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Sample records for underlying neurogenic bladder

  1. Neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your bladder at all Have signs of a bladder infection (fever, burning when you urinate, frequent urination) Urinate small amounts, frequently Alternative Names Neurogenic detrusor overactivity; NDO; Neurogenic bladder sphincter dysfunction; NBSD ...

  2. Neurogenic Bladder

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    Peter T. Dorsher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented.

  3. Long neglected neurogenic bladder.

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    Binnani, Pooja; Gupta, Ruchi; Kedia, Nikhil; Pattewar, Sainath; Bahadur, Madan Mohan

    2011-07-01

    Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI) post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  4. Long neglected neurogenic bladder

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    Pooja Binnani; Ruchi Gupta; Nikhil Kedia; Sainath Pattewar; Madan Mohan Bahadur

    2011-01-01

    Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI) post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  5. Long neglected neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Binnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary diversion is indicated for the management of the neurogenic bladder. However, there is a risk for developing pyocystitis in this type of patients. We present a case of young female who presented with a history of frequent urinary tract infection (UTI post urinary diversion for neurogenic bladder. Ever since she underwent simple cystectomy, there have been no further episodes of UTI.

  6. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

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    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  7. Intraspinal schwannoma and neurogenic bladder.

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    Yang, K S; Ho, C S; Tai, P A; Kung, W M

    2018-04-01

    Most lumbar intradural schwannomas present initially as radiculopathies with sensory disturbances. However, neurogenic bladder dysfunction may be one of the earliest manifestations and can cause long-term disability. We present the case of a patient with a L3-4 schwannoma (newly diagnosed owing to recurrent urinary retention and urinary tract infection) who finally underwent surgical resection. Improvement of bladder sensation was documented by urodynamic study and the patient was subsequently weaned off her Foley catheter with satisfactory outcome.

  8. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of neurogenic bladder.

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    Ginsberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a disorder of the lower urinary tract created by damage to or diseases of the nervous system. Found in many patients with neurologic disorders, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury, and spina bifida among others, neurogenic bladder can lead to problematic symptoms and complications including urinary incontinence, frequency, and urgency, along with risk for infection and involvement of the upper urinary tract and kidney disease. The disorder can also create substantial embarrassment resulting in social isolation for affected patients. Healthcare utilization may be excessive in patients with neurogenic bladder, including office and emergency department visits and subsequent hospitalizations. Because of its significant effects on quality of life, it is important to reassess the epidemiology and physiology of neurogenic bladder, its diagnosis and assessment, and the impact of the symptoms and complications associated with it to better manage patients with this disorder and improve outcomes.

  9. Management of vesicoureteral reflux in neurogenic bladder

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    Charlotte Q. Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is a significant risk factor for pyelonephritis and renal scarring. VUR can occur through a defective ureterovesical junction (UVJ or an overwhelmed normal UVJ mechanism such as in bladder dysfunction of congenital, acquired, or behavioral etiology. There are numerous causes for the development of a neurogenic bladder from spinal dysraphisms to spinal cord trauma and even centrally based abnormalities in children with apparently normal motor function (inappropriately termed nonneurogenic neurogenic bladder. The foundation of managing reflux in these neurogenic bladders is to maintain low bladder pressures which will commonly mean that compliance will be normal as well. There have been several publications that have shown that if bladder pressures are lowered simply with clean intermittent catheterization and medications that the reflux can resolve spontaneously. Alternatively, the patients that are in need of bladder augmentation can have spontaneous resolution of their reflux with the resulting increase in capacity. Surgical intervention is called for when bladder capacity is adequate and the reflux persists or if it is part of a larger operation to increase capacity and to manage outlet resistance. In some instances, reimplantation is necessary because the ureters interfere with the bladder neck procedure. Aside from open and robotic surgical intervention the use of endoscopic injectable agents is beginning to become more popular especially when combined with intravesical botulinum toxin A injections. Great strides are being made in the management of patients with neurogenic bladders and we are seeing more choices for the urologist to be able to manage these patients.

  10. UTIs in patients with neurogenic bladder.

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    Jahromi, Mona S; Mure, Amanda; Gomez, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) remain one of the most prevalent and frustrating morbidities for neurogenic bladder patients, and death attributed to urosepsis in the spinal cord injury (SCI) patient is higher when compared to the general population. Risk factors include urinary stasis, high bladder pressures, bladder stones, and catheter use. While classic symptoms of UTI include dysuria, increased frequency and urgency, neurogenic bladder patients present differently with increased spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary incontinence, and vague pains. Multiple modalities have been assessed for prevention including catheter type, oral supplements, bladder irrigation, detrusor injections and prophylactic antimicrobials. Of these, bladder inoculation with E. coli HU2117, irrigation with iAluRil(®), detrusor injections, and weekly prophylaxis with alternating antibiotics appear to have a positive reduction in UTI but require further study. Ultimately, treatment for symptomatic UTI should account for the varied flora and possible antibiotic resistances including relying on urine cultures to guide antibiotic therapy.

  11. Spontaneous Bladder Perforation in an Infant Neurogenic Bladder: Laparoscopic Management

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    Daniel Cabezalí Barbancho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bladder perforation is an uncommon event in childhood. It is usually associated with bladder augmentation. We are presenting a case of bladder rupture in an infant with neurogenic bladder without prior bladder surgery. Three days after lipomyelomeningocele excision the patient showed signs and symptoms of acute abdomen. The ultrasound exploration revealed significant amount of intraperitoneal free fluid and therefore a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A posterior bladder rupture was diagnosed and repaired laparoscopically. Currently, being 3 years old, she keeps successfully dry with clean intermittent catheterization. Neurogenic bladder voiding function can change at any time of its evolution and lead to complications. Early diagnosis of spontaneous bladder rupture is of paramount importance, so it is essential to think about it in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen.

  12. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

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    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  13. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    OpenAIRE

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete...

  14. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.

  15. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

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    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder

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    OLANDOSKI, Karen Previdi; KOCH, Vera; TRIGO-ROCHA, Flavio Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: Preservation of renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder is an important goal of treatment for the disease. This study analyzed the evolution of renal function in patients with congenital neurogenic bladder. METHODS: We reviewed the records of 58 pediatric patients with respect to the following attributes: gender, age, etiology of neurogenic bladder, reason for referral, medical/surgical management, episodes of treated urinary tract infections, urodynamics, DMSA sci...

  17. [Urinary tract infection and neurogenic bladder].

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    Salomon, J; Gory, A; Bernard, L; Ruffion, A; Denys, P; Chartier-Kastler, E

    2007-05-01

    One of the main complications of spinal cord injury is neurogenic bladder when the bladder fails to empty spontaneously. Urinary tract infection is the leading cause of morbidity and the second cause of mortality in these subjects. Patient education and personalized medical follow-up must ensure adapted management depending on the risk factors and the voiding mode. The risk of urinary tract infection can be decreased by perfect neurological control of detrusor activity combined with a method of drainage: intermittent self-catheterization. Despite these measures, many patients experience recurrent symptomatic urinary tract infections. Repeated antibiotic therapy increases the risk of selection of multiresistant bacteria without reducing either the incidence or the severity of symptomatic urinary tract infections. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is very frequent in patients treated by intermittent catheterization and does not justify antibiotic therapy, as antiseptics and urinary alkalinizers or acidifiers have been shown to be effective. "Antibiocycle" strategies could have a beneficial role by significantly decreasing the number of infections and hospitalizations with no major ecological risks, by using molecules that are well tolerated orally with a low selection pressure. All febrile urinary tract infections require rapid investigation and an urgent urological and infectious diseases opinion (abscess, severe sepsis, resistance). The SPILF-AFU 2002 consensus conference provided answers to major questions concerning the definition, treatment and prevention of nosocomial urinary tract infection, especially in a context of neurogenic bladder.

  18. Bibliometric profile of neurogenic bladder in the literature: a 20-year bibliometric analysis

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    Yuan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic bladder is a dysfunction of the lower urinary tract caused by nervous system disorder. We investigated the trends in publication of articles under the topic "neurogenic bladder" using bibliometric analysis. Articles on neurogenic bladder, published between 1995 and 2014, were retrieved from the ISI Web of Science citation database. We analyzed the search results for authors, countries, institutions, journals, and top-cited papers. A total of 1,904 articles were retrieved. There was a small increase in the number of articles on neurogenic bladder from 1995 (n = 43 to 2014 (n = 117. The USA was the leading country in the total number of articles (n = 598. However, the number of publications from China has rapidly increased, and China was ranked second in 2014. Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler (n = 65 was the most productive author, and University of Paris VI (Paris 6 (n = 61 was the most productive institution. The Journal of Urology published the greatest number of articles on this topic (n = 285. Articles on neurogenic bladder were often published in a professional journal under the category Urology & Nephrology, Neurosciences & Neurology, or Rehabilitation. Visualization analysis based on co-citation networks was conducted using CiteSpace III. Visualization analysis revealed that the hot spots in neurogenic bladder were botulinum toxin-A, prazosin, bethanechol, and afferent pathways. These findings provide new insight into the publication trends and hot spots in neurogenic bladder.

  19. Effects of electrotherapy in treatment of neurogenic bladder in children with occult spinal dysraphism

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    Ćirović Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neurogenic bladder can develop as a result of various degrees of neurogenic lesion in spina bifida. The degree of bladder dysfunction depends on the level and type of spina bifida. Due to results upon complete diagnostic protocols, treatment options are applied. Objective Comparison of therapy results of patients with occult spinal dysraphism with neurogenic bladder that under-went medicamentous therapy and medicamentous with electrotherapy treatment. Methods We had 49 patients with neurogenic bladder that were treated at the University Children's Hospital in Belgrade in the period 2003-2008. The first group of children received medicamentous therapy and the second group received medicamentous therapy with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation. In both groups we evaluated 4 symptoms: daily enuresis, enuresis nocturna, urgency and frequency and 4 urodynamic parameters: lower bladder capacity, unstable contractions and residual urine and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia. Follow-up urodynamic evaluation was done after 3, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results Our findings pointed out a high statistical significance of improvement in all evaluated urodynamic parameters of neurogenic bladder (predominantly in bladder capacity in the group of children with combined therapy as well in resolution of symptoms (predominantly enuresis nocturna, urgency and frequency. Conclusion Combined therapy is more efficient in treatment of children with neurogenic bladder. Electrotherapy is non-invasive, easily applicable and has had a significant place in treatment of children with dysfunctional voiding.

  20. Chronic kidney disease in neurogenic bladder.

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    Sung, Bong Mo; Oh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Moon Hee; Choi, Hye Min

    2018-03-01

    It was believed that neurogenic bladder (NB) might be a risk factor of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, data are limited regarding the real incidence or risk of CKD in NB. In addition, serum creatinine (sCr), a classical marker of renal function, is not reliable in NB patients because they present muscle wasting due to disuse or denervation. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of CKD in NB patients using serum Cystatin-C. Secondly, we aimed to identify the risk factors for CKD development in NB. This was a cross-sectional study in a public hospital, a specialized center for patients who were victims of industrial accidents. Serum Cystatin-C was checked at the regular laboratory test in the structured NB programme of the hospital, and 313 patients were included in the study. The overall prevalence of CKD, defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) bladder volume, recurrent urinary tract infection, and proteinuria were significantly associated with CKD in the multivariable analysis. Chronic kidney disease prevalence was more than three times higher in NB patients than in the general population despite recent progress in the medical care of NB. Co-morbid diabetes, small bladder volume, recurrent urinary tract infection, and proteinuria seem to be the risk factors for CKD development in NB. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  1. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

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    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  2. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required.

  3. Urinary Tract Infection in Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction

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    Yu.B. Bielan; T.A. Morozova

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Among all the diseases of the urinary system, microbial-inflammatory lesions dominate, their prevalence is 29 per 1,000 of child population. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction leads to the chronicity and recurrence of urinary tract infections. Objective. To study the etiologic spectrum in children with urinary tract infection associated with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Materials and methods. The study involved 434 children aged 4 to 15 years, who were hospitalized and out-patien...

  4. Investigation into neurogenic bladder in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

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    Arantes de Araújo, Liubiana; Ferraz de Arruda Musegante, André; de Oliveira Damasceno, Edjane; Barroso, Ubirajara; Badaro, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    During the follow-up of children who had been diagnosed with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), it was noted that some were experiencing dysfunctional voiding. Further investigation into these cases led to a diagnosis of neurogenic bladder. Few studies have investigated the relationship between AMC and neurogenic bladder, this being the first to describe the clinical characteristics of neurogenic bladder among these patients. A series of 26 cases were obtained from the electronic medical records of patients with AMC who were admitted to Hospital Sarah in Salvador between 1994 and 2007. The patients had all been diagnosed with neurogenic bladder through clinical symptoms, lower urinary tract exams, and urodynamic findings. There was urinary incontinence in 21 patients (81%), and 50% had a history of urinary tract infections. Renal function was altered in 4 patients (15%) and normal in 22 (85%). In the urodynamic study, 14 patients (64%) had detrusor overactivity and 6 (27%) had underactivity. Patients with AMC may show changes in the urinary tract, including neurogenic bladder. It is mandatory to study these symptomatic children with urinary disorders. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is Neurogenic Bladder a Risk Factor for Febrile Urinary Tract Infection After Ureteroscopy and, if so, Why?

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    Stauffer, Craig E; Snyder, Elizabeth; Ngo, Tin C; Elliott, Christopher S

    2018-02-01

    To characterize the rate of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) after ureteroscopy in patients with neurogenic bladder compared with those with physiologically normal bladders. Although generally considered safe and effective, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that patients with neurogenic bladder are at an increased risk of infectious complications following ureteroscopy. We performed a retrospective chart review of those undergoing ureteroscopy in a single academically affiliated hospital system between June 2013 and May 2016. Information regarding neurogenic bladder status, culture results, bladder management, and the presence of upper tract decompression was collected. Postoperative febrile UTI was defined as a hospital admission within 1 week of surgery because of fever not attributable to another source. Of 467 ureteroscopies, 44 (9.5%) were performed in the setting of neurogenic bladder. Febrile UTI rates were higher in patients with neurogenic bladder compared with control patients (9% vs 1.4%, P = .01) with significantly higher rates in those dependent on bladder catheterization. Interestingly, the presence of a nephrostomy tube in patients with physiologically normal bladders increased the risk of postoperative febrile UTI to levels comparable with patients with neurogenic bladder who were catheter dependent (10.5% vs 12.5%, respectively). Although infectious complications in the neurogenic population are likely multifactorial, the reliance on catheterization and thus colonization appears to be a significant factor and extends to non-neurogenic patients. These data suggest that bacterial colonization may be the significant underlying risk factor for febrile UTI after ureteroscopy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Persistent neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to infantile botulism.

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    Breinbjerg, Anders; Rittig, Søren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-13

    We present a child, 5 months of age, diagnosed with infantile botulism, showing the signs of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The patient presented with progressive muscle weakness, hypotonia, suckling and swallowing problems and absent peripheral reflexes at clinical examination. Botulinum neurotoxin type A was detected in her serum, confirming the diagnosis. Starting at day 6, the girl presented with a urinary retention initially necessitating free bladder drainage and subsequently intermittent catheterisation. After 6 weeks in intensive care, the patient recovered but the bladder underactivity persisted. Four months following recovery, a urodynamic evaluation was performed, showing a near normal detrusor activity and normal bladder emptying, and the catheterisation was ceased. At 6 months, the girl was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and bladder emptying problems, which persisted, and clean intermittent catheterisation was started. The final urodynamic evaluation, a year and a half after her initial presentation, revealed a normal detrusor activity and an adequate bladder emptying.

  7. Urinary Tract Infection in Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction

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    Yu.B. Bielan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Among all the diseases of the urinary system, microbial-inflammatory lesions dominate, their prevalence is 29 per 1,000 of child population. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction leads to the chronicity and recurrence of urinary tract infections. Objective. To study the etiologic spectrum in children with urinary tract infection associated with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Materials and methods. The study involved 434 children aged 4 to 15 years, who were hospitalized and out-patient treatment in Omsk from 2008 to 2014. Bacteriological urine culture on the microflora with determining the sensitivity to antibiotics was performed using Urin System Plus (Liofilchem, Italy. At the same time, the urine was examined for the presence of Cytomegalovirus, Herpes simplex virus I–II, Mycoplasma genitalium, Chlamydiae trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum by polymerase chain reaction and enzyme immunoassay. Data processing was performed using Statistica 10.0 software package. Results. It was found that in the urine microbial landscape of children with urinary tract infection and neurogenic bladder dysfunction, Staphylococcus family dominated, unlike the spectrum of uropathogens in patirnts with urinary tract infection without functional obstruction, which is characterized by the predominance of Escherichia coli. The detection rate of cytomegalovirus in the urine indicates a significant decrease in the immunity of children with urinary tract infection and neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Conclusion. The shown differences in microbial landscape of the urine in urinary tract infection associated with neurogenic bladder dysfunction and without functional obstruction must be considered in the selection of an adequate therapy for patients of different groups, including immunocorrective approaches.

  8. Sacral Fracture Causing Neurogenic Bladder: A Case Report

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    Sasaji, Tatsuro; Yamada, Noboru; Iwai, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    A 76-year-old man presented with a Denis Zone III sacral fracture after a traffic accident. He also developed urinary retention and perineal numbness. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by the sacral fracture. A computed tomogram (CT) revealed that third sacral lamina was fractured and displaced into the spinal canal, but vertebral body did not displace. The fracture lines began at the center of lamina and extended bilateraly. The fracture pattern was unique....

  9. Long-term follow-up of sigmoid bladder augmentation for low-compliance neurogenic bladder.

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    Zhang, Peng; Yang, Yong; Wu, Zhi-jin; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Chao-hua; Zhang, Xiao-dong

    2014-09-01

    To assess the clinical and urodynamic outcomes of patients with low-compliance neurogenic bladder who were treated with sigmoid bladder augmentation (SBA) over a long-term follow-up. We retrospectively reviewed 52 patients with low-compliance neurogenic bladder who underwent SBA alone or with antireflux techniques in our hospital from 2006 to 2014. Clinical outcomes regarding bladder function, incontinence, medications, catheterization schedules, subsequent interventions, bowel function, and patient satisfaction were addressed. The mean follow-up was 49 months. All patients experienced significant increases in safe cystometric capacity from 113.8 ± 65.9 mL to 373.1 ± 66.7 mL (P bladder compliance from 2.96 ± 1.55 mL/cm H2O to 14.07 ± 5.45 mL/cm H2O (P neurogenic detrusor overactivity, and 11 (21.1%) had recurrent febrile urinary tract infections after SBA. Among 47 prehydronephrosis patients (grade I-II in 10 and III-V in 37), 16 still had minor hydronephrosis after SBA, but the hydronephrosis had been improved significantly (all posthydronephroses were grade I-II instead). All patients reported significant improvements in constipation, and no patient had obvious metabolic acidosis or bladder perforation after SBA. All patients expressed extreme satisfaction with the operation. SBA provided durable clinical and urodynamic improvement for patients with low-compliance neurogenic bladder and constipation. SBA alone, without ureteral reimplantation, seemed sufficient for neurogenic bladder. Furthermore, there was a high level of patient satisfaction with SBA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurogenic bladder and chronic urinary retention associated with MDMA abuse.

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    Beuerle, John R; Barrueto, Fermin

    2008-06-01

    The use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, known as "ecstasy"), a synthetic amphetamine and "club drug," has been associated with acute, transient urinary retention. We report a case of neurogenic bladder and chronic urinary retention associated with MDMA abuse. A 21-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED) because he had abdominal pain and difficulty urinating. He had experienced difficulty in initiating urination over the past 1.5 months, with periods of 24 to 36 hours between voids and large volumes of urine. The patient had a chronic pattern of MDMA use, taking 4 tablets/day for 3 months. Two weeks before coming to the ED, he had been admitted to an inpatient drug rehabilitation center. During the time since that admission, the patient had visited EDs repeatedly for insertion and removal of Foley catheters to relieve the urinary retention until he could be admitted to a urologic service. Cystometrogram was abnormal, finding no sensation of bladder fullness after instillation of 350 mL of saline and inability to generate a voluntary voiding pressure. Cystoscopy revealed no outlet obstruction. The findings were consistent with neurogenic bladder. The patient was given prescriptions for bethanecol and phenazopyridine, and told to continue a 10-day course of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim for urinary tract infection. He was discharged with a Foley catheter in place. Symptoms of urinary retention persisted at 1-year follow-up, despite self-catheterization and complete cessation of MDMA use. Chronic MDMA use may lead to neurogenic bladder and chronic urinary retention.

  11. Surgical Management of Anatomic Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Males with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordhoff, Toscane C; Groen, Jan; Scheepe, Jeroen R; Blok, Bertil F M

    2018-03-15

    Surgical treatment of anatomic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) may be indicated in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. A bothersome complication after surgery is urinary incontinence. To identify the optimal practice in the surgical treatment of anatomic BOO in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction, due to multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury (SCI), spina bifida, or cerebrovascular accident (CVA). A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. Medline, Embase, Cochrane controlled trial databases, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched for publications until January 2017. A total of 930 abstracts were screened. Eight studies were included. The types of anatomic BOO discussed were benign prostate obstruction, urethral stricture, and bladder neck sclerosis. The identified surgical treatments were transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in patients with Parkinson, CVA or SCI, endoscopic treatment of urethral stricture by laser ablation or urethrotomy (mainly in SCI patients), and bladder neck resection (BNR) in SCI patients. The outcome of TURP may be highly variable, and includes persistent or de novo urinary incontinence, regained normal micturition control, and urinary continence. Good results were seen in BNR and endoscopic urethrotomy studies. Laser ablation and cold knife urethrotomy resulted in restarting intermittent catheterization or adequate voiding. Overall, a high risk of bias was found. This systematic review provides an overview of the current literature on the outcome of several surgical approaches of different types of anatomic BOO in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Identifying the optimal practice was impossible due to limited availability of high-quality studies. The outcome of several surgical approaches in males with neurogenic bladder dysfunction with benign prostate obstruction, urethral stricture

  12. Aggressive bladder carcinoma in an HIV-positive man with tetraplegia and neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabdallah, Justin O; Collins, Clinton W; Carucci, Laura R; Moores, Kenneth E; Gater, David R; Klausner, Adam P

    2011-01-01

    Patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to spinal cord injury who are managed long term with an indwelling catheter are known to be at increased risk for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Immunosuppression is a known risk factor for malignancies that often are more aggresSive than those seen in normal populations. Case report and discussion of management recommendations. We summarize the case of a 44-year-old HIV-positive C5-C6 incomplete tetraplegic male (date of injury 1980), who was diagnosed with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and succumbed to disease within 6 months of diagnosis. The patient was a non-smoker who was never managed with an indwelling catheter. There has been no such case reported in the literature. HIV infection in the presence of a neurogenic bladder may carry an increased risk of aggressive bladder malignancy. More studies are warranted to determine whether routine annual screening with cystoscopy in all patients with HIV and neurogenic bladder is indicated.

  13. Promising long-term outcome of bladder autoaugmentation in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eva Lund; Hvistendahl, Gitte Møller; Rawashdeh, Yazan F H; Olsen, L Henning

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcome of bladder autoaugmentation in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Data were compiled from the records of 25 children with a median age of 9.3 years (range 0.9 to 14.2) who underwent detrusor myotomy between 1992 and 2008. All patients were diagnosed with small bladder capacity, low compliance and high end filling pressures, and were unresponsive to clean intermittent catheterization and anticholinergics. Median followup was 6.8 years (range 0.1 to 15.6). Median postoperative bladder capacity was unchanged or decreased to 95 ml (range 25 to 274) during the first 3 months compared to a median preoperative capacity of 103 ml (14 to 250). At 5 months postoperatively median bladder capacity increased significantly to 176 ml (range 70 to 420, pbladder compliance doubled after 1 year to 10 ml/cm H2O (range 1 to 31, pBladder autoaugmentation in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction offers, after a transient decrease in bladder capacity, a long lasting increase in capacity and compliance, while the end filling pressure decreases. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder

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    Karen Previdi Olandoski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Preservation of renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder is an important goal of treatment for the disease. This study analyzed the evolution of renal function in patients with congenital neurogenic bladder. METHODS: We reviewed the records of 58 pediatric patients with respect to the following attributes: gender, age, etiology of neurogenic bladder, reason for referral, medical/surgical management, episodes of treated urinary tract infections, urodynamics, DMSA scintigraphy, weight, height, blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate, microalbuminuria and metabolic acidosis. Statistical analysis was performed, adopting the 5% significance level. RESULTS: The mean age at presentation was 4.2 ± 3.5 years. Myelomeningocele was the most frequent etiology (71.4%. Recurrent urinary tract infection was the reason for referral in 82.8% of the patients. Recurrent urinary tract infections were diagnosed in 84.5% of the patients initially; 83.7% of those patients experienced improvement during follow-up. The initial mean glomerular filtration rate was 146.7 ± 70.1 mL/1.73 m²/min, and the final mean was 193.6 ± 93.6 mL/1.73 m²/min, p = 0.0004. Microalbuminuria was diagnosed in 54.1% of the patients initially and in 69% in the final evaluation. Metabolic acidosis was present in 19% of the patients initially and in 32.8% in the final assessment. CONCLUSIONS: Patient referral to a pediatric nephrologist was late. A reduction in the number of urinary tract infections was observed with adequate treatment, but microalbuminuria and metabolic acidosis occurred frequently despite adequate management.

  15. Renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olandoski, Karen Previdi; Koch, Vera; Trigo-Rocha, Flavio Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Preservation of renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder is an important goal of treatment for the disease. This study analyzed the evolution of renal function in patients with congenital neurogenic bladder. We reviewed the records of 58 pediatric patients with respect to the following attributes: gender, age, etiology of neurogenic bladder, reason for referral, medical/surgical management, episodes of treated urinary tract infections, urodynamics, DMSA scintigraphy, weight, height, blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate, microalbuminuria and metabolic acidosis. Statistical analysis was performed, adopting the 5% significance level. The mean age at presentation was 4.2 ± 3.5 years. Myelomeningocele was the most frequent etiology (71.4%). Recurrent urinary tract infection was the reason for referral in 82.8% of the patients. Recurrent urinary tract infections were diagnosed in 84.5% of the patients initially; 83.7% of those patients experienced improvement during follow-up. The initial mean glomerular filtration rate was 146.7 ± 70.1 mL/1.73 m²/min, and the final mean was 193.6 ± 93.6 mL/1.73 m²/min, p = 0.0004. Microalbuminuria was diagnosed in 54.1% of the patients initially and in 69% in the final evaluation. Metabolic acidosis was present in 19% of the patients initially and in 32.8% in the final assessment. Patient referral to a pediatric nephrologist was late. A reduction in the number of urinary tract infections was observed with adequate treatment, but microalbuminuria and metabolic acidosis occurred frequently despite adequate management.

  16. Sacral Fracture Causing Neurogenic Bladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Sasaji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old man presented with a Denis Zone III sacral fracture after a traffic accident. He also developed urinary retention and perineal numbness. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by the sacral fracture. A computed tomogram (CT revealed that third sacral lamina was fractured and displaced into the spinal canal, but vertebral body did not displace. The fracture lines began at the center of lamina and extended bilateraly. The fracture pattern was unique. The sacrum was osteoporosis, and this fracture may be based on osteoporosis. We performed laminectomy to decompress sacral nerve roots. One month after surgery, the patient was able to urinate. Three months after surgery, his bladder function recovered normally. One year after surgery, he returned to a normal daily life and had no complaints regarding urination. One-year postoperative CT showed the decompressed third sacrum without displacement.

  17. Morbidity and efficacy of ureteroscopic stone treatment in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, Matthew S; Kalmus, Angela; Casale, Pasquale

    2013-10-01

    There is a lack of information on the safety and efficacy of ureteroscopy in the neurogenic bladder population. We hypothesized that ureteroscopy in patients with neurogenic bladder would be associated with an increased risk of complications and a lower stone clearance rate than in patients without neurological impairment. We reviewed a local registry of patients with ICD-9 codes for urolithiasis between 2004 and 2012. The study cohort was assembled from all eligible patients with neurogenic bladder and a randomly selected control group that had undergone ureteroscopy. Statistical analysis of demographic variables and surgical outcomes was performed. Complications were classified according to the Clavien system. Clearance was defined by computerized tomography, renal/bladder ultrasound or direct ureterorenoscopy. Ureteroscopy was performed a total of 173 times in 127 controls and a total of 45 times in 20 patients with neurogenic bladder. There was no difference between presenting episodes by gender (p = 1.0), race (p = 0.654) or body mass index (p = 0.519). Bacteriuria was associated with the stone episode in 16.4% of controls and 67% of neurogenic bladder cases (p neurogenic bladder (80.5 minutes, IQR 50-110.5 vs 52, IQR 33-78, p = 0.0003). The proportion of complications was significantly different (p = 0.013). Stones cleared in 86.6% of controls compared to 63% of neurogenic bladder cases (p = 0.004). Patients with neurogenic bladder have increased morbidity after ureteroscopy for upper tract calculi compared to neurologically unaffected controls. Infection has a role in this morbidity. The clearance rate is lower but the stone burden is more significant in those with neurogenic bladder. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nocturnal bladder emptying: a simple technique for reversing urinary tract deterioration in children with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koff, Stephen A; Gigax, Michael R; Jayanthi, Venkata R

    2005-10-01

    In this preliminary study we sought to determine the effect of instituting nocturnal bladder emptying (NBE) in children with neurogenic (NGB) or nonneurogenic neurogenic bladder (NNGNGB) in whom urinary tract deterioration developed despite optimal daytime clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) and urotropic medications. We hypothesize that a syndrome of nocturnal overdistention of the bladder (SNOB) can cause urinary tract deterioration through increased nighttime storage pressures manifested by recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), worsening incontinence, hydronephrosis and/or decreasing bladder compliance and capacity, and may be reversed by NBE. A total of 19 children with NGB (17) or NNGNGB (2) who displayed urinary tract deterioration while on CIC and urotropic medications were started on NBE. Of the patients 15 used a continuously draining nighttime catheter while 4 had scheduled awakenings during the night to perform CIC. The primary indications for NBE were recurrent symptomatic UTI in 5, new or progressive hydronephrosis in 7, and decreasing bladder capacity and compliance in 7. At a mean followup of 23 months 15 (79%) patients showed improvement or complete resolution of 1 or more signs or symptoms of hydronephrosis (7), increase in bladder capacity (5), recurrent UTI (6) and worsening incontinence (3). The remaining 4 patients had no response to NBE. No adverse effects were observed with 10 hours or less of nightly indwelling catheter time. Patients with NGB or NNGNGB on idealized daytime programs of CIC and urotropic drugs may have high intravesical pressures and experience urological deterioration because of an unrecognized SNOB. NBE is a simple technique for treating this condition and reversing the pathophysiological changes. The observation that NBE alone may increase bladder compliance and capacity sufficient to avoid bladder augmentation suggests that development of decreased bladder compliance and capacity in children with NGB may not

  19. [Urodynamic changes after bladder augmentation surgery in paediatric patients with myelomeningocele due to neurogenic bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza Torres, Raúl Ignacio; Galarza-Flores, Mario Eduardo; Gómez-Castellanos, Julio Cesar; Barrera-de León, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Augmentation cystoplasty is a successful surgical procedure for the management of neurogenic bladder in children in order to improve urodynamic parameters. The aim of this article is to describe urodynamic changes after augmentation cystoplasty in children with myelomeningocele. A descriptive cross-sectional study including children aged 8-16 years with a myelomeningocele operated on for augmentation cystoplasty surgery with sigmoid colon segments due to a neurogenic bladder from the years 2003-2013. A urodynamic study was conducted before and after the surgical procedure. Non-probabilistic sample of consecutive cases. Descriptive statistics with frequencies and percentages, medians, and ranges. Inferential intra-group comparison with the Wilcoxon test and inter-group with Mann-Whitney U. SPSS 20.0 statistical package. The study included 50 patients, of whom 25 were male and 25 were female, with a median age of 12 years (range, 6-15 years). Bladder capacity improved from 52.8% to 95.9% (p<0.001), uninhibited contractions 1.4-1.8, contraction intensity 47-8.5 (p<0.001), mean pre-surgical and post-surgical filling pressure 40.8cm H2O and 11.0cm H2O, respectively (p<0.001), mean emptying pressure 48.5 vs. 3.6cm H2O (p<0.001), and bladder accommodation 4.6 vs. 41.3cm H2O (p<0.001). Augmentation cystoplasty with sigmoid colon significantly improved urodynamic parameters, such as bladder accommodation and filling pressure in children with myelomeningocele-associated neurogenic bladder. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Predictors of upper tract damage in pediatric neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Raghu; Puri, Archana; Anand, Rama; Jain, Ajay K; Lal, Brahmanand; Garg, Vaibhav

    2017-10-01

    Upper tract damage (UTD) is a life-threatening complication of neurogenic bladder (NB). Early identification of risk factors for UTD and institution of remedial measures may probably prevent UTD. The aim was to study the predictors of UTD in children 2 years or older with NB. This cross-sectional, observational study over 2 years included 30 children. UTD was defined as serum creatinine of >1 mg/dL or society of fetal urology grade III-IV hydronephrosis or hydroureteronephrosis on ultrasonography or renal scars on 99 m technetium dimercaptosuccinic scan or subnormal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) for age. The evaluated clinical variables were age at presentation, gender, palpable bladder lump, and recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Bladder wall thickness (BWT), grade and laterality of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR), status of the bladder neck, post-void residue (PVR), and level and type of intraspinal lesions were also noted. Urodynamic studies were performed for functional bladder assessment. A p-value 1 mg% (2, 6%), SFU III-IV (11, 36%), renal scars (12, 40%), and subnormal GFR in (2, 6%) patients. Clinical risk factors for UTD were delayed presentation (p = 0.034), palpable bladder lump (p ≤ 0.001; OR 38.5; CI 5.6-262.5), and recurrent UTI (p = 0.033, OR 4.125, CI 0.913-18.630). The presence of significant PVR, trabeculated bladder, spin-top urethra, and bilateral VUR were identified as radiological risk factors for UTD. Mean BWT in patients with and without UTD was 4.69 ± 1.78 mm and 2.91 ± 1.08 mm respectively. BWT predictive of UTD was 3.05 mm (Figure). The mean detrusor leak point pressure (DLPP) did not vary significantly in those with and without UTD (36.82 ± 14.74 and 29.09 ± 10.44 cmH 2 O, respectively), yet 75% patients with DLPP > 40 cmH 2 O had UTD (p = 0.038, OR 5.4, CI 0.84-34.84). DLPP bladder lump, recurrent UTI, increased BWT, bilateral VUR, increased PVR, and DLPP > 40 cm H 2 O were identified as potential

  1. Urinary Tract Infection Prophylaxis in Children with Neurogenic Bladder with Cranberry Capsules: Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mutlu, Hatice; Ekinci, Zelal

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this randomized controlled prospective study is to evaluate the efficacy of cranberry capsules for prevention of UTI in children with neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele. Patients and Methods. To be eligible for this study, patients had to be diagnosed as neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele, evaluated urodynamically, followed up with clean intermittent catheterization and anticholinergic drugs. Intervention. Six months of treatment with placebo; afte...

  2. Reconstitution of experimental neurogenic bladder dysfunction using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Masahiro; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Masuda, Maki; Akatsuka, Akira; Hoshi, Akio; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Postoperative neurogenic bladder dysfunction is a major complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer and is mainly caused by unavoidable damage to the bladder branch of the pelvic plexus (BBPP) associated with colateral blood vessels. Thus, we attempted to reconstitute disrupted BBPP and blood vessels using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells that show synchronized reconstitution capacity of vascular, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems. METHODS.: Under pentobarbital anesthesia, intravesical pressure by electrical stimulation of BBPP was measured as bladder function. The distal portion of BBPP with blood vessels was then cut unilaterally (experimental neurogenic bladder model). Measurements were performed before, immediately after, and at 4 weeks after transplantation as functional recovery. Stem cells were obtained from the right soleus and gastrocnemius muscles after enzymatic digestion and cell sorting as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN). Suspended cells were autografted around the damaged region, whereas medium alone and CD45 cells were transplanted as control groups. To determine the morphological contribution of the transplanted cells, stem cells obtained from green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse muscles were transplanted into a nude rat model and were examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. RESULTS.: At 4 weeks after surgery, the transplantation group showed significantly higher functional recovery ( approximately 80%) than the two controls ( approximately 28% and 24%). The transplanted cells showed an incorporation into the damaged peripheral nerves and blood vessels after differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and fibroblasts around the bladder. CONCLUSION.: Transplantation of multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of damaged BBPP.

  3. [Major influential factors of the micturition alert device dedicated to neurogenic bladders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhuo; Hou, Chunlin; Zheng, Xianyou; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Wanhong; Lin, Haodong

    2008-08-01

    To study major influential factors of the micturition alert device dedicated to neurogenic bladders for the product design and clinical application of the device. One ferrite permanent magnet with thickness and diameter of 3 mm and 10 mm, respectively, and three NdFeB permanent magnets with the thickness of 3 mm and diameter of 10, 15 and 20 mm, respectively, were used. The effects of thickness of the abdominal wall as well as the position and type of permanent magnets on the micturition alert device dedicated to neurogenic bladders were measured in vitro simulated test, when the abdominal wall was set to 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 cm, respectively, and the position of permanent magnets was 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 cm, respectively. The effect of the geomagnetic field on the device was measured under the condition that the thickness of the simulated abdominal wall was set to 2, 3, 4 and 5 cm, respectively, and the position of permanent magnets was 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 cm, respectively. The value showed in the warning unit was positively correlated with the position of the ferrite permanent magnet only when the thickness of the simulated abdominal wall was 2 cm (r=0.632, P NdFeB permanent magnets was significant (r > 0.622, P NdFeB permanent magnets, but weakened with the increasing thickness of the simulated abdominal wall. The effect of the geomagnetic field was correlated with the exposition of the body, the position of the permanent magnet and the thickness of the abdominal wall. The major influential factors of the micturition alert device dedicated to neurogenic bladder include the magnetism and location of the permanent magnet, the thickness of the abdominal wall and the geomagnetic field. These factors are correlated with and affect each other. Reasonable allocation of these factors may optimize the device.

  4. Augmentation cystoplasty and simultaneous ureteral reimplantation reduce high-grade vesicoureteral reflux in children with neurogenic bladder

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    Jen-Bin Wang

    2011-07-01

    Conclusion: Simultaneous ureteral reimplantation reduces postop HVUR significantly. We recommend augmentation and simultaneous ureteral reimplantation in children with HVUR and neurogenic bladder if technically feasible.

