aetiology of the insult to the nervous system.2 In addition ...

  14. The neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews the definition, etiology and evaluation, and medical and neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain. A neuropathic origin for facial pain should be considered when evaluating a patient for rhinologic surgery because of complaints of facial pain. Neuropathic facial pain is caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve in the prepontine cistern and is characterized by an intermittent prickling or stabbing component or a constant burning, searing pain. Medical treatment consists of anticonvulsant medication. Neurosurgical treatment may require microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced analgesic effect of oxycodone compared to morphine in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Thibault

    Full Text Available Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone.

  16. Molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced analgesic effect of oxycodone compared to morphine in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Rivals, Isabelle; Marchand, Fabien; Dubacq, Sophie; McMahon, Stephen B; Pezet, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute) anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone.

  17. Neuropathic pain and spasticity: intricate consequences of spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: The 2016 International Spinal Cord Society Sir Ludwig Guttmann Lecture. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review is to identify different symptoms and signs of neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to present different methods of assessing them. The objective......', 'neuropathic', 'spasticity', 'spasms' and 'spinal cord injury'. RESULTS: This review identified different domains of neuropathic pain and spasticity after SCI and methods to assess them in preclinical and clinical research. Different factors important for pain description include location, onset, pain...... of SCI, and a careful examination and characterization of the symptoms and signs, are a prerequisite for understanding the relationship between neuropathic pain and spasticity and the intricate underlying mechanisms.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 11 July 2017; doi:10.1038/sc.2017.70....

  18. Antidepressants in the treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, Søren H.; Otto, Marit; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2005-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is due to lesion or dysfunction of the peripheral or central nervous system. Tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants have long been the mainstay of treatment of this type of pain. Tricyclic antidepressants may relieve neuropathic pain by their unique ability to inhibit...... presynaptic reuptake of the biogenic amines serotonin and noradrenaline, but other mechanisms such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and ion channel blockade probably also play a role in their pain-relieving effect. The effect of tricyclic antidepressants in neuropathic pain in man has been demonstrated...... in numerous randomised, controlled trials, and a few trials have shown that serotonin noradrenaline and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants also relieve neuropathic pain although with lower efficacy. Tricyclic antidepressants will relieve one in every 2-3 patients with peripheral...

  19. Pharmacological Regulation of Neuropathic Pain Driven by Inflammatory Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norikazu Kiguchi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain can have a major effect on quality of life but current therapies are often inadequate. Growing evidence suggests that neuropathic pain induced by nerve damage is caused by chronic inflammation. Upon nerve injury, damaged cells secrete pro-inflammatory molecules that activate cells in the surrounding tissue and recruit circulating leukocytes to the site of injury. Among these, the most abundant cell type is macrophages, which produce several key molecules involved in pain enhancement, including cytokines and chemokines. Given their central role in the regulation of peripheral sensitization, macrophage-derived cytokines and chemokines could be useful targets for the development of novel therapeutics. Inhibition of key pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines prevents neuroinflammation and neuropathic pain; moreover, recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory (M1 macrophages. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands and T helper type 2 cytokines that reduce M1 macrophages are able to relieve neuropathic pain. Future translational studies in non-human primates will be crucial for determining the regulatory mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation-associated neuropathic pain. In turn, this knowledge will assist in the development of novel pharmacotherapies targeting macrophage-driven neuroinflammation for the treatment of intractable neuropathic pain.

  20. A Review of Neuropathic Pain: From Diagnostic Tests to Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Truini, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain develops when the somatosensory nervous system is affected by a lesion or disease. Diagnostic tests aimed at assessing somatosensory afferent pathway damage are therefore useful for diagnosing neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain manifests with a range of different symptoms such as ongoing burning pain, squeezing or pressure pain, paroxysmal electric shock-like sensations, stabbing pain, or mechanical dynamic allodynia. The various types of neuropathic pain are associated with ...

  1. Molecular Hydrogen Attenuates Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Masanori; Satoh, Yasushi; Otsubo, Yukiko; Kazama, Tomiei

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains intractable and the development of new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Accumulating evidence indicates that overproduction of oxidative stress is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, repeated intra-peritoneal or intrathecal injections of antioxidants are unsuitable for continuous use in therapy. Here we show a novel therapeutic method against neuropathic pain: drinking water containing molecular hydrogen (H2) as antioxidant. The effect of hydrogen on neuropathic pain was investigated using a partial sciatic nerve ligation model in mice. As indicators of neuropathic pain, temporal aspects of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were analysed for 3 weeks after ligation. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured using the von Frey test and the plantar test, respectively. When mice were allowed to drink water containing hydrogen at a saturated level ad libitum after ligation, both allodynia and hyperalgesia were alleviated. These symptoms were also alleviated when hydrogen was administered only for the induction phase (from day 0 to 4 after ligation). When hydrogen was administered only for the maintenance phase (from day 4 to 21 after ligation), hyperalgesia but not allodynia was alleviated. Immunohistochemical staining for the oxidative stress marker, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, showed that hydrogen administration suppressed oxidative stress induced by ligation in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion, oral administration of hydrogen water may be useful for alleviating neuropathic pain in a clinical setting. PMID:24941001

  2. Medical management of trigeminal neuropathic pains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2010-06-01

    Although trigeminal neuralgia has traditionally been considered the prime neuralgic condition in the face region, other forms of neuropathic pain are now being more frequently recognized and require recognition and a different management approach. This review principally covers medical management of trigeminal neuralgia; but also included is glossopharyngeal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain (atypical odontalgia) and burning mouth syndrome. Systematic reviews and guidelines will be discussed. An update will be provided of drug therapy for these relatively rare facial pains. Trigeminal neuralgia continues to be best managed using anticonvulsant drugs, the primary ones being carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine; baclofen may be helpful and, of the newly emerging drugs, pregabalin has potential. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia remains managed in the same way as trigeminal neuralgia. Trigeminal neuropathic pain is probably best managed according to guidelines used for the management of neuropathic pain, which include the use of tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin, pregabalin, duloxetine, venalafaxine and topical lidocaine. Burning mouth syndrome is a neuropathic pain managed initially with topical clonazepam and then with other neuropathic drugs. Patients need to be involved in their management.

  3. Central Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujin; Zhao, Xing; Hatch, Maya; Chun, Sophia; Chang, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating medical condition affecting 1.2 million people in the United States. Central neuropathic pain is one of the most common medical complications of SCI. Current treatment options include opioids, antiepileptic agents such as gabapentin, antispastic agents such as baclofen or tizanidine, and tricyclic acid. Other options include complementary, nonpharmacological treatment such as exercise or acupuncture, interventional treatments, and psychological approaches. Although these treatment options exist, central neuropathic pain in patients with SCI is still extremely difficult to treat because of its complexity. To develop and provide more effective treatment options to these patients, proper assessment of and classification tools for central neuropathic pain, as well as a better understanding of the pathophysiology, are needed. A combination of approaches, from standard general pain assessments to medically specific questions unique to SCI pathophysiology, is essential for this population. A multidisciplinary approach to patient care, in addition with a better understanding of pathophysiology and diagnosis, will lead to improved management and treatment of patients with SCI displaying central neuropathic pain. Here we summarize the most recent classification tools, pathophysiology, and current treatment options for patients with SCI with central neuropathic pain. PMID:25750485

  4. The characteristics of chronic pain after non-traumatic, non-compressive myelopathy: Focus on neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young In; Kim, Min; Joo, In Soo

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of neuropathic pain after non-traumatic, non-compressive (NTNC) myelopathy and find potential predictors for neuropathic pain. We analyzed 54 patients with NTNC myelopathy. The Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) were used to assess pain. Health-related QOL was evaluated by the Short Form 36-item (SF-36) health survey. Out of 48 patients with pain, 16 (33.3%) patients experienced neuropathic pain. Mean age was significantly lower in patients with neuropathic pain than in patients with non-neuropathic pain (39.1 ± 12.5 vs. 49.8 ± 9.3, P = 0.002). There were no statistically significant differences in the other variables including sex, etiology of myelopathy, pain and QOL scores between the two groups. A binary logistic regression revealed that onset age under 40, and non-idiopathic etiology were independent predictors of the occurrence of neuropathic pain. Both SF-MPQ and LANSS scores were significantly correlated with SF-36 scores, adjusted by age, sex, presence of diabetes mellitus, and current EDSS scores (r = -0.624, P Neuropathic pain must be one of serious complications in patients with NTNC myelopathy and also affects their quality of life. Onset age and etiology of myelopathy are important factors in the development of neuropathic pain in NTNC myelopathy.

  5. Characteristics of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Joon Young; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kim, MinYoung; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2014-06-01

    To characterize neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) according to classification used in the study by Baron et al. (Baron classification), a classification of neuropathic pain based on the mechanism. To also compare the patterns of neuropathic pain in SCI patients with those in patients with other etiologies and to determine the differences in patterns of neuropathic pain between the etiologies. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. We used the Baron classification to investigate the characteristics of neuropathic pain in SCI. Sixty-one SCI patients with neuropathic pain (The Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs score ≥12) were enrolled in this study between November 2012 and August 2013, after excluding patients patients with visual analog scale (VAS) score patients, and patients with systemic disease or pain other than neuropathic pain. The most common pain characteristic was pricking pain followed by electrical pain and numbness. The mean VAS score of at-level neuropathic pain was 7.51 and that of below-level neuropathic pain was 6.83. All of the patients suffered from rest pain, but 18 (54.6%) patients with at-level neuropathic pain and 20 (50.0%) patients with below-level neuropathic pain suffered from evoked pain. There was no significant difference in between at-level and below-level neuropathic pains. The result was quite different from the characteristics of post-herpetic neuralgia, but it was similar to the characteristics of diabetic neuropathy as shown in the study by Baron et al., which means that sensory nerve deafferentation may be the most common pathophysiologic mechanism of neuropathic pain after SCI. Since in our study, we included short and discrete symptoms and signs based on diverse mechanisms, our results could be helpful for determining further evaluation and treatment.

  6. Neuropathic orofacial pain: Facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; Benoliel, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    Definition and taxonomy This review deals with neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve, i.e. painful post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy (PTTN). Symptomatology The clinical characteristics of PTTN vary considerably, partly due to the type and extent of injury. Symptoms involve combinations of spontaneous and evoked pain and of positive and negative somatosensory signs. These patients are at risk of going through unnecessary dental/surgical procedures in the attempt to eradicate the cause of the pain, due to the fact that most dentists only rarely encounter PTTN. Epidemiology Overall, approximately 3% of patients with trigeminal nerve injuries develop PTTN. Patients are most often female above the age of 45 years, and both physical and psychological comorbidities are common. Pathophysiology PTTN shares many pathophysiological mechanisms with other peripheral neuropathic pain conditions. Diagnostic considerations PTTN may be confused with one of the regional neuralgias or other orofacial pain conditions. For intraoral PTTN, early stages are often misdiagnosed as odontogenic pain. Pain management Management of PTTN generally follows recommendations for peripheral neuropathic pain. Expert opinion International consensus on classification and taxonomy is urgently needed in order to advance the field related to this condition.

  7. Somatosensory Profiles but Not Numbers of Somatosensory Abnormalities of Neuropathic Pain Patients Correspond with Neuropathic Pain Grading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; Houghton, Andrea; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Vliet, Andre; Timmerman, Wia; den Boer, Johan A.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; van Wijhe, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Due to the lack of a specific diagnostic tool for neuropathic pain, a grading system to categorize pain as 'definite', 'probable', 'possible' and 'unlikely' neuropathic was proposed. Somatosensory abnormalities are common in neuropathic pain and it has been suggested that a greater number of

  8. Classification of neuropathic pain in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunelli, Cinzia; Bennett, Michael I; Kaasa, Stein

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) in cancer patients lacks standards for diagnosis. This study is aimed at reaching consensus on the application of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) special interest group for neuropathic pain (NeuPSIG) criteria to the diagnosis of NP in cancer patients...... was found on the statement "the pathophysiology of NP due to cancer can be different from non-cancer NP" (MED=9, IQR=2). Satisfactory consensus was reached for the first 3 NeuPSIG criteria (pain distribution, history, and sensory findings; MEDs⩾8, IQRs⩽3), but not for the fourth one (diagnostic test....../imaging; MED=6, IQR=3). Agreement was also reached on clinical examination by soft brush or pin stimulation (MEDs⩾7 and IQRs⩽3) and on the use of PRO descriptors for NP screening (MED=8, IQR=3). Based on the study results, a clinical algorithm for NP diagnostic criteria in cancer patients with pain...

  9. Spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Wolter, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Tilman Wolter Interdisciplinary Pain Centre, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany Abstract: Neuropathic pain constitutes a significant portion of chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain are usually more heavily burdened than patients with nociceptive pain. They suffer more often from insomnia, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, analgesic medication often has an insufficient effect on neuropathic pain. Spinal cord stimulation constitutes a therapy alternative that, to date, re...

  10. Neuropathic pain and cytokines: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark AK

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Anna K Clark, Elizabeth A Old, Marzia Malcangio Wolfson Centre for Age Related Diseases, King's College London, London, UK Abstract: Neuropathic pain represents a major problem in clinical medicine because it causes debilitating suffering and is largely resistant to currently available analgesics. A characteristic of neuropathic pain is abnormal response to somatic sensory stimulation. Thus, patients suffering peripheral neuropathies may experience pain caused by stimuli which are normally nonpainful, such as simple touching of the skin or by changes in temperature, as well as exaggerated responses to noxious stimuli. Convincing evidence suggests that this hypersensitivity is the result of pain remaining centralized. In particular, at the first pain synapse in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, the gain of neurons is increased and neurons begin to be activated by innocuous inputs. In recent years, it has become appreciated that a remote damage in the peripheral nervous system results in neuronal plasticity and changes in microglial and astrocyte activity, as well as infiltration of macrophages and T cells, which all contribute to central sensitization. Specifically, the release of pronociceptive factors such as cytokines and chemokines from neurons and non-neuronal cells can sensitize neurons of the first pain synapse. In this article we review the current evidence for the role of cytokines in mediating spinal neuron–non-neuronal cell communication in neuropathic pain mechanisms following peripheral nerve injury. Specific and selective control of cytokine-mediated neuronal–glia interactions results in attenuation of the hypersensitivity to both noxious and innocuous stimuli observed in neuropathic pain models, and may represent an avenue for future therapeutic intervention. Keywords: anti-inflammatory cytokines, proinflammatory cytokines, microglia, astrocytes, first pain synapse

  11. Prevalence and associations of neuropathic pain in a cohort of multi-ethnic Asian low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, Yueting; Tan, Cheng-Yin; Ng, Chong-Jing; Thang, Sue-Sien; Tan, Leong-Hooi; Khoo, Yvonne Khaii; Lim, Jun-Ni; Ng, Jia-Hui; Chan, Chris Yin-Wei; Kwan, Mun-Keong; Goh, Khean-Jin

    2017-04-01

    The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain differs in different ethnic populations. The aims of the study are to determine its frequency and associations in a multi-ethnic cohort of Asian low back pain patients. This was a cross-sectional study of low back patients seen at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Neuropathic low back pain patients were identified using the painDETECT questionnaire and compared with non-neuropathic (unclear or nociceptive) low back pain patients, in terms of socio-demographic and clinical factors, pain severity (numerical pain rating scale, NPRS), disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, RMDQ), as well as anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). Of 210 patients, 26 (12.4%) have neuropathic low back pain. Neuropathic pain is associated with non-Chinese ethnicity, higher body mass index and pain radiation below the knee. Patients with neuropathic pain have significantly higher NPRS and RMDQ scores, and there are more subjects with anxiety on HADS. However, there are no differences between the groups in age, gender, pain duration or underlying diagnosis of low back pain. The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain in a multi-ethnic Malaysian cohort is lower than previously reported in other populations with possible differences between ethnic groups. It is associated with greater pain severity, disability and anxiety.

  12. Nortriptyline for neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Aldington, Dominic; Moore, R Andrew

    2015-01-08

    Antidepressants are widely used to treat chronic neuropathic pain (pain due to nerve damage), usually in doses below those at which they exert antidepressant effects. An earlier review that included all antidepressants for neuropathic pain is being replaced by new reviews of individual drugs examining individual neuropathic pain conditions.Nortriptyline is a tricyclic antidepressant that is occasionally used for treating neuropathic pain, and is recommended in European, UK, and USA guidelines. To assess the analgesic efficacy and associated adverse events of nortriptyline for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and EMBASE from inception to 7 January 2015, and the reference lists of retrieved papers and other reviews. We also searched two clinical trials databases for ongoing or unpublished studies. We included randomised, double-blind studies of at least two weeks' duration comparing nortriptyline with placebo or another active treatment in chronic neuropathic pain. Participants were adults aged 18 years and over. We included only full journal publication articles and clinical trial summaries. Two review authors independently extracted efficacy and adverse event data, and examined issues of study quality. We considered the evidence using three tiers. First tier evidence derived from data meeting current best standards and subject to minimal risk of bias (outcome equivalent to substantial pain intensity reduction, intention-to-treat analysis without imputation for dropouts; at least 200 participants in the comparison, 8 to 12 weeks' duration, parallel design); second tier evidence from data that failed to meet one or more of these criteria and were considered at some risk of bias but with adequate numbers in the comparison; and third tier evidence from data involving small numbers of participants that was considered very likely to be biased or used outcomes of limited clinical utility

  13. Spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain constitutes a significant portion of chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain are usually more heavily burdened than patients with nociceptive pain. They suffer more often from insomnia, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, analgesic medication often has an insufficient effect on neuropathic pain. Spinal cord stimulation constitutes a therapy alternative that, to date, remains underused. In the last 10 to 15 years, it has undergone constant technical advancement. This review gives an overview of the present practice of spinal cord stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain and current developments such as high-frequency stimulation and peripheral nerve field stimulation.

  14. Desipramine for neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Leslie; Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Phillips, Tudor

    2014-09-23

    Antidepressants are widely used to treat chronic neuropathic pain (pain due to nerve damage), usually in doses below those at which they exert antidepressant effects. An earlier review that included all antidepressants for neuropathic pain is being replaced by new reviews of individual drugs examining individual neuropathic pain conditions.Desipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant that is occasionally used for treating neuropathic pain. To assess the analgesic efficacy of desipramine for chronic neuropathic pain in adults, and to assess the associated adverse events. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE from inception to 29 April 2014, and the reference lists of retrieved papers and other reviews. We also used our own hand searched database to identify older studies, and two clinical trials databases for ongoing or unpublished studies. We included randomised, double-blind studies of at least two weeks duration comparing desipramine with placebo or another active treatment in chronic neuropathic pain. Participants were adults aged 18 years and over. We included only full journal publication articles. Two review authors independently extracted the efficacy and adverse event data, and examined issues of study quality. We performed analysis using three tiers of evidence. First tier evidence was derived from data meeting current best standards and subject to minimal risk of bias (outcome equivalent to substantial pain intensity reduction, intention-to-treat analysis without imputation for dropouts, at least 200 participants in the comparison, 8 to 12 weeks duration, parallel design); second tier from data that failed to meet one or more of these criteria and were considered at some risk of bias but with adequate numbers in the comparison; and third tier from data involving small numbers of participants and considered very likely to be biased or that used outcomes of limited clinical utility, or both. Five studies treated 177 participants with painful diabetic

  15. Imipramine for neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Leslie; Derry, Sheena; Phillips, Tudor; Moore, R Andrew; Wiffen, Philip J

    2014-05-19

    Antidepressants are widely used to treat chronic neuropathic pain (pain due to nerve damage), usually in doses below those at which they exert antidepressant effects. An earlier review that included all antidepressants for neuropathic pain is being replaced by new reviews of individual drugs examining individual neuropathic pain conditions.Imipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant that is occasionally used to treat neuropathic pain. To assess the analgesic efficacy of imipramine for chronic neuropathic pain in adults, and to assess the associated adverse events. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE on 18 November 2013, as well as the reference lists of retrieved papers and other reviews. We also used our own handsearched database for older studies, and two clinical trials databases. We included randomised, double-blind studies of at least two weeks' duration comparing imipramine with placebo or another active treatment in chronic neuropathic pain. Participants were adults aged 18 and over. We included only articles with full journal publication and extended trial abstracts and summaries. Two review authors independently extracted efficacy and adverse event data, and examined issues of study quality. We performed analysis using three tiers of evidence. First tier evidence was derived from data meeting current best standards and subject to minimal risk of bias (outcome equivalent to substantial pain intensity reduction, intention-to-treat analysis without imputation for dropouts; at least 200 participants in the comparison, 8 to 12 weeks duration, parallel design); second tier from data that failed to meet one or more of these criteria and were considered at some risk of bias but with adequate numbers in the comparison; and third tier from data involving small numbers of participants which was considered very likely to be biased or used outcomes of limited clinical utility, or both. Five studies treated 168 participants with painful diabetic neuropathy or

  16. Koumine Attenuates Neuroglia Activation and Inflammatory Response to Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Lin Jin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of studies, the currently available drugs largely fail to control neuropathic pain. Koumine—an alkaloidal constituent derived from the medicinal plant Gelsemium elegans Benth.—has been shown to possess analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects and the possible underlying mechanisms of koumine. The analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of koumine were explored by using chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve (CCI neuropathic pain model in vivo and LPS-induced injury in microglia BV2 cells in vitro. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis were used to assess the modulator effect of koumine on microglia and astrocyte activation after CCI surgery. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to evaluate the levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Western blot analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR were used to examine the modulator effect of koumine on microglial M1 polarization. We found that single or repeated treatment of koumine can significantly reduce neuropathic pain after nerve injury. Moreover, koumine showed inhibitory effects on CCI-evoked microglia and astrocyte activation and reduced proinflammatory cytokine production in the spinal cord in rat CCI models. In BV2 cells, koumine significantly inhibited microglia M1 polarization. Furthermore, the analgesic effect of koumine was inhibited by a TSPO antagonist PK11195. These findings suggest that the analgesic effects of koumine on CCI-induced neuropathic pain may result from the inhibition of microglia activation and M1 polarization as well as the activation of astrocytes while sparing the anti-inflammatory responses to neuropathic pain.

  17. Morphine for chronic neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Tess E; Chen, Junqiao; Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Carr, Daniel B; Aldington, Dominic; Cole, Peter; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-05-22

    Neuropathic pain, which is caused by a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system, may be central or peripheral in origin. Neuropathic pain often includes symptoms such as burning or shooting sensations, abnormal sensitivity to normally painless stimuli, or an increased sensitivity to normally painful stimuli. Neuropathic pain is a common symptom in many diseases of the nervous system. Opioid drugs, including morphine, are commonly used to treat neuropathic pain. Most reviews have examined all opioids together. This review sought evidence specifically for morphine; other opioids are considered in separate reviews. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of morphine for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and Embase for randomised controlled trials from inception to February 2017. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and reviews, and online clinical trial registries. We included randomised, double-blind trials of two weeks' duration or longer, comparing morphine (any route of administration) with placebo or another active treatment for neuropathic pain, with participant-reported pain assessment. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality and potential bias. Primary outcomes were participants with substantial pain relief (at least 50% pain relief over baseline or very much improved on Patient Global Impression of Change scale (PGIC)), or moderate pain relief (at least 30% pain relief over baseline or much or very much improved on PGIC). Where pooled analysis was possible, we used dichotomous data to calculate risk ratio (RR) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) or harmful outcome (NNH). We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE and created 'Summary of findings' tables. We identified five randomised, double-blind, cross-over studies with treatment periods of four to

  18. Methadone for neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicol, Ewan D; Ferguson, McKenzie C; Schumann, Roman

    2017-05-17

    This review replaces an earlier review, "Methadone for chronic non-cancer pain in adults". This review serves to update the original and includes only studies of neuropathic pain. Methadone belongs to a class of analgesics known as opioids, that are considered the cornerstone of therapy for moderate-to-severe postsurgical pain and pain due to life-threatening illnesses; however, their use in neuropathic pain is controversial. Methadone has many characteristics that differentiate it from other opioids, which suggests that it may have a different efficacy and safety profile. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of methadone for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL (CRSO), MEDLINE (Ovid), and Embase (Ovid), and two clinical trial registries. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved articles. The date of the most recent search was 30 November 2016. We included randomised, double-blind studies of two weeks' duration or longer, comparing methadone (in any dose, administered by any route, and in any formulation) with placebo or another active treatment in chronic neuropathic pain. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two review authors independently considered trials for inclusion in the review, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. There were insufficient data to perform pooled analyses. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence for each outcome using GRADE and created a 'Summary of findings' table. We included three studies, involving 105 participants. All were cross-over studies, one involving 19 participants with diverse neuropathic pain syndromes, the other two involving 86 participants with postherpetic neuralgia. Study phases ranged from 20 days to approximately eight weeks. All administered methadone orally, in doses ranging from 10 mg to 80 mg daily. Comparators were primarily placebo, but one study also included morphine and tricyclic antidepressants

  19. Neuropathic pain: A personal case reflection on a critical incident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji P Duraisamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a distressing symptom for the patient and a difficult symptom for the physician to treat. There is lack of evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of malignant neuropathic pain. The case reflection is a personal account of what has been learnt from a critical incident in a particular patient in the management of neuropathic pain. Psychological issues are known to increase pain percetion and affect the quality of life. The case reflection explores problem areas, defines lacunae in knowledge, and demonstrates active learning of the management of neuropathic pain through reflective practice.

  20. EFNS guidelines on neurostimulation therapy for neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFNS Panel on Neuropathic Pain, Vienna; Cruccu, Giorgio; Aziz, T. Z.

    2007-01-01

    Pharmacological relief of neuropathic pain is often insufficient. Electrical neurostimulation is efficacious in chronic neuropathic pain and other neurological diseases. European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) launched a Task Force to evaluate the evidence for these techniques...... and to produce relevant recommendations. We searched the literature from 1968 to 2006, looking for neurostimulation in neuropathic pain conditions, and classified the trials according to the EFNS scheme of evidence for therapeutic interventions. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is efficacious in failed back surgery...

  1. Neuropathic pain: targeting the melatonin MT 2 receptor | Smith ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More recently, melatonin, commonly known as the neurohormone that regulates the circadian rhythm, has come to light as a therapeutic treatment option in the neuropathic pain setting. Early clinical trials showed a link between melatonin and chronic pain, which includes neuropathic pain. The MT2 receptor has also been ...

  2. Spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolter T

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tilman Wolter Interdisciplinary Pain Centre, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany Abstract: Neuropathic pain constitutes a significant portion of chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain are usually more heavily burdened than patients with nociceptive pain. They suffer more often from insomnia, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, analgesic medication often has an insufficient effect on neuropathic pain. Spinal cord stimulation constitutes a therapy alternative that, to date, remains underused. In the last 10 to 15 years, it has undergone constant technical advancement. This review gives an overview of the present practice of spinal cord stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain and current developments such as high-frequency stimulation and peripheral nerve field stimulation. Keywords: spinal cord stimulation, neuropathic pain, neurostimulation

  3. Chronic neuropathic pain: mechanisms, drug targets and measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sindrup, Søren H.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in many diseases or injuries of the peripheral or central nervous system, and has a substantial impact on quality of life and mood. Lesions of the nervous system may lead to potentially irreversible changes and imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory systems...... to assess various symptoms and signs in neuropathic pain and knowledge of drug mechanisms are prerequisites for pursuing this approach. The present review summarizes mechanisms of neuropathic pain, targets of currently used drugs, and measures used in neuropathic pain trials....

  4. Etiology and Pharmacology of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alles, Sascha R A; Smith, Peter A

    2018-04-01

    Injury to or disease of the nervous system can invoke chronic and sometimes intractable neuropathic pain. Many parallel, interdependent, and time-dependent processes, including neuroimmune interactions at the peripheral, supraspinal, and spinal levels, contribute to the etiology of this "disease of pain." Recent work emphasizes the roles of colony-stimulating factor 1, ATP, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Excitatory processes are enhanced, and inhibitory processes are attenuated in the spinal dorsal horn and throughout the somatosensory system. This leads to central sensitization and aberrant processing such that tactile and innocuous thermal information is perceived as pain (allodynia). Processes involved in the onset of neuropathic pain differ from those involved in its long-term maintenance. Opioids display limited effectiveness, and less than 35% of patients derive meaningful benefit from other therapeutic approaches. We thus review promising therapeutic targets that have emerged over the last 20 years, including Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, transient receptor potential channel type V1 channels, and adenosine A3 receptors. Despite this progress, the gabapentinoids retain their status as first-line treatments, yet their mechanism of action is poorly understood. We outline recent progress in understanding the etiology of neuropathic pain and show how this has provided insights into the cellular actions of pregabalin and gabapentin. Interactions of gabapentinoids with the α 2 δ -1 subunit of voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels produce multiple and neuron type-specific actions in spinal cord and higher centers. We suggest that drugs that affect multiple processes, rather than a single specific target, show the greatest promise for future therapeutic development. Copyright © 2018 by The Author(s).

  5. Combination treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Jakob Vormstrup; Jung, Anne; Jonsson, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    , but combination therapy had not been included in guidelines until recently. Based on clinical empiricism and scientific evidence, a Delphi consensus process provided a consolidated guidance on pharmacological combination treatment of NeP. METHODS: A two-round virtual internet-based Delphi process with 6 Danish...... pain specialists was undertaken. In the first round, questions were answered individually and anonymously, whereas in the second round, the panel openly discussed first round's summary of outcomes. Combinations of pharmacological pain treatments, that is, pregabalin/gabapentin, TCAs, serotonin...

  6. Acupuncture for neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Zi Yong; Wang, Ke; Cui, Hua Shun; Yao, Yibo; Liu, Shi Min; Zhou, Jia; Chen, Tong Yu; Xia, Jun

    2017-12-02

    Neuropathic pain may be caused by nerve damage, and is often followed by changes to the central nervous system. Uncertainty remains regarding the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture treatments for neuropathic pain, despite a number of clinical trials being undertaken. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of acupuncture treatments for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, four Chinese databases, ClinicalTrials.gov and World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) on 14 February 2017. We also cross checked the reference lists of included studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with treatment duration of eight weeks or longer comparing acupuncture (either given alone or in combination with other therapies) with sham acupuncture, other active therapies, or treatment as usual, for neuropathic pain in adults. We searched for studies of acupuncture based on needle insertion and stimulation of somatic tissues for therapeutic purposes, and we excluded other methods of stimulating acupuncture points without needle insertion. We searched for studies of manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture or other acupuncture techniques used in clinical practice (such as warm needling, fire needling, etc). We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and pain relief. The secondary outcomes were any pain-related outcome indicating some improvement, withdrawals, participants experiencing any adverse event, serious adverse events and quality of life. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and for continuous outcomes we calculated the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. We also calculated number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) where possible. We combined all data using a random-effects model and assessed the quality of evidence using GRADE to generate

  7. Pregabalin in chemotherapy induced neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Atreya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic agents belonging to vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and antitubulins produce peripheral neuropathy for which there is no validated treatment. Pregabalin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid analog, is known to inhibit theα2δ subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel. Earlier studies and case reports have shown pregabalin to be effective in treating neuropathic pain. We present a case series of patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy who were successfully treated with pregabalin with reduction in the hyperalgesia, allodynia, and improvement in the quality of life.

  8. Prevalence of Neuropathic Pain and the Need for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat Morley-Forster

    2006-01-01

    There is an unmet need for the treatment of neuropathic pain as evidenced by reports of pain despite the use of opioids and anticonvulsants, continuing psychological difficulties, lack of access to treatments and patients seeking access to complementary therapy.

  9. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shenyu; Tang, Hailiang; Zhou, Junming; Gu, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Quchi (LI11), Hegu (LI04), Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats’ upper limbs was significantly at...

  10. Tanshinone IIA attenuates neuropathic pain via inhibiting glial activation and immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fa-Le; Xu, Min; Wang, Yan; Gong, Ke-Rui; Zhang, Jin-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, characterized by spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia, is a devastating neurological disease that seriously affects patients' quality of life. We have previously shown that tanshinone IIA (TIIA), an important lipophilic component of Danshen, had significant anti-nociceptive effect in somatic and visceral pain, it is surprisingly noted that few pharmacological studies have been carried out to explore the possible analgesic action of TIIA on neuropathic pain and the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, in the present study, by using spinal nerve ligation (SNL) pain model, the antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects of TIIA on neuropathic pain were evaluated by intraperitoneal administration in rats. The results indicated that TIIA dose-dependently inhibited SNL-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. As revealed by OX42 levels, TIIA effectively repressed the activation of spinal microglial activation in SNL-induced neuropathic pain. Meanwhile, TIIA also decreased the expressions of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in the spinal cord. Furthermore, TIIA inhibited oxidative stress by significantly rescuing the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and decreasing the malondialdehyde (MDA). Moreover, TIIA depressed SNL-induced MAPKs activation in spinal cord. Taken together, our study provides evidence that TIIA inhibited SNL-induced neuropathic pain through depressing microglial activation and immune response by the inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways. Our findings suggest that TIIA might be a promising agent in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuropathic orofacial pain part 1--prevalence and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, E R; Cousins, M J

    2000-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is defined as "pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system". Neuropathic orofacial pain has previously been known as "atypical odontalgia" (AO) and "phantom tooth pain". The patient afflicted with neuropathic oral/orofacial pain may present to the dentist with a persistent, severe pain, yet there are no clearly identifiable clinical or radiographic abnormalities. Accordingly, multiple endodontic procedures may be instigated to remove the likely anatomical source of the pain, yet the pain persists. There have been few studies and limited patient numbers investigating the condition. Two retrospective studies revealed the incidence of persistent pain following endodontic treatment to be 3-6% and 5% of patients; one author with wide experience in assessing the condition estimated its prevalence at 125,000 individuals in the USA alone. In one study, 50% of neuropathic orofacial pain patients reported persistent pain specifically following endodontic treatment. Patients predisposed to the condition may include those suffering from recurrent cluster or migraine headaches. Neuropathic pain states include postherpetic neuralgia (shingles) and phantom limb/stump pain. The aberrant developmental neurobiology leading to this pain state is complex. Neuropathic pain serves no protective function, in contrast to physiological pain that warns of noxious stimuli likely to result in tissue damage. The relevant clinical features of neuropathic pain include: (i) precipitating factors such as trauma or disease (infection), and often a delay in onset after initial injury (days-months), (ii) typical complaints such as dysaesthesias (abnormal unpleasant sensations), pain that may include burning, and paroxysmal, lancinating or sharp qualities, and pain in an area of sensory deficit, (iii) on physical examination there may be hyperalgesia, allodynia and sympathetic hyperfunction, and (iv) the pathophysiology includes deafferentation

  12. The evidence for pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sindrup, Søren Hein; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2010-01-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials on neuropathic pain treatment are accumulating, so an updated review of the available evidence is needed. Studies were identified using MEDLINE and EMBASE searches. Numbers needed to treat (NNT) and numbers needed to harm (NNH) values were used...... to compare the efficacy and safety of different treatments for a number of neuropathic pain conditions. One hundred and seventy-four studies were included, representing a 66% increase in published randomized, placebo-controlled trials in the last 5 years. Painful poly-neuropathy (most often due to diabetes...... are the drug classes for which there is the best evidence for a clinical relevant effect. Despite a 66% increase in published trials only a limited improvement of neuropathic pain treatment has been obtained. A large proportion of neuropathic pain patients are left with insufficient pain relief. This fact...

  13. Allergic Inflammation Leads to Neuropathic Pain via Glial Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Ryo; Fujii, Takayuki; Wang, Bing; Masaki, Katsuhisa; Kido, Mizuho A; Yoshida, Mari; Matsushita, Takuya; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2016-11-23

    Allergic and atopic disorders have increased over the past few decades and have been associated with neuropsychiatric conditions, such as autism spectrum disorder and asthmatic amyotrophy. Myelitis presenting with neuropathic pain can occur in patients with atopic disorder; however, the relationship between allergic inflammation and neuropathic pain, and the underlying mechanism, remains to be established. We studied whether allergic inflammation affects the spinal nociceptive system. We found that mice with asthma, atopic dermatitis, or atopic diathesis had widespread and significantly more activated microglia and astroglia in the spinal cord than those without atopy, and displayed tactile allodynia. Microarray analysis of isolated microglia revealed a dysregulated phenotype showing upregulation of M1 macrophage markers and downregulation of M2 markers in atopic mice. Among the cell surface protein genes, endothelin receptor type B (EDNRB) was most upregulated. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that EDNRB expression was enhanced in microglia and astroglia, whereas endothelin-1, an EDNRB ligand, was increased in serum, lungs, and epidermis of atopic mice. No EDNRA expression was found in the spinal cord. Expression of FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog B was significantly higher in the dorsal horn neurons of asthma mice than nonatopic mice. The EDNRB antagonist BQ788 abolished glial and neural activation and allodynia. We found increased serum endothelin-1 in atopic patients with myelitis and neuropathic pain, and activation of spinal microglia and astroglia with EDNRB upregulation in an autopsied case. These results suggest that allergic inflammation induces diffuse glial activation, influencing the nociceptive system via the EDNRB pathway. The prevalence of allergic disorders has markedly increased over the past few decades. Allergic disorders are associated with neuropsychiatric conditions; however, the relationship between allergic inflammation

  14. Platelet-rich plasma and the elimination of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffler, Damien P

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral neuropathic pain typically results from trauma-induced nociceptive neuron hyperexcitability and their spontaneous ectopic activity. This pain persists until the trauma-induced cascade of events runs its full course, which results in complete tissue repair, including the nociceptive neurons recovering their normal biophysical properties, ceasing to be hyperexcitable, and stopping having spontaneous electrical activity. However, if a wound undergoes no, insufficient, or too much inflammation, or if a wound becomes stuck in an inflammatory state, chronic neuropathic pain persists. Although various drugs and techniques provide temporary relief from chronic neuropathic pain, many have serious side effects, are not effective, none promotes the completion of the wound healing process, and none provides permanent pain relief. This paper examines the hypothesis that chronic neuropathic pain can be permanently eliminated by applying platelet-rich plasma to the site at which the pain originates, thereby triggering the complete cascade of events involved in normal wound repair. Many published papers claim that the clinical application of platelet-rich plasma to painful sites, such as muscle injuries and joints, or to the ends of nerves evoking chronic neuropathic pain, a process often referred to as prolotherapy, eliminates pain initiated at such sites. However, there is no published explanation of a possible mechanism/s by which platelet-rich plasma may accomplish this effect. This paper discusses the normal physiological cascade of trauma-induced events that lead to chronic neuropathic pain and its eventual elimination, techniques being studied to reduce or eliminate neuropathic pain, and how the application of platelet-rich plasma may lead to the permanent elimination of neuropathic pain. It concludes that platelet-rich plasma eliminates neuropathic pain primarily by platelet- and stem cell-released factors initiating the complex cascade of wound healing events

  15. Chronic Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury: The Patient's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Henwood

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic neuropathic pain (CNP in spinal cord injury (SCI is recognized as severely compromising, in both adjustment after injury and quality of life. Studies indicate that chronic pain in SCI is associated with great emotional distress over and above that of the injury itself. Currently, little is known about the SCI patient's perception of the impact of living with chronic neuropathic pain.

  16. Does hemiplegic shoulder pain share clinical and sensory characteristics with central neuropathic pain? A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilig, Gabi; Rivel, Michal; Doron, Dana; Defrin, Ruth

    2016-10-01

    Hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) is a common poststroke complication and is considered to be a chronic pain syndrome. It is negatively correlated with the functional recovery of the affected arm and the quality of life of the individual. It also leads to a longer length of stay in rehabilitation. Today, there is no consensus as to the underlying mechanism causing HSP, making the syndrome difficult to treat. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and sensory profile of individuals with HSP to that of individuals with established central neuropathic pain (CNP) in order to identify common features and the presence of neuropathic components in HSP. Cross sectional controlled study. Outpatient rehabilitation clinics. Sixteen chronic HSP patients and 18 chronic CNP patients with spinal cord injury (SCI-CNP). The chronic pain characteristics, thresholds of thermal and tactile sensations and presence of pathological sensations were compared between groups, and between painful and pain free body regions within groups. Correlations were calculated between HSP intensity and sensory and musculoskeletal characteristics. Patients with HSP and patients with SCI-CNP had similar decrease of thermal sensibility in the painful compared to intact body regions and both groups presented similar rates of pathological sensations in painful regions. HSP and SCI-CNP differed however, in the quality of pain and aggravating factors. Significant correlations were found between HSP intensity and heat-pain threshold, presence of subluxation and spasticity. The similarities between HSP and SCI-CNP and the altered spinothalamic function and sensitization suggest that HSP has neuropathic components in its mechanism. Nevertheless, the unique features of HSP point towards additional possible mechanisms. The use of specific therapy options for neuropathic pain should be considered when treating patients with HSP.

  17. Pain matrices and neuropathic pain matrices: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Peyron, Roland

    2013-12-01

    The pain matrix is conceptualised here as a fluid system composed of several interacting networks. A nociceptive matrix receiving spinothalamic projections (mainly posterior operculoinsular areas) ensures the bodily specificity of pain and is the only one whose destruction entails selective pain deficits. Transition from cortical nociception to conscious pain relies on a second-order network, including posterior parietal, prefrontal and anterior insular areas. Second-order regions are not nociceptive-specific; focal stimulation does not evoke pain, and focal destruction does not produce analgesia, but their joint activation is necessary for conscious perception, attentional modulation and control of vegetative reactions. The ensuing pain experience can still be modified as a function of beliefs, emotions and expectations through activity of third-order areas, including the orbitofrontal and perigenual/limbic networks. The pain we remember results from continuous interaction of these subsystems, and substantial changes in the pain experience can be achieved by acting on each of them. Neuropathic pain (NP) is associated with changes in each of these levels of integration. The most robust abnormality in NP is a functional depression of thalamic activity, reversible with therapeutic manoeuvres and associated with rhythmic neural bursting. Neuropathic allodynia has been associated with enhancement of ipsilateral over contralateral insular activation and lack of reactivity in orbitofrontal/perigenual areas. Although lack of response of perigenual cortices may be an epiphenomenon of chronic pain, the enhancement of ipsilateral activity may reflect disinhibition of ipsilateral spinothalamic pathways due to depression of their contralateral counterpart. This in turn may bias perceptual networks and contribute to the subjective painful experience. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterizing neuropathic pain profiles: enriching interpretation of painDETECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappelleri JC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Joseph C Cappelleri,1 Vijaya Koduru,2 E Jay Bienen,3 Alesia Sadosky4 1Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, USA; 2Eliassen Group, New London, CT, USA; 3Outcomes Research Consultant, New York, NY, USA; 4Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA Purpose: To psychometrically evaluate painDETECT, a patient-reported screening questionnaire for neuropathic pain (NeP, for discriminating among sensory pain symptoms (burning, tingling/prickling, light touching, sudden pain attacks/electric shock-type pain, cold/heat, numbness, and slight pressure. Methods: The seven-item version of painDETECT provides an overall score that targets only sensory symptoms, while the nine-item version adds responses on two items to the overall score, covering pain course pattern and pain radiation. Both versions have relevance in terms of characterizing broad NeP. The nine- and seven-item versions of painDETECT were administered to subjects with confirmed NeP across six conditions identified during office visits to US community-based physicians. Responses on the sensory symptom items were dichotomized into “at least moderate” (ie, moderate, strongly, very strongly relative to the combined other responses (never, hardly noticed, slightly. Logistic regression of dichotomized variables on the total painDETECT score provided probabilities of experiencing each symptom across the range of painDETECT scores. Results: Both painDETECT versions discriminated among the symptoms with similar probabilities across the score ranges. Using these data, the probability of moderately experiencing each pain sensory item was estimated for a particular score, providing a pain profile. Additionally, the likelihood of experiencing each sensation was determined for a discrete increase in score, ie, the odds of at least a moderate sensation of burning (versus less than a moderate sensation was 1.29 for a 1-point increase, 3.52 for a 5-point increase, and 12.42 for every 10-point increase in the nine-item painDETECT score

  19. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS/RSD and Neuropathic Pain: Role of Intravenous Bisphosphonates as Analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yanow

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a sequela of dysfunction, injuries, or diseases of the peripheral and/or central nervous system pain pathways, which has historically been extremely difficult to treat. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS types 1 and 2 are neuropathic pain conditions that have a long history in the medical literature but whose pathophysiology remains elusive and whose available treatment options remain few. While an exact animal model for CRPS doesn't yet exist, there are several animal models of neuropathic pain that develop behaviors of hypersensitivity, one of the hallmark signs of neuropathic pain in humans.

  20. Diagnosis and medical treatment of neuropathic pain in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Del Arco

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the difficulties in diagnosing and treating neuropathic pain caused by leprosy and to understand the main characteristics of this situation. Methods: 85 patients were treated in outpatient units with reference to leprosy and the accompanying pain. We used a questionnaire known as the Douleur Neuropathic 4 test and we conducted detailed neurological exams. As a result, 42 patients were excluded from the study for not having proved their pain. Results: Out of the 37 patients that experienced pain, 22 (59.5% had neuropathic pain (or a mixture of this pain and their existing pain and of these 90.8% considered this pain to be moderate or severe. 81.8% of the sample suffered with this pain for more than 6 months. Only 12 (54.5% of the patients had been diagnosed with neuropathic pain and in almost half of these cases, this pain had not been diagnosed. With reference to medical treatment (n=12 for neuropathic pain, 5 (41.6% responded that they became better. For the other 7 (58.4% there were no changes in relation to the pain or in some cases the pain worsened in comparison to their previous state. Statistical analysis comparing improvements in relation to the pain amongst the patients that were treated (n=12 and those that were not, showed significant differences (value p=0.020. Conclusion: we noted difficulties in diagnosing neuropathic pain for leprosy in that almost half of the patients that were studied had not had their pain diagnosed. We attributed this to some factors such as the non-adoption of the appropriate protocols which led to inadequate diagnosis and treatment that overlooked the true picture.

  1. Topical amitriptyline and ketamine for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    A neuropathy is a disturbance of function or pathological change in nerves. In some cases, peripheral neuropathic pain may occur due to a lesion or disease of the peripheral somatosensory nervous system. Efficacy of different agents for peripheral neuropathic pain conditions is less than optimal. The administration of topical analgesics might be an option, due to the potential of reduced adverse effects and increased patient compliance. There is major interest in compounding topical analgesics for peripheral neuropathic pain, but several challenges remain for this approach. Topical analgesics have the potential to be a valuable additional approach for the management of peripheral neuropathic pain. Topical amitriptyline-ketamine combination (AK) is a promising agent for peripheral neuropathic pain conditions. Some studies have shown its efficacy in neuropathic pain conditions. However, this data was not uniformely obtained and its role remains still controversial. Efficacy may depend on many factors, including the choice of the vehicle, the concentration, the pain site, and specific diseases. More studies are necessary to support the use of AK in clinical practice.

  2. Puerarin Alleviates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting Neuroinflammation in Spinal Cord

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Liu; Kaijun Liao; Changxi Yu; Xuejun Li; Suhuan Liu; Shuyu Yang

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain responds poorly to drug treatments, and partial relief is achieved in only about half of the patients. Puerarin, the main constituent of Puerariae Lobatae Radix, has been used extensively in China to treat hypertension and tumor. The current study examined the effects of puerarin on neuropathic pain using two most commonly used animal models: chronic constriction injury (CCI) and diabetic neuropathy. We found that consecutive intrathecal administration of puerarin (4–100 nM) ...

  3. Genetic studies of human neuropathic pain conditions: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorina-Lichtenwalter, Katerina; Parisien, Marc; Diatchenko, Luda

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Numerous studies have shown associations between genetic variants and neuropathic pain disorders. Rare monogenic disorders are caused by mutations of substantial effect size in a single gene, whereas common disorders are likely to have a contribution from multiple genetic variants of mild effect size, representing different biological pathways. In this review, we survey the reported genetic contributors to neuropathic pain and submit them for validation in a 150,000-participant sample of the U.K. Biobank cohort. Successfully replicated association with a neuropathic pain construct for 2 variants in IL10 underscores the importance of neuroimmune interactions, whereas genome-wide significant association with low back pain (P = 1.3e-8) and false discovery rate 5% significant associations with hip, knee, and neck pain for variant rs7734804 upstream of the MAT2B gene provide evidence of shared contributing mechanisms to overlapping pain conditions at the molecular genetic level. PMID:29240606

  4. Puerarin alleviates neuropathic pain by inhibiting neuroinflammation in spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Liao, Kaijun; Yu, Changxi; Li, Xuejun; Liu, Suhuan; Yang, Shuyu

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain responds poorly to drug treatments, and partial relief is achieved in only about half of the patients. Puerarin, the main constituent of Puerariae Lobatae Radix, has been used extensively in China to treat hypertension and tumor. The current study examined the effects of puerarin on neuropathic pain using two most commonly used animal models: chronic constriction injury (CCI) and diabetic neuropathy. We found that consecutive intrathecal administration of puerarin (4-100 nM) for 7 days inhibited the mechanical and thermal nociceptive response induced by CCI and diabetes without interfering with the normal pain response. Meanwhile, in both models puerarin inhibited the activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal dorsal horn. Puerarin also reduced the upregulated levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in the spinal cord. In summary, puerarin alleviated CCI- and diabetes-induced neuropathic pain, and its effectiveness might be due to the inhibition of neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. The anti-inflammation effect of puerarin might be related to the suppression of spinal NF-κB activation and/or cytokines upregulation. We conclude that puerarin has a significant effect on alleviating neuropathic pain and thus may serve as a therapeutic approach for neuropathic pain.

  5. Puerarin Alleviates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting Neuroinflammation in Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain responds poorly to drug treatments, and partial relief is achieved in only about half of the patients. Puerarin, the main constituent of Puerariae Lobatae Radix, has been used extensively in China to treat hypertension and tumor. The current study examined the effects of puerarin on neuropathic pain using two most commonly used animal models: chronic constriction injury (CCI and diabetic neuropathy. We found that consecutive intrathecal administration of puerarin (4–100 nM for 7 days inhibited the mechanical and thermal nociceptive response induced by CCI and diabetes without interfering with the normal pain response. Meanwhile, in both models puerarin inhibited the activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal dorsal horn. Puerarin also reduced the upregulated levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in the spinal cord. In summary, puerarin alleviated CCI- and diabetes-induced neuropathic pain, and its effectiveness might be due to the inhibition of neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. The anti-inflammation effect of puerarin might be related to the suppression of spinal NF-κB activation and/or cytokines upregulation. We conclude that puerarin has a significant effect on alleviating neuropathic pain and thus may serve as a therapeutic approach for neuropathic pain.

  6. Clonazepam for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Ruth; Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Moore, R Andrew

    2012-05-16

    Antiepileptic drugs have been used in pain management since the 1960s; some have shown efficacy in treating different neuropathic pain conditions. Clonazepam, a benzodiazepine, is an established antiepileptic drug, but its place in the treatment of neuropathic pain is unclear. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of the antiepileptic drug clonazepam in neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 2). MEDLINE, and EMBASE to 28 February 2012, together with reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We planned to include randomised, double-blind studies of eight weeks duration or longer, comparing clonazepam with placebo or another active treatment in chronic neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia. Two review authors would independently extract data for efficacy and adverse events, and examine issues of study quality. We did not identify any studies that satisfied the inclusion criteria. This review uncovered no evidence of sufficient quality to support the use of clonazepam in chronic neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia.

  7. Duloxetine in patients with central neuropathic pain caused by spinal cord injury or stroke: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Hollmann, M. W.; van der Vegt, M. H.; Kruis, M. R.; Heesen, M.; Vos, K.; Pijl, A. J.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying central neuropathic pain are poorly understood. Pain inhibitory mechanisms including sertononergic and norepinephrine systems may be dysfunctional. In this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial we evaluated the effects of duloxetine on pain relief

  8. Prevalence of Neuropathic Pain According to the IASP Grading System in Patients with Chronic Non-Malignant Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vægter, Henrik Bjarke; Andersen, Per Grunwald; Madsen, Marianne Frobøse

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of neuropathic pain according to the new International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) grading system. The secondary objective was to compare the system classification of neuropathic pain with the classification of neuropathic pain...

  9. Spinal cord stimulation and modulation of neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Cecilia Cecilia Clementine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports on the opportunities of several new applications of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our pilot study and consecutively performed international randomised controlled trial on effects of SCS in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy showed

  10. Elucidation of pathophysiology and treatment of neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, Jan H.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system, is relatively common, occurring in about 1% of the population. Studies in animal models describe a number of peripheral and central pathophysiological processes after nerve injury that

  11. Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide in spinal cord injury neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven R; Bing, Jette; Hansen, Rikke M

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI) represent significant problems. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a fatty acid amide that is produced in many cells in the body, is thought to potentiate the action of endocannabinoids and to reduce pain and inflammation. This randomized...

  12. Neuropathic Pain - Current Concepts | Meyer | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuropathic pain (NP) represents a common and diverse group of disorders with peripheral and/or central nervous system damage or dysfunction. Many patients report intractable and severe pain that is resistant to simple analgesics. The diagnosis of NP is primarily based on clinical evaluation rather than diagnostic tests.

  13. Fabry disease: a rare cause of neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegstraaten, Marieke; Linthorst, Gabor E.; van Schaik, Ivo N.; Hollak, Carla E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease is characterized by burning or shooting pains in hands and feet, which have a severe impact on the quality of life of patients. It is therefore of importance that Fabry patients receive adequate diagnosis, counseling, treatment and follow up. This review describes neuropathic pain in

  14. Blocking proteinase-activated receptor 2 alleviated neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H; Wei, Y; Tian, F; Niu, T; Yi, G

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Especially, neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effectively therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a family member of G-protein-coupled receptors and are activated by a proteolytic mechanism. One of its subtypes PAR2 has been reported to be engaged in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms responsible for SCI evoked-neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increases PAR2 and its downstream pathways TRPV1 and TRPA1 expression in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal PAR2 by intrathecal injection of FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibits neuropathic pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation whereas FSLLRY-NH2 decreases the protein expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 as well as the levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Results of this study have important implications, i.e. targeting one or more of these signaling molecules involved in activation of PAR2 and TRPV1/TRPA1 evoked by SCI may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  15. Milnacipran for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Gill, Dipender; Phillips, Tudor; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Milnacipran is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) that is sometimes used to treat chronic neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. Objectives To evaluate the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of milnacipran in the management of chronic neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE to 4th of January 2012, together with reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind studies of eight weeks duration or longer, comparing milnacipran with placebo or another active treatment in chronic neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia. Data collection and analysis We extracted efficacy and adverse event data, and two study authors examined issues of study quality independently. Main results Five studies (4138 participants) were included, all of which were placebo-controlled, involved participants with fibromyalgia, and used titration to a target dose of 100 mg or 200 mg milnacipran. There were no other active comparators or studies in other neuropathic pain conditions. Study quality was generally good, although the imputation method used in analyses of the primary outcomes could overestimate treatment effect. Both doses of milnacipran provided moderate levels of pain relief to about 40% of those treated, compared to 30% with placebo, giving a number needed to treat of 8 to 10. Adverse events were common in both milnacipran (87%) and placebo (78%) groups, but serious adverse events (pain due to fibromyalgia, providing moderate levels of pain relief (at least 30%) to about 40% of participants, compared with about 30% with placebo. There were insufficient data to assess substantial levels of pain relief (at least 50%), and the use of last observation carried forward imputation may overestimate drug efficacy. Milnacipran is associated with increased adverse events and adverse event withdrawals, which were significantly greater for the higher dose. There were no

  16. EFNS guidelines on pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attal, Nadine; Cruccu, Giorgio; Haanpää, Marja

    2006-01-01

    Neuropathic pain treatment remains unsatisfactory despite a substantial increase in the number of trials. This EFNS Task Force aimed at evaluating the existing evidence about the pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain. Studies were identified using first the Cochrane Database then Medline....... Trials were classified according to the aetiological condition. All class I and II controlled trials (according to EFNS classification of evidence) were assessed, but lower-class studies were considered in conditions that had no top level studies. Only treatments feasible in an outpatient setting were...