  5. Bladder augmentation and urinary diversion in patients with neurogenic bladder: surgical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Raimund; Schröder, Annette; Thüroff, Joachim W

    2012-04-01

    In patients with a neurogenic bladder, the primary goal is preservation of renal function and prevention of urinary tract infection, with urinary continence as the secondary goal. After failure of conservative treatment (clean intermittent catheterisation and pharmacotherapy) urinary diversion should be considered. In this review, the surgical options with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. In patients with a hyper-reflexive, small-capacity and/or low-compliance bladder with normal upper urinary tract, bladder augmentation (bowel segments/ureter) is an option. To those who are unable to perform clean intermittent catheterisation via urethra, a continent cutaneous stoma can be offered. In patients with irreparable sphincter defects a continent cutaneous diversion is an option. For patients who are not suitable for a continent diversion (incompliant±chronic renal failure), a colonic conduit for incontinent diversion is preferred. Surgical complications specific to urinary diversion include: ureterointestinal stenosis, stomal stenosis, stone formation, bladder perforation, and shunt infection and obstruction. Surgical revision is required in around one third of patients. Careful lifelong follow-up of these patients is necessary, as some of these complications can occur late. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Augmentation enterocystoplasty without reimplantation for patients with neurogenic bladder and vesicoureteral reflux

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Han-Chao; Yang, Jin; Ye, Xin; Hu, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) after augmentation cystoplasty alone in patients with a hypocompliant neurogenic bladder. Between January 2009 and December 2014, 29 patients with a hypocompliant bladder associated with VUR confirmed by videourodynamics (VUD) preoperatively were recruited in this study. All patients had undergone bladder augmentation with a generous detubularized segment of bowel at our institution. No effort had be...

  7. Functional innervation of Guinea-pig bladder interstitial cells of cajal subtypes: neurogenic stimulation evokes in situ calcium transients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah M Gray

    Full Text Available Several populations of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC exist in the bladder, associated with intramural nerves. Although ICC respond to exogenous agonists, there is currently no evidence of their functional innervation. The objective was to determine whether bladder ICC are functionally innervated. Guinea-pig bladder tissues, loaded with fluo-4AM were imaged with fluorescent microscopy and challenged with neurogenic electrical field stimulation (EFS. All subtypes of ICC and smooth muscle cells (SMC displayed spontaneous Ca(2+-oscillations. EFS (0.5 Hz, 2 Hz, 10 Hz evoked tetrodotoxin (1 µM-sensitive Ca(2+-transients in lamina propria ICC (ICC-LP, detrusor ICC and perivascular ICC (PICC associated with mucosal microvessels. EFS responses in ICC-LP were significantly reduced by atropine or suramin. SMC and vascular SMC (VSM also responded to EFS. Spontaneous Ca(2+-oscillations in individual ICC-LP within networks occurred asynchronously whereas EFS evoked coordinated Ca(2+-transients in all ICC-LP within a field of view. Non-correlated Ca(2+-oscillations in detrusor ICC and adjacent SMC pre-EFS, contrasted with simultaneous neurogenic Ca(2+ transients evoked by EFS. Spontaneous Ca(2+-oscillations in PICC were little affected by EFS, whereas large Ca(2+-transients were evoked in pre-EFS quiescent PICC. EFS also increased the frequency of VSM Ca(2+-oscillations. In conclusion, ICC-LP, detrusor ICC and PICC are functionally innervated. Interestingly, Ca(2+-activity within ICC-LP networks and between detrusor ICC and their adjacent SMC were synchronous under neural control. VSM and PICC Ca(2+-activity was regulated by bladder nerves. These novel findings demonstrate functional neural control of bladder ICC. Similar studies should now be carried out on neurogenic bladder to elucidate the contribution of impaired nerve-ICC communication to bladder pathophysiology.

  8. Urinary-cutaneous Fistulae in Patients With Neurogenic Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, Valary T; Eswara, Jairam R; Weese, Jonathan R; Potretzke, Aaron M; Brandes, Steven B

    2015-12-01

    To review our experience with neurogenic bladder (NGB) patients who developed urinary-cutaneous fistulae (UCF). Patients with NGB can form UCF of multiple etiologies; however, little is known about the characteristics or long-term outcomes of these defects. We reviewed 21 patients with NGB who developed UCF between 1998 and 2013. The clinical end points of the study were development of UCF, fistula repair failure, and need for permanent urinary diversion. Possible risk factors associated with repair failures were examined. We evaluated 21 patients with a mean age of 39.5 years (23-76) and median follow-up of 67 months (1-179). Causes of UCF included decubitus ulcers (7), wound infections or abscess formation (5), condom catheter complications (4), traumatic catheterization (4), and pelvic trauma (1). Thirteen patients had their fistulae repaired surgically, with 9 patients eventually requiring urinary diversion with a suprapubic (SP) tube (7) or ileal conduit (2) (9 of 13, 69%). Eight patients had their urine diverted upon presentation, with ileal conduit (5 of 8, 63%), SP tube (2 of 8, 25%), or perineal urethrostomy (1 of 8, 12%). In total, 17 eventually required permanent surgical or SP tube urinary diversion (81%), of which 9 were with an SP tube (53%), 4 with an ileal conduit (23%), 3 with a conduit catheter (18%), and 1 with a perineal urethrostomy (6%). UCF repairs in patients with NGB are a challenge to manage. Patients who undergo surgical repair of their fistula are likely to require repeat repairs with eventual need for a permanent urinary diversion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The management of paediatric neurogenic bladder: an approach in a resource-poor setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maison, Patrick Opoku Manu; Lazarus, John

    2017-11-01

    If untreated, paediatric neurogenic bladder can cause renal failure and urinary incontinence. It is usually caused by neural tube defects such as myelomeningocele. Children with a neurogenic bladder should be monitored from birth and management should aim to preserve renal function and achieve social continence. This article outlines the management options appropriate for these children in resource-poor settings. In most low- and middle-income countries, a general lack of awareness of the neurological effects on the urinary tract results in late presentation, usually with urological complications even when spina bifida is diagnosed early. Physical examination must include neurological examination for spinal deformities and intact sacral reflexes. About 90% of children with occult spinal dysraphisms will have cutaneous sacral lesions. The work-up includes urinalysis, serial ultrasound of the urinary tracts and urodynamics. Urodynamic assessment is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of the paediatric neurogenic bladder. In poorly resourced settings, simple eyeball urodynamics can be performed in the absence of a conventional urodynamic set-up. Clean intermittent catheterisation (CIC), the mainstay of treatment, is most suitable for resource-poor settings because it is effective and inexpensive. Antimuscarinic drugs such as oxybutynin complement CIC by reducing detrusor overactivity. Intravesical injection of Botox and bladder augmentation surgery is required by a small subset of patients who fail to respond to combined CIC and oxybutynin therapy. Children with neurogenic bladder in resource-poor settings should have early bladder management to preserve renal function and provide social continence.

  10. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction presenting as urinary retention in neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Erin R; Sullivan, Jennifer; Nagaraj, Shashi K; Wiener, John S; Kishnani, Priya S

    2015-01-01

    Neuronopathic Gaucher disease can present as a continuum of clinical findings, including somatic symptoms of anemia, thrombocytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and bone disease as well as neurologic sequelae. There is a spectrum of neurologic symptoms ranging from oculomotor apraxia to severe convulsions. The heterozygosity of phenotypes makes it difficult to predict the disease course. We describe an 8-year-old male with neuronopathic type III Gaucher disease who developed bladder dysfunction and was unable to completely void. He also presented with hypertension and acute renal insufficiency, most likely secondary to urinary retention. A complete evaluation was done for causes of urinary retention and bladder dysfunction. A renal bladder ultrasound demonstrated marked hydroureteronephrosis. There was no clinical evidence of infection and cystoscopy revealed no anatomic obstruction. In addition, MRI showed no spinal abnormalities. His bladder dysfunction was managed operatively by creating a catheterizable stoma, using his appendix, to empty his bladder, and surgical findings were consistent with neurogenic bladder. He continues to be managed for his Gaucher disease and neurogenic bladder by genetics, nephrology and urology. This is the first clinical report of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

  11. Detrusor Arreflexia as an End Stage of Neurogenic Bladder in HAM/TSP?

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    Matheus Tannus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The HTLV-1 virus is a known agent involved in the development of HAM/TSP. Past studies have typically observed patients with autonomic dysfunction consisting of detrusor overactivity and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia, with the occasional observation of underactive detrusor or detrusor arreflexia. However, studies have not yet evaluated the progression of neurogenic bladder over time. In this paper, we describe a HAM/TSP patient with the initial development of overactive detrusor, and subsequent development of detrusor arreflexia. Given a paucity of studies characterizing the effects of HTLV-1 on the autonomic nervous system, particularly aspects controlling continence, this patient's clinical course may represent one type of end point for patients with HAM/TSP and neurogenic bladder. Further cohort or case-series studies, with particular emphasis on the progression of neurogenic bladder, are needed to evaluate the significance of this described case in relation to typical disease progression patterns.

  12. Gentamicin bladder instillations decrease symptomatic urinary tract infections in neurogenic bladder patients on intermittent catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lindsey; He, Chang; Bevins, Jack; Clemens, J Quentin; Stoffel, John T; Cameron, Anne P

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to determine if gentamicin bladder instillations reduce the rate of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) in neurogenic bladder (NGB) patients on intermittent self-catheterization (ISC) who have recurrent UTIs. Secondary aims were to examine the effects of intravesical gentamicin on the organism resistance patterns. We retrospectively reviewed our prospective NGB database. Inclusion criteria were NGB patients performing ISC exclusively for bladder drainage with clinical data available for six months before and six months after initiating prophylactic intravesical gentamicin instillations. Symptomatic UTIs were defined as symptoms consistent with UTI plus the need for antibiotic treatment. Twenty-two patients met inclusion criteria; etiology of NGB was 63.6% spinal cord injury, 13.6% multiple sclerosis. Median time since injury/diagnosis was 14 years and 6/22 (27.3%) had undergone urological reconstruction. Patients had fewer symptomatic UTI's (median 4 vs. 1 episodes; pbladder instillations decrease symptomatic UTI episodes and reduce oral antibiotics in patients with NGB on ISC who were suffering from recurrent UTIs. Antibiotic resistance decreased while on gentamicin instillations.

  13. Management of neurogenic bladder patients in The Netherlands: do urologists follow guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikken, Berend; Blok, Bertil F M

    2008-01-01

    Preventive measurements are obligatory for optimal treatment of neurogenic bladder patients. We investigated Dutch urological practice in neurogenic bladder patients in relation to the available guidelines on neurogenic bladder. A 12-point survey was sent to all 304 certified urologists of the Dutch Urological Association in July 2007. Management of urinary tract infections (UTI), follow-up of the lower and upper urinary tract and treatment techniques were topics of inquiry. The response rate was 46% of which 94% were involved in treatment of neurogenic bladder patients. Follow-up was performed every 6 or 12 months in 86%, urine analysis respectively in 85% and upper urinary tract imaging with ultrasound in 60%; only 12% routinely repeated urodynamics. Uncomplicated UTI was treated for 7.1 days in women and 9.2 days in males. Eighteen percent used the EAU guidelines on neurogenic bladder frequently, 35% did occasionally and 47% did not use them at all. Urologists, that used these guidelines frequently, treated asymptomatic UTIs significantly less frequent in patients on intermittent catheterization (5% vs. 25%; P = 0.008); no difference was found in frequency of follow-up, urine analysis, surveillance of upper urinary tract, use of routine urodynamics, and availability of treatment techniques. Video urodynamics, the golden standard, was used by only 11% of the adult urologists. The majority of Dutch urologists is involved in the treatment of neurogenic bladder, which suggests a less prominent role for specialized centers. Furthermore, urodynamics are not performed routinely. These observations are contrary to the recommendations of the available guidelines. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. The conceptualization and development of a patient-reported neurogenic bladder symptom score

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    Welk B

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Blayne Welk,1 Sarah A Morrow,2 Wendy Madarasz,3 Patrick Potter,4 Keith Sequeira41Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Western University, London, ON, Canada; 3St Joseph's Health Care, London Ontario, Canada; 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Western University, London, ON, CanadaBackground: There is no single patient-reported instrument that was developed specifically to assess symptoms and bladder-related consequences for neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to identify and consolidate items for a novel measurement tool for this population.Methods: Item generation was based on a literature review of existing instruments, open-ended semistructured interviews with patients, and expert opinion. Judgment-based item reduction was performed by a multidisciplinary expert group. The proposed questionnaire was sent to external experts for review.Results: Eight neurogenic quality of life measures and 29 urinary symptom-specific instruments were identified. From these, 266 relevant items were extracted and used in the creation of the new neurogenic symptom score. Qualitative interviews with 16 adult patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction as a result of spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, or spina bifida were completed. Dominant themes included urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, urgency, and bladder spasms. Using the literature review and interview data, 25 proposed items were reviewed by 12 external experts, and the questions evaluated based on importance on a scale of 1 (not important to 5 (very important. Retained question domains had high mean importance ratings of 3.1 to 4.3 and good agreement with answer hierarchy.Conclusion: The proposed neurogenic bladder symptom score is a novel patient-reported outcome measure. Further work is underway to perform a data-based item reduction and to assess the validity and reliability of this instrument

  15. Neurogenic bladder findings in patients with Congenital Zika Syndrome: A novel condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Monteiro, Lucia Maria; Cruz, Glaura Nisya de Oliveira; Fontes, Juliana Marin; Saad Salles, Tania Regina Dias; Boechat, Marcia Cristina Bastos; Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Moreira, Maria Elizabeth Lopes

    2018-01-01

    Congenital Zika Syndrome (CZS) has been associated with microcephaly and other central nervous system abnormalities including areas that have been implicated in the control of the lower urinary tract. As such, this descriptive case series has aimed to investigate whether CZS is linked with neurogenic bladder. Identifying such an association is paramount in the effort to recognize CZS complications that have putative treatment options that could mitigate the impact of CZS in infected children. Following IRB approval, urological assessment was performed in all patients referred to our clinic between June 2016 and May 2017 who presented with confirmed CZS-associated microcephaly. The research protocol consisted of obtaining clinical history, laboratory tests, lower and upper urinary tract ultrasounds, as well as a diagnostic urodynamic evaluation. ZIKA virus infection was previously confirmed by maternal history and positive PCR in babies and mothers. Microcephaly and other central nervous system abnormalities were established based on neurological assessment and associated imaging of the central nervous system (CT head and/or Brain MRI). Twenty-two consecutive CZS patients were tested and confirmed to have neurogenic bladder. Of the 22 patients assessed, 21 presented with an overactive bladder combined with reduced bladder capacity and elevated detrusor filling pressures. Clinically significant increases in postvoid residual (PVR) were confirmed in 40% of cases while a urinary tract infection (UTI) was identified in 23% of cases. Neurogenic bladder, a known treatable health condition, was confirmed in 100% of patients tested in this study, most presenting with high-risk urodynamic patterns known to lead to renal damage when left untreated. Follow up studies are necessary to provide further insight onto long-term disease progression and to investigate the response to standard therapies for neurogenic bladder. Nonetheless, we emphasize the importance of proactive

  16. Evaluation and Management of Neurogenic Bladder: What Is New in China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin Liao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic bladder (NB or neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD, a dysfunction of the urinary bladder and urethra due to disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves, is a major global medical and social problem. Numerous nervous system abnormalities, such as: stroke, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord tumors, congenital spina bifida, and diabetes, can cause NB/NLUTD. There are two major types of bladder control problems associated with NB/NLUTD: the bladder becomes either overactive or underactive depending on the nature, level, and extent of nerve damage. This review specifically focuses on the diagnosis and management of NB/NLUTD in China as well as on recent efforts to treat this disease.

  17. Augmentation cystoplasty and simultaneous ureteral reimplantation reduce high-grade vesicoureteral reflux in children with neurogenic bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Jen-Bin Wang; Chin-Su Liu; Shin-Lin Tsai; Chou-Fu Wei; Tai-Wai Chin

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the incidence of residual high-grade vesicoureteral reflux (HVUR) (≥Grade III) in neurogenic bladder patients receiving augmentation cystoplasty alone or with simultaneous ureteral reimplantation. Furthermore, we also tried to find the risk factors of residual VUR and febrile urinary tract infection. Methods: Between 1999 and 2009, urinary bladder augmentation was performed in 21 children with neurogenic bladder. Seventeen of these patients had VUR on preoperative vo...

  18. A case of solitary pelvic kidney with vesicoureteral reflux and neurogenic bladder dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    滝内, 秀和; 桜井, 勗; 辻本, 幸夫; 菅尾, 英木; 中村, 正広

    1987-01-01

    A case of solitary pelvic kidney with neurogenic bladder dysfunction with vesicoureteral reflux is presented. The patient was a 15-year-old boy with sacral vertebral dysplasia and hare-lip, and he has been complaining of recurrent fever episodes and urinary incontinence since 11 years old. Renal anomaly was confirmed by DIP, CT and angiography, and grade IV vesicoureteral reflux was demonstrated by voiding cystourethrography. On cystometrography, low compliance bladder which had a 70 ml capac...

  19. Urinary tract infection prophylaxis in children with neurogenic bladder with cranberry capsules: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Hatice; Ekinci, Zelal

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this randomized controlled prospective study is to evaluate the efficacy of cranberry capsules for prevention of UTI in children with neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele. Patients and Methods. To be eligible for this study, patients had to be diagnosed as neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele, evaluated urodynamically, followed up with clean intermittent catheterization and anticholinergic drugs. Intervention. Six months of treatment with placebo; after a week of wash-out period treatment of cranberry extract tablets (1 capsule/day) for an additional 6 months. Randomization was performed sequentially. Patients and care givers were blinded to drug assignment. Main outcome measure was infection rate. Group comparisons were performed with Wilcoxon test. Results. The study population included 20 (F/M: 13/7) patients with neurogenic bladder with the mean age of 7.25 ± 3.49 (4, 18) years. The median UTI rate was 0.5/year during placebo usage whereas 0/year during cranberry capsule usage. Decrease in infection rate was significant with cranberry capsule usage (P = 0.012). Decrease in the percentage of the pyuria was also recorded as significant (P = 0.000). Any adverse events or side effects were not recorded. Conclusion. We concluded that cranberry capsules could be an encouraging option for the prevention of recurrent UTI in children with neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele.

  20. [Pregnancy and delivery for women with congenital spinal cord defects and neurogenic bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manach, Q; Dommergues, M; Denys, P; Loiseau, K; Idiard-Chamois, B; Chartier-Kastler, E; Phé, V

    2017-10-01

    Data are scarce regarding pregnancy and delivery among women with a neurogenic bladder due to congenital spinal cord defects. To report the obstetrical and urological outcomes of women with congenital spinal cord defects and vesico-sphincteric disorders. A retrospective multicentric study included all consecutive women with a neurogenic bladder due to congenital spinal defects, who delivered between January 2005 and December 2014. The following data were collected: demographics, neuro-urological disease characteristics, urological and obstetrical history, complications during pregnancy, neonatal outcomes, and changes in urological symptoms. Overall, sixteen women, median age 29,4 years old (IQR 22-36), had a total of 20 pregnancies and 21 births (15 caesareans, 5 vaginal deliveries). Prior to the beginning of their first pregnancy, 12 patients were under intermittent self-catheterization. Symptomatic urinary tract infections during pregnancy occurred in 11 pregnancies, including 4 pyelonephritis. In 4 women, stress urinary incontinence had worsened but recovered post-partum. In 3 women, de novo clean intermittent catheterization became necessary and had to be continued post-partum. During 3 pregnancies, anticholinergic treatment had been started or increased because of urge urinary incontinence worsened. These changes were maintained after delivery. The median gestational age at birth was 39.0 weeks (IQR 37.8-39.5). There were 15 caesarean sections, of which 9 were indicated to prevent a potential aggravation of vesico-sphincteric disorders. Among the 5 pregnancies with vaginal delivery, there was no post-partum alteration of the sphincter function. Successful pregnancy outcome is possible in women with congenital spinal cord defects and vesico-sphincteric disorders but it requires managing an increased risk of urinary tract infections, caesarean section, and occasionally worsened urinary incontinence. 5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  1. Onabotulinumtoxin A for treating overactive/poor compliant bladders in children and adolescents with neurogenic bladder secondary to myelomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marte, Antonio

    2012-12-28

    This retrospective study was performed to verify the efficacy and safety of Onabotulinumtoxin A (BTX-A) in treating children with neurogenic bladder (NB) secondary to myelomeningocele (MMC) with detrusor overactivity/low compliance. From January 2002 to June 2011, 47 patients out of 68 with neuropathic bladder were selected (22 females, 25 males, age range 5-17 years; mean age 10.7 years at first injection). They presented overactive/poor compliant neurogenic bladders on clean intermittent catheterization, and were resistant or non compliant to pharmacological therapy. Ten patients presented second to fourth grade concomitant monolateral/bilateral vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). All patients were incontinent despite catheterization. In the majority of patients Botulinum-A toxin was administered under general/local anesthesia by the injection of 200 IU of toxin, without exceeding the dosage of 12 IU/kg body weight, diluted in 20 cc of saline solution in 20 sites, except in the periureteral areas. Follow-up included clinical and ultrasound examination, urodynamics performed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks, and annually thereafter. Seven patients remained stable, 21 patients required a second injection after 6-9 months and 19 a third injection. VUR was corrected, when necessary, in the same session after the BT-A injection, by 1-3 cc of subureteral Deflux®. Urodynamic parameters considered were leak point pressure (LPP), leak point volume (LPV) and specific volume at 20 cm H(2)O pressure. The results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. All patients experienced a significant 66.45% average increase of LPV (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 7169 × 10(-10)) and a significant 118.57% average increase of SC 20 (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 2.466 × 10(-12)). The difference between preoperative and postoperative LPP resulted not significant (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 0.8858) No patient presented severe systemic complications; 38/47 patients presented slight hematuria for 2-3 days. Two

  2. Onabotulinumtoxin A for Treating Overactive/Poor Compliant Bladders in Children and Adolescents with Neurogenic Bladder Secondary to Myelomeningocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study was performed to verify the efficacy and safety of Onabotulinumtoxin A (BTX-A in treating children with neurogenic bladder (NB secondary to myelomeningocele (MMC with detrusor overactivity/low compliance. From January 2002 to June 2011, 47 patients out of 68 with neuropathic bladder were selected (22 females, 25 males, age range 5–17 years; mean age 10.7 years at first injection. They presented overactive/poor compliant neurogenic bladders on clean intermittent catheterization, and were resistant or non compliant to pharmacological therapy. Ten patients presented second to fourth grade concomitant monolateral/bilateral vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. All patients were incontinent despite catheterization. In the majority of patients Botulinum-A toxin was administered under general/local anesthesia by the injection of 200 IU of toxin, without exceeding the dosage of 12IU/kg body weight, diluted in 20 cc of saline solution in 20 sites, except in the periureteral areas. Follow-up included clinical and ultrasound examination, urodynamics performed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks, and annually thereafter. Seven patients remained stable, 21 patients required a second injection after 6–9 months and 19 a third injection. VUR was corrected, when necessary, in the same session after the BT-A injection, by 1–3 cc of subureteral Deflux®. Urodynamic parameters considered were leak point pressure (LPP, leak point volume (LPV and specific volume at 20 cm H2O pressure. The results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. All patients experienced a significant 66.45% average increase of LPV (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 7169 × 10 −10 and a significant 118.57% average increase of SC 20 (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 2.466 × 10 −12. The difference between preoperative and postoperative LPP resulted not significant (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 0.8858 No patient presented severe systemic complications; 38/47 patients presented slight hematuria for

  3. Long-term results of bulking agent injection for persistent incontinence in cases of neurogenic bladder dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vocht, T. F.; Chrzan, R.; Dik, P.; Klijn, A. J.; de Jong, T. P. V. M.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated the effectiveness of bladder neck injection as a supplementary treatment for persistent low pressure incontinence after unsatisfactory fascial sling procedures in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 89 patients with

  4. [Botulinum toxin injection for refractory non-neurogenic overactive bladder. Systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, B; Roumeguère, T

    2015-01-01

    OAB is common with a potential negative impact on quality of life. Anticholinergics and β3-mimetics are the first-line medical treatment. This treatment meets only 50% of patients given a lack of efficacy and adverse effects. Used in the treatment of neurogenic overactive bladder, botulinum toxin is now evaluated for the treatment of refractory non-neurogenic overactive bladder. The objective of this work is to review the literature data concerning the efficacy and safety of intradetrusor botulinum toxin injections to treat refractory idiopathic overactive bladder. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify articles published between May 1988 and April 2013 in Medline for the treatment of refractory idiopathic overactive bladder with botulinum toxin. 37 studies with original samples were selected including 8 randomized controlled trials against placebo. The effectiveness of intra- detrusor injections is demonstrated to reduce the frequency, urgency, nighttime urination, incontinence episodes and to improve bladder capacity and quality of life. The most common side effects are incomplete bladder emptying, intermittent catheterization and increased risk of urinary tract infection. A dose of 100 to 150 U of onabotulinumtoxinA allows the best compromise between efficiency and tolerance. Duration of the effects varies between 3 to 12 months and repeating the injections did not seem to affect the efficiency. Injections including the trigone zone do not cause vesicoureteral reflux. The absence of detrusor hyperactivity does not alter the clinical response. The detrusor injections of botulinum toxin can be considered as an effective second-line treatment for refractory non-neurogenic overactive bladder. Information on intermittent catheterization risk must be provided. The very long-term effectiveness and the absence of urothelium alterations are still outstanding issues.

  5. Enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection in the spinal cord-injured host with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Zarine R; Ross, Sherry S; Dolber, Paul C; Wiener, John S; Tang, Yuping; Seed, Patrick C

    2013-08-01

    Neurogenic bladder predisposes to recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) and renal failure, and susceptibility is commonly ascribed to urinary stasis from elevated residual urine volumes. Escherichia coli UTI was modeled in the spinal cord-injured (SCI) rat with the hypothesis that SCI animals would require fewer bacteria to establish infection, have an exaggerated inflammatory response, and have delayed clearance of infection compared to normal-voiding controls. T10 SCI rats and controls had median infectious doses (ID50) of 10(2) and 10(5) CFU, respectively. Mean residual volumes in the SCI animals did not correlate with susceptibility to initiation of UTI or outcome. In the acute infection, control and SCI rats developed acute cystitis and pyelitis without acute differences in histopathological scores of inflammation. However, in vivo imaging of infected animals revealed persistently higher levels of bacteria in the SCI urine and bladders than were seen for controls over 2 weeks. Likewise, at 2 weeks, acute and chronic inflammatory infiltrates persisted in the bladders and kidneys of SCI rats, whereas inflammation largely resolved within the controls. Together these data demonstrate that SCI rats exhibit delayed clearance of infection and exaggerated inflammatory responses in bladders and kidneys; however, the severity of residual volumes does not predict increased susceptibility to UTI. These studies suggest that host-dependent mechanisms that are discrete from alterations in bladder physiology influence UTI susceptibility with the SCI-neurogenic bladder. This model will allow elucidation of SCI-neurogenic bladder-mediated changes in host response that yield UTI susceptibility and may lead to new preventative and therapeutic options.

  6. Catheter policies for management of long term voiding problems in adults with neurogenic bladder disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Jim; Maguire, Suzanne; McCann, John

    2013-11-18

    Management of the neurogenic bladder has the primary objectives of maintaining continence, ensuring low bladder pressure (to avoid renal damage) and avoiding or minimising infection. Options include intermittent urethral catheterisation, indwelling urethral or suprapubic catheterisation, timed voiding, use of external catheter (for men), drug treatment, augmentation cystoplasty and urinary diversion. The primary objective was to determine the effects of different methods of managing long-term voiding problems (persisting after three months) with catheters in patients with neurogenic bladder.Specific hypotheses to be addressed included:1. that intermittent catheterisation is better than indwelling catheterisation;2. that indwelling urethral catheterisation is better than suprapubic catheterisation;3. that external (sheath) catheters are better than indwelling or intermittent urethral catheters;4. that external (sheath) catheters are better than suprapubic catheters;5. that intermittent catheterisation is better than timed voiding. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register (searched 3 July 2013), which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and MEDLINE in process, and handsearched journals and conference proceedings. We sought additional trials from other sources such as the reference lists of relevant articles and by contacting consultants in Spinal Cord Injury Centres throughout the United Kingdom. All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing methods of using catheters to manage urinary voiding in people with neurogenic bladder. Abstracts were independently inspected by the reviewers and full papers were obtained where necessary. Approximately 400 studies were scrutinised. No trials were found that met the inclusion criteria, and five studies were excluded from the review. Despite a comprehensive search no evidence from randomised or quasi-randomised controlled

  7. Position statement: a clinical approach to the management of adult non-neurogenic overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eric; Lee, Dominic; Gani, Johan; Gillman, Michael; Maher, Christopher; Brennan, Janelle; Johns Putra, Lydia; Ahmad, Laura; Chan, Lewis Lw

    2018-01-15

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a highly prevalent medical condition that has an adverse impact on various health-related quality-of-life domains, including a significant psychosocial and financial burden. This position statement, formulated by members of the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand and the UroGynaecological Society of Australasia, summarises the current recommendations for clinical diagnosis and treatment strategies in patients with non-neurogenic OAB, and guides clinicians in the decision-making process for managing the condition using evidence-based medicine. Main recommendations: Diagnosis and initial management should be based on thorough clinical history, examination and basic investigations to exclude underlying treatable causes such as urinary tract infection and urological malignancy. Initial treatment strategies for OAB involve conservative management with behavioural modification and bladder retraining. Second-line management involves medical therapy using anticholinergic or β3 agonist drugs provided there is adequate assessment of bladder emptying. If medical therapy is unsuccessful, further investigations with urodynamic studies and cystourethroscopy are recommended to guide further treatment. Intravesical botulinum toxin and sacral neuromodulation should be considered in medical refractory OAB. Changes in management as a result of this statement: OAB is a constellation of urinary symptoms and is a chronic condition with a low likelihood of cure; managing patient expectations is essential because OAB is challenging to treat. At present, the exact pathogenesis of OAB remains unclear and it is likely that there are multiple factors involved in this disease complex. Current medical treatment remains far from ideal, although minimally invasive surgery can be effective. Further research into the pathophysiology of this common condition will hopefully guide future developments in disease management.

  8. Urothelial carcinoma with prominent squamous differentiation in the setting of neurogenic bladder: role of human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blochin, Elen B; Park, Kay J; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat

    2012-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder are rare in the Western world; the majority of cases are reported in countries endemic to Schistosoma parasitic infections. Unlike squamous tumors of the uterine cervix or oropharynx, the human papillomavirus (HPV) is not commonly associated with bladder squamous cell carcinomas. We report on two cases of HPV-positive urothelial carcinomas of the urinary bladder with extensive squamous differentiation showing the typical basaloid, poorly differentiated morphology of HPV-associated tumors. These occurred in patients with neurogenic bladders who had long-standing histories of self-catheterization with tumors that tested positive for HPV by in situ hybridization. A retrospective review of our institutional database revealed four additional patients with bladder tumors showing squamous differentiation arising in the setting of neurogenic bladder. Review of these cases showed the more common well-differentiated keratinizing appearance of squamous cell carcinomas of the bladder. These tumors showed only patchy positivity for p16 immunohistochemical stain (not the diffuse strong staining seen in HPV-positive tumors), and the one tested case was negative for HPV by in situ hybridization. HPV infection and neurogenic bladder have been independently associated with increased risk of developing carcinoma in the urinary bladder; however, this is the first report of squamous tumors arising in the setting of concurrent neurogenic bladder and HPV infection. The morphology of these tumors is similar to that of other high-risk HPV-associated squamous carcinomas with a basaloid, poorly differentiated appearance and little to no keratin formation.

  9. Augmentation enterocystoplasty without reimplantation for patients with neurogenic bladder and vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han-Chao; Yang, Jin; Ye, Xin; Hu, Hai-Feng

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) after augmentation cystoplasty alone in patients with a hypocompliant neurogenic bladder. Between January 2009 and December 2014, 29 patients with a hypocompliant bladder associated with VUR confirmed by videourodynamics (VUD) preoperatively were recruited in this study. All patients had undergone bladder augmentation with a generous detubularized segment of bowel at our institution. No effort had been made to correct the existing reflux. Preoperative assessment included urinalysis, kidney function tests, ultrasonography, and videourodynamic evaluation. All patients had various degrees of VUR. The status of VUR and bladder function were studied by VUD. The mean follow-up period was 2.2 years (range 0.5-5.5 years). The VUD manifested a significant improvement of bladder capacity, diminution of intravesical pressure, and resolution of reflux after bladder augmentation. After the surgery, 24/29 (83%) no longer had reflux, 3/29 (10%) showed improvement in reflux, and 2/29 (7%) demonstrated no change in reflux. In addition, 16/21 (76%) patients had reflux Grades I-III; 100% patients with reflux Grades IV and V had complete cessation of reflux. Only one patient had symptomatic urinary infection after the surgery. Augmentation enterocystoplasty without ureteral reimplantation is thus effective and adequate for patients with high-pressure and hypocompliant neurogenic bladder. Therefore, ureteral reimplantation is not necessary when augmentation enterocystoplasty is recommended for patients with high-pressure, low-compliant bladder and VUR. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  10. Augmentation enterocystoplasty without reimplantation for patients with neurogenic bladder and vesicoureteral reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chao Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR after augmentation cystoplasty alone in patients with a hypocompliant neurogenic bladder. Between January 2009 and December 2014, 29 patients with a hypocompliant bladder associated with VUR confirmed by videourodynamics (VUD preoperatively were recruited in this study. All patients had undergone bladder augmentation with a generous detubularized segment of bowel at our institution. No effort had been made to correct the existing reflux. Preoperative assessment included urinalysis, kidney function tests, ultrasonography, and videourodynamic evaluation. All patients had various degrees of VUR. The status of VUR and bladder function were studied by VUD. The mean follow-up period was 2.2 years (range 0.5–5.5 years. The VUD manifested a significant improvement of bladder capacity, diminution of intravesical pressure, and resolution of reflux after bladder augmentation. After the surgery, 24/29 (83% no longer had reflux, 3/29 (10% showed improvement in reflux, and 2/29 (7% demonstrated no change in reflux. In addition, 16/21 (76% patients had reflux Grades I-III; 100% patients with reflux Grades IV and V had complete cessation of reflux. Only one patient had symptomatic urinary infection after the surgery. Augmentation enterocystoplasty without ureteral reimplantation is thus effective and adequate for patients with high-pressure and hypocompliant neurogenic bladder. Therefore, ureteral reimplantation is not necessary when augmentation enterocystoplasty is recommended for patients with high-pressure, low-compliant bladder and VUR.

  11. A systematic review and comparison of questionnaires in the management of spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and the neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, B; Stothers, L; Macnab, A; Lazare, D; Nigro, M

    2016-03-01

    Validated questionnaires are increasingly the preferred method used to obtain historical information. Specialized questionnaires exist validated for patients with neurogenic disease including neurogenic bladder. Those currently available are systematically reviewed and their potential for clinical and research use are described. A systematic search via Medline and PubMed using the key terms questionnaire(s) crossed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) for the years 1946 to January 22, 2014 inclusive. Additional articles were selected from review of references in the publications identified. Only peer reviewed articles published in English were included. 18 questionnaires exist validated for patients with neurogenic bladder; 14 related to MS, 3 for SCI, and 1 for neurogenic bladder in general; with 4 cross-validated in both MS and SCI. All 18 are validated for both male and female patients; 59% are available only in English. The domains of psychological impact and physical function are represented in 71% and 76% of questionnaires, respectively. None for the female population included elements to measure symptoms of prolapse. The last decade has seen an expansion of validated questionnaires to document bladder symptoms in neurogenic disease. Disease specific instruments are available for incorporation into the clinical setting for MS and SCI patients with neurogenic bladder. The availability of caregiver and interview options enhances suitability in clinical practice as they can be adapted to various extents of disability. Future developments should include expanded language validation to the top 10 global languages reported by the World Health Organization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Should simultaneous ureteral reimplantation be performed during sigmoid bladder augmentation to reduce vesicoureteral reflux in neurogenic bladder cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yang, Yong; Wu, Zhi-jin; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Chao-hua; Zhang, Xiao-dong

    2015-05-01

    To assess the necessity of performing simultaneous collateral reimplantation during sigmoid bladder augmentation (SBA) to reduce vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in low-compliance neuropathic bladder with associated VUR. We retrospectively identified 31 patients who underwent SBA alone or with simultaneous ureteral reimplantation at our hospital. The video urodynamics data, VUR status, renal function, and clinical symptoms were studied during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 57 months (range 12-117). All patients displayed significantly increased safe cystometric capacity (P bladder compliance (P bladder volumes due to augmentation. The patients' improving renal function benefited most from the enlarged bladder and partly from increased antireflux resistance of vesico-ureter anastomosis. Twelve (38.7%) had recurrent febrile urinary tract infection after SBA, and one (3.2%) suffered from vesico-ureter anastomosis contracture after ureteral reimplantation. A preoperative intravesical VUR pressure of 20 cmH2O is not an effective cutoff point for whether ureteral reimplantation should be simultaneously performed during SBA. Augmentation appears to be more important than reimplantation for protecting kidney from damage due to febrile urinary tract infection after SBA. Simultaneous reimplantation may be not necessary during SBA in neurogenic bladder.

  13. Treatment of the neurogenic bladder in spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Tom P V M; Chrzan, Rafal; Klijn, Aart J; Dik, Pieter

    2008-06-01

    Renal damage and renal failure are among the most severe complications of spina bifida. Over the past decades, a comprehensive treatment strategy has been applied that results in minimal renal scaring. In addition, the majority of patients can be dry for urine by the time they go to primary school. To obtain such results, it is mandatory to treat detrusor overactivity from birth onward, as upper urinary tract changes predominantly start in the first months of life. This means that new patients with spina bifida should be treated from birth by clean intermittent catheterization and pharmacological suppression of detrusor overactivity. Urinary tract infections, when present, need aggressive treatment, and in many patients, permanent prophylaxis is indicated. Later in life, therapy can be tailored to urodynamic findings. Children with paralyzed pelvic floor and hence urinary incontinence are routinely offered surgery around the age of 5 years to become dry. Rectus abdominis sling suspension of the bladder neck is the first-choice procedure, with good to excellent results in both male and female patients. In children with detrusor hyperactivity, detrusorectomy can be performed as an alternative for ileocystoplasty provided there is adequate bladder capacity. Wheelchair-bound patients can manage their bladder more easily with a continent catheterizable stoma on top of the bladder. This stoma provides them extra privacy and diminishes parental burden. Bowel management is done by retrograde or antegrade enema therapy. Concerning sexuality, special attention is needed to address expectations of adolescent patients. Sensibility of the glans penis can be restored by surgery in the majority of patients.

  14. Teapot ureterocystoplasty and ureteral Mitrofanoff channel for bilateral megaureters: technical points and surgical results of neurogenic bladder.

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    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Farrokhi-Khajeh-Pasha, Yasin; Ostovaneh, Mohammad Reza; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Hojjat, Asal

    2010-03-01

    We present the long-term results of simultaneous "teapot" ureterocystoplasty and ureteral Mitrofanoff in patients with bilateral megaureters due to neurogenic bladder, and compare urodynamic results before and after the procedure. We treated 13 children (mean age 7.3 years) with end stage neurogenic bladder and refluxing megaureters (mean diameter 5.5 cm) with simultaneous teapot ureterocystoplasty and Mitrofanoff appendicovesicostomy between April 1995 and May 2001. The larger ureter was used for teapot bladder augmentation while keeping its distal 2 cm tubularized. The Mitrofanoff channel was then created using the opposite ureter. Followup ranged from 109 to 169 months (median 121). At the end of the followup period all patients were dry with clean intermittent catheterization and/or voiding. No repeat augmentation was needed and there were no bladder calculi during followup. Median postoperative bladder capacity was 430 ml (IQR 380 to 477), which was increased significantly compared to preoperative evaluations (210 ml, IQR 181 to 230, p = 0.001). During followup bladder compliance also improved significantly (p = 0.001) and serum creatinine level decreased (p = 0.021). Although neurogenic bladder and high grade reflux are poor prognostic factors for ureterocystoplasty, the present modification resulted in enduring bladder augmentation with no calculus formation. Bladders remained compliant with good capacity, presumably because sufficient tissue and blood supply were provided for the augmented flap. 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurogenic bladder in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury: treatment and follow-up.

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    Yıldız, N; Akkoç, Y; Erhan, B; Gündüz, B; Yılmaz, B; Alaca, R; Gök, H; Köklü, K; Ersöz, M; Cınar, E; Karapolat, H; Catalbaş, N; Bardak, A N; Turna, I; Demir, Y; Güneş, S; Alemdaroğlu, E; Tunç, H

    2014-06-01

    Multi-center, cross-sectional study. Our aim was to evaluate the treatment methods and follow-up of neurogenic bladder in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury retrospectively using a questionnaire. Turkey. Three hundred and thirty-seven patients who had spinal cord injury for at least 2 years were enrolled from six centers in the neurogenic bladder study group. They were asked to fill-out a questionnaire about treatments they received and techniques they used for bladder management. The study included 246 male and 91 female patients with a mean age of 42±14 years. Intermittent catheterization (IC) was performed in 77.9% of the patients, 3.8% had indwelling catheters, 13.8% had normal spontaneous micturition, 2.6% performed voiding maneuvers, 1.3% used diapers and 0.6% used condom catheters. No gender difference was found regarding the techniques used in bladder rehabilitation (P>0.05). Overall, 63.2% of patients used anticholinergic drugs; anticholinergic drug use was similar between genders (P>0.05). The most common anticholinergic drug used was oxybutynin (40.3%), followed by trospium (32.6%), tolterodine (19.3%) darifenacin (3.3%), propiverine (3.3%) and solifenacin (1.1%). The specialties of the physicians who first prescribed the anticholinergic drug were physiatrists (76.2%), urologists (22.1%) and neurologists (1.7%). Only four patients had previously received injections of botulinum-toxin-A into the detrusor muscle and three of them stated that their symptoms showed improvement. Most of the patients (77%) had regular follow-up examinations, including urine cultures, urinary system ultrasound and urodynamic tests, when necessary; the reasons for not having regular control visits were living distant from hospital (15.3%) and monetary problems (7.7%). Of the patients, 42.7% did not experience urinary tract infections (UTI), 36.4% had bacteriuria but no UTI episodes with fever, 15.9% had 1-2 clinical UTI episodes per year and 5% had ⩾3 clinical UTIs

  16. Treatment outcome of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in children; a five-year experience.

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    Roshanzamir, Fathollah; Rouzrokh, Mohsen; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Khaleghnejad, Ahmad; Mohajerzadeh, Leila; Dalirani, Reza

    2014-06-01

    A neurogenic bladder is one which functions abnormally due to disorders of sacral nerves that control the bladder's ability to fill, store and empty urine. Abnormal bladder function can cause the bladder to be underactive or overactive. This study was planned to evaluate the treatment outcome of our patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NGBD). Thirty three patients who have been treated for NGBD were evaluated. Diagnosis was confirmed by voiding-cysto-urethrography (VCUG) and urodynamic study. The patients were treated medically and all had clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). Data regarding age, sex, clinical and paraclinical findings, sonography, imagings, renal scan, associated anomalies, treatment and outcomes were collected and entered in SPSS software version18 and analyzed by descriptive statistical. Findings : Totally 33 patients aged three days to four years (mean 6.8 months) were included in this study. There were 20 (61%) males and 13 (39%) females. Mean follow-up period was 3.4±1.2 years (1.5 months to 5 years). Eighty two precent cases had bilatral and 18% unilatral hydronephrosis and bilatral vesicouretral reflux (VUR) existed in 67% and unilatral in 33% of the patients. Treatment consisted of antibiotherapy and CIC in all patients, which was only in 33% of the cases succesful. The most common associated anomaly was meningomyelocle in 8 patients. Vesicostomy was performed in 22 (67%) cases. Kidney scan showed scar in 10 patients at follow-up study. Complete continence on follow-up was achieved in 24 (71% ) patients, and it was improved in 6 (18% ) cases. Mortality rate was 9% (3 cases). Cure rate was 85% in urinary tract infection, 82.7% in hydronephrosis, 80% in VUR and 86.5% in kidney function. Anticholinergic medications was not effective in all our patients. We believe that permanent vesicostomy is an effective and acceptable surgical intervention for protection of upper urinary tract decompression, especially in those who do not

  17. Factors implicated in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections in neurogenic bladders: some revered, few forgotten, others ignored.

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    Vasudeva, Pawan; Madersbacher, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    To comprehensively review factors implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders, and to stimulate research, especially in the somewhat ignored and forgotten areas of this important clinical subject. In addition to reviewing relevant articles on pubmed, some important articles from previous times which were not available online were also procured and reviewed. Intrinsic defence mechanisms including protective flora, anti-adherence mechanisms, urothelial, and immunological responses to bacterial binding and the blood supply to the urinary bladder may be impaired in patients with neurogenic bladders. Further, bacterial washout mechanisms may be compromised as a result of inefficient voiding, reflux, and altered hydrokinetics. Finally, catheterization itself contributes to urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders. In order to address the issue of urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders, multiple factors need to be looked into and corrected. Further research is required, especially in the area of compromised host defence mechanisms. An individualized approach, which attempts to optimize each factor is recommended. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Prospective evaluation of antibiotic treatment for urological procedure in patients presenting with neurogenic bladder.

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    Weglinski, L; Rouzaud, C; Even, A; Bouchand, F; Davido, B; Duran, C; Salomon, J; Perronne, C; Denys, P; Chartier-Kastler, E; Dinh, A

    2016-09-01

    Patients presenting with neurogenic bladder often require urological procedures (urodynamic testing and botulinum toxin injections) and a preventive antibiotic therapy. We aimed to assess the efficacy of this little known strategy in a cohort of patients. All patients presenting with neurogenic bladder who underwent urological procedure were included in the study. They received an antibiotic therapy in accordance with the urine cytobacteriological examination results. The antibiotic therapy was initiated two days before the procedure and prolonged up until two days after the procedure if the culture was positive. Patients were treated with a single dose of fosfomycin-trometamol in case of a negative culture. The main study outcome was the occurrence of urinary tract infection (UTI), defined by a positive urine culture and symptoms, up until 14 days after the procedure. A total of 80 urological procedures were performed. Mean patient age was 47±13.1 years (sex ratio 1.22); 59 (73.8%) presented with asymptomatic bacteriuria before the procedure. Nine (11.1%) UTIs were recorded on Day 14, of which one (1.2%) was febrile. Two patients required an additional curative antibiotic therapy. No patient was hospitalized. Overall, 77.8% of UTIs were cured without antibiotic therapy. Screening and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria before urological procedures seems unnecessary and vainly exposes this population at high risk of infectious diseases to antibiotic therapies. This data should be confirmed by a randomized clinical trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Urological surveillance and management of patients with neurogenic bladder: Results of a survey among practicing urologists in Canada.

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    Blok, Bertil F M; Karsenty, Gilles; Corcos, Jacques

    2006-10-01

    To determine current trends in management and surveillance of the neurogenic bladder population by Canadian urologists who routinely work with and provide care for these patients. A questionnaire was mailed to members of the Canadian Urological Association. The assessment and follow-up of upper and lower urinary tract function in neurogenic bladder patients, their optimal frequency and management of related infections were the topics of inquiry. One hundred and five of 602 urologists responded, for a response rate of 18%. Twenty-three (22%) of the respondents did not treat neurogenic bladder patients. Four out of five urologists who treated these patients favored a yearly renal ultrasound for routine surveillance of the upper urinary tract and routinely performed urodynamic studies for evaluation of the lower tract. Only a relatively small percentage used videourodynamics. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) was preferred for the management of neurogenic bladder in patients with emptying difficulties. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) was preferably not treated. Symptomatic UTI was treated with antibiotics for 7 to 10 days by about 75% of the responding urologists, while 23% of female patients and 9% of male patients were treated for less than 7 days. Although most of the urologists had access to established treatment modalities, like CIC education and bladder augmentation, only 30% made use of botulinum toxin injections. This study confirms that most urologists in Canada, working with neurogenic bladder patients, follow principles reported in the literature regarding the need for evaluation, surveillance, and management of the urinary tract. However, there is no consensus on the specific methods used for surveillance of the urinary system. The results emphasize the need for clear guidelines in this field of urology in Canada.

  20. Follow-up of Long-term Treatment with Clean Intermittent Catheterization for Neurogenic Bladder in Children

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    Panuwat Lertsithichai

    2004-04-01

    Conclusions: For most patients and with close long-term follow-up, early treatment of neurogenic bladder using CIC in children born with myelomeningocele yields better results than late treatment. In our experience, treatment is recommended as soon as possible, especially during the first year of life.

  1. [Giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum: a case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Quan, Chang-Yi; Li, Gang; Cai, Qi-Liang; Hu, Bin; Wang, Jiu-Wei; Niu, Yuan-Jie

    2013-02-01

    To study the etiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of a case of giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum and reviewed the relevant literature. The patient was a 37-year-old man, with urinary incontinence for 22 years and intermittent dysuria with frequent micturition for 9 years, aggravated in the past 3 months. He had received surgery for spina bifida and giant vesico-prostatic calculus. The results of preoperative routine urinary examination were as follows: WBC 17 -20/HPF, RBC 12 - 15/HPF. KUB, IVU and pelvic CT revealed spina bifida occulta, neurogenic bladder and giant prostatic calculus. The patient underwent TURP and transurethral lithotripsy with holmium-YAG laser. The prostatic calculus was carbonate apatite in composition. Urinary dynamic images at 2 weeks after surgery exhibited significant improvement in the highest urine flow rate and residual urine volume. Seventeen months of postoperative follow-up showed dramatically improved urinary incontinence and thicker urine stream. Prostate diverticulum with prostatic giant calculus is very rare, and neurogenic bladder may play a role in its etiology. Cystoscopy is an accurate screening method for its diagnosis. For the young patients and those who wish to retain sexual function, TURP combined with holmium laser lithotripsy can be employed, and intraoperative rectal examination should be taken to ensure complete removal of calculi.

  2. Multicenter randomized controlled trial of bacterial interference for prevention of urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darouiche, Rabih O; Green, Bruce G; Donovan, William H; Chen, David; Schwartz, Michael; Merritt, John; Mendez, Michelle; Hull, Richard A

    2011-08-01

    To compare the effectiveness of bacterial interference versus placebo in preventing urinary tract infection (UTI). The main outcome measure was the numbers of episodes of UTI/patient-year. Randomization was computer generated, with allocation concealment by visibly indistinguishable products distributed from a core facility. The healthcare providers and those assessing the outcomes were unaware of the group allocation. Adult patients (n = 65) with neurogenic bladder after spinal cord injury and a history of recurrent UTI were randomized in a 3:1 ratio to receive either Escherichia coli HU2117 or sterile saline. Urine cultures were obtained weekly during the first month and then monthly for 1 year. The patients were evaluable if they remained colonized with E. coli HU2117 for >4 weeks (experimental group). The trial is closed to follow-up. Of the 59 patients who received bladder inoculations, 27 were evaluable (17 in the experimental group and 10 in the placebo group). The 2 study groups had comparable clinical characteristics. Of 17 patients colonized with E. coli HU2117 and the 10 control patients, 5 (29%, 95% confidence interval 0.11-0.56) and 7 (70%, 95% confidence interval 0.35-0.92) developed >1 episode of UTI (P = .049; 1-sided Fisher's exact test), respectively. The average number of episodes of UTI/patient-year was also lower (P = .02, Wilcoxon rank sum test) in the experimental (0.50) than in the control group (1.68). E. coli HU2117 did not cause symptomatic UTI. Bladder colonization with E. coli HU2117 safely reduces the risk of symptomatic UTI in patients with spinal cord injury. Effective, but less complex, methods for achieving bladder colonization with E. coli HU2117 are under investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PRINCIPLES OF THERAPY OF A NEUROGENIC HYPERACTIVE URINARY BLADDER IN PATIENTS AFTER CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT

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    P. G. Shchvartz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic hyperactiv e bladder in different clinical variations is a characteristic com plication of restorativ e and residual periods of ischemic stroke and an important diagnostic criterion in vascular dementia. Mechanisms of formation of individual symptoms included in this syndrome is due to ischemic damage to cortical, subcortical and brainstem (the nucleus of Barrington centres of urination and associative areas of the brain, and the functional dissociation of these structures due to demyelination of the Central conductors of the afferent and efferent impulses. As a result of deficit of cerebral effects (such as brake and activating, is a violation of the implementation of the reflexes of urination (including carrying out continence, ongoing spinal (sympathetic, parasympathetic and somatic. The article presents a new concept of formation of the syndrome of hyperactive bladder on the basis of violations of the implementation of the 4 reflexes of urination, which provides the normal retention of urine and are responsible for the accumulation function of the bladder. First we analyzed the main point of application of drugs of anticholinergic and sympathomimetic actions in the reflexes of urination and mechanisms of restoration of function of the lower urinary tract in patients with acute and chronic v ascular diseases of the brain.

  4. Chapter 1: The conditions of neurogenic detrusor overactivity and overactive bladder.

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    Haab, Francois

    2014-07-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a symptom syndrome consisting of urinary urgency, usually accompanied by frequency and nocturia, with or without urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), in the absence of a causative infection or pathological conditions. The prevalence of OAB is approximately 11-19% in both men and women, and leads to a significant negative effect on a patient's health-related quality of life (HRQOL). OAB is also associated with comorbidities such as urinary tract infection (UTI) and an increased risk of falls. Following behavioral therapy, anticholinergic agents are commonly prescribed, but these often fail because of lack of efficacy and/or poor tolerability. Evaluation of treatment success in OAB should include pre-defined, patient-centered goals. Patients for whom oral therapy has failed to meet such goals may be considered refractory to oral therapy and candidates for minimally invasive therapy. Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a bladder dysfunction frequently observed in patients with conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI). Increased storage pressure can put the upper urinary tract at risk of deterioration and reducing this risk is a primary aim of therapy. Urinary incontinence (UI) is reported by approximately 50% of MS patients, and most SCI patients will develop some bladder dysfunction. NDO leads to a negative impact on HRQOL, independent of the impact of the primary condition. NDO patients in whom oral therapy has failed to normalize storage pressure may be considered refractory and are candidates for minimally invasive therapy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Giant Congenital Pelvic AVM Causing Cardiac Failure, Diplegia, and Neurogenic Bladder.

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    Bekci, Tumay; Yucel, Serap; Turgut, Eser; Soylu, Aysegul Idil

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are uncommon lesions and only a rare number of male cases have been reported. Their clinical presentations are variable and imaging modalities have an important place in diagnosis and treatment planning. We present the imaging findings of a giant congenital pelvic AVM that was diagnosed in a 30-year-old male patient eight years ago and which progressed despite follow-up and treatment, causing cardiac failure, diplegia, and neurogenic bladder. Pelvic AVMs are uncommon lesions and they can present with various symptoms based on their locations and sizes. Delays in the diagnosis and treatment can cause local and systemic complications. Imaging is very important in the diagnosis of pelvic AVM.

  6. [Neurogenic bladder function disorders in patients with meningomyelocele: S2k guidelines on diagnostics and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R; Assion, C; Beetz, R; Bürst, M; Cremer, R; Ermert, A; Goepel, M; Kuwertz-Bröking, E; Ludwikowski, B; Michael, T; Pannek, J; Peters, H; Rohrmann, D; Rübben, I; Schröder, A; Trollmann, R; Thüroff, J W; Wagner, W

    2015-02-01

    The treatment of children and adolescents with meningomyelocele has experienced a clear change in the last 30 years. The establishment of pharmacotherapy, clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) and infection prophylaxis have improved the prognosis for patients and have led to new therapeutic strategies. The interdisciplinary cooperation between neonatologists, neurosurgeons, pediatric neurologists, pediatric urologists, pediatric nephrologists, pediatric orthopedists and pediatric surgeons leads to optimization of individualized therapy. These guidelines present definitions and classifications, investigations and timing which are described in detail. The conservative and operative therapy options for neurogenic bladder function disorders are described and discussed with reference to the current literature. The brief overview provides in each case assistance for the treating physician in the care of this patient group and facilitates the interdisciplinary cooperation.

  7. Chapter 5: Clinical data in neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and overactive bladder (OAB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Francisco; Nitti, Victor

    2014-07-01

    Following use of botulinum toxin in the 1980s for the treatment of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), the potential therapeutic value of this neurotoxin in urology has been the subject of much interest. The DIGNITY (Double-blind InvestiGation of purified Neurotoxin complex In neurogenic deTrusor overactivitY) clinical research program aimed to compare onabotulinumtoxinA with placebo in terms of efficacy and safety in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) due to SCI or multiple sclerosis. The EMBARK clinical research program mirrored these aims in patients with overactive bladder with urinary incontinence (UI). Each program comprised two phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled studies. In all four trials, primary efficacy endpoints were met, and significant benefits of onabotulinumtoxinA versus placebo were demonstrated across a range of secondary endpoints, including measures of health-related quality of life. The most common adverse event across both programs was urinary tract infection. Interim analyses of data from ongoing long-term extensions to these phase III trials have provided promising evidence for the efficacy of repeated injections. While further investigation is recommended to enrich the dataset, the available evidence indicates that onabotulinumtoxinA provides an effective treatment option for these two populations, which were previously considered very difficult to treat. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [CYSTECTASY AND REHABILITATION TRAINING FOR TREATMENT OF NEUROGENIC BLADDER DYSFUNCTION WITH HYPERREFLEXIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luping; Fan, Yingzhong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Qian; Gou, Li

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of ileal mucosal seromuscular patch for bladder expansion combined with rehabilitation training for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NBD) with hyperreflexia. A retrospective study was performed on the clinical data of 61 patients with NBD and hyperreflexia who were treated and followed up between July 2008 and June 2013. There were 36 males and 25 females, aged 6-23 years (mean, 10 years). The reasons included meningomyelocele operation (43 patients),surgery for lipoma in lumbar vertebra (4 patients), operation of thoracolubar teratoma (2 patients), and lumbosacral spina B3ifida (12 patients). The results of urodynamics indicated that bladder volume decreased obviously and the residual urine increased. The voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) showed the vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), including 6 cases (10 sides) of grade V, 7 cases (12 sides) of grade IV, and 6 cases (8 sides) of grade III. The color doppler ultrosound showed mild hydronephrosis in 23 cases (41 sides), moderate hydronephrosis in 25 cases (42 sides), and severe hydronephrosis in 13 cases (22 sides). The blood biochemical examination suggested chronic renal failure (CRF) in 13 cases. The treatment included augmentation for bladder and rehabilitation training after operation. The operation time was (157+/- 26) minutes; the intraoperative blood loss was (43 +/- 15) mL, and no patient was given blood transfusion. The patients were followed up 1.5-6.0 years (mean, 4.5 years). Vesical fistula occurred in 4 cases, urinary infection in 5 cases, dysuresia in 2 cases, and cystolith in 1 case after operation. At 1 year after operation, the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontience Short Form (IQ-F) score was significantly better than peoperative score (H=9.813, P=0.000). The aurdynmic data showed that the difference value between observed and theoretical bladder volumes, bladder compliance, residual urine volume, maximum flow rate, and

  9. Button Cystostomy: Is it Really a Safe and Effective Therapeutic Option in Pediatric Patients With Neurogenic Bladder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosiello, Giovanni; Lopes Mendes, Ana Ludy; Capitanucci, Maria Luisa; Zaccara, Antonio Maria; De Gennaro, Mario

    2017-03-01

    To define safety and effectiveness of cystostomy button in the management of bladder drainage in pediatric patients with neurogenic bladder, and report our personalized surgical technique. This study is a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing cystostomy button placement for bladder drainage from October 2009 to December 2015. Endoscopic and open surgical techniques and medium-term complication were analyzed and indications were recorded. Thirty-five patients, 16 (45.7%) females and 19 (54.3%) males, underwent cystostomy button placement for bladder drainage with a mean age of 8.6 ± 4.8 years (standard deviation) and a mean follow-up time of 37 months. There were 91.4% of patients who had a neurogenic bladder; a nonobstructive urinary retention was diagnosed in the remainder of cases. A medium-term complication was mostly represented by urinary tract infection observed in 10 of 35 patients that was the most representative cause of button removal (4 of 35). Other observed complications were button leakage (n = 2), decubitus (n = 1), and bladder stone (n = 1). No postoperative complication was observed and no differences were found in terms of complications in the two surgical approaches performed. Cystostomy button is a safe and effective treatment for bladder drainage in neurogenic pediatric patients and it is also well accepted by patients and caregivers. Cystostomy button, which may avoid mechanical concerns and most of the social discomfort, should be considered an alternative method to other bladder drainage modalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiological consideration of neurogenic bladder in patients with traumatic spinal injury

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    Kim, Soo Han; Yu, Yun Jeong; Shin, Hyun Ja [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    We evaluated 104 patients of neurogenic bladder secondary to traumatic spinal cord injury. Those were diagnosed by I. V. P. and V. C. U. at Korea Veterans Hospital during 9 years from January, 1978 to May, 1987. The type of neurogenic bladder, complications and urethral configuration, according to the level of spinal cord injury were discusses. The result were as follows: 1. The incidence of patient according to the level of spinal cord injury was 49 out of 104 in those with vertebral level T7 or above, 15 out of 104 in those with T8-T10 level, and 40 in those with vertebral level T11 or below. The incidence of UMNB was 67.3% in those with vertebral T7 or above, 53.3% in T8-T10. The incidence of LMNB was 62.5% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 2. Overall incidence of urinary tract calculus was 32.7%. Highest incidence of calculus was 46.7% in those with vertebral level T8-T10. 3. Overall incidence of vesicoureteral reflux was 23.1%. Highest incidence of reflux was 46.7% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 4. Overall incidence of pyelonephritis was 26.9%. 5. Overall incidence of hydronephrosis was 20.2%. Highest incidence of hydronephrosis was 27.5% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 6. Almost entire urethra was shown funnel type in 66 out of 73 cases. Saccular dilatation of posterior urethra was 7 cases. Saccular dilatation of posterior urethra with LMNB was 4 cases, which were occurred only in those with vertebral level T11 or below.

  11. Radiological consideration of neurogenic bladder in patients with traumatic spinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Han; Yu, Yun Jeong; Shin, Hyun Ja

    1987-01-01

    We evaluated 104 patients of neurogenic bladder secondary to traumatic spinal cord injury. Those were diagnosed by I. V. P. and V. C. U. at Korea Veterans Hospital during 9 years from January, 1978 to May, 1987. The type of neurogenic bladder, complications and urethral configuration, according to the level of spinal cord injury were discusses. The result were as follows: 1. The incidence of patient according to the level of spinal cord injury was 49 out of 104 in those with vertebral level T7 or above, 15 out of 104 in those with T8-T10 level, and 40 in those with vertebral level T11 or below. The incidence of UMNB was 67.3% in those with vertebral T7 or above, 53.3% in T8-T10. The incidence of LMNB was 62.5% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 2. Overall incidence of urinary tract calculus was 32.7%. Highest incidence of calculus was 46.7% in those with vertebral level T8-T10. 3. Overall incidence of vesicoureteral reflux was 23.1%. Highest incidence of reflux was 46.7% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 4. Overall incidence of pyelonephritis was 26.9%. 5. Overall incidence of hydronephrosis was 20.2%. Highest incidence of hydronephrosis was 27.5% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 6. Almost entire urethra was shown funnel type in 66 out of 73 cases. Saccular dilatation of posterior urethra was 7 cases. Saccular dilatation of posterior urethra with LMNB was 4 cases, which were occurred only in those with vertebral level T11 or below

  12. Evaluation of cranberry juice on bacteriuria and pyuria in spinal cord injured patient with neurogenic bladder

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    mohamad Rajaei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are the most common medical complication experienced by individuals living with SCI . Several factors are responsible for the high prevalence of UTIs in individual with SCI. Concerns regarding the overuse of antibiotics in individuals with SCI and emerge multi-drug-resistant bacteria , has prompted consideration for consumer –directed alternatives to improve urinary tract health. This study was designed to evaluation of cranberry juice on bacteriuria and pyuria and in spinal cord injured patients with neurogenic bladder in Shahrekord, Iran. Methods: This study was randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial .60 patients (51 male and 9 female with creatinine levels below 1.5 mg/dl and in the analysis of their urine white blood cell (WBC counts were greater than 10 in a high-powered field (pyuria or with a presence of bacteriuria (>= 104 cc/ml in their urine culture selected in this study. Urine analysis and culture were carried out at before and after intervention.Samples was divided into two two groups of 30.The case patients were given a dose of 250 to 300 ml of cranberry juice cocktail with 30% concentration, daily with meals.The control group was fed the same amount of a placebo cocktail.After two weeks, first morning urine analysis and culture test were done.Data collected and analyzed using K-squared method using the SPSS software and Paired-T test technique. Results: Urine analysis and culture before and after interventions show , Urinary PH in case and control groups did not any significant statistical difference before and after intervention (P>0.05. A change in pyuria and bacteriuria levels in case patients was observed after the treatment which was statistically significant (P95٪. Conclusion: Consumption of cranberries can be effective in treating SCI patients with UTI under certain conditions. The effectiveness was most profound in patients with normal GFR who did not use

  13. Comparison of different antibiotic protocols for asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with neurogenic bladder treated with botulinum toxin A

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    Ana Claudia Paradella

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNTA injection has been widely used for the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury who do not respond to conventional treatment. There is no consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis for this procedure. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients with spinal cord injury who underwent detrusor BoNTA injection between January of 2007 and December of 2013 in a rehabilitation hospital. Occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI was assessed in 3 groups in accordance with their use of antibiotics (prophylactic dosage, 3 days, more than 3 days for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. All patients were performing self or assisted clean intermittent bladder catheterization and underwent a rigid cystoscopy, under general or regional anesthesia with sedation, and the drug used was Botox®. A total of 616 procedures were performed during the study period. There were 11 identified cases of UTI (1.8% with a trend to a higher rate in the group that used antibiotics for longer time. This report shows that a single dose of antibiotics before the detrusor BoNTA injection is enough to prevent UTI. Randomized clinical trial should be conducted for definitive conclusions.

  14. Comparison of different antibiotic protocols for asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with neurogenic bladder treated with botulinum toxin A.

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    Paradella, Ana Claudia; Musegante, André Ferraz de Arruda; Brites, Carlos

    Intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) injection has been widely used for the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury who do not respond to conventional treatment. There is no consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis for this procedure. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients with spinal cord injury who underwent detrusor BoNTA injection between January of 2007 and December of 2013 in a rehabilitation hospital. Occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) was assessed in 3 groups in accordance with their use of antibiotics (prophylactic dosage, 3 days, more than 3 days) for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. All patients were performing self or assisted clean intermittent bladder catheterization and underwent a rigid cystoscopy, under general or regional anesthesia with sedation, and the drug used was Botox ® . A total of 616 procedures were performed during the study period. There were 11 identified cases of UTI (1.8%) with a trend to a higher rate in the group that used antibiotics for longer time. This report shows that a single dose of antibiotics before the detrusor BoNTA injection is enough to prevent UTI. Randomized clinical trial should be conducted for definitive conclusions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. [Neurology and the bladder: how to assess and manage neurogenic bladder dysfunction. With particular references to neural control of micturition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Tsuyusaki, Yohei; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Bladder dysfunctions are one of the most common features seen in the failure of the autonomic nervous system. Among those, overactive bladder (urinary urgency and frequency) worsens quality of life of the patients, and a large amount of post-voiding residual urine or urinary retention causes urinary tract infection, kidney dysfunction, and may bring renal failure. In the present paper we discussed neural control of micturition and how to assess it. Also, we proposed appropriate management of bladder dysfunction in elderly white matter lesions (a common cause of OAB) and diabetic neuropathy (a usual pathology underlying urinary retention). For OAB, anti-cholinergics are the mainstay, whereas for the pathological post-voiding residual urine or urinary retention, alpha-blockers, cholinergic agents and clean, intermittent self-catheterization are the choice. Treatment of bladder dysfunctions is the important target for maximizing patients' quality of life.

  16. Augmentation cystoplasty and simultaneous ureteral reimplantation reduce high-grade vesicoureteral reflux in children with neurogenic bladder.

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    Wang, Jen-Bin; Liu, Chin-Su; Tsai, Shin-Lin; Wei, Chou-Fu; Chin, Tai-Wai

    2011-07-01

    To compare the incidence of residual high-grade vesicoureteral reflux (HVUR) (≥Grade III) in neurogenic bladder patients receiving augmentation cystoplasty alone or with simultaneous ureteral reimplantation. Furthermore, we also tried to find the risk factors of residual VUR and febrile urinary tract infection. Between 1999 and 2009, urinary bladder augmentation was performed in 21 children with neurogenic bladder. Seventeen of these patients had VUR on preoperative voiding cystourethrography, of whom 11 patients (14 ureters) received augmentation alone (Group A) and 6 patients (8 ureters) received simultaneously ureteral reimplantation (Group B). Univariate logistic regression analysis and Fisher exact test were used for statistical analysis. Six patients (8 ureters) had residual HVURs in Group A, but none in Group B. The incidences of residual HVUR were 57.14% and 0%, respectively. Seven patients had febrile UTIs after operation, 6 of them had residual HVURs. In risk factor analysis, postoperative follow-up duration less than 12 months and lack of anti-reflux operation were significant risk factors for residual HVUR; the residual HVUR was the significant risk factor for febrile urinary tract infection. Simultaneous ureteral reimplantation reduces postop HVUR significantly. We recommend augmentation and simultaneous ureteral reimplantation in children with HVUR and neurogenic bladder if technically feasible. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Evaluate the impact of neurogenic bladder in veterans with traumatic spinal cord injury.

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    Rabadi, Meheroz H; Aston, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This observational study aimed to determine the prevalence of neurogenic bladder (NGB), and its impact (frequency of urinary tract infection [UTI], autonomic dysreflexia (AD) pressure ulcers, spasticity, and hospitalization rates) on veterans with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). NGB (detrusor muscle and urethral sphincter dysfunction with loss of bladder sensation to void), secondary to SCI, is commonly encountered in daily practice; however, its impact on veterans' overall health has been less well studied. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic charts of veterans with SCI enrolled in our program and regularly followed in our SCI clinic. Demographic data collected included: age, sex, race/ethnicity, and age, level, severity and cause of spinal injury. Also noted was presence of NGB, episodes of UTI, presence of pressure ulcers, AD, spasticity, and hospitalization rate. Differences between those with and without NGB were evaluated using Generalized Linear Models. Of 161 veterans with SCI, symptoms of NGB was present in 133 (83%). Presence of NGB was associated with severe spinal cord injury. Veterans with NGB had more frequent UTI and presence of pressure ulcers (P < 0.05). They also were more likely to need hospitalization and were at an increased risk of dying. Incidence of NGB in veterans with SCI is high, is mainly associated with severe spinal cord injury, and severely impacts veterans' health by frequently causing UTIs, increasing hospitalization rate, and increases risk of death.

  18. Neurogenic bladder evaluation and management after spinal cord injury: Current practice among urologists working in Saudi Arabia

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    Waleed Al Taweel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the current trends in the management and surveillance of the NB population secondary to spinal cord injury (SCI or myelomeningocele by certified urologist working in Saudi Arabia and to compare it to the current guidelines. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a 12-points questionnaire distributed to urologists working in Saudi Arabia and registered at the Saudi medical association. The assessment and follow-up of upper and lower urinary tract function in neurogenic bladder patients, their optimal frequency and management of related infections were the topics of inquiry. Results: Of the 272 urologists surveyed, 105 responded, yielding a response rate of 38%. Eighty-nine percent of respondents said that ultrasound was their diagnostic tool of choice for upper tract evaluation. Sixty-one percent of respondents said that they would follow their patients with a multichannel urodynamic study. Forty percent of urologists stated that they would treat asymptomatic bacteriuria. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC was the most common modality chosen for the management of neurogenic bladder in patients with emptying difficulties. Conclusion: This study confirms that most urologists in Saudi Arabia involved with neurogenic bladder management. However, more than one third of the urologists do not have urodynamic machine and only two of the reporting practitioners has a videourodynamic machine. The results emphasize the need for clear guidelines in this field of urology in Saudi Arabia. Highly specialized rehabilitation centers for neurogenic bladder secondary to SCI are required for optimal care and urologist teaching.

  19. Management of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder: challenges and solutions

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    Pannek J

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jürgen Pannek, Jens Wöllner Neuro-Urology, Swiss Paraplegic Center, Nottwil, Switzerland Introduction: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are one of the most common morbidities in persons with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD. They are associated with a significant morbidity and mortality, and they affect the quality of life of the affected patients. Diagnosis and treatment of UTI in this group of patients are challenging. In this review, the current strategies regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are summarized. Diagnostics: it is important to correctly diagnose a UTI, as treatment of bacteriuria should strictly be avoided. A UTI is defined as a combination of laboratory findings (leukocyturia and bacteriuria and symptoms. Laboratory findings without symptoms are classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria. Routine urine screening is not advised. Treatment: Only UTI should be treated; treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is not indicated. Prior to treatment, urine for a urine culture should be obtained. Antibiotic treatment for ~7 days is advised. Prevention: In recurrent UTI, bladder management should be optimized and morphologic causes for UTI should be excluded. If UTIs persist, medical prophylaxis should be considered. Currently, no prophylactic measure with evidence-based efficacy exists. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis should be used merely as an ultimate measure. Among the various mentioned innovative approaches for UTI prevention, bacteriophages, intravesical instillations, complementary and alternative medicine techniques, and probiotics seem to be most promising. Conclusion: Recently, several promising innovative options for UTI prophylaxis have been developed which may help overcome the current therapeutic dilemma. However, further well designed studies are necessary to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these approaches. Keywords: neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, spinal cord injury, prophylaxis

  20. [Urinary infection in patients with neurogenic bladder: patterns of resistance to the most frequent uropathogens].

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    Romero-Cullerés, G; Planells-Romeo, I; Martinez de Salazar-Muñoz, P; Conejero-Sugrañes, J

    2012-09-01

    To analyze the most frequent causes and resistances of the uropathogens in patients affected by neurogenic bladder. A total of 284 patients, in whom a total of 284 urinary cultures were performed, were included. Of these, 106 came from patients with neurological injuries, 28 from a non-neurogenic control group, 75 from patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of our Hospital and 75 patients who came into the emergency room with the symptoms of an acute urinary tract infection. A quantitative urine culture was performed in a chromogenic media and the resistances of all urine cultures that were positive for one or two micro-organisms were identified and studied. A total of 67% of the patients with neurological injuries had positive urine cultures compared to 25% of control group patients. The urine cultures of patients admitted into the ICU and those of the Emergency Room group were 100% positive, since the first 75 positive urine cultures were selected for the study. E.coli was the most-frequently microorganism isolated in the group of neurological patients, as well as among the patients from the Emergency Room and from the control group. In the ICU, the most-frequently isolated micro-organism was Enterococcus spp. (19.4%), followed by P. aeruginosa (16.5%). The study of resistances in general E. coli has high rates of resistance to ampicillin and co-trimoxazole and, although to a lesser degree to ciprofloxacin. E. coli is the micro-organism most frequently isolated among all of the groups except in the ICU, where it is surpassed by Enterococcus spp. and P. aeruginosa. The resistances among the four population groups studied have different features, overall showing a low rate of resistance to nitrofurantoin and especially to fosfomycin, observed in patients from the Emergency Room or admitted to the ICU and neurological patients. Copyright © 2011 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin A intradetrusor injections in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity/neurogenic overactive bladder: a systematic review.

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    Soljanik, Irina

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) is increasingly used for therapy of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) refractory to antimuscarinics or where patients are experiencing antimuscarinic-related side effects. The objective was to compare and critically discuss the reported efficacy and safety of BoNTA in adults with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Studies published between January 1985 and July 2012 were identified in the MEDLINE (PubMed) and SCOPUS databases. A search for studies with onabotulinumtoxinA--the only formulation of BoNTA approved by the US FDA in adults with NDO--was performed. Exclusion criteria were urethral sphincter injection, no separate analysis between onabotulinumtoxinA and other formulations of BoNTA, mean follow-up ≤ 4 weeks and studies with ten or fewer patients. Clinical and urodynamic parameters for efficacy, adverse events (AEs) and tolerability were reviewed to offer recommendations for practice and future research. A total of 28 included studies revealed superior effects of onabotulinumtoxinA compared with placebo in achieving continence, reducing incontinence episodes, improving urodynamic parameters and health-related quality of life. The most frequently reported AEs were de novo intermittent catheterization, urinary retention and asymptomatic urinary infection. Limitations of this review are the inclusion of studies with the level-3 evidence (22/28 studies), the heterogenicity of outcome parameters and time points chosen for follow-up reported in the reviewed studies. OnabotulinumtoxinA therapy is effective, safe and well tolerated in adults with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Further high-quality prospective trial data are required to determine the optimal dose, injection technique, long-term safety, favourable timing, indications for re-injections, and the impact of concomitant antimuscarinics on onabotulinumtoxinA therapy.