  17. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Xiaojia; Huang, Bin; Ma, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1) and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  18. Antidepressants inhibit P2X4 receptor function: a possible involvement in neuropathic pain relief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozaki-Saitoh Hidetoshi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain is characterized by pain hypersensitivity to innocuous stimuli (tactile allodynia that is nearly always resistant to known treatments such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or even opioids. It has been reported that some antidepressants are effective for treating neuropathic pain. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. We have recently demonstrated that blocking P2X4 receptors in the spinal cord reverses tactile allodynia after peripheral nerve injury in rats, implying that P2X4 receptors are a key molecule in neuropathic pain. We investigated a possible role of antidepressants as inhibitors of P2X4 receptors and analysed their analgesic mechanism using an animal model of neuropathic pain. Results Antidepressants strongly inhibited ATP-mediated Ca2+ responses in P2X4 receptor-expressing 1321N1 cells, which are known to have no endogenous ATP receptors. Paroxetine exhibited the most powerful inhibition of calcium influx via rat and human P2X4 receptors, with IC50 values of 2.45 μM and 1.87 μM, respectively. Intrathecal administration of paroxetine produced a striking antiallodynic effect in an animal model of neuropathic pain. Co-administration of WAY100635, ketanserin or ondansetron with paroxetine induced no significant change in the antiallodynic effect of paroxetine. Furthermore, the antiallodynic effect of paroxetine was observed even in rats that had received intrathecal pretreatment with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, which dramatically depletes spinal 5-hydroxytryptamine. Conclusion These results suggest that paroxetine acts as a potent analgesic in the spinal cord via a mechanism independent of its inhibitory effect on serotonin transporters. Powerful inhibition on P2X4 receptors may underlie the analgesic effect of paroxetine, and it is possible that some antidepressants clinically used in patients with neuropathic pain show antiallodynic effects, at least in part

  19. Prevalence of neuropathic pain according to the IASP grading system in patients with chronic non-malignant pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Andersen, Per Grunwald; Madsen, Marianne Frobøse; Handberg, Gitte; Enggaard, Thomas Peter

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of neuropathic pain according to the new International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) grading system. The secondary objective was to compare the system classification of neuropathic pain with the classification of neuropathic pain according to a patient-administered screening questionnaire. A Multidisciplinary Pain Center. One hundred twenty patients with a variety of chronic pain conditions referred to a multidisciplinary pain center. Consecutively referred patients filled out the PainDETECT Questionnaire before the first consultation. During the first consultation, patients had pain history taken and bedside examination performed by a pain specialist. Patients were classified according to the score on the PainDETECT Questionnaire and graded according to the IASP grading system about the certainty of neuropathic pain. According to the IASP grading system, 22 patients (18.3%) classified as probable or definite neuropathic pain and 90 patients (75%) as unlikely neuropathic pain. According to the PainDETECT Questionnaire, 55 patients (45%) were classified as likely neuropathic pain and 13 patients (10.8%) as unlikely neuropathic pain. Eleven patients (20%) who were classified as neuropathic pain according to PainDETECT were also classified as probable or definite neuropathic pain by the new IASP grading system. According to the new IASP grading system, less than 20% of the patients referred to a multidisciplinary pain center fulfilled the criteria for neuropathic pain. The classification of neuropathic pain with the IASP system varies from the classification of neuropathic pain with the use of a self-administered screening questionnaire. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Neuropathic pain in cancer patients treated with bortezomib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito Vizcaíno, S; Casanova-Mollà, J; Escoda, L; Galán, S; Miró, J

    The neuropathic pain is the most habitual problem in the neuropathy induced by chemotherapy (NIQ) and the one that more interferes in the quality of life of the patients. His precocious detection turns out to be fundamental to reduce or to eliminate the problems that from this one stem. The aims of this study were: 1) determine the incident and NIQ's characteristics and neuropathic pain in patients with mieloma multiple (MM) treated with bortezomib, and 2) to evaluate the impact of the neuropathic pain in the activities of the daily life (AVD). All the patients diagnosed of MM candidates for treatment with bortezomib attended in the Hospital Joan XXIII during 2013, took part. The participants were interviewed individually and were reporting on the presence, the characteristics and the impact of the pain, as well as of the adverse effects of the bortezomib. There took part 22 persons, of which NIQ presented the half, being the degree 2 the predominant one. The most habitual location of the neuropathic pain was hands and feet; it was appearing in a spontaneous and progressive way deteriorating in rest and during the night, with predominance of positive symptoms. The impact of the pain was reflected in all the AVD. The principal limitation was the disability to enjoy the life. The peripheral neuropathy occupied the first place in order of subjective importance for the patient followed by the fatigue and the constipation. A proper assessment and early detection of neuropathic pain is critical to minimizing its impact on the quality of life of patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Microglia: A Promising Target for Treating Neuropathic and Postoperative Pain, and Morphine Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-Ray Wen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Management of chronic pain, such as nerve-injury-induced neuropathic pain associated with diabetic neuropathy, viral infection, and cancer, is a real clinical challenge. Major surgeries, such as breast and thoracic surgery, leg amputation, and coronary artery bypass surgery, also lead to chronic pain in 10–50% of individuals after acute postoperative pain, partly due to surgery-induced nerve injury. Current treatments mainly focus on blocking neurotransmission in the pain pathway and have only resulted in limited success. Ironically, chronic opioid exposure might lead to paradoxical pain. Development of effective therapeutic strategies requires a better understanding of cellular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Progress in pain research points to an important role of microglial cells in the development of chronic pain. Spinal cord microglia are strongly activated after nerve injury, surgical incision, and chronic opioid exposure. Increasing evidence suggests that, under all these conditions, the activated microglia not only exhibit increased expression of microglial markers CD 11 b and Iba 1, but also display elevated phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Inhibition of spinal cord p38 has been shown to attenuate neuropathic and postoperative pain, as well as morphine-induced antinociceptive tolerance. Activation of p38 in spinal microglia results in increased synthesis and release of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. These microglia-released mediators can powerfully modulate spinal cord synaptic transmission, leading to increased excitability of dorsal horn neurons, that is, central sensitization, partly via suppressing inhibitory synaptic transmission. Here, we review studies that support the pronociceptive role of microglia in conditions of neuropathic and postoperative pain and opioid

  2. Bioinformatic Analysis of Potential Biomarkers for Spinal Cord Injured Patients With Intractable Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Ye, Fang; Huang, Chanyan; Xue, Faling; Li, Yingyuan; Gao, Shaowei; Qiu, Zeting; Li, Si; Chen, Qinchang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Song, Yiyan; Huang, Wenqi; Tan, Wulin; Wang, Zhongxing

    2018-03-15

    Neuropathic pain is one of the common complications after spinal cord injury (SCI), affecting patients' life quality. The molecular mechanism for neuropathic pain after SCI is still unclear. We aimed to discover potential genes and MicroRNAs(miRNAs) related to neuropathic pain by bioinformatics method. Microarray data of GSE69901 were obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Peripheral blood samples from patients with or without neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) were collected. 12 samples with neuropathic pain and 13 samples without pain as control were included in the downloaded microarray. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between neuropathic pain group and control group were detected using GEO2R online tool. Functional enrichment analysis of DEGs was performed using DAVID database. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed from STRING database. MiRNAs targeting these DEGs were obtained from miRNet database. A merged miRNA-DEG network was constructed and analyzed with Cytoscape software. Total 1134 DEGs were identified between patients with or without neuropathic pain(case and control) and 454 biological processes were enriched. We identified 4 targeted miRNAs, including mir-204-5p, mir-519d-3p, mir-20b-5p, mir-6838-5p, which may be the potential biomarker for SCI patients. Protein modification and regulation biological process of central nervous system may be a risk factor of in SCI patients. Certain genes and miRNAs may be potential biomarkers for the prediction of and potential targets for prevention and treatment of neuropathic pain after SCI.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http

  3. Estrogen alleviates neuropathic pain induced after spinal cord injury by inhibiting microglia and astrocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Youn; Choi, Hae Young; Ju, Bong-Gun; Yune, Tae Young

    2018-04-16

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) is developed in about 80% of SCI patients and there is no efficient therapeutic drug to alleviate SCI-induced neuropathic pain. Here we examined the effect of estrogen on SCI-induced neuropathic pain at below-level and its effect on neuroinflammation as underlying mechanisms. Neuropathic pain is developed at late phase after SCI and a single dose of 17β-estradiol (100, 300 μg/kg) were administered to rats with neuropathic pain after SCI through intravenous injection. As results, both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were significantly reduced by 17β-estradiol compared to vehicle control. Both microglia and astrocyte activation in the lamina I and II of L4-5 dorsal horn was also inhibited by 17β-estradiol. In addition, the levels of p-p38MAPK and p-ERK known to be activated in microglia and p-JNK known to be activated in astrocyte were significantly decreased by 17β-estradiol. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators such as Il-1β, Il-6, iNos, and Cox-2 was more attenuated in 17β-estradiol-treated group than in vehicle-treated group. Particularly, we found that the analgesic effect by 17β-estradiol was mediated via estrogen receptors, which are expressed in dorsal horn neurons. These results suggest that 17β-estradiol may attenuate SCI-induced neuropathic pain by inhibiting microglia and astrocyte activation followed inflammation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cortical and white matter alterations in patients with neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Eun Jin; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Shin, Hyung Ik; Lee, Youngjo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2013-12-02

    Neuropathic pain is one of the major problems of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), which remains refractory to treatment despite a variety of therapeutic approach. Multimodal neuroimaging could provide complementary information for brain mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain, which could be based on development of more effective treatment strategies. Ten patients suffering from chronic neuropathic pain after SCI and 10 healthy controls underwent FDG-PET, T1-anatomical MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. We found decreases of both metabolism and the gray matter volume in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in patients compared to healthy controls, as well as hypometabolism in the medial prefrontal cortex and gray matter volume loss in bilateral anterior insulae and subgenual anterior cingulate cortices. These brain regions are generally known to participate in pain modulation by affective and cognitive processes. Decreases of mean diffusivity (MD) in the right internal capsule including, cerebral peduncle, pre-and post-central white matter, and prefrontal white matter as components of the corticospinal and thalamocortical tracts were demonstrated in patients. Further, lower MD value of prefrontal white matter was correlated with decreased metabolism of medial prefrontal cortex in patients. These results indicated that white matter changes imply abnormal pain modulation in patients as well as motor impairment. Our study showed the functional and structural multimodal imaging modality commonly identified the possible abnormalities in the brain regions participating pain modulation in neuropathic pain. Multifaceted imaging studies in neuropathic pain could be useful elucidating precise mechanisms of persistent pain, and providing future directions for treatment. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemokines in neuron-glial cell interaction and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from damage or dysfunction of the nervous system is a highly debilitating chronic pain state and is often resistant to currently available treatments. It has become clear that neuroinflammation, mainly mediated by proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, plays an important role in the establishment and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines were originally identified as regulators of peripheral immune cell trafficking and were also expressed in neurons and glial cells in the central nervous system. In recent years, accumulating studies have revealed the expression, distribution and function of chemokines in the spinal cord under chronic pain conditions. In this review, we provide evidence showing that several chemokines are upregulated after peripheral nerve injury and contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain via different forms of neuron-glia interaction in the spinal cord. First, chemokine CX3CL1 is expressed in primary afferents and spinal neurons and induces microglial activation via its microglial receptor CX3CR1 (neuron-to-microglia signaling). Second, CCL2 and CXCL1 are expressed in spinal astrocytes and act on CCR2 and CXCR2 in spinal neurons to increase excitatory synaptic transmission (astrocyte-to-neuron signaling). Third, we recently identified that CXCL13 is highly upregulated in spinal neurons after spinal nerve ligation and induces spinal astrocyte activation via receptor CXCR5 (neuron-to-astrocyte signaling). Strategies that target chemokine-mediated neuron-glia interactions may lead to novel therapies for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  6. How to diagnose neuropathic pain? The contribution from clinical examination, pain questionnaires and diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cesa, S; Tamburin, S; Tugnoli, V; Sandrini, G; Paolucci, S; Lacerenza, M; Marchettini, P; Cruccu, G; Truini, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with peripheral and central nervous system diseases may suffer from different types of pain, namely nociceptive, neuropathic and mixed pain. Although in some cases, the distinction between these types of pain is clinically evident, yet in some patients an accurate differential diagnosis requires dedicated clinical examination, screening questionnaires and diagnostic techniques some of which are available only in specialized pain centres. This review briefly addresses the currently agreed definitions of the different types of pain and shows how clinical examination, pain questionnaires and diagnostic tests can help the clinicians in identifying neuropathic pain.

  7. Synaptic Homeostasis and Allostasis in the Dentate Gyrus Caused by Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Rui Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been generally accepted that pain can cause imbalance between excitation and inhibition (homeostasis at the synaptic level. However, it remains poorly understood how this imbalance (allostasis develops in the CNS under different pain conditions. Here, we analyzed the changes in both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission and modulation of the dentate gyrus (DG under two pain conditions with different etiology and duration. First, it was revealed that the functions of the input-output (I/O curves for evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs following the perforant path (PP stimulation were gained under both acute inflammatory and chronic neuropathic pain conditions relative to the controls. However, the functions of I/O curves for the PP-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs differed between the two conditions, namely it was greatly gained under inflammatory condition, but was reduced under neuropathic condition in reverse. Second, both the frequency and amplitude of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs were increased under inflammatory condition, however a decrease in frequency of mIPSCs was observed under neuropathic condition. Finally, the spike discharge of the DG granule cells in response to current injection was significantly increased by neuropathic pain condition, however, no different change was found between inflammatory pain condition and the control. These results provide another line of evidence showing homeostatic and allostatic modulation of excitatory synaptic transmission by inhibitory controls under different pathological pain conditions, hence implicating use of different therapeutic approaches to maintain the homeostasis between excitation and inhibition while treating different conditions of pathological pain.

  8. Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: Mechanism, Assessment and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Mete Civelek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a devastating disease which may cause physical, psychological and social dysfunction. Neuropathic pain (NP after SCI is common, can be seen in varying degrees and is one of the most difficultly treated problems developing after SCI. With the addition of the NP to loss of function after SCI, sleep patterns, moods and daily activities of patients are adversely affected. In order to treat pain effectively, classification of pain after SCI must be done carefully and correctly. According to classification of International Pain Study Group, pain after SCI is divided into two main groups as nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is defined as %u201Cpain occuring as a direct result of a disease or lesion directly affecting somato-sensorial system%u201D. NP after SCI can be classified according to anatomical region (above the level of lesion, at the level of lesion, below the level of lesion. Treatment of NP after SCI is often challenging and receiving response to treatment may take long time. Therefore, treatment of NP after SCI should be multifactorial. Treatment options include pharmochologic treatment, application of transcutanous electrical nerve stimulation, psychiatric treatment approaches, and surgical approaches in selected cases. In pharmachologic treatment, first line agents are tricyclic antidepresants, pregabalin and gabapentin. In this review, mechanisms and assessment and treatment of NP after SCI is discussed with the guide of current literature.

  9. Low back pain: guidelines for the clinical classification of predominant neuropathic, nociceptive, or central sensitization pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Jo; Apeldoorn, Adri; Hallegraeff, Hank; Clark, Jacqui; Smeets, Rob; Malfliet, Annaleen; Girbes, Enrique L; De Kooning, Margot; Ickmans, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a heterogeneous disorder including patients with dominant nociceptive (e.g., myofascial low back pain), neuropathic (e.g., lumbar radiculopathy), and central sensitization pain. In order to select an effective and preferably also efficient treatment in daily clinical practice, LBP patients should be classified clinically as either predominantly nociceptive, neuropathic, or central sensitization pain. To explain how clinicians can differentiate between nociceptive, neuropathic, and central sensitization pain in patients with LBP. Narrative review and expert opinion Universities, university hospitals and private practices Recently, a clinical method for the classification of central sensitization pain versus neuropathic and nociceptive pain was developed. It is based on a body of evidence of original research papers and expert opinion of 18 pain experts from 7 different countries. Here we apply this classification algorithm to the LBP population. The first step implies examining the presence of neuropathic low back pain. Next, the differential diagnosis between predominant nociceptive and central sensitization pain is done using a clinical algorithm. The classification criteria are substantiated by several original research findings including a Delphi survey, a study of a large group of LBP patients, and validation studies of the Central Sensitization Inventory. Nevertheless, these criteria require validation in clinical settings. The pain classification system for LBP should be an addition to available classification systems and diagnostic procedures for LBP, as it is focussed on pain mechanisms solely.

  10. Walking with Neuropathic Pain: Paradoxical Shift from Burden to Support?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Kopsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Baclofen 5% cream can be used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. We describe an unusual case of a neuropathic pain patient with spinal cord injury. A 71-year-old woman with a partial spinal cord injury lesion at L4 complained of tingling, pins and needles, and burning in her legs. She scored her pain as 6 before adding baclofen 5% cream to her pain medication (pregabalin 450 mg, acetaminophen 3000 mg, and diclofenac 150 mg daily. One month later she experienced complete pain relief, though experienced increased difficulties in walking, leading to frequent falls. Her steadier walking without stumbling and falling was more important to her than pain reduction. Thus she decided to stop using baclofen. This unusual case report discusses two important issues that relate to pain medicine and rehabilitation in patients with painful spinal cord lesions: (1 the presence of wide areas of sensory loss “covered” by the presence of painful sensations and (2 pathological sensations that can be used and integrated in the body schema to create an improved spatiovisual orientation and thus mobility. Both these aspects have to be taken into account when treating pain and design rehabilitation programs.

  11. Pain relief with lidocaine 5% patch in localized peripheral neuropathic pain in relation to pain phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Dyveke T; Lund, Karen; Finnerup, Nanna B

    2015-01-01

    In neuropathic pain with irritable nociceptor phenotype, up-regulation of sodium channels on nociceptors is supposed to be an important pain mechanism that may be targeted by topical sodium channel blockade. This randomised, double-blind, phenotype-panel, cross-over study with 4-week treatment...... periods of lidocaine 5% patch and placebo was performed to search for phenotype differences in effect. The primary efficacy measure was the total pain intensity on an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS), and the primary objective was to compare the effect of lidocaine in patients with and without...... irritable nociceptor phenotype as defined by hypersensitivity and preserved small fibre function determined by quantitative sensory testing. Forty-six patients with neuropathic pain due to nerve injury or postherpetic neuralgia were randomised. The modified intention-to-treat population comprised 15...

  12. Metabolite Concentrations in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex Predict High Neuropathic Pain Impact After Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    1Present address: Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, College of Dentistry , University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. None...most common reasons for reduced quality of life after spinal cord injury (SCI) [8,59]. The most rational approach for managing these refractory pain... diabetes [45] and after SCI [34]. Basic research suggests that glial activation is an important mechanism underlying neuropathic pain after SCI [22,23

  13. An improved behavioural assay demonstrates that ultrasound vocalizations constitute a reliable indicator of chronic cancer pain and neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Deepitha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On-going pain is one of the most debilitating symptoms associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders. An understanding of mechanisms underlying on-going pain, i.e. stimulus-independent pain has been hampered so far by a lack of behavioural parameters which enable studying it in experimental animals. Ultrasound vocalizations (USVs have been proposed to correlate with pain evoked by an acute activation of nociceptors. However, literature on the utility of USVs as an indicator of chronic pain is very controversial. A majority of these inconsistencies arise from parameters confounding behavioural experiments, which include novelty, fear and stress due to restrain, amongst others. Results We have developed an improved assay which overcomes these confounding factors and enables studying USVs in freely moving mice repetitively over several weeks. Using this improved assay, we report here that USVs increase significantly in mice with bone metastases-induced cancer pain or neuropathic pain for several weeks, in comparison to sham-treated mice. Importantly, analgesic drugs which are known to alleviate tumour pain or neuropathic pain in human patients significantly reduce USVs as well as mechanical allodynia in corresponding mouse models. Conclusions We show that studying USVs and mechanical allodynia in the same cohort of mice enables comparing the temporal progression of on-going pain (i.e. stimulus-independent pain and stimulus-evoked pain in these clinically highly-relevant forms of chronic pain.

  14. Neuropathic Pain Medication Use Does Not Alter Outcomes of Spinal Cord Stimulation for Lower Extremity Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Dermot P; Martins, Yuri Chaves; Doshi, Tina; Bicket, Mark; Zhang, Kui; Hanna, George; Ahmed, Shihab

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for the treatment of lower extremity pain is believed to the result of increased activity in the descending inhibitory and decreased activity in the ascending excitatory tracts. Evidence suggests that the analgesia afforded by SCS may be altered using certain neuropathic pain medications that also modulate neurotransmitters in these sensory tracts. We hypothesize that neuropathic pain medications may alter the response to SCS therapy. One hundred and fifteen subjects undergoing SCS therapy for lower extremity pain were retrospectively examined. The pharmacologic profile, including stable use of neuropathic and opioid medications, were recorded. Three separate logistic regression models examined the odds ratio of primary outcomes; a successful SCS trial, a 50% decrease in pain or a 50% reduction in opioid use one year after implant. Neither the use of opioids or neuropathic pain medications were associated with changes in the odds of a successful SCS trial or a 50% pain reduction. A higher dose of chronic opioids use prior to a trial was associated with greater odds of having a 50% reduction in opioid use following implant. OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.02, p-value neuropathic pain medications did not change the odds of either a successful SCS trial, or of experiencing a 50% reduction in pain at one year. The association between higher opioid doses and greater odds of a 50% reduction in opioid use may be the reflective of SCS's ability to reduce opioid reliance in chronic pain patients. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  15. Treatment of Chronic Refractory Neuropathic Pelvic Pain with High-Frequency 10-kilohertz Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Thomas; Yong, Robert J; Gill, Jatinder S

    2017-11-06

    Chronic neuropathic pelvic pain remains a recalcitrant problem in the field of pain management. Case series on application of 10 kHz spinal cord stimulation is presented. High frequency stimulation can improve chronic neuropathic pain states that are known to be mediated at the conus medullaris and offers another avenue for the treatment of these patients. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  16. Effect of Xylopic Acid on Paclitaxel-induced Neuropathic pain in rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xylopic acid, a diterpenoid isolated from the fruits of Xylopia aethiopica has demonstrated analge-sic properties in acute pain models. It was therefore evaluated for its analgesic properties in paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain, a type of pain difficult to treat clinically. Neuropathic pain was induced in rats by injecting 2 mg ...

  17. Cognitive behavioural treatment programme for chronic neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heutink, M.

    2014-01-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) often face serious secondary health conditions, including different types of pain. Neuropathic pain is often rated by them as the most severe type of pain. Pharmacological interventions are often insufficiently effective in providing neuropathic pain relief and,

  18. Prevalence of acute neuropathic pain after cancer surgery: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P N Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Acute neuropathic pain (ANP is an under-recognised and under-diagnosed condition and often difficult to treat. If left untreated, it may further transform into persistent post-operative chronic pain leading to a disability. Aims: This prospective study was undertaken on 300 patients to identify the prevalence of ANP in the post-operative period by using a neuropathic pain detection questionnaire tool. Methods: This is an open-label study in which patients with six different types of cancer surgeries (Thoracic, gastro-intestinal, gynae/urology, bone/soft-tissue, head and neck and breast subgroups-50 each were included for painDETECT questionnaire tool on the 2 nd and 7 th day surgery. Results: This study found a 10% point prevalence of ANP. Analysis showed that 25 patients had ′possible′ ANP, the maximum from urological cancer surgery (6 followed by thoracic surgery (5. Five patients were found to have ′positive′ ANP including 2 groin node dissection, 2 hemipelvectomy and 1 oesophagectomy. Conclusion: Significant relationship between severity of post-operative pain was found with the occurrence of ANP in the post-operative period requiring a special attention to neuropathic pain assessment. Larger studies are required with longer follow-up to identify accurately the true prevalence and causative factors of ANP after surgery.

  19. Diagnosis and medical treatment of neuropathic pain in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arco, Rogerio Del; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Bassi, Thiago Gasperini; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco

    2016-08-08

    to identify the difficulties in diagnosing and treating neuropathic pain caused by leprosy and to understand the main characteristics of this situation. 85 patients were treated in outpatient units with reference to leprosy and the accompanying pain. We used a questionnaire known as the Douleur Neuropathic 4 test and we conducted detailed neurological exams. As a result, 42 patients were excluded from the study for not having proved their pain. Out of the 37 patients that experienced pain, 22 (59.5%) had neuropathic pain (or a mixture of this pain and their existing pain) and of these 90.8% considered this pain to be moderate or severe. 81.8% of the sample suffered with this pain for more than 6 months. Only 12 (54.5%) of the patients had been diagnosed with neuropathic pain and in almost half of these cases, this pain had not been diagnosed. With reference to medical treatment (n=12) for neuropathic pain, 5 (41.6%) responded that they became better. For the other 7 (58.4%) there were no changes in relation to the pain or in some cases the pain worsened in comparison to their previous state. Statistical analysis comparing improvements in relation to the pain amongst the patients that were treated (n=12) and those that were not, showed significant differences (value p=0.020). we noted difficulties in diagnosing neuropathic pain for leprosy in that almost half of the patients that were studied had not had their pain diagnosed. We attributed this to some factors such as the non-adoption of the appropriate protocols which led to inadequate diagnosis and treatment that overlooked the true picture. identificar as dificuldades em diagnosticar e tratar a dor neuropática causada pela hanseníase, bem como determinar as características principais dessa situação. examinaram-se 85 pacientes tratados no ambulatório de referência para hanseníase e referiam dor. Aplicou-se questionário, o teste Douleur Neuropathic 4, e criterioso exame neurológico pelo qual exclu

  20. Pain severity and the economic burden of neuropathic pain in the United States: BEAT Neuropathic Pain Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Schaefer,1 Alesia Sadosky,2 Rachael Mann,3 Shoshana Daniel,4 Bruce Parsons,2 Michael Tuchman,5 Alan Anschel,6 Brett R Stacey,7 Srinivas Nalamachu,8 Edward Nieshoff9 1Covance Market Access Services Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, 2Pfizer, Inc., New York, NY, 3Covance Market Access Services Inc., San Diego, CA, 4Covance Market Access Services Inc., Conshohocken, PA, 5Palm Beach Neurological Center, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, 6Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 7Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, 8International Clinical Research Institute, Overland Park, KS, 9Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan/Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USABackground: As with many chronic conditions, patients with neuropathic pain (NeP are high consumers of health care resources. However, limited literature exists on the economic burden of NeP, including its impact on productivity. The aim of this study was to characterize health care resource utilization, productivity, and costs associated with NeP by pain severity level in US adults.Methods: Subjects (n=624 with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, human immunodeficiency virus-related peripheral NeP, post-trauma/post-surgical NeP, spinal cord injury with NeP, chronic low back pain with NeP, and small fiber neuropathy were recruited during routine office visits to US community-based general practitioners and specialists. Clinicians captured clinical characteristics, NeP-related medications, and health care resource utilization based on 6-month retrospective medical chart review. Subjects completed questionnaires on demographics, pain/symptoms, costs, and productivity. Brief Pain Inventory pain severity scores were used to classify subjects by mild, moderate, or severe pain. Annualized NeP-related costs (adjusted for covariates were estimated, and differences across pain severity groups were evaluated.Results: In total, 624 subjects were recruited (mean age 55.5±13.7 years; 55.4% male

  1. Neuropathic Pain Experiences of Spinal Cord Injury Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chin-Ching; Lin, Hung-Ru; Tsai, Ming-Dar; Tsay, Shiow-Luan

    2017-11-09

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is a common, severe problem that affects spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Only SCI patients truly understand the impact and extent of this type of pain. The aim of this study was to understand the NP experienced by SCI patients and the influence of this type of pain on their daily life. A qualitative design was used. An interview guide including a semistructured questionnaire and in-depth interviews was conducted with SCI patients with NP in a neurorehabilitation department at a medical center in northern Taiwan. The data were collected using a purposive sampling method. Content analysis was performed on the interview data, which were obtained from 13 SCI patients with NP. Three themes and eight subthemes were identified that described the NP experience of the participants and the influence of NP on their daily life. The three themes included elusive pain (changing and individual pain sensations, erratically haunting threat, and phantom limb sensations), complicated feelings about pain (converting depression into an active attitude toward life, having feelings of anticipation and anxiety about future pain relief, and facing and experiencing pain), and renewed hope (bravely fighting pain and seeking pain relief methods). This study revealed three important themes of NP experienced by SCI patients, including elusive pain, complicated feelings about pain, and renewed hope. Nurses should understand the nature of NP, provide a thorough pain assessment, and design a proper pain management plan to care effectively for patients with NP.

  2. Interventional management of neuropathic pain: NeuPSIG recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Robert H.; O’Connor, Alec B.; Kent, Joel; Mackey, Sean C.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Stacey, Brett R.; Levy, Robert M.; Backonja, Miroslav; Baron, Ralf; Harke, Henning; Loeser, John D.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Turk, Dennis C.; Wells, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is often refractory to pharmacologic and non-interventional treatment. On behalf of the International Association for the Study of Pain Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group (NeuPSIG), the authors evaluated systematic reviews, clinical trials, and existing guidelines for the interventional management of NP. Evidence is summarized and presented for neural blockade, spinal cord stimulation (SCS), intrathecal medication, and neurosurgical interventions in patients with the following peripheral and central NP conditions: herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN); painful diabetic and other peripheral neuropathies; spinal cord injury NP; central post-stroke pain; radiculopathy and failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS); complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS); and trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy. Due to the paucity of high-quality clinical trials, no strong recommendations can be made. Four weak recommendations based on the amount and consistency of evidence, including degree of efficacy and safety, are: (1) epidural injections for herpes zoster; (2) steroid injections for radiculopathy; (3) SCS for FBSS; and (4) SCS for CRPS type 1. Based on the available data, we recommend not to use sympathetic blocks for PHN nor RF lesions for radiculopathy. No other conclusive recommendations can be made due to the poor quality of available of data. Whenever possible, these interventions should either be part of randomized clinical trials or documented in pain registries. Priorities for future research include randomized clinical trials; long-term studies; and head-to-head comparisons among different interventional and non-interventional treatments. PMID:23748119

  3. Irrational drug use in neuropathic pain treatment: a twoyear data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Irrational drug use in neuropathic pain treatment: a twoyear data analysis. E Tan, A Akıncı, G Ayvaz, T Erbaş, M Ertaş, O Güç, S Hepgüler, S Kiraz, SZ Oşar, S Öztürk, NS Özyalçın, S Palaoğlu, M Uyar, S Ünal, S Yalçın ...

  4. Spinal SIRT1 activation attenuates neuropathic pain in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Shao

    Full Text Available Abnormal histone acetylation occurs during neuropathic pain through an epigenetic mechanism. Silent information regulator 1 (sir2 or SIRT1, a NAD-dependent deacetylase, plays complex systemic roles in a variety of processes through deacetylating acetylated histone and other specific substrates. But the role of SIRT1 in neuropathic pain is not well established yet. The present study was intended to detect SIRT1 content and activity, nicotinamide (NAM and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD in the spinal cord using immunoblotting or mass spectroscopy over time in mice following chronic constriction injury (CCI or sham surgery. In addition, the effect of intrathecal injection of NAD or resveratrol on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia was evaluated in CCI mice. Finally, we investigated whether SIRT1 inhibitor EX-527 could reverse the anti-nociceptive effect of NAD or resveratrol. It was found that spinal SIRT1 expression, deacetylase activity and NAD/NAM decreased significantly 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after CCI surgery as compared with sham group. In addition, daily intrathecal injection of 5 µl 800 mM NAD 1 h before and 1 day after CCI surgery or single intrathecal injection of 5 µl 90 mM resveratrol 1 h before CCI surgery produced a transient inhibitory effect on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in CCI mice. Finally, an intrathecal injection of 5 µl 1.2 mM EX-527 1 h before NAD or resveratrol administration reversed the anti-nociceptive effect of NAD or resveratrol. These data indicate that the reduction in SIRT1 deacetylase activity may be a factor contributing to the development of neuropathic pain in CCI mice. Our findings suggest that the enhancement of spinal NAD/NAM and/or SIRT1 activity may be a potentially promising strategy for the prevention or treatment of neuropathic pain.

  5. Glial role in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Alessandra; Micheli, Laura; Tani, Alessia; Zanardelli, Matteo; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-11-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent, has become a standard treatment for advanced colorectal cancer. The dose-limiting toxicity of this compound is the development of peripheral neuropathy. A tangled panel of symptoms, sensory loss, paresthesia, dysesthesia and pain, may be disabling for patients and adversely affect their quality of life. Recently, we described a characteristic glial activation profile in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Glial cells are considered a new pharmacological target for neuropathic pain relief but its relevance in chemotherapy-dependent neuropathies is debated. Aimed to evaluate the significance of glial activation in pain generated by oxaliplatin, the microglial inhibitor minocycline or the astrocyte inhibitor fluorocitrate were continuously infused by intrathecal route in oxaliplatin-treated rats. Both compounds significantly reduced oxaliplatin-evoked pain though the efficacy of fluorocitrate was higher revealing a prominent role of astrocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis of the dorsal horn confirmed the specific Iba1-positive cell inhibition caused by minocycline as well as the selectivity of fluorocitrate on GFAP-positive cells. The activation of astrocytes in minocycline-treated rats suggests a microglia-independent modulation of astrocytes by oxaliplatin neurotoxicity. Neither the selective activation of astrocyte after minocycline treatment nor the exclusive microglial response after fluorocitrate is able to evoke pain. Morphometric and morphological determinations performed on dorsal root ganglia evidenced that the glial inhibitors did not prevent the oxaliplatin-dependent increase of eccentric nucleoli and multinucleolated neurons. The decrease of soma area was also unaltered. In summary, these data highlight the role of central glial cells in oxaliplatin-dependent neuropathic pain. On the other hand, glial inhibition is not associated with neuroprotective effects suggesting the need for careful

  6. Fibromyalgia as a neuropathic pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Martinez-Lavin

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses scientific evidence supporting the notion that all fibromyalgia (FM features can be explained on the basis of autonomic (sympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Also suggests that FM main features (widespread pain and tenderness at palpation on specific anatomic points are manifestations of painful neuropathy. On these bases, a holistic approach for FM treatment is proposed.

  7. Differential transcriptional profiling of damaged and intact adjacent dorsal root ganglia neurons in neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Reinhold

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion in the somatosensory system, is a severely impairing mostly chronic disease. While its underlying molecular mechanisms are not thoroughly understood, neuroimmune interactions as well as changes in the pain pathway such as sensitization of nociceptors have been implicated. It has been shown that not only are different cell types involved in generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain, like neurons, immune and glial cells, but, also, intact adjacent neurons are relevant to the process. Here, we describe an experimental approach to discriminate damaged from intact adjacent neurons in the same dorsal root ganglion (DRG using differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Two fluorescent tracers, Fluoroemerald (FE and 1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI, were used, whose properties allow us to distinguish between damaged and intact neurons. Subsequent sorting permitted transcriptional analysis of both groups. Results and qPCR validation show a strong regulation in damaged neurons versus contralateral controls as well as a moderate regulation in adjacent neurons. Data for damaged neurons reveal an mRNA expression pattern consistent with established upregulated genes like galanin, which supports our approach. Moreover, novel genes were found strongly regulated such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, providing novel targets for further research. Differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and sorting allows for a clear distinction between primarily damaged neuropathic neurons and "bystanders," thereby facilitating a more detailed understanding of their respective roles in neuropathic processes in the DRG.

  8. Macrophage-to-sensory neuron crosstalk mediated by Angiotensin II type-2 receptor elicits neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Eric; Shepherd, Andrew; Mickle, Aaron; Copits, Bryan; Karlsson, Pall; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Golden, Judith; Tadinada, Satya; Mack, Madison; Haroutounian, Simon; De Kloet, Annette; Samineni, Vijay; Valtcheva, Manouela; Mcilvried, Lisa; Sheahan, Tayler

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve damage initiates a complex series of cellular and structural processes that culminate in chronic neuropathic pain. Our study defines local angiotensin signaling via activation of the Angiotensin II (Ang II) type-2 receptor (AT2R) on macrophages as the critical trigger of neuropathic pain. An AT2R-selective antagonist attenuates neuropathic, but not inflammatory pain hypersensitivity in mice, and requires the cell damage-sensing ion channel transient receptor potential family-...

  9. Neuropathic pain due to fibromatosis: Does anticancer treatment help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mathew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid fibromatosis, although histologically benign, infiltrates local structures. The involvement of neural structures can lead to difficult neuropathic pain and the escalating use of analgesics. We report a patient with desmoid fibromatosis of the chest wall causing brachial plexus infiltration. As the tumor was locally invasive and unresectable, he was treated with radiation therapy and oral tamoxifen. On follow-up, there was significant pain relief, sustained reduction in the tumor size, and reduced analgesic requirement. Antineoplastic treatments like local radiation therapy and targeted systemic therapy with hormones or other agents can be considered in the management of selected unresectable desmoid fibromatosis to improve symptom control and reduce polypharmacy.

  10. Neuropathic pain in temporomandibular joint disorders: case-control analysis by MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedullà, E; Meli, G A; Garufi, A; Mandalà, M L; Blandino, A; Cascone, P

    2009-08-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ-D) may be associated with the onset of neuropathic pain. The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess if, at the open-mouth position, the distance between the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk and the mandibular nerve is shorter in patients with TMJ-D and neuropathic pain vs patients with TMJ-D without neuropathic pain or in healthy people. After ethical committee approval, we evaluated by MR imaging 16 TMJs with TMJ-D and neuropathic pain, 16 TMJs with TMJ-D without neuropathic pain, and 16 TMJs of healthy volunteers. All of the subjects were informed about the study procedure. We evaluated the distance between the TMJ disk and the mandibular nerve at the oval foramen level. Furthermore, the presence within the TMJs of internal derangement, osteoarthrosis, joint effusion, and bone marrow edema was evaluated. At the maximal open-mouth position, the distance between the TMJ disk and the mandibular nerve is shorter in patients with TMJ-D and neuropathic pain than in patients with TMJ-D without neuropathic pain or in healthy volunteers (P proximity between the TMJ disk and the mandibular nerve could be one of the causes of the onset of neuropathic pain in patients with TMJ-D and neuropathic pain.

  11. Pannexin 1: a novel participant in neuropathic pain signaling in the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, David; Ibarra, Paula; Retamal, Jeffri; Pelissier, Teresa; Laurido, Claudio; Hernandez, Alejandro; Constandil, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Pannexin 1 (panx1) is a large-pore membrane channel expressed in many tissues of mammals, including neurons and glial cells. Panx1 channels are highly permeable to calcium and adenosine triphosphatase (ATP); on the other hand, they can be opened by ATP and glutamate, two crucial molecules for acute and chronic pain signaling in the spinal cord dorsal horn, thus suggesting that panx1 could be a key component for the generation of central sensitization during persistent pain. In this study, we examined the effect of three panx1 blockers, namely, 10panx peptide, carbenoxolone, and probenecid, on C-reflex wind-up activity and mechanical nociceptive behavior in a spared nerve injury neuropathic rat model involving sural nerve transection. In addition, the expression of panx1 protein in the dorsal horn of the ipsilateral lumbar spinal cord was measured in sural nerve-transected and sham-operated control rats. Sural nerve transection resulted in a lower threshold for C-reflex activation by electric stimulation of the injured hindpaw, together with persistent mechanical hypersensitivity to pressure stimuli applied to the paw. Intrathecal administration of the panx1 blockers significantly depressed the spinal C-reflex wind-up activity in both neuropathic and sham control rats, and decreased mechanical hyperalgesia in neuropathic rats without affecting the nociceptive threshold in sham animals. Western blotting showed that panx1 was similarly expressed in the dorsal horn of lumbar spinal cord from neuropathic and sham rats. The present results constitute the first evidence that panx1 channels play a significant role in the mechanisms underlying central sensitization in neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Peripheral and central sensitization in remote spinal cord regions contribute to central neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Carlton, Susan M.; Du, Junhui; Tan, Huai Yu; Nesic, Olivera; Hargett, Gregory L.; Bopp, Anne C.; Yamani, Ammar; Lin, Qing; Willis, William D.; Hulsebosch, Claire E.

    2009-01-01

    Central neuropathic pain (CNP) developing after spinal cord injury (SCI) is described by the region affected: above-level, at-level and below-level pain occurs in dermatomes rostral, at/near, or below the SCI level, respectively. People with SCI and rodent models of SCI develop above-level pain characterized by mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Mechanisms underlying this pain are unknown and the goals of this study were to elucidate components contributing to the generation of ab...

  13. [Preoperative, neuropathic component in patients with back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y-J; Koch, E M W; Breidebach, J B; Bornemann, R; Wirtz, D C; Pflugmacher, R

    2017-04-01

    The objectification of pain is essential for evaluation, treatment plan and follow-up; therefore, it is necessary to find reliable clinical parameters. The goal of the study was the preoperative screening of a neuropathic component in patients with vertebral compression fracture (WKF), herniated disc (NPP) or spinal cord compression (SKS). Depending on the preoperative condition on admittance, patients were classified into three groups: group 1 WKF, group 2 NPP and group 3 SKS. To characterize the pain we used the painDETECT questionnaire, the Oswestry questionnaire and further questionnaires. All patients were surgically treated according to the diagnosis, e.g. radiofrequency kyphoplasty, nucleotomy or spondylodesis. We evaluated the data from 139 patients (45% WKF, 34% NPP and 21% SKS). There were no differences in preoperative pain intensity (median ordinal scale 0-10) with a mean preoperative score of 7 for all groups. The total score of the painDETECT questionnaire showed significantly higher results in group 2 (median 18) and in group 3 (median 14) than in group 1 (median 9). There was even a significant difference between groups 2 and 3 (p = 0.03). The highest pain intensity was detected in group 1 with a median visual analog scale (VAS) of 71 mm. The total scores in the painDETECT questionnaire and the scores in the Oswestry questionnaire correlated in groups 2 and 3. The painDETECT questionnaire was shown to be a very suitable instrument for evaluating the neuropathic pain component in patients with dorsalgia. This could be very useful in planning further therapy.

  14. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E–binding protein 4 (4E-BP1 and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1 in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  15. Neuropathic pain, depressive symptoms, and C-reactive protein in sciatica patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Tomas; Bob, Petr

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence that neuropathic pain component in low back pain (LBP) patients is associated with higher ratings of comorbidities such as depression and anxiety disorders. In line with current findings, the purpose of this clinical study is to examine a hypothesis regarding a relationship of neuropathic pain component, depression, and other psychopathological symptoms in a specific group of LBP patients with sciatica pain. With respect to findings that depression is related to inflammatory changes, and inflammatory mediators may play a role in neuropathic pain generation, we have assessed also serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Results of the present study show that increased neuropathic pain component in sciatica patients is associated with elevated levels of depression, anxiety, alexithymia, and serum CRP levels. In conclusion, results of this study indicate that CRP levels in sciatica patients are closely associated with neuropathic pain.

  16. A preconditioning nerve lesion inhibits mechanical pain hypersensitivity following subsequent neuropathic injury

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    Wu Ann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A preconditioning stimulus can trigger a neuroprotective phenotype in the nervous system - a preconditioning nerve lesion causes a significant increase in axonal regeneration, and cerebral preconditioning protects against subsequent ischemia. We hypothesized that a preconditioning nerve lesion induces gene/protein modifications, neuronal changes, and immune activation that may affect pain sensation following subsequent nerve injury. We examined whether a preconditioning lesion affects neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation after peripheral nerve injury. Results We found that a preconditioning crush injury to a terminal branch of the sciatic nerve seven days before partial ligation of the sciatic nerve (PSNL; a model of neuropathic pain induced a significant attenuation of pain hypersensitivity, particularly mechanical allodynia. A preconditioning lesion of the tibial nerve induced a long-term significant increase in paw-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli and paw-withdrawal latency to thermal stimuli, after PSNL. A preconditioning lesion of the common peroneal induced a smaller but significant short-term increase in paw-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli, after PSNL. There was no difference between preconditioned and unconditioned animals in neuronal damage and macrophage and T-cell infiltration into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs or in astrocyte and microglia activation in the spinal dorsal and ventral horns. Conclusions These results suggest that prior exposure to a mild nerve lesion protects against adverse effects of subsequent neuropathic injury, and that this conditioning-induced inhibition of pain hypersensitivity is not dependent on neuroinflammation in DRGs and spinal cord. Identifying the underlying mechanisms may have important implications for the understanding of neuropathic pain due to nerve injury.

  17. The pharmacogenomics of escitalopram in the treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte Brasch; Møller, Malik U; Sindrup, Søren Hein

    of neuropathic pain is still unsatisfactory. The effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), escitalopram, on pain in polyneuropathy was tested in an earlier randomized, placebo-controlled, double- blinded cross-over trial including  41 patients who were treated with 20 mg escitalopram...... and placebo. The clinical study showed a moderate, good or complete pain relief for escitalopram in 11 patients ("responders") but at only a slight or no relief  in 30 patients ("non-responders"). The difference in response to escitalopram may be caused by genetic differences between the responders...... and effect of escitalopram when dichotomizing the patients into responders and non-responders. Using quantitative assessment of pain might add more information to the association studies....

  18. Alpha-1 Adrenoceptor Hyperresponsiveness in Three Neuropathic Pain States: Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1, Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain and Central Pain States Following Spinal Cord Injury

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    Robert W Teasell

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of the pain associated with complex regional pain syndrome, spinal cord injury and diabetic peripheral neuropathy is not known. The pain of complex regional pain syndrome has often been attributed to abnormal sympathetic nervous system activity based on the presence of vasomotor instability and a frequently reported positive response, albeit a temporary response, to sympathetic blockade. In contrast, the pain below the level of spinal cord injury and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are generally seen as deafferentation phenomena. Each of these pain states has been associated with abnormal sympathetic nervous system function and increased peripheral alpha-1 adrenoceptor activity. This increased responsiveness may be a consequence of alpha-1 adrenoceptor postsynaptic hypersensitivity, or alpha-2 adrenoceptor presynaptic dysfunction with diminished noradrenaline reuptake, increased concentrations of noradrenaline in the synaptic cleft and increased stimulation of otherwise normal alpha-1 adrenoceptors. Plausible mechanisms based on animal research by which alpha-1 adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness can lead to chronic neuropathic-like pain have been reported. This raises the intriguing possibility that sympathetic nervous system dysfunction may be an important factor in the generation of pain in many neuropathic pain states. Although results to date have been mixed, there may be a greater role for new drugs which target peripheral alpha-2 adrenoceptors (agonists or alpha-1 adrenoceptors (antagonists.

  19. Localized neuropathic pain: an expert consensus on local treatments

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    Pickering G

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gisèle Pickering,1–3 Elodie Martin,1,3 Florence Tiberghien,4 Claire Delorme,5 Gérard Mick6,7 1Centre de Pharmacologie Clinique, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, 2Inserm, CIC 1405, Neurodol 1107, 3Laboratoire de Pharmacologie, Faculté de Médecine, Clermont Université, Clermont-Ferrand, 4Centre d’Evaluation et de Traitement de la Douleur, CHU Jean Minjoz, Besançon, 5Centre d’Evaluation et Traitement de la Douleur, Bayeux, 6Unité d’Evaluation et Traitement de la Douleur, Voiron, 7Laboratoire AGEIS, Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, France Background: Pain localization is one of the hallmarks for the choice of first-line treatment in neuropathic pain. This literature review has been conducted to provide an overview of the current knowledge regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of localized neuropathic pain (LNP, its assessment and the existing topical pharmacological treatments. Materials and methods: Literature review was performed using Medline from 2010 to December 2016, and all studies involving LNP and treatments were examined. A multidisciplinary expert panel of five pain specialists in this article reports a consensus on topical approaches that may be recommended to alleviate LNP and on their advantages in clinical practice. Results: Successive international recommendations have included topical 5% lidocaine and 8% capsaicin for LNP treatment. The expert panel considers that these compounds can be a first-line treatment for LNP, especially in elderly patients and patients with comorbidities and polypharmacy. Regulatory LNP indications should cover the whole range of LNP and not be restricted to specific etiologies or sites. Precautions for the use of plasters must be followed cautiously. Conclusion: Although there is a real need for more randomized controlled trials for both drugs, publications clearly demonstrate excellent risk/benefit ratios, safety, tolerance and continued efficacy throughout long-term treatment. A major

  20. Botulinum Toxin for Neuropathic Pain: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Mi Oh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used therapeutically for focal dystonia, spasticity, and chronic migraine. Its spectrum as a potential treatment for neuropathic pain has grown. Recent opinions on the mechanism behind the antinociceptive effects of BoNT suggest that it inhibits the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. There is some evidence showing the axonal transport of BoNT, but it remains controversial. The aim of this review is to summarize the experimental and clinical evidence of the antinociceptive effects, mechanisms, and therapeutic applications of BoNT for neuropathic pain conditions, including postherpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndrome, and trigeminal neuralgia. The PubMed and OvidSP databases were searched from 1966 to May 2015. We assessed levels of evidence according to the American Academy of Neurology guidelines. Recent studies have suggested that BoNT injection is an effective treatment for postherpetic neuralgia and is likely efficient for trigeminal neuralgia and post-traumatic neuralgia. BoNT could also be effective as a treatment for diabetic neuropathy. It has not been proven to be an effective treatment for occipital neuralgia or complex regional pain syndrome.

  1. Chronic Orofacial Pain: Burning Mouth Syndrome and Other Neuropathic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Raymond C; Ferguson, McKenzie; Herndon, Christopher M

    2017-01-01

    Chronic orofacial pain is a symptom associated with a wide range of neuropathic, neurovascular, idiopathic, and myofascial conditions that affect a significant proportion of the population. While the collective impact of the subset of the orofacial pain disorders involving neurogenic and idiopathic mechanisms is substantial, some of these are relatively uncommon. Hence, patients with these disorders can be vulnerable to misdiagnosis, sometimes for years, increasing the symptom burden and delaying effective treatment. This manuscript first reviews the decision tree to be followed in diagnosing any neuropathic pain condition, as well as the levels of evidence needed to make a diagnosis with each of several levels of confidence: definite, probable, or possible. It then examines the clinical literature related to the idiopathic and neurogenic conditions that can occasion chronic orofacial pain, including burning mouth syndrome, trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post-herpetic neuralgia, and atypical odontalgia. Temporomandibular disorders also are examined as are other headache conditions, even though they are not neurologic conditions, because they are common and can mimic symptoms of the latter disorders. For each of these conditions, the paper reviews literature regarding incidence and prevalence, physiologic and other contributing factors, diagnostic signs and symptoms, and empirical evidence regarding treatments. Finally, in order to improve the quality and accuracy of clinical diagnosis, as well as the efficiency with which effective treatment is initiated and delivered, criteria are offered that can be instrumental in making a differential diagnosis. PMID:28638895

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, William; Wand, Benedict M; O'Connell, Neil E

    2017-09-14

    Neuropathic pain, which is due to nerve disease or damage, represents a significant burden on people and society. It can be particularly unpleasant and achieving adequate symptom control can be difficult. Non-pharmacological methods of treatment are often employed by people with neuropathic pain and may include transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). This review supersedes one Cochrane Review 'Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for chronic pain' (Nnoaham 2014) and one withdrawn protocol 'Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for neuropathic pain in adults' (Claydon 2014). This review replaces the original protocol for neuropathic pain that was withdrawn. To determine the analgesic effectiveness of TENS versus placebo (sham) TENS, TENS versus usual care, TENS versus no treatment and TENS in addition to usual care versus usual care alone in the management of neuropathic pain in adults. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, AMED, CINAHL, Web of Science, PEDro, LILACS (up to September 2016) and various clinical trials registries. We also searched bibliographies of included studies for further relevant studies. We included randomised controlled trials where TENS was evaluated in the treatment of central or peripheral neuropathic pain. We included studies if they investigated the following: TENS versus placebo (sham) TENS, TENS versus usual care, TENS versus no treatment and TENS in addition to usual care versus usual care alone in the management of neuropathic pain in adults. Two review authors independently screened all database search results and identified papers requiring full-text assessment. Subsequently, two review authors independently applied inclusion/exclusion criteria to these studies. The same review authors then independently extracted data, assessed for risk of bias using the Cochrane standard tool and rated the quality of evidence using GRADE. We included 15 studies with 724 participants. We found a

  3. Mechanisms of chronic central neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsebosch, Claire E; Hains, Bryan C; Crown, Eric D; Carlton, Susan M

    2009-04-01

    Not all spinal contusions result in mechanical allodynia, in which non-noxious stimuli become noxious. The studies presented use the NYU impactor at 12.5 mm drop or the Infinite Horizons Impactor (150 kdyn, 1 s dwell) devices to model spinal cord injury (SCI). Both of these devices and injury parameters, if done correctly, will result in animals with above level (forelimb), at level (trunk) and below level (hindlimb) mechanical allodynia that model the changes in evoked somatosensation experienced by the majority of people with SCI. The sections are as follows: 1) Mechanisms of remote microglial activation and pain signaling in "below-level" central pain 2) Intracellular signaling mechanisms in central sensitization in "at-level" pain 3) Peripheral sensitization contributes to "above level" injury pain following spinal cord injury and 4) Role of reactive oxygen species in central sensitization in regional neuropathic pain following SCI. To summarize, differential regional mechanisms contribute to the regional chronic pain states. We propose the importance of understanding the mechanisms in the differential regional pain syndromes after SCI in the chronic condition. Targeting regional mechanisms will be of enormous benefit to the SCI population that suffer chronic pain, and will contribute to better treatment strategies for other chronic pain syndromes.

  4. Hedonic and motivational responses to food reward are unchanged in rats with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Alec; McKinzie, David L; Witkin, Jeffrey M; Remeniuk, Bethany; Husein, Omar; Gleason, Scott D; Oyarzo, Janice; Navratilova, Edita; McElroy, Brian; Cowen, Stephen; Kennedy, Jeffrey D; Porreca, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Rewards influence responses to acute painful stimuli, but the relationship of chronic pain to hedonic or motivational aspects of reward is not well understood. We independently evaluated hedonic qualities of sweet or bitter tastants and motivation to seek food reward in rats with experimental neuropathic pain induced by L5/6 spinal nerve ligation. Hedonic response was measured by implantation of intraoral catheters to allow passive delivery of liquid solutions, and "liking/disliking" responses were scored according to a facial reactivity scale. Spinal nerve ligation rats did not differ from controls in either "liking" or "disliking" reactions to intraoral sucrose or quinine, respectively, at postsurgery day 21, suggesting no differences in perceived hedonic value of sweet or bitter tastants. To assess possible motivational deficits during acute and chronic pain, we used fixed- and progressive-ratio response paradigms of sucrose pellet presentation in rats with transient inflammatory or chronic neuropathic pain. Assessment of response acquisition and break points under the progressive ratio schedule revealed no differences between sham and spinal nerve ligation rats for up to 120 days after injury. However, rats with inflammation showed decrements in lever pressing and break points on days 1 and 2 after complete Freund adjuvant injection that normalized by day 4, consistent with transient ongoing pain. Thus, although acute ongoing inflammatory pain may transiently reduce reward motivation, we did not detect influences of chronic neuropathic pain on hedonic or motivational responses to food rewards. Adaptations that allow normal reward responding to food regardless of chronic pain may be of evolutionary benefit to promote survival.

  5. Effects of Ginkgo Biloba Extract EGb-761 on Neuropathic Pain in Mice: Involvement of Opioid System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chao; Li, Wei; Xu, Fan; Li, Mo; Yang, Liu; Hu, Xue-Yu; Ye, Zheng-Xu; Wang, Zhe; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2016-11-01

    Neuropathic pain is considered as one of the most difficult types of pain to manage with conventional analgesics. EGb-761 is extracted from leaves of Ginkgo biloba and has analgesia and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to examine the effect of EGb-761 on chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain behaviors, including thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, and to explore the possible mechanisms underlying this action. To this end, CCI mice were intraperitoneally injected with EGb-761 (10, 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg), and thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, cytokines, and mu-opioid receptor expression were measured. Results showed that EGb-761 attenuated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia dose-dependently and the best delivery time window was from day 7 to day 14 after CCI. Additionally, EGb-761 treatment significantly decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhanced mu opioid receptor (MOR) expression in the sciatic nerve. Moreover, the opioid antagonist naloxone prevented the effect of EGb-761 on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia but did not influence the effect of EGb-761 on inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, this study suggests that the potential of EGb-761 as a new analgesic for neuropathic pain treatment, and opioid system may be involved in the EGb-761-induced attenuation of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Smoked cannabis for chronic neuropathic pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Mark A; Wang, Tongtong; Shapiro, Stan; Robinson, Ann; Ducruet, Thierry; Huynh, Thao; Gamsa, Ann; Bennett, Gary J; Collet, Jean-Paul

    2010-10-05

    Chronic neuropathic pain affects 1%-2% of the adult population and is often refractory to standard pharmacologic treatment. Patients with chronic pain have reported using smoked cannabis to relieve pain, improve sleep and improve mood. Adults with post-traumatic or postsurgical neuropathic pain were randomly assigned to receive cannabis at four potencies (0%, 2.5%, 6% and 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol) over four 14-day periods in a crossover trial. Participants inhaled a single 25-mg dose through a pipe three times daily for the first five days in each cycle, followed by a nine-day washout period. Daily average pain intensity was measured using an 11-point numeric rating scale. We recorded effects on mood, sleep and quality of life, as well as adverse events. We recruited 23 participants (mean age 45.4 [standard deviation 12.3] years, 12 women [52%]), of whom 21 completed the trial. The average daily pain intensity, measured on the 11-point numeric rating scale, was lower on the prespecified primary contrast of 9.4% v. 0% tetrahydrocannabinol (5.4 v. 6.1, respectively; difference = 0.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02-1.4). Preparations with intermediate potency yielded intermediate but nonsignificant degrees of relief. Participants receiving 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol reported improved ability to fall asleep (easier, p = 0.001; faster, p sleep (less wakefulness, p = 0.01) relative to 0% tetrahydrocannabinol. We found no differences in mood or quality of life. The most common drug-related adverse events during the period when participants received 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol were headache, dry eyes, burning sensation in areas of neuropathic pain, dizziness, numbness and cough. A single inhalation of 25 mg of 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol herbal cannabis three times daily for five days reduced the intensity of pain, improved sleep and was well tolerated. Further long-term safety and efficacy studies are indicated. (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Register

  7. Neuropathic pain and use of PainDETECT in patients with fibromyalgia: a cohort study

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    Gauffin Jarno

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Fibromyalgia has a plethorae of symptoms, which can be confusing and even misleading. Accurate evaluation is necessary when patients with fibromyalgia are treated. Different types of instruments are available for the clinicians to supplement evaluation. Our objective was to study the applicability of the PainDETECT instrument to screen neuropathic pain in patients with fibromyalgia. Methods 158 patients with primary fibromyalgia underwent a neurological examination including bedside sensory testing. They also fulfilled four questionnaires: PainDETECT, Beck depression inventory IA (BDI IA, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ and a self-made questionnaire regarding present pain and pain relieving methods of the patients. The results of the clinical evaluation and questionnaires were then compared. Results Clinically verified neuropathic pain was diagnosed in 53/158 [34% (95% Cl: 26 to 41] patients. The ROC curve achieved a maximum Youden´s index at score of 17 when sensitivity was 0.79 (95% Cl: 0.66 to 0.89 and specificity 0.53 (95% Cl: 0.43 to 0.63. The PainDETECT total score (OR: 1.14 95% Cl: 1.06 to 1.22, FM as the worst current pain (OR: 0.31; 95% 0.16 to 0.62, body mass index (BMI (OR: 1.05; 95% Cl: 1.00 to 1.11 and the intensity of current pain (OR: 1.20; 95% Cl: 1.01 to 1.41 were significantly associated with the presence of neuropathic pain in univariate analyses. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of thorough clinical examination. The Neuropathic pain screening tool PainDETECT is not as useful in patients with fibromyalgia as in patients with uncompromised central pain control.