  2. Genetic Evaluation of E. coli Strains Isolated from Asymptomatic Children with Neurogenic Bladders

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    John Kryger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to describe the genetic profiles of E. coli that colonize asymptomatic pediatric neurogenic bladders. E. coli was isolated from 25 of 80 urine samples. Patients were excluded if they presented with symptomatic urinary tract infection or received treatment with antibiotics in the preceding three months. Multiplex PCR was performed to determine E. coli phylotype (A, B1, B2, and D and the presence of seven pathogenicity islands (PAIs and 10 virulence factors (VFs. E. coli strains were predominantly of the B1 and B2 phylotype, with few strains in the A or D phylotype. The PAIs IV536, ICFT073, and IICFT073 had the highest prevalence: 76%, 64%, and 48%, respectively. The PAIs II536, IJ96, and IIJ96 were less prevalent: 28%, 20%, and 24%, respectively. The most prevalent VF was vat (40%, while the least prevalent VFs were sfa (8% and iha (12%. None of the strains carried the VF fyuA, which is very common in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. The genetic profiles of E. coli in this cohort seem to be more similar to UPEC than to commensal E. coli. However, they appear to have reduced virulence potential that allows them to colonize asymptomatically.

  3. Staphylococcus saprophyticus native valve endocarditis in a diabetic patient with neurogenic bladder: A case report.

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    Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Kusaba, Koji; Yamakuchi, Hiroki; Hamada, Yohei; Urakami, Toshiharu; Aoki, Yosuke

    2015-09-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with 2-day history of malaise and dyspnea. He had mitral prolapse and type II diabetes mellitus with neurogenic bladder, which was cared for by catheterization on his own. On arrival the patient was in septic condition with hypoxemia, and physical examination revealed systolic murmur at the apex. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed vegetation of the mitral and the aortic valve. The presence of continuous bacteremia was confirmed by multiple sets of blood culture, whereby gram-positive cocci was retrieved and identified as Staphylococcus saprophyticus (S. saprophyticus) both phenotypically and genetically. Because two major criteria of the Modified Duke Criteria were met, the patient was diagnosed with native valve endocarditis due to S. saprophyticus. The urine culture was also positive for gram-positive cocci, phenotypically identified as Staphylococcus warneri, which was subsequently identified as S. saprophyticus with the use of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and MALDI-TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry), indicating strongly that the intermittent catheterization-associated urinary tract infection resulted in bacteremia that eventually lead to infective endocarditis. This patient was treated with vancomycin and clindamycin. Because of multiple cerebral infarctions, the patient underwent mitral and aortic valve replacement on hospital day 5. Blood culture turned negative at 6th hospital day. Antibiotic therapy was continued for six weeks after surgery. The patient's clinical course was uneventful thereafter, and was discharged home. This is the first case report of native valve endocarditis caused by S. saprophyticus of confirmed urinary origin. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical profile of motor neuron disease patients with lower urinary tract symptoms and neurogenic bladder.

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    Vázquez-Costa, Juan Francisco; Arlandis, Salvador; Hervas, David; Martínez-Cuenca, Esther; Cardona, Fernando; Pérez-Tur, Jordi; Broseta, Enrique; Sevilla, Teresa

    2017-07-15

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are frequent in motor neuron disease (MND) patients, but clinical factors related to them are unknown. We describe differences in LUTS among MND phenotypes and their relationship with other clinical characteristics, including prognosis. For this study, we collected clinical data of a previously published cohort of patients diagnosed with classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (cALS), progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) or primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) with and without LUTS. Familial history was recorded and the C9ORF72 expansion was analysed in the entire cohort. Patients were followed-up for survival until August 2016. Fifty-five ALS patients (37 cALS, 10 PMA and 8 PLS) were recruited. Twenty-four reported LUTS and neurogenic bladder (NB) could be demonstrated in nine of them. LUTS were not influenced by age, phenotype, disability, cognitive or behavioural impairment, or disease progression, but female sex appeared to be a protective factor (OR=0.39, p=0.06). Neither family history nor the C9ORF72 expansion was linked to LUTS or NB. In the multivariate analysis, patients reporting LUTS early in the disease course tended to show poorer survival. In this study, LUTS appear to be more frequent in male MND patients, but are not related to age, clinical or genetic characteristics. When reported early, LUTS could be a sign of rapid disease spread and poor prognosis. Further prospective longitudinal and neuroimaging studies are warranted to confirm this hypothesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Toward Self-Control Systems for Neurogenic Underactive Bladder: A Triboelectric Nanogenerator Sensor Integrated with a Bistable Micro-Actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab Hassani, Faezeh; Mogan, Roshini P; Gammad, Gil G L; Wang, Hao; Yen, Shih-Cheng; Thakor, Nitish V; Lee, Chengkuo

    2018-04-24

    Aging, neurologic diseases, and diabetes are a few risk factors that may lead to underactive bladder (UAB) syndrome. Despite all of the serious consequences of UAB, current solutions, the most common being ureteric catheterization, are all accompanied by serious shortcomings. The necessity of multiple catheterizations per day for a physically able patient not only reduces the quality of life with constant discomfort and pain but also can end up causing serious complications. Here, we present a bistable actuator to empty the bladder by incorporating shape memory alloy components integrated on flexible polyvinyl chloride sheets. The introduction of two compression and restoration phases for the actuator allows for repeated actuation for a more complete voiding of the bladder. The proposed actuator exhibits one of the highest reported voiding percentages of up to 78% of the bladder volume in an anesthetized rat after only 20 s of actuation. This amount of voiding is comparable to the common catheterization method, and its one time implantation onto the bladder rectifies the drawbacks of multiple catheterizations per day. Furthermore, the scaling of the device for animal models larger than rats can be easily achieved by adjusting the number of nitinol springs. For neurogenic UAB patients with degraded nerve function as well as degenerated detrusor muscle, we integrate a flexible triboelectric nanogenerator sensor with the actuator to detect the fullness of the bladder. The sensitivity of this sensor to the filling status of the bladder shows its capability for defining a self-control system in the future that would allow autonomous micturition.

  6. Efficacy, tolerability and safety profile of propiverine in the treatment of the overactive bladder (non-neurogenic and neurogenic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madersbacher, H; Mürtz, G

    2001-11-01

    Propiverine hydrochloride (propiverine) is a compound that has neurotropic and musculotropic effects on the urinary bladder smooth muscle. Controlled clinical trials have shown its effectiveness in treating detrusor hyperreflexia and in treating patients with symptoms of an overactive bladder: this is true not only for adults but in children and the elderly as well. European and Japanese studies have also documented that propiverine is well tolerated. It is better tolerated than oxybutynin (particularly in regard to frequency and severity of dryness of the mouth). In several Japanese studies authors demonstrated that propiverine is well tolerated on a long-term basis. Voigt reported an adverse event incidence rate of 13% in a follow-up investigation during 10 years of treatment. A post-marketing drug surveillance consisting of 4390 patients provided additional data concerning efficacy and safety of propiverine. It is one of the few drugs recommended for the treatment of detrusor overactivity by the Committee on Pharmacological Treatment during the First International Consultation on Incontinence.

  7. The effectiveness of ureteric reimplantation during bladder augmentation for high-grade vesicoureteric reflux in patients with neurogenic bladder: long-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yutaka; Kato, Yoshifumi; Okazaki, Tadaharu; Lane, Geoffrey J; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamataka, Atsuyuki

    2007-12-01

    The outcome of ureteric reimplantation (UR) during bladder augmentation (BA) for high-grade vesicoureteric reflux (HVUR) in patients with neurogenic bladder was assessed to determine the effectiveness of UR. A literature review of HVUR and BA was also performed. Twenty-two consecutive sigmoidocolocystoplasty patients were reviewed retrospectively; 10 had unilateral HVUR only, 3 had bilateral HVUR, and 9 had unilateral HVUR associated with low-grade VUR in the contralateral renal unit (RU). Preoperatively, VUR was grade V in 3 RU, grade IV in 22 RU, grade III in 5 RU, and grade II in 4 RU. Ureteric reimplantation was performed in the native bladder in 24 RU (16 patients) and in the colon cap in 10 RU (6 patients). Mean age at sigmoidocolocystoplasty/UR was 8.5 years (range, 2-15 years). Mean follow-up was 12.8 years (range, 2-22 years). Postoperatively, cystourethrography showed residual VUR (grade IV to grade III) in only 1 RU (3%); diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid scintigraphy showed no obstruction in all RU; (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid was improved in 13 RU, unchanged in 18 RU, and worsened in 3 RU; and serum creatinine remained normal in 20 patients and worsened in 2. Urinary tract infection, universal preoperatively, was seen postoperatively in only 2 patients. In the literature, 0% to 16.7% of HVUR persisted after BA alone, and no long-term data were available. Ureteric reimplantation during BA is safe and effective for treating HVUR in patients with neurogenic bladder.

  8. Transvaginal sling suspension of bladder neck in female patients with neurogenic sphincter incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, Pieter; Klijn, Aart J.; van Gool, Jan D.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.

    2003-01-01

    Many surgical options exist to enhance bladder neck closing pressure in women. Most procedures are relatively large with a success rate of between 70% and 90%. Sling procedures with the sling placed between the anterior vaginal wall and bladder neck cause a risk of traumatic lesions of the bladder

  9. Results of the treatment of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in spinal cord injury by sacral posterior root rhizotomy and anterior sacral root stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kerrebroeck, P. E.; Koldewijn, E. L.; Rosier, P. F.; Wijkstra, H.; Debruyne, F. M.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated the results of treatment of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in spinal cord injury by sacral posterior root rhizotomy and anterior sacral root stimulation using the Finetech-Brindley stimulator. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 52 patients with spinal cord lesions and urological

  10. Supratrigonal cystectomy with Hautmann pouch as treatment for neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients: long-term functional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeaux, Nicolas; Yates, David R; Denys, Pierre; Even-Schneider, Alexia; Richard, Francois; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel

    2012-06-01

    To study clinical and urodynamic data along with immediate and long-term morbidity of surgical management of neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients Single-center retrospective study of 61 SCI patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) related urinary incontinence and/or sphincter weakness incontinence who underwent supratrigonal cystectomy with Hautmann pouch ± concomitant stress incontinence procedure (27.9%; n = 17). With a mean follow-up of 5.84 years (range 1-20.5) an improved or total continence rate was achieved in 89.7% and 74.1%, respectively. Surgery failed (incontinence persisted) for six (10.3%) patients, three of which had a simultaneous procedure for stress incontinence. On urodynamics, maximum cystometric capacity (MCC) (ml) increased from 305.2 to 509.4 (P infection and preserving upper tract function, which is reflected in the improvement on urodynamics. The incidence of secondary bowel dysfunction and potential risk of a simultaneous procedure for stress incontinence needs to be discussed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Bacterial ecology and resistance to antibiotics in patients with neurogenic overactive bladder treated with intravesical botulinum toxin injections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J; Le Breton, F; Jousse, M; Haddad, R; Verollet, D; Guinet-Lacoste, A; Amarenco, G

    2014-10-01

    For the last ten years, botulinum neurotoxin type A has become the gold standard for the treatment of neurogenic overactive detrusor. Bacterial colonization is common for these patients using clean intermittent self-catheterization, and toxin injections are at risk of urinary tract infections. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of different germs and their resistance to antibiotics in patients with neurogenic bladder, treated with intravesical botulinum toxin injections. This epidemiologic study took place from September to October 2012 in a urodynamic and neurourology unit in a teaching hospital in Paris, France. Eighty patients with a valid urine culture according to our protocol, were included. Fourty-four culture were positive with 45 bacteria. We found an Escherichia coli in 42.5%, a Klebsiella pneumoniae in 7.5%, a Citrobacter freundii and an enterococcus in 2.5%, and a Staphylococcus aureus in 1.25%. Penicillin resistance were found in 51.11%, 3rd generation cephalosporins in 8.89%, quinolones in 28.89% and sulfamids in 24.44%. None were resistant to fosfomycin. E. coli was the most frequent bacterium. No resistance to fosfomycin was found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Usefulness of classical homoeopathy for the prevention of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction: A case series

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    Jürgen Pannek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to Spinal Cord Injury (SCI, recurrent Urinary Tract Infections (UTI, is a frequently encountered clinical problem. Often, conventional preventive measures are not successful. Aims: To treat the patients of SCI suffering from recurrent UTI with classical homoeopathy as add-on to standard urologic care. Materials and Methods: After exclusion of morphological abnormalities and initiation of a standard regime for prophylaxis, all patients with a neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to SCI, with more than three symptomatic UTI/year, were offered additional homoeopathic care. Symptoms were fever, incontinence, increased spasticity, decreased bladder capacity or pain/decreased general health combined with significant bacteriuria. Descriptive statistics was used for analysis. Results: Eight patients were followed up for a median period of 15 months. Five patients remained free of UTI, whereas UTI frequency was reduced in three patients. Conclusion: Our initial experience with homoeopathic prevention of UTI as add on to standard urologic prophylactic measures is encouraging. For an evidence-based evaluation of this concept, prospective studies are required. Keys for the positive outcome of this case series are co-operation of well-qualified partners, mutual respect and the motivation to co-operate closely.

  13. Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid bladder neck injection for persistent outlet incompetency after sling procedures in children with neurogenic urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaJusta, Daniel; Gargollo, Patricio; Snodgrass, Warren

    2013-06-01

    We report outcomes after dextranomer/hyaluronic acid (Dx/HA) bladder neck injection for persistent outlet incompetency despite prior sling or Leadbetter/Mitchell bladder neck revision plus sling (LMS) in children with neurogenic urinary incontinence. Consecutive patients with outlet incompetency after sling (n = 17) or LMS (n = 9) underwent a maximum of 2 Dx/HA injections. Antegrade and/or retrograde endoscopy was used to access the bladder outlet, and injection done in quadrants to achieve visual mucosal coaptation. Outcomes were described as either "dry", not requiring pads, or "wet". There were 24 children with follow-up after injection, of which 9 (38%) were initially dry and 15 (62%) remained wet. Of the 9 dry patients, 4 had recurrent incontinence at a mean of 16 months while 5 remained dry at a mean of 27 months. Second injections were done in a total of 14 children, with 1 dry at 39 months. Of all 24 children, up to 2 injections resulted in 6 (25%) dry patients, while the remainder was wet at last follow-up. Gender, initial outlet surgery, pre-injection pad use, injection technique, and volume injected did not predict outcomes. Dx/HA bladder neck injection resulted in dryness in 25% of patients in this series after failed sling or LMS. Second injections after either initial failure or success achieved dryness in only 7%, and are no longer recommended. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anticholinergic drugs versus non-drug active therapies for non-neurogenic overactive bladder syndrome in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Cody, June D; Alhasso, Ammar; Stewart, Laurence

    2012-12-12

    Overactive bladder syndrome is defined as urgency with or without urgency incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia. Pharmacotherapy with anticholinergic drugs is often the first line medical therapy, either alone or as an adjunct to various non-pharmacological therapies after conservative options such as reducing intake of caffeine drinks have been tried. Non-pharmacologic therapies consist of bladder training, pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback, behavioural modification, electrical stimulation and surgical interventions. To compare the effects of anticholinergic drugs with various non-pharmacologic therapies for non-neurogenic overactive bladder syndrome in adults. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register (searched 4 September 2012), which includes searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and MEDLINE, and the reference lists of relevant articles. All randomised or quasi-randomised, controlled trials of treatment with anticholinergic drugs for overactive bladder syndrome or urgency urinary incontinence in adults in which at least one management arm involved a non-drug therapy. Trials amongst patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction were excluded. Two authors evaluated the trials for appropriateness for inclusion and risk of bias. Two authors were involved in the data extraction. Data extraction was based on predetermined criteria. Data analysis was based on standard statistical approaches used in Cochrane reviews. Twenty three trials were included with a total of 3685 participants, one was a cross-over trial and the other 22 were parallel group trials. The duration of follow up varied from two to 52 weeks. The trials were generally small and of poor methodological quality. During treatment, symptomatic improvement was more common amongst those participants on anticholinergic drugs compared with bladder training in seven small trials (73/174, 42% versus 98/172, 57% not

  15. What do we know about neurogenic bladder prevalence and management in developing countries and emerging regions of the world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przydacz, Mikolaj; Denys, Pierre; Corcos, Jacques

    2017-09-01

    To summarize information on Neurogenic Bladder (NB) epidemiology, management and access to patient treatment in developing countries and emerging regions of the world in order to propose future interventions and help governmental as well as non-governmental organizations design their action plans. Different search methods were used to gather the maximum available data. They included strategic searches; reference checks; grey literature searches (reports, working papers, government documents, civil society information); contacting professional societies, registries, and authors; requesting unpublished data from organizations; and browsing related websites and journals. The incidence and prevalence rates of NB in developing countries are difficult to establish because epidemiological reports are few and far between. The frequency of bladder dysfunction in neurologically impaired populations can be approximately estimated in some of these countries. Similar information paucity affects diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to NB patients living in less-developed regions of the world. The assessment and management of NB seems to vary markedly between countries, and care of patients from emerging regions of the world is often inadequate. Strong concerted efforts are needed on the part of international scientific societies, non-governmental organizations and local governments to work together to change the prognosis for these patients and to improve their quality of life. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Predictive Factors for Intermittent Self-catheterization in German and Brazilian Individuals With Spina Bifida and Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faleiros, Fabiana; Käppler, Christoph; Costa, Juliana Neves; Favoretto, Naira; Pontes, Fernando

    Our study aimed to identify predictive factors for the use of intermittent self-catheterization (ISC) in persons with spina bifida (SB) and neurogenic bladder. Cultural effects were evaluated by comparing ISC use in individuals from 2 countries, Germany and Brazil. Cross-sectional, descriptive study. The study included 71 Brazilian and 77 German individuals with SB (108 females and 92 males), aged between 6 and 55 years, who have used ISC for bladder management. Data were collected using printed (Brazil) and online (Germany) questionnaires, with 53 questions related to intermittent catheterization (IC) technique, the materials used in IC, difficulties with IC, and sociodemographic and health variables. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and multivariate logistical regression. Self-catheterization and assisted catheterization were used for 92 and 56 patients, respectively. Intermittent self-catheterization was more common in German participants (79.2%), while most Brazilian participants used assisted catheterization (56.3%). The following variables influenced the choice of catheterization method, according to logistic regression: age, education level, presence of hydrocephalus, severity of SB, and nationality. The variables unrelated to ISC use included gender, difficulty obtaining ISC equipment or learning to perform ISC, and wheelchair dependency. The identification of predictive factors for ISC improved our understanding of ISC in SB patients and should aid in the development of more effective strategies to increase ISC use.

  17. Clinical guidelines for male lower urinary tract symptoms associated with non-neurogenic overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Cheng Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this guideline is to direct urologists and patients regarding how to identify overactive bladder (OAB in male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS and to make an accurate diagnosis and establish treatment goals to improve the patients' quality of life (QoL. LUTS are commonly divided into storage, voiding, and postmicturition symptoms, and are highly prevalent in elderly men. LUTS can result from a complex interplay of pathophysiologic features that can include bladder dysfunction and bladder outlet dysfunction such as benign prostatic obstruction (BPO or poor relaxation of the urethral sphincter. Diagnosis of OAB in male LUTS leads to accurate diagnosis of pure OAB and bladder outlet-related OAB, and appropriate treatment in men with residual storage symptoms after treatment for LUTS.

  18. Study of kidney damage in paediatric patients with neurogenic bladder and its relationship with the pattern of bladder function and treatment received.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, M; Somoza, I; Curros-Mata, N

    2016-01-01

    Kidney failure is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with myelodysplasia. We analysed the presence of renal lesions in these patients using dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy and related their presence with the type of vesical function and the delay in receiving appropriate management. We performed a retrospective study of patients with myelodysplasia treated in our hospital since 2004. We analysed the epidemiological and clinical data and the pattern of bladder function according to urodynamic studies. We classified the patients into 4 urodynamic patterns according to detrusor and sphincter behaviour. We linked this behaviour to renal function in the scintigraphy and the care received since birth. The study included 39 patients with myelodysplasia. The most common bladder pattern was type A (61.5%), with sphincter and detrusor hyperactivity, followed by type D (20.5%), C (7.8%) and B (5.1%). Some 38% of our patients (n=15) had some type of nephropathy. Some 92.9% of the children who were properly treated during the first year of their life had no renal lesions in the scintigraphy. We found some type of nephropathy in 56% of the patients for whom appropriate treatment was delayed for more than a year. The nephropathy was more severe the later the management was started. There is a statistically significant relationship between a delay in treatment and impairment in renal scintigraphy in patients with neurogenic bladders. The early study and treatment of patients is essential for decreasing renal impairment, reducing the need for surgery and improving the continence options. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term followup after endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux with dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackwich, A S; Skoog, S J; Austin, J C

    2012-10-01

    Subureteral injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer is a minimally invasive method to treat vesicoureteral reflux. We report short and long-term success in treating secondary vesicoureteral reflux in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction or severe voiding dysfunction. We performed a retrospective chart review of all subureteral injection procedures done to identify patients with neurogenic bladder or severe voiding dysfunction. Short (less than 12 months) and long-term vesicoureteral reflux results for patients and ureters were recorded. Preoperative urodynamics and radiographic findings were reviewed. Preoperative factors were evaluated to identify patients with greater chances of success. A total of 12 patients (17 ureters) were identified (10 with neurogenic bladder and 2 with Hinman syndrome). Short-term success (no vesicoureteral reflux) was achieved in 50% of patients and 58% of ureters. At a median followup of 4.5 years (range 1 to 9) success decreased to 35% of ureters. Overall, long-term success was found in 25% of patients who were free of vesicoureteral reflux and required no additional surgery. Of the patients 41% required additional urological surgery for vesicoureteral reflux or related conditions. With long-term followup many patients who had initial improvement in vesicoureteral reflux ultimately experienced treatment failure and recurrence of reflux. At a median of 4.5 years 25% of patients with neurogenic bladder and vesicoureteral reflux were successfully treated with endoscopic injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Conditional Electrical Stimulation in Animal and Human Models for Neurogenic Bladder: Working Toward a Neuroprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C R

    2016-12-01

    Sacral neuromodulation has had a tremendous impact on the treatment of urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms for patients with neurologic conditions. This stimulation does not use real-time data from the body or input from the patient. Incorporating this is the goal of those pursuing a neuroprosthesis to enhance bladder function for these patients. Investigators have demonstrated the effectiveness of conditional (also called closed-loop) feedback in animal models as well as limited human studies. Dorsal genital nerve, pudendal nerve, S3 afferent nerve roots, S1 and S2 ganglia have all been used as targets for stimulation. Most of these have also been used as sources of afferent nerve information using sophisticated nerve electrode arrays and filtering algorithms to detect significant bladder events and even to estimate the fullness of the bladder. There are problems with afferent nerve sensing, however. Some of these include sensor migration and low signal to noise ratios. Implantable pressure sensors have also been investigated that have their own unique challenges, such as erosion and sensor drift. As technology improves, an intelligent neuroprosthesis with the ability to sense significant bladder events and stimulate as needed will evolve.

  1. Strategies for prevention of urinary tract infections in neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Lance L; Klausner, Adam P

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the problem of urinary tract infections (UTIs) after spinal cord injury and disorders is defined, the relationship of bladder management to UTIs is discussed, and mechanical and medical strategies for UTI prevention in spinal cord injury and disorders are described. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction Presenting as Urinary Retention in Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease

    OpenAIRE

    McNamara, Erin R.; Sullivan, Jennifer; Nagaraj, Shashi K.; Wiener, John S.; Kishnani, Priya S.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronopathic Gaucher disease can present as a continuum of clinical findings, including somatic symptoms of anemia, thrombocytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and bone disease as well as neurologic sequelae. There is a spectrum of neurologic symptoms ranging from oculomotor apraxia to severe convulsions. The heterozygosity of phenotypes makes it difficult to predict the disease course. We describe an 8-year-old male with neuronopathic type III Gaucher disease who developed bladder dysfunction and...

  3. Management of urinary tract infection with intravesical amikacin may increase the risk of bladder oxidative stress in children with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amasyali, Akin Soner; Yilmaz, Dilek; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Kucukdurmaz, Faruk; Sonmez, Ferah; Erol, Haluk

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated the bladder oxidative stress in neurogenic bladder children treated with intravesical amikacin for recurrent UTI and whether urinary isoprostane f2 alpha (F2-IsoP) is a good biomarker in this particular condition. This prospectively designed controlled study was approved by the Adnan Menderes University institutional ethics committee (Adnan Menderes University, 2015/649). Between January 2016 and January 2017, twenty-six children with meningomyelocele who had been doing CIC were recruited. Serum and urine samples were collected during urinary tract infection (UTI) (group 1) and after management of UTI with intravesical amikacin (group 2) besides standard oral antibiotic treatment. While oxidative stress parameters SOD, GSH, GPX, MDA, F2-IsoP and NO were analyzed in the serum samples, only F2-IsoP was analyzed in the urine. All data were compared with 23 normal healthy control children (group 3). Median age, CIC duration and number of CIC per day of patients' group were 84 (60-147) months, 60 (30-90) months and 4 (4-6), respectively. Male-to-female ratio was 1:16. There was no statistical difference between groups in terms of serum oxidative stress parameters (p > 0.05). However, statistically significant urine F2-IsoP changes exist between groups (p = 0.011) (Fig. 1). But there were no correlations between urine F2-IsoP and disease clinical data such as CIC duration or number of CIC per day. Serum glutathione levels in group 2 were higher than group 1 and 3, as well (p = 0.023, Kruskal-Wallis test). Fig. 1 Comparison of median urinary isoprostane f2 alpha levels CONCLUSION: Higher urine F2-IsoP levels after management of UTI with intravesical amikacin may reflect increased lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in children with NB. This detrimental effect on bladder should be considered in the long-term treatment period.

  4. Clinical efficacy of an anticolinergic agent in HAM/TPS patients with neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néviton Matos de Castro

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the efficacy of the propantheline bromide inneurogenic bladder in HTLV-I infected patients. Methods: From January/2001 to February/2004, twenty-one HTLV-I-carriers (7 men and 14 womenwere selected for treatment with propantheline bromide 15 mg, PO, 2 to 3times a day for 3 months, not discontinuing in the follow-up. At the end ofthe treatment period, patients were revaluated through specificquestionnaires for urinary symptoms (UDI and quality of life (Ditrovie.Results: From the 21 patients enrolled, 15 (71.4% presented importantclinical improvement, referring decrease of urinary frequency, urgencyand loss, nocturia, and even total control of the dysfunction. Conclusion:We observed an efficient response to the anticholinergic agentpropantheline bromide in urinary dysfunction caused by the HTLV-I.

  5. Creation of a continent urinary channel in adults with neurogenic bladder: long-term results with the Monti and Casale (Spiral Monti) procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, David; Anderson, Kirk; Knopick, Christopher R; Shah, Ketul; Flynn, Brian J

    2014-05-01

    To describe our technique and long-term results with creation of a continent urinary channel in adults with neurogenic bladder (NGB) using a single piece of bowel. From 2004 to 2013, 26 adult patients underwent creation of a continent urinary channel by a single surgeon. A retrospective medical record review was performed noting the indications, technique, concomitant procedures, complications, and outcomes. Continence outcome, ease of catheterization, and need for further surgical interventions are reported. Twenty women and 6 men were identified with a mean age of 48 years (range, 25-80) and a follow-up of 64 months (range, 22-100). The mean body mass index (BMI) was 30.5 kg/m(2) (range, 20.1-50.2). All patients had benign bladder disease, including 22 (85%) with known neurologic disease and 4 with a devastated bladder outlet. Creation of a continent urinary channel was performed using the single Monti tube in 1, double Monti tube in 7, and the Casale (Spiral Monti) in 18. Mean hospital stay was 10.5 days (range, 5-37). The most common complication was recurrent urinary tract infection that occurred in 14 patients (54%). There were 5 (19%) bowel complications and 1 (4%) bladder perforation. The percentage of patients continuing to catheterize via the stoma with a BMI of 40 kg/m(2) was 89%, 50%, and 25%, respectively. The Monti and Casale procedures are effective in creating a long continent urinary channel for catheterization in the adult population with neurogenic bladder, regardless of BMI. However, despite an intact channel, stomal self-catheterization appears to be challenging in morbidly obese patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy on urodynamics and oxidative damage of nerve in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder

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    Ming-Bao Ye

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy on urodynamics and oxidative damage of nerve in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder. Methods: A total of 78 patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=39, control group received conventional therapy and observation group received conventional therapy + α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy. Before treatment and after one course of treatment, urodynamic indexes, peripheral nerve conduction latency time and serum indexes of two groups were detected respectively. Results: After one course of treatment, RUV, Pdet, FS, T and C value as well as ROS, MDA, SP, NPY and ChAT content of both groups were significantly lower than those before treatment, MFR value as well as GSH, SOD, BDNF and CNTF content was significantly higher than those before treatment, and the sensory conduction latency time of median nerve and ulnar nerve as well as motor conduction latency time of median nerve and peroneal nerve were shorter than those before treatment (P<0.05; RUV, Pdet, FS, T and C value as well as ROS, MDA, SP, NPY and ChAT content of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group, MFR value as well as GSH, SOD, BDNF and CNTF content was significantly higher than those of control group, and the sensory conduction latency time of median nerve and ulnar nerve as well as motor conduction latency time of median nerve and peroneal nerve were significantly shorter than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy can optimize the urodynamics in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder and also reduce the oxidative damage of nerve, and it is an effective solution for treatment of such disease.

  7. Intravesical prostatic protrusion correlates well with storage symptoms in elderly male patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yen Lu

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: In elderly male patients with non-neurogenic OAB, more severe storage symptoms are associated with a lower maximum flow rate and a more prominent IPP, indicating that a significant cause of male non-neurogenic OAB is prostate associated.

  8. The paediatric neuropathic bladder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A neurogenic bladder can be defined as a dysfunctinal urinary bladder caused by disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves involved in the control of micturition (urination). In pathophysiological terms, a neurogenic bladder is caused by a spinal reflex arc that occurs when the bladder becomes autonomous.

  9. Emergence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in catheter-associated urinary tract infection in neurogenic bladder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaba, Kei; Shigemura, Katsumi; Osawa, Kayo; Nomi, Masashi; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2014-03-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is a common clinic problem. The purpose of this study was to investigate recent trends in CAUTI in neurogenic bladder patients focusing on extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli. Isolates from the urine of neurogenic bladder patients with UTI were investigated. Nine strains of ESBL-producing E coli were assayed by molecular strain typing using the Diversilab system for repetitive-sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR). E coli accounted for most of the bacteria (74.1% to 81.0%) that produced ESBLs. Rep-PCR data showed that 7 out of 9 ESBL-producing E coli belonged to the same typing group with high similarity (more than 97% similarity) and that this distribution corresponded with antibiotic resistance patterns. ESBL producing E coli strains isolated from CAUTI patients could be discriminated by rep-PCR typing using the Diversilab system in consistent with antibiotic resistance patterns. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Retrograde pyelonephritis and lumbar spondylitis as a result of Salmonella typhi in a type 2 diabetes patient with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tatsuya; Bouchi, Ryotaro; Minami, Isao; Ohara, Norihiko; Nakano, Yujiro; Nishitani, Rie; Murakami, Masanori; Takeuchi, Takato; Akihisa, Momoko; Fujita, Masamichi; Izumiyama, Hajime; Hashimoto, Koshi; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of a 62-year-old diabetic woman with acute pyelonephritis and spondylitis caused by Salmonella typhi. She was admitted to Tokyo Medical Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, because of unconsciousness and was diagnosed with sepsis by retrograde pyelonephritis as a result of Salmonella typhi. Antibiotics treatment was immediately started; however, she subsequently developed lumbar spondylitis, and long-term conservative treatment with antibiotics and a fixing device were required. This is the first report of a diabetic patient who developed retrograde urinary tract infection with Salmonella typhi, followed by sepsis and spondylitis. The infection could be a result of diabetic neuropathy, presenting neurogenic bladder and hydronephrosis. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotics and became asymptomatic with normal inflammatory marker levels, and no clinical sign of recurrence was observed in the kidney and spine at 4 months.

  11. Retrospective clinic and urodynamic study in the neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisgros, Odile; Barnay, Jose-Luis; Darbon-Naghibzadeh, Farideh; Olive, Pascale; René-Corail, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    HTLV-I associated tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) and HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM) is an endemic disease in Caribbean Island. Bladder-sphincter dysfunctions are almost present. The objectives of the study are to describe clinic and urodynamic characteristics of voiding disorders in Martiniquan population, evaluate if there is a relationship between motor and urinary handicap, and evaluate prognosis factors of urologic complications. Retrospective study of 60 patients suffering from HAM/TSP. Clinical, urodynamic datas, scale of urinary and motor handicap (Urinary Symptom Profile [USP] questionnaire and Osame Score) were collected. Storage symptoms were the most frequent (75%) whatever type of detrusor activity. Detrusor overactivity was the most frequent disorder (68.3%). Bladder compliance was normal in half percent of the cases. Urethral activity was increased in 47% of the cases. Detrusor sphincter dysynergia was found in 78% of the cases, post-void residual in 58% of cases. Sixty five percent of the patients present at least one urologic complication (morphologic and/or infectious) but there was no correlation with motor enablement (P = 0.3097), neither urodynamic study (P = 0.432 for detrusor overactivity, P = 0.107 for detrusor underactivity, P = 0.058 for high urethral activity, P = 0.893 for detrusor sphincter dysynergia, P = 0.850 for post-void residual volume), neither with evolution duration of HAM/TSP (P = 0.348). USP score was not in correlation with Osame score (P = 0.07). Urologic symptoms are not always in relationship with urodynamic study: a systematic urodynamic study is necessary to evaluate HAM/TSP neurogenic bladder. No clinic or urodynamic criterias are predictive of urologic complications. These patients need a close follow up. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:449-452, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effectiveness of Short Term Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation for Non-neurogenic Overactive Bladder Syndrome in Adults: A Meta-analysis

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    Elita Wibisono

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate the effectiveness of short-term PTNS for non-neurogenic OAB in adults systematically by comparing with sham procedure and other treatments. Methods: we performed a systematic review of cohort study. Data sources were MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, National Library for Health, Cochrane, and google scholar from 2005 through 2015. Meta-analysis was performed using the random effects model. Heterogeneity of effects was assessed by calculating I2 statistic. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.3 for RCT meta-analysis. Results: we analized 11 randomised controlled trial (RCT and five prospective non-comparative studies with variable success rate. Based on percentage of responders, the results were 37.3% - 81.8% in PTNS group, 0% - 20.9% in sham group, 54.8% in anti-muscarinic group, and 89.7% in multimodal group. The decrease of voiding symptoms episodes per day was found in PTNS (0.7-4.5, sham (0.3-1.5, and anti-muscarinic (0.6-2.9 groups. In meta-analysis of four RCTs, the results favour PTNS over sham procedure with overall risk ratio of 7.32(95% CI of 1.69-32.16, p=0.09, I2=54%. Conclusion: there is an evidence of effectiveness of short term PTNS in treatment of non-neurogenic OAB. PTNS is proven significantly better than sham procedure. Key words: overactive bladder, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation, sham, anti-muscarinic, voiding symptoms.

  13. Localized inhibition of P2X7R at the spinal cord injury site improves neurogenic bladder dysfunction by decreasing urothelial P2X3R expression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Alvaro; Yazdi, Iman K; Tang, Xiufeng; Rivera, Carolina; Taghipour, Nima; Grossman, Robert G; Boone, Timothy B; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-02-15

    Reestablishment of bladder function in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) is a clinical priority. Our objectives were to determine whether SCI-localized inhibition of purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) improve bladder function by decreasing afferent signals mediated by urothelial P2X3R. Systemic inhibition of P2X7R may improve locomotion in rodent SCI models; however, beneficial effects on bladder function and its physiological mechanisms have not been evaluated. We designed a thermosensitive nanohydrogel (NHG) consisting of the P2X7R antagonist brilliant blue-G (BBG) loaded into silica nanoparticles, embedded with poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic) acid, and resuspended in 20% pluronic acid. Female Sprague-Dawley rats with a bilateral dorsal lesion at the thoracic T8/T9 region received either 100μl of an empty NHG, or a NHG containing BBG (BBG-NHG) on top of the spinal tissue. Cystometric properties, spinal immunohistochemistry for P2X7R, and bladder immunohistochemistry for P2X3R were evaluated at four weeks post-SCI. After SCI animals recovered hind-legs use but neurogenic bladder dysfunction remained. SCI rats treated with BBG-NHG for a period of at least two weeks post-SCI experienced fewer non-voiding contractions. The localized inhibition of P2X7R decreased microglia activation. At the lower urinary tract level we observed, unexpectedly, a concomitant reduction of urothelial P2X3 receptors, which are involved in initiation of bladder afferent transmission to start micturition. Localized inhibition of P2X7R for two weeks can be associated with reduced number of microglia and attenuated bladder hyperexcitability mediated by downregulation of urothelial P2X3R in rats with neurogenic bladder dysfunction and independently of locomotor improvements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An unresolved relationship: the relationship between lesion severity and neurogenic bladder in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Sevgi Ikbali; Sarifakioglu, Banu; Yalbuzdağ, Şeniz Akcay; Saraçgil Coşar, Sacide Nur

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between the severity of the spinal lesion and urodynamic findings, bladder drainage method at discharge, and incidence of renal calculi in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). STUDYDESIGN: Retrospective. In-patient rehabilitation unit of a tertiary research hospital. A total of 131 patients who were admitted to our clinic with a diagnosis of SCI and placed into a rehabilitation program were included in the study. The severity of the lesion was determined according to the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). We evaluated the relationship between the severity of the lesion and the detrusor hyperactivity and compliance as determined by urodynamic investigation, the bladder drainage method used at discharge, and the renal calculi rate as determined by ultrasonography. While no difference was found between the patients with complete and incomplete injuries in terms of age, sex, disease duration, detrusor hyperactivity and compliance, the bladder drainage method was found to show a significant change according to the severity of the lesion. None of the patients were found to have hydronephrosis and the rate of renal calculi showed no statistically significant difference according to the severity of the lesion. We concluded that urodynamic examination is required in each patient with SCI as the severity of the lesion is not sufficient to determine the bladder type, and patients with complete and incomplete injuries should be monitored with the same sensitivity in terms of complications.

  15. Inflammatory response to Escherichia coli urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder of the spinal cord injured host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Rajeev; Madden-Fuentes, Ramiro J; Ortiz, Tara K; Balsara, Zarine; Tang, Yuping; Nseyo, Unwanaobong; Wiener, John S; Ross, Sherry S; Seed, Patrick C

    2014-05-01

    Urinary tract infections cause significant morbidity in patients with spinal cord injury. An in vivo spinal cord injured rat model of experimental Escherichia coli urinary tract infection mimics human disease with enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection compared to controls. We hypothesized that a dysregulated inflammatory response contributes to enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection. Spinal cord injured and sham injured rats were inoculated transurethrally with E. coli. Transcript levels of 84 inflammatory pathway genes were measured in bladder tissue of each group before infection, 24 hours after infection and after 5 days of antibiotic therapy. Before infection quantitative polymerase chain reaction array revealed greater than twofold up-regulation in the proinflammatory factor transcripts slc11a1, ccl4 and il1β, and down-regulation of the antimicrobial peptides lcn2 and mpo in spinal cord injured vs control bladders. At 24 hours after infection spinal cord injured bladders showed an attenuated innate immune response with decreased expression of il6, slc11a1, il1β and lcn2, and decreased il10 and slpi expression compared to controls. Despite clearance of bacteriuria with antibiotics spinal cord injured rats had delayed induction of il6 transcription and a delayed anti-inflammatory response with decreased il10 and slpi transcript levels relative to controls. Spinal cord injured bladders fail to mount a characteristic inflammatory response to E. coli infection and cannot suppress inflammation after infection is eliminated. This may lead to increased susceptibility to urinary tract infection and persistent chronic inflammation through neural mediated pathways, which to our knowledge remain to be defined. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Afferent Pathway-Mediated Effect of α1 Adrenergic Antagonist, Tamsulosin, on the Neurogenic Bladder After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Hee; Kim, Sung-Eun; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Jayoung; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2017-09-01

    The functions of the lower urinary tract (LUT), such as voiding and storing urine, are dependent on complex central neural networks located in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. Thus, the functions of the LUT are susceptible to various neurologic disorders including spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI at the cervical or thoracic levels disrupts voluntary control of voiding and the normal reflex pathways coordinating bladder and sphincter functions. In this context, it is noteworthy that α1-adrenoceptor blockers have been reported to relieve voiding symptoms and storage symptoms in elderly men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Tamsulosin, an α1-adrenoceptor blocker, is also considered the most effective regimen for patients with LUT symptoms such as BPH and overactive bladder (OAB). In the present study, the effects of tamsulosin on the expression of c-Fos, nerve growth factor (NGF), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) in the afferent micturition areas, including the pontine micturition center (PMC), the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter (vlPAG), and the spinal cord (L5), of rats with an SCI were investigated. SCI was found to remarkably upregulate the expression of c-Fos, NGF, and NADPH-d in the afferent pathway of micturition, the dorsal horn of L5, the vlPAG, and the PMC, resulting in the symptoms of OAB. In contrast, tamsulosin treatment significantly suppressed these neural activities and the production of nitric oxide in the afferent pathways of micturition, and consequently, attenuated the symptoms of OAB. Based on these results, tamsulosin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, could be used to attenuate bladder dysfunction following SCI. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism and effects of tamsulosin on the afferent pathways of micturition.

  17. Differences in urodynamic study variables in adult patients with neurogenic bladder and myelomeningocele before and after augmentation enterocystoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainrib, Michael; Reyblat, Polina; Ginsberg, David A

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate urodynamic parameters in myelomeningocele patients with native bladders and after augmentation, continence rates and check the longevity of these parameters after lower urinary tract (LUT) reconstruction. A retrospective review of adult myelomeningocele patients with UDS. 118 adult patients with NGB secondary to myelomeningocele were identified. 58/118 (49.1%) had UDS performed in our clinic: 18/58 (31%) after prior reconstruction ("Augment" group) and 40/58 (69%) during annual urologic follow up ("NoSx" group). Urodyanmic findings after augmentation included: Pdet@MCC 31.1 (1-95) cmH(2)O, MCC 495.9 ml, NDO in 3/18 (16.7%), mean DLPP 54.0 (48-60) cmH(2)O and mean ALPP 39.6 (20-110) cmH(2)O in 5/18 with an incompetent sphincter. Patients in "NoSx" group had the following findings: Pdet@MCC of 39.6 (1-60) cmH(2)O, MCC 407.5 ml, 18/40 (45%) had NDO, mean DLPP of 48.1 (15-95) cmH(2)O and mean ALPP = 51 (17-78) cmH(2)O in 10/40 with incompetent sphincter. In the "NoSx" group, 19/40 (47.5%) had normal bladder compliance. Mean time from the surgery to UDS was 10.4 years. Continent patients in the "NoSx" group had a significantly higher MCC than incontinent patients in the same group (475 vs. 352 ml, P = 0.029). 8/17 (47.1%) continent patients in "NoSx" group had normal UDS. Most patients after augmentation maintain low bladder pressures for more than 10 years. Close long-term follow up should be maintained, especially in those patients that have not had prior augmentation. Urinary incontinence may be secondary to poor sphincteric function in patients with and without prior augmentation. Moreover, we should continue to follow patients after reconstruction as elevated detrusor pressures can still be seen. Strict follow up after LUT reconstruction still continues to be important. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Prospective evaluation of mouth and eye dryness induced by antimuscarinic drugs used for neurogenic overactive bladder in 35 patients with multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weglinski, L; Manceau, P; Thomas-Pohl, M; Le Breton, F; Amarenco, G

    2017-03-01

    Mouth and eye dryness are frequently reported by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) as side effects of antimuscarinic drugs used for neurogenic overactive bladder. We evaluated the impact of antimuscarinic drugs prescription on these symptoms. MS patients consulting for overactive bladder were included. Xerostomia were evaluated at baseline and thirty days after treatment by self-reporting questionnaires (Xerostomia Quality of Life [X-Qol] and Xerostomia Questionnaire [XQ]), by salivary flow rate and sugar test. Xerophtalmia were evaluated by a self-reporting questionnaire (Ocular Surface Disease Index [OSDI]) and Schirmer test. Iatrogenic anticholinergic impregnation was evaluated by the Anticholinergic Drug Scale. From January to December 2014, 35 patients were included. Mean age was 50.1±10.2 years, mean EDSS=4.9. Mean anticholinergic impregnation was 0.6±1.0. Before treatment, none correlation was found between anticholinergic impregnation and other parameters. Twenty-two patients were evaluated after treatment. At baseline and thirty days after treatment, mean scores were respectively: 0.78±0.51 and 0.73±0.43 (P=0.67) for X-Qol, 9.22±11.8 and 7.03±11.4 (P=0.32) for XQ, 18.8±14.9 and 13.9±11.6 (P=0.06) for OSDI. Mean salivary flow rates were respectively 1.54±1.11 and 1.22±1.3 (P=0.53), positive sugar tests concerned respectively 68% and 55% of patients (P=0.53), and positive Schirmer test concerned 50% before and after treatment. Eye and mouth dryness exist in our MS population, even before prescription of antimuscarinic treatment, and is not getting worse after prescription. Those symptoms should not be the reason to stop an efficient treatment, but should be the reason to find and treat their aetiology. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Validation of a Dutch version of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: an observational web-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Blok, Bertil F M; Heesakkers, John P; Heerings, Marco; Lemmens, Wim A; Donders, Rogier

    2015-10-30

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) the impact of urological symptoms on quality of life and daily activities is considerable. Yet, a substantial percentage of patients may not be urologically evaluated and thus fail to be treated concordantly. The 8-item Actionable questionnaire is a validated English screening tool for the detection of neurogenic bladder overactivity in MS. To enable the use of the 8-item Actionable in The Netherlands and Belgium we translated the questionnaire into the Dutch language and investigated the test-retest reliability and the concurrent validity of the Dutch version. The process of translating the English Actionable questionnaire into the Dutch language included forward translations and back-translations. Then, in an online observational study, MS patients completed the Dutch Actionable at Days 1 and 8, and the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life 54-Items (MSQoL-54) and Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile (MSIP) questionnaires at Day 1; the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score was assessed by phone at Day 1. For assessment of the test-retest reliability Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) between the Day 1 and Day 8 Actionable scores was calculated. For assessment of the concurrent validity r values were calculated between the Day 1 Actionable score and the EDSS score, the Physical and Mental MSQoL-54 composites, and the MSIP domain and symptom disability scores. N = 141 (106 female, 35 male) (80 relapsing remitting, 48 progressive, 13 unknown), mean age 47.8 (standard deviation [SD] 10.4) years, mean EDSS score 4.7 (SD 1.8); 137 patients completed the Day 8 assessment. Pearson's r between Actionable scores Day 1 and Day 8: 0.85 (P < .0001). Pearson's r between Actionable score Day 1 and scores for EDSS 0.41 (P < 0.0001), MSQoL-54 Physical -0.31 (P = 0.0002), MSQoL-54 Mental -0.29 (P = 0.0005), MSIP Excretion and Reproductive Functions 0.44 (P < 0.0001), Muscle and Movement Functions 0.39 (P

  20. [Acute neurogenic pulmonary edema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquefeuil, B

    1975-01-01

    Neurogenic edema, in the strict sense of the term, has at the present time practically not benefitted from precise hemodynamic investigations in human clinical practice, and owing to this fact, authors still classify them under the heading "mixed edema or of unknown pathogenesis". In contrast with this lack of information in man, animal experimental works are surprising by their coherence and the experimental facility of producing neurogenic edema (cranial hypertension by a small inflatable balloon and cisternal infection of fibrin). If one excludes the now ancient vagal theories (CAMERON 1949; CAMPBELL, 1949) which were never confirmed, all of the most recent experimental works (SARNOFF, 1952; DUCKER, 1968; LUISADA, 1967; MORITZ, 1974) confirm the adrenergic disorder of central origin during neurogenic A.P.E. which from the hemodynamic standpoint is like an authentic hemodynamic A.P.E. with raised left atrial pressure, pulmonary venous pressure and pulmonary capillary pressure.

  1. Radiodiagnosis of anomalies, diseases and injuries of urinary bladder in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyul'ko, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Problems of radiodiagnosis of such urinary bladder diseases as ureter and urinary bladder anomalies, congenital fistulae, urinary bladder calcicosis, calculuses, foreign bodies and injuries of urinary bladder tuberculosis and tumors neurogenic disorder of urination in children are considered

  2. Bladder-emptying methods, neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and impact on quality of life in people with long-term spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaansen, Jacinthe J E; van Asbeck, Floris W A; Tepper, Marga; Faber, Willemijn X; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; de Kort, Laetitia M O; Post, Marcel W M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To describe bladder-emptying methods used by people with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to determine usage differences in relation to time since injury, sex, lesion level and completeness of lesion. Furthermore, to evaluate the relationship between bladder-emptying methods and

  3. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment.

  4. Giant bladder diverticulum in a boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Ozcakir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the bladder diverticula in children are seen commonly which is association with infravesical obstruction or neurogenic bladder function, the case of giant congenital bladder diverticula are rare. In this paper, an 11 years old boy with giant bladder diverticula presenting urinary infections is evaluated in terms of diagnosis and management by current literature.

  5. An Investigation into the Nature of Non-Voiding Contractions Resulting from Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    filling, be it steady or episodic, evokes a limited mass-reflex of the abdominal musculature . This contraction of abdominal muscle then stimulates the... activity in general ( abdominal wall and pelvic floor). Figure 7 illustrates these preliminary results. 0 20 40 60 Bladder Contraction Amplitude (BCA...over the course of the past year have been that NVC in chronic SCI are accompanied by intra- abdominal pressure increases resulting from abdominal wall

  6. Office bladder distention with Electromotive Drug Administration (EMDA is equivalent to distention under General Anesthesia (GA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Kathryn J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bladder distention is commonly used in diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis (IC. Traditionally performed in the operating room under general or spinal anesthesia (GA, it is expensive and associated with short term morbidity. Office bladder distention using electromotive drug administration (EMDA has been suggested as an alternative that is well tolerated by patients. We report the first comparative findings of patients undergoing both office distention with EMDA and distention in the operating room (OR with GA. Methods This retrospective chart review identified 11 patients participating in two protocols of EMDA bladder distention who also underwent bladder distention under GA either prior to or after the EMDA procedure. Results The median absolute difference in bladder capacity between GA and EMDA was only 25 cc; the median percent difference was 5%. Cystoscopic findings, while not prospectively compiled, appear to have been similar. Conclusion This study represents the first comparison between distention with EMDA versus GA and confirms the technical feasibility of performing bladder distention in an office setting. The distention capacity achieved in the office was nearly identical to that in the OR and the cystoscopic findings very similar. Further investigation into the comparative morbidity, cost, and other outcome measures is warranted to define the ultimate role of EMDA bladder distention in the clinical evaluation and care of patients with IC.

  7. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. [Physics of materials and female stress urinary continence: New concepts: I) Elasticity under bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerquin, B

    2015-09-01

    Improving the understanding of the adaptation to stress of urinary continence. A transversal analysis between physics of materials and the female anatomy. Laws of physics of the materials and of their viscoelastic behavior are applied to the anatomy of the anterior vaginal wall. The anterior vaginal wall may be divided into two segments of different viscoelastic behavior, the vertical segment below the urethra and the horizontal segment below the bladder. If the urethra gets crushed on the first segment according to the hammock theory, the crushing of the bladder on the second segment is, on the other hand, damped by its important elasticity. The importance of this elasticity evokes an unknown function: damping under the bladder that moderates and delays the increase of intravesical pressure. This damping function below the bladder is increased in the cystocele, which is therefore a continence factor; on the other hand, it is impaired in obesity, which is therefore a factor of SUI. It is necessary to include in the theory of stress continence, the notion of a damping function below the bladder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. An Implantable Neuroprosthetic Device to Normalize Bladder Function after SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    long term. Frequent urethral catheterization can cause low urinary tract infection (2). In addition, detrusor overactivity (DO) induces poor bladder ...management of neurogenic bladder and sexual dysfunction after spinal cord injury. Spine 2001;26:S129–S136. 3. van Kerrebroeck PEV, Koldewijn EL, Rosier PFWM...Wijkstra H, Debruyne FMJ. Results of the treatment of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in spinal cord injury by sacral posterior root rhizotomy and

  10. Sarcopenia, a Neurogenic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is an aging-associated condition, which is currently characterized by the loss of muscle mass and muscle strength. However, there is no consensus regarding its characterization hitherto. As the world older adult population is on the rise, the impact of sarcopenia becomes greater. Due to the lack of effective treatments, sarcopenia is still a persisting problem among the global older adults and should not be overlooked. As a result, it is vital to investigate deeper into the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of sarcopenia in order to develop more effective therapeutic interventions and to inscribe a more uniform characterization. The etiology of sarcopenia is currently found to be multifactorial, and most of the pharmacological researches are focused on the muscular factors in aging. Although the complete mechanism underlying the development of sarcopenia is still waiting to be elucidated, we propose in this article that the primary trigger of sarcopenia may be neurogenic in origin based on the intimate relationship between the nervous and muscular system, namely, the motor neuron and its underlying muscle fibers. Both of them are affected by the cellular environment and their physiological activity.

  11. Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busl, Katharina M; Bleck, Thomas P

    2015-08-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema is an underrecognized and underdiagnosed form of pulmonary compromise that complicates acute neurologic illness and is not explained by cardiovascular or pulmonary pathology. This review aims to provide a concise overview on pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical characteristics, impact on outcome and treatment of neurogenic pulmonary edema, and considerations for organ donation. Database searches and a review of the relevant medical literature. Selected studies included English-language articles concerning neurogenic pulmonary edema using the search terms "neurogenic" with "pulmonary oedema" or "pulmonary edema," "experimental neurogenic pulmonary edema," "donor brain death," and "donor lung injury." Selected studies were reviewed by both authors, and data extracted based on author consensus regarding relevance for this review. Existing evidence is organized to address: 1) pathophysiology, 2) epidemiology and association with different neurologic diseases, 3) clinical presentation, 4) impact on outcome, 5) treatment, and 6) implications for organ donation after brain death. Neurogenic pulmonary edema occurs as a complication of acute neurologic illness and may mimic acute lung injury of other etiology. Its presence is important to recognize in patients due to its impact on clinical course, prognosis, and treatment strategies.

  12. Relationship among bacterial virulence, bladder dysfunction, vesicoureteral reflux and patterns of urinary tract infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Douglas W; Patel, Ashay S; Horvath, Dennis J; Li, Birong; Koff, Stephen A; Justice, Sheryl S

    2012-07-01

    We hypothesized that virulence levels of Escherichia coli isolates causing pediatric urinary tract infections differ according to severity of infection and also among various uropathies known to contribute to pediatric urinary tract infections. We evaluated these relationships using in vitro cytokine interleukin-6 elicitation. E. coli isolates were cultured from children presenting with urinary tract infections. In vitro cytokine (interleukin-6) elicitation was quantified for each isolate and the bacteria were grouped according to type of infection and underlying uropathy (neurogenic bladder, nonneurogenic bowel and bladder dysfunction, primary vesicoureteral reflux, no underlying etiology). A total of 40 E. coli isolates were collected from children with a mean age of 61.5 months (range 1 to 204). Mean level of in vitro cytokine elicitation from febrile urinary tract infection producing E. coli was significantly lower than for nonfebrile strains (p = 0.01). The interleukin-6 response to E. coli in the neurogenic bladder group was also significantly higher than in the vesicoureteral reflux (p = 0.01) and no underlying etiology groups (p = 0.02). In vitro interleukin-6 elicitation, an established marker to determine bacterial virulence, correlates inversely with clinical urinary tract infection severity. Less virulent, high cytokine producing E. coli were more likely to cause cystitis and were more commonly found in patients with neurogenic bladder and nonneurogenic bowel and bladder dysfunction, whereas higher virulence isolates were more likely to produce febrile urinary tract infections and to affect children with primary vesicoureteral reflux and no underlying etiology. These findings suggest that bacteria of different virulence levels may be responsible for differences in severity of pediatric urinary tract infections and may vary among different underlying uropathies. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by

  13. Pathophysiology of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banakhar, Mai A; Al-Shaiji, Tariq F; Hassouna, Magdy M

    2012-08-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common disorder that negatively affects the quality of life of our patients and carries a large socioeconomic burden. According to the International Continence Society, it is characterized as urinary urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually, with frequency and nocturia in the absence of causative infection. The pathophysiology of this disease entity varies between neurogenic, myogenic, or idiopathic factors. This paper provides a review of the contemporary theories behind the pathophysiology of OAB.

  14. [Etiology and pathogenesis of overactive bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bschleipfer, T; Wagenlehner, F; Weidner, W

    2011-04-01

    The symptom complex"overactive bladder" (OAB) affects more than 10% of adult individuals. The etiopathology is complex and multifactorial. Foremost, urinary tract infection, bladder cancer, foreign bodies, and history of radiation or intravesical instillation of chemotherapeutics must be excluded. In many cases, OAB is caused by neurogenic disorders that activate involuntary detrusor contractions (detrusor overactivity, DO). Also, non-neurogenic disorders such as bladder outlet obstruction or dysfunctions of the female pelvic floor/slack ligaments that affect the urothelium, suburothelium, detrusor and bladder afferents are substantially involved in the pathogenesis of OAB. Until now, circulatory disorders have not been adequately taken into consideration but seem to be another etiological factor that causes OAB. Henceforth, molecular changes of bladder afferents and circulatory disorders in patients suffering from OAB have to be investigated in more detail.

  15. Electrical management of neurogenic lower urinary tract disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joussain, C; Denys, P

    2015-09-01

    Management of lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) in neurological diseases remains a priority because it leads to many complications such as incontinence, renal failure and decreased quality of life. A pharmacological approach remains the first-line treatment for patients with neurogenic LUTD, but electrical stimulation is a well-validated and recommended second-line treatment. However, clinicians must be aware of the indications, advantages and side effects of the therapy. This report provides an update on the 2 main electrical stimulation therapies for neurogenic LUTD - inducing direct bladder contraction with the Brindley procedure and modulating LUT physiology (sacral neuromodulation, tibial posterior nerve stimulation or pudendal nerve stimulation). We also describe the indications of these therapies for neurogenic LUTD, following international guidelines, as illustrated by their efficacy in patients with neurologic disorders. Electrical stimulation could be proposed for neurogenic LUTD as second-line treatment after failure of oral pharmacologic approaches. Nevertheless, further investigations are needed for a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of these techniques and to confirm their efficacy. Other electrical investigations, such as deep-brain stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, or improved sacral anterior root stimulation, which could be associated with non-invasive and highly specific deafferentation of posterior roots, may open new fields in the management of neurogenic LUTD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Portable bladder ultrasound: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound. TARGET POPULATION AND CONDITION Data from the National Population Health Survey indicate prevalence rates of urinary incontinence are 2.5% in women and 1.4 % in men in the general population. Prevalence of urinary incontinence is higher in women than men and prevalence increases with age. Identified risk factors for urinary incontinence include female gender, increasing age, urinary tract infections (UTI), poor mobility, dementia, smoking, obesity, consuming alcohol and caffeine beverages, physical activity, pregnancy, childbirth, forceps and vacuum-assisted births, episiotomy, abdominal resection for colorectal cancer, and hormone replacement therapy. For the purposes of this review, incontinence populations will be stratified into the following; the elderly, urology patients, postoperative patients, rehabilitation settings, and neurogenic bladder populations. Urinary incontinence is defined as any involuntary leakage of urine. Incontinence can be classified into diagnostic clinical types that are useful in planning evaluation and treatment. The major types of incontinence are stress (physical exertion), urge (overactive bladder), mixed (combined urge and stress urinary incontinence), reflex (neurological impairment of the central nervous system), overflow (leakage due to full bladder), continuous (urinary tract abnormalities), congenital incontinence, and transient incontinence (temporary incontinence). Postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, which is the amount of urine in the bladder immediately after urination, represents an important component in continence assessment and bladder management to provide quantitative feedback to the patient and continence care team regarding the effectiveness of the voiding technique. Although there is no standardized definition of normal PVR urine volume, measurements greater than 100 mL to 150 mL are considered an indication for urinary

  17. Neurogenic voiding dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Petros; Apostolidis, Apostolos

    2017-05-01

    This review aims to analyze and discuss all recently published articles associated with neurogenic voiding discussion providing readers with the most updated knowledge and trigger for further research. They include the proposal of a novel classification system for the pathophysiology of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) which combines neurological defect in a distinct anatomic location, and data on bowel dysfunction, autonomic dysreflexia and urine biomarkers; review of patient-reported outcome measures in NLUTD; review of the criteria for the diagnosis of clinically significant urinary infections; novel research findings on the pathophysiology of NLUTD; and review of data on minimally and more invasive treatments. Despite the extended evidence base on NLUTD, there is a paucity of high-quality new research concerning voiding dysfunction as opposed to storage problems. The update aims to inform clinicians about new developments in clinical practice, as well as ignite discussion for further clinical and basic research in the aforementioned areas of NLUTD.

  18. [Clinical Benefits of Transurethral Resection Under Narrow Band Imaging for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Koji; Kobatake, Kohei; Ohara, Shinya; Kato, Masao

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the clinical benefits of transurethral resection (TUR) under narrow band imaging (NBI-TUR) for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) compared with conventional white light imaging TUR (WLI-TUR). The subjects were 172 patients with NMIBC who were followed for more than 1 year after undergoing TUR with no additional postoperative treatment. In the WLI-TUR group (n=101), lesions that were detected as positive after systematic intravesical observation under WLI were resected completely under WLI. In the NBI-TUR group (n=71), similar observations under WLI were followed by systematic intravesical observation under NBI. After multiple site biopsy under NBI, TUR was performed for all lesions that were detected as positive under NBI. The sensitivity was calculated based on the results of cystoscopy and pathology of multiple site biopsy samples under WLI and NBI in the NBITUR group. The tumor recurrence rate was analyzed in both groups. Background factors did not differ significantly between the two groups, except for the observation period (63.3 months in the WLI-TUR group vs 42.0 months in the NBI-TUR group, p<0.01). The procedure under NBI had significantly higher sensitivity (94.6% vs 75.0%, p<0.01) compared with that under WLI. The recurrence-free rate in the NBITUR group was significantly higher than that in the WLI-TUR group (p=0.013). The tumor recurrencefree rate of NBI-TUR is higher than that of conventional WLI-TUR for patients with NMIBC.

  19. Acridine orange exhibits photodamage in human bladder cancer cells under blue light exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Lin, Ji-Fan; Tsai, Te-Fu; Chen, Hung-En; Chou, Kuang-Yu; Yang, Shan-Che; Tang, Ya-Ming; Hwang, Thomas I-Sheng

    2017-10-26

    Human bladder cancer (BC) cells exhibit a high basal level of autophagic activity with accumulation of acridine-orange(AO)-stained acidic vesicular organelles. The rapid AO relocalization was observed in treated BC cells under blue-light emission. To investigate the cytotoxic effects of AO on human BC cell lines under blue-light exposure, human immortalized uroepithelial (SV-Huc-1) and BC cell lines (5637 and T24) were treated with indicated concentrations of AO or blue-light exposure alone and in combination. The cell viability was then determined using WST-1, time-lapse imaging with a Cytosmart System and continuous quantification with a multi-mode image-based reader. Treatment of AO or blue-light exposure alone did not cause a significant loss of viability in BC cells. However, AO exhibited a dose-dependent increment of cytotoxicity toward BC cells under blue-light exposure. Furthermore, the tumor formation of BC cells with treatment was significantly reduced when evaluated in a mouse xenograft model. The photodamage caused by AO was nearly neglected in SV-Huc-1 cells, suggesting a differential effect of this treatment between cancer and normal cells. In summary, AO, as a photosensitizer, disrupts acidic organelles and induces cancer cell death in BC cells under blue-light irradiation. Our findings may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy against human BC.

  20. [Neurogenic intermittent claudication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmundowicz, W; Haftek, J

    1984-01-01

    In the period 1971-1981 operations were carried out in 1114 cases of discopathy or lumbar spondylosis. Three patients in this group had pains of the type of intermittent claudication as the main symptoms. In all these cases narrowing of the vertebral canal was found in the lumbar part caused in two cases by degenerative changes and herniation of the intervertebral discs, and in a third case it was due to an extensive connective tissue scar at the site of previously done laminectomy. The nerve roots of the cauda were relieved from pressure surgically and in all cases pains disappeared. The authors discuss factors contributing to the development of neurogenic intermittent claudication.

  1. Voiding by Mandatory Position Changing: Giant Bladder Stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Cicek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Voiding by Mandatory Position Changing: Giant Bladder Stone Bladder Stones frequently develops on the base of neurogenic micturation disorders, infection, bladder outlet disorders, spinal cord injury and foreign bodies. BPH for men and previous incontinans surgery in women are risk factors for bladder Stone development according to gender. In this case report a 49 years old man, who can void by mandatory position changing owing to a giant bladder stone is presented . [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 120-122

  2. Etiopathogenesis of neurogenic pulmonary edema

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 160, 5-6 (2010), s. 152-154 ISSN 0043-5341 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : neurogenic pulmonary edema * intracranial pressure * sympathetic system Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  3. Neurogenic tumors of the stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneton, J.N.; Drouillard, J.; Roux, P.; Ettore, F.; Lecomte, P.

    1983-08-01

    The general and radiologic features of neurogenic tumors of the stomach are reviewed in connection with 18 cases (16 benign and 2 maglignant tumors). Such neurogenic tumors are rare in the stomach, representing less than 0.5% of all tumors. Solitary neurogenic tumors must be differentiated from those encountered during von Recklinghausen's disease. Radiological or endoscopic examination can generally determine the benign or malignant nature of solitary neurogenic tumors, which are essentially represented by schwannomas. Since these tumors are submucosal, a deep biopsy is imperative; furthermore, since such tumors are subject to hemorrhage, prior investigation by CT appears advisable to detect possible hypervascularization after injection of contrast material. For patients with von Recklinghausen's disease, a neurofibroma is usually diagnosed when faced with a digestive hemorrhage. Radiological exploration of the entire digestive tract appears essential to confirm the solitary nature of the gastric lesion and to be sure it is responsible for the clinical symptoms.

  4. Spontaneous rupture of bladder diverticulum after postoperative radiotherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Kazunori; Iijima, Mitsuharu; Nozue, Masashi; Imai, Michiko; Suzuki, Sachiko; Sakahara, Harumi; Ohta, Nobutaka; Kasami, Masako [Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    We present a case of spontaneous rupture of bladder diverticulum three years after postoperative whole pelvic irradiation (50.4 Gy) for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The patient had suffered from a neurogenic bladder after hysterectomy, but excretory urography revealed no abnormalities. Bladder diverticulum was found two years later. Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder is one of the late complications associated with radiotherapy, although it is very rare. Postoperative neurogenic bladder may also be associated with rupture. We should be aware of this rare complication in patients who receive pelvic irradiation. (author)

  5. Magnitude-dependent proliferation and contractility modulation of human bladder smooth muscle cells under physiological stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, De-Yi; Wazir, Romel; Du, Caigan; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Wei, Tang-Qiang; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and test a kind of stretch pattern which is based on modified BOSE BioDynamic system to produce optimum physiological stretch during bladder cycle. Moreover, we aimed to emphasize the effects of physiological stretch's amplitude upon proliferation and contractility of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs). HBSMCs were seeded onto silicone membrane and subjected to stretch simulating bladder cycle at the range of stretches and time according to customized software on modified BOSE BioDynamic bioreactor. Morphological changes were assessed using immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscope. Cell proliferation and cell viability were determined by BrdU incorporation assay and Cell Counting Kit-8, respectively. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. RT-PCR was used to assess phenotypic and contractility markers. HBSMCs were found to show morphologically spindle-shaped and orientation at various elongations in the modified bioreactor. Stretch-induced proliferation and viability depended on the magnitude of stretch, and stretches also regulate contractility and contraction markers in a magnitude-dependent manner. We described and tested a kind of stretch pattern which delivers physiological stretch implemented during bladder cycle. The findings also showed that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent morphological, proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in vitro.

  6. EAU Guidelines on the Assessment of Non-neurogenic Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms including Benign Prostatic Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratzke, Christian; Bachmann, Alexander; Descazeaud, Aurelien; Drake, Marcus J; Madersbacher, Stephan; Mamoulakis, Charalampos; Oelke, Matthias; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Gravas, Stavros

    2015-06-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) represent one of the most common clinical complaints in adult men and have multifactorial aetiology. To develop European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on the assessment of men with non-neurogenic LUTS. A structured literature search on the assessment of non-neurogenic male LUTS was conducted. Articles with the highest available level of evidence were selected. The Delphi technique consensus approach was used to develop the recommendations. As a routine part of the initial assessment of male LUTS, a medical history must be taken, a validated symptom score questionnaire with quality-of-life question(s) should be completed, a physical examination including digital rectal examination should be performed, urinalysis must be ordered, post-void residual urine (PVR) should be measured, and uroflowmetry may be performed. Micturition frequency-volume charts or bladder diaries should be used to assess male LUTS with a prominent storage component or nocturia. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) should be measured only if a diagnosis of prostate cancer will change the management or if PSA can assist in decision-making for patients at risk of symptom progression and complications. Renal function must be assessed if renal impairment is suspected from the history and clinical examination, if the patient has hydronephrosis, or when considering surgical treatment for male LUTS. Uroflowmetry should be performed before any treatment. Imaging of the upper urinary tract in men with LUTS should be performed in patients with large PVR, haematuria, or a history of urolithiasis. Imaging of the prostate should be performed if this assists in choosing the appropriate drug and when considering surgical treatment. Urethrocystoscopy should only be performed in men with LUTS to exclude suspected bladder or urethral pathology and/or before minimally invasive/surgical therapies if the findings may change treatment. Pressure-flow studies should be performed

  7. Bladder Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Catheterization • Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Bladder Management [ Download this pamphlet: "Bladder Management" - (PDF, 499KB) ] The ... and medication or surgery may be helpful. Bladder Management Foley or Suprapubic Catheter A tube is inserted ...

  8. Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer occurs in the lining of the bladder. It ... urinate Low back pain Risk factors for developing bladder cancer include smoking and exposure to certain chemicals in ...

  9. [A Case of Emphysematous Cystitis with Bladder Diverticulum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Shinya; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Arase, Shigeki; Hori, Yasuhide; Tochigi, Hiromi; Sugimura, Yoshiki

    2016-08-01

    Emphysematous cystitis (EC) is a rare form of acute complicated urinary tract infection (UTI). We report a case of EC with bladder diverticulum. A 77-year-old man who had a medical history of diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with the chief complaint of macrohematuria and pneumaturia. Based on the findings of an abdominal computed tomography and cystoscopy, the diagnosis of EC and bladder diverticulum was made with its characteristic feature being gas within the bladder wall and lumen and a cystic lesion from the bladder. His condition improved immediately with a combination of bladder drainage and appropriate antibiotics. The cystography revealed a very large diverticulum causing incomplete bladder emptying and stagnation of urine. We considered diabetes mellitus and a large amount of residual urine after urination due to bladder diverticulum and neurogenic bladder as the possible causal factors of EC in this case.

  10. Bladder Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  11. Neurogenic and non neurogenic functions of endogenous neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica eButti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is a lifelong process that occurs in two main neurogenic niches of the brain, namely in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles and in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG in the hippocampus. In the 1960s, studies on adult neurogenesis have been hampered by the lack of established phenotypic markers. The precise tracing of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs was therefore, not properly feasible. After the (partial identification of those markers, it was the lack of specific tools that hindered a proper experimental elimination and tracing of those cells to demonstrate their terminal fate and commitment. Nowadays, irradia-tion, cytotoxic drugs as well as genetic tracing/ablation procedures have moved the field forward and increased our understanding of neurogenesis processes in both physiological and pathological conditions. Newly formed NPC progeny from the SVZ can replace granule cells in the olfactory bulbs of rodents, thus contributing to orchestrate sophisticated odour behaviour. SGZ-derived new granule cells, instead, integrate within the DG where they play an essential role in memory functions. Furthermore, converging evidence claim that endogenous NPCs not only exert neurogenic functions, but might also have non-neurogenic homeostatic functions by the release of different types of neuroprotective molecules. Remarkably, these non-neurogenic homeostatic functions seem to be necessary, both in healthy and diseased conditions, for example for preventing or limiting tissue damage. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic and the non-neurogenic functions of adult NPCs both in physiological and pathological conditions.

  12. Exstrophy of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollohan, J

    1999-03-01

    Exstrophy of the bladder is a rare congenital defect that occurs when the abdominal wall and underlying structures, including the ventral wall of the bladder, fail to fuse in utero. As a result, the lower urinary tract is exposed, and the everted bladder appears through the abdominal opening. Various surgical interventions have been employed with variable success in the hope of achieving complete dryness, full control over delivery of urine, freedom from catheters and external appliances, and a protected upper urinary tract. The most popular surgical approach is the primary bladder closure with secondary bladder neck reconstruction. Comprehensive nursing, medical, and surgical care are necessary to preserve renal and sexual function. The many complex problems experienced by these infants and their families call for a multidisciplinary approach. This article reviews occurrence, clinical presentation, and management of exstrophy of the bladder.

  13. Neurogenic inflammation in human and rodent skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmelz, M; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2001-01-01

    The combination of vasodilation and protein extravasation following activation of nociceptors has been termed "neurogenic inflammation." In contrast to rodents, no neurogenic protein extravasation can be elicited in healthy human skin. Dermal microdialysis has considerably increased our knowledge...... about neurogenic inflammation in human skin, including the involvement of mast cells.......The combination of vasodilation and protein extravasation following activation of nociceptors has been termed "neurogenic inflammation." In contrast to rodents, no neurogenic protein extravasation can be elicited in healthy human skin. Dermal microdialysis has considerably increased our knowledge...

  14. Botulinum Toxin in Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Levi D'Ancona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin on urodynamic parameters and quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Methods Thirty four adult patients with spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity were selected. The patients received 300 units of botulinum toxin type A. The endpoints evaluated with the episodes of urinary incontinence and measured the maximum cystometric capacity, maximum amplitude of detrusor pressure and bladder compliance at the beginning and end of the study (24 weeks and evaluated the quality of life by applying the Qualiveen questionnaire. Results A significant decrease in the episodes of urinary incontinence was observed. All urodynamic parameters presented a significant improvement. The same was observed in the quality of life index and the specific impact of urinary problems scores from the Qualiveen questionnaire. Six patients did not complete the study, two due to incomplete follow-up, and four violated protocol and were excluded from the analyses. No systemic adverse events of botulinum toxin type A were reported. Conclusions A botulinum toxin type A showed a significantly improved response in urodynamics parameters and specific and general quality of life.

  15. [The dimethyl sulfoxide under general anesthesia: An alternative after failure without anesthesia in the painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaullier, M; Tricard, T; Mouracade, P; Saussine, C

    2018-03-08

    The intravesical instillation of dimethyl sulfoxide (iDMSO), performed without anesthestic, is a therapeutic option for the painful bladder syndrome/interstial cystitis (PBS/IC). Some patients are against those iDMSO because of bad tolerance. Our study evaluates the tolerance and the outcome of the iDMSO under general anesthetic (GA) after the failure of the iDMSO without anesthetic. From May 2013 to April 2016, 11 patients with a PBS, 9 women (81.8 %), have been treated by iDMSO without anesthetic, without improvement because of bad tolerance and no possibility to have a one hour contact between the bladder and the DMSO. The 11 patients were evaluated by mictional calendar and Sant O'Leary score. All the patients had a hydrodistension and a per os treatment without improvement. Six new iDMSO were performed under general anesthetic in ambulatory surgery with good tolerance for the 11 patients. The frequency and the nocturia before iDMSO without anesthetic and after iDMSO under general anesthetic were 32.2minutes [15; 60] and 6.3 per night [3; 10] and 126.9minutes [25; 240] and 3 per night [2; 6], so a variation respectively of 96.4minutes [0; 180] and of 3.75 per night [2; 6]. The symptom score and the problem index were 17.5 [13; 20] and 15.5 [13; 16] before and 13.5 [4; 20] and 12 [1; 16] after iDMSO under general anesthetic; a variation of 3.2 [0; 9] and 4 [0; 12]. The iDMSO under general anesthetic seems to improve objectively and subjectively the patients who are not improved by the instillations without anesthetic because of bad tolerance. 4. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Contractility of the guinea pig bladder measured in situ and in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Groen (Jan); R. van Mastrigt (Ron); J.L.H.R. Bosch (Ruud)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractTo study the relative importance of neurogenic factors in detrusor contractility and to relate a total bladder in vitro contractility model to a previously described bladder wall strip model, active intravesical pressure values were compared in situ and in vitro in eight male guinea

  17. Prediction of Bladder Outcomes after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavese, Chiara; Schneider, Marc P; Schubert, Martin; Curt, Armin; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Finazzi-Agrò, Enrico; Mehnert, Ulrich; Maier, Doris; Abel, Rainer; Röhrich, Frank; Weidner, Norbert; Rupp, Rüdiger; Kessels, Alfons G; Bachmann, Lucas M; Kessler, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction represents one of the most common and devastating sequelae of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). As early prediction of bladder outcomes is essential to counsel patients and to plan neurourological management, we aimed to develop and validate a model to predict urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis from the data of 1,250 patients with traumatic SCI included in the European Multicenter Spinal Cord Injury study, we developed two prediction models of urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI and performed an external validation in 111 patients. As predictors, we evaluated age, gender, and all variables of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) and of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). Urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after SCI were assessed through item 6 of SCIM. The full model relies on lower extremity motor score (LEMS), light-touch sensation in the S3 dermatome of ISNCSI, and SCIM subscale respiration and sphincter management: the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (aROC) was 0.936 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.922-0.951). The simplified model is based on LEMS only: the aROC was 0.912 (95% CI: 0.895-0.930). External validation of the full and simplified models confirmed the excellent predictive power: the aROCs were 0.965 (95% CI: 0.934-0.996) and 0.972 (95% CI 0.943-0.999), respectively. This study is limited by the substantial number of patients with a missing 1-y outcome and by differences between derivation and validation cohort. Our study provides two simple and reliable models to predict urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI. Early prediction of bladder function might optimize counselling and patient-tailored rehabilitative interventions and improve patient stratification in

  18. Development of an Implantable Pudendal Nerve Stimulator To Restore Bladder Function in Humans After SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    IP) in the area of closed loop treatment of neurogenic bladder , which will be very relevant to the PSTIM project. InCube Labs has also developed...increasing functional bladder capacity, continence and evacuation of urine along with reduction in urinary tract infections and improvement in upper tract...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-C-0066 TITLE: Development of an Implantable Pudendal Nerve Stimulator To Restore Bladder Function in Humans After SCI

  19. Caudal Regression Syndrome/neurogenic bladder presented as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burhan M. Edrees

    health status of the patients.1 This syndrome usually occurs in combination with morphologic dysfunction of the feet and spinal cord malformations. It can be said that CRS is a rare and serious medical condition ... mities within the spinal cord, brain, or nervous supply. A number .... Negative HIV Elisa and nor- mal level of ...