  8. The role of glia in the spinal cord in neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Old, Elizabeth Amy; Clark, Anna K; Malcangio, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain, both inflammatory and neuropathic, is a debilitating condition in which the pain experience persists after the painful stimulus has resolved. The efficacy of current treatment strategies using opioids, NSAIDS and anticonvulsants is limited by the extensive side effects observed in patients, underlining the necessity for novel therapeutic targets. Preclinical models of chronic pain have recently provided evidence for a critical role played by glial cells in the mechanisms underlying the chronicity of pain, both at the site of damage in the periphery and in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Here microglia and astrocytes respond to the increased input from the periphery and change morphology, increase in number and release pro-nociceptive mediators such as ATP, cytokines and chemokines. These gliotransmitters can sensitise neurons by activation of their cognate receptors thereby contributing to central sensitization which is fundamental for the generation of allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain.

  9. Stratifying patients with peripheral neuropathic pain based on sensory profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollert, Jan; Maier, Christoph; Attal, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    In a recent cluster analysis, it has been shown that patients with peripheral neuropathic pain can be grouped into 3 sensory phenotypes based on quantitative sensory testing profiles, which are mainly characterized by either sensory loss, intact sensory function and mild thermal hyperalgesia and...... populations that need to be screened to reach a subpopulation large enough to conduct a phenotype-stratified study. The most common phenotype in diabetic polyneuropathy was sensory loss (83%), followed by mechanical hyperalgesia (75%) and thermal hyperalgesia (34%, note that percentages are overlapping...

  10. Combined approaches for the relief of spinal cord injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Young S; Kim, Hee Young; Lee, Bong Hyo; Yang, Chae Ha

    2016-04-01

    The adequate treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced neuropathic pain still remains an unresolved problem. The current medications predominantly used in the SCI-induced neuropathic pain therapy are morphine, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and antiepileptics, which suggests that psychiatric aspects might be important factors in the treatment of neuropathic pain. It is well documented that the modulation of the sensory events is not a unique way for achieving pain relief. In addition, pain patients still express dissatisfaction and complain of unwanted effects of the medications, suggesting that alternative approaches for the treatment of neuropathic pain are essential. In psychiatry, pain relief represents relaxation and a feeling of comfort and satisfaction, which suggests that cognitive and emotional motivations are important factors in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The comorbidity of chronic pain and psychiatric disorders, which is well recognized, suggests that the effective therapeutic relief for neuropathic pain induced by SCI can be achieved in conjunction with the management of the sensory and psychiatric aspects of patient. In this review, we address the feasibility of a combined acupuncture and pharmacotherapy treatment for the relief of neuropathic pain behavior following SCI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cannabis-based medicines for chronic neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücke, Martin; Phillips, Tudor; Radbruch, Lukas; Petzke, Frank; Häuser, Winfried

    2018-03-07

    This review is one of a series on drugs used to treat chronic neuropathic pain. Estimates of the population prevalence of chronic pain with neuropathic components range between 6% and 10%. Current pharmacological treatment options for neuropathic pain afford substantial benefit for only a few people, often with adverse effects that outweigh the benefits. There is a need to explore other treatment options, with different mechanisms of action for treatment of conditions with chronic neuropathic pain. Cannabis has been used for millennia to reduce pain. Herbal cannabis is currently strongly promoted by some patients and their advocates to treat any type of chronic pain. To assess the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of cannabis-based medicines (herbal, plant-derived, synthetic) compared to placebo or conventional drugs for conditions with chronic neuropathic pain in adults. In November 2017 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and two trials registries for published and ongoing trials, and examined the reference lists of reviewed articles. We selected randomised, double-blind controlled trials of medical cannabis, plant-derived and synthetic cannabis-based medicines against placebo or any other active treatment of conditions with chronic neuropathic pain in adults, with a treatment duration of at least two weeks and at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Three review authors independently extracted data of study characteristics and outcomes of efficacy, tolerability and safety, examined issues of study quality, and assessed risk of bias. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. For efficacy, we calculated the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) for pain relief of 30% and 50% or greater, patient's global impression to be much or very much improved, dropout rates due to lack of efficacy, and the standardised mean differences for pain intensity, sleep problems, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and psychological distress. For

  12. Percutaneous Nerve Stimulation in Chronic Neuropathic Pain Patients due to Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopsky, D.J.; Ettema, F.W.L.; van der Leeden, M.; Dekker, J.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The long-term prognosis for neuropathic pain resolution following spinal cord injury (SCI) is often poor. In many SCI patients, neuropathic pain continues or even worsens over time. Thus, new treatment approaches are needed. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility and

  13. Ethanolic extract of Aloe vera ameliorates sciatic nerve ligation induced neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Kanyadhara

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of the present study validate the use of EEAV to treat neuropathic pain. This effect may be attributed to the decreased migration of neutrophils and due to the anti-oxidant properties of A. vera. Further studies to confirm the mechanism of action will help develop suitable A. vera formulations for neuropathic pain therapy .

  14. Alpha lipoic acid : a new treatment for neuropathic pain in patients with diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijnhout, G. S.; Alkhalaf, A.; Kleefstra, N.; Bibo, H. J. G.

    Background: Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat. We identified those studies in the literature in which the effectiveness of alpha lipoic acid as a treatment for neuropathic pain was evaluated. Methods: Systematic literature review. The databases MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched using the

  15. Neuropathic-like pain features and cross-sectional associations in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, Sanne M.W.; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; Steunebrink, Laura Margaretha Maria; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Increasing evidence indicates that features suggestive of neuropathic pain may also be present in patients with common rheumatic conditions. The objective of this study was to examine neuropathic-like pain symptoms and associated factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods We

  16. Neuronal CC chemokines : the distinct roles of CCL21 and CCL2 in neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, Knut; Boddeke, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The development of neuropathic pain in response to peripheral nerve lesion for a large part depends on microglia located at the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Thus the injured nerve initiates a response of microglia, which represents the start of a cascade of events that leads to neuropathic pain

  17. Chronic pain in Gaucher disease: skeletal or neuropathic origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devigili, Grazia; De Filippo, Michele; Ciana, Giovanni; Dardis, Andrea; Lettieri, Christian; Rinaldo, Sara; Macor, Daniela; Moro, Alessandro; Eleopra, Roberto; Bembi, Bruno

    2017-08-31

    Pain is one of the most disabling symptoms of Gaucher disease. It is referred by the majority of Gaucher patients and often persists despite long-term enzyme replacement treatment. It has been mainly considered as nociceptive pain secondary to skeletal involvement but it is described even in the absence of bone disease without a clear explanation. In the last years an increasing number of reports have described the presence of neurological manifestation in Gaucher type 1 patients, including subclinical large fibre neuropathy. In our Gaucher clinic we have observed the recurrence of painful symptoms in a group of type 1 Gaucher patients even after a long-term enzyme replacement therapy. A cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the pathophysiology of pain in a cohort of 25 Gaucher patients (13 females, 12 males). Twenty-two patients received enzyme replacement therapy for a period of time ranging from 10 to >20 years, while three were new diagnosis. Pain was classified as bone or neurologic related on the basis of anamnestic data, clinical and electrophysilogical examinations. Intensity and quality of pain were recorded by Douleur Neuropathique en 4 questionnaire and Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. Neuroalgological evaluation, quantitative sensory testing, nerve conduction studies and evaluation of epidermal nerve fibres density were performed. Comorbidities for peripheral neuropathy were excluded. Thirteen patients complained of pain suggestive of neuropathic origin with proximal patchy distribution, six manifested severe pain paroxysmal, nine pinprick hypoesthesia and 17 thermal hypoesthesia. At quantitative sensory testing, all of them showed high cold thresholds with errata sensation (burning instead of cold), paradoxical heat sensation and mechanic hypoesthesia; three patients showed pressure pain hyperalgesia. Epidermal denervation was present in 19 patients, 12 of them with non-length dependent pattern. These results confirm the role of

  18. The effect of Sativex in neuropathic pain and spasticity in spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven Robert; Hansen, Rikke Bod Middelhede; Johansen, Inger Lauge

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury represent significant but still unresolved problems, which cause considerable suffering and reduced quality of life for patients with spinal cord injury. Treatment of neuropathic pain and spasticity is complicated and patients...... often receive incomplete relief from present available and recommended treatment. Cannabinoids has shown efficacy on both neuropathic pain and spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury, but the studies one the topic has been too small to make a general conclusion for patients with spinal cord...... injury. Aims: To investigate the effect of Sativex (cannabinoid agonist given as an oral mucosal spray), on neuropathic pain and spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. We will include 30 patients with neuropathic pain...

  19. Continuous sacral nerve root block in the management of neuropathic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, Jan H.; van der Vegt, Marinus H.; Ubags, Leon H.; Pijl, Aarnout J.; Dzoljic, Misa

    2002-01-01

    IMPLICATIONS: Neuropathic cancer pain caused by tumor infiltration in the sacral plexus is primarily treated by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and opioids. In one patient with severe pain despite pharmacotherapy, a catheter for the continuous administration of

  20. Botulinum Toxin Type A for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Neuro-Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Intiso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a natural protective mechanism and has a warning function signaling imminent or actual tissue damage. Neuropathic pain (NP results from a dysfunction and derangement in the transmission and signal processing along the nervous system and it is a recognized disease in itself. The prevalence of NP is estimated to be between 6.9% and 10% in the general population. This condition can complicate the recovery from stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord lesions, and several neuropathies promoting persistent disability and poor quality of life. Subjects suffering from NP describe it as burning, itching, lancing, and numbness, but hyperalgesia and allodynia represent the most bothersome symptoms. The management of NP is a clinical challenge and several non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions have been proposed with variable benefits. Botulinum toxin (BTX as an adjunct to other interventions can be a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of disabled people. Although BTX-A is predominantly used to reduce spasticity in a neuro-rehabilitation setting, it has been used in several painful conditions including disorders characterized by NP. The underlying pharmacological mechanisms that operate in reducing pain are still unclear and include blocking nociceptor transduction, the reduction of neurogenic inflammation by inhibiting neural substances and neurotransmitters, and the prevention of peripheral and central sensitization. Some neurological disorders requiring rehabilitative intervention can show neuropathic pain resistant to common analgesic treatment. This paper addresses the effect of BTX-A in treating NP that complicates frequent disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system such as spinal cord injury, post-stroke shoulder pain, and painful diabetic neuropathy, which are commonly managed in a rehabilitation setting. Furthermore, BTX-A has an effect in relief pain that may characterize less common neurological disorders

  1. Fear of pain in children and adolescents with neuropathic pain and CRPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    A significant proportion of children and adolescents with chronic pain endorse elevated pain-related fear. Pain-related fear is associated with high levels of disability, depressive symptoms, and school impairment. Due to faulty nerve signaling, individuals with neuropathic pain and CRPS may be more prone to develop pain-related fear as they avoid use of and neglect the affected body area(s), resulting in exacerbated symptoms, muscle atrophy, maintenance of pain signaling, and ongoing pain-related disability. Not surprisingly, effective treatments for elevated pain-related fears involve exposure to previously avoided activities to down-regulate incorrect pain signaling. In the context of intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment of youth with neuropathic pain, decreasing pain-related fear is associated with improved physical and psychological functioning, while high initial pain-related fear is a risk factor for less treatment responsiveness. An innovative approach to targeting pain-related fear as well as evidence of a neural response to treatment involving decoupling of the amygdala with key fear circuits in youth with CRPS suggest breakthroughs in our ability to ameliorate these issues. PMID:26785161

  2. The contribution of TRPM8 and TRPA1 channels to cold allodynia and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspani, Ombretta; Zurborg, Sandra; Labuz, Dominika; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2009-10-08

    Cold allodynia is a common feature of neuropathic pain however the underlying mechanisms of this enhanced sensitivity to cold are not known. Recently the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPM8 and TRPA1 have been identified and proposed to be molecular sensors for cold. Here we have investigated the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 mRNA in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and examined the cold sensitivity of peripheral sensory neurons in the chronic construction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain in mice.In behavioral experiments, chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve induced a hypersensitivity to both cold and the TRPM8 agonist menthol that developed 2 days post injury and remained stable for at least 2 weeks. Using quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization we examined the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 in DRG. Both channels displayed significantly reduced expression levels after injury with no change in their distribution pattern in identified neuronal subpopulations. Furthermore, in calcium imaging experiments, we detected no alterations in the number of cold or menthol responsive neurons in the DRG, or in the functional properties of cold transduction following injury. Intriguingly however, responses to the TRPA1 agonist mustard oil were strongly reduced.Our results indicate that injured sensory neurons do not develop abnormal cold sensitivity after chronic constriction injury and that alterations in the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 are unlikely to contribute directly to the pathogenesis of cold allodynia in this neuropathic pain model.

  3. Spinal dopaminergic involvement in the antihyperalgesic effect of antidepressants in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mi; Hoshino, Hajime; Saito, Shigeru; Yang, Yang; Obata, Hideaki

    2017-05-10

    Antidepressants such as tricyclic antidepressants, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors are a first-line treatment for neuropathic pain. Here, we aimed to determine the involvement of the spinal dopaminergic system in the antihyperalgesic effects of antidepressants in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL). The right L5 spinal nerve of male Sprague-Dawley rats was ligated under inhalation anesthesia to induce hyperalgesia. Behavioral testing was performed by measuring ipsilateral hindpaw withdrawal thresholds after intraperitoneal injection of amitriptyline, duloxetine, milnacipran, and fluoxetine. D2-like receptors were blocked by intrathecal administration of sulpiride. We also determined the concentrations of dopamine in the spinal cord using microdialysis after injection of antidepressants. The dopamine contents in the spinal dorsal horn were also measured in normal and SNL rats at 2, 3, 4, and 8 weeks after SNL surgery. Intraperitoneal injection of amitriptyline, duloxetine, milnacipran, and fluoxetine (3-30mg/kg) produced antihyperalgesic effects, and prevented by intrathecal pre-injection of sulpiride (30μg). Microdialysis revealed the dopamine levels in the spinal cord were increased after intraperitoneal injection of each antidepressant (10mg/kg). Furthermore, the dopamine content in homogenized spinal cord tissue were increased at 2 weeks after SNL and then subsequently declined. Our results suggest that the effect of antidepressants against neuropathic pain is related to modulation of not only noradrenalin and serotonin but also dopamine levels in the spinal cord. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The mechanism of neurofeedback training for treatment of central neuropathic pain in paraplegia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad Abul; Fraser, Matthew; Conway, Bernard A; Allan, David B; Vuckovic, Aleksandra

    2015-10-13

    Central neuropathic pain has a prevalence of 40% in patients with spinal cord injury. Electroencephalography (EEG) studies showed that this type of pain has identifiable signatures, that could potentially be targeted by a neuromodulation therapy. The aim of the study was to investigate the putative mechanism of neurofeedback training on central neuropathic pain and its underlying brain signatures in patients with chronic paraplegia. Patients' EEG activity was modulated from the sensory-motor cortex, electrode location C3/Cz/C4/P4 in up to 40 training sessions Results. Six out of seven patients reported immediate reduction of pain during neurofeedback training. Best results were achieved with suppressing Ɵ and higher β (20-30 Hz) power and reinforcing α power at C4. Four patients reported clinically significant long-term reduction of pain (>30%) which lasted at least a month beyond the therapy. EEG during neurofeedback revealed a wide spread modulation of power in all three frequency bands accompanied with changes in the coherence most notable in the beta band. The standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography analysis of EEG before and after neurofeedback therapy showed the statistically significant reduction of power in beta frequency band in all tested patients. Areas with reduced power included the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex, the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and the Insular Cortex. Neurofeedback training produces both immediate and longer term reduction of central neuropathic pain that is accompanied with a measurable short and long term modulation of cortical activity. Controlled trials are required to confirm the efficacy of this neurofeedback protocol on treatment of pain. The study is a registered UKCRN clinical trial Nr 9824.

  5. Autophagy impairment in a mouse model of neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berliocchi Laura

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autophagy is an intracellular membrane trafficking pathway controlling the delivery of cytoplasmic material to the lysosomes for degradation. It plays an important role in cell homeostasis in both normal settings and abnormal, stressful conditions. It is now recognised that an imbalance in the autophagic process can impact basal cell functions and this has recently been implicated in several human diseases, including neurodegeneration and cancer. Here, we investigated the consequences of nerve injury on the autophagic process in a commonly used model of neuropathic pain. The expression and modulation of the main autophagic marker, the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3, was evaluated in the L4-L5 cord segment seven days after spinal nerve ligation (SNL. Levels of LC3-II, the autophagosome-associated LC3 form, were markedly higher in the spinal cord ipsilateral to the ligation side, appeared to correlate with the upregulation of the calcium channel subunit α2δ-1 and were not present in mice that underwent sham surgery. However, LC3-I and Beclin 1 expression were only slightly increased. On the contrary, SNL promoted the accumulation of the ubiquitin- and LC3-binding protein p62, which inversely correlates with autophagic activity, thus pointing to a block of autophagosome turnover. Our data showed for the first time that basal autophagy is disrupted in a model of neuropathic pain.

  6. Pain following cancer treatment: Guidelines for the clinical classification of predominant neuropathic, nociceptive and central sensitization pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Jo; Leysen, Laurence; Adriaenssens, Nele; Aguilar Ferrándiz, Maria Encarnación; Devoogdt, Nele; Tassenoy, An; Ickmans, Kelly; Goubert, Dorien; van Wilgen, C Paul; Wijma, Amarins J; Kuppens, Kevin; Hoelen, Wouter; Hoelen, Astrid; Moloney, Niamh; Meeus, Mira

    2016-06-01

    In addition to fatigue, pain is the most frequent persistent symptom in cancer survivors. Clear guidelines for both the diagnosis and treatment of pain in cancer survivors are lacking. Classification of pain is important as it may facilitate more specific targeting of treatment. In this paper we present an overview of nociceptive, neuropathic and central sensitization pain following cancer treatment, as well as the rationale, criteria and process for stratifying pain classification. Recently, a clinical method for classifying any pain as either predominant central sensitization pain, neuropathic or nociceptive pain was developed, based on a large body of research evidence and international expert opinion. We, a team of 15 authors from 13 different centers, four countries and two continents have applied this classification algorithm to the cancer survivor population. The classification of pain following cancer treatment entails two steps: (1) examining the presence of neuropathic pain; and (2) using an algorithm for differentiating predominant nociceptive and central sensitization pain. Step 1 builds on the established criteria for neuropathic pain diagnosis, while Step 2 applies a recently developed clinical method for classifying any pain as either predominant central sensitization pain, neuropathic or nociceptive pain to the cancer survivor population. The classification criteria allow identifying central sensitization pain following cancer treatment. The recognition of central sensitization pain in practice is an important development in the integration of pain neuroscience into the clinic, and one that is relevant for people undergoing and following cancer treatment.

  7. The effects of music therapy on pain in patients with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Esra Akın; Uyar, Meltem; Eyigör, Can; Hakverdioğlu Yönt, Gülendam; Çelik, Serkan; Khorshıd, Leyla

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of relaxing music on pain intensity in patients with neuropathic pain. A quasi-experimental study, repeated measures design was used. Thirty patients, aged 18-70 years, with neuropathic pain and hospitalized in an Algology clinic were identified as a convenience sample. Participants received 60 minutes of music therapy. Classical Turkish music was played to patients using a media player (MP3) and headphones. Participants had pain scores taken immediately before the intervention and at the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention. Data were collected over a 6-month period in 2012. The patients' mean pain intensity scores were reduced by music, and that decrease was progressive over the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The results of this study implied that the inclusion of music therapy in the routine care of patients with neuropathic pain could provide nurses with an effective practice for reducing patients' pain intensity. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effectiveness of repetitive trancranial or peripheral magnetic stimulation in neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumru, Hatice; Albu, Sergiu; Vidal, Joan; Tormos, Josep Maria

    2017-05-01

    Maladaptive plasticity in the sensorimotor system, following neurological lesions or diseases, plays a central role in the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Repetitive magnetic stimulation of the central and peripheral nervous system has gained relevance as noninvasive approach for neuromodulation and pain relief. Systematic reviews that evaluate the effectiveness and specificity of different protocols of repetitive magnetic stimulation to control neuropathic pain in clinical populations have the potential to improve the therapeutic applicability of this technique. Studies whose primary goal was to evaluate the effectiveness of repetitive magnetic stimulation for the treatment of various types of neuropathic pain published in PubMed until August 2015 have been included in this systematic review. A total of 39 articles fulfilling the inclusion criteria were analyzed of which 37 studies investigated pain modulation using repetitive magnetic stimulation over the motor or non-motor cortices and two studies evaluated pain modulation using repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation protocols. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the primary motor cortex using high frequency stimulation protocols can effectively reduce neuropathic pain, particularly in individuals with pain related to non-cerebral lesions. The application of multiple sessions can lead to long-lasting pain modulation and cumulative effects. Implications for Rehabilitation Maladaptive plasticity plays a central role in sensitization of nociceptive pathways, generation and maintainance of neuropathic pain; Most neuropathic pain conditions are refractory to pharmacological therapies; Repetitive magnetic stimulation of the central and peripheral nervous system has gained relevance as noninvasive approach for neuromodulation and pain relief.

  9. Most Relevant Neuropathic Pain Treatment and Chronic Low Back Pain Management Guidelines: A Change Pain Latin America Advisory Panel Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amescua-Garcia, Cesar; Colimon, Frantz; Guerrero, Carlos; Jreige Iskandar, Aziza; Berenguel Cook, Maria; Bonilla, Patricia; Campos Kraychete, Durval; Delgado Barrera, William; Alberto Flores Cantisani, Jose; Hernandez-Castro, John Jairo; Lara-Solares, Argelia; Perez Hernandez, Concepcion; Rico, Maria Antonieta; Del Rocio Guillen Nunez, Maria; Sempertegui Gallegos, Manuel; Garcia, Joao Batista Santos

    2018-03-01

    Chronic pain conditions profoundly affect the daily living of a significant number of people and are a major economic and social burden, particularly in developing countries. The Change Pain Latin America (CPLA) advisory panel aimed to identify the most appropriate guidelines for the treatment of neuropathic pain (NP) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) for use across Latin America. Published systematic reviews or practice guidelines were identified by a systematic search of PubMed, the Guidelines Clearinghouse, and Google. Articles were screened by an independent reviewer, and potential candidate guidelines were selected for more in-depth review. A shortlist of suitable guidelines was selected and critically evaluated by the CPLA advisory panel. Searches identified 674 and 604 guideline articles for NP and CLBP, respectively. Of these, 14 guidelines were shortlisted for consensus consideration, with the following final selections made: "Recommendations for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain from the Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group in 2015-pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis."Diagnosis and treatment of low back pain: A joint clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society" (2007). The selected guidelines were endorsed by all members of the CPLA advisory board as the best fit for use across Latin America. In addition, regional considerations were discussed and recorded. We have included this expert local insight and advice to enhance the implementation of each guideline across all Latin American countries.

  10. Quantitative sensory testing and mapping: a review of nonautomated quantitative methods for examination of the patient with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, David; Sehgal, Nalini; Moeller-Bertram, Tobias; Edwards, Robert R; Wasan, Ajay; Wallace, Mark; Irving, Gordon; Argoff, Charles; Backonja, Misha-Miroslav

    2009-09-01

    Despite a growing interest in neuropathic pain, neurologists and pain specialists do not have a standard, validated, office examination for the evaluation of neuropathic pain signs to complement the neurologic, musculoskeletal, and general physical examinations. An office neuropathic pain examination focused on quantifying sensory features of neuropathic pain, ranging from deficits to allodynia and hyperalgesia, and evoked by a physiologically representative array of stimuli, will be an essential tool to monitor treatment effectiveness and for clinical investigation into the mechanisms and management of neuropathic pain. Such an examination should include mapping of areas of stimulus-evoked neuropathic pain and standardized, reproducible quantitative sensory testing (QST) of tactile, punctuate, pressure, and thermal modalities. We review quantitative sensory testing methodology in general and specific tests for the evaluation of neuropathic pain phenomena. Numerous quantitative sensory testing techniques for dynamic mechanical, pressure, vibration, and thermal sensory testing and mapping have been described. We propose a comprehensive neuropathic pain evaluation protocol that is based upon these available techniques. A comprehensive neuropathic pain evaluation protocol is essential for further advancement of clinical research in neuropathic pain. A protocol that uses tools readily available in clinical practice, when established and validated, can be used widely and thus accelerate data collection for clinical research and increase clinical awareness of the features of neuropathic pain.

  11. Neuropathic pain. Redefinition and a grading system for clinical and research purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treede, R.-D.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Campbell, J.N.

    2008-01-01

    potentially tissue-damaging stimuli. Pain may also arise by activity generated within the nervous system without adequate stimulation of its peripheral sensory endings. For this type of pain, the International Association for the Study of Pain introduced the term neuropathic pain, defined as "pain...... evidence from a neurologic examination. This grading system is proposed for clinical and research purposes....

  12. Neuropathic Pain Components in Patients with Cancer: Prevalence, Treatment, and Interference with Daily Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterling, Anne; te Boveldt, Nienke; Verhagen, Constans; van der Graaf, Winette T; Van Ham, Maaike; Van der Drift, Miep; Vissers, Kris; Engels, Yvonne

    2016-04-01

    Pain and neuropathic symptoms impact quality of life of patients with cancer. To obtain more insight in the prevalence, severity, and treatment of neuropathic symptoms in patients with cancer and their interference with daily activities, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the outpatient clinic of a Dutch university hospital. A cross-sectional study among outpatients with cancer. To identify pain, its intensity, quality, and interference with daily activities, the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) was used. Neuropathic symptoms were identified with the Douleur Neuropathique (DN4) interview and pain characteristics with the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). Pain medication and adjuvant analgesics were also collected with a prestructured questionnaire. Descriptives, chi-squared tests, t-tests, and a logistic regression analysis were conducted. 892 patients completed the questionnaires. Twenty-three percent (n = 204) reported moderate to severe pain, and 19% (n = 170) scored positive on neuropathic symptoms (DN4 ≥ 3). Particularly in patients with a rating on a numeric rating scale (NRS) < 5, existence of neuropathic symptoms significantly increased interference with daily activities. Of patients with neuropathic symptoms, 8% received adjuvant pain treatment. Receiving curative treatment, using a systemic drug with neurotoxicity, having had an operation, and having had a lymph node dissection independently contributed to having neuropathic symptoms. This study shows that over 40% of the patients with moderate to severe pain also have neuropathic symptoms, causing increased interference with daily activities. Most of these patients do not receive adjuvant analgesics. There is a need to improve management of neuropathic symptoms in patients with cancer. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  13. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boomershine CS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Michelle J Ormseth, Beth A Sholz, Chad S BoomershineDivision of Rheumatology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients.Keywords: duloxetine, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, review, treatment

  14. Treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome as a neuropathic pain condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Vas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A lady of 52 years with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC presented with chronic pelvic pain, irritative voiding with sphincter dominance on urodynamics. 3 yrs of oral analgesics, antispasmodics and intravesical therapy was ineffective. We surmised her pain, and irritative voiding to be secondary to constant straining against a dysfunctional pelvic floor. We treated PBS/IC as a neuropathic phenomenon with a combination of neuromodulator medications and continuous caudal epidural analgesia to reduce the pain induced peripheral and central sensitisation. Botulinum toxin type A injection into pelvic floor muscles appeared to address their dysfuction. Clinical and urodynamics response was encouraging.

  15. Persistent orodental pain, atypical odontalgia, and phantom tooth pain: when are they neuropathic disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Glenn T

    2006-08-01

    Patients with unrelenting pain in the teeth, gingival, palatal or alveolar tissues often see multiple dentists and have multiple irreversible procedures performed and still have their pain. Up to one-third of patients attending a chronic facial pain clinic have undergone prior irreversible dental procedures for their pain without success. In these cases, if no local source of infectious, inflammatory, or other pathology can be found, then the differential diagnosis must include a focal neuropathic pain disorder. The common diagnoses given include the terms atypical odontalgia, persistent orodental pain, or if teeth have been extracted, phantom tooth pain. One possibility is that these pain complaints are due to a neuropathic alteration of the trigeminal nerve. There are several diagnostic procedures that need to be performed in any patient suspected of having a trigeminal neuropathic disorder including (1) cold testing of involved teeth for pulpal nonvitality; (2) a periapical radiograph examining the teeth for apical change; (3) a panoramic radiograph examining for other maxillofacial disease; (4) a thorough head and neck examination also looking for abnormality; (5) a cranial nerve examination including anesthetic testing which documents any increased or decreased nerve trigeminal nerve sensitivity and rules out other neurologic changes outside the trigeminal nerve; and (6) MRI imaging in some cases. Finally, when a nonobvious atypical toothache first presents, direct microscopic examination of the tooth for incomplete tooth fracture is also suggested. The majority of these patients are women over the age 30 with pain in the posterior teeth/alveolar arch. Multiple causes exist for sustained neuropathic pain including direct nerve injury (e.g., associated with fracture or surgical treatment), nerve injection injury, nerve compression injury (e.g., implant, osseous growth, neoplastic invasion) and infection-inflammation damage to the nerve itself. Sustained nerve

  16. Neuropathic pain in a Fabry disease rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James J; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Moehring, Francie; Murphy, Carly A; O'Hara, Crystal L; Tiemeyer, Michael; Stucky, Cheryl L; Dahms, Nancy M

    2018-03-22

    Fabry disease, the most common lysosomal storage disease, affects multiple organs and results in a shortened life span. This disease is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A, which leads to glycosphingolipid accumulation in many cell types. Neuropathic pain is an early and severely debilitating symptom in patients with Fabry disease, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that cause the pain are unknown. We generated a rat model of Fabry disease, the first nonmouse model to our knowledge. Fabry rats had substantial serum and tissue accumulation of α-galactosyl glycosphingolipids and had pronounced mechanical pain behavior. Additionally, Fabry rat dorsal root ganglia displayed global N-glycan alterations, sensory neurons were laden with inclusions, and sensory neuron somata exhibited prominent sensitization to mechanical force. We found that the cation channel transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is sensitized in Fabry rat sensory neurons and that TRPA1 antagonism reversed the behavioral mechanical sensitization. This study points toward TRPA1 as a potentially novel target to treat the pain experienced by patients with Fabry disease.

  17. Neuropathic pain. Redefinition and a grading system for clinical and research purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treede, R.-D.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Campbell, J.N.

    2008-01-01

    potentially tissue-damaging stimuli. Pain may also arise by activity generated within the nervous system without adequate stimulation of its peripheral sensory endings. For this type of pain, the International Association for the Study of Pain introduced the term neuropathic pain, defined as "pain...... initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system." While this definition has been useful in distinguishing some characteristics of neuropathic and nociceptive types of pain, it lacks defined boundaries. Since the sensitivity of the nociceptive system is modulated by its adequate...... affecting the somatosensory system. This revised definition fits into the nosology of neurologic disorders. The reference to the somatosensory system was derived from a wide range of neuropathic pain conditions ranging from painful neuropathy to central poststroke pain. Because of the lack of a specific...

  18. Topical analgesics for neuropathic pain: preclinical exploration, clinical validation, future development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawynok, J

    2014-04-01

    Topical analgesics applied locally to skin or to specialized compartments modify pain by actions on sensory nerve endings and/or adjacent cellular elements. With this approach, there are low systemic drug levels, good tolerability and few drug interactions, and combination with oral formulations is feasible. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the potential for topical analgesics to contribute to improved management of neuropathic pain. Mechanistic and preclinical studies indicate much potential for development of novel topical analgesics for neuropathic pain. In humans, two topical analgesics are approved for use in post-herpetic neuralgia (lidocaine 5% medicated plaster, capsaicin 8% patch), and there is evidence for efficacy in other neuropathic pain conditions. Comparative trials indicate similar efficacy between topical and oral analgesics. Not all individuals respond to topical analgesics, and there is interest in determining factors (patient factors, sensory characteristics) which might predict responsiveness to topical analgesics. There is a growing number of controlled trials and case reports of investigational agents (vasodilators, glutamate receptor antagonists, α2-adrenoreceptor agonists, antidepressants, centrally acting drugs), including combinations of several agents, indicating these produce pain relief in neuropathic pain. There is interest in compounding topical analgesics for neuropathic pain, but several challenges remain for this approach. Topical analgesics have the potential to be a valuable additional approach for the management of neuropathic pain. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  19. The effect of Normast (PEA) on neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven Robert; Bing, Jette; Hansen, Rikke Bod Middelhede

    2015-01-01

    ) on neuropathic pain, and sec¬ondary to study the effect of Normast on spas¬ticity and psychological functioning in patients with spinal cord injury. Population characteristics: Gender, male/female, n 43/15 Age since inclusion, years, mean (SD) 55.3 (9.5) Time since injury, years, mean (SD) 8.8 (8.9) Present......Introduction: Neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI) represent still a significant, unresolved problem causing suffering and re¬duced quality of life in patients with SCI. Treatment of neuropathic pain is a complex and difficult task, and many patients have incom...

  20. Neuropathic Pain Components in Patients with Cancer: Prevalence, Treatment, and Interference with Daily Activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterling, A.; Boveldt, N.D. te; Verhagen, C.A.; Graaf, W.T. van der; Ham, M.A.P.C. van; Drift, M.A. van der; Vissers, K.; Engels, Y.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain and neuropathic symptoms impact quality of life of patients with cancer. To obtain more insight in the prevalence, severity, and treatment of neuropathic symptoms in patients with cancer and their interference with daily activities, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the

  1. The effect of Normast (PEA) in neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven Robert; Bing, Jette; Hansen, Rikke Bod Middelhede

    2015-01-01

    and psychological functioning in patients with spinal cord injury. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel multicenter study. We have included 66 patients with neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury. Questionnaires regarding neuropathic pain, spasticity, insomnia, anxiety and depression......Introduction: Neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury represent significant problems. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is a fatty acid that is produced in many cells in the body, and it is thought to potentiate the body's own cannabis-like substances (endocannabinoids). PEA is suggested...... to reduce pain and inflammation but randomized controlled trials are lacking. Normast is a medical supplement which contains (PEA) approved for use in Denmark. The primary aim is to investigate the effect of Normast (PEA) on neuropathic pain, and secondary to study the effect of Normast on spasticity...

  2. TMEM16F Regulates Spinal Microglial Function in Neuropathic Pain States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Batti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a widespread chronic pain state that results from injury to the nervous system. Spinal microglia play a causative role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain through secretion of growth factors and cytokines. Here, we investigated the contribution of TMEM16F, a protein that functions as a Ca2+-dependent ion channel and a phospholipid scramblase, to microglial activity during neuropathic pain. We demonstrate that mice with a conditional ablation of TMEM16F in microglia do not develop mechanical hypersensitivity upon nerve injury. In the absence of TMEM16F, microglia display deficits in process motility and phagocytosis. Moreover, loss of GABA immunoreactivity upon injury is spared in TMEM16F conditional knockout mice. Collectively, these data indicate that TMEM16F is an essential component of the microglial response to injury and suggest the importance of microglial phagocytosis in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

  3. Prevalence of neuropathic pain among Black African patients suffering from common low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouédraogo, Dieu-Donné; Nonguierma, Victor; Napon, Christian; Kabré, Abel; Tiéno, Hervé; Guira, Oumar; Kaboré, Jean; Drabo, Joseph Y

    2012-07-01

    To study the prevalence and semiotic characteristics of neuropathic pain in the common low back pain to the Black African subject. This was a prospective cross-sectional survey carried on from April 1 2009 to August 31 2009 in consultations of rheumatology, neurology, and neurosurgery at the University Hospital Yalgado Ouédraogo in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso). All patients with a low back pain or a common lomboradiculalgie were included. DN4 questionnaire was used for the diagnosis of neuropathic pain. One hundred and seven patients have been recruited during the study period; Sixty-four (59.80%) were female (sex ratio M/F: 0.67). The average age was 34.11 ± 13.46 years of age with extremes of 20 and 79. The average duration of disease was 48.53 months with extremes of 10 days and 50 years. Eighty-seven patients (81.31%) had a disease duration, which was 3 months longer. Sixty-six patients (61.70%) had a predominant lomboradiculalgie; among the remaining 41, low back pain predominated. Average intensity of pain was 62.81 ± 22.43 (on a scale of 100). A sign of Lasèque was present in the 41 (38.30%) patients. Fifty-three (49.5%) patients had a neuropathic pain. The prevalence of neuropathy signs according to the DN4 questionnaire was as follows: burning (n = 37; 34.58%), painful cold (n = 13; 12.15%), electric shocks (n = 31; 38.97%), pins and needles (n = 34; 31.77%), tingling (n = 35; 32.71%), numbness (n = 45; 42.05%), itching (n = 18; 16.82%), touch hypoesthesia (n = 35; 32.71%), pinprick (n = 33; 30.84%), and tactile allodynia (n = 21; 19.62%). Among the studied variables, the presence of a radiculalgy was statistically associated with neuropathic pain. The lomboradiculalgie of the Black African subject associates neuropathic pain observed in half of patients. Treatment must therefore always take account of this association. However, further studies are needed before any definitive conclusion.

  4. Neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity in patients with treated leprosy: a cross-sectional prevalence study in Mumbai.

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    Estrella Lasry-Levy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain has been little studied in leprosy. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain and the validity of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with treated leprosy. The association of neuropathic pain with psychological morbidity was also evaluated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adult patients who had completed multi-drug therapy for leprosy were recruited from several Bombay Leprosy Project clinics. Clinical neurological examination, assessment of leprosy affected skin and nerves and pain evaluation were performed for all patients. Patients completed the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: One hundred and one patients were recruited, and 22 (21.8% had neuropathic pain. The main sensory symptoms were numbness (86.4%, tingling (68.2%, hypoesthesia to touch (81.2% and pinprick (72.7%. Neuropathic pain was associated with nerve enlargement and tenderness, painful skin lesions and with psychological morbidity. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92% in diagnosing neuropathic pain. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 is a simple tool for the screening of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients. Psychological morbidity was detected in 15% of the patients and 41% of the patients with neuropathic pain had psychological morbidity.

  5. The Impact of Enrollment in a Specialized Interdisciplinary Neuropathic Pain Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Garven

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic pain clinics have been created because of the increasing recognition of chronic pain as a very common, debilitating condition that requires specialized care. Neuropathic pain (NeP is a multifaceted, specialized form of chronic pain that often requires input from multiple disciplines for assessment and management.

  6. The clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, E C; Erhan, B; Lakse, E

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the characteristics of neuropathic pain and observe intensity alterations in pain with regard to time during the day in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. A total of 50 SCI patients (M/F, 40/10; mean age, 35±12 years) with at-level and below-level neuropathic pain were included in the study. All patients were examined and classified according to the ASIA/ISCoS 2002 International Neurologic Examination and Classification Standards. The history, duration, localization and characteristics of the pain were recorded. Neuropathic pain of patients was evaluated with the McGill-Melzack Pain Questionnaire and LANSS (Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs) Pain Scale. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to measure the severity of pain four times during the day. Quality of life was analyzed with Short Form 36. Out of 50 patients, 10 were tetraplegic and 40 were paraplegic. In all, 28 patients had motor and sensory complete injuries (AIS A), whereas 22 patients had sensory incomplete (AIS B, C and D) injuries. The most frequently used words to describe neuropathic pain were throbbing, tiring, hot and tingling. Pain intensity was significantly higher in the night than in the evening, noon and morning (PNeuropathic pain is a serious complaint in SCI patients and affects their quality of life. Neuropathic pain intensity was higher in the night hours than other times of day. This situation reinforces the need for a continued research and education on neuropathic pain in SCI.

  7. A burden of illness study for neuropathic pain in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liedgens H

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hiltrud Liedgens,1 Marko Obradovic,1 Jonathan De Courcy,2 Timothy Holbrook,2 Rafal Jakubanis2 1Grunenthal, Aachen, Germany; 2Adelphi Real World, Bollington, Cheshire, UK Purpose: Neuropathic pain (NP is often severe and represents a major humanistic and economic burden. This study aimed at providing insight on this burden across France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK, considering direct and indirect costs, productivity loss, and humanistic impact on patients and their families. Methods: Physician questionnaires provided data on patients presenting with NP covering demographics, sick leave and retirement, number of consultations, drug treatments, and surgical procedures. Patients provided further demographic and disease-related data and completed the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI, the EuroQol 5-Dimension (EQ-5D, and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI questionnaires. All health-related direct unitary costs were collected from relevant country-specific sources and adjusted to 2012 prices (€ where necessary. A subgroup analysis of costs based on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (n=894, fibromyalgia (n=300, and low back pain (n=963 was performed. Findings: About 413 physicians completed a total of 3,956 patient records forms. Total annual direct health-care costs per patient ranged from €1,939 (Italy to €3,131 (Spain. Annual professional caregiver costs ranged from €393 (France to €1,242 (UK, but this only represented a small proportion of total care because much care is provided by family or friends. Sick leave costs ranged from €5,492 (UK to €7,098 (France, with 10%–32% patients prevented from working at some point by NP. Total cost (including direct and indirect costs of NP per patient was €10,313 in France (69% of the total cost, €14,446 in Germany (78%, €9,305 in Italy (69%, €10,597 in Spain (67%, and €9,685 in the UK (57%. Indirect costs (ie, sick leave constituted the majority of costs in all five

  8. Motor cortex stimulation for neuropathic pain: From phenomenology to mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Peyron, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is relatively recent neurosurgical technique for pain control, the use of which is growing steadily since its description in the last decade. While clinical series show that at least 50% of patients with chronic, pharmacoresistant neuropathic pain may benefit from this technique, the mechanisms of action of MCS remain elusive. In this review, we synthesise a number of studies that, combining electrophysiology and functional imaging, have permitted to proceed from phenomenology to models that may account for part of such mechanisms. MCS appears to trigger rapid and phasic activation in the lateral thalamus, which leads to a cascade of events of longer time-course in medial thalamus, anterior cingulate/orbitofrontal cortices and periaqueductal grey matter. Activity in these latter structures is delayed relative to actual cortical neurostimulation and becomes maximal during the hours that follow MCS arrest. Current hypotheses suggest that MCS may act through at least two mechanisms: activation of perigenual cingulate and orbitofrontal areas may modulate the emotional appraisal of pain, rather than its intensity, while top down activation of brainstem PAG may lead to descending inhibition toward the spinal cord. Recent evidence also points to a possible secretion of endogenous opioids triggered by chronic MCS. This, along with the delayed and long-lasting activation of several brain structures, is consistent with the clinical effects of MCS, which may also last for hours or days after MCS discontinuation.

  9. Pain-related psychological distress, self-rated health and significance of neuropathic pain in Danish soldiers injured in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duffy, J R; Warburg, Finn; Koelle, S-F T

    2015-01-01

    Disorder Checklist-Civilian, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and EuroQOL Visual Analogue Scale) administered to injured soldiers. The participants were classified into three groups according to the PainDETECT questionnaire: non-neuropathic pain, possible neuropathic pain and definite neuropathic...... pain. RESULTS: Fifty-three participants were included. The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian score was in median (interquartile range) 26 (22-31), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale score was 4 (2-6.5) and 2 (1-5) for anxiety and depression respectively. Evidence of neuropathic...... pain correlated positively with the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian score (rho = 0.469, P Anxiety and Depression Scale subscale for anxiety score (rho = 0.357, P = 0.009), and inversely with the EuroQOL Visual Analogue Scale score (rho = -0.361, P = 0...

  10. Transcranial direct current stimulation to lessen neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury: a mechanistic PET study.

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    Yoon, Eun Jin; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Hye-Ri; Kim, Sang Eun; Lee, Youngjo; Shin, Hyung Ik

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can produce lasting changes in corticospinal excitability and can potentially be used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying the effects of tDCS are unknown. We investigated the underlying neural mechanisms of tDCS for chronic pain relief using [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([(18)F]FDG-PET). Sixteen patients with neuropathic pain (mean age 44.1 ± 8.6 years, 4 females) due to traumatic spinal cord injury received sham or active anodal stimulation of the motor cortex using tDCS for 10 days (20 minutes, 2 mA, twice a day). The effect of tDCS on regional cerebral glucose metabolism was evaluated by [(18)F]FDG-PET before and after tDCS sessions. There was a significant decrease in the numeric rating scale scores for pain, from 7.6 ± 0.5 at baseline to 5.9 ± 1.8 after active tDCS (P = .016). We found increased metabolism in the medulla and decreased metabolism in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex after active tDCS treatment compared with the changes induced by sham tDCS. Additionally, an increase in metabolism after active tDCS was observed in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and insula. The results of this study suggest that anodal stimulation of the motor cortex using tDCS can modulate emotional and cognitive components of pain and normalize excessive attention to pain and pain-related information.

  11. Behavioral and morphological evidence for the involvement of glial cells in the antinociceptive effect of najanalgesin in a rat neuropathic pain model.

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    Liang, Yingxia; Jiang, Weijian; Zhang, Zhiyu; Yu, Jianfeng; Tao, Liang; Zhao, Shujin

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a devastating neurological disease that seriously affects patients' quality of life. Despite a high level of incidence, the underlying mechanisms of neuropathic pain are still poorly understood. However, recent evidence supports the prominent role of spinal glial cells in neuropathic pain states. In our laboratory, we observed that najanalgesin, a novel peptide isolated from the venom of Naja naja atra, exerts significant analgesic effects on acute pain in mice and neuropathic pain in rats. The objective of the present study was to determine whether spinal glia are associated with the antinociceptive effect of najanalgesin in an L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) rodent model of neuropathic pain. Mechanical allodynia developed after surgery, and hypersensitivity was significantly attenuated by the intrathecal administration of najanalgesin. The inhibitory effect of najanalgesin was significantly (pfluorocitrate (a glial cell antagonist). In addition, the astrocyte activation was attenuated following najanalgesin treatment in the dorsal horn of neuropathic rats, as assessed by immunohistology and Western blotting. The tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) content of cerebral spinal fluid and cell culture supernatants changed significantly after najanalgesin administration. The results suggest that najanalgesin may exert its anti-allodynic effect by altering astrocyte cell function.

  12. Frequency, character, intensity and impact of neuropathic pain in a cohort of spinal cord injury patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, H.; Akhtar, N.; Matee, S.; Butt, A.W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine frequency, character, approximate location and intensity of neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury and its impact on the quality of life. Study Design: A cross-sectional survey Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Rawalpindi from Feb 2009 to Feb 2010. Material and Methods: Through non-probability convenience sampling 87 patients of both genders diagnosed with spinal cord injury based on American Spinal Injury Association criteria and admitted within a year of injury were included. Those in spinal shock, having poor cognition, inability to communicate, concurrent brain injury and history of chronic pain before injury were excluded. The history, localization and characteristics of the pain and interference with life activities were recorded. Neuropathic pain of patients was evaluated with Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Pain Scale. Visual analogue scale was used to measure the severity of pain. Results: Out of 87 patients (mean age 36.9 years) seventy four were male and 13 were female. Seventy patients (80%) were AIS-A, 6 (7%) were AIS-B and 11 (13%) were AIS-C. Neuropathic pain was present in 57.5% (n=50). Most of the patients localized their pain below the neurological level of injury (78%) and rated pain intensity as moderate pain (54%). Majority (48%) described the pain as burning followed by electric shock like (42%), stabbing (8%) and pricking (2%). 48% patients reported that their quality of life was affected due to pain. 52% required two analgesics of different groups to relieve pain followed by 40% requiring three analgesics and 8% requiring one analgesic. Conclusion: Neuropathic pain is prevalent in people with spinal cord injury and adversely affects life quality. Neuropathic pain is primarily described as a burning sensation of moderate intensity mostly referred to below the neurological level of injury. (author)

  13. Histamine upregulates Nav1.8 expression in primary afferent neurons via H2 receptors: involvement in neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Wang, Ran-Ran; Yu, Jie; Tang, Ying-Ying; Hou, Wei-Wei; Lou, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Hong; Chen, Zhong

    2014-10-01

    The upregulation of Nav1.8 in primary afferents plays a critical role in the development and persistence of neuropathic pain. The mechanisms underlying the upregulation are not fully understood. The present study aims to investigate the regulatory effect of histamine on the expression of Nav1.8 in primary afferent neurons and its involvement in neuropathic pain. Histamine at 10(-8) M increased the expression of Nav1.8 in cultured DRG neurons. This effect could be blocked by H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine or famotidine, but not by H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine or dual H3 /H4 antagonist thioperamide. Peri-sciatic administration of histamine increased Nav1.8 expression in the sciatic nerve and L4/L5 DRG neurons in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied with remarkable mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral hindpaw. Famotidine but not pyrilamine or thioperamide inhibited Nav1.8 upregulation and pain hypersensitivity. In addition, famotidine (40 mg/kg, i.p.) not only suppressed autotomy behavior in the rat neuroma model of neuropathic pain but also attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia following partial sciatic nerve ligation. Moreover, famotidine inhibited Nav1.8 upregulation in the neuroma and ligated sciatic nerve. Our findings indicate that histamine increases Nav1.8 expression in primary afferent neurons via H2 receptor-mediated pathway and thereby contributes to neuropathic pain. H2 receptor antagonists may potentially be used as analgesics for patients with neuropathic pain. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Functional brain imaging: what has it brought to our understanding of neuropathic pain? A special focus on allodynic pain mechanisms.

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    Peyron, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Brain responses to nociception are well identified. The same is not true for allodynic pain, a strong painful sensation in response to touch or innocuous cold stimuli that may be experienced by patients with neuropathic pain. Brain (or spinal cord) reorganization that may explain this paradoxical perception still remains largely unknown. Allodynic pain is associated with abnormally increased activity in SII and in the anterior insular cortex, contralateral and/or ipsilateral to allodynia. Because a bilateral increase in activity has been repeatedly reported in these areas in nociceptive conditions, the observed activation during allodynia can explain that a physiologically nonpainful stimulus could be perceived by the damaged nervous system as a painful one. Both secondary somatosensory and insular cortices receive input from the thalamus, which is a major relay of sensory and spinothalamic pathways, the involvement of which is known to be crucial for the development of neuropathic pain. Both thalamic function and structure have been reported to be abnormal or impaired in neuropathic pain conditions including in the basal state, possibly explaining the spontaneous component of neuropathic pain. A further indication as to how the brain can create neuropathic pain response in SII and insular cortices stems from examples of diseases, including single-case reports in whom a focal brain lesion leads to central pain disappearance. Additional studies are required to certify the contribution of these areas to the disease processes, to disentangle abnormalities respectively related to pain and to deafferentation, and, in the future, to guide targeting of stimulation studies.

  15. Cannabinoid-mediated modulation of neuropathic pain and microglial accumulation in a model of murine type I diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

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    Ellis Connie L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the frequency of diabetes mellitus and its relationship to diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN and neuropathic pain (NeP, our understanding of underlying mechanisms leading to chronic pain in diabetes remains poor. Recent evidence has demonstated a prominent role of microglial cells in neuropathic pain states. One potential therapeutic option gaining clinical acceptance is the cannabinoids, for which cannabinoid receptors (CB are expressed on neurons and microglia. We studied the accumulation and activation of spinal and thalamic microglia in streptozotocin (STZ-diabetic CD1 mice and the impact of cannabinoid receptor agonism/antagonism during the development of a chronic NeP state. We provided either intranasal or intraperitoneal cannabinoid agonists/antagonists at multiple doses both at the initiation of diabetes as well as after establishment of diabetes and its related NeP state. Results Tactile allodynia and thermal hypersensitivity were observed over 8 months in diabetic mice without intervention. Microglial density increases were seen in the dorsal spinal cord and in thalamic nuclei and were accompanied by elevation of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, a marker of microglial activation. When initiated coincidentally with diabetes, moderate-high doses of intranasal cannabidiol (cannaboid receptor 2 agonist and intraperitoneal cannabidiol attenuated the development of an NeP state, even after their discontinuation and without modification of the diabetic state. Cannabidiol was also associated with restriction in elevation of microglial density in the dorsal spinal cord and elevation in phosphorylated p38 MAPK. When initiated in an established DPN NeP state, both CB1 and CB2 agonists demonstrated an antinociceptive effect until their discontinuation. There were no pronociceptive effects demonstated for either CB1 or CB2 antagonists. Conclusions The prevention of microglial accumulation and activation in the dorsal spinal

  16. Biopsychosocial characteristics of patients with neuropathic pain following spinal cord trauma injury. Case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Viviana Gonçalves; Jesus,Cristine Alves Costa de

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:Spinal cord injury is a change in spinal canal structures and may induce motor, sensory, autonomic and psychoaffective changes. Trauma injury is the most prevalent. Neuropathic pain is more frequent in people with spinal cord injury and may be disabling. Pain development mechanism is poorly known being its management difficult for both patients and health professionals. This study aimed at identifying biopsychosocial characteristics associated to neuropathic ...

  17. Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury resistant to conventional therapies - case report

    OpenAIRE

    Andrzej Daszkiewicz; Zbigniew Gierlotka; Wojciech Nierodziński; Aleksandra Misiołek; Hanna Misiołek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There are patients with neuropathic pain in whom the treatment is ineffective, despite the fact that is conducted with adherence to the current guidelines. In these patients alternative treatment methods such as hypnosis could be effective. Methods The paper presents a case of a 58-year-old man with central neuropathic pain after cervical spinal cord injury. The conservative treatment with antiepileptics including gabapentoids), antidepressants (tricyclic and selective no...

  18. Analysis of long-standing nociceptive and neuropathic pain in patients with post-polio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werhagen, Lars; Borg, Kristian

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze pain, both nociceptive and neuropathic, in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS) and relate the pain to age at the initial polio infection, age at examination, to gender and disability. The study was conducted in a university hospital department. Patients with PPS were interviewed at their regular visits about pain, its character, intensity and localization. A clinical examination, including a thorough neurological examination, was performed. Data included age at time of polio infection, age at time of examination and gender. Pain intensity was measured with the VAS-scale and walking capability by the WISCI-scale. One hundred sixty-three (88 women, 75 men) patients were included in the study. Pain was present in 109 (67%). Pain was more frequently reported by women (82%) than by men (49%). 96 patients experienced nociceptive pain, 10 patients both neuropathic and nociceptive pain and three experienced pure neuropathic pain. Half of the patients with pain experienced pain in more than one body region. When neuropathic pain was present, another additional neurological disorder was diagnosed. Pain was more often found in younger patients (around 70%) than in older patients (around 50%). In summary pain is common in patients with PPS and most patients experienced nociceptive pain. Women have pain more often than men. Older patients experience pain more seldom than younger patients. Age at time of primary polio infection is important for the development of pain. When neuropathic pain is present, it is important to proceed with neurological examination to find an adequate diagnosis.

  19. Depression, anxiety, health-related quality of life and pain in patients with chronic fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormsen, Lise; Rosenberg, Raben; Bach, Flemming W; Jensen, Troels S

    2010-02-01

    Chronic pain is often associated with comorbidities such as anxiety and depression, resulting in a low health-related quality of life. The mechanisms underlying this association are not clear, but a disturbance in the pain control systems from the brain stem has been suggested. Thirty neuropathic pain (NP) patients, 28 patients with fibromyalgia (FM), and 26 pain-free age- and gender-matched controls were included and examined with respect to mental distress (self-rated Symptom Checklist-92), depression (doctor-rated Hamilton Depression Scale and self-rated Major Depression Inventory), and anxiety (doctor-rated Hamilton Anxiety Scale and self-rated Anxiety Inventory). In addition, patients assessed their health-related quality of life (SF-36). Chronic pain patients with FM and NP had significantly more mental distress including depression and anxiety than healthy controls both by self-rating and by a professional rating. However, these scores are low compared to other studies on mental distress in chronic pain patients. Only few chronic pain patients meet the diagnostic criteria for depression (NP 3.3%, FM 7.1%), and associations between pain and mental symptoms were only found in the FM group despite similar pain intensities. The findings suggest that different mechanisms are responsible for the development of mood disorders in the two patient groups.

  20. Neural markers of neuropathic pain associated with maladaptive plasticity in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal-Faria, Paula; Yalcin, Nilufer; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-04-01

    Given the potential use of neural markers for the development of novel treatments in spinal cord pain, we aimed to characterize the most effective neural markers of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). A systematic PubMed review was conducted, compiling studies that were published prior to April, 2014 that examined neural markers associated with neuropathic pain after SCI using electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques. We identified 6 studies: Four using electroencephalogram (EEG); 1 using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET (positron emission tomography); and 1 using MR spectroscopy. The EEG recordings suggested a reduction in alpha EEG peak frequency activity in the frontal regions of SCI patients with neuropathic pain. The MRI scans showed volume loss, primarily in the gray matter of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and by FDG-PET, hypometabolism in the medial prefrontal cortex was observed in SCI patients with neuropathic pain compared with healthy subjects. In the MR spectroscopy findings, the presence of pain was associated with changes in the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. When analyzed together, the results of these studies seem to point out to a common marker of pain in SCI characterized by decreased cortical activity in frontal areas and possibly increased subcortical activity. These results may contribute to planning further mechanistic studies as to better understand the mechanisms by which neuropathic pain is modulated in patients with SCI as well as clinical studies investigating best responders of treatment. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  1. Spinal cord stimulation attenuates temporal summation in patients with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Elon; Burstein, Yulia; Suzan, Erica; Treister, Roi; Aviram, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Evidence has shown that electrical stimulation at the dorsal columns attenuated the "wind-up" phenomenon in dorsal horn neurons in nerve-injured rats. This study was aimed to test the effect of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) on temporal summation (TS), the clinical correlate of the wind-up phenomenon in patients with radicular leg pain. Eighteen patients with SCS implants were tested both 30 minutes after SCS activation ("ON") and 2 hours after turning it off ("OFF"), in a random order. Temporal summation was evaluated in the most painful site in the affected leg and in the corresponding area in the contralateral leg by applying a tonic painful heat stimulus (46.5°C; 120 seconds) and simultaneous recording of the perceived heat pain intensity. Patients were also requested to report their clinical pain intensity (0-100 numerical pain scale) during SCS "ON" and "OFF". The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used in the comparisons between SCS "ON" and "OFF". Spinal cord stimulation activation significantly attenuated clinical pain intensity (from 66 ± 18 to 27 ± 31, P spinal cord neurons, is a possible mechanism underlying SCS analgesia in patients with neuropathic pain.