  20. Influence of the duration of treatment on the effectiveness of anal maximal electrical stimulation in children with nonneurogenic overactive bladder and micturition problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tršinar

    2012-01-01

    The two-month MES used in treating children with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and micturition problems had somewhat better but statistically insignificant clinical and cystometric results compared to the one-month MES.

  1. Fibromyalgi som neurogen smertetilstand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Jespersen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    an underlying augmented central pain processing which includes sensitization of pain-transmitting neurons and dysfunction of pain inhibitory pathways. If this permanent change in the function of the nociceptive system is shown to equal fibromyalgia, the condition may be considered a neuropathic pain condition.......Fibromyalgia is characterised by chronic widespread pain and mechanical hyperalgesia. It is associated with a higher pain intensity, fewer pain-free intervals and more pronounced pain-related interference in function than other musculoskeletal pain conditions. Increasing evidence supports...

  2. Bladder Capacity is a Biomarker for a Bladder Centric versus Systemic Manifestation in Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen J; Zambon, João; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Langefeld, Carl D; Matthews, Catherine A; Badlani, Gopal; Bowman, Heather; Evans, Robert J

    2017-08-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome presents a significant clinical challenge due to symptom heterogeneity and the myriad associated comorbid medical conditions. We recently reported that diminished bladder capacity may represent a specific interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome subphenotype. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between anesthetic bladder capacity, and urological and nonurological clinical findings in a cohort of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome who had undergone therapeutic urinary bladder hydrodistention. This is a retrospective chart review of prospectively collected data on women diagnosed with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome between 2011 and 2015 who underwent bladder hydrodistention. Assessments in each patient included a detailed history and physical examination, ICPI (Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index), ICSI (Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index) and PUF (Pelvic Pain and Urgency/Frequency Patient Symptom Scale). Bladder capacity was determined during bladder hydrodistention with the patient under general anesthesia. Mean age was 45.8 years and mean bladder capacity was 857 ml in the 110 enrolled patients. We found a significant inverse correlation between bladder capacity and scores on 3 gold standard interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome metrics, including ICPI (p = 0.0014), ICSI (p = 0.0022) and PUF (p = 0.0009) as well as urination frequency (p = 0.0025). Women with higher bladder capacity were significantly more likely to report depression (p = 0.0059) and irritable bowel syndrome (p = 0.022). Low bladder capacity while under anesthesia was significantly associated with high symptom scores on 3 validated interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome questionnaires as well as with urinary frequency. However, it was not associated with depression or other common systemic pain problems. These results suggest that low bladder capacity is a marker for a bladder

  3. Urinary bladder adenocarcinoma arising in a spina bifida patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Mireille; Mandel, Edmund; Kirschenbaum, Alexander M; Unger, Pamela D

    2007-12-01

    Urinary bladder adenocarcinomas are rare malignancies accounting for approximately 2.5% of all urothelial neoplasms. Intestinal metaplasia of the urothelium indicates the presence of intestinal-type goblet cells and was generally observed to coexist with or to precede the diagnosis of bladder adenocarcinomas. Controversy continues of whether intestinal metaplasia is an acquired precancerous lesion, secondary to different insults to the urothelium, or a concomitant lesion in glandular carcinogenesis. Patients with neurogenic bladders are particularly at risk for developing bladder cancer, mostly squamous cell carcinoma and rarely adenocarcinoma. In these patients, chronic irritation of the urothelium as well as long-term indwelling urinary catheters were the most significant risk factors. Spina bifida is a congenital developmental abnormality that may result in neurogenic bladder. There is only one previously reported case of urothelial carcinoma with associated squamous metaplasia of the bladder occurring in a spina bifida patient. We report the first case of bladder adenocarcinoma associated with intestinal metaplasia occurring in a spina bifida occulta patient. The patient had a complicated clinical course and suffered recurrent urinary tract infections, renal calculi, and urinary incontinence and was managed with intermittent as well as indwelling catheterization.

  4. Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bladder cancer care at Mayo Clinic Symptoms Bladder cancer signs and symptoms may include: Blood in urine (hematuria) Painful urination Pelvic pain If you have hematuria, your urine may appear bright red or cola colored. Sometimes, urine may not look any different, ...

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Tamsulosin for the Treatment of Non-neurogenic Voiding Dysfunction in Females: A 8-Week Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Sung; Han, Deok Hyun; Lee, Young-Suk; Choo, Myung-Soo; Yoo, Tag Keun; Park, Heung Jae; Yoon, Hana; Jeong, Hyeon; Lee, Sun Ju; Kim, Hayoung

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic effects of tamsulosin for women with non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction. Women who had voiding dysfunctions for at least 3 months were included. Inclusion criteria were age ≥18 yr, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) of ≥15, and maximum flow rate (Qmax) of ≥12 mL/sec and/or postvoid residuals (PVR) of ≥150 mL. Patients with neurogenic voiding dysfunction or anatomical bladder outlet obstruction were excluded. All patients were classified according to the Blaivas-Groutz nomogram as having no or mild obstruction (group A) or moderate or severe obstruction (group B). After 8 weeks of treatment, treatment outcomes and adverse effects were evaluated. One hundred and six patients were evaluable (70 in group A, 36 in group B). After treatments, mean IPSS, bother scores, Qmax, PVR, diurnal and nocturnal micturition frequencies and scored form of the Bristol Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms questionnaire (BFLUTS-SF) were changed significantly. Eighty-nine patients (84%) reported that the treatment was beneficial. The proportion of patients reported that their bladder symptoms caused "moderate to many severe problems" were significantly decreased. No significant difference were observed between the groups in terms of IPSS, bother score, Qmax, PVR, micturition frequency, and BFLUTS-SF changes. Adverse effects related to medication were dizziness (n=3), de novo stress urinary incontinence (SUI) (n=3), aggravation of underlying SUI (n=1), fatigue (n=1). Tamsulosin was found to be effective in female patients with voiding dysfunction regardless of obstruction grade. PMID:20052356

  6. Pathophysiological studies of overactive bladder and bladder motor dysfunction in a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Chia; Chuang, Yao-Chi; Chiang, Po-Hui; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2011-07-01

    We studied bladder motor dysfunction and searched for markers of neurogenic and myogenic alterations among fructose fed rats with or without abnormal voiding behavior. Female Wistar rats were fed with a fructose rich diet (60%) or a normal diet for 6 months. Based on cystometry and voiding behavior the fructose fed rats were divided into 3 groups, including a group with normal detrusor function with normal micturition frequency, a group with detrusor overactivity with increased micturition frequency and a group with acontractile detrusor with increased micturition frequency. Denuded bladder tissues were obtained to assess in vitro detrusor contractility, postsynaptic receptors, smoothelin, nitrosative products and the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Fructose fed rats with abnormal voiding behavior had obvious neurogenic and myogenic alterations, including increased expression of postsynaptic receptors, dysregulation of smoothelin and decreased expression of Bcl-2 with a subsequent increase in apoptotic cells in the bladder stroma, causing decreased carbachol induced contractility. Rats with detrusor overactivity were also insulted by nitrosative stress associated with nitrotyrosine up-regulation in the bladder tissue. Up-regulation of M(2) and M(3)-muscarinic receptors, and P2X(1) receptors appeared to be generalized alterations of fructose fed rats and not exclusive to those with detrusor overactivity. Up-regulation of postsynaptic receptors and dysregulation of smoothelin contribute to overactive bladder symptoms in rats with metabolic syndrome. Nitrosative stress and decreased Bcl-2 expression lead to bladder muscle cell loss via the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, which may further deteriorate bladder function. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of HIF Reduces Bladder Hypertrophy and Improves Bladder Function in Murine Model of Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Nao; Malykhina, Anna P; Wilcox, Duncan T

    2016-04-01

    Posterior urethral valves are the most common cause of partial bladder outlet obstruction in the pediatric population. However, to our knowledge the etiology and the detailed mechanisms underlying pathological changes in the bladder following partial bladder outlet obstruction remain to be elucidated. Recent findings suggest that hypoxia and associated up-regulation of HIFs (hypoxia-inducible factors) have a key role in partial bladder outlet obstruction induced pathology in the bladder. We examined the effects of pharmacological inhibition of HIF pathways by 17-DMAG (17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) in pathophysiological phenotypes after partial bladder outlet obstruction. Partial bladder outlet obstruction was surgically created in male C57BL/6J mice. The animals received oral administration of 17-DMAG or vehicle daily starting from the initiation of obstruction up to 5 days. Sham operated mice served as controls. Bladders were harvested from each group 2, 4 and 7 days postoperatively, and analyzed for histological and biochemical changes. Bladder function was assessed by in vitro muscle contractility recordings. Partial bladder outlet obstruction caused a significant increase in the bladder mass accompanying enhanced collagen deposition in the bladder wall while 17-DMAG treatment suppressed those increases. Treatment with 17-DMAG attenuated the degree of up-regulation of HIFs and their target genes involving the development of tissue fibrosis in obstructed bladders. Treatment with 17-DMAG improved the decreased responses of obstructed bladder strips to electrical field stimulation and KCl. In vivo 17-DMAG treatment decreased partial bladder outlet obstruction induced pathophysiological changes in the bladder. HIF pathway inhibition has a potential clinical implication for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to treat bladder pathology associated with partial bladder outlet obstruction. Copyright © 2016 American Urological

  8. The purinergic component of human bladder smooth muscle cells’ proliferation and contraction under physiological stretch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie, E-mail: kunjiewangatscu@163.com

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation and contraction. •Optimum applied stretch in vitro is 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively. •Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 is upregulated after application of stretch. •P2X2 is possibly more susceptible to stretch related changes. •Purinoceptors functioning may explain conditions with atropine resistance. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether cyclic stretch induces proliferation and contraction of human smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs), mediated by P2X purinoceptor 1 and 2 and the signal transduction mechanisms of this process. Methods: HBSMCs were seeded on silicone membrane and stretched under varying parameters; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (Frequency: 0.05 Hz, 0.1 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz). 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay was employed for proliferative studies. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. After optimal physiological stretch was established; P2X1 and P2X2 were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot. Specificity of purinoceptors was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (NF023 for P2X1, and A317491for P2X2), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation and contractility were observed at 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively, applied at a frequency of 0.1 Hz; At 5% stretch, proliferation increased from 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023%, p < 0.05. Mean contraction at 10% stretching increased from 31.7 ± 2.3%, (control) to 78.28 ±1.45%, p < 0.05. Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 was upregulated after application of stretch. Inhibition had effects on proliferation (1.232 ± 0.051, p < 0.05 NF023) and (1.302 ± 0.021, p < 0.05 A314791) while contractility was markedly reduced (68.24 ± 2.31, p < 0.05 NF023) and (73.2 ± 2.87, p < 0.05 A314791). These findings shows that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in

  9. Trigonalgia: An overlooked cause of bladder pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. Aminu

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... has shown a mean prevalence of 61% due to bladder pain syndrome excluding pregnancy and cancer [2]. E-mail address: sani aminu@hotmail.com. Peer review under responsibility of Pan African Urological Surgeons'. Association. Bladder pain denotes painful experience arising from the bladder.

  10. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Bladder: New Parameters for Evaluating Voiding Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macnab, A.; Shadgan, B.; Stothers, L.; Macnab, A.; Afshar, K.

    2011-01-01

    We describe innovative methodology for monitoring alterations in bladder oxygenation and haemodynamics in humans using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Concentrations of the chromophores oxygenated (O 2 Hb) and deoxygenated (HHb) haemoglobin and their sum (total haemoglobin) differ during bladder contraction in health and disease. A wireless device that incorporates three paired light emitting diodes (wavelengths 760 and 850 nanometers) and silicon photodiode detector collects data trans cutaneously (10 Hz) with the emitter/detector over the bladder during spontaneous bladder emptying. Data analysis indicates comparable patterns of change in chromophore concentration in healthy children and adults (positive trend during voiding, predominantly due to elevated O 2 Hb), but different changes in symptomatic subjects with characteristic chromophore patterns identified for voiding dysfunction due to specific pathophysiology: bladder outlet obstruction (males), overactive bladder (females), and non neurogenic dysfunction (children). Comparison with NIRS muscle data suggests altered bladder haemodynamics and/or oxygenation may underlie voiding dysfunction offering new insight into the causal physiology.

  11. Sacral rhizotomies and electrical bladder stimulation in spinal cord injury. 2. Cost-effectiveness and quality of life analysis. Dutch Study Group on Sacral Anterior Root Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielink, G.; Essink-Bot, M. L.; van Kerrebroeck, P. E.; Rutten, F. F.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present a cost-effectiveness analysis of sacral rhizotomies and electrical bladder stimulation compared with conventional care of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. METHODS: During a 3-year inclusion period, data on costs and quality of life before the

  12. Human papillomavirus-related basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder associated with genital tract human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginori, Alessandro; Barone, Aurora; Santopietro, Rosa; Barbanti, Gabriele; Cecconi, Filippo; Tripodi, Sergio Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a biologically aggressive neoplasm mainly found in the head and neck region. Recently, four cases of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder have been reported, and three of them occurred in patients with neurogenic bladder, repeated catheterizations and human papillomavirus infection of the urinary tract. To the best of our knowledge, none of the patients affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder described in the literature had documented genital involvement by human papillomavirus. Herein, we describe the case of a woman with neurogenic bladder affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder and by a concomitant genital tract human papillomavirus infection. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Bladder activation: afferent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2002-05-01

    The major function of the lower urinary tract is to store and periodically evacuate urine from the bladder. This requires coordination of the smooth muscles of the bladder and urethra, and of the striated muscles of the outflow region and pelvic floor by a complex neural control system. Lumbosacral afferent fibers (pelvic afferents), but also afferents in the hypogastric and pudendal nerves, are of major importance for the regulation of the mechanisms for continence and micturition. In the bladder, afferent nerves have been identified suburothelially as well as in the detrusor muscle. Suburothelially, they form a plexus that lies immediately beneath the epithelial lining. This plexus is particularly dense in the bladder neck and the trigone. The most important afferents for the micturition process are myelinated Adelta-fibers and unmyelinated C-fibers. Immunocytochemical and tracing studies have revealed that numerous peptides, including substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, enkephalins, and cholecystokinin are localized either alone, or in combination, in afferent pathways of the bladder and urethra. The receptors on these nerves include: vanilloid receptors, purinoceptors, tachykinin, and prostanoid receptors. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been found to mediate excitation of small-diameter sensory neurons via P2X3 receptors, and it has been proposed that in the bladder, distention causes release of ATP from the urothelium. ATP, in turn, can activate P2X3 receptors on suburothelial afferent nerve terminals to evoke a neural discharge. However, it is most likely that a cascade of inhibitory and stimulatory transmitters/mediators, as well as ATP, are involved in the transduction mechanisms underlying the activation of afferent fibers during bladder filling.

  14. Factors that influence the urodynamic results of botulinum toxin in the treatment of neurogenic hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Vírseda-Chamorro, M; Salinas Casado, J; Gómez-Rodríguez, A; Esteban-Fuertes, M

    2015-05-01

    To determine the urodynamic efficacy and factors that influence the urodynamic results of treatment of neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity with intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). A retrospective study was conducted with a cohort of 70 patients composed of 40 men and 30 women with stable SCI (mean age, 39 ± 13.3 years) who underwent an intradetrusor injection of 300 IUs of BTX-A. A urodynamic study was conducted prior to the injection and 6 ± 4.3 months after the treatment. New urodynamic studies were subsequently performed up to an interval of 16 ± 12.2 months. The BTX-A significantly increased (p bladder capacity, the bladder volume of the first involuntary contraction of the detrusor and the postvoid residue. We observed a decrease that tended towards statistical significance (p bladder accommodation nor the urethral resistance index (bladder outlet obstruction index) varied significantly. The increase in vesical capacity was maintained in 50% of the sample for more than 32 months. Age, sex, anticholinergic treatment and lesion age showed no influence in terms of the increase in bladder capacity. The indwelling urinary catheter (IUC) was the only statistically significant negative factor. The urodynamic effect of BTX-A is maintained for a considerable time interval. The IUC negatively influences the result of the treatment. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Implication of ultrasound bladder parameters on treatment response in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia under medical management

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    Rajeev Thekumpadam Puthenveetil

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasound bladder parameters are useful tools for measuring the treatment response in BPH patients. Our study shows that RI and DWT significantly correlate with the treatment response in BPH patients. More importantly, pretreatment values of increased IPP and PUA determines the non-improvement of symptoms in BPH patients. Our study suggests the importance of transabdominal ultrasonography (KUB–P with Doppler for evaluating treatment responses to medical management.

  16. The role of cystectomy for non-malignant bladder conditions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Julio T; Dolat, MaryEllen T; Klausner, Adam P; Dragoescu, Ema; Hampton, Lance J

    2014-10-01

    Few studies have adequately addressed the indications, efficacy, and quality-of-life for cystectomy performed for non-malignant bladder conditions. Patients with debilitating non-malignant bladder conditions who have failed all previous conservative therapies may undergo various forms of cystectomy, including partial, simple or radical cystectomy. We provide a review of the current literature and recommendations for cystectomy for various non-malignant bladder conditions. A systematic review of MEDLINE was conducted to find prospective and retrospective studies using the keywords "cystectomy", "benign", and `non-malignant`. Articles were reviewed and triaged, background articles were added as supplements, leaving a final review of 67 papers. Data from the final review suggests that common benign indications for cystectomy are interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS), neurogenic bladder, hemorrhagic/radiation cystitis, infectious diseases of the bladder and miscellaneous conditions of the bladder such as endometriosis and total refractory incontinence. The most common perioperative complications include urinary tract and wound infections. Efficacy of cystectomy in patients with IC/PBS is greater than 80%, while efficacy in patients with neurogenic bladder is greater than 90%. Finally, improved urinary quality-of-life has been demonstrated in patients with neurogenic bladder post-cystectomy. Cystectomy for non-malignant conditions can be considered for patients who have failed previous conservative therapy. The limited data in existence suggests fertility can be adequately preserved after cystectomy in younger males. The data regarding the forms of urinary diversion suggests no significant advantage between any of the major forms of urinary diversion. Finally, while newer pharmacologics and technological advances are widely used in the treatment of various benign urological conditions, their role in preventing or treating refractory benign bladder

  17. Neurophysiological modeling of bladder afferent activity in the rat overactive bladder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Mahipal; van Asselt, Els; van Mastrigt, Ron; Clavica, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    The overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome-based urinary dysfunction characterized by "urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia". Earlier we developed a mathematical model of bladder nerve activity during voiding in anesthetized rats and found that the nerve activity in the relaxation phase of voiding contractions was all afferent. In the present study, we applied this mathematical model to an acetic acid (AA) rat model of bladder overactivity to study the sensitivity of afferent fibers in intact nerves to bladder pressure and volume changes. The afferent activity in the filling phase and the slope, i.e., the sensitivity of the afferent fibers to pressure changes in the post-void relaxation phase, were found to be significantly higher in AA than in saline measurements, while the offset (nerve activity at pressure ~0) and maximum pressure were comparable. We have thus shown, for the first time, that the sensitivity of afferent fibers in the OAB can be studied without cutting nerves or preparation of single fibers. We conclude that bladder overactivity induced by AA in rats is neurogenic in origin and is caused by increased sensitivity of afferent sensors in the bladder wall.

  18. Synostosis Between Pubic Bones due to Neurogenic, Heterotopic Ossification

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    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic, heterotopic ossification is characterised by the formation of new, extraosseous (ectopic bone in soft tissue in patients with neurological disorders. A 33-year-old female, who was born with spina bifida, paraplegia, and diastasis of symphysis pubis, had indwelling urethral catheter drainage and was using oxybutynin bladder instillations. She was prescribed diuretic for swelling of feet, which aggravated bypassing of catheter. Hence, suprapubic cystostomy was performed. Despite anticholinergic therapy, there was chronic urine leak around the suprapubic catheter and per urethra. Therefore, the urethra was mobilised and closed. After closure of the urethra, there was no urine leak from the urethra, but urine leak persisted around the suprapubic catheter. Cystogram confirmed the presence of a Foley balloon inside the bladder; there was no urinary fistula. The Foley balloon ruptured frequently, leading to extrusion of the Foley catheter. X-ray of abdomen showed heterotopic bone formation bridging the gap across diastasis of symphysis pubis. CT of pelvis revealed heterotopic bone lying in close proximity to the balloon of the Foley catheter; the sharp edge of heterotopic bone probably acted like a saw and led to frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter. Unique features of this case are: (1 temporal relationship of heterotopic bone formation to suprapubic cystostomy and chronic urine leak; (2 occurrence of heterotopic ossification in pubic region; (3 complications of heterotopic bone formation viz. frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter by the irregular margin of heterotopic bone and difficulty in insertion of suprapubic catheter because the heterotopic bone encroached on the suprapubic track; (4 synostosis between pubic bones as a result of heterotopic ossification..Common aetiological factors for neurogenic, heterotopic ossification, such as forceful manipulation, trauma, or spasticity, were absent in this

  19. Unusual Presentation of Mediastinal Neurogenic Tumours

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    Giampiero Negri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediastinal neurogenic tumours generally arise as single benign lesions and their typical location is the costovertebral sulcus. In about 10% of cases mediastinal neurogenic tumours may extend to the spinal canal; occasionally they may extend to the cervical region and, more rarely, may be multiple or associated with other synchronous mediastinal lesions. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. This report describes three cases of unusual presentation of mediastinal benign schwannomas successfully treated at our Hospital. In the first case multiple simultaneous paravertebral lesions were resected through a posterior approach. In the second case a tumour of the posterior mediastinum extending to the cervical region was excised through a one-stage combined supraclavicular incision followed by left mini-invasive video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical techniques. The third case describes a patient with a posterior neurogenic mediastinal tumour with a synchronous parathyroid adenoma of the anterior mediastinum, which were both successfully resected by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

  20. Use of botulinum toxin in individuals with neurogenic detrusor overactivity: State of the art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsenmeyer, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injection into the bladder wall has been shown to be an effective alternative to anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) medications and more invasive surgery in those with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and urinary incontinence who are not tolerating anticholinergic medications. In August 2011, Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for this use. Clinically, intradetrusor injection of BoNT has been found to decrease urinary incontinence and improve quality of life. Its impact on urodynamic parameters is an increase in the maximum cystometric (bladder) capacity and decrease in the maximum detrusor pressures. The most common side effects are urinary tract infections and urinary retention. There have been rare reports and a black box warning of distant spread of BoNT. BoNT has gained popularity because of its effectiveness and long duration of action, relative ease of administration, easy learning curve, reproducibility of results on repeated administration, and low incidence of complications. Objective To discuss the structure and function, mechanisms of action, clinical and urodynamic studies, injection technique, potential beneficial and adverse effects, and potential areas of research of BoNT. Methods Literature search focused on botulinum toxin in MEDLINE/PubMed. Search terms included botulinum toxin, neurogenic bladder, NDO, botox bladder, botox spinal cord injury, botox, FDA, botox side effects. All papers identified were English language, full-text papers. In addition, English abstracts of non-English papers were noted. The reference list of identified articles was also searched for further papers. Conclusion Botulinum toxin is an alternative treatment for individuals with NDO who fail to tolerate anticholinergic medications. Its popularity has increased because of the literature, which has supported its effectiveness, safety, easy

  1. Neurogenic Stuttering and Lateralized Motor Deficits Induced by Tranylcypromine

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    J. D. Duffy

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of neurogenic stuttering induced by the monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine is described. The association of neurogenic stuttering with acquired lateralized motor deficits in the patient described is discussed with reference to current theories regarding the pathogenesis of neurogenic stuttering.

  2. A systematic review of the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurogenic hyperactivity of the detrusor muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borau, A; Adot, J M; Allué, M; Arlandis, S; Castro, D; Esteban, M; Salinas, J

    Neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity (NDH) is a urodynamic observation characterised by involuntary detrusor contractions during the filling phase that are caused by an underlying neurological disease. The common and severe complications that can result from NDH warrant the preparation of healthcare protocols for the proper management of patients with NDH. The aim of this study is to standardise the criteria for the decision-making process in the management of patients with diagnosed or suspected NDH, providing personalised medical care. We performed a systematic noncomprehensive literature review on the aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of NDH. Based on the review, recommendations were issued by nominal consensus of a group of urology specialists. In general, the diagnosis of NDH is arrived at by a proper review of the medical history, physical examination and voiding diary before performing any diagnostic study. The main treatment objectives are to protect the upper urinary tract, restore function of the lower tract and improve these patients' continence and quality of life. The treatment consists of several steps aimed at obtaining proper bladder storage that allows for sufficiently spaced voidings. The follow-up should be personalised based on each patient's needs. The identification and management of NDH is important for positively redirecting the function of the lower urinary tract, in terms of filling and voiding, thereby improving the patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  3. Prediction of Bladder Outcomes after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

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    Chiara Pavese

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic bladder dysfunction represents one of the most common and devastating sequelae of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI. As early prediction of bladder outcomes is essential to counsel patients and to plan neurourological management, we aimed to develop and validate a model to predict urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI.Using multivariate logistic regression analysis from the data of 1,250 patients with traumatic SCI included in the European Multicenter Spinal Cord Injury study, we developed two prediction models of urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI and performed an external validation in 111 patients. As predictors, we evaluated age, gender, and all variables of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI and of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM. Urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after SCI were assessed through item 6 of SCIM. The full model relies on lower extremity motor score (LEMS, light-touch sensation in the S3 dermatome of ISNCSI, and SCIM subscale respiration and sphincter management: the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (aROC was 0.936 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.922-0.951. The simplified model is based on LEMS only: the aROC was 0.912 (95% CI: 0.895-0.930. External validation of the full and simplified models confirmed the excellent predictive power: the aROCs were 0.965 (95% CI: 0.934-0.996 and 0.972 (95% CI 0.943-0.999, respectively. This study is limited by the substantial number of patients with a missing 1-y outcome and by differences between derivation and validation cohort.Our study provides two simple and reliable models to predict urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI. Early prediction of bladder function might optimize counselling and patient-tailored rehabilitative interventions and improve patient

  4. [Bladder lithiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylla, C; Fall, P A; Ndoye, A; Diao, B; Diallo, A B; Gueye, S M; Ba, M; Diagne, B A

    2001-01-01

    to study the particularities of the bladder lithiasis in our countries. This was a retrospective study of 94 cases (62 men and 32 women) of bladder lithiasis over a period of 13 years. The lithogenic factors; clinic, paraclinic and therapeutic aspects have been studied. Morphoconstitutional analysis has been carded out in collaboration with Cristal Laboratory (St Cloud hospital center in France). mean age was 24.2+/-20.7 years old. The principals mains of consultation were: dysuria (n =36), mictionnal pain (n = 28), hematuria (n = 15). Facilitating factors have been found in 27% of cases. In 10 cases, there was an association bladdder lithiasis and bladdder-vaginal fistula. Radiologic test was dominated by intraveinous urographic (53.19 of cases). The metabolic test showed hypercalcemia and cristalluria in 2 cases. In 7,45 % of cases, we have founding a renal failure. An urinary tract infection have been noticed in 42 % of cases. Open surgery has been the main treatement (96 %) associating in 15 % of cases the treatement of an uropathy. In one case the bladder lithiasis weighed 1120 g. The morphologic and spectrophotometric analysis of the lithiasis have been achieved in 13 % of cases showing the predominance of struvite. the bladder lithiasis is still common in our countries; it could be good for us to access endoorporeals and extracorporeals therapeutic equipements in orderto reduce the indications of open surgery.

  5. Bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Eric Roger Wroclawski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus patients through clinical and laboratorial evaluation, ultrasonography, radiological and endoscopic examination. Methods: Thirty-nine patients, either outpatients or inpatients at the Department of Rheumatology of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina from Universidade de São Paulo were evaluated as to clinical and laboratorial data. All patients were submitted to ultrasonographic evaluation of the upper urinary tract, radiological and endoscopic examinations of the middle and lower urinary tracts. Rresults: Mean age of patients varied between 13 and 62 years (median = 29 years. Thirty-six were females and three were males. The disease varied from 6 months to 22 years (median three years and one month. Clinical and laboratory activity of the disease was present in 30 patients. Twenty-two patients had the diagnosis of lupus established for three years or more. Twenty-five patients were asymptomatic and all had received corticosteroids for treatment at least once. Twenty-three received antimalarial drugs; ten received cytostatics, and seven patients received non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Upper urinary tract ultrasonography was normal in all cases but one with staghorn calculus associated with neurogenic bladder secondary to neurological involvement by the disease. Vesicoureteral reflux was observed in two cases. Other two patients had significant post-voiding residual urine, both with neurogenic bladder secondary to nervous system involvement by lupus. The average bladder maximum capacity in an awaken patient was 342 mL, and was decreased in 18.9% of cases. This subgroup of patients presented a greater frequency of urinary symptoms and greater use of cytostatic drugs (Z > Z5%. A pathognomonic cystoscopic pattern of bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus could not be established. Cystoscopic aspects similar to those seen in the initial or minor

  6. Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Outcomes following a Conservative Management Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Robert A; Pisansky, Andrew; Fleck, Joseph; Hoversten, Patrick; Cotter, Katherine J; Katorski, Jenna; Liberman, Daniel; Elliott, Sean P

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy is characterized by motor impairment following injury to the developing brain. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction is estimated to affect at least a third of children with cerebral palsy. However there are limited data as patients transition to adulthood. We sought to describe the symptoms, sequelae and management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction in adults with cerebral palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of adult patients with cerebral palsy between 2011 and 2014. Patients with prior bladder reconstruction or catheterization based bladder drainage were excluded from study. Cerebral palsy severity was determined using GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System). A conservative evaluation and treatment paradigm was used. Noninvasive treatments were encouraged. Specifically clean intermittent catheterization, which is often not feasible, is avoided unless urinary retention, hydronephrosis or refractory lower urinary tract symptoms develop. There were 121 patients included in final analysis. Median age was 25 and 61 patients (50%) had GMFCS level V. Noninvasive management failed in 28 of 121 patients (23%) as defined by hydronephrosis in 9, persistent urinary retention in 10 and refractory lower urinary tract symptoms/incontinence in 9. Urethral clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated. Of all patients 25% showed evidence of urolithiasis during the study period. Surgical intervention was rare and associated with significant morbidity. Adults with cerebral palsy may present with variable signs and symptoms of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. Conservative treatment was successful in more than 75% of patients. Clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated in patients in whom conservative treatment failed. Surgical intervention was rarely indicated and it should be reserved for select individuals. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  7. Pathogenetic Mechanisms of Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 15 (2015), s. 1135-1145 ISSN 0897-7151 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : baroreflex-induced bradycardia * blood pressure rise * blood volume redistribution * neurogenic pulmonary edema * spinal cord injury * sympathetic nervous system Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.377, year: 2015

  8. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

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    Jacek Tomaszewski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, 3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and 3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future.

  9. Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bladder Control Problems in Women (Urinary Incontinence) Kegel Exercises Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) What ... a vaginal pessary, or surgery. Pelvic floor, or Kegel, exercises involve strengthening pelvic floor muscles. Strong pelvic ...

  10. Pediatric kidney recipients with small capacity, defunctionalized urinary bladders receiving adult-sized kidney without prior bladder augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Sophoclis; Lightner, Amy; Concepcion, Waldo; Rose, Marilyn; Salcedo-Concepcion, Kathrine; Salvatierra, Oscar

    2011-02-27

    Children with small capacity, defunctionalized urinary bladders present unique operative challenges. Thus, traditional practice has included pretransplant bladder augmentation, but this has several adverse consequences. A single-institutional, retrospective review from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2008 was conducted. Twelve pediatric patients, whom had not undergone pretransplant bladder augmentation, did not have neurogenic bladders or require preoperative catheterization, and a small capacity defunctionalized bladders were included. All were managed by the same surgeon with a previously described ureteral implantation, and a 7F ureteral stent attached to a large diameter suprapubic catheter was removed in a joint manner without cystoscopy at 2 weeks. Data were collected on patient and graft survival, rejection episodes, urinary tract infection (UTI) requiring antibiotics, grade of vesicoureteral reflux, and posttransplant bladder capacity. One-year patient and graft survival rates were 100%. One patient experienced a clinical rejection episode, which was successfully treated. Five patients (41.7%) had a UTI requiring abx treatment within the first postoperative year, but at 1 year, all patients had sterile urinary tracts. After removal of suprapubic catheters and ureteral stents, all patients were able to void spontaneously. Seven patients had no posttransplant ureteral reflux, three had grade 1 reflux, and two had grade 3 reflux (both successfully treated). The average age estimated pretransplant bladder and 1 year posttransplant bladder capacity was 14.5% and 84% of expected, respectively. In pediatric end-stage renal disease patients with a small capacity defunctionalized bladder, it is reasonable to proceed with kidney transplantation without pretransplant bladder augmentation, thus avoiding an unnecessary surgery.

  11. Microglia from neurogenic and non-neurogenic regions display differential proliferative potential and neuroblast support

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    Gregory Paul Marshall

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microglia isolated from the neurogenic subependymal zone (SEZ and hippocampus (HC are capable of massive in vitro population expansion that is not possible with microglia isolated from non-neurogenic regions. We asked if this regional heterogeneity in microglial proliferative capacity is cell intrinsic, or is conferred by interaction with respective neurogenic or non-neurogenic niches. By combining SEZ and cerebral cortex (CTX primary tissue dissociates to generate heterospatial cultures, we find that exposure to the SEZ environment does not enhance CTX microglia expansion; however, the CTX environment exerts a suppressive effect on SEZ microglia expansion. Furthermore, addition of purified donor SEZ microglia to either CTX- or SEZ-derived cultures suppresses the expansion of host microglia, while the addition of donor CTX microglia enhances the over-all microglia yield. These data suggest that SEZ and CTX microglia possess intrinsic, spatially restricted characteristics that are independent of their in vitro environment, and that they represent unique and functionally distinct populations. Finally, we determined that the repeated supplementation of neurogenic SEZ cultures with expanded SEZ microglia allows for sustained levels of inducible neurogenesis, provided that the ratio of microglia to total cells remains within a fairly narrow range.

  12. Metastatic carcinoma of the urinary bladder in a 67-year-old female with underlying triple primary cancers

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    Chia-Yen Hung

    2016-06-01

    A 67-year-old Taiwanese female presented to our institution in November 1997 with gastric signet ring cell carcinoma, pT2N0M0, status post subtotal gastrectomy. In February 2003 she was diagnosed with left breast invasive lobular carcinoma status post modified radical mastectomy, pT2N2M0. Further examination in January 2005 revealed proximal transverse colon cancer, Dukes' C2, with status post right hemicolectomy. She achieved disease-free status from all three malignancies after surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy for breast and colon cancers sequentially. In November 2011, she complained about sudden onset of gross hematuria for several days. Diagnostic cystoscopy showed a mass lesion over her urinary bladder. Cystoscope-assisted biopsy showed metastatic poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet ring appearance. Herein we have discussed the pathologic role in the diagnosis of metastatic tumor involving a patient with multiple primary cancers. We also explored the epidemiologic risk and potential causal mechanism of patients with multiple primary cancers.

  13. Taiwanese Continence Society clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

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    Hann-Chorng Kuo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the current evidence and expert opinions on diagnosis and management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD in Taiwan. The main problems of NLUTD are failure to store, failure to empty, and combined failure to store and empty. The priority of management of NLUTD should follow the order of: (1 preservation of renal function; (2 freedom from urinary tract infection (UTI; (3 efficient bladder emptying; and (4 freedom from indwelling catheter, and patients' expectation of management should be respected. Management of the urinary tract in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI or multiple sclerosis (MS must be based on urodynamic findings, rather than inferences from the neurologic evaluation. Selecting high risk patients is important to prevent renal function impairment in patients with chronic NLUTD. Patients with NLUTD should be regularly followed up for their lower urinary tract dysfunction by urodynamic study and any urological complication should be adequately treated. Avoiding a chronic indwelling catheter can reduce the incidence of developing a low compliant bladder. Antimuscarinic agents with clean intermittent catheterization (CIC may reduce urological complications and improve quality of life (QoL in patients with NLUTD. Intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A provides an alternative treatment for refractory detrusor overactivity (DO or low compliant bladder and can replace the need for bladder augmentation. When surgical intervention is necessary, we should consider the least invasive type of surgery and reversible procedure first and avoid any unnecessary surgery of the lower urinary tract. Keeping the bladder and urethra in a good condition without interference of the neuromuscular continuity provides patients with NLUTD a chance for future new technologies. It is most important to never give up on improving the QoL in patients with NLUTD.

  14. Preoperative neurogenic pulmonary edema: A dilemma for decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Lakkireddigari, Siva Kumar Reddy; Durga, Padmaja; Nayak, Madhukar; Ramchandran, Gopinath

    2012-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema may be a less-recognized consequence of obstructive hydrocephalus. The authors report a patient with acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to cerebellar metastatic lesion, who presented with neurogenic pulmonary edema. The edema resolved on placement of the ventriculoperitonial shunt. This report addresses the importance of recognition of neurogenic pulmonary edema as a possible perioperative complication resulting from an increase in intracranial pressure and the iss...

  15. Preoperative neurogenic pulmonary edema: A dilemma for decision making

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    Siva Kumar Reddy Lakkireddigari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic pulmonary edema may be a less-recognized consequence of obstructive hydrocephalus. The authors report a patient with acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to cerebellar metastatic lesion, who presented with neurogenic pulmonary edema. The edema resolved on placement of the ventriculoperitonial shunt. This report addresses the importance of recognition of neurogenic pulmonary edema as a possible perioperative complication resulting from an increase in intracranial pressure and the issues involved with anesthetic management of co-existing neurogenic pulmonary edema and intracranial hypertension.

  16. The role of video-urodynamic studies in managing non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soygür, T; Arikan, N; Tokatli, Z; Karaboga, R

    2004-04-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the role of video-urodynamics (VUD) in the diagnosis and management of voiding dysfunction in children. The records of the 128 children with dysfunctional voiding symptoms were retrospectively evaluated. All patients had a noninvasive screening assessment consisting of a detailed voiding history, ultrasonography and uroflowmetry, and measurement of residual urine. All the patients had also undergone VUD with no selection criteria. The results of VUD were compared retrospectively with the noninvasive screening assessment results. In 84 patients with urge syndrome VUD showed detrusor overactivity in 72 (86%); the bladder configuration and voiding-phase results were normal. Three (3.5%) patients had low-grade reflux. In 38 patients with voiding dysfunction VUD showed an intermittent flow pattern and/or increased electromyographic activity with a "spinning top" deformity of the bladder neck and increased detrusor pressure during voiding. Five (13%) of these children had low-grade reflux. In six infrequent voiders VUD revealed increased bladder capacity with fractionated flow patterns, with concomitantly increased abdominal pressures. There was decreased detrusor pressure during voiding with significant residual urine volume in only two patients; there was no reflux in any of the patients in this group. We do not recommend routine VUD in children with non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction, as it does not generally change the management and treatment. A detailed voiding history and physical examination is usually sufficient for a correct diagnosis.

  17. Superficial Bladder Cancer Therapy

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    Emmanuel Schenkman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer treatment remains a challenge despite significant improvements in preventing disease progression and improving survival. Intravesical therapy has been used in the management of superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder (i.e. Ta, T1, and carcinoma in situ with specific objectives which include treating existing or residual tumor, preventing recurrence of tumor, preventing disease progression, and prolonging survival. The initial clinical stage and grade remain the main determinant factors in survival regardless of the treatment. Prostatic urethral mucosal involvement with bladder cancer can be effectively treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG intravesical immunotherapy. Intravesical chemotherapy reduces short-term tumor recurrence by about 20%, and long-term recurrence by about 7%, but has not reduced progression or mortality. Presently, BCG immunotherapy remains the most effective treatment and prophylaxis for TCC (Ta, T1, CIS and reduces tumor recurrence, disease progression, and mortality. Interferons, Keyhole-limpet hemocyanin (KLH, bropirimine and Photofrin-Photodynamic Therapy (PDT are under investigation in the management of TCC and early results are encouraging. This review highlights and summarizes the recent advances in therapy for superficial TCC.

  18. Urodynamic Bladder Patterns in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, T.; Khan, A. A.; Iqbal, S.; Aziz, U.; Jilani, S.; Ayyub, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of various neurogenic bladder patterns in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury presenting at Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine Rawalpindi based on urodynamic studies. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM) Rawalpindi, from Jul 2014 to Jun 2016. Material and Methods: One hundred and forty traumatic spinal cord injury patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were included both from indoor and outdoor departments through non-probability purposive sampling. Urodynamic studies were performed using the urodynamic equipment at urodynamic laboratory. Data were collected and recorded on specialized proforma by the principal investigator. Results: Among 140 study participants detrusor overactivity was found in 100 patients out of which 76 (76 percent) had thoracic level of injury, 20 (20 percent) had cervical level and 4 (4 percent) had lumbar level of injury. Detrusor areflexia was the bladder pattern in 40 patients out of which 26 (65 percent) had thoracic level of injury, 10 (25 percent) had cervical level, and 4 (10 percent) had lumbar level of injury. Conclusion: Detrusor overactivity was the commonest neurogenic bladder pattern among the traumatic spinal cord injury patients. (author)

  19. Mechanisms of neurogenic pulmonary edema development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2008), s. 499-506 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GA309/06/1246; GA MŠk 1M0538 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697; GA MZd(CZ) NR8339 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Neurogenic pulmonary edema * Rat * Lung Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  20. Expression profiles of variation integration genes in bladder urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J M; Wang, Y Q; Gao, Z L; Wu, J T; Shi, B K; Yu, C C

    2014-04-30

    Bladder cancer is a common cancer worldwide and its incidence continues to increase. There are approximately 261,000 cases of bladder cancer resulting in 115,000 deaths annually. This study aimed to integrate bladder cancer genome copy number variation information and bladder cancer gene transcription level expression data to construct a causal-target module network of the range of bladder cancer-related genomes. Here, we explored the control mechanism underlying bladder cancer phenotype expression regulation by the major bladder cancer genes. We selected 22 modules as the initial module network to expand the search to screen more networks. After bootstrapping 100 times, we obtained 16 key regulators. These 16 key candidate regulatory genes were further expanded to identify the expression changes of 11,676 genes in 275 modules, which may all have the same regulation. In conclusion, a series of modules associated with the terms 'cancer' or 'bladder' were considered to constitute a potential network.

  1. A crucial role for the cortico-striato-cortical loop in the pathogenesis of stroke-related neurogenic stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theys, Catherine; De Nil, Luc; Thijs, Vincent; van Wieringen, Astrid; Sunaert, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Neurogenic stuttering is an acquired speech disorder characterized by the occurrence of stuttering-like dysfluencies following brain damage. Because the onset of stuttering in these patients is associated with brain lesions, this condition provides a unique opportunity to study the neural processes underlying speech dysfluencies. Lesion localizations of 20 stroke subjects with neurogenic stuttering and 17 control subjects were compared using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping. The results showed nine left-hemisphere areas associated with the presence of neurogenic stuttering. These areas were largely overlapping with the cortico-basal ganglia-cortical network comprising the inferior frontal cortex, superior temporal cortex, intraparietal cortex, basal ganglia, and their white matter interconnections through the superior longitudinal fasciculus and internal capsule. These results indicated that stroke-induced neurogenic stuttering is not associated with neural dysfunction in one specific brain area but can occur following one or more lesion throughout the cortico-basal ganglia-cortical network. It is suggested that the onset of neurogenic stuttering in stroke subjects results from a disintegration of neural functions necessary for fluent speech. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  2. Bladder sensation measures and overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, David E; Neil, Nancy J; Govier, Fred E; Kobashi, Kathleen C

    2009-09-01

    We performed a prospective multicomponent study to determine whether subjective and objective bladder sensation instruments may provide data on sensory dysfunction in patients with overactive bladder. We evaluated 70 prospectively enrolled patients with urodynamics and questionnaires on validated urgency (Urgency Perception Score), general overactive bladder (Urogenital Distress Inventory) and quality of life (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire). We first sought a correlation between sensory specific (Urgency Perception Score) and quality of life questionnaire scores. We then assessed a correlation between sensory questionnaire scores and urodynamic variables, exploring the hypothesis that certain urodynamic parameters may be bladder sensation measures. We evaluated 2 urodynamic derivatives (first sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity) to increase sensory finding discrimination. We noted a moderate correlation between the Urgency Perception Score (0.56) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (0.74) vs the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (each p Perception Score and bladder capacity (-0.25, p sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity statistically significantly correlated with the Urgency Perception Score despite the lesser or absent correlation associated with the individual components of these derivatives. Bladder sensation questionnaires may be valuable to identify patients with sensory dysfunction and provide additional data not obtained in generalized symptom questionnaires. Urodynamic variables correlated with bladder sensation questionnaire scores and may be an objective method to assess sensory dysfunction.

  3. Monomelic neurogenic syndromes: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Mamede; Swash, Michael

    2007-12-15

    Monomelic neurogenic syndromes are rare. Their classification and prognostic features have not been addressed in the European population. A prospective study of 17 patients with monomelic neurogenic amyotrophy, of upper or lower limb onset, with progression limited to one limb for three or more years. Clinical and neurophysiological studies were performed in the subsequent 3 or more years. Fifteen patients were of European origin and two were Asian. Those presenting with proximal monomelic weakness or with involvement of the posterior compartment of the lower leg showed no further progression after the initial period of development of the syndrome. Brisk reflexes in wasted muscles did not predict progression. Electromyographic signs of denervation in the opposite limb at presentation did not predict later progression. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) features of corticospinal dysfunction were a useful predictor of subsequent progression (p=0.01). One patient with lower limb onset developed conduction block with weakness in an upper limb nine years after presentation, and this upper limb weakness responded to IVIg therapy. This adult-onset European group of patients is different as compared with juvenile-onset Asian cases. The clinical syndromes appear heterogeneous, but neurophysiological investigations, in particular TMS, can be helpful in determining prognosis. Multifocal motor neuropathy should be considered when there is progression, even years after onset.

  4. Bladder-type hydropneumatic accumulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anigas, F.

    1985-01-01

    Hydropneumatic pressure accumulators allow liquids to be stored under pressure, their operating principle being based on the inherent compressibility of elements in a liquid and gaseous state. A wide range of fluids can be covered by means of the appropriate choice of the material for the body and bladder. Their main applications are: energy accumulation, safety reserve, suspension. (author)

  5. Bladder outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002238.htm Bladder outlet obstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is a blockage at the base ...

  6. Overactive bladder syndrome - management and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Janine; McLeod, Nicholas; Thani-Gasalam, Ruban; Rashid, Prem

    2012-11-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is a symptom-based clinical diagnosis. It is characterised by urinary urgency, frequency and nocturia, with or without urge urinary incontinence. These symptoms can often be managed in the primary care setting. This article provides a review on overactive bladder syndrome and provides advice on management for the general practitioner. Overactive bladder syndrome can have a significant effect on quality of life, and affects 12-17% of the population. Prevalence increases with age. The management of overactive bladder syndrome involves exclusion of underlying pathology. First line treatment includes lifestyle interventions, pelvic floor exercises, bladder training and antimuscarinic agents. Failure of conservative management necessitates urology referral. Second line therapies are more invasive, and include botulinum toxin, neuromodulation or surgical interventions such as augmentation cystoplasty or urinary diversion.

  7. Pathomechanism of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome and Mapping the Heterogeneity of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a heterogeneous syndrome which is usually characterized by urinary frequency, nocturia, and bladder pain. Several pathomechanisms have been proposed, including uroepithelial dysfunction, mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation, autoimmunity, and occult urinary tract infections. It is possible that an inflammatory process alters regulation of urothelial homeostasis and results in dysfunction of the bladder epithelium. Different phenotypes of IC/BPS have been explored including Hunner and non-Hunner type IC, hypersensitive bladder, and bladder pain both with and without functional somatic syndrome. Different gene expressions have also been found in different IC phenotypes. Abnormal expressions of uroplakin, chondroitin sulfate and adhesive protein E-cadherin, tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 in IC/BPS bladder suggest abnormal epithelial differentiation in this bladder disease. Analysis of inflammatory proteins, or cytokines in the urine or serum provides another diagnostic foundation forIC/BPS subtypes. The involvement of IC/BPS in systemic functional somatic syndrome and other pelvic organ diseases might also subdivide subtypes of IC/BPS. Chronic inflammation, increased urothelial apoptosis, and abnormal urothelial function are closely associated in IC bladders. This article reviews recent research on the pathomechanisms of IC, which might help us in mapping the heterogeneity of the disease. PMID:27915472

  8. Large sliding inguino-scrotal hernia of the urinary bladder: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Huang, Yonggang; Ye, Jing; Gao, Guodong; Zhang, Fangjie; Wu, Hao

    2018-03-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias of the urinary bladder are protrusions of the bladder through the internal inguinal ring, most of which are insignificant and diagnosed intra-operatively. Large inguino-scrotal bladder hernias commonly present with lower urinary tract symptoms and may cause severe complications, including bladder incarceration or necrosis, bladder hemorrhage, obstructive or neurogenic bladder dysfunction, and even renal failure. We describe and discuss the clinical findings and management of a 59-year-old man who complained of a decrease in scrotal size after voiding and 2-stage voiding requiring pressure to the scrotum. The patient was diagnosed preoperatively as massive, bilateral, inguinoscrotal hernias, and a large, left-sided, sliding bladder hernia. The patient underwent a timely open re-peritoneal inguinal herniorrhaphy using a mesh. The surgical outcomes were good, and no surgical site infection, chronic postoperative inguinal pain or recurrence were recorded during the follow-up. Better knowledge of this rare condition of large inguino-scrotal sliding bladder hernia could help in making a correct diagnosis preoperatively and provide proper surgical management timely, so as to reduce delay in treatment and avoid potential complications.

  9. The Role(s of Cytokines/Chemokines in Urinary Bladder Inflammation and Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder pain syndrome (BPS/interstitial cystitis (IC is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be bladder related and with at least one urinary symptom. It was recently concluded that 3.3–7.9 million women (>18 years old in the United States exhibit BPS/IC symptoms. The impact of BPS/IC on quality of life is enormous and the economic burden is significant. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of BPS/IC are unknown, numerous theories including infection, inflammation, autoimmune disorder, toxic urinary agents, urothelial dysfunction, and neurogenic causes have been proposed. Altered visceral sensations from the urinary bladder (i.e., pain at low or moderate bladder filling that accompany BPS/IC may be mediated by many factors including changes in the properties of peripheral bladder afferent pathways such that bladder afferent neurons respond in an exaggerated manner to normally innocuous stimuli (allodynia. The goals for this review are to describe chemokine/receptor (CXCL12/CXCR4; CCL2/CCR2 signaling and cytokine/receptor (transforming growth factor (TGF-β/TGF-β type 1 receptor signaling that may be valuable LUT targets for pharmacologic therapy to improve urinary bladder function and reduce somatic sensitivity associated with urinary bladder inflammation.

  10. The role(s) of cytokines/chemokines in urinary bladder inflammation and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Eric J; Arms, Lauren; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome (BPS)/interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be bladder related and with at least one urinary symptom. It was recently concluded that 3.3-7.9 million women (>18 years old) in the United States exhibit BPS/IC symptoms. The impact of BPS/IC on quality of life is enormous and the economic burden is significant. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of BPS/IC are unknown, numerous theories including infection, inflammation, autoimmune disorder, toxic urinary agents, urothelial dysfunction, and neurogenic causes have been proposed. Altered visceral sensations from the urinary bladder (i.e., pain at low or moderate bladder filling) that accompany BPS/IC may be mediated by many factors including changes in the properties of peripheral bladder afferent pathways such that bladder afferent neurons respond in an exaggerated manner to normally innocuous stimuli (allodynia). The goals for this review are to describe chemokine/receptor (CXCL12/CXCR4; CCL2/CCR2) signaling and cytokine/receptor (transforming growth factor (TGF-β)/TGF-β type 1 receptor) signaling that may be valuable LUT targets for pharmacologic therapy to improve urinary bladder function and reduce somatic sensitivity associated with urinary bladder inflammation.

  11. Correlation of gene expression with bladder capacity in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaco, Marc; Koslov, David S; Keys, Tristan; Evans, Robert J; Badlani, Gopal H; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Walker, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Interstitial cystitis and bladder pain syndrome are terms used to describe a heterogeneous chronic pelvic and bladder pain disorder. Despite its significant prevalence, our understanding of disease etiology is poor. We molecularly characterized interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and determined whether there are clinical factors that correlate with gene expression. Bladder biopsies from female subjects with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and female controls without signs of the disease were collected and divided into those with normal and low anesthetized bladder capacity, respectively. Samples then underwent RNA extraction and microarray assay. Data generated by these assays were analyzed using Omics Explorer (Qlucore, Lund, Sweden), GeneSifter® Analysis Edition 4.0 and Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis to determine similarity among samples within and between groups, and measure differentially expressed transcripts unique to each phenotype. A total of 16 subjects were included in study. Principal component analysis and unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clear separation between gene expression in tissues from subjects with low compared to normal bladder capacity. Gene expression in tissue from patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome who had normal bladder capacity did not significantly differ from that in controls without interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. Pairwise analysis revealed that pathways related to inflammatory and immune response were most involved. Microarray analysis provides insight into the potential pathological condition underlying interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. This pilot study shows that patients with this disorder who have low compared to normal bladder capacity have significantly different molecular characteristics, which may reflect a difference in disease pathophysiology. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc

  12. Clinical characteristics of bladder cancer in patients with spinal cord injury: the experience from a single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böthig, Ralf; Kurze, Ines; Fiebag, Kai; Kaufmann, Albert; Schöps, Wolfgang; Kadhum, Thura; Zellner, Michael; Golka, Klaus

    2017-06-01

    Life expectancy for people with spinal cord injury has shown a marked increase due to modern advances in treatment methods and in neuro-urology. However, since life expectancy of people with paralysis increases, the risk of developing of urinary bladder cancer is gaining importance. Single-centre retrospective evaluation of patient data with spinal cord injuries and proven urinary bladder cancer and summary of the literature. Between 1998 and 2014, 24 (3 female, 21 male) out of a total of 6599 patients with spinal cord injury were diagnosed with bladder cancer. The average age at bladder cancer diagnosis was 57.67 years, which is well below the average for bladder cancer cases in the general population (male: 73, female: 77). All but one patient had a latency period between the onset of the spinal paralysis and tumour diagnosis of more than 10 years. The median latency was 29.83 years. The median survival for these patients was 11.5 months. Of the 24 patients, 19 (79%) had muscle invasive bladder cancer at ≥T2 at the time of diagnosis. The type of neurogenic bladder (neurogenic detrusor overactivity or acontractility) and the form of bladder drainage do not appear to influence the risk. Long-term indwelling catheter drainage played only a minor role in the investigated patients. The significantly younger age at onset and the frequency of invasive tumours at diagnosis indicate that spinal cord injury influences bladder cancer risk and prognosis as well. Early detection of bladder cancer in patients with spinal cord injury remains a challenge.

  13. Subject-controlled stimulation of dorsal genital nerve to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opisso, Eloy; Borau, Albert; Rijkhoff, Nico J M

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effects of subject controlled dorsal genital nerve (DGN) electrical stimulation on neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in subjects at home. Subjects underwent a 5-day study at home with DGN stimulation. Stimulation was provided with surface electrodes placed either on the dorsal penile shaft in males and on or close to the clitoris in females. The days 1 and 5 were with no stimulation whereas days 2-4 were with stimulation. Two urodynamic studies were performed at the beginning and at the end of the study. A bladder diary was obtained. Eleven subjects with NDO and with urge incontinence were included. One subject stopped the protocol before the end of the 5-day trial and two did not undergo the second urodynamic study. The subjects showed a statistically significant increase in bladder capacities compared to baseline (P = 0.047). Mean volume per day voided significantly increased over the study within the subjects. Differences between day 1 and day 5 were statistically significant (P = 0.028). The feasibility and the globally positive outcomes of the study indicate that the stimulation of the dorsal genital nerve can be an option for the treatment of the NDO. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Immunophenotypic and Molecular Analysis of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Potential for Neurogenic Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Nikhat; Khan, Aleem A; Vishwakarma, Sandeep K

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence shows that dental pulp (DP) tissues could be a potential source of adult stem cells for the treatment of devastating neurological diseases and several other conditions. Exploration of the expression profile of several key molecular markers to evaluate the molecular dynamics in undifferentiated and differentiated DP-derived stem cells (DPSCs) in vitro . The characteristics and multilineage differentiation ability of DPSCs were determined by cellular and molecular kinetics. DPSCs were further induced to form adherent (ADH) and non-ADH (NADH) neurospheres under serum-free condition which was further induced into neurogenic lineage cells and characterized for their molecular and cellular diversity at each stage. Statistical analysis used one-way analysis of variance, Student's t -test, Livak method for relative quantification, and R programming. Immunophenotypic analysis of DPSCs revealed >80% cells positive for mesenchymal markers CD90 and CD105, >70% positive for transferring receptor (CD71), and >30% for chemotactic factor (CXCR3). These cells showed mesodermal differentiation also and confirmed by specific staining and molecular analysis. Activation of neuronal lineage markers and neurogenic growth factors was observed during lineage differentiation of cells derived from NADH and ADH spheroids. Greater than 80% of cells were found to express β-tubulin III in both differentiation conditions. The present study reported a cascade of immunophenotypic and molecular markers to characterize neurogenic differentiation of DPSCs under serum-free condition. These findings trigger the future analyses for clinical applicability of DP-derived cells in regenerative applications.

  15. Giant bladder diverticulum : A rare cause of bladder outlet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant bladder diverticula are rare causes of bladder outlet obstruction in children and have rarely been reported. In this paper, we present three children with giant bladder diverticula who presented with bladder outlet obstruction within a year. Micturating cystourethrogram is important for investigating bladder outlet ...

  16. Modelling Creep (Relaxation of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravkovic Nebojsa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We first present the results of an experiment in which the passive properties of the urinary bladder were investigated using strips of rabbit bladder. Under the assumption that the urinary bladder had orthopaedic characteristics, the strips were taken in the longitudinal and in the circumferential directions. The material was subjected to uniaxial tension, and stress-stretch curves were generated for various rates of deformation. We found that the rates did not have a significantly effect on the passive response of the material. Additionally, the stress-stretch dependence during relaxation of the material when exposed to isometric conditions was determined experimentally.

  17. Risk factors for symptomatic urinary tract infections in individuals with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, J; Wöllner, J; Pannek, J

    2016-09-01

    Retrospective investigation. To investigate the association of patient and injury characteristics, as well as bladder management, with the occurrence of patient-reported, symptomatic urinary tract infection(s) UTI(s) in patients with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). Tertiary urologic referral center. The patient database was screened for patients with chronic (>12 months) NLUTD who had presented between 2008 and 2012. Patient characteristics, bladder evacuation management, the annual number of patient-reported, symptomatic UTIs and the type of prophylactic treatment to prevent UTIs were collected. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the effects of the investigated risk factors on the occurrence of symptomatic UTI(s) and recurrent symptomatic UTIs (⩾3 annual UTIs). The data of 1104 patients with a mean NLTUD duration of 20.3±11.6 years were investigated. The evacuation method was a significant (P⩽0.004) predictor for the occurrence of symptomatic UTI and recurrent symptomatic UTIs. The greatest annual number of symptomatic UTIs was observed in patients using transurethral indwelling catheters, and the odds of experiencing a UTI and recurrent UTIs were increased more than 10- and 4-fold, respectively. The odds of a UTI or recurrent UTIs were also increased significantly (P⩽0.014) in patients using intermittent catheterization (IC). Botulinum toxin injections into the detrusor increased the odds of a UTI ~10-fold (P=0.03). The bladder evacuation method is the main predictor for symptomatic UTIs in individuals with NLUTD. Transurethral catheters showed the highest odds of symptomatic UTI and should be avoided whenever possible.

  18. "Hair in the Bladder": An Unusual Finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cindolo, Luca; Bada, Maida; Bellocci, Roberto; De Francesco, Piergustavo; Castellan, Pietro; Berardinelli, Francesco; Neri, Fabio; Schips, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Trichobezoar is a rare condition whereby a hairball is found in the human stomach or gastrointestinal tract, most frequently in young women, mainly in association with a psychiatric disorder. Trichobezoar cases have also been reported in the bladder and represent a rare complication of foreign bodies, called "hair nidus or hair ball," in patients with chronic catheter. Approximately 10% to 15% of patients on long-term urethral catheter or clean intermittent self-catheterization develop urinary tract stones. In a small minority of cases, bladder stones can develop around a foreign body that was introduced into the bladder. In the literature, there are few cases of foreign bladder bodies that formed stones over a hair nidus. Recognizing this condition can optimize the patient's quality of life. Herein, we present a case of a 71-year-old Caucasian male with a long-term catheter in hypocontractile urinary bladder secondary to injury of pelvic plexus after rectal surgery. He had a bladder stone caused by hair encrusted together. Hair is introduced into the bladder either by adherence to the catheter directly or by overlying the urethral meatus and being pushed internally. Regular hygiene and shaving of pubic area represent effective preventive measures to reduce this kind of complications in patients with chronic indwelling catheter or under a self-catheterization regimen.

  19. Thrombomodulin expression regulates tumorigenesis in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chun-Te; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Lin, Paul- Yang; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of potential tumor markers will help improve therapeutic planning and patient management. Thrombomodulin (TM) is a sensitive urothelial marker. TM was reported to be one of the endogenous anti-metastatic factors and has diagnostic and prognostic values for the progression of carcinoma. In the present study, we examine the role of TM in bladder cancer. We studied the role of TM in tumor behavior and related signaling pathways in vitro using the human bladder cancer cell lines HT1376, HT1197, J82 and T24, and in vivo using animal models. We also selected clinical specimens from 100 patients with bladder cancer for immunohistochemical staining to evaluate the predictive capacity of TM in tumor invasiveness. The data revealed that positive immunoreactivity for TM was inversely correlated with clinical stage and DNA methyltransferase 1 immunoreactivity. Decreased TM expression could predict the aggressive tumor growth and advanced clinical stage in bladder cancer. When TM was inhibited, tumor growth rate and invasion ability were augmented in vitro and in vivo. The underlying changes included increased cell proliferation, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB activation significantly increased TM expression and attenuated tumor aggressiveness in bladder cancer. TM plays an important role in bladder cancer tumor aggressiveness in vitro and in vivo and is a clinically significant predictor that may represent a suitable therapeutic target for bladder cancer

  20. Hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from abattoir-derived bovine fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, Fernando; Becerra, Víctor; Cortes, Yennifer; Vidal, Sonia; Sáenz, Leonardo; Palomino, Jaime; De Los Reyes, Mónica; Peralta, Oscar A

    2014-07-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are multipotent progenitor cells characterized by their ability to both self-renew and differentiate into tissues of mesodermal origin. The plasticity or transdifferentiation potential of MSC is not limited to mesodermal derivatives, since under appropriate cell culture conditions and stimulation by bioactive factors, MSC have also been differentiated into endodermal (hepatocytes) and neuroectodermal (neurons) cells. The potential of MSC for hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation has been well documented in different animal models; however, few reports are currently available on large animal models. In the present study we sought to characterize the hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation and multipotent potential of bovine MSC (bMSC) isolated from bone marrow (BM) of abattoir-derived fetuses. Plastic-adherent bMSC isolated from fetal BM maintained a fibroblast-like morphology under monolayer culture conditions. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that bMSC populations were positive for MSC markers CD29 and CD73 and pluripotency markers OCT4 and NANOG; whereas, were negative for hematopoietic markers CD34 and CD45. Levels of mRNA of hepatic genes α-fetoprotein (AFP), albumin (ALB), alpha1 antitrypsin (α1AT), connexin 32 (CNX32), tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) and cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4) were up-regulated in bMSC during a 28-Day period of hepatogenic differentiation. Functional analyses in differentiated bMSC cultures evidenced an increase (P < 0.05) in albumin and urea production and glycogen storage. bMSC cultured under neurogenic conditions expressed NESTIN and MAP2 proteins at 24 h of culture; whereas, at 144 h also expressed TRKA and PrPC. Levels of MAP2 and TRKA mRNA were up-regulated at the end of the differentiation period. Conversely, bMSC expressed lower levels of NANOG mRNA during both hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation processes. The expression patterns of linage-specific markers and the production of

  1. Effects of aniracetam on bladder overactivity in rats with cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Y; Yokoyama, O; Komatsu, K; Kodama, K; Yotsuyanagi, S; Niikura, S; Nagasaka, Y; Namiki, M

    2000-06-01

    Aniracetam has been used to improve the mental condition of patients with cerebrovascular disease. Previous studies have demonstrated that aniracetam activates the residual functions of cholinergic neurons in damaged brain areas. In this study, the effects of aniracetam on bladder overactivity after left middle cerebral artery occlusion were assessed through oral or i.c.v. administration in sham-operated and cerebral infarcted rats. Oral administration of aniracetam (100 and 300 mg/kg) resulted in a significant and dose-dependent increase in bladder capacity in cerebral infarcted rats but had no effect on bladder capacity in sham-operated rats. Intracerebroventricular administration of aniracetam (0.25 and 2.5 microg/rat) resulted in a significant and dose-dependent increase in bladder capacity in cerebral infarcted rats but not in sham-operated rats. Aniracetam had no significant effect on bladder contraction pressure or micturition threshold pressure in either sham-operated or cerebral infarcted rats. Furthermore, i.c.v. administration of atropine (1 microg/rat), a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, completely inhibited the enhancing effects of aniracetam on bladder capacity in cerebral infarcted rats. The effects of aniracetam on bladder overactivity are thought to be mediated in part by activation of cholinergic inhibitory mechanisms in the brain. These results indicate that aniracetam may improve the neurogenic voiding dysfunction observed in patients with cerebrovascular disease.

  2. Influence of bladder lithiasis on lower urinary tract dynamics in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vírseda-Chamorro, M; Salinas-Casado, J; Barroso-Manso, Á; Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Fuertes, M E

    2017-08-01

    A prospective and a case-matched control study. To study the lower urinary tract dysfunction associated with bladder lithiasis in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Toledo (Spain). We have carried out a urodynamic study in 30 patients with SCI with lithiasis in their bladder before and 3 months after bladder endoscopic lithotripsy. This second study was compared with the urodynamic findings of a different group of 30 patients with SCI, without a history of bladder lithiasis, paired with cases by gender and date of urodynamic study. We have found that the prevalence of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) was significantly different after bladder lithotripsy, although the cystomanometric capacity was significantly increased. A group of patients with lithiasis showed a maximum flow rate, a voiding maximum detrusor pressure and the detrusor contractility parameter Wmax lower than that in controls. On the other hand, a voiding abdominal straining was found to be significantly greater than that in controls. Bladder lithiasis affects the presence of NDO in patients with SCI. Patients with SCI who develop bladder lithiasis present a lower detrusor contractility power compared with those who do not.

  3. Squamous Metaplasia and Its Management in Non-malignant Bladder Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenol Tonyalı

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To reveal possible associations between non-malignant bladder disease and malignancy by evaluating the pathologic examination results of patients who underwent cystectomy for non-malignant diseases and to suggest a point of view for disease management. Materials and Methods: Medical records of patients, who underwent cystectomy in our clinic between January 2005 and January 2015 for non-malignant diseases, were examined retrospectively. Results: A total of 14 patients were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 58.7±9.3 years. Of the patients eight of them were followed up with interstitial cystitis (IC, five with neurogenic bladder and one with hemorrhagic cystitis. Time from diagnosis to cystectomy was 6.1±5.8 years on average in IC patients, 13.8±9.8 years in neurogenic bladder patients and 10 years in hemorrhagic cystitis patients. No malignancy finding was observed according to the pathologic examination results of the cystectomy specimens. However, either chronic or active inflammation was observed in all the patients. In addition to other pathologies non-keratinized squamous metaplasia was detected in five patients. Conclusion: Patients with non-malignant diseases should be followed-up with cystoscopy and bladder biopsy as a pre-malign lesion caution. Although cystectomy and urinary diversion are surgery methods with high complication rates, they could be suggested to well-informed patients as treatment alternatives.

  4. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has ex...... can be challenging, and misdiagnosis as a psychological problem, overactive bladder, or chronic urinary infection has plagued patients with the problem....

  5. OnabotulinumtoxinA in overactive bladder: Evidence-based consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Cidre, M A; Arlandis-Guzmán, S

    2016-04-01

    To offer a set of useful recommendations for urologists who are starting to provide treatment of overactive bladders with onabotulinumtoxinA. A literature search to December 2013 was conducted, as well as a subsequent critical reading of the selected publications. The coordinators prepared a document that was submitted for review by the members of the Spanish Group for the use of Botulinum Toxin in Urology. The expert group considered that onabotulinumtoxinA may be used for overactive bladder syndrome with urinary urge incontinence secondary to neurogenic or idiopathic detrusor overactivity for patients for whom conservative treatment and first-line medical treatment has failed, is not tolerated or is contraindicated. Treatment in most cases was performed with local intravesical anesthesia, although it can also be performed under epidural or general anesthesia. Patients must be informed of the possibility of requiring self-catheterization or temporary catheterization. Clinicians should ensure that the patients are capable of performing this catheterization before the treatment is conducted. Patients must also be informed of the need for antibiotic prophylaxis to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections. At least 2 follow-up visits are recommended: the first at days 7-14 after the injection and the second at 2-3 months. Reinjection is indicated when the effect of the treatment decreases. These guidelines can help clinicians in their daily decisions and limit the potential risks associated with the incorrect use of the drug. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 May Help Downregulate TNF-Alpha, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-12 (p70 in the Neurogenic Bladder of Spinal Cord Injured Patient with Urinary Tract Infections: A Two-Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley C. Anukam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of urinary tract infection (UTI in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI continues to be of concern, due to complications that can occur. An emerging concept that is a common underlying pathophysiological process is involved, wherein pathogens causing UTI have a role in inflammatory progression. We hypothesized that members of the commensal flora, such as lactobacilli, may counter this reaction through anti-inflammatory mediation. This was assessed in a pilot two-patient study in which probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri were administered to one patient and placebo to another, both along with antibiotics to treat acute UTI. Urinary TNF-alpha was significantly downregulated (P=.015 in the patient who received the probiotic and who used intermittent catheterization compared with patient on placebo and using an indwelling catheter. The extent to which this alteration resulted in improved well-being in spinal cord injured patients remains to be determined in a larger study.

  7. Antiproliferative Factor Signaling and Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    A unique glycopeptide, antiproliferative factor (APF), has been suggested as a urinary biomarker and potential mediator of long-term bladder disorder Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome. There is no known cause for this disease. Several mechanistic approaches have been employed to address the underlying mechanism whereby APF regulates cellular responses in the bladder epithelium. A summary of recent literature is provided, and is focused on signal transduction pathways and networks that are responsive to APF. PMID:22259731

  8. The pattern of autonomic tone disorder and its correction in children with overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Morozov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system dysregulation is one of the leading components in the pathogenesis of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. These disorders lead to diverse changes in the functions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems with disordered release of mediators (norepinephrine, acetylcholine, hormones of the adrenal cortex and other endocrine glands, a number of biologically active substances (polypeptides, prostaglandins, as well as to the impaired sensitivity of vascular a- and p-adrenoceptors. Children with dysuria concurrently develop visceral, CNS, and circulatory system dysfunctions and metabolic disturbances. The paper describes the clinical trial of children with overactive bladder, which demonstrates the autonomic tone in these patients (и=44. The findings point to the important involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the pathogenesis of the disease and provide a rationale for the incorporation of vegetotropic drugs normalizing the autonomic nervous system into the combination therapy of overactive bladder.

  9. Bladder necrosis: 'A man without a bladder'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosschieter, Judith; Oudshoorn, Frederik H K; Meuleman, Eric J H; Nieuwenhuijzen, Jakko A

    2018-02-17

    Since the use of antibiotics, bladder necrosis has become a rare condition. We report a case of bladder necrosis in a 90-year-old man following urinary retention. After insertion of a transurethral catheter (TUC), 2 L of urine was evacuated. In the following days, the TUC became intermittently blocked. Adequate bladder drainage could not be obtained despite intensive rinsing and placement of a suprapubic catheter. On surgical exploration necrosis of almost the entire bladder wall, except for the trigone, was encountered. Surgical debridement of the non-viable bladder wall without opening the abdominal cavity was conducted, and a TUC was placed in the Retzius cavity to ensure evacuation of urine. Since the patient was haemodynamically unstable, construction of a urinary diversion was waived and urinary drainage of the Retzius cavity by the TUC was accepted, resulting in adequate urinary drainage without compromising renal function. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...

  11. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If You Have Questions Print en español Ultrasonido: vejiga What It Is A bladder ultrasound is a safe and painless test that ... Exam: Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG) Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder) Urinary ... only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  12. Developments in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, L.; Niijima, T.; Prout, G.; Schroder, F.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Guidelines for Radiation Therapy in Clinical Research on Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma in Situ; Policy on Monitoring and Reporting Results; Standardization of Protocol Formnd The Role of Cytology in the Diagnosis, Detection and Follow-up of Bladder Cancer

  13. Treatment of Neurogenic Cough with Tramadol: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Gregory R; Teng, Stephanie E; Achlatis, Efstratios; Fang, Yixin; Amin, Milan R

    2017-07-01

    This study employs validated cough assessment tools to prospectively determine the impact of tramadol on cough severity and quality of life in subjects with neurogenic cough. The study was a prospective case series with planned data collection at a tertiary care academic medical center laryngology practice. Sixteen consecutive collected subjects with neurogenic cough prospectively completed pre- and posttreatment validated cough assessment tools, the cough severity index (CSI) and Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ). All subjects in the study reported at least some improvement in their cough symptoms. In a Wilcoxon signed rank test that compared paired results, CSI scores improved from 23 to 14 and LCQ scores improved from 74 to 103 ( P = .003 and P = .005, respectively). This small preliminary assessment suggests that tramadol warrants additional evaluation as a treatment for neurogenic cough.

  14. New Diagnostic and Treatment Modalities for Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, M. Libby; Lum, Ying Wei

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is a widely recognized, yet controversial, syndrome. The lack of specific objective diagnostic modalities makes diagnosis difficult. This is compounded by a lack of agreed upon definitive criteria to confirm diagnosis. Recent efforts have been made to more clearly define a set of diagnostic criteria that will bring consistency to the diagnosis of neurogenic thoracic syndrome. Additionally, advancements have been made in the quality and techniques of various imaging modalities that may aid in providing more accurate diagnoses. Surgical decompression remains the mainstay of operative treatment; and minimally invasive techniques are currently in development to further minimize the risks of this procedure. Medical management continues to be refined to provide non-operative treatment modalities for certain patients, as well. The aim of the present work is to review these updates in the diagnosis and treatment of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. PMID:28555024

  15. [Homeopathic prophylaxis of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, J; Jus, M C; Jus, M S

    2012-04-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) in patients with spinal cord injury are a frequent clinical problem. Often, preventive measures are not successful. We present the case reports of five patients with recurrent UTI who received additional homeopathic treatment. Of these patients, three remained free of UTI, whereas UTI frequency was reduced in two patients. Our initial experience with homeopathic prevention of UTI is encouraging. For an evidence-based evaluation of this concept, prospective studies are required.

  16. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    Stem cells;. Bladder tissue engineering;. Decellularization;. Bladder acellular matrix. Abstract. A wide range of injuries could affect the bladder and lead to eventual loss ... Tissue engineering relies upon three essential pillars; the scaffold, the cells seeded on scaffolds and lastly ..... Clinical trials in bladder tissue engineering.