  2. Prevalence of Neuropathic Pain in Radiotherapy Oncology Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manas, Ana; Monroy, Jose Luis; Ramos, Avelino Alia; Cano, Carmen; Lopez-Gomez, Vanessa; Masramon, Xavier; Perez, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Neuropathic pain (NP) in cancer patients severely impacts quality of life. Radiotherapy (RT) may cause NP, and at the same time, cancer patients visit RT units for pain relief. NP prevalence at these sites and current analgesic treatment should be assessed to improve management. Methods and Materials: This epidemiological, prospective, multicenter study was undertaken to assess NP prevalence, according to Douleur Neuropathique 4 questions questtionaire (DN4) test results, and analgesic management in cancer pain patients visiting RT oncologic units. Secondary analyses assessed NP etiology and pain intensity (using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form) and impact (using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Medical Outcomes Study [MOS] for Sleep, and the Health Survey Short Form-12). Results: A total of 1,098 patients with any kind of pain were registered. NP prevalence was 31.1% (95% confidence interval, 28.4%--33.9%); 291 NP patients (mean age, 62.2 ±12.5 years and 57.7% men) were eligible for study; 49% of patients were overweight. The most frequent tumors were those of breast and lung, and stage IIIB was the most common cancer stage. The tumors caused 75% of NP cases. Anxiety, sleepiness, and depression were common. At 8 weeks, pain intensity and interference with daily activities decreased significantly for 50.8% of responders. Depression and anxiety (p < 0.0001) scores on the Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary measures (p < 0.0001) and all MOS-Sleep subscales, except for snoring, improved significantly. The percentage of satisfied patients increased from 13.8% to 87.4% (p < 0.0001) with the current analgesic treatment, which meant a 1.2- and 6-fold increase (p < 0.0001) in narcotic analgesics and anticonvulsants, respectively, compared to previous treatment. Conclusions: NP is highly prevalent at RT oncology units, with sleepiness, anxiety, and depression as frequent comorbidities. There is a need to improve management

  3. Exploring acute-to-chronic neuropathic pain in rats after contusion spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Andrew D; Ayala, Monica T; Schleicher, Wolfgang E; Smith, Elana J; Bateman, Emily M; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes chronic pain in 65% of individuals. Unfortunately, current pain management is inadequate for many SCI patients. Rodent models could help identify how SCI pain develops, explore new treatment strategies, and reveal whether acute post-SCI morphine worsens chronic pain. However, few studies explore or compare SCI-elicited neuropathic pain in rats. Here, we sought to determine how different clinically relevant contusion SCIs in male and female rats affect neuropathic pain, and whether acute morphine worsens later chronic SCI pain. First, female rats received sham surgery, or 150kDyn or 200kDyn midline T9 contusion SCI. These rats displayed modest mechanical allodynia and long-lasting thermal hyperalgesia. Next, a 150kDyn (1s dwell) midline contusion SCI was performed in male and female rats. Interestingly, males, but not females showed SCI-elicited mechanical allodynia; rats of both sexes had thermal hyperalgesia. In this model, acute morphine treatment had no significant effect on chronic neuropathic pain symptoms. Unilateral SCIs can also elicit neuropathic pain that could be exacerbated by morphine, so male rats received unilateral T13 contusion SCI (100kDyn). These rats exhibited significant, transient mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia. Acute morphine did not exacerbate chronic pain. Our data show that specific rat contusion SCI models cause neuropathic pain. Further, chronic neuropathic pain elicited by these contusion SCIs was not amplified by our course of early post-trauma morphine. Using clinically relevant rat models of SCI could help identify novel pain management strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The contribution of TRPM8 and TRPA1 channels to cold allodynia and neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ombretta Caspani

    Full Text Available Cold allodynia is a common feature of neuropathic pain however the underlying mechanisms of this enhanced sensitivity to cold are not known. Recently the transient receptor potential (TRP channels TRPM8 and TRPA1 have been identified and proposed to be molecular sensors for cold. Here we have investigated the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 mRNA in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG and examined the cold sensitivity of peripheral sensory neurons in the chronic construction injury (CCI model of neuropathic pain in mice.In behavioral experiments, chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve induced a hypersensitivity to both cold and the TRPM8 agonist menthol that developed 2 days post injury and remained stable for at least 2 weeks. Using quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization we examined the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 in DRG. Both channels displayed significantly reduced expression levels after injury with no change in their distribution pattern in identified neuronal subpopulations. Furthermore, in calcium imaging experiments, we detected no alterations in the number of cold or menthol responsive neurons in the DRG, or in the functional properties of cold transduction following injury. Intriguingly however, responses to the TRPA1 agonist mustard oil were strongly reduced.Our results indicate that injured sensory neurons do not develop abnormal cold sensitivity after chronic constriction injury and that alterations in the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 are unlikely to contribute directly to the pathogenesis of cold allodynia in this neuropathic pain model.

  5. Neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury: report of 213 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Assis, Maruska Salles; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Cecon, Angelo Daros

    2013-09-01

    Management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI) can be a frustrating experience for patients since it poses a therapeutic challenge. In this article the authors describe the clinical characteristics of a group of patients with pain after spinal cord injury. In this retrospective study, 213 patients with SCI and neuropathic pain were assessed. We analyzed clinical characteristics, treatment options, and pain intensity for these patients. The main cause of SCI was spine trauma, which occurred in 169 patients, followed by tumors and infection. Complete lesions were verified in 144 patients. In our study, patients with traumatic SCI and partial lesions seem to be presented with more intense pain; however, this was not statistically significant. Neuropathic pain is a common complaint in patients with SCI and presents a treatment challenge. Knowledge of the clinical characteristics of this group of patients may help determine the best approach to intervention.

  6. Neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury: report of 213 patients

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    Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective Management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI can be a frustrating experience for patients since it poses a therapeutic challenge. In this article the authors describe the clinical characteristics of a group of patients with pain after spinal cord injury. Methods In this retrospective study, 213 patients with SCI and neuropathic pain were assessed. We analyzed clinical characteristics, treatment options, and pain intensity for these patients. Results The main cause of SCI was spine trauma, which occurred in 169 patients, followed by tumors and infection. Complete lesions were verified in 144 patients. In our study, patients with traumatic SCI and partial lesions seem to be presented with more intense pain; however, this was not statistically significant. Conclusions Neuropathic pain is a common complaint in patients with SCI and presents a treatment challenge. Knowledge of the clinical characteristics of this group of patients may help determine the best approach to intervention.

  7. Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury resistant to conventional therapies - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daszkiewicz, Andrzej; Gierlotka, Zbigniew; Nierodziński, Wojciech; Misiołek, Aleksandra; Misiołek, Hanna

    There are patients with neuropathic pain in whom the treatment is ineffective, despite the fact that is conducted with adherence to the current guidelines. In these patients alternative treatment methods such as hypnosis could be effective. The paper presents a case of a 58-year-old man with central neuropathic pain after cervical spinal cord injury. The conservative treatment with antiepileptics including gabapentoids), antidepressants (tricyclic and selective noradrenaline and serotonin inhibitor - SNRI) and opioids was not effective. In the pain management centre the celiac plexus stimulation and neuromodulation was performed, however, with no positive results. The patient was referred to the psychiatrist using hypnosis in his medical practice. The psychiatrist qualified the patient to pain treatment with hypnosis. After several hypnotic sessions the pain intensity score in numeric rating scale (NRS) decreased from NRS 7 to NRS 5 points and became acceptable for the patient. Hypnosis can be considered an effective method of neuropathic pain treatment in some patients.

  8. Prevalence, Causes, and Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Dutch Nursing Home Residents : A Retrospective Chart Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kollenburg, Esther G. P.; Lavrijsen, Jan C. M.; Verhagen, Stans C.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Schalkwijk, Annelies; Vissers, Kris C. P.

    Objectives To identify the prevalence and causes of neuropathic pain in Dutch nursing home residents; to establish the prevalence of painful and nonpainful diabetic polyneuropathy in a subsample of individuals with diabetes mellitus and central poststroke pain (CPSP) in a subsample of individuals

  9. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonists Modulate Neuropathic Pain: a Link to Chemokines?

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    Caroline eFreitag

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain presents a widespread and intractable medical problem. While numerous pharmaceuticals are used to treat chronic pain, drugs that are safe for extended use and highly effective at treating the most severe pain do not yet exist. Chronic pain resulting from nervous system injury (neuropathic pain is common in conditions ranging from multiple sclerosis to HIV-1 infection to type II diabetes. Inflammation caused by neuropathy is believed to contribute to the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines are key inflammatory mediators, several of which (MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, fractalkine, SDF-1 among others have been linked to chronic, neuropathic pain in both human conditions and animal models. The important roles chemokines play in inflammation and pain make them an attractive therapeutic target. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are a family of nuclear receptors known for their roles in metabolism. Recent research has revealed that PPARs also play a role in inflammatory gene repression. PPAR agonists have wide-ranging effects including inhibition of chemokine expression and pain behavior reduction in animal models. Experimental evidence suggests a connection between PPAR agonists' pain ameliorating effects and suppression of inflammatory gene expression, including chemokines. In early clinical research, one PPARα agonist, palmitoylethanolamide, shows promise in relieving chronic pain. If this link can be better established, PPAR agonists may represent a new drug therapy for neuropathic pain.

  10. An Intensive Locomotor Training Paradigm Improves Neuropathic Pain following Spinal Cord Compression Injury in Rats.

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    Dugan, Elizabeth A; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is often associated with both locomotor deficits and sensory dysfunction, including debilitating neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, current conventional pharmacological, physiological, or psychological treatments provide only marginal relief for more than two-thirds of patients, highlighting the need for improved treatment options. Locomotor training is often prescribed as an adjunct therapy for peripheral neuropathic pain but is rarely used to treat central neuropathic pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential anti-nociceptive benefits of intensive locomotor training (ILT) on neuropathic pain consequent to traumatic SCI. Using a rodent SCI model for central neuropathic pain, ILT was initiated either 5 d after injury prior to development of neuropathic pain symptoms (the "prevention" group) or delayed until pain symptoms fully developed (∼3 weeks post-injury, the "reversal" group). The training protocol consisted of 5 d/week of a ramping protocol that started with 11 m/min for 5 min and increased in speed (+1 m/min/week) and time (1-4 minutes/week) to a maximum of two 20-min sessions/d at 15 m/min by the fourth week of training. ILT prevented and reversed the development of heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia, as well as reversed developed tactile allodynia, suggesting analgesic benefits not seen with moderate levels of locomotor training. Further, the analgesic benefits of ILT persisted for several weeks once training had been stopped. The unique ability of an ILT protocol to produce robust and sustained anti-nociceptive effects, as assessed by three distinct outcome measures for below-level SCI neuropathic pain, suggests that this adjunct therapeutic approach has great promise in a comprehensive treatment strategy for SCI pain.

  11. The astrocyte-targeted therapy by Bushi for the neuropathic pain in mice.

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    Keisuke Shibata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is accumulating evidence that the activation of spinal glial cells, especially microglia, is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, the inhibition of microglial activation is often ineffective, especially for long-lasting persistent neuropathic pain. So far, neuropathic pain remains largely intractable and a new therapeutic strategy for the pain is still required. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Seltzer model mice, we investigated the temporal aspect of two types of neuropathic pain behaviors, i.e., thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, as well as that of morphological changes in spinal microglia and astrocytes by immunohistochemical studies. Firstly, we analyzed the pattern of progression in the pain behaviors, and found that the pain consisted of an "early induction phase" and subsequent "late maintenance phase". We next analyzed the temporal changes in spinal glial cells, and found that the induction and the maintenance phase of pain were associated with the activation of microglia and astrocytes, respectively. When Bushi, a Japanese herbal medicine often used for several types of persistent pain, was administered chronically, it inhibited the maintenance phase of pain without affecting the induction phase, which was in accordance with the inhibition of astrocytic activation in the spinal cord. These analgesic effects and the inhibition of astrocytic activation by Bushi were mimicked by the intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate, an inhibitor of astrocytic activation. Finally, we tested the direct effect of Bushi on astrocytic activation, and found that Bushi suppressed the IL-1β- or IL-18-evoked ERK1/2-phosphorylation in cultured astrocytes but not the ATP-evoked p38- and ERK1/2-phosphorylation in microglia in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that the activation of spinal astrocytes was responsible for the late maintenance phase of neuropathic pain in the Seltzer model mice and

  12. The astrocyte-targeted therapy by Bushi for the neuropathic pain in mice.

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    Shibata, Keisuke; Sugawara, Takeshi; Fujishita, Kayoko; Shinozaki, Youichi; Matsukawa, Takashi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the activation of spinal glial cells, especially microglia, is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, the inhibition of microglial activation is often ineffective, especially for long-lasting persistent neuropathic pain. So far, neuropathic pain remains largely intractable and a new therapeutic strategy for the pain is still required. Using Seltzer model mice, we investigated the temporal aspect of two types of neuropathic pain behaviors, i.e., thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, as well as that of morphological changes in spinal microglia and astrocytes by immunohistochemical studies. Firstly, we analyzed the pattern of progression in the pain behaviors, and found that the pain consisted of an "early induction phase" and subsequent "late maintenance phase". We next analyzed the temporal changes in spinal glial cells, and found that the induction and the maintenance phase of pain were associated with the activation of microglia and astrocytes, respectively. When Bushi, a Japanese herbal medicine often used for several types of persistent pain, was administered chronically, it inhibited the maintenance phase of pain without affecting the induction phase, which was in accordance with the inhibition of astrocytic activation in the spinal cord. These analgesic effects and the inhibition of astrocytic activation by Bushi were mimicked by the intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate, an inhibitor of astrocytic activation. Finally, we tested the direct effect of Bushi on astrocytic activation, and found that Bushi suppressed the IL-1β- or IL-18-evoked ERK1/2-phosphorylation in cultured astrocytes but not the ATP-evoked p38- and ERK1/2-phosphorylation in microglia in vitro. Our results indicated that the activation of spinal astrocytes was responsible for the late maintenance phase of neuropathic pain in the Seltzer model mice and, therefore, the inhibition of astrocytic activation by Bushi could be a

  13. Effect of Gabapentin and Baclofen on Histology Study in Neuropathic Pain

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    Fifteen A. Fajrin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain resulted from injury to nerves is often resistant to current treatments and can seriously cause chronic pain if no appropriate treatment is given. This study was designed to prove the effectiveness of gabapentin and baclofen in increasing latency time toward thermal stimulus and recovering the morphology of dorsal horn of spinal cord in neuropathic-induced chronic pain. Forty mice were divided into 8 groups i.e sham, negative control, gabapentin at three different doses (10, 30, 100 nmol and baclofen at three different doses (1, 10, 30 nmol. Neuropathic condition was induced by ligation of sciatic nerve with Partial Sciatic Nerve Ligation (PSNL method. Gabapentin and baclofen were administrated intrathecally once a day for seven days, a week after neuropathic induction. Latency time toward thermal stimulus was measured on days 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12 and 14 after induction. Histology of the dorsal horn of spinal cord tissue was examined by haematoxylline-eosin staining. The results showed that intrathecal injection of gabapentin and baclofen significantly increased latency time of mice toward thermal stimulus compared with negative control. Gabapentin and baclofen are effective as treatment for neuropathic pain. They can also help the recovery process of the histology in dorsal horn in neuropathic pain.

  14. The effect of oxcarbazepine in peripheral neuropathic pain depends on pain phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torgaard Demant, Dyveke; Lund, Karen; Vollert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In neuropathic pain it has been suggested that pain phenotype based on putative pain mechanisms may predict response to treatment. This was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and phenotype-stratified study with 2 6-week treatment periods of oxcarbazepine (1800-2400mg) and placebo....... The primary efficacy measure was change in median pain intensity between baseline and the last week of treatment measured on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and the primary objective was to compare the effect of oxcarbazepine in patients with and without the irritable nociceptor phenotype as defined...... patients: 31 with the irritable and 52 with the nonirritable nociceptor phenotype. In the total sample, oxcarbazepine relieved pain of 0.7 points (on a numeric rating scale 0-10; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4-1.4) more than placebo (P=0.015) and there was a significant interaction between treatment...

  15. Topical Ketamine 10% for Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury Patients: An Open-Label Trial.

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    Rabi, Joseph; Minori, Joshua; Abad, Hasan; Lee, Ray; Gittler, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Topical ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, has been shown to be effective in certain neuropathic pain syndromes. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of topical ketamine in spinal cord injury patients with neuropathic pain. An open label trial enrolled five subjects at an outpatient rehabilitation hospital with traumatic spinal cord injuries who had neuropathic pain at or below the level of injury. Subjects applied topical ketamine 10% three times a day for a two-week duration. Subjects recorded their numerical pain score-ranging from 0 to 10, with 0 representing "no pain, 5 representing "moderate pain," and 10 being described as "worst possible pain"-in a journal at the time of application of topical ketamine and one hour after application. Using a numerical pain scale allows for something as subjective as pain to be given an objective quantification. Subjects also recorded any occurrence of adverse events and level of satisfaction. All five subjects had a decrease in their numerical pain scale by the end of two weeks, ranging from 14% to 63%. The duration ranged from one hour in one subject to the next application in other subjects. There were no adverse effects. Overall, four out of the five subjects stated they were satisfied. Topical ketamine 10% is an effective neuropathic pain medicine in patients with spinal cord injuries; however, further studies need to be done with a placebo and larger sample size. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  16. Oscillatory neural representations in the sensory thalamus predict neuropathic pain relief by deep brain stimulation.

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    Huang, Yongzhi; Green, Alexander L; Hyam, Jonathan; Fitzgerald, James; Aziz, Tipu Z; Wang, Shouyan

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the function of sensory thalamic neural activity is essential for developing and improving interventions for neuropathic pain. However, there is a lack of investigation of the relationship between sensory thalamic oscillations and pain relief in patients with neuropathic pain. This study aims to identify the oscillatory neural characteristics correlated with pain relief induced by deep brain stimulation (DBS), and develop a quantitative model to predict pain relief by integrating characteristic measures of the neural oscillations. Measures of sensory thalamic local field potentials (LFPs) in thirteen patients with neuropathic pain were screened in three dimensional feature space according to the rhythm, balancing, and coupling neural behaviours, and correlated with pain relief. An integrated approach based on principal component analysis (PCA) and multiple regression analysis is proposed to integrate the multiple measures and provide a predictive model. This study reveals distinct thalamic rhythms of theta, alpha, high beta and high gamma oscillations correlating with pain relief. The balancing and coupling measures between these neural oscillations were also significantly correlated with pain relief. The study enriches the series research on the function of thalamic neural oscillations in neuropathic pain and relief, and provides a quantitative approach for predicting pain relief by DBS using thalamic neural oscillations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment and management of pain, with particular emphasis on central neuropathic pain, in moderate to severe dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E.J.A.; Plooij, B.

    2012-01-01

    In patients with dementia, undertreatment of pain, irrespective of its aetiology, is widely recognized; the risk for undertreatment increases with the severity of dementia. We argue, however, that central neuropathic pain is by far the most undertreated type of pain in patients with dementia.

  18. NK cells mediate the cumulative analgesic effect of electroacupuncture in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

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    Gao, Yong-Hui; Wang, Jun-Ying; Qiao, Li-Na; Chen, Shu-Ping; Tan, Lian-Hong; Xu, Qiu-Ling; Liu, Jun-Ling

    2014-08-26

    Cumulating evidence has revealed the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy in relieving pain via immunoregulation. However, its underlying mechanism remains unknown. The present study was designed to determine the changes of immunogenic responses at different time-points of electroacupuncture (EA) interventions in neuropathic pain rats. The neuropathic pain model was established by ligature of the left sciatic nerve to induce chronic constriction injury (CCI). EA was applied at Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34) for the EA groups. The thermal pain threshold was detected with an algesia-detector. The subgroups of plasma and splenic lymphocytes were determined via fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Specific inflammatory cytokines were assayed using an ELISA-based bead multiplex assay. The activities of splenic natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes were detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium colorimetric method. For confirming the involvement of NK cell in EA-analgesia, anti-asialo-ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide (anti-asialo-GM1) antibody was given to CCI rats before EA. Following CCI, the thermal pain threshold of the affected hind footpad was significantly decreased, and increased from the 3rd day to the 12th day after EA interventions, presenting a time-dependent tendency from the 5th day on. From day 3 to 5 of EA interventions, the percentages and activity of splenic NK cells, concentrations of splenic interleukin-2 (IL-2) and beta-endorphin (β-EP) were significantly increased. Meanwhile, the concentrations of plasma IL-2, IL-1β and gamma-interferon (IFN-γ) were significantly decreased and returned to the normal level on day 12 following EA. Plasma transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) levels were considerably upregulated on day 5 and 12 following EA. The CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratio was markedly downregulated compared with the control and CCI groups on day 5 and returned to the normal level on day 12 following EA. After depleting NK cells by

  19. Assessment of economic effectiveness in treatment of neuropathic pain and refractory angina pectoris using spinal cord stimulation.

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    Harat, Aleksandra; Sokal, Paweł; Zieliński, Piotr; Harat, Marek; Rusicka, Teresa; Herbowski, Leszek

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies is related to expanding financial needs. The escalation of expenses for health protection and simultaneous economic problems has resulted in an interest in the subject of economic assessment. Decision makers in the health sector should have reasonable tools that will allow them to make complex evaluations of the economic suitability of health technologies. Economic analysis should also prove that launching new procedures can save money. Numerous studies indicate that chronic pain and psycho-sociological variables lead to a worse quality of life. Chronic pain issues are a major public health problem, by virtue of the difficulties in efficient therapy and the social costs reflected in incapability of work and disability. Spinal cord stimulation is the most efficacious procedure in the treatment of chronic pain. The aim of the study was to estimate the costs of treatment of 37 patients suffering from refractory angina pectoris and neuropathic pain who underwent SCS surgery between 2002 and 2008 in the Neurosurgery Clinic of the 10th Military Hospital in Bydgoszcz in the period of two years before and two years after spinal cord stimulation. The authors also assessed quality of life, using the SF 36 questionnaire, and degree of pain using VAS. The issue was examined with a cost-benefit analysis. Cost was understood as the expenses made two years before and two years after the SCS procedure. The benefits were health care expenses saved by implementation of the SCS procedure. All the costs included in both alternative treatment techniques in a period of 5 years underwent a discounting procedure. The authors also included the price of the neurostimulator under a sensitivity analysis. To assess the quality of life before and after the SCS procedure, a SF 36 questionnaire was used, and to assess the level of pain before and after the SCS procedure, the VAS scale. The costs of treatment of refractory angina

  20. Neuropathic pain characteristics in patients from Curitiba (Brazil) with spinal cord injury.

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    Vall, Janaína; Costa, Carlos Mauricio de Castro; Santos, Terezinha de Jesus Teixeira; Costa, Samuel Bovy de Castro

    2011-02-01

    This was a descriptive cross-sectional study on patients with spinal cord injuries living in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. The aim was to evaluate the pain characteristics among such patients seen at referral care centers for spinal cord injury patients in Curitiba. A total of 109 adults with spinal cord injury in this city were evaluated regarding the presence of pain, especially neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was evaluated using the DN4 questionnaire, a universal instrument that has been translated and validated for Portuguese. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the intensity of pain. The prevalence of pain among these 109 patients was 31.2% (34 patients). The nociceptive pain presented was classified as musculoskeletal pain (nine patients), visceral pain (four patients) and mixed pain (one patient), thus totaling 14 patients (12.8%). Another 20 patients (18.3%) showed symptoms of neuropathic pain and fulfilled the criteria for neuropathic pain with scores greater than 4 out 10 in the DN4 questionnaire. Regarding the characteristics of the patients with neuropathic pain, most of them were male, younger than 40 years of age and paraplegic with incomplete lesions. They had become injured from 1 to more than 5 years earlier. The predominant etiology was gunshot wounds, and the intensity of their pain was high, with VAS scores greater than 5. This study partially corroborates other studies conducted on this subject. Studies of this type are important for understanding the profile of these patients, for the purpose of designing strategies for their rehabilitation, with a focus on the appropriate treatment and management of pain.

  1. Neuropathic pain characteristics in patients from Curitiba (Brazil with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Vall

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This was a descriptive cross-sectional study on patients with spinal cord injuries living in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. The aim was to evaluate the pain characteristics among such patients seen at referral care centers for spinal cord injury patients in Curitiba. A total of 109 adults with spinal cord injury in this city were evaluated regarding the presence of pain, especially neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was evaluated using the DN4 questionnaire, a universal instrument that has been translated and validated for Portuguese. A visual analog scale (VAS was used to evaluate the intensity of pain. The prevalence of pain among these 109 patients was 31.2% (34 patients. The nociceptive pain presented was classified as musculoskeletal pain (nine patients, visceral pain (four patients and mixed pain (one patient, thus totaling 14 patients (12.8%. Another 20 patients (18.3% showed symptoms of neuropathic pain and fulfilled the criteria for neuropathic pain with scores greater than 4 out 10 in the DN4 questionnaire. Regarding the characteristics of the patients with neuropathic pain, most of them were male, younger than 40 years of age and paraplegic with incomplete lesions. They had become injured from 1 to more than 5 years earlier. The predominant etiology was gunshot wounds, and the intensity of their pain was high, with VAS scores greater than 5. This study partially corroborates other studies conducted on this subject. Studies of this type are important for understanding the profile of these patients, for the purpose of designing strategies for their rehabilitation, with a focus on the appropriate treatment and management of pain.

  2. Therapeutic implications of toll-like receptors in peripheral neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Krishan K; Saini, Jyoti; Mahajan, Kanika; Singh, Dhyanendra; Jayswal, Dinkar P; Mishra, Srishti; Bishayee, Anupam; Sethi, Gautam; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a state of chronic pain arising after peripheral or central nerve injury. These injuries can be mediated through the activation of various cells (astrocytes, microglia and Schwann cells), as well as the dissolution of distal axons. Recent studies have suggested that after nerve injury, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) involved in Wallerian degeneration and generation of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, these TLRs are responsible for the stimulation of astrocytes and microglia that can cause induction of the proinflammatory mediators and cytokines in the spinal cord, thereby leading to the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Indeed considering the prevalence of neuropathic pain and suffering of the affected patients, insights into the diverse mechanism(s) of activation of TLR signaling cascades may open novel avenues for the management of this chronic condition. Moreover, existing therapies like antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opiates and other analgesic are not sufficiently effective in reducing the pain. In this review, we present substantial evidences highlighting the diverse roles of TLRs and their signaling pathways involved in the progression of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, an elaborate discussion on various existing treatment regimens and future targets involving TLRs has also been included. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychometric validation of the Portuguese version of the Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory

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    de Andrade Daniel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgroud It has been shown that different symptoms or symptom combinations of neuropathic pain (NeP may correspond to different mechanistic backgrounds and respond differently to treatment. The Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI is able to detect distinct clusters of symptoms (i.e. dimensions with a putative common mechanistic background. The present study described the psychometric validation of the Portuguese version (PV of the NPSI. Methods Patients were seen in two consecutive visits, three to four weeks apart. They were asked to: (i rate their mean pain intensity in the last 24 hours on an 11-point (0-10 numerical scale; (ii complete the PV-NPSI; (iii provide the list of pain medications and doses currently in use. VAS and Global Impression of Change (GIC were filled out in the second visit. Results PV-NPSI underwent test-retest reliability, factor analysis, analysis of sensitivity to changes between both visits. The PV-NPSI was reliable in this setting, with a good intra-class correlation for all items. The factorial analysis showed that the PV-NPSI inventory assessed different components of neuropathic pain. Five different factors were found. The PV-NPSI was adequate to evaluate patients with neuropathic pain and to detect clusters of NeP symptoms. Conclusions The psychometric properties of the PV-NPSI rendered it adequate to evaluate patients with both central and peripheral neuropathic pain syndromes and to detect clusters of NeP symptoms.

  4. Tempol Ameliorates and Prevents Mechanical Hyperalgesia in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Kee; Hwang, Seon-Hee; Abdi, Salahadin

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and prevent. Tempol decreases cellular superoxide radical levels and oxidative stress. The aims of our study were to investigate the analgesic and preventive effects of tempol on paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in rats and to identify the associated mechanisms of action. Neuropathic pain was induced with intraperitoneally injected paclitaxel on four alternate days in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Tempol was administered systemically as a single injection and a continuous infusion before or after the injection of paclitaxel. The mechanical threshold for allodynia, protein levels, and free radical levels were measured using von Frey filaments, Western blotting, and live cell imaging, respectively. After the rats developed neuropathic pain behavior, a single intraperitoneal injection and continuous infusion of tempol ameliorated paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. Systemic infusion of tempol in the early phase of the development of pain behavior prevented the development of paclitaxel-induced pain behavior. Paclitaxel increased the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C, phosphorylated nuclear factor κB, phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D), IL-1β, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia; however, tempol decreased these levels. Paclitaxel also increased superoxide levels in a culture of primary dorsal root ganglion cells and tempol decreased these levels. In conclusion, tempol alleviates and prevents chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain in rats by reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokines and free radicals in dorsal root ganglia.

  5. 5% lidocaine medicated plaster double effect in a case of orofacial localized neuropathic pain

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    Casale R

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Casale,1,2 Yuriy Romanenko,2,3 Massimo Allegri4–6 1Department of Clinical Neurophysiology and Pain Rehabilitation Unit, Foundation "Salvatore Maugeri", Research and Care Institute, IRCCS, Pavia, Italy; 2EFIC Montescano Pain School, Montescano, Italy; 3Department of Neurology, Lugansk City Hospital 4, Lugansk, Ukraine; 4Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 5Pain Therapy Service Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy; 6SIMPAR group, Pavia, Italy Abstract: Localized neuropathic pain (LNP is a type of neuropathic pain that is characterized by “consistent and limited area(s of maximum pain associated with negative or positive sensory signs and/or spontaneous symptoms characteristic of neuropathic pain”. This definition encompasses a huge number of neuropathic orofacial pain syndromes. We present a case report of a patient who was affected with sleep apnea syndrome treated with nocturnal oxygen mask delivery, in whom orofacial LNP hampered the wearing of a mask due to unbearable burning and throbbing pain. The application of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster during the night led to an impressive reduction of both the pain level and the size of the painful area due to the plaster's pharmacological mechanisms, which were associated with a secondary benefit due to its mechanical protective action. This case report shows how these two factors could be of clinical value and have to be considered more systematically in the treatment of LNP in reducing pain and the size of the painful area. Keywords: trigeminal pain, localized neuropathic pain, topical treatment, 5% lidocaine medicated plaster

  6. Neuropathic pain: an updated grading system for research and clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerup, Nanna B.; Haroutounian, Simon; Kamerman, Peter; Baron, Ralf; Bennett, David L.H.; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Freeman, Roy; Hansson, Per; Nurmikko, Turo; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Rice, Andrew S.C.; Serra, Jordi; Smith, Blair H.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Jensen, Troels S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The redefinition of neuropathic pain as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system,” which was suggested by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Special Interest Group on Neuropathic Pain (NeuPSIG) in 2008, has been widely accepted. In contrast, the proposed grading system of possible, probable, and definite neuropathic pain from 2008 has been used to a lesser extent. Here, we report a citation analysis of the original NeuPSIG grading paper of 2008, followed by an analysis of its use by an expert panel and recommendations for an improved grading system. As of February, 2015, 608 eligible articles in Scopus cited the paper, 414 of which cited the neuropathic pain definition. Of 220 clinical studies citing the paper, 56 had used the grading system. The percentage using the grading system increased from 5% in 2009 to 30% in 2014. Obstacles to a wider use of the grading system were identified, including (1) questions about the relative significance of confirmatory tests, (2) the role of screening tools, and (3) uncertainties about what is considered a neuroanatomically plausible pain distribution. Here, we present a revised grading system with an adjusted order, better reflecting clinical practice, improvements in the specifications, and a word of caution that even the “definite” level of neuropathic pain does not always indicate causality. In addition, we add a table illustrating the area of pain and sensory abnormalities in common neuropathic pain conditions and propose areas for further research. PMID:27115670

  7. Pain from Dental Implant Placement, Inflammatory Pulpitis Pain, and Neuropathic Pain Present Different Somatosensory Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporatti, André Luís; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Stuginski-Barbosa, Juliana; Bonfante, Estevam Augusto; Costa, Yuri Martins; Rodrigues Conti, Paulo César

    2017-01-01

    To address the two following questions: (1) What kind of somatosensory abnormalities may be characterized in patients receiving dental implants (IMP), in ongoing inflammatory dental pulpitis (IP) patients, and in neuropathic pain (atypical odontalgia [AO]) patients? and (2) What sort of sensory and neural changes may result from dental implant placement surgery and pulpectomy? A total of 60 subjects were divided into three groups: the IMP (n = 20), IP (n = 20), and AO groups (n = 20). Quantitative sensory testing (QST) was performed preoperatively (baseline) for all three groups and postoperatively at 1 month and 3 months after dental implant placement or pulpectomy (in the IMP group and IP group, respectively). Statistical analyses were completed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance and z score transformations (α = 5%). The main findings of this study indicated that: (1) Elevations in mechanical detection threshold (MDT) and in current perception threshold (CPT) related to C-fiber activation, indicating a loss of function, were found at baseline in IP patients; (2) Somatosensory abnormalities such as allodynia, reduced MDT and mechanical pain threshold (MPT), and impaired pain modulation were found in AO patients; (3) No somatosensory alterations after implant placement were found in the IMP group; and (4) Somatosensory alterations in the form of reduction in the CPT related to C-fiber activation were reported 3 months after pulpectomy in the IP group. This study showed that somatosensory abnormalities were evident in AO and IP patients, and somatosensory alterations were seen in IP patients even 3 months after pulpectomy. However, no somatosensory alterations were seen after implant placement.

  8. Schwann cells promote post-traumatic nerve inflammation and neuropathic pain through MHC class II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlehnert, Maike; Derksen, Angelika; Hagenacker, Tim; Kindermann, David; Schäfers, Maria; Pawlak, Mathias; Kieseier, Bernd C; Meyer Zu Horste, Gerd

    2017-10-02

    The activation of T helper cells requires antigens to be exposed on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs) via MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules. Expression of MHC-II is generally limited to professional APCs, but other cell types can express MHC-II under inflammatory conditions. However, the importance of these conditional APCs is unknown. We and others have previously shown that Schwann cells are potentially conditional APCs, but the functional relevance of MHC-II expression by Schwann cells has not been studied in vivo. Here, we conditionally deleted the MHC-II β-chain from myelinating Schwann cells in mice and investigated how this influenced post-traumatic intraneural inflammation and neuropathic pain using the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. We demonstrate that deletion of MHC-II in myelinating Schwann cells reduces thermal hyperalgesia and, to a lesser extent, also diminishes mechanical allodynia in CCI in female mice. This was accompanied by a reduction of intraneural CD4+ T cells and greater preservation of preferentially large-caliber axons. Activation of T helper cells by MHC-II on Schwann cells thus promotes post-traumatic axonal loss and neuropathic pain. Hence, we provide experimental evidence that Schwann cells gain antigen-presenting function in vivo and modulate local immune responses and diseases in the peripheral nerves.

  9. Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Chronic Neuropathic or Radicular Pain: An Interaction of Pain and Age

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    Orla Moriarty

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of empirical research has confirmed an association between chronic pain and cognitive dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cognitive function is affected in patients with a diagnosis of chronic neuropathic or radicular pain relative to healthy control participants matched by age, gender, and years of education. We also examined the interaction of pain with age in terms of cognitive performance. Some limitations of previous clinical research investigating the effects of chronic pain on cognitive function include differences in the pain and cognitive scale materials used, and the heterogeneity of patient participants, both in terms of their demographics and pathological conditions. To address these potential confounds, we have used a relatively homogenous patient group and included both experimental and statistical controls. We have also specifically investigated the interaction effect of pain and age on cognitive performance. Patients (n = 38 and controls (n = 38 were administered a battery of cognitive tests measuring IQ, spatial and verbal memory, attention, and executive function. Educational level, depressive symptoms, and state anxiety were assessed as were medication usage, caffeine, and nicotine consumption to control for possible confounding effects. Both the level of depressive symptoms and the state anxiety score were higher in chronic pain patients than in matched control participants. Chronic pain patients had a lower estimated IQ than controls, and showed impairments on measures of spatial and verbal memory. Attentional responding was altered in the patient group, possibly indicative of impaired inhibitory control. There were significant interactions between chronic pain condition and age on a number of cognitive outcome variables, such that older patients with chronic pain were more impaired than both age-matched controls and younger patients with chronic pain. Chronic pain did not appear

  10. Towards a definition of refractory neuropathic pain for epidemiological research. An international Delphi survey of experts

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    Smith Blair H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Best current estimates of neuropathic pain (NeuP prevalence come from studies using various screening detecting pain with probable neuropathic features; the proportion experiencing significant, long-term NeuP, and the proportion not responding to standard treatment are unknown. These “refractory” cases are the most clinically important to detect, being the most severe, requiring specialist treatment. Methods We report an international Delphi survey of experts in NeuP, aiming for consensus on the features required to define, for epidemiological research: (1 neuropathic pain; and (2 when NeuP is “refractory”. A web-based questionnaire was developed and data collected from three rounds of questionnaires from nineteen experts. Results There was good consensus on essential inclusion of six items to identify NeuP (“prickling, tingling, pins & needles”, “pain evoked by light touch”, “electric shocks or shooting pain”, “hot or burning” pain, “brush allodynia on self-examination”, and “relevant history” and on some items that were non-essential. Consensus was also reached on components of a “refractory NeuP” definition: minimum duration (one year; number of trials of drugs of known effectiveness (four; adequate duration of these trials (three months / maximum tolerated; outcomes of treatment (pain severity, quality of life. Further work needs to validate these proposed criteria in general population research. Conclusions This paper presents an international consensus on measuring the epidemiology of refractory neuropathic pain. This will be valuable in reaching an agreed estimate of the prevalence of neuropathic pain, and the first estimate of refractory neuropathic pain prevalence.

  11. The effect of Normast (PEA) on neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven Robert; Bing, Jette; Hansen, Rikke Bod Middelhede

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI) represent still a significant, unresolved problem causing suffering and re¬duced quality of life in patients with SCI. Treatment of neuropathic pain is a complex and difficult task, and many patients have incom......¬plete relief from present available and recom¬mended treatment. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is a fatty acid which is produced in many cells in the body. It suggested to potentiate the body’s own canna¬bis-like substances (endocannabinoids) and to reduce pain and inflammation. Clinical trials support the use......) on neuropathic pain, and sec¬ondary to study the effect of Normast on spas¬ticity and psychological functioning in patients with spinal cord injury. Population characteristics: Gender, male/female, n 43/15 Age since inclusion, years, mean (SD) 55.3 (9.5) Time since injury, years, mean (SD) 8.8 (8.9) Present...

  12. Ultramicronized Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in spinal cord injury neuropathic pain: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven Robert; Bing, Jette; Hansen, Rikke Bod Middelhede

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  Neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI) represent significant problems. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is a fatty acid that isproduced in many cells in the body, and it is thought to potentiate endocannabinoids. PEA is suggested to reduce pain and inflammation...... but RCT arelacking. Normast is a medical supplement which contains PEA approved for use in Denmark. The primary aim was to investigate the effect of Normaston neuropathic pain, and secondary to study the effect of Normast on spasticity and psychological functioning in patients with spinal cord injury....... Methods  A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel multicenter study. Study population of at least 66 patients must complete the 12 week trial.Questionnaires regarding neuropathic pain, spasticity, insomnia, anxiety and depression are completed before and after treatment. A numeric...

  13. Transient receptor potential channel polymorphisms are associated with the somatosensory function in neuropathic pain patients.

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    Andreas Binder

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p = 0.03, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V with cold hypoalgesia (p = 0.0035. Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1 and impaired (2 sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p = 0.006, p = 0.005 and pG (rs222747, M315I to cold hypaesthesia (p = 0.002, but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In this study we found no evidence that genetic

  14. PI3K/Akt Pathway is Required for Spinal Central Sensitization in Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Lv, Yanling; Ren, Facheng

    2018-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) has been identified in the expression of central sensitization after noxious inflammatory stimuli. However, its contribution in neuropathic pain remains to be determined. Here we address the role of PI3K signaling in central sensitization in a model of neuropathic pain, and propose a novel potential drug target for neuropathic pain. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) rat model was used in the study as the model for neuropathic pain. Western blotting, whole-cell patch clamp, and von Frey assay were performed to study biochemical, electrical, and behavioral changes in CCI rats, respectively. A steroid metabolite of the fungi (wortmannin) was used to block PI3K signaling and its effects on CCI rats were tested. PI3K/Akt signaling increased in the spinal cord L4-L6 sections in the CCI rats. CCI also facilitated miniature excitatory postsynaptic potential of dorsal horn substantia gelatinosa neurons, increased phosphorylation of glutamate receptor subunit GluA1 and synapsin at the synapse, and induced mechanic allodynia. Wortmannin reversed biochemical, electrical, and behavioral changes in CCI rats. This study is the first to show PI3K/Akt signaling is required for spinal central sensitization in the CCI neuropathic pain model.

  15. Inefficacy of high-dose transdermal fentanyl in a patient with neuropathic pain, a case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, C.P.; Bremer, R.; Dongelmans, D.A.; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Crul, B.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Pain partially responsive to opioids can lead to rapid escalating dosages due to tolerance development. In this report the case of a 58-year-old female with neuropathic pain using increasing transdermal (TTS) fentanyl dosages to a maximum dose of 3400 microg/h resulting in fentanyl plasma levels of

  16. Study of nociceptive flexion reflex in healthy subjects and patients with chronic neuropathic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, S A; Turbina, L G; Zus'man, A A; Posokhov, S I

    2012-12-01

    Nociceptive flexion reflex was measured in healthy subjects and patients with chronic neuropathic pain (diabetic distal symmetric sensorimotor polyneuropathy). The study of nociceptive flexion reflex revealed reduction of subjective pain threshold and reflex threshold in patients compared with healthy persons reflecting deficit of descending antinociceptive influences in the CNS.

  17. Descending volleys generated by efficacious epidural motor cortex stimulation in patients with chronic neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Holsheimer, J.; Goujon, Colette; Keravel, Yves; Nguyen, Jean-Paul

    Epidural motor cortex stimulation (EMCS) is a therapeutic option for chronic, drug-resistant neuropathic pain, but its mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. In two patients with refractory hand pain successfully treated by EMCS, the presence of implanted epidural cervical electrodes for

  18. Long term clinical outcome of peripheral nerve stimulation in patients with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calenbergh, F. Van; Gybels, J.; Laere, K. Van

    2009-01-01

    of the present study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy of PNS in a group of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain treated with PNS since the 1980s. METHODS: Of an original series of 11 patients, 5 patients could be invited for clinical examination, detailed assessment of clinical pain and QST...

  19. Guidelines for neuropathic pain management in patients with cancer: a European survey and comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piano, V.M.M.; Schalkwijk, A.; Burgers, J.; Verhagen, S.; Kress, H.; Hekster, Y.A.; Lanteri-Minet, M.; Engels, Y.M.; Vissers, K.

    2013-01-01

    Between 19% and 39% of patients with cancer pain suffer from neuropathic pain. Its diagnosis and treatment is still challenging. Yet, national clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed in several European countries to assist practitioners in managing these patients safely and legally.

  20. Use of Lidocaine Patches for Neuropathic Pain in a Comprehensive Cancer Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Ann Fleming

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are few reports of the use of the lidocaine 5% patch (L5%P for neuropathic pain (NP in the cancer patient. Within a comprehensive cancer centre, L5%P has been prescribed by the Pain and Palliative Care Service (Peter McCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia for selected patients with NP since 2001.

  1. Development of the Japanese Version of the Leeds Assessment of the Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Pain Scale: Diagnostic Utility in a Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Tatsuya; Sumitani, Masahiko; Matsudaira, Ko; Kawaguchi, Mika; Inoue, Reo; Hozumi, Jun; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Oshima, Hirofumi; Mori, Kanto; Taketomi, Shuji; Inui, Hiroshi; Tahara, Keitaro; Yamagami, Ryota; Hayakawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to assess the diagnostic utility of the linguistically validated Japanese version of the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Pain Scale (LANSS-J) as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in the clinical setting. Patients with neuropathic pain or nociceptive pain who were 20 to 85 years of age were included. Sensitivity and specificity using the original cutoff value of 12 were assessed to evaluate the diagnostic utility of the LANSS-J. Sensitivity and specificity with possible cutoff values were calculated, along with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. We then evaluated agreement regarding assessment of the LANSS-J by two investigators. We used the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the total score and Cohen's kappa coefficient for each item. Data for patients with neuropathic pain (n = 30) and those with nociceptive pain (n = 29) were analyzed. With a cutoff of 12, the sensitivity was 63.3% (19/30) and the specificity 93.1% (27/29). Sensitivity improved substantially with a cutoff of ≤ 11 (≥ 83.3%, 25/30). High specificity (93.1%, 27/29) was sustained with a cutoff of 9 to 12. The ICC for the total score was 0.85, indicating sufficient agreement. Kappa coefficients ranged from 0.68 to 0.84. The LANSS-J is a valid screening tool for detecting neuropathic pain. Our results suggest that employing the original cutoff value provides high specificity, although a lower cutoff value of 10 or 11 (with its high specificity maintained) may be more beneficial when pain attributed to neuropathic mechanisms is suspected in Japanese patients. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  2. Effect of Patient Education on Reducing Medication in Spinal Cord Injury Patients With Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Na Young; Chang, Shin Hye; Lee, Jae Joong; Park, Han Kyul

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether providing education about the disease pathophysiology and drug mechanisms and side effects, would be effective for reducing the use of pain medication while appropriately managing neurogenic pain in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. In this prospective study, 109 patients with an SCI and neuropathic pain, participated in an educational pain management program. This comprehensive program was specifically created, for patients with an SCI and neuropathic pain. It consisted of 6 sessions, including educational training, over a 6-week period. Of 109 patients, 79 (72.5%) initially took more than two types of pain medication, and this decreased to 36 (33.0%) after the educational pain management program was completed. The mean pain scale score and the number of pain medications decreased, compared to the baseline values. Compared to the non-response group, the response group had a shorter duration of pain onset (p=0.004), and a higher initial number of different medications (ppain management program, can be a valuable complement to the treatment of spinal cord injured patients with neuropathic pain. Early intervention is important, to prevent patients from developing chronic SCI-related pain.

  3. Effects of riluzole on P2X7R expression in the spinal cord in rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Zhuang, Ying; Yan, Ming; Chen, Hui; Ge, An-Qi; Sun, Li; Miao, Bei

    2016-04-08

    Neuropathic pain is becoming an intractable health threat, with its profound effect on quality of life, thus posing a major challenge to clinical therapy. Despite the reported efficacy of riluzole in some pain models, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The present study aimed to assess the effects of riluzole in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI). Subsequent to model establishment, paw withdrawal latencies (PWLs) and the paw withdrawal mecha threshold (PWT) rapidly decreased, coupled with inhibited microglial activation and upregulated P2X7R expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH). Following intraperitoneal administration of riluzole (4mg/kg) once daily for 5 consecutive days as from day 3 after surgery, the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in the hind limbs were significantly attenuated. In addition, riluzole downregulated P2X7R expression and inhibited microglial activation in SCDH. Our results indicated that riluzole is effective in alleviating neuropathic pain and inhibiting microglial activation, presumably via the downregulated P2X7R expression in SCDH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative sensory testing in measurement of neuropathic pain phenomena and other sensory abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backonja, Miroslav-Misha; Walk, David; Edwards, Robert R; Sehgal, Nalini; Moeller-Bertram, Toby; Wasan, Ajay; Irving, Gordon; Argoff, Charles; Wallace, Mark

    2009-09-01

    Neuropathic pain disorders are usually characterized by spontaneous ongoing or intermittent symptoms, stimulus-evoked positive sensory phenomena, and negative sensory phenomena. Spontaneous individual subject specific phenomena are identified in the neurologic history and are quantifiable by means of self-reported neuropathic pain symptoms tools such as scales, inventories, and questionnaires. Negative and positive sensory phenomena are assessed by the neurologic bedside examination and quantitative sensory testing (QST), which refers to psychophysical tests of sensory perception during the administration of stimuli with predetermined physical properties and following specific protocols. QST is able to capture and quantify stimulus-evoked negative and positive sensory phenomena, and as such should become standard if not a critical tool in neuropathic pain research and practice. Although the advent of anatomic and functional imaging modalities is revolutionizing our understanding of the mechanisms of neuropathic pain, only by anchoring such test results to individual subjects' own perceptions via QST can they provide meaningful information about neuropathic pain, which is based on perceptual experience. To yield useful results, QST requires a cooperative subject and carefully standardized methods, including standardization of the stimulus parameters as well as the testing environment, instructions, and evaluation methods. This manuscript provides a concise review of fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the role of QST in the process of eliciting information about sensory abnormalities associated with neuropathic pain and the place of that information in analysis of pain mechanisms. Together with the companion manuscript, this review provides definitions that should help further the use of QST as a diagnostic tool as well.

  5. Endocannabinoid activation of CB1receptors contributes to long-lasting reversal of neuropathic pain by repetitive spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Tai, L; Qiu, Q; Mitchell, R; Fleetwood-Walker, S; Joosten, E A; Cheung, C W

    2017-05-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been shown to be effective in the management of certain neuropathic pain conditions, however, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated repetitive SCS in a rodent neuropathic pain model, revealing long-lasting and incremental attenuation of hyperalgesia and a mechanism of action involving endocannabinoids. Animals were implanted with monopolar electrodes at the time of partial sciatic nerve injury. Dorsal columns at spinal segments T12/13 were stimulated 3 days later (early SCS), and again at day 7 (late SCS) using low-frequency parameters. Hypersensitivity to cutaneous mechanical stimuli was assessed using von Frey filaments. Pharmacological agents, selected to identify endocannabinoid and opioid involvement, were administered intraperitoneally, 10 min before SCS. Early SCS caused partial reversal of mechanical hypersensitivity with corresponding changes in the biomarker of central sensitization, [phospho-Tyr 1472 ]-GluN2B. The partial reversal of hyperalgesia by early SCS was amplified by co-administration of LY 2183240, an inhibitor of endocannabinoid reuptake/breakdown. This amplification was inhibited by a CB 1 R antagonist, AM251, but not by a CB 2 R antagonist, AM630. Early SCS-induced reversal of hyperalgesia was attenuated by naloxone, indicating a role for opioids. Late SCS resulted in an incremental level of reversal of hyperalgesia, which was inhibited by AM251, but not by CB 2 or opioid receptor antagonists. The endocannabinoid system, and in particular the CB 1 R, plays a pivotal role in the long-lasting and incremental reversal of hyperalgesia induced by repetitive SCS in a neuropathic pain model. Alternative parameters for repetitive spinal cord stimulation (SCS) at 25/10 Hz elicit particularly long-lasting and incremental reversal of hyperalgesia in a neuropathic pain model through a mechanism involving endocannabinoids. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  6. Grid-climbing Behaviour as a Pain Measure for Cancer-induced Bone Pain and Neuropathic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Gallego-Pedersen, Simone; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar

    2017-01-01

    Despite affecting millions of people, chronic pain is generally treated insufficiently. A major point of focus has been the lack of translation from preclinical data to clinical results, with the predictive value of chronic pain models being a major concern. In contrast to current focus on stimulus......-based nociceptive responses in preclinical research, development of behavioural tests designed to quantify suspension of normal behaviour is likely a more equivalent readout for human pain-assessment tests. In this study, we quantified grid-climbing behaviour as a non-stimulus-evoked behavioural test for potential...... use as a measure of neuropathic and cancer-induced bone pain in mice. In both models, the grid-climbing test demonstrated pain-related sparing of the affected leg during climbing. In both models, the behaviour was reversed by administration of morphine, suggesting that the observed behaviour was pain-specific....

  7. Celastrol Attenuates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Mediated by Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longhe Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celastrol, a major active ingredient of Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. f. (thunder god vine, has exhibited a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammation, anti-cancer and immunosuppression. In the present study, we used animal models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain, generated by carrageenan injection and spared nerve injury (SNI, respectively, to evaluate the effect of celastrol and to address the mechanisms underlying pain processing. Intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of celastrol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of carrageenan-induced edema and allodynia. Real-time PCR analysis showed that celastrol (0.3 mg/kg, i.p. significantly reduced mRNA expressions of inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, in carrageenan-injected mice. In SNI mice, pain behavior studies showed that celastrol (1 mg/kg, i.p. effectively prevented the hypersensitivity of mechanical nociceptive response on the third day post-surgery and the seventh day post-surgery. Furthermore, the anti-hyperalgesic effects of celastrol in carrageenan-injected mice and SNI mice were reversed by SR144528 (1 mg/kg, i.p., a specific cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2 receptor antagonist, but not by SR141716 (1 mg/kg, i.p., a specific cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1 receptor antagonist. Taken together, our results demonstrate the analgesia effects of celastrol through CB2 signaling and propose the potential of exploiting celastrol as a novel candidate for pain relief.

  8. Reappraising neuropathic pain in humans--how symptoms help disclose mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truini, Andrea; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2013-10-01

    Neuropathic pain--that is, pain arising directly from a lesion or disease that affects the somatosensory system--is a common clinical problem, and typically causes patients intense distress. Patients with neuropathic pain have sensory abnormalities on clinical examination and experience pain of diverse types, some spontaneous and others provoked. Spontaneous pain typically manifests as ongoing burning pain or paroxysmal electric shock-like sensations. Provoked pain includes pain induced by various stimuli or even gentle brushing (dynamic mechanical allodynia). Recent clinical and neurophysiological studies suggest that the various pain types arise through distinct pathophysiological mechanisms. Ongoing burning pain primarily reflects spontaneous hyperactivity in nociceptive-fibre pathways, originating from 'irritable' nociceptors, regenerating nerve sprouts or denervated central neurons. Paroxysmal sensations can be caused by several mechanisms; for example, electric shock-like sensations probably arise from high-frequency bursts generated in demyelinated non-nociceptive Aβ fibres. Most human and animal findings suggest that brush-evoked allodynia originates from Aβ fibres projecting onto previously sensitized nociceptive neurons in the dorsal horn, with additional contributions from plastic changes in the brainstem and thalamus. Here, we propose that the emerging mechanism-based approach to the study of neuropathic pain might aid the tailoring of therapy to the individual patient, and could be useful for drug development.

  9. Atypical odontalgia--a form of neuropathic pain that emulates dental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, Stanley; Howard, Jennifer; Quek, Sam

    2008-01-01

    In order for the neuropathic pain associated with AO to occur in the oral or facial area, a deafferentation process must be initiated as previously explained. Deafferentation happens when there is a trauma to tissues including, but not limited to, endodontic therapy, a surgical extraction or even a simple one, a deep scaling, an injurious dental injection, and even the placement of a crown. Thankfully, most patients heal uneventfully. Apparently a small percentage of patients have a genetic predisposition to deafferentation pain. In reviewing articles on this subject, there is often material about the inadvertent dental treatment of patients with AO. Many patients often have undergone numerous invasive procedures in an effort to ameliorate pain. It is not possible to read a research paper about AO without reading about the recurrent theme of either overtreatment or unnecessary treatment. Caution should be exercised when performing endodontic therapy solely for the relief of pain without objective need for such therapy. It is common for the AO patient to undergo many other irreversible dental treatments with no resolution of pain symptoms. When the dentist encounters a patient in pain for which there is no dental connection, he or she should strongly consider referring the patient to a facility or practitioner who has expertise in dealing with the non-dental source of dental pain.

  10. Mechanistic Differences in Neuropathic Pain Modalities Revealed by Correlating Behavior with Global Expression Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique J. Cobos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neuropathic pain is a major morbidity of neural injury, yet its mechanisms are incompletely understood. Hypersensitivity to previously non-noxious stimuli (allodynia is a common symptom. Here, we demonstrate that the onset of cold hypersensitivity precedes tactile allodynia in a model of partial nerve injury, and this temporal divergence was associated with major differences in global gene expression in innervating dorsal root ganglia. Transcripts whose expression change correlates with the onset of cold allodynia were nociceptor related, whereas those correlating with tactile hypersensitivity were immune cell centric. Ablation of TrpV1 lineage nociceptors resulted in mice that did not acquire cold allodynia but developed normal tactile hypersensitivity, whereas depletion of macrophages or T cells reduced neuropathic tactile allodynia but not cold hypersensitivity. We conclude that neuropathic pain incorporates reactive processes of sensory neurons and immune cells, each leading to distinct forms of hypersensitivity, potentially allowing drug development targeted to each pain type.

  11. A3 adenosine receptor agonist prevents the development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by modulating spinal glial-restricted redox-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Kali; Esposito, Emanuela; Doyle, Timothy; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Tosh, Dillip K; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Salvemini, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy accompanied by chronic neuropathic pain is the major dose-limiting toxicity of several anticancer agents including the taxane paclitaxel (Taxol). A critical mechanism underlying paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain is the increased production of peroxynitrite in spinal cord generated in response to activation of the superoxide-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase. Peroxynitrite in turn contributes to the development of neuropathic pain by modulating several redox-dependent events in spinal cord. We recently reported that activation of the Gi/Gq-coupled A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) with selective A3AR agonists (ie, IB-MECA) blocked the development of chemotherapy induced-neuropathic pain evoked by distinct agents, including paclitaxel, without interfering with anticancer effects. The mechanism or mechanisms of action underlying these beneficial effects has yet to be explored. We now demonstrate that IB-MECA attenuates the development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by inhibiting the activation of spinal NADPH oxidase and two downstream redox-dependent systems. The first relies on inhibition of the redox-sensitive transcription factor (NFκB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (ERK and p38) resulting in decreased production of neuroexcitatory/proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) and increased formation of the neuroprotective/anti-inflammatory IL-10. The second involves inhibition of redox-mediated posttranslational tyrosine nitration and modification (inactivation) of glia-restricted proteins known to play key roles in regulating synaptic glutamate homeostasis: the glutamate transporter GLT-1 and glutamine synthetase. Our results unravel a mechanistic link into biomolecular signaling pathways employed by A3AR activation in neuropathic pain while providing the foundation to consider use of A3AR agonists as therapeutic agents in patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2014

  12. Self-reported somatosensory symptoms of neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain correlate with tender point count and pressure-pain thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Jespersen, Anders; Bliddal, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Widespread pain and pain hypersensitivity are the hallmark of fibromyalgia, a complex pain condition linked to central sensitization. In this study the painDETECT questionnaire (PDQ), validated to identify neuropathic pain and based on pain quality items, was applied in a cross-sectional sample...... of patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aims of the study were to assess the patient-reported sensory neuropathic symptoms by PDQ and to correlate these with tender point (TP) count and pressure-pain thresholds. Eighty-one patients (75 F, 6 M) with CWP (ACR-criteria) filled in the PDQ. Manual TP......-37). Mean PDT was 8.8 kPa (range: 2-36) and mean PTT 30.9 kPa (range: 4-85). Deep-tissue hyperalgesia was the predominant somatosensory symptom reported in 83%, but other neuropathic symptoms were also frequent, e.g. burning 51% and prickling 47%. Statistically significant correlations were found between...

  13. Dynamic Changes in Nociception and Pain Perception After Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Neuropathic Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biurrun Manresa, José A; Sörensen, Jan; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gerdle, Björn

    2015-12-01

    Patients with an implanted spinal cord stimulation (SCS) system for pain management present an opportunity to study dynamic changes in the pain system in a situation where patients are not stimulated (ie, experiencing severe pain) compared with a situation in which patients have just been stimulated (ie, pain free or greatly reduced pain). The aims of this study were (1) to determine if there are differences in nociceptive withdrawal reflex thresholds (NWR-T) and electrical pain thresholds (EP-T) before and after SCS; and (2) to establish if these differences are related to psychological factors associated with chronic pain. Seventeen volunteers with chronic neuropathic pain participated in the experiment. Electrical stimuli were applied to assess the NWR-T and the EP-T. In addition, psychological factors (ie, pain characteristics, depression, anxiety, and disability indexes) were also recorded. The NWR-T and EP-T were assessed with the SCS system off (at least 8 h before the experiment), and then reassessed 1 hour after the SCS system was turned on. Ongoing pain intensity ratings decreased (P=0.018), whereas the NWR-T increased (P=0.028) after the SCS was turned on, whereas no significant difference was found for EP-T (P=0.324). Psychological factors were significant predictors for EP-T but not for NWR-T. The results of this study suggest that pain relief after SCS is partially mediated by a decrease in the excitability of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord.

  14. Evaluating Sativex® in Neuropathic Pain Management: A Clinical and Neurophysiological Assessment in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Margherita; Naro, Antonino; Leo, Antonino; Sessa, Edoardo; D'Aleo, Giangaetano; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study was to better investigate the role of Sativex(®) in improving pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients by means of either clinical or neurophysiological assessment. Pain is a common symptom of MS, affecting up to 70% of patients. Pain treatment is often unsatisfactory, although emerging drugs (including cannabinoids) are giving encouraging results. Clinical pain assessment in MS is very difficult, and more objective tools are necessary to better quantify this symptom and its potential response to the treatments. We enrolled 20 MS patients (10 with and 10 without neuropathic pain), who underwent a specific clinical (such as visual analog scale) and neurophysiological assessment (by means of laser-evoked potentials and transcranial magnetic stimulation), before and after 4 weeks of Sativex administration. One month of drug administration in MS patients with neuropathic pain successfully reduced pain rating and improved quality of life. Interestingly, such effects were paralleled by an increase of fronto-central γ-band oscillation and of pain-motor integration strength. Our data suggest that Sativex may be effective in improving MS-related neuropathic pain, maybe through its action on specific cortical pathways. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Aromatherapy Massage for Neuropathic Pain and Quality of Life in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok Metin, Zehra; Arikan Donmez, Ayse; Izgu, Nur; Ozdemir, Leyla; Arslan, Ismail Emre

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of aromatherapy massage on neuropathic pain severity and quality of life (QoL) in patients suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy. This open-label randomized controlled clinical study was conducted in a university hospital endocrine outpatient clinic in Turkey. The study sample consisted of 46 patients, randomly allocated to an intervention group (n = 21) and a control group (n = 25). The intervention group received aromatherapy massage three times per week for a period of 4 weeks. The control group received only routine care. Data were collected from patients using the Douleur Neuropathique questionnaire, the visual analog scale, and the Neuropathic Pain Impact on Quality of Life questionnaire. Neuropathic pain scores significantly decreased in the intervention group compared with the control group in the fourth week of the study. Similarly, QoL scores significantly improved in the intervention group in the fourth week of the study. Aromatherapy massage is a simple and effective nonpharmacological nursing intervention that can be used to manage neuropathic pain and improve QoL in patients with painful neuropathy. Aromatherapy massage is a well-tolerated, feasible, and safe nonpharmacological method that can be readily integrated into clinical settings by nursing staff. The essential oils rosemary, geranium, lavender, eucalyptus, and chamomile can be safely used by nurses in the clinical setting, if applicable. However, training and experience of nurses in aromatherapy massage is critical to achieving positive results. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. A Prospective Study of Commonly Prescribed Drugs in the Management of Neuropathic Pain and its Medication Adherence Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R; Silwal, P; Basnet, N; Shakya Shrestha, S; Shrestha, R; Pokharel, B R

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain is one of the common complains of patients visiting neurology and orthopedic departments in hospitals. Management of neuropathic pain is difficult and is often symptomatic rather than being curative. Adherence to medication is necessary for pain management to be effective. However, there are various factors related to patient, physician, drug regimen and other socio-economic affecting adherence. Objective To study commonly prescribed drugs in neuropathic pain management and the medication adherence pattern including its associated factors. Method Patients already diagnosed as neuropathic pain were interviewed using structured questionnaire and data entered in Microsoft Office Excel 2007. Informed consent was taken from the patients. Result Among the 84 patients in the study, 69% were females. Majority 53.6% of patients had low back pain as cause of neuropathic pain. Anticonvulsants were mostly prescribed (75%) followed by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (52.4%) and Methylcobalamin (47.6%). More than 50% (n=49) patients were not adherent to the prescribed medication and majority (61.2%) of them were housewives. Significant association was observed between patient's adherence to gender, occupation, polypharmacy, drug regimen, cost and availability of medicine. Conclusion Anticonvulsants were commonly prescribed drugs in patients with neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was seen more in females with low back pain. Majority of patients were non-adherent and forgetfulness was the major reason for missing dose in them.

  17. Anti-hyperalgesic effects of calcitonin on neuropathic pain interacting with its peripheral receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Akitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polypeptide hormone calcitonin is clinically well known for its ability to relieve neuropathic pain such as spinal canal stenosis, diabetic neuropathy and complex regional pain syndrome. Mechanisms for its analgesic effect, however, remain unclear. Here we investigated the mechanism of anti-hyperalgesic action of calcitonin in a neuropathic pain model in rats. Results Subcutaneous injection of elcatonin, a synthetic derivative of eel calcitonin, relieved hyperalgesia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the CCI provoked the upregulation of tetrodotoxin (TTX-sensitive Nav.1.3 mRNA and downregulation of TTX-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA on the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglion (DRG, which would consequently increase the excitability of peripheral nerves. These changes were reversed by elcatonin. In addition, the gene expression of the calcitonin receptor and binding site of 125I-calcitonin was increased at the constricted peripheral nerve tissue but not at the DRG. The anti-hyperalgesic effect and normalization of sodium channel mRNA by elcatonin was parallel to the change of the calcitonin receptor expression. Elcatonin, however, did not affect the sensitivity of nociception or gene expression of sodium channel, while it suppressed calcitonin receptor mRNA under normal conditions. Conclusions These results suggest that the anti-hyperalgesic action of calcitonin on CCI rats could be attributable to the normalization of the sodium channel expression, which might be exerted by an unknown signal produced at the peripheral nerve tissue but not by DRG neurons through the activation of the calcitonin receptor. Calcitonin signals were silent in the normal condition and nerve injury may be one of triggers for conversion of a silent to an active signal.

  18. Central Sensitization and Neuropathic Features of Ongoing Pain in a Rat Model of Advanced Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelin, Joshua; Imbert, Ian; Cormier, Jennifer; Allen, Joshua; Porreca, Frank; King, Tamara

    2016-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) pain is most commonly characterized by movement-triggered joint pain. However, in advanced disease, OA pain becomes persistent, ongoing and resistant to treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The mechanisms underlying ongoing pain in advanced OA are poorly understood. We recently showed that intra-articular (i.a.) injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) into the rat knee joint produces concentration-dependent outcomes. Thus, a low dose of i.a. MIA produces NSAID-sensitive weight asymmetry without evidence of ongoing pain and a high i.a. MIA dose produces weight asymmetry and NSAID-resistant ongoing pain. In the present study, palpation of the ipsilateral hind limb of rats treated 14 days previously with high, but not low, doses of i.a. MIA produced expression of the early oncogene, FOS, in the spinal dorsal horn. Inactivation of descending pain facilitatory pathways using a microinjection of lidocaine within the rostral ventromedial medulla induced conditioned place preference selectively in rats treated with the high dose of MIA. Conditioned place preference to intra-articular lidocaine was blocked by pretreatment with duloxetine (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally at -30 minutes). These observations are consistent with the likelihood of a neuropathic component of OA that elicits ongoing, NSAID-resistant pain and central sensitization that is mediated, in part, by descending modulatory mechanisms. This model provides a basis for exploration of underlying mechanisms promoting neuropathic components of OA pain and for the identification of mechanisms that might guide drug discovery for treatment of advanced OA pain without the need for joint replacement. Difficulty in managing advanced OA pain often results in joint replacement therapy in these patients. Improved understanding of mechanisms driving NSAID-resistant ongoing OA pain might facilitate development of alternatives to joint replacement therapy. Our findings suggest

  19. Cervical Spinal Cord and Dorsal Nerve Root Stimulation for Neuropathic Upper Limb Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Adrian B; Parrent, Andrew G; MacDougall, Keith W

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a well-established treatment for chronic neuropathic pain in the lower limbs. Upper limb pain comprises a significant proportion of neuropathic pain patients, but is often difficult to target specifically and consistently with paresthesias. We hypothesized that the use of dorsal nerve root stimulation (DNRS), as an option along with SCS, would help us better relieve pain in these patients. All 35 patients trialed with spinal stimulation for upper limb pain between July 1, 2011, and October 31, 2013, were included. We performed permanent implantation in 23/35 patients based on a visual analogue scale pain score decrease of ≥50% during trial stimulation. Both the SCS and DNRS groups had significant improvements in average visual analogue scale pain scores at 12 months compared with baseline, and the majority of patients in both groups obtained ≥50% pain relief. The majority of patients in both groups were able to reduce their opioid use, and on average had improvements in Short Form-36 quality of life scores. Complication rates did not differ significantly between the two groups. Treatment with SCS or DNRS provides meaningful long-term relief of chronic neuropathic pain in the upper limbs.

  20. Experiences with spinal cord stimulator in patients with chronic neuropathic back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjesdal, Kine; Furnes, Bodil; Dysvik, Elin

    2014-09-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex, chronic, and disabling condition that has physical, functional, and psychosocial repercussions. Although the estimated prevalence of neuropathic pain in the general population ranges from 1.5% to 8%, neuropathic pain is frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated. The aims of this study were to examine the experience of patients treated with spinal cord stimulation as a pain-relieving treatment and how this may influence the patient's ability to participate in everyday life activities. A qualitative approach based on seven telephone interviews was performed. The participants were recruited from a university hospital in Norway, and all used spinal cord stimulation as a pain-relieving treatment. Qualitative content analysis was used. Two thematic findings emerged: (1) pain relief with spinal cord stimulation as a complex and individual experience and (2) challenges in adaptations in everyday life with spinal cord stimulation. Findings indicate that spinal cord stimulation can offer pain relief that can help patients achieve a meaningful life despite chronic pain. Spinal cord stimulation also may have disadvantages that should be considered before offering this treatment. It seems evident that extended information needs about working mechanism of SCS and precautions as well as follow-up are required to meet unexpected challenges in adaptation. Here the nurse has an important role when informing and following this patient group. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamics of circadian thalamocortical flow of information during a peripheral neuropathic pain condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder eCardoso-Cruz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the thalamocortical loop plays a crucial role in the encoding of sensory-discriminative features of painful stimuli. However, only a few studies have addressed the changes in thalamocortical dynamics that may occur after the onset of chronic pain. Our goal was to evaluate how the induction of chronic neuropathic pain affected the flow of information within the thalamocortical loop throughout the brain states of the sleep-wake cycle. To address this issue we recorded local field potentials – LFPs – both before and after the establishment of neuropathic pain in awake freely moving adult rats chronically implanted with arrays of multielectrodes in the lateral thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex. Our results show that the neuropathic injury induced changes in the number of wake and slow-wave-sleep state episodes, and especially in the total number of transitions between brain states. Moreover, partial directed coherence – PDC – analysis revealed that the amount of information flow between cortex and thalamus in neuropathic animals decreased significantly, indicating that the overall thalamic activity had less weight over the cortical activity. However, thalamocortical LFPs displayed higher phase-locking during awake and slow-wave-sleep episodes after the nerve lesion, suggesting faster transmission of relevant information along the thalamocortical loop. The observed changes are in agreement with the hypothesis of thalamic dysfunction after the onset of chronic pain, and may result from diminished inhibitory effect of the primary somatosensory cortex over the lateral thalamus.

  2. Examining the Time to Therapeutic Effect of Pregabalin in Spinal Cord Injury Patients With Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Diana D; Emir, Birol; Parsons, Bruce

    2015-05-01

    In 2 large-scale, placebo-controlled trials, pregabalin improved both pain and pain-related sleep interference in patients with neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury (SCI). In both trials, pregabalin found statistically significant improvement compared with placebo after 1 week of treatment. However, the effects of pregabalin in the days immediately after initiation of treatment are unknown. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine timing of pregabalin's therapeutic effect in the days after initiation of treatment. Data were derived from 2 trials of pregabalin in patients with SCI-related neuropathic pain. Each day patients rated severity of pain and pain-related sleep interference over the past 24 hours on a scale from 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating greater severity. To quantify timing of therapeutic effect, we compared (pregabalin [vs] placebo) daily average pain and pain-related sleep interference scores over the first 14 days of treatment. Significant improvement was defined as the first day, of ≥2 consecutive days, that pregabalin significantly (P pain and pain-related sleep interference score among patients with a clinically meaningful and sustained response (≥30% improvement from baseline to end point) by using a time-to-event analysis method. Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to estimate the median (or 25th quartile) time (in days) required to achieve a ≥1-point improvement, among these responders, in pain and pain-related sleep interference scores. Comparisons between pregabalin and placebo were made with a log-rank test. In both trials, significant improvement of pain and pain-related sleep interference occurred within 2 days of initiating treatment with pregabalin. Among patients reporting a clinically meaningful and sustained response to treatment (patients with ≥30% improvement from baseline to end point), the time to a ≥1-point improvement of pain and pain-related sleep interference occurred significantly earlier among

  3. Neuropathic pain-like alterations in muscle nociceptor function associated with vibration-induced muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojie; Green, Paul G; Levine, Jon D

    2010-11-01

    We recently developed a rodent model of the painful muscle disorders induced by occupational exposure to vibration. In the present study we used this model to evaluate the function of sensory neurons innervating the vibration-exposed gastrocnemius muscle. Activity of 74 vibration-exposed and 40 control nociceptors, with mechanical receptive fields in the gastrocnemius muscle, were recorded. In vibration-exposed rats ∼15% of nociceptors demonstrated an intense and long-lasting barrage of action potentials in response to sustained suprathreshold mechanical stimulation (average of 2635 action potentials with frequency of ∼44Hz during a 1min suprathreshold stimulus) much greater than that has been reported to be produced even by potent inflammatory mediators. While these high-firing nociceptors had lower mechanical thresholds than the remaining nociceptors, exposure to vibration had no effect on conduction velocity and did not induce spontaneous activity. Hyperactivity was not observed in any of 19 neurons from vibration-exposed rats pretreated with intrathecal antisense for the IL-6 receptor subunit gp130. Since vibration can injure peripheral nerves and IL-6 has been implicated in painful peripheral neuropathies, we suggest that the dramatic change in sensory neuron function and development of muscles pain, induced by exposure to vibration, reflects a neuropathic muscle pain syndrome. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spinal cord stimulation for chronic pain of neuropathic or ischaemic origin: systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E L; Duenas, A; Holmes, M W; Papaioannou, D; Chilcott, J

    2009-03-01

    This report addressed the question 'What is the clinical and cost-effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in the management of chronic neuropathic or ischaemic pain?' Thirteen electronic databases [including MEDLINE (1950-2007), EMBASE (1980-2007) and the Cochrane Library (1991-2007)] were searched from inception; relevant journals were hand-searched; and appropriate websites for specific conditions causing chronic neuropathic/ischaemic pain were browsed. Literature searches were conducted from August 2007 to September 2007. A systematic review of the literature sought clinical and cost-effectiveness data for SCS in adults with chronic neuropathic or ischaemic pain with inadequate response to medical or surgical treatment other than SCS. Economic analyses were performed to model the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of SCS in patients with neuropathic or ischaemic pain. From approximately 6000 citations identified, 11 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the clinical effectiveness review: three of neuropathic pain and eight of ischaemic pain. Trials were available for the neuropathic conditions failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type I, and they suggested that SCS was more effective than conventional medical management (CMM) or reoperation in reducing pain. The ischaemic pain trials had small sample sizes, meaning that most may not have been adequately powered to detect clinically meaningful differences. Trial evidence failed to demonstrate that pain relief in critical limb ischaemia (CLI) was better for SCS than for CMM; however, it suggested that SCS was effective in delaying refractory angina pain onset during exercise at short-term follow-up, although not more so than coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for those patients eligible for that surgery. The results for the neuropathic pain model suggested that the cost-effectiveness estimates for SCS in patients with FBSS who had inadequate

  5. Use of the Rat Grimace Scale to Evaluate Neuropathic Pain in a Model of Cervical Radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Blythe H; Weisshaar, Christine L; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2017-01-01

    Although neck and low-back pain are common sources of neuropathic pain with high societal costs, the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is not well-defined. Traditionally, most rodent pain studies rely on evoked reflex-based testing to measure pain. However, these testing methods do not reveal spontaneous pain, particularly early after injury. The rat grimace scale (RGS) for quantifying spontaneous pain has been validated after visceral, incisional, orthopedic, and inflammatory insults but not neuropathic pain. The current study used a rat model of radiculopathy to investigate the time course of RGS, the effect of the NSAID meloxicam on RGS, and the reliability and consistency of RGS across testers. RGS values at baseline and at 3, 6, 24, and 48 h after cervical nerve root compression (NRC) that induced robust evoked pain responses were compared with those obtained after sham surgery. The RGS was also evaluated at 6 h after NRC in another set of rats that had received meloxicam treatment prior to surgery. At 6 h, NRC induced higher RGS scores (1.27 ± 0.18) than did sham surgery (0.93 ± 0.20), and scores remained above baseline for as long as 48 h. Treatment with meloxicam before NRC reduced RGS at 6 h to sham levels, which were lower than those of injury without treatment. The RGS was associated with very good interobserver reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.91) and excellent internal consistency (Cronbach α, 0.87). These findings suggest that RGS is a useful approach to identifying and monitoring acute neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:28222837

  6. Needs and requests--patients and physicians voices about improving the management of spinal cord injury neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrbrink, Cecilia; Löfgren, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The present purpose was to explore patients' and involved physicians' needs and requests for improving their management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Sixteen patients with SCI and neuropathic pain, and nine physicians, were interviewed in focus-groups or individual interviews. An emergent design was used and the interviews and analyses were carried out in parallel, making it possible to use and deepen new emerging knowledge. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and processed according to content analysis. A final model with four themes described the results. Three themes covered the current situation: limitations in structure, lack of knowledge and competence, and frustrations. A fourth theme, needs and requests, described suggestions by patients and physicians for future improvements. Suggestions included increased participation, increased patient involvement in the pain rehabilitation process, support in the process of learning to live with pain, implementation of multi-modal pain rehabilitation, and the use of complementary treatments for neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain following SCI needs to be assessed and treated using a structured, inter-disciplinary, multi-modal rehabilitation approach involving patients in planning and decision-making. For improving SCI neuropathic pain management, there is a great need for individually-tailored management, planned in a dialogue on equal terms between health care and the patient. Patients desire continuity and regularity and the possibility of receiving complementary treatments for SCI neuropathic pain. Access to structured pain rehabilitation is needed. Support and tools need to be provided in the learning-to-live with pain process.

  7. The Effectiveness of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Knee Osteoarthritis with Neuropathic Pain Component: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemile Sevgi Polat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS in knee osteoarthritis with neuropathic pain component. Materials and Methods: The patients were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS for pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster osteoarthritis index (WOMAC for physical function and the Kellgren-Lawrence system for severity of osteoarthritis, painDETECT questionnaire for presence of neuropathic pain. Patients were divided into two groups according to painDETECT questionnaire scores. Group 1 consisted of 20 patients (39.2% with likely and possible neuropathic pain, group 2 consisted of 31 patients (60.8% with unlikely neuropathic pain. All patients received hot pack, TENS and home exercise program was given. Physical therapy agents were given for 3 weeks, 5 days a week. Assessments were evaluated in all patients before and after the treatment. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in demographic features and radiographic evaluations between the groups. The VAS, WOMAC pain and physical function scores were significantly lower after treatment in knee patients with neuropathic pain component, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: TENS is a neuropathic pain component in knee osteoarthritis patients, which is effective in reducing pain and improving physical function. The benefit of TENS therapy is that it can be used in conjunction with drug therapy, thereby reducing the drug dose and drug side effects.

  8. [Effects of intrathecal escin and clonidine in the treatment of neuropathic pain in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin-hua; Zhou, Pu; Huang, Ying; Wang, Bao; Chen, Chen-yan; Qing, Zhao-hui

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the effects of intrathecal escin and clonidine, used alone or in combination, in the treatment of neuropathic pain in rats and the possible mechanism. Ninety-six male SD rats weighing 250-300 g were chronically implanted with lumbar intrathecal catheters. One week later, the left L5 and L6 spinal nerve roots were ligated to establish the model of spinal nerve ligation neuropathic pain (SNL). The rats were then randomly divided into 16 groups (n=6), including the control (saline), escin, clonidine, escin+clonidine, and the antagonist groups. Mechanical withdrawal threshold was assessed before and at 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 min after intrathecal administration was evaluated. The maximal possible effect (MPE) was calculated and the effect of the treatments on the neuropathic pain. Isobolographic analysis was performed to characterize any potential interactions between the drugs. MPE was significantly higher in escin group (20, 40 microg), clonidine group (2, 5, 10 microg) and escin+clonidine group [1/4, 1/2 (escin ED(50)+clonidine ED(50))] than in the saline group (Pescin (5-40 microg) or clonidine (1-10 microg) alone dose-dependently alleviated neuropathic pain. Isobolographic analysis suggested a synergistic effect between escin and clonidine. Intrathecal pretreatment with yohimbine (20 microg) antagonized the effects of clonidine (Pescin and clonidine (Pescin and clonidine alone can dose-dependently relieve neuropathic pain. Escin and clonidine produce a synergistic effect for pain relief, which may involve the actions of alpha(2) receptor and Ca(2+) channel.

  9. Investigation of neuropathic pain in treated leprosy patients in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haroun, O. M; Hietaharju, A.; Bizuneh, E.; Brandsma, J.W.; Tesfaye, F.; Haanpää, M.; Rice, A.S.; Lockwood, D.N.

    2012-01-01

    Pain can be a significant problem for treated leprosy patients. It can be nociceptive due to tissue inflammation occurring during episodes of immune mediated reactions, or neuropathic due to leprosy affecting the somatosensory system. There are sparse epidemiological data on the prevalence and

  10. Exploring the potential effect of Ocimum sanctum in vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaggi Amteshwar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum and its saponin rich fraction in vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathic pain in rats. Peripheral neuropathy was induced in rats by administration of vincristine sulfate (50 μg/kg i.p. for 10 consecutive days. The mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, paw heat hyperalgesia and cold tail hyperalgesia were assessed by performing the pinprick, acetone, hot plate and cold tail immersion tests, respectively. Biochemically, the tissue thio-barbituric acid reactive species (TBARS, super-oxide anion content (markers of oxidative stress and total calcium levels were measured. Vincristine administration was associated with the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat and cold hyperalgesia. Furthermore, vincristine administration was also associated with an increase in oxidative stress and calcium levels. However, administration of Ocimum sanctum (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. and its saponin rich fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. for 14 days significantly attenuated vincristine-induced neuropathic pain along with decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels. It may be concluded that Ocimum sanctum has ameliorative potential in attenuating chemotherapy induced-painful neuropathic state, which may be attributed to decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels. Furthermore, saponin rich fraction of Ocimum sanctum may be responsible for its noted beneficial effect in neuropathic pain in rats.

  11. [Pitfalls in the treatment of neuropathic pain in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, A.; Verhagen, C.A.H.H.V.M.; Engels, Y.M.P.; Hekster, Y.A.; Vissers, K.C.P.

    2011-01-01

    Three patients with cancer experienced severe side-effects after starting anti-neuropathic pain therapy. All patients, 1 woman and 2 men aged between 69 and 71, fell or had problems with balance. These side-effects diminished after reducing the doses or stopping the medication. It seems that

  12. Identification of patients with neuropathic pain using electronic primary care records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Gajria

    2011-05-01

    Conclusion Computerised health records offer an excellent opportunity to improve the identification of patients for clinical research in complex conditions like chronic neuropathic pain. To make full use of data from these records, standardisation of clinical coding and consensus on diagnostic criteria are needed.

  13. Neuropathic Pain: Delving into the Oxidative Origin and the Possible Implication of Transient Receptor Potential Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Carrasco

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, neuropathic pain is an underestimated socioeconomic health problem affecting millions of people worldwide, which incidence may increase in the next years due to chronification of several diseases, such as cancer and diabetes. Growing evidence links neuropathic pain present in several disorders [i.e., spinal cord injury (SCI, cancer, diabetes and alcoholism] to central sensitization, as a global result of mitochondrial dysfunction induced by oxidative and nitrosative stress. Additionally, inflammatory signals and the overload in intracellular calcium ion could be also implicated in this complex network that has not yet been elucidated. Recently, calcium channels namely transient receptor potential (TRP superfamily, including members of the subfamilies A (TRAP1, M (TRPM2 and 7, and V (TRPV1 and 4, have demonstrated to play a role in the nociception mediated by sensory neurons. Therefore, as neuropathic pain could be a consequence of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species and endogen antioxidants, antioxidant supplementation may be a treatment option. This kind of therapy would exert its beneficial action through antioxidant and immunoregulatory functions, optimizing mitochondrial function and even increasing the biogenesis of this vital organelle; on balance, antioxidant supplementation would improve the patient's quality of life. This review seeks to deepen on current knowledge about neuropathic pain, summarizing clinical conditions and probable causes, the relationship existing between oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and TRP channels activation, and scientific evidence related to antioxidant supplementation.

  14. α2δ Modulators for management of compression neuropathic pain: A review of three case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq A Tramboo

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate the effectiveness of a2d modulators for management of neuropathic pain secondary to compression radiculopathy. The results also suggest a possible therapeutic superiority of LYRICA over locally available generic brands of pregabalin and gabapentin. These findings need to be further examined in randomized, controlled trials.

  15. Ketamine for acute neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyongsong; Mishina, Masahiro; Kokubo, Rinko; Nakajima, Takao; Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Kobayashi, Shiro; Teramoto, Akira

    2013-06-01

    Ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, may be useful for treating neuropathic pain, which is often difficult to control. We report a prospective study of 13 patients with acute neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury (SCI) treated with ketamine. All underwent a test challenge with 5mg ketamine. Patients with satisfactory responses were then treated intravenously and subsequently perorally with ketamine. Pre- and post-treatment pain was recorded on a visual analogue scale. All 13 patients responded positively to the ketamine test challenge and underwent continued ketamine administration. At the cessation of treatment and alter at final follow up, pain was decreased by 74.7% and 96.8%, respectively. The average administration period was 17.2 days; it was longer (59 days) in one patient treated in the subacute phase. All patients suffered allodynia-type pain and experienced 30% or less of their original pain intensity upon test challenge. Side effects were noted in five patients, although their severity did not require treatment cessation. In patients with SCI, ketamine reduced allodynia. Particularly good results were obtained in patients treated in the acute phase and these patients did not experience post-treatment symptom recurrence. Our results suggest that in patients with SCI, ketamine is useful for treating neuropathic pain in the acute phase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of chronic intractable neuropathic pain with dronabinol: case report of two adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudich, Zvia; Stinson, Jennifer; Jeavons, Michael; Brown, Stephen C

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of dronabinol for the treatment of neuropathic pain refractory to previous treatment. We studied the response (reduction of pain intensity and functional improvement) to dronabinol (5 mg/day to 25 mg/day) in two adolescents with neuropathic pain and depression refractory to previous treatments over two and five years, respectively. Reduction in pain intensity (45%) was achieved in patient 2 and was unchanged in patient 1. Functional improvement was markedly increased in terms of academic performance, mood and sleep in both patients over four to five months, without major adverse effects. While these improvements dissipated over time, the patients were more reconnected with rehabilitation and focused less on the intrusiveness of their pain problem in their every day lives. Dronabinol appeared to be effective in improving pain affect and psychosocial functioning in the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain and may be considered as an adjuvant medication in the rehabilitation process. Well-controlled placebo studies are required for further evaluation.

  17. Self-reported somatosensory symptoms of neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain correlate with tender point count and pressure-pain thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Jespersen, Anders; Bliddal, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Widespread pain and pain hypersensitivity are the hallmark of fibromyalgia, a complex pain condition linked to central sensitization. In this study the painDETECT questionnaire (PDQ), validated to identify neuropathic pain and based on pain quality items, was applied in a cross-sectional sample...... of patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aims of the study were to assess the patient-reported sensory neuropathic symptoms by PDQ and to correlate these with tender point (TP) count and pressure-pain thresholds. Eighty-one patients (75 F, 6 M) with CWP (ACR-criteria) filled in the PDQ. Manual TP...... examination was conducted according to ACR guidelines. Computerized cuff pressure algometry was used for the assessment of pressure-pain detection thresholds (PDT, unit: kPa) and pressure-pain tolerance thresholds (PTT, unit: kPa). Mean TP count was 14.32 (range: 2-18), mean PDQ score 22.75 (range: 5...

  18. Neuroplasticity of ascending and descending pathways after somatosensory system injury: reviewing knowledge to identify neuropathic pain therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadas-Vaello, P; Castany, S; Homs, J; Álvarez-Pérez, B; Deulofeu, M; Verdú, E

    2016-05-01

    This is a narrative review of the literature. This review aims to be useful in identifying therapeutic targets. It focuses on the molecular and biochemical neuroplasticity changes that occur in the somatosensory system, including ascending and descending pathways, during the development of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, it highlights the latest experimental strategies, based on the changes reported in the damaged nociceptive neurons during neuropathic pain states. This study was conducted in Girona, Catalonia, Spain. A MEDLINE search was performed using the following terms: descending pain pathways; ascending pain pathways; central sensitization; molecular pain; and neuropathic pain pharmacological treatment. Neuropathic pain triggered by traumatic lesions leads to sensitization and hyperexcitability of nociceptors and projection neurons of the dorsal horn, a strengthening in the descendent excitatory pathway and an inhibition of the descending inhibitory pathway of pain. These functional events are associated with molecular plastic changes such as overexpression of voltage-gated ion channels, algogen-sensitive receptors and synthesis of several neurotransmitters. Molecular studies on the plastic changes in the nociceptive somatosensory system enable the development of new pharmacological treatments against neuropathic pain, with higher specificity and effectiveness than classical drug treatments. Although research efforts have already focused on these aspects, additional research may be necessary to further explore the potential therapeutic targets in neuropathic pain involved in the neuroplasticity changes of neuropathological pathways from the injured somatosensory system.

  19. Postbariatric surgery neuropathic pain (PBSNP): case report, literature review, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattalai Kailasam, Vasanth; DeCastro, Claricio; Macaluso, Claude; Kleiman, Anne

    2015-02-01

    This study is aimed at facilitating clinician understanding of factors associated with postbariatric surgery neuropathic pain (PBSNP) and discussing the evidence base for management options. A case report and systematic literature review. A search was conducted of PubMed, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, EMBASE, Psych Info, and Cochrane Database of Reviews for articles published between 1985 and 2013 on neuropathy, pain, and pharmacokinetics associated with postbariatric surgery. The epidemiology of PBSNP has not been well established, and current therapeutic options are not evidence based. Available data indicate up to 33% incidence of pain in patients with neuropathy after bariatric surgery, resulting in significant decreases in quality of life and increases in health care costs. Pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying PBSNP are unclear, and the natural course is variable, with some patients experiencing spontaneous improvement when nutritional deficiency is identified and corrected. Early identification of nutritional deficiency along with glycemic and lipid control may prevent or partially reverse postsurgical neuropathy and modulate PBSNP. A better understanding of the peripheral and central mechanisms resulting in PBSNP is likely to promote the development of targeted and effective treatments. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A preliminary report on stem cell therapy for neuropathic pain in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers ER

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available E Russell Vickers,1 Elisabeth Karsten,2 John Flood,3 Richard Lilischkis21Sydney Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, NSW, Australia; 2Regeneus Ltd, Gordon, NSW, Australia; 3St Vincents Hospital, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaObjective: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been shown in animal models to attenuate chronic neuropathic pain. This preliminary study investigated if: i injections of autologous MSCs can reduce human neuropathic pain and ii evaluate the safety of the procedure.Methods: Ten subjects with symptoms of neuropathic trigeminal pain underwent liposuction. The lipoaspirate was digested with collagenase and washed with saline three times. Following centrifugation, the stromal vascular fraction was resuspended in saline, and then transferred to syringes for local injections into the pain fields. Outcome measures at 6 months assessed reduction in: i pain intensity measured by standard numerical rating scale from 0–10 and ii daily dosage requirements of antineuropathic pain medication.Results: Subjects were all female (mean age 55.3 years ± standard deviation [SD] 14.67; range 27–80 years with pain symptoms lasting from 4 months to 6 years and 5 months. Lipoaspirate collection ranged from 102–214 g with total cell numbers injected from 33 million to 162 million cells. Cell viability was 62%–91%. There were no systemic or local tissue side effects from the stem cell therapy (n=41 oral and facial injection sites. Clinical pain outcomes showed that at 6 months, 5/9 subjects had reduced both pain intensity scores and use of antineuropathic medication. The mean pain score pre-treatment was 7.5 (SD 1.58 and at 6 months had decreased to 4.3 (SD 3.28, P=0.018, Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Antineuropathic pain medication use showed 5/9 subjects reduced their need for medication (gabapentin, P=0.053, Student's t-test.Conclusion: This preliminary open-labeled study showed autologous administration of stem cells for neuropathic trigeminal pain

  1. Effect of Repeated Electroacupuncture Intervention on Hippocampal ERK and p38MAPK Signaling in Neuropathic Pain Rats

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    Jun-ying Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of our past studies showed that hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR-1 mRNA and differentially expressed proteins participating in MAPK signaling were involved in electroacupuncture (EA induced cumulative analgesia in neuropathic pain rats, but the underlying intracellular mechanism remains unknown. The present study was designed to observe the effect of EA stimulation (EAS on hippocampal extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK and p38 MAPK signaling in rats with chronic constrictive injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve, so as to reveal its related intracellular targets in pain relief. After CCI, the thermal pain thresholds of the affected hind were significantly decreased compared with the control group (P<0.05. Following one and two weeks’ EAS of ST 36-GB34, the pain thresholds were significantly upregulated (P<0.05, and the effect of EA2W was remarkably superior to that of EA2D and EA1W (P<0.05. Correspondingly, CCI-induced decreased expression levels of Ras, c-Raf, ERK1 and p-ERK1/2 proteins, and p38 MAPK mRNA and p-p38MAPK protein in the hippocampus tissues were reversed by EA2W (P<0.05. The above mentioned results indicated that EA2W induced cumulative analgesic effect may be closely associated with its function in removing neuropathic pain induced suppression of intracellular ERK and p38MAPK signaling in the hippocampus.

  2. Neurophysiological and histopathological evaluation of small fiber pathways as diagnostic characterization of neuropathic pain and autonom dysfunction syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Devigli, Grazia

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript is made up of two individual not related articles about peripheral neuropathic pain syndrome. The first article reports the effect on pain relief in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain after brachial plexus lesions or distal peripheral nerve injury using an implanted peripheral nerve stimulator applied directly on nerve branch using a peculiar surgical technique. Seven patients with post-traumatic lesion of brachial plexus or peripheral nerve complaining severe intractab...

  3. Differential effects of subcutaneous electrical stimulation (SQS) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in rodent models of chronic neuropathic or inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Portocarrero, Louis P; Cordero, Toni; Billstrom, Tina; Swearingen, Kim; Wacnik, Paul W; Johanek, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used for many years for the treatment of pain. Present-day research demonstrates that stimulation targets and parameters impact the induction of specific pain-modulating mechanisms. New targets are increasingly being investigated clinically, but the scientific rationale for a particular target is often not well established. This present study compares the behavioral effects of targeting peripheral axons by electrode placement in the subcutaneous space vs. electrode placement on the surface of the skin in a rodent model. Rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain were used to investigate subcutaneous electrical stimulation (SQS) vs. transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Electrical parameters and relative location of the leads were held constant under each condition. SQS had cumulative antihypersensitivity effects in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain rodent models, with significant inhibition of mechanical hypersensitivity observed on days 3-4 of treatment. In contrast, reduction of thermal hyperalgesia in the inflammatory model was observed during the first four days of treatment with SQS, and reduction of cold allodynia in the neuropathic pain model was seen only on the first day with SQS. TENS was effective in the inflammation model, and in agreement with previous studies, tolerance developed to the antihypersensitivity effects of TENS. With the exception of a reversal of cold hypersensitivity on day 1 of testing, TENS did not reveal significant analgesic effects in the neuropathic pain rodent model. The results presented show that TENS and SQS have different effects that could point to unique biologic mechanisms underlying the analgesic effect of each therapy. Furthermore, this study is the first to demonstrate in an animal model that SQS attenuates neuropathic and inflammatory-induced pain behaviors. © 2013 Medtronic, Inc.

  4. Thalamic deep brain stimulation for neuropathic pain after amputation or brachial plexus avulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Boccard, Sandra G; Linhares, Paulo; Chamadoira, Clara; Rosas, Maria José; Abreu, Pedro; Rebelo, Virgínia; Vaz, Rui; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2013-09-01

    Fifteen hundred patients have received deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat neuropathic pain refractory to pharmacotherapy over the last half-century, but few during the last decade. Deep brain stimulation for neuropathic pain has shown variable outcomes and gained consensus approval in Europe but not the US. This study prospectively evaluated the efficacy at 1 year of DBS for phantom limb pain after amputation, and deafferentation pain after brachial plexus avulsion (BPA), in a single-center case series. Patient-reported outcome measures were collated before and after surgery, using a visual analog scale (VAS) score, 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and University of Washington Neuropathic Pain Score (UWNPS). Twelve patients were treated over 29 months, receiving contralateral, ventroposterolateral sensory thalamic DBS. Five patients were amputees and 7 had BPAs, all from traumas. A postoperative trial of externalized DBS failed in 1 patient with BPA. Eleven patients proceeded to implantation and gained improvement in pain scores at 12 months. No surgical complications or stimulation side effects were noted. In the amputation group, after 12 months the mean VAS score improved by 90.0% ± 10.0% (p = 0.001), SF-36 by 57.5% ± 97.9% (p = 0.127), UWNPS by 80.4% ± 12.7% (p stimulation demonstrated efficacy at 1 year for chronic neuropathic pain after traumatic amputation and BPA. Clinical trials that retain patients in long-term follow-up are desirable to confirm findings from prospectively assessed case series.

  5. Anti-allodynic Effect of Nefopam and Morphine in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

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    Taraneh Moini Zanjani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Moini Zanjani T, Saghaei E, Ameli H, Sabetkasaei M. Anti-allodynic Effect of Nefopam and Morphine in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain. Novel Biomed 2013;1:16-22.Background: Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain due to a disorder in the peripheral or central nervous system with different pathophysiological mechanisms. Current treatments are not effective. Here we compared the analgesic effect of nefopam, and morphine in chronic constriction injury (CCI model of neuropathic pain.Methods: Male wistar rat (150-200g, n=8 were divided into 3 different groups: 1- Saline-treated CCI group, 2- Saline-treated sham group, and 3- Drug-treated CCI groups. In CCI model of neuropathic pain, the left sciatic nerve was exposed and 4 loose chromic gut ligatures were placed around the nerve proximal to the trifurcation. Ketamine 60mg/kg and xylazine 10 mg/kg were used for anesthesia. Nefopam (10, 20, 30mg/kg, and morphine (1, 3, 5mg/kg were injected 30 minutes before surgery and continued daily to day 14 post-ligation. Von Frey filaments for mechanical allodynia and acetone test for cold allodynia were respectively used as pain behavioral tests. Experiments were performed on day 0 (before surgery and days 1, 3, 5,7,10 and 14 post injury. Behavioral studies were performed in a quiet room between 9:00 to 11:00 AM. All experiments followed the IASP guidelines on ethical standards for investigation of experimental pain in animals.Results: Nefopam (20 and 30mg/kg blocked mechanical and cold allodynia during the experimental period, but the analgesic effects of morphine (5mg/kg lasted for 7 days.Conclusions: It seems that nefopam could effectively reduce pain behavior compared to morphine with reduced adverse effects.

  6. Scrambler therapy for the treatment of neuropathic pain related to leukemia in a pediatric patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hahck Soo; Kim, Won-Joong; Kim, Hyung Gon; Yoo, Seung Hee

    2017-11-01

    Cancer-related neuropathic pain often responds poorly to standard pain treatments. Scrambler therapy has relieved refractory chronic pain in several uncontrolled clinical trials. An 11-year-old female patient was suffering from left groin and medial thigh pain after irradiation to the knee. The girl was diagnosed with precursor B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia 2 years ago. Extramedullary relapse of leukemia developed 1 month ago and pain had started. She was treated with oral medications, but she was continuously complaining of severe pain. Neuropathic pain caused by obturator nerve involvement in leukemia. Scrambler therapy. Pain reduction. Scrambler therapy is noninvasive, is not associated with any complications, causes minimal discomfort during treatment, and is very effective in a pediatric patient with cancer-related neuropathic pain.

  7. Unmasking the tonic-aversive state in neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    King, Tamara; Vera-Portocarrero, Louis; Gutierrez, Tannia; Vanderah, Todd W; Dussor, Gregory; Lai, Josephine; Fields, Howard L; Porreca, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Tonic pain has been difficult to demonstrate in animals. Because relief of pain is rewarding, analgesic agents that are not rewarding in the absence of pain should become rewarding only when there is ongoing pain. We used conditioned place preference to concomitantly determine the presence of tonic pain in rats and the efficacy of agents that relieve it. This provides a new approach for investigating tonic pain in animals and for evaluating the analgesic effects of drugs.

  8. Psychological defensive profile of sciatica patients with neuropathic pain and its relationship to quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutoglu, A; Boyaci, A; Karababa, I F; Koca, I; Kaya, E; Kucuk, A; Yetisgin, A

    2015-09-01

    To identify differences between defense styles and mechanisms in sciatica patients with or without neuropathic pain and their relationship to quality of life. The study included 37 sciatica patients with neuropathic pain (SNP), 36 sciatica patients without neuropathic pain and 38 healthy subjects. Pain severity was measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Psychological condition was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Defense mechanisms were assessed using a 40-item Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40) and quality of life was assessed using Short Form-36 (SF-36). BDI and BAI scores were significantly higher in the SNP group (p < 0.001). Idealization and immature defense styles, as well as isolation, displacement and somatization were significantly higher in the SNP group (p < 0.05). SF-36 parameters also differed significantly between the groups, with controls having the best scores and the SNP group the worst. In linear regression analysis, acting out and BDI were found to affect the pain domain of the SF-36 (p < 0.001). The acting out defensive style and BDI were independently associated with pain-related quality of life. In the SNP group, significant differences were found in the immature and neurotic styles of the defense mechanisms.

  9. Brain activity modifications following spinal cord stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, L D; Duarte, R V; Furlong, P L; Ashford, R L; Raphael, J H

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is believed to exert supraspinal effects; however, these mechanisms are still far from fully elucidated. This systematic review aims to assess existing neurophysiological and functional neuroimaging literature to reveal current knowledge regarding the effects of SCS for chronic neuropathic pain on brain activity, to identify gaps in knowledge, and to suggest directions for future research. Electronic databases and hand-search of reference lists were employed to identify publications investigating brain activity associated with SCS in patients with chronic neuropathic pain, using neurophysiological and functional neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, PET, MEG, EEG). Studies investigating patients with SCS for chronic neuropathic pain and studying brain activity related to SCS were included. Demographic data (age, gender), study factors (imaging modality, patient diagnoses, pain area, duration of SCS at recording, stimulus used) and brain areas activated were extracted from the included studies. Twenty-four studies were included. Thirteen studies used neuroelectrical imaging techniques, eight studies used haemodynamic imaging techniques, two studies employed both neuroelectrical and haemodynamic techniques separately, and one study investigated cerebral neurobiology. The limited available evidence regarding supraspinal mechanisms of SCS does not allow us to develop any conclusive theories. However, the studies included appear to show an inhibitory effect of SCS on somatosensory evoked potentials, as well as identifying the thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex as potential mediators of the pain experience. The lack of substantial evidence in this area highlights the need for large-scale controlled studies of this kind. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  10. Adult Stem Cell as New Advanced Therapy for Experimental Neuropathic Pain Treatment

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    Silvia Franchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NP is a highly invalidating disease resulting as consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. All the pharmacological treatments today in use give a long lasting pain relief only in a limited percentage of patients before pain reappears making NP an incurable disease. New approaches are therefore needed and research is testing stem cell usage. Several papers have been written on experimental neuropathic pain treatment using stem cells of different origin and species to treat experimental NP. The original idea was based on the capacity of stem cell to offer a totipotent cellular source for replacing injured neural cells and for delivering trophic factors to lesion site; soon the researchers agreed that the capacity of stem cells to contrast NP was not dependent upon their regenerative effect but was mostly linked to a bidirectional interaction between the stem cell and damaged microenvironment resident cells. In this paper we review the preclinical studies produced in the last years assessing the effects induced by several stem cells in different models of neuropathic pain. The overall positive results obtained on pain remission by using stem cells that are safe, of easy isolation, and which may allow an autologous transplant in patients may be encouraging for moving from bench to bedside, although there are several issues that still need to be solved.

  11. Regional migratory osteoporosis: case report of a patient with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Esin; Sahin, Ebru; Dilek, Banu; Baydar, Meltem; Manisali, Metin; Kosay, Can; Gulbahar, Selmin

    2011-10-01

    Regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO) is an idiopathic disorder characterized by severe periarticular pain, transient and migratory arthralgia, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis in this disease may appear in the form of local regional osteoporosis and bone marrow edema or generalized osteoporosis. It occurs most commonly in middle-aged men and late second or third trimester pregnant women. The laboratory findings of the disease are usually normal and do not demonstrate apparent anomalies. The presence of bone marrow edema on MRI is its characteristic finding. RMO can only be separated from transient osteoporosis of hip and avascular necrosis with migration to other joints. Clinically, RMO progresses in three stages: increasing pain and disability, radiological findings (osteopenia), maximalization of symptoms, and finally, the regression of the disease and radiological changes. In this case report, we present a 29-year-old woman whose symptoms had first appeared at the second trimester of pregnancy and migrated both to the other joints in the proximo-distal direction and to the adjacent bones within the same joint. She also had symptoms such as hyperalgesia, hyperesthesia and hypertrichosis along with neuropathic pain, which she described as a burning, biting, and prickling type of pain at the right leg. The neuropathic pain of the patient was resistant to medical treatment. We believe that this case was worth reporting because of the obstinate clinical course of the patient's disease and her severe neuropathic pain that was resistant to treatment.

  12. Effects of electroacupuncture on orphanin FQ immunoreactivity and preproorphanin FQ mRNA in nucleus of raphe magnus in the neuropathic pain rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Xie, Hong; Dong, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Yan-Qing; Wu, Gen-Cheng

    2004-07-15

    Orphanin FQ (OFQ) is an endogenous ligand for opioid receptor-like-1 (ORL1) receptor. Previous studies have shown that both OFQ immunoreactivity and preproorphanin FQ (ppOFQ) mRNA expression could be observed in the brain regions involved in pain modulation, e.g., nucleus of raphe magnus (NRM), dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). It was reported that electroacupuncture (EA) has analgesic effect on neuropathic pain, and the analgesic effect was mediated by the endogenous opioid peptides. In the present study, we investigated the effects of EA on the changes of OFQ in the neuropathic pain rats. In the sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) model, we investigated the changes of ppOFQ mRNA and OFQ immunoreactivity in NRM after EA by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry methods, respectively. Then, the ppOFQ mRNA-positive and OFQ immunoreactive cells were counted under a computerized image analysis system. The results showed that expression of ppOFQ mRNA decreased and OFQ immunoreactivity increased after EA treatment in the neuropathic pain rats. These results indicated that EA modulated OFQ synthesis and OFQ peptide level in NRM of the neuropathic pain rats. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  13. The β-lactam clavulanic acid mediates glutamate transport-sensitive pain relief in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P J; Gegelashvili, G; Munro, G

    2017-01-01

    , ceftriaxone, displays analgesic effects in rodent chronic pain models. METHODS: Here, the antinociceptive actions of another β-lactam clavulanic acid, which possesses negligible antibiotic activity, were compared with ceftriaxone in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain......-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, clavulanic acid up-regulates GluTs in cultured rodent- and human astroglia and alleviates CCI-induced hypersensitivity, most likely through up-regulation of GLT1b in spinal dorsal horn. SIGNIFICANCE: Chronic dosing of clavulanic acid alleviates neuropathic pain in rats and up......-regulates glutamate transporters both in vitro and in vivo. Crucially, a similar up-regulation of glutamate transporters in human spinal astrocytes by clavulanic acid supports the development of novel β-lactam-based analgesics, devoid of antibacterial activity, for the clinical treatment of chronic pain....

  14. Prevalence of Neuropathic Pain and Patient-Reported Outcomes in Korean Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain Resulting from Neuropathic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hwan; Hong, Jae Taek; Lee, Chong-Suh; Kim, Keun-Su; Suk, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Park, Ye-Soo; Chang, Bong-Soon; Jun, Deuk Soo; Kim, Young-Hoon; Lee, Jung-Hee; Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Jung-Sub; Park, Si-Young; Oh, In-Soo; Hong, Jae-Young; Shin, Hyun-Chul; Kim, Woo-Kyung; Kim, Joo-Han; Lee, Jung-Kil; Kim, In-Soo; Ha, Yoon; Im, Soo-Bin; Kim, Sang Woo; Han, In-Ho; Shin, Jun-Jae; Rim, Byeong Cheol; Seo, Bo-Jeong; Kim, Young-Joo; Lee, Juneyoung

    2017-12-01

    A noninterventional, multicenter, cross-sectional study. We investigated the prevalence of neuropathic pain (NP) and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of the quality of life (QoL) and functional disability in Korean adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Among patients with CLBP, 20%-55% had NP. Patients older than 20 years with CLBP lasting for longer than three months, with a visual analog scale (VAS) pain score higher than four, and with pain medications being used for at least four weeks before enrollment were recruited from 27 general hospitals between December 2014 and May 2015. Medical chart reviews were performed to collect demographic/clinical features and diagnosis of NP (douleur neuropathique 4, DN4). The QoL (EuroQoL 5-dimension, EQ-5D; EQ-VAS) and functional disability (Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale, QBPDS) were determined through patient surveys. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to compare PROs between the NP (DN4≥4) and non-NP (DN4NP. The prevalence of NP was higher in male patients (46.8%; p p p NP group vs. non-NP group: 0.4±0.3 vs. 0.5±0.3; p NP group vs. non-NP group: 45.8±21.2 vs. 36.3±20.2; p NP showed lower EQ-5D (β=-0.1; p p NP. NP was highly prevalent in Korean patients with CLBP. Patients with CLBP having NP had a lower QoL and more severe dysfunction than those without NP. To enhance the QoL and functional status of patients with CLBP, this study highlights the importance of appropriately diagnosing and treating NP.

  15. Effect the exercise program on neuropathic pain intensity in patients with paraplegia Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedghi Goyaghaj N

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patients with spinal cord injury suffer from continuous and persistent neuropathic pain that has a destructive impact on their quality of life. Exercise therapy is one of the non-pharmacological interventions that is recommended to control chronic pain, This study aimed to determine the effect of exercise program on neuropathic pain intensity in patients with paraplegia Spinal Cord Injury. Materials and Method: This study is a clinical trial.that population was the all of the patients with spinal cord injury, who referred to one of the educational hospitals in Tehran in 2014, 40 patient were selected based on purposive sampling and were randomly allocated into two groups of experimental and control. Exercise program for paraplegia spinal cord injury was implemented in experimental group during twelve 45-60minutes sessions, twice a week. Data collection was done before and one week after the intervention through using personal information form and, The International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Basic Data Set. Data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS19 and Fisher's exact test, Independent samples T-test Paired T-test and Chi square. Results: The mean score of neuropathic pain intensity before the intervention was 8.05 ± 1.51 in intervention group and 7.57 ± 1.21 in the control group. These amounts after the intervention were 5.55 ± 1.61 and 7.37 ± 1.05 respectively (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Results showed that the regular exercise program can reduce neuropathic pain severity in patients with spinal cord injuries and it can be recommended as a non-pharmacological method of pain control in these patients.

  16. Effect of NMDA NR2B antagonist on neuropathic pain in two spinal cord injury models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngkyung; Cho, Hwi-young; Ahn, Young Ju; Kim, Junesun; Yoon, Young Wook

    2012-05-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are thought to play an important role in the processes of central sensitization and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, particularly after spinal cord injury (SCI). NMDA antagonists effectively reduce neuropathic pain, but serious side effects prevent their use as therapeutic drugs. NMDA NR2B antagonists have been reported to effectively reduce inflammatory and neuropathic pain. In this study, we investigated the effects of NR2B antagonists on neuropathic pain and the expression of NR2B in the spinal cord in 2 SCI models. SCI was induced at T12 by a New York University impactor (contusion) or by sectioning of the lateral half of the spinal cord (hemisection). Ifenprodil (100, 200, 500, 1000nmol) and Ro25-6981 (20, 50, 100, 200nmol) were intrathecally injected and behavioral tests were conducted. Ifenprodil increased the paw withdrawal threshold in both models but also produced mild motor depression at higher doses. Ro25-6981 increased the mechanical nociceptive threshold in a dose-dependent manner without motor depression. NR2B expression was significantly increased on both sides at the spinal segments of L1-2 and L4-5 in the hemisection model but did not change in the contusion model. Increased expression of NR2B in the hemisection model was reduced by intrathecal ifenprodil. These results suggest that intrathecal NMDA NR2B antagonist increased the mechanical nociceptive threshold after SCI without motor depression. A selective subtype of NMDA receptor, such as NR2B, may be a more selective target for pain control because NMDA receptors play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of chronic pain. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduction of central neuropathic pain with ketamine infusion in a patient with Ehlers–Danlos syndrome: a case report

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    Lo TC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tony Chung Tung Lo,1,* Stephen Tung Yeung,2,* Sujin Lee,1 Kira Skavinski,3 Solomon Liao,4 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of California Irvine, Orange, CA, 2Department of Immunology, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, 3Department of Palliative Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, 4Department of Palliative Medicine, University of California Irvine, Orange, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Ehlers–Danlos syndrome frequently causes acute and chronic pain because of joint subluxations and dislocations secondary to hypermobility. Current treatments for pain related to Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and central pain syndrome are inadequate. This case report discusses the therapeutic use of ketamine intravenous infusion as an alternative. Case report: A 27-year-old Caucasian female with a history of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and spinal cord ischemic myelopathy resulting in central pain syndrome, presented with severe generalized body pain refractory to multiple pharmacological interventions. After a 7-day course of ketamine intravenous infusion under controlled generalized sedation in the intensive care unit, the patient reported a dramatic reduction in pain levels from 7–8 out of 10 to 0–3 out of 10 on a numeric rating scale and had a significant functional improvement. The patient tolerated a reduction in her pain medication regimen, which originally included opioids, gabapentin, pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Conclusion: Ketamine infusion treatment has been used in various pain syndromes, including central neuropathic pain, ischemic pain, and regional pain syndrome. Reports have suggested that ketamine modulates pain by the regression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor to a resting state. As such, propagation of nociceptive signal to brain is interrupted allowing for the restoration of

  18. Neuropathic pain in primary care | Koch | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and presents a significant challenge for pain clinicians and general practitioners. Often, patients have poor pain resolution. It is important that patients with any chronic pain are identified and managed appropriately according to their distinct treatment needs. Keywords: pain, postherpetic neuralgia, herpes zoster, shingles ...

  19. The role of the immune system in the generation of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Margarita; Dawes, John M; Bennett, David L H

    2012-07-01

    Persistent pain is a sequela of several neurological conditions with a primary immune basis, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome and multiple sclerosis. Additionally, diverse forms of injury to the peripheral or the central nervous systems--whether traumatic, metabolic, or toxic--result in substantial recruitment and activation of immune cells. This response involves the innate immune system, but evidence also exists of T-lymphocyte recruitment, and in some patient cohorts antibodies to neuronal antigens have been reported. Mediators released by immune cells, such as cytokines, sensitise nociceptive signalling in the peripheral and central nervous systems. Preclinical data suggest an immune pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, but clinical evidence of a central role of the immune system is less clear. An important challenge for the future is to establish to what extent this immune response initiates or maintains neuropathic pain in patients and thus whether it is amenable to therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Operant self-administration of pregabalin in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bura, S A; Cabañero, D; Maldonado, R

    2018-04-01

    Pregabalin is a first-line agent for neuropathic pain treatment whose abuse liability remains controversial. Surprisingly, studies exploring the reinforcing properties of pregabalin in operant mouse models are missing. We evaluated the acquisition of operant pregabalin self-administration in mice exposed to a partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) or a sham operation. After surgery, mice were trained in operant boxes to intravenously self-administer pregabalin at 1.5 or 3 mg/kg/inf or saline during 10 days. Thermal and mechanical sensitivity were assessed before and after self-medication, and depressive-like behaviour was evaluated after discontinuation of the treatment. Partial sciatic nerve ligation and sham-operated mice exposed to pregabalin at 3 mg/kg/inf showed higher active responding compared to mice exposed to saline. The differences in active responding were more robust in nerve-injured than in sham-operated mice. Self-medication at either dose of pregabalin partially inhibited thermal hypersensitivity, whereas only self-medication at 3 mg/kg/inf reduced mechanical sensitivity. Finally, a depressive-like behaviour was revealed after saline treatment in nerve-injured mice, and this emotional manifestation was abolished after pregabalin treatment at the high dose. Pregabalin showed reinforcing effects both in PSNL and sham-operated mice and attenuated the nociceptive and emotional manifestations of neuropathic pain in mice self-administering this drug. Therefore, pregabalin self-administration was related to neuropathic pain relief, but also to reinforcing properties related to psychotropic drug effects. This study reveals the improvement in nociceptive and emotional manifestations of neuropathic pain after operant pregabalin self-medication in mice and suggests the reinforcing effects of this drug in an operant paradigm. This study shows that mice with a nerve injury self-administer pregabalin at doses effective reducing nociceptive hypersensitivity and

  1. Tolerability of NGX-4010, a capsaicin 8% patch for peripheral neuropathic pain

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    Peppin JF

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available John F Peppin1, Kristine Majors2, Lynn R Webster3, David M Simpson4, Jeffrey K Tobias5, Geertrui F Vanhove51The Pain Treatment Center of the Bluegrass, Lexington, KY, USA; 2Integrated Clinical Trial Services, Inc, West Des Moines, IA, USA; 3Lifetree Clinical Research and Pain Clinic, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 4Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 5NeurogesX, Inc, San Mateo, CA, USABackground/purpose: NGX-4010 (QUTENZA™; NeurogesX Inc, San Mateo, CA, a capsaicin 8% dermal patch, is licensed in the European Union for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP in nondiabetic adults and in the United States for the treatment of neuropathic pain associated with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN. While NGX-4010 treatment is associated with a low risk of systemic adverse events, patch application-related pain is common and may be managed with local cooling and/or oral analgesics. This article characterizes the tolerability of NGX-4010 and will help to guide any pain management.Methods: This integrated analysis of tolerability data collected from the NGX-4010 clinical study program included 1696 patients with PNP. Patch application-related pain on the treatment day was captured as Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS “pain now” scores while “average pain for the past 24 hours” NPRS scores were analyzed for 7 days following treatment. Other tolerability assessments included the percentage of patients completing ≥90% of the intended treatment duration and patients using medication for patch application-related pain.Results: The mean maximum change in “pain now” NPRS scores from pretreatment levels during and after patch application was 2.6 for all patients. This pain was transient and resolved following patch removal. Mean “average pain for the past 24 hours” NPRS scores returned to baseline by the evening of the treatment day for patients with PHN, and the evening of day 2 for patients with human immunodeficiency virus

  2. The effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with neuropathic pain from spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngernyam, Niran; Jensen, Mark P; Arayawichanon, Preeda; Auvichayapat, Narong; Tiamkao, Somsak; Janjarasjitt, Suparerk; Punjaruk, Wiyada; Amatachaya, Anuwat; Aree-uea, Benchaporn; Auvichayapat, Paradee

    2015-02-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has demonstrated efficacy for reducing neuropathic pain, but the respective mechanisms remain largely unknown. The current study tested the hypothesis that pain reduction with tDCS is associated with an increase in the peak frequency spectrum density in the theta-alpha range. Twenty patients with spinal cord injury and bilateral neuropathic pain received single sessions of both sham and anodal tDCS (2 mA) over the left primary motor area (M1) for 20 min. Treatment order was randomly assigned. Pre- to post-procedure changes in pain intensity and peak frequency of electroencephalogram spectral analysis were compared between treatment conditions. The active treatment condition (anodal tDCS over M1) but not sham treatment resulted in significant decreases in pain intensity. In addition, consistent with the study hypothesis, peak theta-alpha frequency (PTAF) assessed from an electrode placed over the site of stimulation increased more from pre- to post-session among participants in the active tDCS condition, relative to those in the sham tDCS condition. Moreover, we found a significant association between a decrease in pain intensity and an increase in PTAF at the stimulation site. The findings are consistent with the possibility that anodal tDCS over the left M1 may be effective, at least in part, because it results in an increase in M1 cortical excitability, perhaps due to a pain inhibitory effect of motor cortex stimulation that may influence the descending pain modulation system. Future research is needed to determine if there is a causal association between increased left anterior activity and pain reduction. The results provide new findings regarding the effects of tDCS on neuropathic pain and brain oscillation changes. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. All rights reserved.

  3. Percutaneous nerve stimulation in chronic neuropathic pain patients due to spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsky, David Jos; Ettema, Frank Willem Leo; van der Leeden, Marike; Dekker, Joost; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke Marjan

    2014-03-01

    The long-term prognosis for neuropathic pain resolution following spinal cord injury (SCI) is often poor. In many SCI patients, neuropathic pain continues or even worsens over time. Thus, new treatment approaches are needed. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility and effect of percutaneous (electrical) nerve stimulation (P(E)NS) in SCI patients with chronic neuropathic pain. In 18 weeks, 12 P(E)NS treatments were scheduled. Assessment with questionnaires was performed at baseline (T0), after 8 weeks (T8), 18 weeks (T18), and 12 weeks post-treatment (T30). From 26 screened patients, 17 were included. In total, 91.2% questionnaires were returned, 2 patients dropped out, and 4.2% of the patients reported minor side effects. Pain scores on the week pain diary measured with the numerical rating scale improved significantly at T8, from 6.5 at baseline to 5.4, and were still significantly improved at T18. Pain reduction of ≥ 30% directly after a session was reported in 64.6% sessions. In total, 6 patients experienced reduction in size of the pain areas at T18 and T30, with a mean reduction of 45.8% at T18 and 45.3% at T30. P(E)NS is feasible as an intervention in SCI patients and might have a positive effect on pain reduction in a part of this patient group. © 2013 The Authors Pain Practice © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  4. A randomized trial of pregabalin in patients with neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Diana D; Nieshoff, Edward C; Suda, Kota; Goto, Shin-Ichi; Sanin, Luis; Kaneko, Takehiko; Sporn, Jonathan; Parsons, Bruce; Soulsby, Matt; Yang, Ruoyong; Whalen, Ed; Scavone, Joseph M; Suzuki, Makoto M; Knapp, Lloyd E

    2013-02-05

    To assess the efficacy and tolerability of pregabalin for the treatment of central neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI). Patients with chronic, below-level, neuropathic pain due to SCI were randomized to receive 150 to 600 mg/d pregabalin (n = 108) or matching placebo (n = 112) for 17 weeks. Pain was classified in relation to the neurologic level of injury, defined as the most caudal spinal cord segment with normal sensory and motor function, as above, at, or below level. The primary outcome measure was duration-adjusted average change in pain. Key secondary outcome measures included the change in mean pain score from baseline to end point, the percentage of patients with ≥30% reduction in mean pain score at end point, patient global impression of change scores at end point, and the change in mean pain-related sleep interference score from baseline to end point. Additional outcome measures included the medical outcomes study-sleep scale and the Hospital anxiety and depression scale. Pregabalin treatment resulted in statistically significant improvements over placebo for all primary and key secondary outcome measures. Significant pain improvement was evident as early as week 1 and was sustained throughout the treatment period. Adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile of pregabalin and were mostly mild to moderate in severity. Somnolence and dizziness were most frequently reported. This study demonstrates that pregabalin is effective and well tolerated in patients with neuropathic pain due to SCI. This study provides class I evidence that pregabalin, 150 to 600 mg/d, is effective in reducing duration-adjusted average change in pain compared with baseline in patients with SCI over a 16-week period (p = 0.003, 95% confidence interval = -0.98, -0.20).

  5. Systemic Administration of Propentofylline, Ibudilast, and (+)-Naltrexone Each Reverses Mechanical Allodynia in a Novel Rat Model of Central Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Amanda; Wieseler, Julie; Favret, Jacob; Johnson, Kirk W.; Rice, Kenner C.; Maier, Steven F.; Falci, Scott; Watkins, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    Central neuropathic pain (CNP) is a debilitating consequence of central nervous system (CNS) damage for which current treatments are ineffective. To explore mechanisms underlying CNP, we developed a rat model involving T13/L1 dorsal root avulsion. The resultant dorsal horn damage creates bilateral below-level (L4-6) mechanical allodynia. This allodynia, termed spinal neuropathic avulsion pain (SNAP), occurs in the absence of confounding paralysis. To characterize this model, we undertook a series of studies aimed at defining whether SNAP could be reversed by any of 3 putative glial activation inhibitors, each with distinct mechanisms of action. Indeed, the phosphodiesterase inhibitor propentofylline, the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) inhibitor ibudilast, and the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist (+)-naltrexone each reversed below-level allodynia bilaterally. Strikingly, none of these impacted SNAP upon first administration but required 1–2 wk of daily administration before pain reversal was obtained. Given reversal of CNP by each of these glial modulatory agents, these results suggest that glia contribute to the maintenance of such pain and enduring release of MIF and endogenous agonists of TLR4 is important for sustaining CNP. The markedly delayed efficacy of all 3 glial modulatory drugs may prove instructive for interpretation of apparent drug failures after shorter dosing regimens. PMID:24412802

  6. Neuropathic pain prevalence following spinal cord injury: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, D; Fullen, B M; Stokes, D; Lennon, O

    2017-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), chronic pain is a common secondary complication with neuropathic pain (NP) cited as one of the most distressing and debilitating conditions leading to poor quality of life, depression and sleep disturbances. Neuropathic pain presenting at or below the level of injury is largely refractory to current pharmacological and physical treatments. No consensus on the prevalence of NP post SCI currently exists, hence this systematic review was undertaken. The review comprised three phases: a methodological assessment of databases [PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Cochrane Library and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro)] identifying potential papers and screening for inclusion criteria by two independent reviewers; data extraction; and finally rating of internal validity and strength of the evidence, using a published valid and reliable scale. Meta-analysis estimated pooled point prevalence rates using a random effects model. In total, 17 studies involving 2529 patients were included in the review. Overall point prevalence rates for NP were established at 53% (38.58-67.47); 19% (13.26-26.39) for at-level NP and 27% (19.89-34.61) for below-level NP, with high heterogeneity noted (I 2  = 84-93%). Prevalence rates for NP following SCI are high. Future studies should include established definitions, classification systems and assessment tools for NP at defined time points post SCI to follow the trajectory of this problem across the lifespan and include indices of sleep, mood and interference to allow for appropriate, optimal and timely NP management for each patient. WHAT DOES THIS REVIEW ADD?: This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to record pooled point prevalence of neuropathic pain post spinal cord injury at 53%. Additional pooled analysis shows that neuropathic pain is more common below the level of lesion, in patients with tetraplegia, older patients

  7. Contribution of microglia and astrocytes to the central sensitization, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in the juvenile rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikeda Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of pain after peripheral nerve and tissue injury involves not only neuronal pathways but also immune cells and glia. Central sensitization is thought to be a mechanism for such persistent pain, and ATP involves in the process. We examined the contribution of glia to neuronal excitation in the juvenile rat spinal dorsal horn which is subjected to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Results In rats subjected to neuropathic pain, immunoreactivity for the microglial marker OX42 was markedly increased. In contrast, in rats subjected to inflammatory pain, immunoreactivity for the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased slightly. Optically-recorded neuronal excitation induced by single-pulse stimulation to the dorsal root was augmented in rats subjected to neuropathic and inflammatory pain compared to control rats. The bath application of a glial inhibitor minocycline and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB203580 inhibited the neuronal excitation in rats subjected to neuropathic pain. A specific P2X1,2,3,4 antagonist TNP-ATP largely inhibited the neuronal excitation only in rats subjected to neuropathic pain rats. In contrast, an astroglial toxin L-alpha-aminoadipate, a gap junction blocker carbenoxolone and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125 inhibited the neuronal excitation only in rats subjected to inflammatory pain. A greater number of cells in spinal cord slices from rats subjected to neuropathic pain showed Ca2+ signaling in response to puff application of ATP. This Ca2+ signaling was inhibited by minocycline and TNP-ATP. Conclusions These results directly support the notion that microglia is more involved in neuropathic pain and astrocyte in inflammatory pain.

  8. Contribution of microglia and astrocytes to the central sensitization, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in the juvenile rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kiritoshi, Takaki; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2012-06-15

    The development of pain after peripheral nerve and tissue injury involves not only neuronal pathways but also immune cells and glia. Central sensitization is thought to be a mechanism for such persistent pain, and ATP involves in the process. We examined the contribution of glia to neuronal excitation in the juvenile rat spinal dorsal horn which is subjected to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. In rats subjected to neuropathic pain, immunoreactivity for the microglial marker OX42 was markedly increased. In contrast, in rats subjected to inflammatory pain, immunoreactivity for the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased slightly. Optically-recorded neuronal excitation induced by single-pulse stimulation to the dorsal root was augmented in rats subjected to neuropathic and inflammatory pain compared to control rats. The bath application of a glial inhibitor minocycline and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB203580 inhibited the neuronal excitation in rats subjected to neuropathic pain. A specific P2X1,2,3,4 antagonist TNP-ATP largely inhibited the neuronal excitation only in rats subjected to neuropathic pain rats. In contrast, an astroglial toxin L-alpha-aminoadipate, a gap junction blocker carbenoxolone and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125 inhibited the neuronal excitation only in rats subjected to inflammatory pain. A greater number of cells in spinal cord slices from rats subjected to neuropathic pain showed Ca2+ signaling in response to puff application of ATP. This Ca2+ signaling was inhibited by minocycline and TNP-ATP. These results directly support the notion that microglia is more involved in neuropathic pain and astrocyte in inflammatory pain.

  9. Discriminating between neuropathic pain and sensory hypersensitivity using the Chronic Pain Questions (CPQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Karin S; Currie, Brooke M; Donevan, Sean; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Hegeman-Dingle, Rozelle; Abraham, Lucy; Thompson, Christine; Sadosky, Alesia; Brodsky, Marina

    2017-01-01

    The Chronic Pain Questions (CPQ) were developed for clinical use with the aim of supporting primary care physicians in the screening, assessment and monitoring of patients with chronic pain. the purpose of this study was to examine the ability of the cpq CPQ to discriminate between patients with neuropathic pain (nep) versus those with sensory hypersensitivity (sh). Adult men and women with a diagnosis of a NeP or SH condition were recruited from 5 clinical sites across the United States. Participants completed a series of self-administered questionnaires, including the CPQ. Continuous variables were compared between groups with independent t-tests; categorical variables were compared with chi-square analyses. A series of exploratory logistic regressions were performed to discern optimal screening criteria for SH using CPQ responses. 98 participants, 68 with physician-confirmed diagnoses of SH and 30 with NeP, participated. 81.6% were female, 73.5% Caucasian, and mean (± SD) age was 58.4 ± 12.6 years. SH participants included significantly more females compared to the NeP group (94.1% vs. 53.3%). Differences in CPQ responses between groups were statistically significant for six of the 14 CPQ items with SH participants having significantly lower scores on specific pain quality questions and significantly higher scores on trouble thinking/remembering (5.3 ± 3.5 vs. 3.0 ± 2.8) and sensitivity to lights/noises/smells (4.8 ± 3.5 vs. 2.7 ± 3.0). No significant differences were found between groups for chronic pain intensity, pain made worse with touch, pain limited to joints, or pain interference with usual activity, sleep or mood. Logistic regression analyses revealed strong c indices (≥0.89) for all models. Consistent findings demonstrated that younger age, female gender, and scores ≥6 for the CPQ question on sensitivity to lights/noises/smells were all predictive of SH. The CPQ can help differentiate between patients with NeP and SH. More research

  10. The Emerging Role of HMGB1 in Neuropathic Pain: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Wan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NPP is intolerable, persistent, and specific type of long-term pain. It is considered to be a direct consequence of pathological changes affecting the somatosensory system and can be debilitating for affected patients. Despite recent progress and growing interest in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease, NPP still presents a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 mediates inflammatory and immune reactions in nervous system and emerging evidence reveals that HMGB1 plays an essential role in neuroinflammation through receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLR, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, C-X-X motif chemokines receptor 4 (CXCR4, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor. In this review, we present evidence from studies that address the role of HMGB1 in NPP. First, we review studies aimed at determining the role of HMGB1 in NPP and discuss the possible mechanisms underlying HMGB1-mediated NPP progression where receptors for HMGB1 are involved. Then we review studies that address HMGB1 as a potential therapeutic target for NPP.

  11. Analgesic effect of piracetam on peripheral neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ashish K; Bhati, Yogendra; Tripathi, Chakra D; Sharma, Krishna K

    2014-08-01

    Despite immense advances in the treatment strategies, management of neuropathic pain remains unsatisfactory. Piracetam is a prototype of nootropic drugs, used to improve cognitive impairment. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of piracetam on peripheral neuropathic pain in rats. Neuropathic pain was induced by the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. Following this, piracetam was intraperitoneally administered for 2 weeks in doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, and pain was assessed by employing the behavioural tests for thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate and tail flick tests) and cold allodynia (acetone test). After the induction of neuropathic pain, significant development of thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia was observed. The administration of piracetam (50 mg/kg) did not have any significant effect on all the behavioural tests. Further, piracetam (100 mg/kg) also had no effect on the hot plate and tail flick tests; however it significantly decreased the paw withdrawal duration in the acetone test. Piracetam in a dose of 200 mg/kg significantly modulated neuropathic pain as observed from the increased hot plate and tail flick latencies, and decreased paw withdrawal duration (in acetone test). Therefore, the present study suggests the potential use of piracetam in the treatment of neuropathic pain, which merits further clinical investigation.

  12. Proteomic Identification of an Upregulated Isoform of Annexin A3 in the Spinal Cords of Rats in a Neuropathic Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangyuan Zou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NP is induced by nerve damage or a disturbance in the peripheral or central nervous systems. Nerve damage causes the activation of sensitizing mechanisms in the peripheral and central nervous systems, which induces transcriptional and post-transcriptional alterations in sensory nerves. However, the underlying mechanisms of NP remain elusive. In the study, Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE-based comparative proteomics identified 38 differential gel spots, and 15 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs between the sham and the chronic constriction injury (CCI-induced neuropathic pain rats. Of them, Annexin A3 (ANXA3 was significantly increased after CCI with Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence imaging. A lentivirus delivering ANXA3 shRNA (LV-shANXA3 was administered intrathecally to determine the analgesic effects of ANXA3 on allodynia and hyperalgesia in a CCI-induced neuropathic pain model in rats. Further study showed that LV-shANXA3 reversed the upregulation of ANXA3, alleviated CCI-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. The study indicated that ANXA3 may play an important role in neuropathic pain.

  13. Botulinum toxin type A for neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zee-A; Song, Dae Heon; Oh, Hyun-Mi; Chung, Myung Eun

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) on patients with spinal cord injury-associated neuropathic pain. The effect of BTX-A on 40 patients with spinal cord injury-associated neuropathic pain was investigated using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. A 1-time subcutaneous BTX-A (200U) injection was administered to the painful area. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores (0-100mm), the Korean version of the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and the World Health Organization WHOQOL-BREF quality of life assessment were evaluated prior to treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the injection. At 4 and 8 weeks after injection, the VAS score for pain was significantly reduced by 18.6 ± 16.8 and 21.3 ± 26.8, respectively, in the BTX-A group, whereas it was reduced by 2.6 ± 14.6 and 0.3 ± 19.5, respectively, in the placebo group. The pain relief was associated with preservation of motor or sensory function below the neurological level of injury. Among the responders in the BTX-A group, 55% and 45% reported pain relief of 20% or greater at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, after the injection, whereas only 15% and 10% of the responders in the placebo group reported a similar level of pain relief. Improvements in the score for the physical health domain of the WHOQOL-BREF in the BTX-A group showed a marginal trend toward significance (p = 0.0521) at 4 weeks after the injection. These results indicate that BTX-A may reduce intractable chronic neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  14. Upregulation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Cells by Nerve Injury Contributes to Development of Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, You-Qing; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Nerve injury induces long-term changes in gene expression in the nociceptive circuitry and can lead to chronic neuropathic pain. However, the transcriptional mechanism involved in neuropathic pain is poorly understood. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATc) is a transcriptional factor regulated by the Ca2+-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin. In this study, we determined nerve injury–induced changes in the expression of NFATc1–c4 in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cords an...

  15. Long-term administration of high doses of transdermal buprenorphine in cancer patients with severe neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert, Wojciech; Kowalski,Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Wojciech Leppert, Grzegorz Kowalski Chair and Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland Background: Buprenorphine is often administered by the transdermal route (transdermal buprenorphine [TB]) in cancer patients with severe neuropathic pain. However, high doses of TB of 140 µg/h are rarely used.Patients and methods: Three cancer patients with severe neuropathic Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) pain scores of 8–10 who were success...

  16. Long-term administration of high doses of transdermal buprenorphine in cancer patients with severe neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert W; Kowalski G

    2015-01-01

    Wojciech Leppert, Grzegorz Kowalski Chair and Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland Background: Buprenorphine is often administered by the transdermal route (transdermal buprenorphine [TB]) in cancer patients with severe neuropathic pain. However, high doses of TB of 140 µg/h are rarely used.Patients and methods: Three cancer patients with severe neuropathic Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) pain scores of 8–10 who were successfully tr...

  17. Orofacial neuropathic pain mouse model induced by Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC of the infraorbital nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Fei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal neuropathic pain attacks can be excruciating for patients, even after being lightly touched. Although there are rodent trigeminal nerve research models to study orofacial pain, few models have been applied to studies in mice. A mouse trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC model is introduced here which successfully and reliably promotes vibrissal whisker pad hypersensitivity. Results The chronic orofacial neuropathic pain model is induced after surgical placement of chromic gut suture in the infraorbital nerve fissure in the maxillary bone. Slight compression and chemical effects of the chromic gut suture on the portion of the infraorbital nerve contacted cause mild nerve trauma. Nerve edema is observed in the contacting infraorbital nerve bundle as well as macrophage infiltration in the trigeminal ganglia. Centrally in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, increased immunoreactivity for an activated microglial marker is evident (OX42, postoperative day 70. Mechanical thresholds of the affected whisker pad are significantly decreased on day 3 after chromic gut suture placement, persisting at least 10 weeks. The mechanical allodynia is reversed by suppression of microglial activation. Cold allodynia was detected at 4 weeks. Conclusions A simple, effective, and reproducible chronic mouse model mimicking clinical orofacial neuropathic pain (Type 2 is induced by placing chromic gut suture between the infraorbital nerve and the maxillary bone. The method produces mild inflammatory compression with significant continuous mechanical allodynia persisting at least 10 weeks and cold allodynia measureable at 4 weeks.

  18. Neuropathic pain mechanisms in patients with chronic sports injuries: a diagnostic model useful in sports medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilgen, Cornelis P; Keizer, Doeke

    2011-01-01

    The pathophysiology of chronic sports injuries such as overuse or tendinopathy remains largely unknown. With this exploratory study, we aim to detect signs of sensitization of the nervous system. Sensitization is an indication of the involvement of neuropathic mechanisms in patients with chronic sports injuries. Sensory descriptors were assessed by means of a neuropathic pain questionnaire (DN4-interview) and by three methods of sensory testing. The test results were integrated in a scoring system. Patients were recruited from an outpatient clinic of a University Medical Centre and at primary care physical therapy practices. Fifteen athletes with a unilateral chronic sports injury were included. All subjects filled out the seven-items of the DN4-interview to assess sensory descriptors. Next, the presence of brush-evoked allodynia was assessed and pain thresholds with Von Frey monofilaments and a pressure algometer were measured in all patients to determine signs of sensitization. Based on the scoring system, in 4 out of 15 patients (27%) the presence of sensitization could be detected. In two other patients, signs of hypoalgesia were observed. The involvement of sensitization as an explanation for the pain in chronic sports injuries is credible in a considerable proportion of patients. With respect to treatment, the establishment of such neuropathic pain mechanisms is of clinical significance. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Synaptic Conversion of Chloride-Dependent Synapses in Spinal Nociceptive Circuits: Roles in Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Cooper

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological conversion of chloride-dependent synapses from inhibitory to excitatory function, as a result of aberrant neuronal chloride homeostasis, is a known mechanism for the genesis of neuropathic pain. This paper examines theoretically how this type of synaptic conversion can disrupt circuit logic in spinal nociceptive circuits. First, a mathematical scaling factor is developed to represent local aberration in chloride electrochemical driving potential. Using this mathematical scaling factor, electrophysiological symbols are developed to represent the magnitude of synaptic conversion within nociceptive circuits. When inserted into a nociceptive circuit diagram, these symbols assist in understanding the generation of neuropathic pain associated with the collapse of transmembrane chloride gradients. A more generalized scaling factor is also derived to represent the interplay of chloride and bicarbonate driving potentials on the function of GABAergic and glycinergic synapses. These mathematical and symbolic representations of synaptic conversion help illustrate the critical role that anion driving potentials play in the transduction of pain. Using these representations, we discuss ramifications of glial-mediated synaptic conversion in the genesis, and treatment, of neuropathic pain.

  20. Microsurgical Drezotomy for Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury: Long Term Results in a Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo González, Juan Carlos; López Cárdenas, Gloria Viviana; Berbeo Calderón, Miguel Enrique; Zorro Guio, Óscar; Díaz Orduz, Roberto Carlos; Feo Lee, Óscar

    2012-01-01

    70 % of patients with spinal cord injuries are chronic and disabling neuropathic pain. This article presents the 23 years-old patient case, who suffered an infrasegmentary severe pain by spinal cord trauma. We performed neurosurgical treatment of pain. Drezotomy is selective section of nociceptive fibers in the spinal segments involved. The patient has 24 months of complete improvement and discontinuation of analgesics. Un 70 % de pacientes con lesión medular tiene dolor neuropático crónic...

  1. Controlling neuropathic pain by adeno-associated virus driven production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flotte Terence R

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite many decades of drug development, effective therapies for neuropathic pain remain elusive. The recent recognition of spinal cord glia and glial pro-inflammatory cytokines as important contributors to neuropathic pain suggests an alternative therapeutic strategy; that is, targeting glial activation or its downstream consequences. While several glial-selective drugs have been successful in controlling neuropathic pain in animal models, none are optimal for human use. Thus the aim of the present studies was to explore a novel approach for controlling neuropathic pain. Here, an adeno-associated viral (serotype II; AAV2 vector was created that encodes the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10. This anti-inflammatory cytokine is known to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Upon intrathecal administration, this novel AAV2-IL-10 vector was successful in transiently preventing and reversing neuropathic pain. Intrathecal administration of an AAV2 vector encoding beta-galactosidase revealed that AAV2 preferentially infects meningeal cells surrounding the CSF space. Taken together, these data provide initial support that intrathecal gene therapy to drive the production of IL-10 may prove to be an efficacious treatment for neuropathic pain.

  2. Prevalence of pain and relative diagnostic performance of screening tools for neuropathic pain in cancer patients: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, C; Sánchez-Martínez, N; Ballesteros, A; Blanco, T; Collazo, A; González, F; Villoria, J

    2015-07-01

    Neuropathic pain can be overlooked in cancer patients. The advent of screening tools can help in recognizing it. However, little is known about their relative diagnostic performance and factors that affect it. This study evaluated the prevalence of neuropathic pain using several diagnostic strategies in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Patients attending the Oncology Unit of the investigators' site to continue their chemotherapy schedule were systematically screened for this cross-sectional study. Before starting chemotherapy drugs, pain specialists made a clinical diagnosis of neuropathic pain (either disease related, treatment related or comorbid) and medical oncologists administered three validated screening tools. Their relative diagnostic performance and the impact of some pain features on it were analysed using multivariate statistical methods. From a total of 358 patients, 194 (54.2%) suffered from pain and 73 (20.4%) had a clinical diagnosis of pure neuropathic or mixed pain. Among the screening tools, the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) was more specific (93.4%), although less sensitive (68.1%) than the Douleur Neuropathique in 4 Questions (DN4) (sensitivity: 87.5%, specificity: 88.4%). Interestingly, the specificities of these two instruments did not differ in patients with mild pain, while the DN4 remained to be more sensitive than the LANSS regardless of pain severity. Neuropathic pain is common in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The DN4 might be of great help for the early detection of patients at risk because of incipient chemotherapy-related neuropathies and the LANSS to rule out neuropathic pain in patients with complex pain conditions. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  3. A comparison of coping strategies in patients with fibromyalgia, chronic neuropathic pain, and pain-free controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baastrup, S; Schultz, Rikke; Brødsgaard, I

    2016-01-01

    Patients suffering from chronic pain may benefit from learning adaptive coping strategies. Consensus on efficient strategies for this group of patients is, however, lacking, and previous studies have shown inconsistent results. The present study has examined coping strategies in two distinctly...... different groups of chronic pain patients and a group of healthy controls. Thirty neuropathic pain (NP) patients, 28 fibromyalgia (FM) patients, and 26 pain-free healthy controls completed the Coping Strategy Questionnaire (CSQ-48/27) and rated their daily pain. The results showed that FM and NP patients...... did not cope differently with pain. The only difference between the groups was that FM patients felt more in control of their pain than NP patients. Both patient groups used more maladaptive/passive coping strategies, but surprisingly also more adaptive/active coping strategies than healthy controls...

  4. [Electric stimulation acupuncture in peripheral neuropathic pain syndromes. Clinical pilot study on analgesic effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irnich, D; Winklmeier, S; Beyer, A; Peter, K

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the potential value of acupuncture in the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. Explorative analysis should provide data for further randomised controlled trials. In an uncontrolled clinical trial electroacupuncture was given to 17 patients with chronic neuropathic pain of peripheral origin which was resistant to preceding pain therapy. Patients were treated twice weekly for 4 weeks. Assessment of outcome measurements comprised: Intensity of continuous pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), intensity of pain attacks (VAS), duration of pain attacks, number of pain attacks and changes in mood (VAS). All measures were evaluated by diary (1 week before treatment to 2 weeks after treatment and 1 week at follow up three months after treatment). Changes of global complaints and patients' beliefs in treatment (credibility assessment) were also assessed. At re-evaluation two weeks after treatment, mean continuous pain was reduced by 32.9% and intensity of pain attacks was reduced by 59%. Mean number of daily pain attacks decreased from 4.2 (SD +/- 4.6, 0.14-13.3) before treatment to 2.2 (SD +/- 3.8, 0-7.5) two weeks after treatment. Duration of pain attacks and mood showed no substantial changes. Three months after treatment, continuous pain was reduced by 15.9% and intensity of pain attacks was reduced by 44% compared to baseline. No serious adverse events were observed On the basis of this small pilot study, trial treatment by electroacupuncture seems to be justified in these patients given a lack of success of standard treatments. The apparent beneficial analgesic effects of electroacupuncture appear to warrant further investigation.

  5. Management of chronic neuropathic pain with single and compounded topical analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick; Tverdohleb, Tatiana; Nikibin, Farid; Knezevic, Ivana; Candido, Kenneth D

    2017-11-01

    The goal of our review was to emphasize important aspects that physicians should take into consideration when prescribing topical analgesics as part of chronic neuropathic pain treatment. We discuss the dermatopharmacokinetics and microstructural components of the skin, differences between topical and transdermal drug delivery, and topical medication effects on peripheral neuropathy and central sensitization. Even though the US FDA approved topical analgesics are 8%-capsaicin and 5%-lidocaine patches for treating postherpetic neuralgia, there are many other studies conducted on the efficacy of topical ketamine cream, clonidine gel, topical gabapentin, topical baclofen and topical phenytoin for peripheral neuropathic pain, either alone or in combination with other formulations. Furthermore, we discuss new compounded topical analgesics that are becoming more popular and that are showing promising results in the management of chronic peripheral neuropathies. However, more studies are needed for elucidation of the role of topical analgesics and their effects, especially when combined with other treatments.

  6. Neuropathic pain as a process: reversal of chronification in an animal model

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    Dableh LJ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Liliane J Dableh1,2, Kiran Yashpal1,2, James L Henry1,21Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CanadaAbstract: Peripheral neuropathic pain arises from trauma to sensory nerves. Other types of acute neurotrauma such as stroke and spinal cord injury are treated immediately, largely to prevent secondary damage. To pursue the possibility that neuropathic pain may also be amenable to early treatment, a rat model of neuropathic pain was induced using a 2-mm polyethylene cuff implanted around one sciatic nerve. Within 24 hours, hypersensitivity to von Frey hair stimulation appeared, as indicated by decreased paw withdrawal thresholds. When the cuff was removed 24 hours after implantation, readings returned to pre-implantation levels starting as early as day 18. When the cuff was removed after 4 days, there was a period of initial hypersensitivity, and then an increase toward baseline at two time points near the end of the study; therefore, only a partial recovery toward pre-implantation values occurred. Having established that a temporal reversal can occur, the next step examined possible pharmacological reversal. The tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist, CP-96,345, produced a minor increase in withdrawal thresholds in animals with the cuff left permanently implanted. To determine the effect of early and repeated administration of CP-96,345, it was given daily on days 1–4. The cuff was removed on day 4. Six days later, readings showed reversal of tactile hypersensitivity. We suggest that persistent neuropathic pain occurs from processes that develop over several hours and days, and that some of these processes may be prevented by early medical intervention. Thus, nerve injury in the context of chronic neuropathic pain should be treated in a similar manner to nerve injury resulting from stroke, spinal cord

  7. Virtual Reality Hypnosis In The Treatment Of Chronic Neuropathic Pain: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneal, Brent J.; Patterson, David R.; Soltani, Maryam; Teeley, Aubriana; Jensen, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    This case report evaluates virtual reality hypnosis (VRH) in treating chronic neuropathic pain in a patient with a 5-year history of failed treatments. The patient participated in a 6-month trial of VRH, and her pain ratings of intensity and unpleasantness dropped on average 36% and 33%, respectively, over the course of 33 sessions. In addition, she reported both no pain and a reduction of pain for an average of 3.86 and 12.21 hours, respectively, after treatment sessions throughout the course of the VRH treatment. These reductions and the duration of treatment effects following VRH treatment were superior to those following a trial of standard hypnosis (non-VR) treatment. However, the pain reductions with VRH did not persist over long periods of time. The findings support the potential of VRH treatment for helping individuals with refractory chronic pain conditions. PMID:18726807

  8. Promoting Gait Recovery and Limiting Neuropathic Pain After Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Mercier, Catherine; Roosink, Meyke; Bouffard, Jason; Bouyer, Laurent J.

    2016-01-01

    Most persons living with a spinal cord injury experience neuropathic pain in the months following their lesion, at the moment where they receive intensive gait rehabilitation. Based on studies using animal models, it has been proposed that central sensitization in nociceptive pathways (maladaptive plasticity) and plasticity related to motor learning (adaptive plasticity) share common neural mechanisms and compete with each other. This article aims to address the discrepancy between the growin...

  9. Antinociceptive effects of topical mepivacaine in a rat model of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathic pain

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    Sagen J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Sagen, Daniel A Castellanos,† Aldric T Hama The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA †Daniel A Castellanos passed away on April 14, 2010 Background: A consequence of HIV infection is sensory neuropathy, a debilitating condition that degrades the quality of life of HIV patients. Furthermore, life-extending antiretroviral treatment may exacerbate HIV sensory neuropathy. Analgesics that relieve other neuropathic pains show little or no efficacy in ameliorating HIV sensory neuropathy. Thus, there is a need for analgesics for people with this particular pain. While lidocaine is used in the management of painful peripheral neuropathies, another local anesthetic mepivacaine, with a potentially improved bioavailability, could be utilized for the management of HIV neuropathic pain.Methods: The efficacy of topical anesthetics was evaluated in a preclinical rodent model of painful peripheral neuropathy induced by epineural administration of the HIV envelope protein gp120 delivered using saturated oxidized cellulose implanted around the sciatic nerve. Beginning at 2 weeks following gp120 administration, the effects of local anesthetics topically applied via gauze pads were tested on heat and mechanical hyperalgesia in the hind paw. Rats were tested using several concentrations of mepivacaine or lidocaine during the following 2 weeks.Results: By 2 weeks following epineural gp120 implantation, the ipsilateral hind paw developed significant hypersensitivity to noxious pressure and heat hyperalgesia. A short-lasting, concentration-dependent amelioration of pressure and heat hyperalgesia was observed following topical application of mepivacaine to the ipsilateral plantar hind paw. By contrast, topical lidocaine ameliorated heat hyperalgesia in a concentration-dependent manner but not pressure hyperalgesia. Equipotent concentrations of mepivacaine and lidocaine applied topically to the

  10. Interleukin-1β overproduction is a common cause for neuropathic pain, memory deficit, and depression following peripheral nerve injury in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Wen-Shan; Wei, Xiao; Mai, Chun-Lin; Murugan, Madhuvika; Wu, Long-Jun; Xin, Wen-Jun; Zhou, Li-Jun; Liu, Xian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is often accompanied by short-term memory deficit and depression. Currently, it is believed that short-term memory deficit and depression are consequences of chronic pain. Here, we test the hypothesis that the symptoms might be caused by overproduction of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in the injured nerve independent of neuropathic pain following spared nerve injury in rats and mice. Mechanical allodynia, a behavioral sign of neuropathic pain, was not correlated with short-term memory deficit and depressive behavior in spared nerve injury rats. Spared nerve injury upregulated IL-1β in the injured sciatic nerve, plasma, and the regions in central nervous system closely associated with pain, memory and emotion, including spinal dorsal horn, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. Importantly, the spared nerve injury-induced memory deficits, depressive, and pain behaviors were substantially prevented by peri-sciatic administration of IL-1β neutralizing antibody in rats or deletion of IL-1 receptor type 1 in mice. Furthermore, the behavioral abnormalities induced by spared nerve injury were mimicked in naïve rats by repetitive intravenous injection of re combinant rat IL-1β (rrIL-1β) at a pathological concentration as determined from spared nerve injury rats. In addition, microglia were activated by both spared nerve injury and intravenous injection of rrIL-1β and the effect of spared nerve injury was substantially reversed by peri-sciatic administration of anti-IL-1β. Neuropathic pain was not necessary for the development of cognitive and emotional disorders, while the overproduction of IL-1β in the injured sciatic nerve following peripheral nerve injury may be a common mechanism underlying the generation of neuropathic pain, memory deficit, and depression. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Eligibility audits for the randomized neuropathic bone pain trial (TROG 96.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, D.E.; Turner, S.L.

    2000-01-01

    In February 1996 the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) initiated a two-arm, multicentre, prospective randomized trial on radiotherapy for neuropathic pain due to bone metastases (TROG 96.05). This trial compares the response to a single 8-Gy fraction with 20 Gy in five fractions. The accrual target is 270 patients. In order to evaluate compliance with eligibility criteria after approximately 1 year of accrual, an independent audit of the first 42 randomized patients was commissioned. This found that only one of these patients did not have genuine neuropathic pain, but that this patient and seven others (19%) had infringements of other eligibility/exclusion criteria for the trial. Accordingly it was decided to continue the full audit up to 90 patients. This detected no further patients without genuine neuropathic pain, and found only one other eligibility infringement (1/48; 2%). It is concluded that this quality assurance (QA) measure undertaken early in the trial led to significantly improved clinician awareness of, and compliance with, eligibility/exclusion criteria. It also enabled an accurate comparison of outcome data for all randomized versus all eligible patients at the time of the preplanned first interim analysis at 90 patients. In view of the excellent compliance demonstrated in the second audit, a one-in-five sampling is proposed for future audits from centres that have already accrued at least five consecutive eligible patients. This is consistent with TROG QA guidelines now operational. Copyright (2000) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. Ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats

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    GURPREET KAUR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of Ocimumsanctum and its saponin rich fraction in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The chronic constriction injury was induced by placing four loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve, proximal to its trifurcation. The mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, paw heat hyperalgesia and cold tail hyperalgesia were assessed by performing the pinprick, acetone, hot plate and cold tail immersion tests, respectively. Biochemically, the tissue thio-barbituric acid reactive species, super-oxide anion content (markers of oxidative stress and total calcium levels were measured. Chronic constriction injury was associated with the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat and cold hyperalgesia along with an increase in oxidative stress and calcium levels. However, administration of Ocimumsanctum (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. and its saponin rich fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. for 14 days significantly attenuated chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain as well as decrease the oxidative stress and calcium levels. It may be concluded that saponin rich fraction of Ocimum sanctum has ameliorative potential in attenuating painful neuropathic state, which may be attributed to a decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels.

  13. Early systemic granulocyte-colony stimulating factor treatment attenuates neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Kuan Chao

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that opioid treatment can reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production and counteract various neuropathic pain syndromes. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF can promote immune cell differentiation by increasing leukocytes (mainly opioid-containing polymorphonuclear (PMN cells, suggesting a potential beneficial role in treating chronic pain. This study shows the effectiveness of exogenous G-CSF treatment (200 µg/kg for alleviating thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI, during post-operative days 1-25, compared to that of vehicle treatment. G-CSF also increases the recruitment of opioid-containing PMN cells into the injured nerve. After CCI, single administration of G-CSF on days 0, 1, and 2, but not on day 3, relieved thermal hyperalgesia, which indicated that its effect on neuropathic pain had a therapeutic window of 0-48 h after nerve injury. CCI led to an increase in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 mRNA and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α protein in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG. These high levels of IL-6 mRNA and TNF-α were suppressed by a single administration of G-CSF 48-144 h and 72-144 h after CCI, respectively. Furthermore, G-CSF administered 72-144 h after CCI suppressed the CCI-induced upregulation of microglial activation in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn, which is essential for sensing neuropathic pain. Moreover, the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone methiodide (NLXM reversed G-CSF-induced antinociception 3 days after CCI, suggesting that G-CSF alleviates hyperalgesia via opioid/opioid receptor interactions. These results suggest that an early single systemic injection of G-CSF alleviates neuropathic pain via activation of PMN cell-derived endogenous opioid secretion to activate opioid receptors in the injured nerve, downregulate IL-6 and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines, and attenuate microglial activation in the spinal dorsal horn. This

  14. Sensory Symptom Profiles of Patients With Neuropathic Pain After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Maria Dolors; Moriña, David; Rodríguez, Neus; Saurí, Joan; Vidal, Joan; Navarro, Albert; Navarro, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    Individuals experiencing neuropathic pain (NP) after spinal cord injury (SCI) present with a variety of pain descriptors in different combinations and at different intensities. These sensory features form distinct patterns, known as sensory symptom profiles. In the present cross-sectional study, we have used a multivariate statistical method (multiple correspondence analysis) to categorize the sensory symptom profiles of a cohort of 338 patients with at-level or below-level NP after SCI. We also investigated possible associations between positive neuropathic symptoms and features of the neurological lesion. The majority of participants had a combination of pain descriptors, with 59% presenting with 3 or 4 pain subtypes. No significant associations were found between specific pain profiles and etiology or clinical degree of the neurological lesion. Furthermore, similar symptom profiles were seen in patients with at-level and below-level NP. The most frequent pattern observed in patients with cervical SCI consisted predominantly of electric shocks and tingling, without burning, pressure pain, or allodynia. Classification of SCI-NP patients into the 5 groups identified in the present study based on their distinct sensory symptom profiles may allow identification of those most likely to respond to a specific analgesic approach.

  15. Diagnosis of Neuropathic Components in Patients with Back Pain Before and After Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y-J; Koch, E M W; Breidebach, J B; Bornemann, R; Wirtz, D C; Pflugmacher, R

    2016-12-01

    Background: The perception of back pain subjective is hard for physicians to measure. For this reason, questionnaires are an important instrument to evaluate the pain 1. The main point of this study was to verify differentiation of pain symptoms in patients with different pain mechanisms. The most important parameter was the PainDetect questionnaire, which can differentiate between nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Additional parameters were measured before and after surgery to characterise pain symptoms in detail. Material and Methods: We selected patients with diagnosed vertebral compression fracture, herniated disc or with spinal cord compression. To characterise the preoperative condition on admittance, we collected the data from the physical examination, as well as clinical data, including X-ray, CT and MRI. To characterise the pain, we used the painDetect questionnaire, the Oswestry Index questionnaire (ODI) and the visual analogue scale (VAS). Depending on the diagnosis, patients were treated by surgery (radiofrequency kyphoplasty, nucleotomy, spondylodesis). At 2 to 3 days and 6 months after surgery, we repeated the questionnaire and compared the results with those before the operation. Data on patient satisfaction and adverse events were also collected. Results: This study included 62 patients with vertebral compression fracture (group 1: VBF, 89 % female, mean age 71 years) and 77 patients with herniated disc or spinal cord compression (group 2: non-VBF, 55 % female, mean age 53 years). There was no difference between both groups in preoperative pain intensity (acute, maximum, average): median ordinal scale 0 to 10; group 1: 6, 8, 7; group 2: 6, 9, 7. The total score in the painDetect questionnaire differed significantly between the two groups (median group 1 = 9, group 2 = 17; effect size r = 0.5; p = 0.000). The existence of neuropathic pain was presumed (> 90 %) in 3 % of the patients in group 1 and in 13 % of patients it

  16. Management of neuropathic pain following treatment for breast cancer in the absence of recurrence: a challenge for the radiation oncologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clubb, B.

    2004-01-01

    This report reviews various management options for treatment-induced neuropathic pain in breast cancer. First-line options include tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsant drugs. Opioids should be prescribed according to published guidelines. Second-line treatments include lignocaine, mexiletine and ketamine. Sympatholytic therapies are available to patients with features of chronic regional pain syndrome. Anti-inflammatory agents are used for neurogenic inflammation. Surgical interventions are considered for refractory neuropathic pain. Interdisciplinary management is appropriate when persisting pain causes physical and psychosocial disabilities. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  17. Carbon monoxide reduces neuropathic pain and spinal microglial activation by inhibiting nitric oxide synthesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnau Hervera

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO synthesized by heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 exerts antinociceptive effects during inflammation but its role during neuropathic pain remains unknown. Our objective is to investigate the exact contribution of CO derived from HO-1 in the modulation of neuropathic pain and the mechanisms implicated.We evaluated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of CO following sciatic nerve injury in wild type (WT or inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (NOS2-KO mice using two carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CORM-2 and CORM-3 and an HO-1 inducer (cobalt protoporphyrin IX, CoPP daily administered from days 10 to 20 after injury. The effects of CORM-2 and CoPP on the expression of HO-1, heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1 and NOS2 as well as a microglial marker (CD11b/c were also assessed at day 20 after surgery in WT and NOS2-KO mice. In WT mice, the main neuropathic pain symptoms induced by nerve injury were significantly reduced in a time-dependent manner by treatment with CO-RMs or CoPP. Both CORM-2 and CoPP treatments increased HO-1 expression in WT mice, but only CoPP stimulated HO-1 in NOS2-KO animals. The increased expression of HO-2 induced by nerve injury in WT, but not in NOS2-KO mice, remains unaltered by CORM-2 or CoPP treatments. In contrast, the over-expression of CD11b/c, NOS1 and NOS2 induced by nerve injury in WT, but not in NOS2-KO mice, were significantly decreased by both CORM-2 and CoPP treatments. These data indicate that CO alleviates neuropathic pain through the reduction of spinal microglial activation and NOS1/NOS2 over-expression.This study reports that an interaction between the CO and nitric oxide (NO systems is taking place following sciatic nerve injury and reveals that increasing the exogenous (CO-RMs or endogenous (CoPP production of CO may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  18. Valproic acid and sodium valproate for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Dipender; Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Moore, R Andrew

    2011-10-05

    Valproic acid and its sodium salt (sodium valproate) are antiepileptic drugs that are sometimes used to treat chronic neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia, although they are not licensed for this use. To evaluate the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of valproic acid and sodium valproate in the management of chronic neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. We identified randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of valproic acid and sodium valproate in acute, and chronic pain by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane CENTRAL to June 2011, together with reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews. RCTs that were double blind and of eight-weeks duration or longer, reporting on analgesic effects and adverse events with valproic acid and sodium valproate in the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. Two review authors independently extracted results and scored for quality. We extracted efficacy and adverse event data, and examined issues of study quality. We included three studies, two in diabetic neuropathy (42 participants treated with valproate, 42 with placebo), and one in post-herpetic neuralgia (23 treated with divalproex sodium, 22 with placebo). Study duration was eight or 12 weeks. No studies were found in fibromyalgia.Only one study reported one of our primary outcomes (≥ 50% pain relief), while all three reported group means for pain reduction from baseline to endpoint. In all three studies; efficacy results were given only for participants who completed the study. One study in diabetic neuropathy and the study in post-herpetic neuralgia reported significant differences between active and placebo groups, but there were insufficient data for reliable pooled analysis.More adverse events were reported with active treatment than placebo, and included nausea, drowsiness and abnormal liver function tests. One participant taking sodium valproate withdrew due to serious derangement of liver enzymes. These three studies no more than hint that sodium

  19. Specific brain morphometric changes in spinal cord injury with and without neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom B. Mole

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Why only certain patients develop debilitating pain after spinal chord injury and whether structural brain changes are implicated remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if patients with chronic, neuropathic below-level pain have specific cerebral changes compared to those who remain pain-free. Voxel-based morphometry of high resolution, T1-weighted images was performed on three subject groups comprising patients with pain (SCI-P, n = 18, patients without pain (SCI-N, n = 12 and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 18. The SCI-P group was first compared directly with the SCI-N group and then subsequently with controls. Overall, grey and white matter changes dependent on the presence of pain were revealed. Significant changes were found within the somatosensory cortex and also in corticospinal tracts and visual-processing areas. When the SCI-P group was directly compared with the SCI-N group, reduced grey matter volume was found in the deafferented leg area of the somatosensory cortex bilaterally. This region negatively correlated with pain intensity. Relative to controls, grey matter in this paracentral primary sensory cortex was decreased in SCI-P but conversely increased in SCI-N. When compared with controls, discrepant corticospinal tract white matter reductions were found in SCI-P and in SCI-N. In the visual cortex, SCI-N showed increased grey matter, whilst the SCI-N showed reduced white matter. In conclusion, structural changes in SCI are related to the presence and degree of below-level pain and involve but are not limited to the sensorimotor cortices. Pain-related structural plasticity may hold clinical implications for the prevention and management of refractory neuropathic pain.

  20. Specific brain morphometric changes in spinal cord injury with and without neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Tom B; MacIver, Kate; Sluming, Vanessa; Ridgway, Gerard R; Nurmikko, Turo J

    2014-01-01

    Why only certain patients develop debilitating pain after spinal chord injury and whether structural brain changes are implicated remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if patients with chronic, neuropathic below-level pain have specific cerebral changes compared to those who remain pain-free. Voxel-based morphometry of high resolution, T1-weighted images was performed on three subject groups comprising patients with pain (SCI-P, n = 18), patients without pain (SCI-N, n = 12) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 18). The SCI-P group was first compared directly with the SCI-N group and then subsequently with controls. Overall, grey and white matter changes dependent on the presence of pain were revealed. Significant changes were found within the somatosensory cortex and also in corticospinal tracts and visual-processing areas. When the SCI-P group was directly compared with the SCI-N group, reduced grey matter volume was found in the deafferented leg area of the somatosensory cortex bilaterally. This region negatively correlated with pain intensity. Relative to controls, grey matter in this paracentral primary sensory cortex was decreased in SCI-P but conversely increased in SCI-N. When compared with controls, discrepant corticospinal tract white matter reductions were found in SCI-P and in SCI-N. In the visual cortex, SCI-N showed increased grey matter, whilst the SCI-N showed reduced white matter. In conclusion, structural changes in SCI are related to the presence and degree of below-level pain and involve but are not limited to the sensorimotor cortices. Pain-related structural plasticity may hold clinical implications for the prevention and management of refractory neuropathic pain.

  1. Neuropathic Pain and Nerve Growth Factor in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: Prospective Clinical-Pathological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Roser; Navarro, Xavier; Gil-Gil, Miguel; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Calls, Aina; Bruna, Jordi

    2017-12-01

    Neuropathic pain can be present in patients developing chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Nerve growth factor (NGF) is trophic to small sensory fibers and regulates nociception. We investigated the changes in serum NGF and intraepidermal nerve fiber density in skin biopsies of cancer patients receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy in a single-center prospective observational study. Patients were evaluated before and after chemotherapy administration. CIPN was graded with Total Neuropathy Score © , nerve conduction studies, and National Common Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events scale. Neuropathic pain was defined according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-CIPN20 questionnaire. Neuropathic pain was present in 13 of 60 patients (21%), who reported shooting or burning pain in the hands (n = 9) and the feet (n = 12). Patients displaying painful CIPN presented higher NGF after treatment compared with patients with painless or absent CIPN (8.7 ± 11.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL, P = 0.016). The change of NGF significantly correlated with neuropathic pain. Patients with painful CIPN did not show significant loss of IEFND compared with patients with painless or absent CIPN (6.16 ± 3.86 vs. 8.37 ± 4.82, P = 0.12). No correlation between IEFND and NGF was observed. Serum NGF increases in cancer patients receiving taxane or platinum with painful CIPN, suggesting that it might be a potential biomarker of the presence and severity of neuropathic pain in this population. Long-term comprehensive studies to better define the course of NGF in relation with neurological outcomes would be helpful in the further design of therapies for CIPN-related neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chromaffin cell transplantation for neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury: a report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen L

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lin Chen,1,2 Haitao Xi,1 Juan Xiao,1 Feng Zhang,1 Di Chen,1 Hongyun Huang,1,3 1Cell Therapy Center, Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, 3Neurorestoratology Institute, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Armed Police Forces, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Neuropathic pain (NP, a common secondary complication following spinal cord injury (SCI, presenting at or below the level of injury is largely refractory to current pharmacological, physical, and surgical treatments. Previous studies have demonstrated the promising value of cell therapy including adrenal chromaffin cells that have the capacity to act as mini-pumps that release amines and peptides for alleviating chronic pain. The paper presents the cases of two gentlemen suffering from severe central NP after thoracic SCI. Six months after chromaffin cell intrathecal injection, their pain relieved significantly. The results demonstrated the preliminary therapeutic efficacy of chromaffin cell transplants in people with NP, and support further research of this treatment strategy for the management of intractable chronic pain due to SCI. Keywords: chromaffin cell, cell transplantation, neuropathic pain, spinal cord injury

  3. Guidelines for neuropathic pain management in patients with cancer: a European survey and comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Virginie; Schalkwijk, Annelies; Burgers, Jako; Verhagen, Stans; Kress, Hans; Hekster, Yechiel; Lanteri-Minet, Michel; Engels, Yvonne; Vissers, Kris

    2013-06-01

    Between 19% and 39% of patients with cancer pain suffer from neuropathic pain. Its diagnosis and treatment is still challenging. Yet, national clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed in several European countries to assist practitioners in managing these patients safely and legally. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of the development and reporting of these CPGs. In collaboration with the European Federation of IASP Chapters, a European inventory of CPGs was conducted. Inclusion criteria were at least one paragraph dedicated to the treatment of neuropathic pain in cancer. Using the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II instrument, 2 appraisers independently assessed the quality of the development process of the included CPGs in 6 quality domains. Besides, CPGs developed by governmental organization were compared with those developed by professional societies using t-tests. Mean scores of the domains "scope and purpose" (80%) and "clarity of presentation" (61%) were satisfactory, "stakeholder involvement" (58%), "rigor of development" (57%), and "editorial independence" (53%) were acceptable, and "applicability" was insufficient (39%). Governmental guidelines had higher quality scores than professional society guidelines for domain "stakeholder involvement" and "editorial independence" (P < 0.01). The quality of the development process of the 9 included CPGs varied widely. CPGs should be developed within a structured guideline program, including methodological support. As developing a CPG is expensive and time-consuming, we recommend more international cooperation to increase quality and lower the development costs. © 2012 The Authors Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  4. Management of Ocular Neuropathic Pain With Vitamin B12 Supplements: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Rohit; Deshpande, Kalyani; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Sethu, Swaminathan

    2015-10-01

    To report the case of a 28-year-old patient with persistent bilateral burning pain and foreign body sensation in both eyes for the past 1 year. The patient showed a poor response to 0.05% cyclosporine eye drops and frequent instillations of artificial tears. Ocular examination showed few superficial punctate epithelial defects, well-positioned laser in situ keratomileusis (performed 5 years ago with symptomless recovery) flaps, and clear interfaces bilaterally, with a tear film breakup time of 7 and 8 seconds in the right and left eyes, respectively. The results of Schirmer tests, confocal microscopy, corneal esthesiometry, and meibography were normal for both eyes. The patient was incidentally diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency, with a serum vitamin B12 value of 90 pg/mL (reference range, 236-911 pg/mL), during routine laboratory tests. In view of weak correlation between signs and symptoms, a putative diagnosis of ocular neuropathic pain secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency was made. Case report. The patient was treated with parenteral vitamin B12, and topical therapy was continued without any changes. The patient experienced dramatic improvement with a decrease in symptoms within 3 weeks of administering vitamin B12 supplements and was symptom-free in the absence of any topical medication 6 months after treatment. Vitamin B12 deficiency, although common in India, has not been reported to be associated with ocular symptoms, including pain and mimicking those seen in severe dry eye. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ocular neuropathic pain and dry eye in patients presenting with recalcitrant ocular neuropathic pain.

  5. Antiallodynic Effect of Pregabalin in Rat Models of Sympathetically Maintained and Sympathetic Independent Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong Woo; Kweon, Tae Dong; Lee, Jong Seok

    2007-01-01

    Pregabalin binds to the voltage-dependent calcium channel α2δ subunit and modulates the release of neurotransmitters, resulting in analgesic effects on neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain has both sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) and sympathetic independent pain (SIP) components. We studied the antiallodynic effects of pregabalin on tactile allodynia (TA) and cold allodynia (CA) in SMP-and SIP-dominant neuropathic pain models. Allodynia was induced by ligation of the L5 & L6 spinal nerves (SMP model) or by transection of the tibial and sural nerves (SIP model) in rats. For intrathecal drug administration, a PE-10 catheter was implanted through the atlantooccipital membrane to the lumbar enlargement. Pregabalin was administered either intraperitoneally (IP) or intrathecally (IT) and dosed up incrementally until an antiallodynic effect without sedation or motor impairment was apparent. TA was assessed using von Frey filaments, and CA was assessed using acetone drops. IP-administered pregabalin dose-dependently attenuated TA in both models and CA in the SMP model, but not CA in the SIP model. IT-administered pregabalin dose-dependently attenuated both TA and CA in both models. However, the dose response curve of IT-administered pregabalin in SMP was shifted to left from that of SIP and the ED50 of IT-administered pregabalin for CA in SMP was about 900 times less than that in SIP. These findings suggest that pregabalin exerts its antiallodynic effect mainly by acting at the spinal cord, and that IT-administered pregabalin has more potent antiallodynic effects in SMP. The α2δ subunit might be less involved in the CA in SIP. PMID:17326244

  6. Effect of subcutaneous treatment with human umbilical cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells on peripheral neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Ju; Yoon, Tae Gyoon; Kang, Moonkyu; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kang, Kyung Sun

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we aim to determine the in vivo effect of human umbilical cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) on neuropathic pain, using three, principal peripheral neuropathic pain models. Four weeks after hUCB-MSC transplantation, we observed significant antinociceptive effect in hUCB-MSC-transplanted rats compared to that in the vehicle-treated control. Spinal cord cells positive for c-fos, CGRP, p-ERK, p-p 38, MMP-9 and MMP 2 were significantly decreased in only CCI model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats, while spinal cord cells positive for CGRP, p-ERK and MMP-2 significantly decreased in SNL model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats and spinal cord cells positive for CGRP and MMP-2 significantly decreased in SNI model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats, compared to the control 4 weeks or 8weeks after transplantation (ppain signaling during pain signal processing within the nervous system, especially for CCI model. Thus, subcutaneous administration of hUCB-MSCs might be beneficial for improving those patients suffering from neuropathic pain by decreasing neuropathic pain activation factors, while increasing neuropathic pain inhibition factor.

  7. Duloxetine Inhibits Microglial P2X4 Receptor Function and Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Yamashita

    Full Text Available P2X4 receptors (P2X4R are a family of ATP-gated non-selective cation channels. We previously demonstrated that activation of P2X4R in spinal microglia is crucial for neuropathic pain, a highly debilitating chronic pain condition, suggesting that P2X4R is a potential therapeutic target for treating neuropathic pain. Thus, the identification of a compound that has a potent inhibitory effect on P2X4R is an important clinical challenge. In the present study, we screened a chemical library of clinically approved drugs and show for the first time that duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, has an inhibitory effect on rodent and human P2X4R. In primary cultured microglial cells, duloxetine also inhibited P2X4R-, but not P2X7R-, mediated responses. Moreover, intrathecal administration of duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain produced a reversal of nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia, a cardinal symptom of neuropathic pain. In rats that were pretreated with a serotonin-depleting agent and a noradrenaline neurotoxin, the antiallodynic effect of duloxetine was reduced, but still remained. Based on these results, we suggest that, in addition to duloxetine's primary inhibitory action on serotonin and noradrenaline transporters, an inhibitory effect on P2X4R may be involved at least in part in an antiallodynic effect of intrathecal duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain.

  8. Multiple sites and actions of gabapentin-induced relief of ongoing experimental neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, Kirsty; Qu, Chaoling; Navratilova, Edita; Oyarzo, Janice; Xie, Jennifer Yanhua; King, Tamara; Dickenson, Anthony H; Porreca, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Gabapentin (GBP) is a first-line therapy for neuropathic pain, but its mechanisms and sites of action remain uncertain. We investigated GBP-induced modulation of neuropathic pain following spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats. Intravenous or intrathecal GBP reversed evoked mechanical hypersensitivity and produced conditioned place preference (CPP) and dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) selectively in SNL rats. Spinal GBP also significantly inhibited dorsal horn wide-dynamic-range neuronal responses to a range of evoked stimuli in SNL rats. By contrast, GBP microinjected bilaterally into the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), produced CPP, and elicited NAc DA release selectively in SNL rats but did not reverse tactile allodynia and had marginal effects on wide-dynamic-range neuronal activity. Moreover, blockade of endogenous opioid signaling in the rACC prevented intravenous GBP-induced CPP and NAc DA release but failed to block its inhibition of tactile allodynia. Gabapentin, therefore, can potentially act to produce its pain relieving effects by (a) inhibition of injury-induced spinal neuronal excitability, evoked hypersensitivity, and ongoing pain and (b) selective supraspinal modulation of affective qualities of pain, without alteration of reflexive behaviors. Consistent with previous findings of pain relief from nonopioid analgesics, GBP requires engagement of rACC endogenous opioid circuits and downstream activation of mesolimbic reward circuits reflected in learned pain-motivated behaviors. These findings support the partial separation of sensory and affective dimensions of pain in this experimental model and suggest that modulation of affective-motivational qualities of pain may be the preferential mechanism of GBP's analgesic effects in patients.

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Slump Test for Identifying Neuropathic Pain in the Lower Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Lawrence M; MacNeil, Brian J

    2015-08-01

    Diagnostic accuracy study with nonconsecutive enrollment. To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the slump test for neuropathic pain (NeP) in those with low to moderate levels of chronic low back pain (LBP), and to determine whether accuracy of the slump test improves by adding anatomical or qualitative pain descriptors. Neuropathic pain has been linked with poor outcomes, likely due to inadequate diagnosis, which precludes treatment specific for NeP. Current diagnostic approaches are time consuming or lack accuracy. A convenience sample of 21 individuals with LBP, with or without radiating leg pain, was recruited. A standardized neurosensory examination was used to determine the reference diagnosis for NeP. Afterward, the slump test was administered to all participants. Reports of pain location and quality produced during the slump test were recorded. The neurosensory examination designated 11 of the 21 participants with LBP/sciatica as having NeP. The slump test displayed high sensitivity (0.91), moderate specificity (0.70), a positive likelihood ratio of 3.03, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.13. Adding the criterion of pain below the knee significantly increased specificity to 1.00 (positive likelihood ratio = 11.9). Pain-quality descriptors did not improve diagnostic accuracy. The slump test was highly sensitive in identifying NeP within the study sample. Adding a pain-location criterion improved specificity. Combining the diagnostic outcomes was very effective in identifying all those without NeP and half of those with NeP. Limitations arising from the small and narrow spectrum of participants with LBP/sciatica sampled within the study prevent application of the findings to a wider population. Diagnosis, level 4-.

  10. Posttraumatic and postsurgical neuropathic pain responsive to treatment with capsaicin 8% topical patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zis, Panagiotis; Apsokardos, Alexandros; Isaia, Christina; Sykioti, Panagiota; Vadalouca, Athina

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin 8% patch (Qutenza) is mainly used to treat postherpetic neuralgia and human immunodeficiency virus-associated neuropathy. However, evidence of the efficacy of Qutenza in other forms of neuropathic pain is lacking. A 24-year old Libyan man, with no previous medical history, sustained multiple wounds in the right side of the chest and back after a bomb explosion. The patient experienced pain, which persisted in a wide location around the surgical intervention for a long time, beyond the usual course of natural healing of an acute pain and was different from that suffered preoperatively. The characteristics of the pain included burning, electric shock-like sensation, tingling, and numbness, and it was paroxysmal. The pain was associated with hyperalgesia and intense allodynia in a wide area, approximately of 1,100 cm2. Our initial treatment strategy included pregabalin, tramadol, and duloxetine. However, our patient's pain responded to treatment with capsaicin 8% patch when the initial treatments showed only minimal effectiveness regarding the intensity of pain. Interestingly, the most important finding was that capsaicin 8% patch showed a more than 80% reduction of the area of allodynia associated with the pain, when other treatments failed. Moreover, although recent data showed that in patients who respond to Qutenza, analgesia starts within a few days of treatment and lasts on average 5 months, our patient showed an initial response within 7 days of treatment but a longer duration of more than 18 months. Although further controlled studies are needed to explore the efficacy of the capsaicin 8% patch in patients who experience posttraumatic neuropathic pain, we encourage clinicians to try the capsaicin 8% patch when alternative treatments fail.

  11. Calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein upregulation in dorsal spinal cord mediates spinal cord injury-induced neuropathic pain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdi, Amin; Zeng, Jun; Sharp, Kelli; Kim, Donghyun; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z David

    2011-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly results in the development of neuropathic pain, which can dramatically impair the quality of life for SCI patients. SCI-induced neuropathic pain can be manifested as both tactile allodynia (a painful sensation to a non-noxious stimulus) and hyperalgesia (an enhanced sensation to a painful stimulus). The mechanisms underlying these pain states are poorly understood. Clinical studies have shown that gabapentin, a drug that binds to the voltage-gated calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit (Ca(v)α2δ-1) proteins is effective in the management of SCI-induced neuropathic pain. Accordingly, we hypothesized that tactile allodynia post SCI is mediated by an upregulation of Ca(v)α2δ-1 in dorsal spinal cord. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether SCI-induced dysregulation of spinal Ca(v)α2δ-1 plays a contributory role in below-level allodynia development in a rat spinal T9 contusion injury model. We found that Ca(v)α2δ-1 expression levels were significantly increased in L4-6 dorsal, but not ventral, spinal cord of SCI rats that correlated with tactile allodynia development in the hind paw plantar surface. Furthermore, both intrathecal gabapentin treatment and blocking SCI-induced Ca(v)α2δ-1 protein upregulation by intrathecal Ca(v)α2δ-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides could reverse tactile allodynia in SCI rats. These findings support that SCI-induced Ca(v)α2δ-1 upregulation in spinal dorsal horn is a key component in mediating below-level neuropathic pain states, and selectively targeting this pathway may provide effective pain relief for SCI patients. Spinal cord contusion injury caused increased calcium channel Ca(v)α2δ-1 subunit expression in dorsal spinal cord that contributes to neuropathic pain states. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Following the clues to neuropathic pain. Distribution and other leads reveal the cause and the treatment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgrade, M J

    1999-11-01

    Neuropathic pain can seem enigmatic at first because it can last indefinitely and often a cause is not evident. However, heightened awareness of typical characteristics, such as the following, makes identification fairly easy: The presence of certain accompanying conditions (e.g., diabetes, HIV or herpes zoster infection, multiple sclerosis) Pain described as shooting, stabbing, lancinating, burning, or searing Pain worse at night Pain following anatomic nerve distribution Pain in a numb or insensate site The presence of allodynia Neuropathic pain responds poorly to standard pain therapies and usually requires specialized medications (e.g., anticonvulsants, tricyclic antidepressants, opioid analgesics) for optimal control. Successful pain control is enhanced with use of a systematic approach consisting of disease modification, local or regional measures, and systemic therapy.

  13. Multimodal therapeutic assessment of peripheral nerve stimulation in neuropathic pain: five case reports with a 20-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Laere, Koen Van; Calenbergh, Frank Van

    2011-01-01

    Neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve lesion is highly resistant to conventional pain treatments but may respond well to direct electrical peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS). In the 1980s, we treated a series of 11 peripheral neuropathic pain patients with PNS. A first outcome assessment......, conducted after a 52-month follow-up, revealed that the majority of the patients were significantly improved. Here, we present the results of a second and more comprehensive follow-up, conducted after more than 20years of PNS usage. Of the six patients still using PNS, five participated in a multimodality...

  14. CCL-1 in the spinal cord contributes to neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, N; Honda, K; Uta, D; Beppu, K; Ushijima, Y; Matsuzaki, Y; Nakashima, S; Kido, M A; Imoto, K; Takano, Y; Noda, M

    2013-06-20

    Cytokines such as interleukins are known to be involved in the development of neuropathic pain through activation of neuroglia. However, the role of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 1 (CCL-1), a well-characterized chemokine secreted by activated T cells, in the nociceptive transmission remains unclear. We found that CCL-1 was upregulated in the spinal dorsal horn after partial sciatic nerve ligation. Therefore, we examined actions of recombinant CCL-1 on behavioural pain score, synaptic transmission, glial cell function and cytokine production in the spinal dorsal horn. Here we show that CCL-1 is one of the key mediators involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Expression of CCL-1 mRNA was mainly detected in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglion, and the expression of specific CCL-1 receptor CCR-8 was upregulated in the superficial dorsal horn. Increased expression of CCR-8 was observed not only in neurons but also in microglia and astrocytes in the ipsilateral side. Recombinant CCL-1 injected intrathecally (i.t.) to naive mice induced allodynia, which was prevented by the supplemental addition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801. Patch-clamp recordings from spinal cord slices revealed that application of CCL-1 transiently enhanced excitatory synaptic transmission in the substantia gelatinosa (lamina II). In the long term, i.t. injection of CCL-1 induced phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit, NR1 and NR2B, in the spinal cord. Injection of CCL-1 also upregulated mRNA level of glial cell markers and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6). The tactile allodynia induced by nerve ligation was attenuated by prophylactic and chronic administration of neutralizing antibody against CCL-1 and by knocking down of CCR-8. Our results indicate that CCL-1 is one of the key molecules in pathogenesis, and CCL-1/CCR-8 signaling system can be a potential target for drug development in the treatment for neuropathic pain.

  15. Effect of photobiomodulation therapy (808 nm) in the control of neuropathic pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Ana Laura Martins; Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; do Canto De Souza, Azair Liane Matos; Sanchez, Ariane Dutra; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Neuropathic pain can be defined as the pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction of the central or peripheral nervous system. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBM) stands out among the physical therapy resources used for analgesia. However, application parameters, especially the energy density, remain controversial in the literature. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the PBM effect, in different energy densities to control neuropathic pain in mice. Fifty (50) mice were induced to neuropathy by chronic constriction surgery of the sciatic nerve (CCI), treated with PBM (808 nm), and divided into five groups: GP (PBM simulation), GS (sham), GL10, GL20, GL40 (energy density of 10, 20, and 40 J/cm 2 , respectively). The evaluations were carried out using the hot plate test and Randall and Selitto test, before and after the CCI surgery, every 15 days during the 90 days experiment. β-Endorphin blood dosage was also tested. For both the hot plate and Randall and Selitto tests, the GL20 and GL40 groups presented reduction of the nociceptive threshold from the 30th day of treatment, the GL10 group only after day 75, and the GP group did not show any improvement throughout the experiment. The β-endorphin dosage was higher for all groups when compared to the GP group. However, only the GL20 group and GL40 presented a significant increase. This study demonstrates that PBM in higher energy density (20, 40 J/cm 2 ) is more effective in the control of neuropathic pain.

  16. The L-kynurenine-probenecid combination reduces neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda-Farias, J B; Pérez-Severiano, F; González-Esquivel, D F; Barragán-Iglesias, P; Bravo-Hernández, M; Cervantes-Durán, C; Aguilera, P; Ríos, C; Granados-Soto, V

    2013-10-01

    l-Kynurenine has antinociceptive effects in acute and inflammatory pain. This study determined the effect of l-kynurenine and its metabolite (kynurenic acid) on rats subjected to neuropathic pain. L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation induced tactile allodynia as measured with von Frey filaments using the up-down method. High-performance liquid chromatography and Western blot analysis determined kynurenic acid levels and expression of kynurenine amino transferase II (KAT II), respectively. l-Kynurenine (50-200 mg/kg, i.p.) or probenecid (100 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect allodynia in neuropathic rats. In contrast, l-kynurenine (50-200 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with probenecid (100 mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of organic anion transport, reversed allodynia. Furthermore, intrathecal kynurenic acid (1-30 μg) reversed allodynia. Probenecid (100 mg/kg, i.p.) supplementation enhanced the maximal antiallodynic effect of intrathecal kynurenic acid (10 μg). Only the combined administration of l-kynurenine (200 mg/kg)/probenecid (100 mg/kg) increased the kynurenic acid concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. KAT II is expressed in dorsal root ganglia and dorsal spinal cord. KAT II expression was unchanged by the spinal nerve ligation or l-kynurenine/probenecid combination. The kynurenine/probenecid combination did not affect motor activity. l-Kynurenine produces its antiallodynic effect in the central nervous system through kynurenic acid. This effect may result from blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. KAT II is expressed in dorsal root ganglion and dorsal spinal cord. Combined l-kynurenine and probenecid therapy has the potential to reduce neuropathic pain in humans. © 2013 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  17. B vitamins relieve neuropathic pain behaviors induced by infraorbital nerve constriction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Reis, Renata C; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2012-12-10

    There is mounting evidence that use of B vitamins can help control neuropathic pain. This study investigated if treatment with B1, B6 and B12 vitamins, alone or in combination with carbamazepine, can ameliorate distinct nociceptive behaviors in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Male Wistar rats were submitted to infraorbital nerve constriction or sham surgery and received a 5-day treatment with one of the B vitamins, a single carbamazepine injection or the association of both treatments and were tested for facial thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia at different time intervals. Repeated treatment with B1 (thiamine), B6 (pyridoxine) and B12 (cyanocobalamin) vitamins (at 180, 180 and 18 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 5 days) prevented the development of heat hyperalgesia after infraorbital nerve injury, but only B12 and B6 treatments attenuated cold and mechanical hyperalgesia, respectively. A single injection of carbamazepine (30 mg/kg) significantly reduced thermal, but not mechanical, hyperalgesia after nerve injury. Combinations of lower doses of each B vitamin (B1 and B6 at 18 mg/kg/day and B12 at 1.8 mg/kg/day for 5 days) with carbamazepine (10mg/kg) markedly reduced heat hyperalgesia after infraorbital nerve injury. Treatment with B12 (1.8 mg/kg/day) combined with carbamazepine (10mg/kg) also synergized to attenuate cold hyperalgesia at some time points, but combination of B6 (18 mg/kg/day) with carbamazepine (30 mg/kg) failed to modify mechanical hyperalgesia. We suggest that B vitamins might constitute a relevant adjuvant to control some aspects of the pain afflicting patients suffering from trigeminal neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of Repeated Electroacupuncture Analgesia on Neurotrophic and Cytokine Factors in Neuropathic Pain Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junying Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a common disability influencing quality of life. Results of previous studies showed that acupuncture has a cumulative analgesic effect, but the relationship with spinal cytokines neurotrophic factors released by astrocytes remains unknown. The present study was designed to observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA treatment on spinal cytokines neurotrophic factors in chronic neuropathic pain rats. The chronic neuropathic pain was established by chronic constrictive injury (CCI. EA treatment was applied at Zusanli (ST36 and Yanglingquan (GB34 (both bilateral once a day, for 30 min. IL-1β mRNA, TNF-α mRNA, and IL-1 mRNA were detected by quantitative real-time PCR, and the proteins of BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 were detected by Western blot. The expression levels of cytokines such as IL-1β mRNA, TNF-α mRNA, IL-6 mRNA, and neurotrophic factors such as BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 in the spinal cord were increased significantly after CCI. The astrocytes released more IL-1β and BDNF after CCI. Repeated EA treatment could suppress the elevated expression of IL-1β mRNA, TNFα mRNA, and BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 but had no effect on IL-6 mRNA. It is suggested that cytokines and neurotrophic factors which may be closely associated with astrocytes participated in the process of EA relieving chronic pain.

  19. Combined Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture and Morphine on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice

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    Woojin Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapeutic drug for colorectal cancer, induces severe peripheral neuropathy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA has been used to attenuate pain, and its effect is known to be mediated by spinal noradrenergic and serotonergic receptors. Morphine is a well-known opioid used to treat different types of pain. Here, we investigated whether treatment with a combination of these two agents has an additive effect on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice. To assess cold and mechanical allodynia, acetone and von Frey filament tests were used, respectively. Significant allodynia signs were observed three days after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.. BVA (0.25, 1, and 2.5 mg/kg, s.c., ST36 or morphine (0.5, 2, and 5 mg/kg, i.p. alone showed dose-dependent anti-allodynic effects. The combination of BVA and morphine at intermediate doses showed a greater and longer effect than either BVA or morphine alone at the highest dose. Intrathecal pretreatment with the opioidergic (naloxone, 20 μg or 5-HT3 (MDL-72222, 15 μg receptor antagonist, but not with α2-adrenergic (idazoxan, 10 μg receptor antagonist, blocked this additive effect. Therefore, we suggest that the combination effect of BVA and morphine is mediated by spinal opioidergic and 5-HT3 receptors and this combination has a robust and enduring analgesic action against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain.

  20. Combined Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture and Morphine on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

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    Kim, Woojin; Kim, Min Joon; Go, Donghyun; Min, Byung-Il; Na, Heung Sik; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-01-22

    Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapeutic drug for colorectal cancer, induces severe peripheral neuropathy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA) has been used to attenuate pain, and its effect is known to be mediated by spinal noradrenergic and serotonergic receptors. Morphine is a well-known opioid used to treat different types of pain. Here, we investigated whether treatment with a combination of these two agents has an additive effect on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice. To assess cold and mechanical allodynia, acetone and von Frey filament tests were used, respectively. Significant allodynia signs were observed three days after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). BVA (0.25, 1, and 2.5 mg/kg, s.c., ST36) or morphine (0.5, 2, and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) alone showed dose-dependent anti-allodynic effects. The combination of BVA and morphine at intermediate doses showed a greater and longer effect than either BVA or morphine alone at the highest dose. Intrathecal pretreatment with the opioidergic (naloxone, 20 μg) or 5-HT3 (MDL-72222, 15 μg) receptor antagonist, but not with α2 adrenergic (idazoxan, 10 μg) receptor antagonist, blocked this additive effect. Therefore, we suggest that the combination effect of BVA and morphine is mediated by spinal opioidergic and 5-HT3 receptors and this combination has a robust and enduring analgesic action against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain.

  1. The effect of exercise frequency on neuropathic pain and pain-related cellular reactions in the spinal cord and midbrain in a rat sciatic nerve injury model

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    Sumizono M

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Megumi Sumizono,1,2 Harutoshi Sakakima,1 Shotaro Otsuka,1 Takuto Terashi,1 Kazuki Nakanishi,1,2 Koki Ueda,1,2 Seiya Takada,1,2 Kiyoshi Kikuchi3 1Course of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan; 2Kirishima Orthopedics, Kirishima, Japan; 3Division of Brain Science, Department of Physiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan Background: Exercise regimens are established methods that can relieve neuropathic pain. However, the relationship between frequency and intensity of exercise and multiple cellular responses of exercise-induced alleviation of neuropathic pain is still unclear. We examined the influence of exercise frequency on neuropathic pain and the intracellular responses in a sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI model. Materials and methods: Rats were assigned to four groups as follows: CCI and high-frequency exercise (HFE group, CCI and low-frequency exercise (LFE group, CCI and no exercise (No-Ex group, and naive animals (control group. Rats ran on a treadmill, at a speed of 20 m/min, for 30 min, for 5 (HFE or 3 (LFE days a week, for a total of 5 weeks. The 50% withdrawal threshold was evaluated for mechanical sensitivity. The activation of glial cells (microglia and astrocytes, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and μ-opioid receptor in the spinal dorsal horn and endogenous opioid in the midbrain were examined using immunohistochemistry. Opioid receptor antagonists (naloxone were administered using intraperitoneal injection. Results: The development of neuropathic pain was related to the activation of glial cells, increased BDNF expression, and downregulation of the μ-opioid receptor in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn. In the No-Ex group, neuropathic pain showed the highest level of mechanical hypersensitivity at 2 weeks, which improved slightly until 5 weeks after CCI. In both exercise groups, the alleviation of

  2. An Exploratory Human Laboratory Experiment Evaluating Vaporized Cannabis in the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain From Spinal Cord Injury and Disease.

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    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas D; Deutsch, Reena; Zhao, Holly; Prasad, Hannah; Phan, Amy

    2016-09-01

    Using 8-hour human laboratory experiments, we evaluated the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in patients with neuropathic pain related to injury or disease of the spinal cord, most of whom were experiencing pain despite traditional treatment. After obtaining baseline data, 42 participants underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling 4 puffs of vaporized cannabis containing either placebo, 2.9%, or 6.7% delta 9-THC on 3 separate occasions. A second dosing occurred 3 hours later; participants chose to inhale 4 to 8 puffs. This flexible dosing was used to attempt to reduce the placebo effect. Using an 11-point numerical pain intensity rating scale as the primary outcome, a mixed effects linear regression model showed a significant analgesic response for vaporized cannabis. When subjective and psychoactive side effects (eg, good drug effect, feeling high, etc) were added as covariates to the model, the reduction in pain intensity remained significant above and beyond any effect of these measures (all P patients with neuropathic pain associated with injury or disease of the spinal cord. A crossover, randomized, placebo-controlled human laboratory experiment involving administration of vaporized cannabis was performed in patients with neuropathic pain related to spinal cord injury and disease. This study supports consideration of future research that would include longer duration studies over weeks to months to evaluate the efficacy of medicinal cannabis in patients with central neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tapentadol extended release in the management of peripheral diabetic neuropathic pain

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    Vadivelu N

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nalini Vadivelu,1 Alice Kai,2 Benjamin Maslin,1 Gopal Kodumudi,3 Aron Legler,1 Jack M Berger4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA; 3Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA; 4Department of Anesthesiology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Tapentadol, a µ-opioid agonist and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, has been found to be an effective medication for a wide variety of chronic pain conditions, including back pain, cancer-related pain, and arthritic pain. It has also been found to have fewer gastrointestinal side effects than more traditional opioid-based therapies. More recently, tapentadol extended release has been demonstrated to be effective in the management of painful diabetic neuropathy, an often debilitating condition affecting approximately one-third of all patients with diabetes. This review highlights the most up-to-date basic and clinical studies by focusing on the mechanisms of action of tapentadol and its clinical efficacy, especially with regard to painful diabetic neuropathy. Keywords: chronic pain, neuropathic pain, pharmacology, analgesia, pain management

  4. Invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation for treatment of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury: a review.

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    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Leis, Stefan; Höller, Peter; Thon, Natasha; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Past evidence has shown that invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation may be effective for relieving central pain. To perform a topical review of the literature on brain neurostimulation techniques in patients with chronic neuropathic pain due to traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess the current evidence for their therapeutic efficacy. A MEDLINE search was performed using following terms: "Spinal cord injury", "Neuropathic pain", "Brain stimulation", "Deep brain stimulation" (DBS), "Motor cortex stimulation" (MCS), "Transcranial magnetic stimulation" (TMS), "Transcranial direct current stimulation" (tDCS), "Cranial electrotherapy stimulation" (CES). Invasive neurostimulation therapies, in particular DBS and epidural MCS, have shown promise as treatments for neuropathic and phantom limb pain. However, the long-term efficacy of DBS is low, while MCS has a relatively higher potential with lesser complications that DBS. Among the non-invasive techniques, there is accumulating evidence that repetitive TMS can produce analgesic effects in healthy subjects undergoing laboratory-induced pain and in chronic pain conditions of various etiologies, at least partially and transiently. Another very safe technique of non-invasive brain stimulation - tDCS - applied over the sensory-motor cortex has been reported to decrease pain sensation and increase pain threshold in healthy subjects. CES has also proved to be effective in managing some types of pain, including neuropathic pain in subjects with SCI. A number of studies have begun to use non-invasive neuromodulatory techniques therapeutically to relieve neuropathic pain and phantom phenomena in patients with SCI. However, further studies are warranted to corroborate the early findings and confirm different targets and stimulation paradigms. The utility of these protocols in combination with pharmacological approaches should also be explored.

  5. Epidural spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain: a neurosurgical multicentric Italian data collection and analysis.

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    Colombo, Elena Virginia; Mandelli, Carlo; Mortini, Pietro; Messina, Giuseppe; De Marco, Nicola; Donati, Roberto; Irace, Claudio; Landi, Andrea; Lavano, Angelo; Mearini, Massimo; Podetta, Stefano; Servello, Domenico; Zekaj, Edvin; Valtulina, Carlo; Dones, Ivano

    2015-04-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a technique used worldwide to treat several types of chronic neuropathic pain refractory to any conservative treatment. The aim of this data collection is to enforce evidence of SCS effectiveness on neuropathic chronic pain reported in the literature and to speculate on the usefulness of the trial period in determining the long-term efficacy. Moreover, the very low percentage of undesired side effects and complications reported in our case series suggests that all implants should be performed by similarly well-trained and experienced professionals. A multicentric data collection on a common database from 11 Italian neurosurgical departments started 3 years ago. Two different types of electrodes (paddle or percutaneous leads) were used. Of 122 patients, 73 % (N = 89) were submitted to a trial period, while the remaining patients underwent the immediate permanent implant (N = 33). Statistical comparisons of continuous variables between groups were performed. Most of the patients (80 %) had predominant pain to their lower limbs, while only 17 % of patients had prevalent axial pain. Significant reduction in pain, as measured by variation in visual analogue scale (VAS) score, was observed at least 1 year after implantation in 63.8 % of the cases, 59.5 % of patients who underwent a test trial and 71.4 % of patients who underwent permanent implant at once. No statistical differences were found between the lower-limb pain group and the axial pain group. No relevant differences in long-term outcomes were observed in previously tested patients compared with patients implanted at once. Through this analysis we hope to recruit new centres, to give more scientific value to our results.

  6. The importance of catastrophizing for successful pharmacological treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain

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    Toth C

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cory Toth, Shauna Brady, Melinda Hatfield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Objective: Catastrophizing may be a negative predictor of pain-related outcomes. We evaluated the impact of catastrophizing upon success of first-line pharmacotherapy in the management of neuropathic pain (NeP due to peripheral polyneuropathy. Methods: Patients with confirmed NeP with NeP Visual Analog Scale (VAS pain severity score ≥4 (0–10 scale completed the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ catastrophizing subscale at baseline. Pharmacological therapy consisting of first-line agents gabapentin, pregabalin, or a tricyclic antidepressant was initiated. Other measures examined included the Karnofsky Performance Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, EuroQol Quality of Life Health Questionnaire, and Modified Brief Pain Inventory. At 3 and 6 months, questionnaires were repeated and adverse effect reporting was completed. Outcome measures assessed were pharmacotherapy success (≥30% relief of NeP and tolerability over 6 months of follow-up. Bivariate relationships using Pearson product-moment correlations were examined for baseline CSQ catastrophizing subscale score and the change in the NeP VAS scores and medication discontinuation. Results: Sixty-six patients were screened, 62 subjects participated, and 58 subjects (94% completed the final follow-up visit. Greater catastrophizing was associated with poor pain relief response and greater likelihood of discontinuation of pharmacotherapy, reports of greater disability, and impaired quality of life. Duration of pain was negatively associated with likelihood of pharmacotherapy success. Conclusion: Catastrophizing exerts maladaptive effects on outcomes with pharmacotherapy in NeP patients. Detection of catastrophizing during clinical visits when pharmacological therapy is being considered can be a predictive factor for patient outcomes. Keywords: neuropathic pain

  7. The Evaluation of the Effect of Neuropathic Pain on Functional Disability in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

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    Yalkın Çalık

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate both the prevalence of neuropathic pain (NP and the effect of functional disability of NP in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP. Materials and Methods: In this study, outpatients data were reviewed retrospectively from January 2014 to December 2014 to determine the patients with CLBP. 190 patients with CLBP meeting the inclusion criteria were included. NP scores of the patients were assessed using Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS and the evaluation of pain was performed using the Visual analoque scale (VAS and functional disability scores was determined by the Oswestry disability index (ODI. Results: In this study NP was detected in 39.4% of the patients with CLBP. The number of female patients with NP (n=60, %80 was significantly higher than the number of male patients with NP (n=15, %20, (p<0.05. ODI and VAS scores of the patients with NP [(19.81±7.28, (5.08±0.76] was significantly higher than those of the patients without NP [(15.28±6.83, (4.44±1.14], (p<0,001. Conclusion: It was found that the co-existence of NP with CLBP increases pain and functional disability.

  8. NEUROPATHIC PAIN-INDUCED DEPRESSIVE-LIKE BEHAVIOR AND HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND PLASTICITY ARE DEPENDENT ON TNFR1 SIGNALING

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    Anna, Dellarole; Paul, Morton; Roberta, Brambilla; Winston, Walters; Spencer, Summer; Danielle, Bernardes; Mariagrazia, Grilli; R, Bethea John

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from neuropathic pain have a higher incidence of mood disorders such as depression. Increased expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been reported in neuropathic pain and depressive-like conditions and most of the pro-inflammatory effects of TNF are mediated by the TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1). Here we sought to investigate: 1) the occurrence of depressive-like behavior in chronic neuropathic pain and the associated forms of hippocampal plasticity, and 2) the involvement of TNFR1-mediated TNF signaling as a possible regulator of such events. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and TNFR1−/− mice. Anhedonia, weight loss and physical state were measured as symptoms of depression. Hippocampal neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, myelin remodeling and TNF/TNFRs expression were analyzed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot assay. We found that neuropathic pain resulted in the development of depressive symptoms in a time dependent manner and was associated with profound hippocampal alterations such as impaired neurogenesis, reduced expression of neuroplasticity markers and myelin proteins. The onset of depressive-like behavior also coincided with increased hippocampal levels of TNF, and decreased expression of TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2), which were all fully restored after mice spontaneously recovered from pain. Notably, TNFR1−/− mice did not develop depressive-like symptoms after injury, nor were there changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and plasticity. Our data show that neuropathic pain induces a cluster of depressive-like symptoms and profound hippocampal plasticity that are dependent on TNF signaling through TNFR1. PMID:24938671

  9. Combined inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase and cyclooxygenases synergistically reduces neuropathic pain in mice

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    Crowe, Molly S; Leishman, Emma; Banks, Matthew L; Gujjar, Ramesh; Mahadevan, Anu; Bradshaw, Heather B; Kinsey, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neuropathic pain is commonly treated with GABA analogues, steroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs inhibit one or more COX isozymes but chronic COX inhibition paradoxically increases gastrointestinal inflammation and risk of unwanted cardiovascular events. The cannabinoids also have analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties and reduce neuropathic pain in animal models. The present study investigated the analgesic effects of inhibiting both monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and COX enzymes, using low doses of both inhibitors. Experimental Approach Mice subjected to chronic constriction injury (CCI) were tested for mechanical and cold allodynia after administration of the MAGL inhibitor, JZL184, or the non-selective COX inhibitor diclofenac. Then, both drugs were co-administered at fixed dose proportions of 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1, based on their ED50 values. PGs, endocannabinoids and related lipids were quantified in lumbar spinal cord. Key Results Combining low doses of JZL184 and diclofenac synergistically attenuated mechanical allodynia and additively reduced cold allodynia. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant, but not the CB2 receptor antagonist, SR144528, blocked the analgesic effects of the JZL184 and diclofenac combination on mechanical allodynia, implying that CB1 receptors were primarily responsible for the anti-allodynia. Diclofenac alone and with JZL184 significantly reduced PGE2 and PGF2α in lumbar spinal cord tissue, whereas JZL184 alone caused significant increases in the endocannabinoid metabolite, N-arachidonoyl glycine. Conclusions and Implications Combining COX and MAGL inhibition is a promising therapeutic approach for reducing neuropathic pain with minimal side effects. PMID:25393148

  10. Quetiapine reverse paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in mice: Role of Alpha2- adrenergic receptors

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    Alireza Abed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common adverse effect of cancer chemo -therapy. This neuropathy has a profound impact on quality of life and patient’s survival. Preventing and treating paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is a major concern. First- and second-generation antipsychotics have shown analgesic effects both in humans and animals. Quetiapine is a novel atypical antipsychotic with low propensity to induce extrapyramidal or hyperprolactinemia side effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of quetiapine on the development and expression of neuropathic pain induced by paclitaxel in mice and the role of α2-adrenoceptors on its antinociception. Materials and Methods: Paclitaxel (2 mg/kg IP was injected for five consecutive days which resulted in thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical and cold allodynia. Results: Early administration of quetiapine from the 1st day until the 5th day (5, 10, and 15 mg/kg PO did not affect thermal, mechanical, and cold stimuli and could not prevent the development of neuropathic pain. In contrast, when quetiapine (10 and 15 mg/kg PO administration was started on the 6th day after the first paclitaxel injections, once the model had been established, and given daily until the 10th day, heat hyperalgesia and mechanical and cold allodynia were significantly attenuated. Also, the effect of quetiapine on heat hyperalgesia was reversed by pretreatment with yohimbine, as an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist. Conclusion: These results indicate that quetiapine, when administered after nerve injury can reverse the expression of neuropathic pain. Also, we conclude that α2-adrenoceptors participate in the antinociceptive effects of quetiapine.

  11. The major brain endocannabinoid 2-AG controls neuropathic pain and mechanical hyperalgesia in patients with neuromyelitis optica.

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    Hannah L Pellkofer

    Full Text Available Recurrent myelitis is one of the predominant characteristics in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO. While paresis, visual loss, sensory deficits, and bladder dysfunction are well known symptoms in NMO patients, pain has been recognized only recently as another key symptom of the disease. Although spinal cord inflammation is a defining aspect of neuromyelitis, there is an almost complete lack of data on altered somatosensory function, including pain. Therefore, eleven consecutive patients with NMO were investigated regarding the presence and clinical characteristics of pain. All patients were examined clinically as well as by Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST following the protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS. Additionally, plasma endocannabinoid levels and signs of chronic stress and depression were determined. Almost all patients (10/11 suffered from NMO-associated neuropathic pain for the last three months, and 8 out of 11 patients indicated relevant pain at the time of examination. Symptoms of neuropathic pain were reported in the vast majority of patients with NMO. Psychological testing revealed signs of marked depression. Compared to age and gender-matched healthy controls, QST revealed pronounced mechanical and thermal sensory loss, strongly correlated to ongoing pain suggesting the presence of deafferentation-induced neuropathic pain. Thermal hyperalgesia correlated to MRI-verified signs of spinal cord lesion. Heat hyperalgesia was highly correlated to the time since last relapse of NMO. Patients with NMO exhibited significant mechanical and thermal dysesthesia, namely dynamic mechanical allodynia and paradoxical heat sensation. Moreover, they presented frequently with either abnormal mechanical hypoalgesia or hyperalgesia, which depended significantly on plasma levels of the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerole (2-AG. These data emphasize the high prevalence of neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia

  12. A Case of Chronic Abdominal Neuropathic Pain and Burning after Female Genital Cutting

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    Vicky Hadid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Female genital cutting is prevalent in the Middle Eastern and African countries. This ritual entails not only immediate complications such as infection, pain, and haemorrhage, but also chronic ones including dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia. However, there is limited data on neuropathic pain secondary to female genital mutilation when searching the literature. Case. This case discusses a 38-year-old female with a history of infibulation who presented with a chronic burning abdominal and anterior vulvar pain including the related investigations and treatment. Discussion. This case brings to light the additional delayed complication of this ritual: sensory neuropathy. Our goal is to educate health professionals to be aware of these complications and to appropriately investigate and treat them in order to find a solution to relieve the patients’ symptoms.

  13. Enhancement of antinociceptive effect of morphine by antidepressants in diabetic neuropathic pain model.

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    Cegielska-Perun, Krystyna; Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Gąsińska, Emilia; Makulska-Nowak, Helena Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that influence of antidepressants on analgesic action of opioids is heterogeneous. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute and repeated (21 days) antidepressant (amitriptyline, moclobemide and reboxetine) treatment on the antinociceptive action of morphine, an opioid agonist, in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced neuropathic pain model. The studies were performed on the male Wistar rats. The changes in nociceptive thresholds were determined by using mechanical stimuli (the Randall-Selitto and the von Frey tests). Diabetes was induced by intramuscular administration of STZ. In this work we report that acute as well as repeated per os administration of antidepressants (amitriptyline, moclobemide and reboxetine) significantly potentiated the antihyperalgesic effect of morphine in STZ-induced neuropathic pain model. Combination therapy, such as classical antidepressants (amitriptyline, moclobemide) with opioids, or agents with noradrenaline reuptake inhibition and μ-opioid receptor activation could be a new target for research into treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. 5-HT6 receptor antagonist attenuates the memory deficits associated with neuropathic pain and improves the efficacy of gabapentinoids.

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    Jayarajan, Pradeep; Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Shinde, Anil; Goura, Venkatesh; Babu, Vuyyuru Arun; Yathavakilla, Sumanth; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh

    2015-10-01

    Memory deficit is a co-morbid disorder in patients suffering from neuropathic pain. Gabapentin and pregabalin (gabapentinoids) are among the widely prescribed medications for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Memory loss and sedation are the commonly reported side effects with gabapentinoids. Improving the cognitive functions and attenuating drug-induced side effects may play a crucial role in the management of pain. We evaluated the effects of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists on the memory deficits associated with neuropathy. We also studied the effects of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists on the side effects, and the analgesic effects of gabapentinoids. 5-HT6 receptor antagonists attenuated the cognitive deficits in neuropathic rats. Neuropathic rats co-treated with 5-HT6 receptor antagonist and gabapentinoids showed improvement in memory. 5-HT6 receptor antagonists enhanced the analgesic effects of gabapentinoids but had no effect on the motor side effects. The observed effects may not be due to pharmacokinetic interactions. 5-HT6 receptor antagonist attenuate the cognitive deficits associated with neuropathy, and this effect is also seen when co-treated with gabapentinoids. Since, 5-HT6 antagonists improved the effectiveness of gabapentinoids, reduction in the dosage and frequency of gabapentinoids treatment may reduce the side effects. Combining 5-HT6 receptor antagonist with gabapentinoids may offer a novel treatment strategy for neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Minocycline treatment inhibits microglial activation and alters spinal levels of endocannabinoids in a rat model of neuropathic pain

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    Guasti, Leonardo; Richardson, Denise; Jhaveri, Maulik; Eldeeb, Khalil; Barrett, David; Elphick, Maurice R; Alexander, Stephen PH; Kendall, David; Michael, Gregory J; Chapman, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Activation of spinal microglia contributes to aberrant pain responses associated with neuropathic pain states. Endocannabinoids (ECs) are present in the spinal cord, and inhibit nociceptive processing; levels of ECs may be altered by microglia which modulate the turnover of endocannabinoids in vitro. Here, we investigate the effect of minocycline, an inhibitor of activated microglia, on levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the related compound N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA), in neuropathic spinal cord. Selective spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats resulted in mechanical allodynia and the presence of activated microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord. Chronic daily treatment with minocycline (30 mg/kg, ip for 14 days) significantly reduced the development of mechanical allodynia at days 5, 10 and 14 post-SNL surgery, compared to vehicle-treated SNL rats (P endocannabinoids and related compounds in neuropathic pain states. PMID:19570201

  16. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meier, Kaare; Perinpam, Larshan

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report......Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report...

  17. Neuropathic pain among patients with primary knee osteoarthritis: Results of a cross-sectional study from a tertiary care center in Southern India

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    R Vignesh Narayan

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Neuropathic pain (DN4 ≥4 was seen in up to 49% patients with knee OA. Centrally acting drugs such as tricyclic antidepressants or duloxetine can be used to improve the quality of life and physical function of knee OA patients with neuropathic pain.

  18. Involvement of the melanocortin-1 receptor in acute pain and pain of inflammatory but not neuropathic origin.

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    Ada Delaney

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Response to painful stimuli is susceptible to genetic variation. Numerous loci have been identified which contribute to this variation, one of which, MC1R, is better known as a gene involved in mammalian hair colour. MC1R is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes and elsewhere and mice lacking MC1R have yellow hair, whilst humans with variant MC1R protein have red hair. Previous work has found differences in acute pain perception, and response to analgesia in mice and humans with mutations or variants in MC1R.We have tested responses to noxious and non-noxious stimuli in mutant mice which lack MC1R, or which overexpress an endogenous antagonist of the receptor, as well as controls. We have also examined the response of these mice to inflammatory pain, assessing the hyperalgesia and allodynia associated with persistent inflammation, and their response to neuropathic pain. Finally we tested by a paired preference paradigm their aversion to oral administration of capsaicin, which activates the noxious heat receptor TRPV1. Female mice lacking MC1R showed increased tolerance to noxious heat and no alteration in their response to non-noxious mechanical stimuli. MC1R mutant females, and females overexpressing the endogenous MC1R antagonist, agouti signalling protein, had a reduced formalin-induced inflammatory pain response, and a delayed development of inflammation-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia. In addition they had a decreased aversion to capsaicin at moderate concentrations. Male mutant mice showed no difference from their respective controls. Mice of either sex did not show any effect of mutant genotype on neuropathic pain.We demonstrate a sex-specific role for MC1R in acute noxious thermal responses and pain of inflammatory origin.

  19. Effects of Melatonin and Vitamin E on Peripheral Neuropathic Pain in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

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    Reza Heidari

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sPrevious studies have indicated that diabetes mellitus might be accompanied by neuropathic pain. Oxidative stress is implicated as a final common pathway in development of diabetic neuropathy. Pharmacological interventions targeted at inhibiting free radical production have shown beneficial effects in diabetic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the possible analgesic effects of melatonin and vitamin E in diabetic rats.Materials and MethodsThis study was performed on 32 male Wistar rats divided into 4 groups: control, diabetic, melatonin-treated diabetic and vitamin E-treated diabetic. Experimental diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal streptozotocin (50 mg/kg injection. Melatonin (10 mg/kg, i.p. and vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p. were injected for 2 weeks after 21st day of diabetes induction. At the end of administration period, pain-related behavior was assessed using 0.5% formalin test according to two spontaneous flinching and licking responses. The levels of lipid peroxidation as well as glutathione-peroxidase and catalase activities were evaluated in lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia.ResultsFormalin-evoked flinching and total time of licking were increased in both acute and chronic phases of pain in diabetic rats as compared to control rats, whereas treatment with melatonin or vitamin E significantly reduced the pain indices. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation levels increased and glutathione-peroxidase and catalase activities decreased in diabetic rats. Both antioxidants reversed the biochemical parameters toward their control values.ConclusionThese results suggest that oxidative stress may contribute to induction of pain in diabetes and further suggest that antioxidants, melatonin and vitamin E, can reduce peripheral neuropathic pain in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

  20. The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in localized neuropathic pain: a reappraisal of the clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de León-Casasola OA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Oscar A de León-Casasola,1,2 Victor Mayoral3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Pain Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, 2University at Buffalo, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. NY, USA; 3Anesthesiology Department, Pain Management Unit, University Hospital of Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain Abstract: Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plasters represent a well-established first-line option for the treatment of peripheral localized neuropathic pain (LNP. This review provides an updated overview of the clinical evidence (randomized, controlled, and open-label clinical studies, real-life daily clinical practice, and case series. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster effectively provides pain relief in postherpetic neuralgia, and data from a large open-label controlled study indicate that the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is as effective as systemic pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy but with an improved tolerability profile. Additionally, improved analgesia and fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated synchronously with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, further demonstrating the value of multimodal analgesia in LNP. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides continued benefit after long-term (≤7 years use and is also effective in various other LNP conditions. Minor application-site reactions are the most common adverse events associated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster; there is minimal risk of systemic adverse events and drug–drug interactions. Although further well-controlled studies are warranted, the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is efficacious and safe in LNP and may have particular clinical benefit in elderly and/or medically compromised patients because of the low incidence of adverse events. Keywords: 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, clinical evidence, localized neuropathic pain, postherpetic neuralgia, review

  1. Neuron-Derived ADAM10 Production Stimulates Peripheral Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain by Cleavage of E-Cadherin in Satellite Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Ouyang, Qing; Chen, Cheng-Wen; Chen, Qian-Bo; Li, Xiang-Nan; Xiang, Zheng-Hua; Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2017-09-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the potential involvement of metalloproteinase family proteins in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, although the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using the spinal nerve ligation model, we investigated whether ADAM10 proteins participate in pain regulation. By implementing invitro methods, we produced a purified culture of satellite glial cells to study the underlying mechanisms of ADAM10 in regulating neuropathic pain. Results showed that the ADAM10 protein was expressed in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing neurons of the dorsal root ganglia, and expression was upregulated following spinal nerve ligation surgery invivo. Intrathecal administration of GI254023X, an ADAM10 selective inhibitor, to the rats one to three days after spinal nerve ligation surgery attenuated the spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of ADAM10 recombinant protein simulated pain behavior in normal rats to a similar extent as those treated by spinal nerve ligation surgery. These results raised a question about the relative contribution of ADAM10 in pain regulation. Further results showed that ADAM10 might act by cleaving E-cadherin, which is mainly expressed in satellite glial cells. GI254023X reversed spinal nerve ligation-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and activation of cyclooxygenase 2 after spinal nerve ligation. β-catenin, which creates a complex with E-cadherin in the membranes of satellite glial cells, was also downregulated by spinal nerve ligation surgery in satellite glial cells. Finally, knockdown expression of β-catenin by lentiviral infection in purified satellite glial cells increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2. Our findings indicate that neuron-derived ADAM10 production stimulates peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain by cleaving E-cadherin in satellite glial cells. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine

  2. Sleep Deprivation Aggravates Median Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain and Enhances Microglial Activation by Suppressing Melatonin Secretion

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    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying; Chen, Chih-Li; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep deprivation is common in patients with neuropathic pain, but the effect of sleep deprivation on pathological pain remains uncertain. This study investigated whether sleep deprivation aggravates neuropathic symptoms and enhances microglial activation in the cuneate nucleus (CN) in a median nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Also, we assessed if melatonin supplements during the sleep deprived period attenuates these effects. Design: Rats were subjected to sleep deprivation for 3 days by the disc-on-water method either before or after CCI. In the melatonin treatment group, CCI rats received melatonin supplements at doses of 37.5, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg during sleep deprivation. Melatonin was administered at 23:00 once a day. Participants: Male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 180-250 g (n = 190), were used. Measurements: Seven days after CCI, behavioral testing was conducted, and immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for qualitative and quantitative analyses of microglial activation and measurements of proinflammatory cytokines. Results: In rats who underwent post-CCI sleep deprivation, microglia were more profoundly activated and neuropathic pain was worse than those receiving pre-CCI sleep deprivation. During the sleep deprived period, serum melatonin levels were low over the 24-h period. Administration of melatonin to CCI rats with sleep deprivation significantly attenuated activation of microglia and development of neuropathic pain, and markedly decreased concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions: Sleep deprivation makes rats more vulnerable to nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, probably because of associated lower melatonin levels. Melatonin supplements to restore a circadian variation in melatonin concentrations during the sleep deprived period could alleviate nerve injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity. Citation: Huang CT, Chiang RP, Chen CL, Tsai YJ. Sleep

  3. Anti-nociceptive roles of the glia-specific metabolic inhibitor fluorocitrate in paclitaxel-evoked neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongming; Cheng, Guangxia; Zhu, Yanrong; Zhang, Xin; Pu, Shaofeng; Wu, Junzhen; Lv, Yingying; Du, Dongping

    2016-10-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol) is a powerful chemotherapy drug used in breast cancers, but it often causes neuropathic pain, leading to the early cessation of therapy and poor treatment outcomes. Approaches for the management of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain are urgently needed. The involvement of spinal astrocytes in the pathogenesis of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy has been reported, but little is known about the role of fluorocitrate (FC), a selective inhibitor of astrocyte activation, during neuropathic pain related to paclitaxel treatment. In this study, we investigated the effects of FC on paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was determined to assess astrocyte activation. To explore the mechanisms involved, the expression of glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the spinal dorsal horn were analyzed. The results showed that paclitaxel decreased the mechanical nociceptive thresholds and increased GFAP expression, leading to spinal astrocyte activation. After paclitaxel treatment, GLT-1 was significantly down-regulated, and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK were obviously up-regulated. However, paclitaxel treatment did not increase p38 phosphorylation. Additional studies showed that paclitaxel-evoked mechanical hypersensitivity was reduced by FC treatment. Moreover, FC treatment inhibited the activation of astrocytes and reversed the changes in GLT-1 expression and MAPK phosphorylation. Further study indicated that FC did not influence the antitumor effect of paclitaxel, suggesting that FC blocked paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain without antagonizing its antitumor effect. Together, these results suggested that paclitaxel induced astrocyte-specific activation, which may contribute to mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia, and that FC could be a potential therapeutic agent for paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  4. 5-HT2CReceptor Knockdown in the Amygdala Inhibits Neuropathic-Pain-Related Plasticity and Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Guangchen; Zhang, Wei; Mahimainathan, Lenin; Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Kiritoshi, Takaki; Fan, Xiuzhen; Wang, Jigong; Green, Thomas A; Neugebauer, Volker

    2017-02-08

    Neuroplasticity in the amygdala drives pain-related behaviors. The central nucleus (CeA) serves major amygdala output functions and can generate emotional-affective behaviors and modulate nocifensive responses. The CeA receives excitatory and inhibitory inputs from the basolateral nucleus (BLA) and serotonin receptor subtype 5-HT 2C R in the BLA, but not CeA, has been implicated anxiogenic behaviors and anxiety disorders. Here, we tested the hypothesis that 5-HT 2C R in the BLA plays a critical role in CeA plasticity and neuropathic pain behaviors in the rat spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. Local 5-HT 2C R knockdown in the BLA with stereotaxic injection of 5-HT 2C R shRNA AAV vector decreased vocalizations and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and increased sensory thresholds of SNL rats, but had no effect in sham controls. Extracellular single-unit recordings of CeA neurons in anesthetized rats showed that 5-HT 2C R knockdown blocked the increase in neuronal activity (increased responsiveness, irregular spike firing, and increased burst activity) in SNL rats. At the synaptic level, 5-HT 2C R knockdown blocked the increase in excitatory transmission from BLA to CeA recorded in brain slices from SNL rats using whole-cell patch-clamp conditions. Inhibitory transmission was decreased by 5-HT 2C R knockdown in control and SNL conditions to a similar degree. The findings can be explained by immunohistochemical data showing increased expression of 5-HT 2C R in non-GABAergic BLA cells in SNL rats. The results suggest that increased 5-HT 2C R in the BLA contributes to neuropathic-pain-related amygdala plasticity by driving synaptic excitation of CeA neurons. As a rescue strategy, 5-HT 2C R knockdown in the BLA inhibits neuropathic-pain-related behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuroplasticity in the amygdala has emerged as an important pain mechanism. This study identifies a novel target and rescue strategy to control abnormally enhanced amygdala activity in an

  5. THE ORIGIN OF THE CONCEPT OF NEUROPATHIC PAIN IN EARLY MEDIEVAL PERSIA (9TH-12TH CENTURY CE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Mojtaba; Shams, Mesbah; Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Zargaran, Arman; Dalfardi, Behnam; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is supposed to be a post-renaissance described medical entity. Although it is often believed that John Fothergill (1712-1780) provided the first description of this condition in 1773, a review of the medieval Persian medical writings will show the fact that neuropathic pain was a medieval-originated concept. "Auojae Asab" [Nerve-originated Pain] was used as a medical term in medieval Persian medical literature for pain syndromes which etiologically originated from nerves. Physicians like Rhazes (d. 925 CE), Haly Abbas (d. 982 CE), Avicenna (d. 1037 CE), and Jorjani (d. 1137 CE) have discussed multiple aspects of nerve-originated pain including its classification, etiology, differentiating characteristics, different qualities, and pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments. Recognizing medieval scholars' views on nerve-originated pain can lighten old historical origins of this concept.

  6. Novel analgesic effects of melanin-concentrating hormone on persistent neuropathic and inflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae-Hwan; Park, Ji-Yeun; Oh, Ju-Young; Bae, Sun-Jeong; Jang, Hyunchul; Jeon, Songhee; Kim, Jongpil; Park, Hi-Joon

    2018-01-15

    The melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a peptidergic neuromodulator synthesized by neurons in the lateral hypothalamus and zona incerta. MCHergic neurons project throughout the central nervous system, indicating the involvements of many physiological functions, but the role in pain has yet to be determined. In this study, we found that pMCH -/- mice showed lower baseline pain thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimuli than did pMCH +/+ mice, and the time to reach the maximum hyperalgesic response was also significantly earlier in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. To examine its pharmacological properties, MCH was administered intranasally into mice, and results indicated that MCH treatment significantly increased mechanical and thermal pain thresholds in both pain models. Antagonist challenges with naltrexone (opioid receptor antagonist) and AM251 (cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonist) reversed the analgesic effects of MCH in both pain models, suggesting the involvement of opioid and cannabinoid systems. MCH treatment also increased the expression and activation of CB1R in the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsolateral- and ventrolateral periaqueductal grey. The MCH1R antagonist abolished the effects induced by MCH. This is the first study to suggest novel analgesic actions of MCH, which holds great promise for the application of MCH in the therapy of pain-related diseases.

  7. Early transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces hyperalgesia and decreases activation of spinal glial cells in mice with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hideaki; Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Watanabe, Shuji; Takeura, Naoto; Sugita, Daisuke; Shimada, Seiichiro; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2014-09-01

    Although transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is widely used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, its effectiveness and mechanism of action in reducing neuropathic pain remain uncertain. We investigated the effects of early TENS (starting from the day after surgery) in mice with neuropathic pain, on hyperalgesia, glial cell activation, pain transmission neuron sensitization, expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and opioid receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. Following nerve injury, TENS and behavioral tests were performed every day. Immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and flow cytometric analysis of the lumbar spinal cord were performed after 8 days. Early TENS reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and decreased the activation of microglia and astrocytes (PEarly TENS decreased p-p38 within microglia (Pearly TENS relieved hyperalgesia in our mouse model of neuropathic pain by inhibiting glial activation, MAP kinase activation, PKC-γ, and p-CREB expression, and proinflammatory cytokines expression, as well as maintenance of spinal opioid receptors. The findings indicate that TENS treatment is more effective when applied as early after nerve injury as possible. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of subcutaneous treatment with human umbilical cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells on peripheral neuropathic pain in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Min Ju; Yoon, Tae Gyoon; Kang, Moonkyu; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kang, Kyung Sun

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aim to determine the in vivo effect of human umbilical cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) on neuropathic pain, using three, principal peripheral neuropathic pain models. Four weeks after hUCB-MSC transplantation, we observed significant antinociceptive effect in hUCB-MSC?transplanted rats compared to that in the vehicle-treated control. Spinal cord cells positive for c-fos, CGRP, p-ERK, p-p 38, MMP-9 and MMP 2 were significantly decreased in only CCI model...

  9. Lipoxin A4 inhibits microglial activation and reduces neuroinflammation and neuropathic pain after spinal cord hemisection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Alessandra Cadete; Berta, Temugin; Forner, Stefânia; Chen, Gang; Bento, Allisson Freire; Ji, Ru-Rong; Rae, Giles Alexander

    2016-04-08

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a severe neurological disorder with many disabling consequences, including persistent neuropathic pain, which develops in about 40 % of SCI patients and is induced and sustained by excessive and uncontrolled spinal neuroinflammation. Here, we have evaluated the effects of lipoxin A4 (LXA4), a member of a unique class of endogenous lipid mediators with both anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, on spinal neuroinflammation and chronic pain in an experimental model of SCI. Spinal hemisection at T10 was carried out in adult male CD1 mice and Wistar rats. To test if LXA4 can reduce neuroinflammation and neuropathic pain, each animal received two intrathecal injections of LXA4 (300 pmol) or vehicle at 4 and 24 h after SCI. Sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the hind paws was evaluated using von Frey monofilaments, and neuroinflammation was tested by measuring the mRNA and/or protein expression levels of glial markers and cytokines in the spinal cord samples after SCI. Also, microglia cultures prepared from murine cortical tissue were used to assess the direct effects of LXA4 on microglial activation and release of pro-inflammatory TNF-α. LXA4 treatment caused significant reductions in the intensity of mechanical pain hypersensitivity and spinal expression levels of microglial markers and pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by SCI, when compared to rodents receiving control vehicle injections. Notably, the increased expressions of the microglial marker IBA-1 and of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α were the most affected by the LXA4 treatment. Furthermore, cortical microglial cultures expressed ALX/FPR2 receptors for LXA4 and displayed potentially anti-inflammatory responses upon challenge with LXA4. Collectively, our results suggest that LXA4 can effectively modulate microglial activation and TNF-α release through ALX/FPR2 receptors, ultimately reducing neuropathic pain in rodents after spinal cord hemisection. The dual anti

  10. Transdermal Buprenorphine Relieves Neuropathic Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Parallel-Group, Placebo-Controlled Trial in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Richard W; Wlodarczyk, John H

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of transdermal buprenorphine in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP). This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial enrolled patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and stable glycemic control who had been experiencing moderate to severe DPNP for at least 6 months on maximal tolerated conventional therapy. Patients were randomly assigned to receive buprenorphine (5 μg/h) or placebo patches. The dose was titrated to effect to a maximum of 40 μg/h. Paracetamol was available as rescue analgesia. The severity of pain and other symptoms of DPNP were assessed daily in a patient diary and at clinic visits. One hundred eight-six patients were enrolled, with 93 randomized to either buprenorphine or placebo. A high proportion of patients did not complete the study (buprenorphine 37 of 93, placebo 24 of 93). The main reason for premature withdrawal in the buprenorphine group was adverse events commonly due to untreated nausea and/or vomiting. Among the per-protocol population, more patients in the buprenorphine group (86.3%) experienced a 30% reduction in average versus baseline pain at week 12 than those in the placebo group (56.6%, P buprenorphine group within the intention-to-treat analysis of the same end point (51.7% vs. 41.3%, P = 0.175). Transdermal buprenorphine, when tolerated, is an effective therapy for DPNP and provides another option to manage this challenging painful condition. Nausea and constipation need to be managed proactively to optimize treatment outcomes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition by 1400W limits pain hypersensitivity in a neuropathic pain rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, C A; Barrett-Jolley, R; Djouhri, L; Thippeswamy, T

    2018-02-13

    What is the central question of this study? Can modulation of inducible NO synthase reduce pain behaviour and pro-inflammatory cytokine signalling in a rat model of neuropathic pain? What is the main finding and its importance? Nitric oxide synthase-based therapies could be effective for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. Peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP), resulting from injury to or dysfunction of a peripheral nerve, is a major health problem that affects 7-8% of the population. It is inadequately controlled by current drugs and is characterized by pain hypersensitivity, which is believed to be attributable to sensitization of peripheral and CNS neurons by various inflammatory mediators. Here we examined, in a rat model of PNP: (i) whether reducing levels of nitric oxide (NO) with 1400W, a highly selective inhibitor of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), would prevent or attenuate pain hypersensitivity; and (ii) the effects of 1400W on plasma concentrations of several cytokines that are secreted after iNOS upregulation during chronic pain states. The L5 spinal nerve axotomy (SNA) model of PNP was used, and 1400W (20 mg kg -1 ) was administered i.p. at 8 h intervals for 3 days starting at 18 h post-SNA. Changes in plasma concentrations of 12 cytokines in SNA rats treated with 1400W were examined using multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The SNA rats developed behavioural signs of mechanical and heat hypersensitivity. Compared with the vehicle/control, 1400W significantly: (i) limited development of mechanical hypersensitivity at 66 h post-SNA and of heat hypersensitivity at 42 h and at several time points tested thereafter; and (ii) increased the plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β and IL-10 in the SNA rats. The findings suggest that 1400W might exert its analgesic effects by reducing iNOS and altering the balance between the pro-inflammatory (IL-1β and IL-1α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines and that therapies

  12. Building a diagnostic algorithm on localized neuropathic pain (LNP and targeted topical treatment: focus on 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casale R

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Casale,1,2 Consalvo Mattia31Department of Clinical Neurophysiology and Pain Rehabilitation Unit, Foundation “Salvatore Maugeri”, Research and Care Institute, IRCCS, Pavia, Italy; 2EFIC Montescano Pain School, Montescano, Italy; 3Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences, Section of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Sapienza University of Rome, ItalyAbstract: Within the broad definition of neuropathic pain, the refinement of clinical diagnostic procedures has led to the introduction of the concept of localized neuropathic pain (LNP. It is characterized by consistent and circumscribed area(s of maximum pain, which are associated with negative or positive sensory signs and/or spontaneous symptoms typical of neuropathic pain. This description outlines the clinical features (currently lacking in guidelines and treatment recommendations in patients for whom topical targeted treatment with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster is suggested as first-line therapy. Few epidemiologic data are present in the literature but it is generally estimated that about 60% of neuropathic pain conditions are localized, and therefore identifiable as LNP. A mandatory clinical criterion for the diagnosis of LNP is that signs and symptoms must be present in a clearly identified and defined area(s. Cartographic recordings can help to define each area and to assess variations. The diagnosis of LNP relies on careful neurological examination more than on pain questionnaires, but it is recognized that they can be extremely useful for recording the symptom profiles and establishing a more targeted treatment. The most widely studied frequent/relevant clinical presentations of LNP are postherpetic neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, and neuropathic postoperative pain. They successfully respond to treatment with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster with equal if not better pain control but with fewer side effects versus conventional systemic

  13. Incidence of neuropathic pain after radiofrequency denervation of the third occipital nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazelka HM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Halena M Gazelka, Sarah Knievel, William D Mauck, Susan M Moeschler, Matthew J Pingree, Richard H Rho, Tim J Lamer Division of Pain Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of neuropathic pain occurring after radiofrequency neurotomy of the third occipital nerve (TON. This study was conducted at a teaching hospital from January 1, 2008, to March 31, 2010. With institutional review board approval, Current Procedural Terminology codes were used to identify patients who received radiofrequency ablation (RFA of the nerves supplying the C2-3 facet joint and the TON. The C3 dorsal ramus provides innervation to the C2-3 facet joint and the suboccipital cutaneous region, and procedures that included ablation to this region were reviewed for complications. Postprocedural data were collected by reviewing follow-up appointment notes and telephone calls. Included were patients who had new neuropathic pain in the distribution of the TON after RFA. They described what they were feeling as burning, tingling, or numbness. All patients who presented with complaints had normal neurologic findings and no secondary cause for their symptoms. The included patient medical records were then reviewed for severity and duration of symptoms and the need for treatment with pain medication. Sixty-four patients underwent C2-3 RFA or TON RFA, and 12 patients were identified as experiencing ablation-induced third occipital neuralgia, an incidence rate of 19%. This finding suggests that patients undergoing RFA of the nerves supplying the C2-3 joint or TON are at risk for postprocedural third occipital neuralgia. This possibility may affect providing informed consent as well as anticipating and managing postprocedural pain. Keywords: cervical spine, neuralgia, neurotomy, ablation

  14. Symptom-Based Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord-Injured Patients: A Randomized Crossover Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyunghoon; Oh, Yoongul; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the differences in medication effect according to pain characteristics in spinal cord-injured patients. This study is a prospective, randomized, crossover study. Fifty-five patients and 66 locations of neuropathic pain were included. Pain was classified into four spontaneous characteristics and three evoked pain characteristics. Oxcarbazepine (Na channel blocker) and pregabalin (calcium channel α2-δ ligand medication) were tried. Patients were divided into two groups: evoked pain present and evoked pain absent. Overall average visual analog scale was obtained. Oxcarbazepine was significantly more effective for patients without evoked pain than in those with it for electrical, burning, and pricking pain. The effect of pregabalin was not different regarding the presence or absence of evoked pain for all pain categories, except burning pain. In patients with evoked pain, pregabalin was shown to be significantly more effective for electrical pain, allodynia, and heat hyperalgesia than oxcarbazepine. In the evoked pain absent group, oxcarbazepine showed greater improvement than pregabalin but was not significant. In summary, the phenotype of neuropathic pain was associated with the efficacy of different pharmacologic treatments. Symptom-based treatment, therefore, can lead to more efficient analgesia.

  15. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 2 of 3: symptoms and signs of peripheral neuropathic pain in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'peripheral neuropathic pain\\' (PNP) refers to pain arising from a primary lesion or dysfunction in the peripheral nervous system. Symptoms and signs associated with an assumed dominance of PNP in patients attending for physiotherapy have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of PNP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Patients\\' pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist specifying the presence or absence of various clinical criteria. A binary logistic regression analysis with Bayesian model averaging identified a cluster of two symptoms and one sign predictive of PNP, including: \\'Pain referred in a dermatomal or cutaneous distribution\\

  16. Antihyperalgesic Effect of Hesperidin Improves with Diosmin in Experimental Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azucena I. Carballo-Villalobos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is caused by a primary lesion, dysfunction, or transitory perturbation in the peripheral or central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the hesperidin antihyperalgesic effects alone or combined with diosmin in a model of neuropathic pain to corroborate a possible synergistic antinociceptive activity. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed in the aesthesiometer and plantar tests, respectively, after chronic constriction injury (CCI model in rats receiving hesperidin (HS, 5 doses from 10 to 1000 mg/kg alone or combined with diosmin (DS, 10 and 100 mg/kg in comparison to gabapentin (31.6 mg/kg. UHPLC-MS analysis of cerebral samples was used to recognize the central concentrations of these flavonoids. Participation of different receptors was also investigated in the presence of haloperidol, bicuculline, and naloxone antagonists. Acute hesperidin administration significantly decreased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. Antihyperalgesic response of hesperidin, improved by a combination with diosmin (DS10/HS100 in both stimuli, was blockaded by haloperidol, bicuculline, and naloxone, but not WAY100635, antagonists. Both flavonoids were detected in brain samples. In conclusion, hesperidin alone and combined with diosmin produces antihyperalgesic response in the CCI model in rats. Antihyperalgesic effect of DS10/HS100 combination involves central activity partially modulated by D2, GABAA, and opioids, but not by 5-HT1A, receptors.

  17. Neuropathic pain inhibitor, RAP-103, is a potent inhibitor of microglial CCL1/CCR8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Mami; Tomonaga, Daichi; Kitazono, Kota; Yoshioka, Yusaku; Liu, Jiadai; Rousseau, Jean-Philippe; Kinkead, Richard; Ruff, Michael R; Pert, Candace B

    2017-12-14

    Chemokine signaling is important in neuropathic pain, with microglial cells expressing chemokine (C-C motif) receptor CCR2, CCR5 and CCR8, all playing key roles. In the previous report (Padi et al., 2012), oral administration of a short peptide, RAP-103, for 7 days fully prevents mechanical allodynia and inhibits the development of thermal hyperalgesia after partial ligation of the sciatic nerve in rodents. As for the mechanism of the inhibiting effect of RAP-103, it was speculated to be due to dual blockade of CCR2 and CCR5. We report here that RAP-103 exhibits stronger antagonism for CCR8 (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC 50 ] 7.7 fM) compared to CCR5 (IC 50  < 100 pM) in chemotaxis using primary cultured mouse microglia. In addition, RAP-103 at a concentration of 0.1 pM completely inhibits membrane ruffling and phagocytosis induced by chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 1 (CCL1), an agonist for CCR8. It has been shown that CCL1/CCR8 signaling is important in tactile allodynia induced by nerve ligation. Therefore, CCR8, among other chemokine receptors such as CCR2/CCR5, could be the most potent target for RAP-103. Inhibitory effects of RAP-103 on plural chemokine receptors may play important roles for broad clinical use in neuropathic pain treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preventive Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A₂ on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongxing; Kim, Woojin; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Yongjae; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-01-19

    Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapy drug used to treat colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are aggravated by cold and mechanical stimuli. Here we examined the preventive effects of Bee Venom (BV) derived phospholipase A₂ (bvPLA₂) on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice and its immunological mechanism. The cold and mechanical allodynia signs were evaluated by acetone and von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The most significant allodynia signs were observed at three days after an injection of oxaliplatin (6 mg/kg, i.p.) and then decreased gradually to a normal level on days 7-9. The oxaliplatin injection also induced infiltration of macrophages and upregulated levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Daily treatment with bvPLA₂ (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days prior to the oxaliplatin injection markedly inhibited the development of cold and mechanical allodynia, and suppressed infiltration of macrophages and the increase of IL-1β level in the DRG. Such preventive effects of bvPLA₂ were completely blocked by depleting regulatory T cells (Tregs) with CD25 antibody pre-treatments. These results suggest that bvPLA₂ may prevent oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing immune responses in the DRG by Tregs.

  19. Calpain-2 Regulates TNF-α Expression Associated with Neuropathic Pain Following Motor Nerve Injury.

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    Chen, Shao-Xia; Liao, Guang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Wen; Wang, Shao-Kun; Li, Yong-Yong; Zeng, Wei-An; Liu, Xian-Guo; Zang, Ying

    2018-02-22

    Both calpain-2 (CALP2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) contribute to persistent bilateral hypersensitivity in animals subjected to L5 ventral root transection (L5-VRT), a model of selective motor fiber injury without sensory nerve damage. However, specific upstream mechanisms regulating TNF-α overexpression and possible relationships linking CALP2 and TNF-α have not yet been investigated in this model. We examined changes in CALP2 and TNF-α protein levels and alterations in bilateral mechanical threshold within 24 h following L5-VRT model injury. We observed robust elevation of CALP2 and TNF-α in bilateral dorsal root ganglias (DRGs) and bilateral spinal cord neurons. CALP2 and TNF-α protein induction by L5-VRT were significantly inhibited by pretreatment using the calpain inhibitor MDL28170. Administration of CALP2 to rats without nerve injury further supported a role of CALP2 in the regulation of TNF-α expression. Although clinical trials of calpain inhibition therapy for alleviation of neuropathic pain induced by motor nerve injury have not yet shown success, our observations linking CALP2 and TNF-α provide a framework of a systems approach based perspective for treating neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of cation-dependent chloride transporters in neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury

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    Rajpal Sharad

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altered Cl- homeostasis and GABAergic function are associated with nociceptive input hypersensitivity. This study investigated the role of two major intracellular Cl- regulatory proteins, Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter 1 (NKCC1 and K+-Cl- cotransporter 2 (KCC2, in neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI. Results Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a contusive SCI at T9 using the MASCIS impactor. The rats developed hyperalgesia between days 21 and 42 post-SCI. Thermal hyperalgesia (TH was determined by a decrease in hindpaw thermal withdrawal latency time (WLT between days 21 and 42 post-SCI. Rats with TH were then treated with either vehicle (saline containing 0.25% NaOH or NKCC1 inhibitor bumetanide (BU, 30 mg/kg, i.p. in vehicle. TH was then re-measured at 1 h post-injection. Administration of BU significantly increased the mean WLT in rats (p Conclusion Taken together, expression of NKCC1 and KCC2 proteins was differentially altered following SCI. The anti-hyperalgesic effect of NKCC1 inhibition suggests that normal or elevated NKCC1 function and loss of KCC2 function play a role in the development and maintenance of SCI-induced neuropathic pain.

  1. Rostral Agranular Insular Cortex Lesion with Motor Cortex Stimulation Enhances Pain Modulation Effect on Neuropathic Pain Model

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    Hyun Ho Jung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the insular cortex is involved in the processing of painful input. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pain modulation role of the insular cortex during motor cortex stimulation (MCS. After inducing neuropathic pain (NP rat models by the spared nerve injury method, we made a lesion on the rostral agranular insular cortex (RAIC unilaterally and compared behaviorally determined pain threshold and latency in 2 groups: Group A (NP + MCS; n=7 and Group B (NP + RAIC lesion + MCS; n=7. Also, we simultaneously recorded neuronal activity (NP; n=9 in the thalamus of the ventral posterolateral nucleus and RAIC to evaluate electrophysiological changes from MCS. The pain threshold and tolerance latency increased in Group A with “MCS on” and in Group B with or without “MCS on.” Moreover, its increase in Group B with “MCS on” was more than that of Group B without MCS or of Group A, suggesting that MCS and RAIC lesioning are involved in pain modulation. Compared with the “MCS off” condition, the “MCS on” induced significant threshold changes in an electrophysiological study. Our data suggest that the RAIC has its own pain modulation effect, which is influenced by MCS.

  2. Consequences of neuropathic pain: quality-of-life issues and associated costs.

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    McCarberg, Bill H; Billington, Richard

    2006-06-01

    Pain is the primary reason for patients seeking healthcare, and it has been estimated to result in more than dollar 100 billion per year in direct medical costs. Neuropathic pain (NP) alone has been associated with an approximately 3-fold increase in use of healthcare resources. The indirect costs associated with chronic pain result from increased absenteeism and decreased productivity at work, and they also have been estimated to total dollar 100 billion each year in the United States. NP contributes substantially to these costs. Results from one study indicated that employment was affected in 43% of patients with NP. Quality of life is also significantly reduced in such patients. Patients with chronic pain also have difficulty in initiating and maintaining sleep, and sleep deprivation has the potential to exacerbate pain. Sleep deprivation is also associated with both anxiety and depression, and both of these conditions can exacerbate sleep disturbances. Effective management of the patient with chronic pain, including NP, requires assessment and, if necessary, treatment of all comorbidities associated with this condition.

  3. Reduced basal ganglia μ-opioid receptor availability in trigeminal neuropathic pain: A pilot study

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    DosSantos Marcos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although neuroimaging techniques have provided insights into the function of brain regions involved in Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain (TNP in humans, there is little understanding of the molecular mechanisms affected during the course of this disorder. Understanding these processes is crucial to determine the systems involved in the development and persistence of TNP. Findings In this study, we examined the regional μ-opioid receptor (μOR availability in vivo (non-displaceable binding potential BPND of TNP patients with positron emission tomography (PET using the μOR selective radioligand [11C]carfentanil. Four TNP patients and eight gender and age-matched healthy controls were examined with PET. Patients with TNP showed reduced μOR BPND in the left nucleus accumbens (NAc, an area known to be involved in pain modulation and reward/aversive behaviors. In addition, the μOR BPND in the NAc was negatively correlated with the McGill sensory and total pain ratings in the TNP patients. Conclusions Our findings give preliminary evidence that the clinical pain in TNP patients can be related to alterations in the endogenous μ-opioid system, rather than only to the peripheral pathology. The decreased availability of μORs found in TNP patients, and its inverse relationship to clinical pain levels, provide insights into the central mechanisms related to this condition. The results also expand our understanding about the impact of chronic pain on the limbic system.

  4. The effect of low-frequency TENS in the treatment of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

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    Celik, E C; Erhan, B; Gunduz, B; Lakse, E

    2013-04-01

    Prospective, randomized and controlled study. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of low-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (LF-TENS) in the treatment of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). A total of 33 SCI patients with neuropathic pain were included in the study. History, duration, localization and characteristics of pain were recorded. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to investigate the effect of LF-TENS four times during the day. Patients were randomly assigned to study and control groups. The study group was treated with 30 min of LF-TENS daily for 10 days while the placebo group with 30 min of sham TENS. The mean age of the patients was 36.55±10.36 years. Out of 33 patients, 7 were tetraplegic and 26 were paraplegic. Twenty-three patients had complete SCI while 10 patients had incomplete injuries. Two groups were similar with respect to age, gender, duration, level and severity of injury. In the LF-TENS treatment group, a statistically significant reduction of the VAS values was observed, however, such an effect was not evident in the control group. This study revealed that in treatment of neuropathic pain of SCI patients, LF-TENS may be effective. This article presents LF-TENS may effectively complement pharmacological treatment in patients with SCI and neuropathic pain.

  5. Capsaicin 8% Patch for Central and Peripheral Neuropathic Pain of Persons with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Two Case Reports.

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    Trbovich, Michelle; Yang, Huiqing

    2015-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury is common and often refractory to standard treatments. The capsaicin 8% patch is a Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment of neuropathic pain in postherpetic neuralgia and has demonstrated significant efficacy in human immunodeficiency virus-autonomic neuropathy. The patch defunctionalizes transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors, impairing cutaneous nociceptors for a prolonged period (i.e., 8-12 wks) with no systemic side effects. A retrospective review was conducted on the effects of the patch in two patients with spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain refractory to standard treatments. Two weeks after application, both patients reported complete pain relief. Average onset of relief of 4 days and average duration of relief of 197 days, requiring only one to four applications per year, paralleled findings reported in postherpetic neuralgia and human immunodeficiency virus-autonomic neuropathy trials. Upregulation of capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors after spinal cord injury has been reported. The capsaicin 8% patch is a promising therapeutic agent for neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury.

  6. Evaluation of Analgesic Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Allium cepa L. in Animal Model of Neuropathic Pain

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    Sanaz Mahdipour

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain that affects on the patient’s quality of life. Use of herbal instead of synthetic drugs recently has been increased due to side effects of synthetic drugs and herbal effective components. Flavonoids are herbal compounds that have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Because Allium cepa L. has a great amount of flavonoids, this study has been designed to evaluate analgesic effects of alcoholic extract of Allium cepa L. on neuropathic pain behavior in chronic constriction injury model in rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI model in Rats. Animals were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10 for each: Sham, CCI model, receiving red onion hydroalcoholic extract at a dose of 100 mg/kg and a group receiving gabapentin (100 mg/kg. Red onion extract and gabapentin were administered by gavage for 21 days. Using thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical and thermal allodynia tests, the analgesic effects of extract have been measured. Results: Findings of this study revealed that CCI surgery on rats induced hyperalgesia, mechanical and thermal allodynia. Daily intakes of alcoholic extract of red onion and gabapentin significantly increase the paw withdrawal latency; increase the threshold to mechanical allodynia and decrease in response to acetone. Conclusion: Oral use of alcoholic extract of Allium cepa L. reduces neuropathic pain behavior in CCI model in rats.

  7. The brain-penetrant 5-HT7receptor agonist LP-211 reduces the sensory and affective components of neuropathic pain.

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    Santello, Mirko; Bisco, Alberto; Nevian, Natalie Elisabeth; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Nevian, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating pathological condition of high clinical relevance. Changes in neuronal excitability in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) play a central role in the negative emotional and affective aspects of chronic pain. We evaluated the effects of LP-211, a new serotonin-receptor-type-7 (5-HT 7 R) agonist that crosses the blood-brain barrier, on ACC neurons in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. LP-211 reduced synaptic integration in layer 5 pyramidal neurons, which was enhanced in neuropathic pain due to a dysfunction of dendritic hyperpolarization-activated-and-cyclic-nucleotide-regulated (HCN) channels. Acute injection of LP-211 had an analgesic effect, increasing the mechanical withdrawal threshold in neuropathic animals, which was partially mediated by an action in the ACC. Additionally, the acute application of LP-211 blocked the switch in the place escape/avoidance behavior induced by noxious stimuli. Thus systemic treatment with a 5-HT 7 R agonist leads to modulation of the ACC, which dampens sensory and affective aspects of chronic pain. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The α2δ-1-NMDA Receptor Complex Is Critically Involved in Neuropathic Pain Development and Gabapentin Therapeutic Actions

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    Jinjun Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available α2δ-1, commonly known as a voltage-activated Ca2+ channel subunit, is a binding site of gabapentinoids used to treat neuropathic pain and epilepsy. However, it is unclear how α2δ-1 contributes to neuropathic pain and gabapentinoid actions. Here, we show that Cacna2d1 overexpression potentiates presynaptic and postsynaptic NMDAR activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons to cause pain hypersensitivity. Conversely, Cacna2d1 knockdown or ablation normalizes synaptic NMDAR activity increased by nerve injury. α2δ-1 forms a heteromeric complex with NMDARs in rodent and human spinal cords. The α2δ-1-NMDAR interaction predominantly occurs through the C terminus of α2δ-1 and promotes surface trafficking and synaptic targeting of NMDARs. Gabapentin or an α2δ-1 C terminus-interfering peptide normalizes NMDAR synaptic targeting and activity increased by nerve injury. Thus, α2δ-1 is an NMDAR-interacting protein that increases NMDAR synaptic delivery in neuropathic pain. Gabapentinoids reduce neuropathic pain by inhibiting forward trafficking of α2δ-1-NMDAR complexes.

  9. Glial TNFα in the spinal cord regulates neuropathic pain induced by HIV gp120 application in rats

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    Ouyang Handong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN is one of the most common forms of peripheral neuropathy, affecting about 30% of people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS. The symptoms of HIV-SN are dominated by neuropathic pain. Glia activation in the spinal cord has become an attractive target for attenuating chronic pain. This study will investigate the role of spinal TNFα released from glia in HIV-related neuropathic pain. Results Peripheral gp120 application into the rat sciatic nerve induced mechanical allodynia for more than 7 weeks, and upregulated the expression of spinal TNFα in the mRNA and the protein levels at 2 weeks after gp120 application. Spinal TNFα was colocalized with GFAP (a marker of astrocytes and Iba1 (a marker of microglia in immunostaining, suggesting that glia produce TNFα in the spinal cord in this model. Peripheral gp120 application also increased TNFα in the L4/5 DRG. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of TNFα siRNA or soluble TNF receptor reduced gp120 application-induced mechanical allodynia. Conclusions Our results indicate that TNFα in the spinal cord and the DRG are involved in neuropathic pain, following the peripheral HIV gp120 application, and that blockade of the glial product TNFα reverses neuropathic pain induced by HIV gp120 application.

  10. R-flurbiprofen reduces neuropathic pain in rodents by restoring endogenous cannabinoids.

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    Philipp Bishay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: R-flurbiprofen, one of the enantiomers of flurbiprofen racemate, is inactive with respect to cyclooxygenase inhibition, but shows analgesic properties without relevant toxicity. Its mode of action is still unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that R-flurbiprofen reduces glutamate release in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord evoked by sciatic nerve injury and thereby alleviates pain in sciatic nerve injury models of neuropathic pain in rats and mice. This is mediated by restoring the balance of endocannabinoids (eCB, which is disturbed following peripheral nerve injury in the DRGs, spinal cord and forebrain. The imbalance results from transcriptional adaptations of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH and NAPE-phospholipase D, i.e. the major enzymes involved in anandamide metabolism and synthesis, respectively. R-flurbiprofen inhibits FAAH activity and normalizes NAPE-PLD expression. As a consequence, R-Flurbiprofen improves endogenous cannabinoid mediated effects, indicated by the reduction of glutamate release, increased activity of the anti-inflammatory transcription factor PPARgamma and attenuation of microglia activation. Antinociceptive effects are lost by combined inhibition of CB1 and CB2 receptors and partially abolished in CB1 receptor deficient mice. R-flurbiprofen does however not cause changes of core body temperature which is a typical indicator of central effects of cannabinoid-1 receptor agonists. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that R-flurbiprofen improves the endogenous mechanisms to regain stability after axonal injury and to fend off chronic neuropathic pain by modulating the endocannabinoid system and thus constitutes an attractive, novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of chronic, intractable pain.

  11. Diagnostic Accuracy of Quantitative Sensory Testing to Discriminate Inflammatory Toothache and Intraoral Neuropathic Pain.

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    Porporatti, André Luís; Costa, Yuri Martins; Stuginski-Barbosa, Juliana; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Duarte, Marco Antônio Hungaro; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2015-10-01

    A differential diagnosis between inflammatory toothache (IT) and intraoral neuropathic pain is challenging. The aim of this diagnostic study was to quantify somatosensory function of subjects with IT (acute pulpitis) and atypical odontalgia (AO, intraoral neuropathic pain) and healthy volunteers and to quantify how accurately quantitative sensory testing (QST) discriminates an IT or AO diagnosis. The sample consisted of 60 subjects equally divided (n = 20) into 3 groups: (1) IT, (2) AO, and (3) control. A sequence of 4 QST methods was performed over the dentoalveolar mucosa in the apical maxillar or mandibular area: mechanical detection threshold, pain detection threshold (PDT), dynamic mechanical allodynia, and temporal summation. One-way analysis of variance, Tukey post hoc analyses, and z score transformation were applied to the data. In addition, the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and diagnostic odds ratio of the QST methods were calculated (α = 5%). Somatosensory abnormalities were found for the AO group, which is consistent with a low detection threshold to touch and pain and the presence of mechanical allodynia. For the IT group, no somatosensory abnormality was observed when compared with the control group. The most accurate QST to discriminate the diagnostic differences between IT and healthy individuals is the PDT. The diagnostic differences between AO and healthy individuals and between IT and AO are best discriminated with the mechanical detection threshold, PDT, and dynamic mechanical allodynia. The proposed QST methods may aid in the differential diagnosis between IT and AO with strong accuracy and may be used as complementary diagnostic tests. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence of neuropathic pain after radiofrequency denervation of the third occipital nerve.

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    Gazelka, Halena M; Knievel, Sarah; Mauck, William D; Moeschler, Susan M; Pingree, Matthew J; Rho, Richard H; Lamer, Tim J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of neuropathic pain occurring after radiofrequency neurotomy of the third occipital nerve (TON). This study was conducted at a teaching hospital from January 1, 2008, to March 31, 2010. With institutional review board approval, Current Procedural Terminology codes were used to identify patients who received radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the nerves supplying the C2-3 facet joint and the TON. The C3 dorsal ramus provides innervation to the C2-3 facet joint and the suboccipital cutaneous region, and procedures that included ablation to this region were reviewed for complications. Postprocedural data were collected by reviewing follow-up appointment notes and telephone calls. Included were patients who had new neuropathic pain in the distribution of the TON after RFA. They described what they were feeling as burning, tingling, or numbness. All patients who presented with complaints had normal neurologic findings and no secondary cause for their symptoms. The included patient medical records were then reviewed for severity and duration of symptoms and the need for treatment with pain medication. Sixty-four patients underwent C2-3 RFA or TON RFA, and 12 patients were identified as experiencing ablation-induced third occipital neuralgia, an incidence rate of 19%. This finding suggests that patients undergoing RFA of the nerves supplying the C2-3 joint or TON are at risk for postprocedural third occipital neuralgia. This possibility may affect providing informed consent as well as anticipating and managing postprocedural pain.

  13. Case Report: Neuropathic pain in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5iu

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    Daniel W. Wheeler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a unique case of a woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain (CIP Syndrome, who developed features of neuropathic pain after sustaining pelvic fractures and an epidural hematoma that impinged on the right fifth lumbar (L5 nerve root. Her pelvic injuries were sustained during painless labor, which culminated in a Cesarean section. She had been diagnosed with CIP as child, which was later confirmed when she was found to have null mutations of the SCN9A gene that encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. She now complains of troubling continuous buzzing in both legs and a vice-like squeezing in the pelvis on walking. Quantitative sensory testing showed that sensory thresholds to mechanical stimulation of the dorsum of both feet had increased more than 10-fold on both sides compared with tests performed before her pregnancy. These findings fulfill the diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain. Notably, she mostly only experiences the negative symptoms (such as numbness and tingling, but also electric shocks, and she has not reported sharp or burning sensations, although the value of verbal descriptors is somewhat limited in a person who has never felt pain before. However, her case strongly suggests that at least some of the symptoms of neuropathic pain can persist despite the absence of the Nav1.7 channel. Pain is a subjective experience and this case sheds light on the transmission of neuropathic pain in humans that cannot be learned from knockout mice.

  14. Protective effect and potential mechanism of Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 on STZ-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

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    Taliyan, Rajeev; Sharma, P L

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes induced neuropathic pain is recognized as one of the most difficult types of pain to treat with conventional analgaesics. EGb 761 is a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba that has analgaesic and antiinflammatory properties and modulatory effects on key pain-related molecules. We examined the effect of EGb 761 on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced neuropathic pain behaviours and assessed its mechanism of action. Streptozotocin (20 mg/kg i.p for 5 days) was administered to induce experimental diabetes. Pain hypersensitivity to radiant heat was measured using the Dynamic Plantar Aesthesiometer to test the pain threshold. Diabetic rats exhibited mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperanalgaesia after the third week of STZ injection and concomitantly increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and nitric oxide concentration. The antioxidant enzymes level of superoxide dismutase and catalase was markedly reduced in STZ-diabetic rats (p < 0.05). Systemic administration of EGb 761 (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg), starting after the third week following STZ injection, dose-dependently reversed STZ-induced thermal hyperanalgaesia and mechanical allodynia. Moreover, it reduced oxidonitrosative stress and concomitantly restored the level of antioxidant enzymes (p < 0.05) as compared with untreated diabetic rats. These results suggest that EGb 761 attenuated STZ-induced neuropathic pain behaviours by inhibiting oxidative and nitrosative stress and may constitute a new approach for treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Combination treatment of neuropathic pain: Danish expert recommendations based on a Delphi process

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    Holbech JV

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Jakob Vormstrup Holbech,1 Anne Jung,2 Torsten Jonsson,3 Mette Wanning,4 Claus Bredahl,5 Flemming W Bach6 1Department of Neurology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 2Medicinsk Fælles Ambulatorium, Holbaek Hospital, 3Aleris-Hamlet Hospitaler Ringsted, 4The Private Pain Clinic, Herlev, 5Clinic Acute Orthopedic Surgical Anesthesia Section, Aalborg Universitetshospital, Aalborg, 6Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Background: Current Danish treatment algorithms for pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain (NeP are tricyclic antidepressants (TCA, gabapentin and pregabalin as first-line treatment for the most common NeP conditions. Many patients have insufficient pain relief on monotherapy, but combination therapy had not been included in guidelines until recently. Based on clinical empiricism and scientific evidence, a Delphi consensus process provided a consolidated guidance on pharmacological combination treatment of NeP.Methods: A two-round virtual internet-based Delphi process with 6 Danish pain specialists was undertaken. In the first round, questions were answered individually and anonymously, whereas in the second round, the panel openly discussed first round’s summary of outcomes. Combinations of pharmacological pain treatments, that is, pregabalin/gabapentin, TCAs, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, opioids, other antiepileptics and cutaneous patches, were assessed based on both scientific and clinical practice experiences. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC grading system was used for evidence rating.Results: Combination of pregabalin/gabapentin with TCA is useful in patients who do not gain sufficient pain relief or tolerate either drug in high doses, or to improve sleep disturbance. Also, combination of pregabalin/gabapentin and SNRIs is reasonably well documented and experienced by some experts to result in sufficient

  16. Reversed cortical over-activity during movement imagination following neurofeedback treatment for central neuropathic pain.

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    Hasan, Muhammad Abul; Fraser, Matthew; Conway, Bernard A; Allan, David B; Vučković, Aleksandra

    2016-09-01

    One of the brain signatures of the central neuropathic pain (CNP) is the theta band over-activity of wider cortical structures, during imagination of movement. The objective of the study was to investigate whether this over-activity is reversible following the neurofeedback treatment of CNP. Five paraplegic patients with pain in their legs underwent from twenty to forty neurofeedback sessions that significantly reduced their pain. In order to assess their dynamic cortical activity they were asked to imagine movements of all limbs a week before the first and a week after the last neurofeedback session. Using time-frequency analysis we compared EEG activity during imagination of movement before and after the therapy and further compared it with EEG signals of ten paraplegic patients with no pain and a control group of ten able-bodied people. Neurofeedback treatment resulted in reduced CNP and a wide spread reduction of cortical activity during imagination of movement. The reduction was significant in the alpha and beta band but was largest in the theta band. As a result cortical activity became similar to the activity of other two groups with no pain. Reduction of CNP is accompanied by reduced cortical over-activity during movement imagination. Understanding causes and consequences mechanism through which CNP affects cortical activity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Spinal Cord Stimulation Alters Protein Levels in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Neuropathic Pain Patients: A Proteomic Mass Spectrometric Analysis.

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    Lind, Anne-Li; Emami Khoonsari, Payam; Sjödin, Marcus; Katila, Lenka; Wetterhall, Magnus; Gordh, Torsten; Kultima, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Electrical neuromodulation by spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a well-established method for treatment of neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism behind the pain relieving effect in patients remains largely unknown. In this study, we target the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome, a little investigated aspect of SCS mechanism of action. Two different proteomic mass spectrometry protocols were used to analyze the CSF of 14 SCS responsive neuropathic pain patients. Each patient acted as his or her own control and protein content was compared when the stimulator was turned off for 48 hours, and after the stimulator had been used as normal for three weeks. Eighty-six proteins were statistically significantly altered in the CSF of neuropathic pain patients using SCS, when comparing the stimulator off condition to the stimulator on condition. The top 12 of the altered proteins are involved in neuroprotection (clusterin, gelsolin, mimecan, angiotensinogen, secretogranin-1, amyloid beta A4 protein), synaptic plasticity/learning/memory (gelsolin, apolipoprotein C1, apolipoprotein E, contactin-1, neural cell adhesion molecule L1-like protein), nociceptive signaling (neurosecretory protein VGF), and immune regulation (dickkopf-related protein 3). Previously unknown effects of SCS on levels of proteins involved in neuroprotection, nociceptive signaling, immune regulation, and synaptic plasticity are demonstrated. These findings, in the CSF of neuropathic pain patients, expand the picture of SCS effects on the neurochemical environment of the human spinal cord. An improved understanding of SCS mechanism may lead to new tracks of investigation and improved treatment strategies for neuropathic pain. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  18. Effective management of intractable neuropathic pain using an intrathecal morphine pump in a patient with acute transverse myelitis

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    Wu WT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wei-Ting Wu,1 Yu-Hui Huang,2,3 Der-Cherng Chen,4 Yu-Hsuan Huang,1 Li-Wei Chou1,5 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 2School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 4Center of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Neurosurgery, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, 5School of Chinese Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, TaiwanAbstract: Transverse myelitis is a rare inflammatory myelopathy characterized by loss of motor and sensory function below the affected level of the spinal cord, and causes neurogenic bowel and bladder. Occasionally, it also causes neuropathic pain with spasticity. Traditional therapies for neuropathic pain are multiple, including multimodal analgesic regimens, antiepileptic or antidepressant medications, opioids, sympathetic blocks, and spinal cord stimulation. Persistent neuropathic pain can cause emotional distress by affecting sleep, work, recreation, and emotional well-being. Here we report the case of a patient suffering from intractable neuropathic pain following acute transverse myelitis that was not relieved by combinations of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, antiepileptic, antidepressant, and opioid medications, or by acupuncture. Implantation of an intrathecal morphine pump controlled the pain successfully without side effects, and enabled the patient to embark on intensive rehabilitation. The patient's muscle strength has improved significantly and the patient may soon be able to use a walker with minimal assistance.Keywords: intrathecal morphine pump, neuropathic pain, rehabilitation, transverse myelitis

  19. Evaluation of the Effect of Duration on the Efficacy of Pulsed Radiofrequency in an Animal Model of Neuropathic Pain.

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    Ramzy, Eiad A; Khalil, Khaled I; Nour, Eman M; Hamed, Mohammed F; Taha, Mohamed A

    2018-03-01

    Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) is increasingly used in clinical practice, especially in neuropathic pain disorders. Although PRF is not new to clinical use, there are significant gaps in knowledge regarding its effectiveness. The current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of duration of application of PRF on its analgesic efficacy in improvement of neuropathic pain. A randomized experimental trial. An animal research facility at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Mansoura University in Egypt. Chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve of 36 male Sprague-Dawley rats was performed to induce neuropathic pain. The rats were divided into 6 groups (6 rats each) in which PRF was applied for 2, 4, 6, or 8 minutes or not at all. In one group, RF cannula was applied without performing PRF intervention. The pain was assessed through observation of resting paw posture (RPP) at 3, 10, and 21 days. Nerve damage was assessed by histopathological evaluation of the sciatic nerve. Immunohistochemical localization of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha]) was also done. RPP was improved in rats treated with PRF. This improvement was significant only in rats treated for 8 minutes. Increased duration for PRF application was associated with a significant decrease in IL-6 and TNF-alpha contents in all groups when compared with the control group. Histopathological evaluation of the constricted sciatic nerve revealed no statistical significance among the different study groups. The study was limited by the lack of measurement of other inflammatory markers that may help elucidate other relevant mechanisms. Increased duration of PRF application resulted in better analgesic efficacy without any increase in tissue injury in an animal model of neuropathic pain. This effect may be attributed to decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Pulsed radiofrequency, analgesic, rats, sciatic nerve, duration, neuropathic pain.

  20. Continuous brachial plexus block at the cervical level using a posterior approach in the management of neuropathic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; van der Vegt, M. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; Pijl, A. J.; Dzoljic, M.

    2001-01-01

    Neuropathic cancer pain due to tumor growth near the brachial plexus is often treated with a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and oral or transdermal opioids. We propose placement of a catheter along the brachial plexus using a

  1. Intervertebral Foramen Injection of Ozone Relieves Mechanical Allodynia and Enhances Analgesic Effect of Gabapentin in Animal Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen-Jun; Yang, Fan; Yang, Fei; Sun, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Fang-Fang; Wang, Jiang-Lin; Wang, Jia-Shuang; Guan, Su-Min; Chen, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In a 5-year follow-up study in a hospital in southern China, it was shown that intervertebral foramen (IVF) injection of ozone at the involved segmental levels could significantly alleviate paroxysmal spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia in patients with chronic, intractable postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and improve the quality of life. However, so far no proof-of-concept studies in animals have been available. This study was designed to investigate whether IVF ozone has an analgesic effect on animal models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Experimental trial in rats. Institute for Biomedical Sciences of Pain. By IVF injection, a volume of 50 µl containing 30 µg/mL ozone-oxygen mixture or 50 µl air was carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats of naïve, inflammatory pain states produced by injections of either bee venom or complete Freud's adjuvant, and neuropathic pain state produced by spared nerve injury, respectively. The effects of IVF ozone on pain-related behaviors were evaluated for 2 weeks or one month. Then combined use of gabapentin (100 mg/1 kg body weight) with IVF ozone was evaluated in rats with neuropathic pain by intraperitoneal administration 5 days after the ozone treatment. Finally, the analgesic effects of another 4 drugs, AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist), A-803467 (a selective Nav1.8 blocker), rapamycin (the mTOR inhibitor), and MGCD0103 (a selective histone deacetylase inhibitor) were evaluated for long term through IVF injection, respectively. (1) IVF injection of ozone at L4-5 was only effective in suppression of mechanical allodynia in rats with neuropathic pain but not with inflammatory pain; (2) the analgesic effects of IVF ozone lasted much longer (> 14 days) than other selective molecular target drugs (bee venom, complete Freud's adjuvant.

  2. Use of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster to treat localized neuropathic pain secondary to traumatic injury of peripheral nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correa-Illanes G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gerardo Correa-Illanes,1 Ricardo Roa,2 José Luis Piñeros,2 Wilfredo Calderón31Rehabilitation Department, 2Burns and Plastic Surgery Department, Hospital del Trabajador, 3Plastic Surgery Department, Hospital del Salvador, Santiago, ChileObjective: The efficacy of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster (LMP has previously been demonstrated in post-traumatic localized neuropathic pain. This study evaluated the use of LMP in localized neuropathic pain secondary to traumatic peripheral nerve injury.Patients and methods: This prospective observational study enrolled patients with traumatic injuries to peripheral nerves that were accompanied by localized neuropathic pain of more than 3 months duration. Demographic variables, pain intensity (measured using the numeric rating scale; NRS, answers to the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4 questionnaire, and the size of the painful area were recorded.Results: Nineteen patients were included, aged (mean ± standard deviation 41.4 ± 15.7 years. Nerve injuries affected the upper (eight patients or lower (11 patients limbs. The mean duration of pain before starting treatment with LMP was 22.6 ± 43.5 months (median 8 months. Mean baseline values included: NRS 6.7 ± 1.6, painful area 17.8 ± 10.4 cm2 (median 18 cm2, and DN4 score 6.7 ± 1.4. The mean duration of treatment with LMP was 19.5 ± 10.0 weeks (median 17.4 weeks. Mean values after treatment were: NRS 2.8 ± 1.5 (≥3 point reduction in 79% of patients, ≥50% reduction in 57.9% of patients and painful area 2.1 ± 2.3 cm2 (median 1 cm2, ≥50% reduction in 94.7% of patients. Functional improvement after treatment was observed in 14/19 patients (73.7%.Conclusion: LMP effectively treated traumatic injuries of peripheral nerves which presented with chronic localized neuropathic pain, reducing both pain intensity and the size of the painful area.Keywords: chronic post-surgical pain, chronic post-traumatic pain, 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, neuropathic pain

  3. Living with chronic neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury: an interpretative phenomenological analysis of community experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Jasmine H; Cotter, Imogen; Fine, Philip; A Finlay, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an in-depth, idiographic study examining the lived experience of chronic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Neuropathic pain (NP) occurs in a large majority of the SCI population and is particularly intractable to treatment. It can be both psychologically and physically debilitating. This study examines how the experience of NP is mediated by its meaning to the sufferer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight people with SCI and chronic NP, attending outpatient clinics at a specialist SCI Centre in the UK. Verbatim transcripts were subjected to interpretative phenomenological analysis to further understand the experience. Analysis suggested that NP has powerful consequences upon the sufferer's physical, psychological and social well-being, in line with a biopsychosocial understanding of pain. Three super-ordinate themes were identified: a perceived gap between treatments received and participants' views of what they wanted and needed; a fight for life control and acceptance; and feeling understood by others with SCI, but isolated from the non-understanding able-bodied. The results are discussed in terms of the possible application of acceptance-based therapy to NP and the potential for the alleviation of the debilitating consequences of NP. Chronic NP after SCI is often described as worse than the injury itself, often impacting upon the sufferers physical and psychological health. The experiences of persons with SCI-specific NP highlight the impact of pain on their physical, psychological and social health. This indicates that healthcare professionals should incorporate a biopsychosocial approach for managing pain post-SCI. Routine clinical follow-up of SCI patients with chronic NP, as well as comprehensive pain management treatment programmes, could address the three themes evidenced in the current study, by moving routine intervention with NP away from pain relief, towards pain management. Continued education for patients

  4. Virtual reality improves embodiment and neuropathic pain caused by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozeg, Polona; Palluel, Estelle; Ronchi, Roberta; Solcà, Marco; Al-Khodairy, Abdul-Wahab; Jordan, Xavier; Kassouha, Ammar; Blanke, Olaf

    2017-10-31

    To investigate changes in body ownership and chronic neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) using multisensory own body illusions and virtual reality (VR). Twenty patients with SCI with paraplegia and 20 healthy control participants (HC) participated in 2 factorial, randomized, repeated-measures design studies. In the virtual leg illusion (VLI), we applied asynchronous or synchronous visuotactile stimulation to the participant's back (either immediately above the lesion level or at the shoulder) and to the virtual legs as seen on a VR head-mounted display. We tested the effect of the VLI on the sense of leg ownership (questionnaires) and on perceived neuropathic pain (visual analogue scale pain ratings). We compared illusory leg ownership with illusory global body ownership (induced in the full body illusion [FBI]), by applying asynchronous or synchronous visuotactile stimulation to the participant's back and the back of a virtual body as seen on a head-mounted display. Our data show that patients with SCI are less sensitive to multisensory stimulations inducing illusory leg ownership (as compared to HC) and that leg ownership decreased with time since SCI. In contrast, we found no differences between groups in global body ownership as tested in the FBI. VLI and FBI were both associated with mild analgesia that was only during the VLI specific for synchronous visuotactile stimulation and the lower back position. The present findings show that VR exposure using multisensory stimulation differently affected leg vs body ownership, and is associated with mild analgesia with potential for SCI neurorehabilitation protocols. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Intrathecal Injection of Human Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ameliorates Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunxiu; Chen, Fengfeng; Yao, Chengye; Shu, Shaofang; Feng, Juan; Hu, Xiaoling; Hai, Quan; Yao, Shanglong; Chen, Xiangdong

    2016-12-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is a clinically incurable disease with miscellaneous causes, complicated mechanisms and available therapies show poor curative effect. Some recent studies have indicated that neuroinflammation plays a vital role in the occurrence and promotion of NP and anti-inflammatory therapy has the potential to relieve the pain. During the past decades, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with properties of multipotentiality, low immunogenicity and anti-inflammatory activity have showed excellent therapeutic effects in cell therapy from animal models to clinical application, thus aroused great attention. However there are no reports about the effect of intrathecal human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUC-MSCs) on NP which is induced by peripheral nerve injury. Therefore, in this study, intrathecally transplanted HUC-MSCs were utilized to examine the effect on neuropathic pain induced by a rat model with spinal nerve ligation (SNL), so as to explore the possible mechanism of those effects. As shown in the results, the HUC-MSCs transplantation obviously ameliorated SNL-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, which was related to the inhibiting process of neuroinflammation, including the suppression of activated astrocytes and microglia, as well as the significant reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and Interleukin -17A (IL-17A) and the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin -10 (IL-10). Therefore, through the effect on glial cells, pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine, the targeting intrathecal HUC-MSCs may offer a novel treatment strategy for NP.

  6. Gene Therapy for Neuropathic Pain by Silencing of TNF-α Expression with Lentiviral Vectors Targeting the Dorsal Root Ganglion in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Kawai, Hiromichi; Terashima, Tomoya; Kojima, Hideto; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can be a debilitating condition. Many types of drugs that have been used to treat neuropathic pain have only limited efficacy. Recent studies indicate that pro-inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) are involved in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. In the present study, we engineered a gene therapy strategy to relieve neuropathic pain by silencing TNF-α expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using lentiviral vectors expressing TNF short hairpin RNA1-4 (LV-TNF-shRNA1-4) in mice. First, based on its efficacy in silencing TNF-α in vitro, we selected shRNA3 to construct LV-TNF-shRNA3 for in vivo study. We used L5 spinal nerve transection (SNT) mice as a neuropathic pain model. These animals were found to display up-regulated mRNA expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), injury markers, and interleukin (IL)-6, an inflammatory cytokine in the ipsilateral L5 DRG. Injection of LV-TNF-shRNA3 onto the proximal transected site suppressed significantly the mRNA levels of ATF3, NPY and IL-6, reduced mechanical allodynia and neuronal cell death of DRG neurons. These results suggest that lentiviral-mediated silencing of TNF-α in DRG relieves neuropathic pain and reduces neuronal cell death, and may constitute a novel therapeutic option for neuropathic pain. PMID:24642694

  7. Sensitization of neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala via the decreased GABAergic inhibition contributes to the development of neuropathic pain-related anxiety-like behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Fang, Dong; Kong, Ling-Yu; Jin, Zi-Run; Cai, Jie; Kang, Xue-Jing; Wan, You; Xing, Guo-Gang

    2014-10-04

    Despite high prevalence of anxiety accompanying with chronic pain, the mechanisms underlying pain-related anxiety are largely unknown. With its well-documented role in pain and emotion processing, the amygdala may act as a key player in pathogenesis of neuropathic pain-related anxiety. Pain-related plasticity and sensitization of CeA (central nucleus of the amygdala) neurons have been shown in several models of chronic pain. In addition, firing pattern of neurons with spike output can powerfully affect functional output of the brain nucleus, and GABAergic neurons are crucial in the modulation of neuronal excitability. In this study, we first investigated whether pain-related plasticity (e.g. alteration of neuronal firing patterns) and sensitization of CeA neurons contribute to nerve injury-evoked anxiety in neuropathic rats. Furthermore, we explored whether GABAergic disinhibition is responsible for regulating firing patterns and intrinsic excitabilities of CeA neurons as well as for pain-related anxiety in neuropathic rats. We discovered that spinal nerve ligation (SNL) produced neuropathic pain-related anxiety-like behaviors in rats, which could be specifically inhibited by intra-CeA administration of anti-anxiety drug diazepam. Moreover, we found potentiated plasticity and sensitization of CeA neurons in SNL-induced anxiety rats, of which including: 1) increased burst firing pattern and early-adapting firing pattern; 2) increased spike frequency and intrinsic excitability; 3) increased amplitude of both after-depolarized-potential (ADP) and sub-threshold membrane potential oscillation. In addition, we observed a remarkable reduction of GABAergic inhibition in CeA neurons in SNL-induced anxiety rats, which was proved to be important for altered firing patterns and hyperexcitability of CeA neurons, thereby greatly contributing to the development of neuropathic pain-related anxiety. Accordantly, activation of GABAergic inhibition by intra-CeA administration of

  8. rTMS of the prefrontal cortex has analgesic effects on neuropathic pain in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, R; Höller, Y; Langthaler, P B; Lochner, P; Golaszewski, S; Schwenker, K; Brigo, F; Trinka, E

    2017-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation study. The analgesic effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in chronic pain have been the focus of several studies. In particular, rTMS of the premotor cortex/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PMC/DLPFC) changes pain perception in healthy subjects and has analgesic effects in acute postoperative pain, as well as in fibromyalgia patients. However, its effect on neuropathic pain in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has not been assessed. Merano (Italy) and Salzburg (Austria). In this study, we performed PMC/DLPFC rTMS in subjects with SCI and neuropathic pain. Twelve subjects with chronic cervical or thoracic SCI were randomized to receive 1250 pulses at 10 Hz rTMS (n=6) or sham rTMS (n=6) treatment for 10 sessions over 2 weeks. The visual analog scale, the sensory and affective pain rating indices of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale were used to assed pain and mood at baseline (T0), 1 day after the first week of treatment (T1), 1 day (T2), 1 week (T3) and 1 month (T4) after the last intervention. Subjects who received active rTMS had a statistically significant reduction in pain symptoms in comparison with their baseline pain, whereas sham rTMS participants had a non-significant change in daily pain from their baseline pain. The findings of this preliminary study in a small patient sample suggest that rTMS of the PMC/DLPFC may be effective in relieving neuropathic pain in SCI patients.

  9. Rescuing Our Warriors from Chronic Pain: A Battlefield-to-Nondeployment Means to Prevent Opioid-induced Amplification of Neuropathic Pain from Traumatic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    agility, suggesting that the decrease in voluntary exercise is due to loss of motivation or pain amplification rather than physical disability . We... disability 15 Sep 2016 - 14 Sep 2017 15. SUBJECT TERMS chronic pain, opioid analgesics, non-opioid analgesics, toll-like receptor 4, return to duty 16...of the project? 1. Define whether deleterious effects of opioids extend beyond neuropathic pain to other indices of disability . Determine

  10. Lipo-endomorphin-1 derivatives with systemic activity against neuropathic pain without producing constipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Varamini

    Full Text Available To enhance the drug-like properties of the endogenous opioid peptide endomorphin-1 (1 = Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH(2, the N-terminus of the peptide was modified with 2-aminodecanoic acid, resulting in compound 3. Tyr in compound 1 was replaced with 2,6-dimethyltyrosine yielding compound 2. Derivative 2 was also substituted with 2-aminodecanoic acid producing compound, 4. Lipoamino acid-modified derivatives showed improved metabolic stability and membrane permeability while maintaining high μ-opioid (MOP receptor binding affinity and acting as a potent agonist. In vivo studies showed dose-dependent antinociceptive activity following intravenous (i.v. administration of compounds 3 and 4 in a chronic constriction injury (CCI-rat model of neuropathi