  17. Mandatory role of proteinase-activated receptor 1 in experimental bladder inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Carole A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, inflammation plays a role in most bladder pathologies and represents a defense reaction to injury that often times is two edged. In particular, bladder neurogenic inflammation involves the participation of mast cells and sensory nerves. Increased mast cell numbers and tryptase release represent one of the prevalent etiologic theories for interstitial cystitis and other urinary bladder inflammatory conditions. The activity of mast cell-derived tryptase as well as thrombin is significantly increased during inflammation. Those enzymes activate specific G-protein coupled proteinase-activated receptors (PARs. Four PARs have been cloned so far, and not only are all four receptors highly expressed in different cell types of the mouse urinary bladder, but their expression is altered during experimental bladder inflammation. We hypothesize that PARs may link mast cell-derived proteases to bladder inflammation and, therefore, play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of cystitis. Results Here, we demonstrate that in addition to the mouse urinary bladder, all four PA receptors are also expressed in the J82 human urothelial cell line. Intravesical administration of PAR-activating peptides in mice leads to an inflammatory reaction characterized by edema and granulocyte infiltration. Moreover, the inflammatory response to intravesical instillation of known pro-inflammatory stimuli such as E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, substance P, and antigen was strongly attenuated by PAR1-, and to a lesser extent, by PAR2-deficiency. Conclusion Our results reveal an overriding participation of PAR1 in bladder inflammation, provide a working model for the involvement of downstream signaling, and evoke testable hypotheses regarding the role of PARs in bladder inflammation. It remains to be determined whether or not mechanisms targeting PAR1 gene silencing or PAR1 blockade will ameliorate the clinical manifestations of cystitis.

  18. Discerning neurogenic vs. non-neurogenic postnatal lateral ventricular astrocytes via activity-dependent input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena W. Adlaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Throughout development, neural stem cells (NSCs give rise to differentiated neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes which together modulate perception, memory, and behavior in the adult nervous system. To understand how NSCs contribute to postnatal/adult brain remodeling and repair after injury, the lateral ventricular (LV neurogenic niche in the rodent postnatal brain serves as an excellent model system. It is a specialized area containing self-renewing GFAP+ astrocytes functioning as NSCs generating new neurons throughout life. In addition to this now well-studied regenerative process, the LV niche also generates astrocytes, playing an important role for glial scar formation after cortical injury. While LV NSCs can be clearly distinguished from their neuroblast and oligodendrocyte progeny via molecular markers, the astrocytic identity of NSCs has complicated their distinction from terminally-differentiated astrocytes in the niche. Our current models of postnatal/adult LV neurogenesis do not take into account local astrogenesis, or the possibility that cellular markers may be similar between non-dividing GFAP+ NSCs and their differentiated astrocyte daughters. Postnatal LV neurogenesis is regulated by NSC-intrinsic mechanisms interacting with extracellular/niche-driven cues. It is generally believed that these local effects are responsible for sustaining neurogenesis, though behavioral paradigms and disease states have suggested possibilities for neural circuit-level modulation. With recent experimental findings that neuronal stimulation can directly evoke responses in LV NSCs, it is possible that this exciting property will add a new dimension to identifying postnatal/adult NSCs. Here, we put forth a notion that neural circuit-level input can be a distinct characteristic defining postnatal/adult NSCs from non-neurogenic astroglia.

  19. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: Clinical management recommendations of the Neurologic Incontinence committee of the fifth International Consultation on Incontinence 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Marcus John; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Cocci, Andrea; Emmanuel, Anton; Gajewski, Jerzy B; Harrison, Simon C W; Heesakkers, John P F A; Lemack, Gary E; Madersbacher, Helmut; Panicker, Jalesh N; Radziszewski, Piotr; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Wyndaele, Jean Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of neurological disease and lower urinary tract dysfunction have been produced by the International Consultations on Incontinence (ICI). These are comprehensive guidelines, and were developed to have world-wide relevance. To update clinical management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction from the recommendations of the fourth ICI, 2009. A series of evidence reviews and updates were performed by members of the working group. The resulting guidelines were presented at the 2012 meeting of the European Association of Urology for consultation, and consequently amended to deliver evidence-based conclusions and recommendations in 2013. The current review is a synthesis of the conclusions and recommendations, including the algorithms for initial and specialized management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. The pathophysiology is categorized according to the nature of onset of neurological disease and the part(s) of the nervous system affected. Assessment requires clinical evaluation, general investigations, and specialized testing. Treatment primarily focuses on ensuring safety of the patient and optimizing quality of life. Symptom management covers conservative and interventional measures to aid urine storage and bladder emptying, along with containment of incontinence. A multidisciplinary approach to management is essential. The review offers a pragmatic review of management in the context of complex pathophysiology and varied evidence base. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:657-665, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Immunophenotypic and molecular analysis of human dental pulp stem cells potential for neurogenic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhat Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Growing evidence shows that dental pulp (DP tissues could be a potential source of adult stem cells for the treatment of devastating neurological diseases and several other conditions. Aims: Exploration of the expression profile of several key molecular markers to evaluate the molecular dynamics in undifferentiated and differentiated DP-derived stem cells (DPSCs in vitro. Settings and Design: The characteristics and multilineage differentiation ability of DPSCs were determined by cellular and molecular kinetics. DPSCs were further induced to form adherent (ADH and non-ADH (NADH neurospheres under serum-free condition which was further induced into neurogenic lineage cells and characterized for their molecular and cellular diversity at each stage. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis used one-way analysis of variance, Student's t-test, Livak method for relative quantification, and R programming. Results: Immunophenotypic analysis of DPSCs revealed> 80% cells positive for mesenchymal markers CD90 and CD105, >70% positive for transferring receptor (CD71, and> 30% for chemotactic factor (CXCR3. These cells showed mesodermal differentiation also and confirmed by specific staining and molecular analysis. Activation of neuronal lineage markers and neurogenic growth factors was observed during lineage differentiation of cells derived from NADH and ADH spheroids. Greater than 80% of cells were found to express β-tubulin III in both differentiation conditions. Conclusions: The present study reported a cascade of immunophenotypic and molecular markers to characterize neurogenic differentiation of DPSCs under serum-free condition. These findings trigger the future analyses for clinical applicability of DP-derived cells in regenerative applications.

  1. Paraganglioma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder are tumors of chromaffin tissue originating from the sympathetic innervations of the urinary bladder wall and are extremely rare. Being functional, in most of the cases they are recognized by their characteristic presentation of hypertensive crisis and postmicturition syncope. A silent presentation of a bladder paraganglioma is very unusual but quite dangerous as they are easily misdiagnosed and adequate peri-operative attention is not provided. Here, we are presenting one such silent paraganglioma in adult women who presented with only a single episode of hematuria and severe hypertensive crisis occur during its trans-urethral resection.

  2. Bladder and Bowel Dysfunction Is Common in Both Men and Women with Mutation of the ABCD1 Gene for X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofereiter, Johann; Smith, Matthew D; Seth, Jai; Tudor, Katarina Ivana; Fox, Zoe; Emmanuel, Anton; Murphy, Elaine; Lachmann, Robin H; Panicker, Jalesh

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene. The commonest phenotype of X-ALD is adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), which is characterised by involvement of the spinal cord and peripheral nerves. The aim of this study was to evaluate bladder and bowel symptoms in men with AMN and female X-ALD carriers. In this cross-sectional study, patients with confirmed mutation of the ABCD1 gene attending a tertiary care service were approached about bladder and bowel complaints and completed the Urinary Symptom Profile (USP), Qualiveen Short Form (SF-Qualiveen), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction (NBD) questionnaires. Neurological disability was assessed using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Forty-eight patients participated, 19 males (mean EDSS score (n = 16) 5.0 (95% CI ± 1.03)) and 29 females (mean EDSS score (n = 25) 3.2 (95% CI ± 0.98)). Overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms were reported in both males (100%, n = 19) and females (86.2%, n = 25). There was no significant gender difference in severity of OAB symptoms (P = 0.35) and impact on quality of life (P = 0.13). Furthermore, there was no significant difference in OAB severity when symptoms were compared between female carriers and a cohort of women (n = 17) with spinal cord damage due to multiple sclerosis (P = 0.27). Twenty-one percent (n = 4) of males and 10% (n = 3) of females had moderate to severe bowel dysfunction. Bladder and bowel complaints are common in both men with AMN and female carriers. They have a significant impact on the quality of life yet are under-reported and under-treated. Though having an X-linked pattern of inheritance, female carriers may experience overactive bladder symptoms which are as severe as in male patients and are likely to be neurological in origin.

  3. Bladder function in patients with dystonia undergoing deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordasini, Livio; Kessler, Thomas M; Kiss, Bernhard; Schüpbach, Michael; Pollo, Claudio; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2014-09-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction is well described in Parkinson's disease and has a major impact on quality of live. In contrast, little is known about the extent of urinary symptoms in other movement disorders such as dystonia and about the role of the basal ganglia in bladder control.. A consecutive series of 11 patients with severe dystonia undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus internus was prospectively enrolled. Bladder function was assessed by the International Prostate Symptom Score and urodynamic investigation (UDI) before DBS surgery and afterwards in the conditions with and without DBS. In UDI before DBS surgery, detrusor overactivity was found in 36% (4/11) of dystonia patients. With pallidal DBS ON, maximum flow rate significantly decreased, post-void residual significantly increased and detrusor overactivity disappeared.. Pathological urodynamic changes can be found in a relevant percentage of dystonia patients. Pallidal DBS has a relaxing effect on detrusor function indicating a role of the basal ganglia in lower urinary tract control. Thus, a better understanding on how subcortical networks influence lower urinary tract function might open new therapeutic perspectives.. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mapping of potential neurogenic niche in the human temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Barreto Nogueira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ are known neurogenic niches in adult mammals. Nonetheless, the existence of neurogenic niches in adult humans is controversial. We hypothesized that mapping neurogenic niches in the human temporal lobe could clarify this issue. Neurogenic niches and neurogenesis were investigated in 28 temporal lobes via immunostaining for nestin and doublecortin (DCX, respectively. Nestin was observed in a continuous layer formed by the SVZ, the subpial zone of the medial temporal lobe and the SGZ, terminating in the subiculum. In the subiculum, remarkable DCX expression was observed through the principal efferent pathway of the hippocampus to the fimbria. A possible explanation for the results is that the SVZ, the subpial zone of the medial temporal lobe and the SGZ form a unit containing neural stem cells that differentiate into neurons in the subiculum. Curiously, the area previously identified as the human rostral migratory stream may in truth be the fornix, which contains axons that originate in the subiculum. This study suggests that neurogenesis may occur in an orchestrated manner in a broad area of the human temporal lobe.

  5. Bladder Diseases - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Expand Section Bladder Diseases: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Enfermedades de la vejiga: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National ...

  6. Bladder augmentation using the gastrointestinal tract. Indication, follow up and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, R Molina; Patiño, G Escribano; Fernández, E Rodríguez; Gil, M J Cancho; García, E Lledó; Alonso, A Husillos; Piniés, G Ogaya; Sánchez, J Piñeiro; Fernández, C Hernández

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of bladder augmentation using the gastrointestinal tract is to create a low-pressure and high-capacity reservoir, permitting suitable continence and voiding, preserving the upper urinary tract. To analyze the indications, complications and results of our series of augmentation enterocystoplasties. We retrospectively reviewed patients undergoing augmentation enterocystoplasty in our department between 1997 and 2010, both included. The indications were: Interstitial cystitis, neurogenic bladder and inflammatory bladder retraction. In all cases a cystography, urethrocystoscopy, urodynamic study and studies of each condition. Bladder release is performed by means of medial laparotomy and an extraperitoneal approach with bivalve opening to the urethral orifices. The bladder augmentation is performed with a 15-20 cm segment of detubularized ileum obtained at 20 cm from the ileocecal valve; in cases of kidney failure, a 7-cm gastric body wedge is added. The bladder catheter was removed following cystogram after 15 days. Monitoring was performed by means of ultrasound with postvoid residual, blood analyses, urine culture and voiding diary. We performed a descriptive study of the demographic characteristics, postoperative complications according to the Clavien classification and in the long term. We included 24 patients, 19 women and 5 men with a mean age of 48.5 years and a median of 47 (21-77). Mean follow up was 7.5 years with a median of 8 (1-11). The indications were: 7 interstitial cystitis, 8 bladder retraction and 7 neurogenic bladder. There were no intraoperative complications. The postoperative complications were 3 Clavien I, 2 type II, 2 IIIA and 1 IIIB. In the long term, 3 patients presented urinary incontinence, 2 mild metabolic acidosis, 5 required self-catheterization, 6 bladder stones, 2 febrile urinary tract infections and 1 stricture of the anastomotic mouth. In three cases, an ileogastrocystoplasty was performed without hydroelectrolytic

  7. Isolated Inguinal Bladder Hernia

    OpenAIRE

    BAYSAL, Tamer; SOYLU, Ahmet; ERDOĞAN, Özgül

    2010-01-01

    Isolated urinary bladder herniation into the inguinal canal is rare. It is often diagnosed intraoperatively during surgery or is identified after intraoperative injury. Early diagnosis with radiologic imaging is important to avoid complications during repair surgery. Computed tomography seems the best imaging choice to outline the details of herniation. We report an incidentally discovered case of inguinal bladder herniation with intravenous pyelography and computed tomography findings. ...

  8. Engineering functional bladder tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Maya; Madduri, Srinivas; Gobet, Rita; Sulser, Tullio; Milleret, Vinzent; Hall, Heike; Atala, Anthony; Eberli, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    End stage bladder disease can seriously affect patient quality of life and often requires surgical reconstruction with bowel tissue, which is associated with numerous complications. Bioengineering of functional bladder tissue using tissue-engineering techniques could provide new functional tissues for reconstruction. In this review, we discuss the current state of this field and address different approaches to enable physiologic voiding in engineered bladder tissues in the near future. In a collaborative effort, we gathered researchers from four institutions to discuss the current state of functional bladder engineering. A MEDLINE® and PubMed® search was conducted for articles related to tissue engineering of the bladder, with special focus on the cells and biomaterials employed as well as the microenvironment, vascularisation and innervation strategies used. Over the last decade, advances in tissue engineering technology have laid the groundwork for the development of a biological substitute for bladder tissue that can support storage of urine and restore physiologic voiding. Although many researchers have been able to demonstrate the formation of engineered tissue with a structure similar to that of native bladder tissue, restoration of physiologic voiding using these constructs has never been demonstrated. The main issues hindering the development of larger contractile tissues that allow physiologic voiding include the development of correct muscle alignment, proper innervation and vascularization. Tissue engineering of a construct that will support the contractile properties that allow physiologic voiding is a complex process. The combination of smart scaffolds with controlled topography, the ability to deliver multiple trophic factors and an optimal cell source will allow for the engineering of functional bladder tissues in the near future. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Bladder cancer and schistosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma-associated bladder cancer was believed, for several decades, to be a completely unique entity of disease, different from urothelial cancer. This was probably due to its distinct clinico pathologic and demographic features that varied from those of urothelial entity. The carcinogenesis is an extremely complex process resulting from the accumulation of many genetic and epigenetic changes leading to alterations in the cell proliferation regulation process. In bladder cancer, many of these carcinogenic cascades were not fully documented or somewhat conflicting. In spite of the efforts performed, much is still needed to explore the presence or absence of the carcinogenic difference with a different etiology. The control of schistosomiasis in certain countries and the subsequent decrease in the intensity of infestation showed changing of features approaching that of urothelial tumors. However the schistosoma-associated bladder cancer presented in more advanced stages than schistosoma-non associated urothelial cancer. More recently, data are gathered that, upon applying the same treatment protocol and management care, stage by stage comparison of the treatment end-results were found to be similar in bladder cancer patients with a different etiology. All treatment options; including radical cystectomy with or without adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemo- or radiotherapy or tri modality bladder preserving treatment seem to lead to similar end-results regardless of etiologic factor(s) implicated in bladder cancer development.

  10. [The mechanism underlying the effects of tea polyphenol on epirubicin-induced autophagy and apoptosis in T24 bladder cancer cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wen; Yin, Hubin; Liu, Yan; Gou, Xin

    2017-06-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism by which epirubicin (EPI) induces autophagy and the mechanism by which tea polyphenol (TP) regulates EPI-induced autophagy and apoptosis in T24 bladder cancer cells. Methods T24 cells weredivided into control group, EPI group, TP group and TP plus EPI group. Eight hours after corresponding treatments in different groups, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to observe the image of autophagosomes. The expressions of autophagy-related protein LC3II and p62 in the cells were detected by Western blotting. Apoptotic cells were evaluated after EPI-treatment for 24 hours by flow cytometry combined with annexin V-FITC/PI staining. Western blotting was performed to determine the levels of cleaved-caspase-3 (c-caspase-3) and cleaved-PARP (c-PARP). LC3II was again tested by Western blotting 8 hours after T24 cells were treated with EPI added with autophagy pathway inhibitor chloroquine and 3-methyladenine, and moreover, the levels of LC3II and p-JNK were detected by Western blotting after T24 cells were treated with EPI combined with TP or the JNK inhibitor SP for 8 hours. Results The amount of autophagosomes and the level of LC3IIin TP plus EPI group were much lower than those in EPI group. SP reduced the level of LC3II induced by EPI. EPI increased p-JNK in a time-dependent manner. TP combined with EPI reduced the activity of JNK pathway. The apoptosis rate and the levels of c-caspase-3 and c-PARP in TP plus EPI group were much higher than those in EPI group. Conclusion TP inhibits autophagy through JNK pathway to enhance EPI-induced apoptosis in T24 bladder cancer cell line.

  11. Is there any possible genotoxic effect in exfoliated bladder cells of rat under the exposure of 1800 MHz GSM-like modulated radio frequency radiation (RFR)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, Neslihan; Sirav, Bahriye; Yuvaci, Hilal Uslu; Turhan, Nilgun; Coskun, Zafer Kutay; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2010-08-01

    People are exposed to many carcinogenic and mutagenic chemicals in their everyday lives. These include antineoplastic drugs, Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)s, aromatic amines, nitrosamines, metals, and electromagnetic radiation. Based on the state of knowledge acquired during the last 50 years of research on possible biological effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), the majority of the scientific community is convinced that exposure to EMF below the existing security limits does not cause a risk to the health of the general public. However, this position is questioned by others, who are of the opinion that the available research data are contradictory or inconsistent and, therefore, unreliable. In this study, we aimed to investigate if there is any effect of 1800 MHz GSM modulated radio frequency radiation (RFR) on the number of micronucleus in exfoliated bladder cells of rat which will be informative about the genotoxic damage. Exposure period was 20 min/day, 5 days/week during a month. Six female Wistar rats were used for two groups: Group I (n=6): controls; Group II (n=6): 1.8 GHz exposed animals. 1800 MHz RFR did not showed a significant MN frequencies in rat bladder cells when compared with the control group (p>0.05). 1800 MHz RFR-exposed animals did not produce any genotoxic effect when compared with the control group ( p>0.05). Kinetic studies are important for any biomarker, especially those in which tissue differentiation and maturation processes will heavily influence the time between induction of damage and collection of damaged cells for micronucleus analysis.

  12. An orthotopic bladder tumor model and the evaluation of intravesical saRNA treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Moo Rim; Yang, Glen; Charisse, Klaus; Epstein-Barash, Hila; Manoharan, Muthiah; Li, Long-Cheng

    2012-07-28

    We present a novel method for treating bladder cancer with intravesically delivered small activating RNA (saRNA) in an orthotopic xenograft mouse bladder tumor model. The mouse model is established by urethral catheterization under inhaled general anesthetic. Chemical burn is then introduced to the bladder mucosa using intravesical silver nitrate solution to disrupt the bladder glycosaminoglycan layer and allows cells to attach. Following several washes with sterile water, human bladder cancer KU-7-luc2-GFP cells are instilled through the catheter into the bladder to dwell for 2 hours. Subsequent growth of bladder tumors is confirmed and monitored by in vivo bladder ultrasound and bioluminescent imaging. The tumors are then treated intravesically with saRNA formulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). Tumor growth is monitored with ultrasound and bioluminescence. All steps of this procedure are demonstrated in the accompanying video.

  13. Chromium in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabek, Tomasz; Socha, Katarzyna; Kudelski, Jacek; Darewicz, Barbara; Markiewicz-Zukowska, Renata; Chlosta, Piotr; Borawska, Maria

    2017-12-23

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies report a strong role of chemical carcinogens in the etiology of bladder cancer. However, the involvement of heavy metals in tumourigenesis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder has been poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between chromium (Cr) and bladder cancer. Chromium concentration in two 36-sample series of bladder cancer tissue and sera from patients with this neoplasm were matched with those of a control group. The amount of trace elements in every tissue sample was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. This was correlated with tumour stage. While the median chromium concentration levels reached statistically higher values in the bladder cancer tissue, compared with the non-cancer tissue (99.632ng/g and 33.144ng/g, respectively; p<0.001), the median Cr levels in the sera of the patients with this carcinoma showed no statistical difference when compared to those of the control group (0.511μg/l and 0.710μg/l, respectively; p=0.408). The median levels of Cr in the bladder tissue, depending on the stage of the tumour, compared with the tissue without the neoplasm, observed the same relationship for both non-muscle invasive and muscle-invasive tumours (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). This study shows that patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder had higher tissue Cr levels than people without tumour, while no difference was found in the Cr serum levels between the two groups of patients under investigation.

  14. The Antimuscarinic Agent Tolterodine Regulates Bladder Extracellular Matrix in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Xin Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Antimuscarinic agents can delay the progression of bladder dysfunction caused by bladder outlet obstruction (BOO. To date, the relationship between muscarinic receptor activity and the bladder extracellular matrix (ECM remains unclear. Thus, an animal model of partial BOO (PBOO in female rats was established to explore the variation in bladder wall ECM proteins under PBOO conditions with antimuscarinic agent administration. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham, PBOO, and PBOO plus tolterodine. Picrosirius red staining was used to examine the smooth muscle and collagen content of bladder samples. Gene microarray and RT-PCR were performed to survey the expression of ECM proteins, receptors, and metabolism regulators in the rat bladder. Positive results were further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Picrosirius red staining showed that smooth muscle volume significantly increased in the PBOO and PBOO plus tolterodine groups (p < 0.05, while collagen significantly increased in the PBOO group (p < 0.05 but not in the PBOO plus tolterodine group. Gene microarray and RT-PCR revealed that none of the collagen subtypes exhibited significant changes after PBOO establishment and tolterodine administration. However, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs increased significantly in the PBOO plus tolterodine group (p < 0.05. Additionally, PBOO inhibited the expression of non-collagen ECM proteins in the rat bladder wall, while tolterodine induced the expression of non-collagen ECM proteins and ECM receptors. Conclusions: Tolterodine decreased the volume of collagen in PBOO rat bladder wall, possibly via MMPs, and regulated the expression of ECM proteins and receptors.

  15. Overactive bladder syndrome in older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagg, A.S.; Cardozo, L.; Chapple, C.R.; Ridder, D. de; Kelleher, C.; Kirby, M.; Milsom, I.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    The overactive bladder symptom complex (OAB) is the commonest cause of urinary incontinence in older people, and is usually due to underlying detrusor overactivity, and as such is a treatable condition. Older people are a heterogeneous group, which includes fit community-dwelling individuals and

  16. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Registry: Malignant tumor of urinary bladder Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Bladder Cancer General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  17. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer Atezolizumab Avelumab Bavencio (Avelumab) Cisplatin Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Durvalumab ...

  18. [A retrospective, observational and multicentre study on patients with hyperactive bladder on treatment with mirabegron and oxybutinine under usual clinical practice conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicras-Mainar, A; Navarro-Artieda, R; Ruiz-Torrejón, A; Saez, M; Coll-de Tuero, G; Sánchez, L

    To evaluate therapeutic persistence, healthcare resources, medical costs and adverse events of oxybutynin and mirabegron treatments in patients with overactive bladder in routine medical practice. An observational, retrospective, multicentre study was carried out using the records of patients attended to in 3 different geographic locations (Barcelona, Girona, Asturias). An analysis was made on the 2 study groups (oxybutynin and mirabegron). Follow-up time was one year. Persistence was defined as the time (months), without discontinuation of the initial treatment, or without change of treatment at least 60 days after the initial prescription. Primary endpoints: comorbidity, healthcare resources used, and adverse events. The data was analysed using the SPSSWIN Program, with a significance of Pbladder had similar persistence with the treatment, lower healthcare costs, but with higher oxybutynin vs. mirabegron adverse reaction rates. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. [MRI guided stereotactic thalamotomy for the treatment of the neurogenic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balás, I; Llumiguano, C; Horvath, Z; Kovér, F; Dóczi, T P

    Medial thalamotomy is one of the first stereotactic operations to have been used for neurogenic pain, has a low complication rate and no risk of the development of iatrogenic neurogenic pain. It represents selective local relief for all types of pain, without causing somatosensorial deficit. We did 39 posteromedial thalamotomies in patients with persistent intractable pain due to various disorders. The pain was assessed pre- and postoperatively on the VAS (Visual Analogic Scale). Half of the patients operated on had relief of pain after thalamotomy. In 84% (n = 39) of our cases this relief occurred on the second day, in 70% (n = 35) after three months, in 63% (n = 27) after six months, in 64% (n = 25) after nine months, in 62% (n = 23) of the patients after 12 months, and in 62% (n = 22) after 24 months. Three patients had temporary complications and one a permanent complication, but this did not make him an invalid. Posteromedial stereotactic thalamotomy under MR guidance can provide safe, effective treatment for persistent, intractable pain.

  20. N-Cadherin Upregulation Promotes the Neurogenic Differentiation of Menstrual Blood-Derived Endometrial Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanli; Yang, Fen; Liang, Shengying; Liu, Qing; Fu, Sulei; Wang, Zhenyu; Yang, Ciqing; Lin, Juntang

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are typically caused by either trauma or medical disorders, and recently, stem cell-based therapies have provided a promising treatment approach. Menstrual blood-derived endometrial stem cells (MenSCs) are considered an ideal therapeutic option for peripheral nerve repair due to a noninvasive collection procedure and their high proliferation rate and immunological tolerance. Here, we successfully isolated MenSCs and examined their biological characteristics including their morphology, multipotency, and immunophenotype. Subsequent in vitro studies demonstrated that MenSCs express high levels of neurotrophic factors, such as NT3, NT4, BDNF, and NGF, and are capable of transdifferentiating into glial-like cells under conventional induction conditions. Moreover, upregulation of N-cadherin (N-cad) mRNA and protein expression was observed after neurogenic differentiation. In vivo studies clearly showed that N-cad knockdown via in utero electroporation perturbed the migration and maturation of mouse neural precursor cells (NPCs). Finally, a further transfection assay also confirmed that N-cad upregulation in MenSCs results in the expression of S100. Collectively, our results confirmed the paracrine effect of MenSCs on neuroprotection as well as their potential for transdifferentiation into glial-like cells and demonstrated that N-cad upregulation promotes the neurogenic differentiation of MenSCs, thereby providing support for transgenic MenSC-based therapy for peripheral nerve injury.

  1. Clinical course of a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence symptoms followed at a tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebl, Adrienne; Fagundes, Simone Nascimento; Koch, Vera Hermina Kalika

    2016-01-01

    To characterize a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence followed-up in a tertiary center. Retrospective analysis of 50 medical records of children who had attained bladder control or minimum age of 5 years, using a structured protocol that included lower urinary tract dysfunction symptoms, comorbidities, associated manifestations, physical examination, voiding diary, complementary tests, therapeutic options, and clinical outcome, in accordance with the 2006 and 2014 International Children's Continence Society standardizations. Female patients represented 86.0% of this sample. Mean age was 7.9 years and mean follow-up was 4.7 years. Urgency (56.0%), urgency incontinence (56.0%), urinary retention (8.0%), nocturnal enuresis (70.0%), urinary tract infections (62.0%), constipation (62.0%), and fecal incontinence (16.0%) were the most prevalent symptoms and comorbidities. Ultrasound examinations showed alterations in 53.0% of the cases; the urodynamic study showed alterations in 94.7%. At the last follow-up, 32.0% of patients persisted with urinary incontinence. When assessing the diagnostic methods, 85% concordance was observed between the predictive diagnosis of overactive bladder attained through medical history plus non-invasive exams and the diagnosis of detrusor overactivity achieved through the invasive urodynamic study. This subgroup of patients with clinical characteristics of an overactive bladder, with no history of urinary tract infection, and normal urinary tract ultrasound and uroflowmetry, could start treatment without invasive studies even at a tertiary center. Approximately one-third of the patients treated at the tertiary level remained refractory to treatment. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical course of a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence symptoms followed at a tertiary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Lebl

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To characterize a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence followed-up in a tertiary center. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 50 medical records of children who had attained bladder control or minimum age of 5 years, using a structured protocol that included lower urinary tract dysfunction symptoms, comorbidities, associated manifestations, physical examination, voiding diary, complementary tests, therapeutic options, and clinical outcome, in accordance with the 2006 and 2014 International Children's Continence Society standardizations. Results: Female patients represented 86.0% of this sample. Mean age was 7.9 years and mean follow-up was 4.7 years. Urgency (56.0%, urgency incontinence (56.0%, urinary retention (8.0%, nocturnal enuresis (70.0%, urinary tract infections (62.0%, constipation (62.0%, and fecal incontinence (16.0% were the most prevalent symptoms and comorbidities. Ultrasound examinations showed alterations in 53.0% of the cases; the urodynamic study showed alterations in 94.7%. At the last follow-up, 32.0% of patients persisted with urinary incontinence. When assessing the diagnostic methods, 85% concordance was observed between the predictive diagnosis of overactive bladder attained through medical history plus non-invasive exams and the diagnosis of detrusor overactivity achieved through the invasive urodynamic study. Conclusions: This subgroup of patients with clinical characteristics of an overactive bladder, with no history of urinary tract infection, and normal urinary tract ultrasound and uroflowmetry, could start treatment without invasive studies even at a tertiary center. Approximately one-third of the patients treated at the tertiary level remained refractory to treatment.

  3. Muscarinic receptors of the urinary bladder: detrusor, urothelial and prejunctional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chess-Williams, R

    2002-06-01

    1. The parasympathetic nervous system is responsible for maintaining normal bladder function, contracting the bladder smooth muscle (detrusor) and relaxing the bladder outlet during micturition. 2. Contraction of the bladder involves direct contraction via M3 receptors and an indirect 're-contraction' via M2-receptors whereby a reduction in adenylate cyclase activity reverses the relaxation induced by beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. 3. Muscarinic receptors are also located on the epithelial lining of the bladder (urothelium) where they induce the release of a diffusible factor responsible for inhibiting contraction of the underlying detrusor smooth muscle. The factor remains unidentified but is not nitric oxide, a cyclooxygenase product or adenosine triphosphate. 4. Finally, muscarinic receptors are also located prejunctionally in the bladder on cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals, where M1-receptors facilitate transmitter release and M2 or M4-receptors inhibit transmitter release. 5. In pathological states, changes may occur in these receptor systems resulting in bladder dysfunction. Muscarinic receptor antagonists are the main therapeutic agents available for treatment of the overactive bladder, but whether their therapeutic effect involves actions at all three locations (detrusor, prejunctional, urothelial) has yet to be established.

  4. Segmentation of urinary bladder in CT Urography (CTU) using CLASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Law, Yuen; Cohan, Richard H.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cho, Hyun-Chong; Zhou, Chuan; Wei, Jun

    2012-03-01

    We are developing a computerized system for bladder segmentation on CTU, as a critical component for computer aided diagnosis of bladder cancer. A challenge for bladder segmentation is the presence of regions without contrast (NC) and filled with IV contrast (C). We are developing a Conjoint Level set Analysis and Segmentation System (CLASS) specifically for this application. CLASS performs a series of image processing tasks: preprocessing, initial segmentation, and 3D and 2D level set segmentation and post-processing, designed according to the characteristics of the bladder in CTU. The NC and the C regions of the bladder were segmented separately in CLASS. The final contour is obtained in the post-processing stage by the union of the NC and C contours. Seventy bladders (31 containing lesions, 24 containing wall thickening, and 15 normal) were segmented. The performance of CLASS was assessed by rating the quality of the contours on a 5-point scale (1= "very poor", 3= "fair", 5 = "excellent"). For the 53 partially contrast-filled bladders, the average quality ratings for the 53 NC and 53 C regions were 4.0+/-0.7 and 4.0+/-1.0, respectively. 46 NC and 41 C regions were given quality ratings of 4 or above. Only 2 NC and 5 C regions had ratings under 3. The average quality ratings for the remaining 12 completely no contrast (NC) and 5 completely contrast-filled (C) bladder contours were 3.3+/-1.0 and 3.4+/-0.5, respectively. After combining the NC and C contours for each of the 70 bladders, 46 had quality ratings of 4 or above. Only 4 had ratings under 3. The average quality rating was 3.8+/-0.7. The results demonstrate the potential of CLASS for automated segmentation of the bladder.

  5. Effects of Radiation Therapy on Established Neurogenic Heterotopic Ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan Ho; Shim, Su Jung; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Hyuna; Kang, Youn Joo

    2016-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is frequently seen on rehabilitation units after spinal cord injuries, fractures, brain injuries, and limb amputations. Currently, there is no effective treatment for HO other than prophylaxis with anti-inflammatory medications, irradiation, and bisphosphonate administration. These prophylactic treatments are not effective for managing ectopic bone once it has formed. Here we describe three cases of established neurogenic HO treated with radiation therapy (RT). All patients had decreased serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone-specific ALP levels with decreased pain but increased range of motion immediately after RT. Post-treatment X-rays revealed no further growth of the HO. All patients maintained clinical and laboratory improvements 4 or 6 months after the RT. Our results suggest that RT is safe and effective in decreasing pain and activity of neurogenic HO.

  6. [Neurogenic communication disorders: how effective are relaxation therapy and acupuncture?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptok, M

    2008-12-01

    Not only neurologists but also ENT-physicians and phoniatricians have to prescribe speech and language therapy for patients with communication disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has gained increasing popularity among patients. Many studies have investigated these procedures and positive effects on certain physical e. g., chronic pain and anxiety disorders could be validated. Unfortunately only few empirical investigations have targeted the use of CAM to treat neurogenic disorders of communication or cognition. In this review we provide an overview over general therapeutical principals of two widely used approaches, relaxation therapy and acupuncture. Then we survey the literature and summarize existent research literature regarding the effects of the treatment of neurogenic disorders including dementia.

  7. [Neurogenic stunned myocardium in Pediatrics. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alados Arboledas, F J; Millán-Miralles, L; Millán-Bueno, M P; Expósito-Montes, J F; Santiago-Gutierrez, C; Martínez Padilla, M C

    2015-10-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium is an unusual clinical entity. It mimics an acute coronary syndrome with electrocardiographic abnormalities, cardiac dysfunction and elevated cardiac enzymes with absence of obstructive coronary disease. It may occur after a neurosurgical procedure. A case is presented of neurogenic stunned myocardium occurring in a child after removal of a posterior fossa medulloblastoma. The patient developed nodal tachycardia with hemodynamic impairment. The clinical course was satisfactory due to antiarrhythmic therapy, with biochemical, echocardiographic, and clinical improvement within a week. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnosing neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome with the triple stimulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jun-Tao; Zhu, Yi; Hua, Xu-Yun; Zhu, Yu; Gu, Yu-Dong; Xu, Jian-Guang; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the diagnostic value of triple stimulation technique (TST) in eight patients with neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) by revealing the conduction block of the proximal lower trunk of the brachial plexus and locating the compression site. Eight patients fulfilling the conventional criteria of the lower-trunk neurogenic TOS were enrolled in our study. TST along with the central motor-conduction time was evaluated. The parameters including the TST amplitude ratio and the TST area ratio were compared between patients and controls. The amplitude ratio was significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group (patients: 0.518 ± 0.113; control: 0.954 ± 0.020, P<0.01), so was the area ratio (patients: 0.453 ± 0.194; control group: 0.955 ± 0.192, P<0.01). No significant difference of central motor-conduction time (CMCT) was seen between the patient group and the control group (patients: 6.62 ± 0.36 ms; control: 6.54 ± 0.36 ms; P=0.528). Surgical procedures proved the compression of the lower trunk in all patients. Our results indicated that there was conduction block besides axon loss in neurogenic TOS patients, and the conduction block was located between the nerve root emerging site and the supraclavicular stimulation site. We first applied TST in diagnosing neurogenic TOS, and we showed that the patient's TST ratio was significantly lower than normal. Combined with clinical manifestations, TOS can be more precisely diagnosed. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Peripheral tumor and tumor-like neurogenic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Evandro [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Aubert, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.aubert@chru-lille.fr [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie-Pathologie, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Wavreille, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.wavreille@chru-lille.fr [Service d’Orthopédie B, Hôpital R Salengro, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Gheno, Ramon; Canella, Clarissa [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Cotten, Anne, E-mail: anne.cotten@chru-lille.fr [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neoplasms of neurogenic origin account for about 12% of all benign and 8% of all malignant soft tissue neoplasms. Traumatic neuroma, Morton neuroma, lipomatosis of a nerve, nerve sheath ganglion, perineurioma, benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) are included in this group of pathologies. Clinical and radiologic evaluation of patients with neurogenic tumors and pseudotumors often reveals distinctive features. In this context, advanced imaging techniques, especially ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) play an important role in the characterization of these lesions. Imaging findings such as location of a soft tissue mass in the region of a major nerve, nerve entering or exiting the mass, fusiform shape, abnormalities of the muscle supplied by the nerve, split-fat sign, target sign and fascicular appearance should always evoke a peripheric nerve sheath neoplasm. Although no single imaging finding or combination of findings allows definitive differentiation between benign from malign peripheric neurogenic tumors, both US and MR imaging may show useful features that can lead us to a correct diagnosis and improve patient treatment. Traumatic neuromas and Morton neuromas are commonly associated to an amputation stump or are located in the intermetatarsal space. Lipomatosis of a nerve usually appears as a nerve enlargement, with thickened nerve fascicles, embedded in evenly distributed fat. Nerve sheath ganglion has a cystic appearance and commonly occurs at the level of the knee. Intraneural perineuroma usually affects young people and manifests as a focal and fusiform nerve enlargement. In this article, we review clinical characteristics and radiologic appearances of these neurogenic lesions, observing pathologic correlation, when possible.

  10. The artificial bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgrandchamps, F; Griffith, D P

    1999-04-01

    An artificial bladder should provide adequate urine storage, allow volitional complete evacuation of urine and preserve renal function. Moreover, its structure has to be biocompatible, resistant to urinary encrustation and tolerant to bacterial infection. Various solutions have been proposed over the years to achieve these multiple requirements. However, most of these solutions and their corresponding prototypes did not advance beyond the stage of a preliminary report of experimental data. This review will bring out the 'proof of principal' in alloplastic prosthetic bladder, including type of alloplast and design concept and the recent development in tissue engineering approaches.

  11. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...... experienced the symptoms for at least 6 weeks in the absence of any confusable diseases that may give rise to the symptoms. Symptoms compatible with the diagnosis are now thought to affect up to 3% of the female population in the United States with a 5:1 female-to-male preponderance. Diagnosis and treatment...

  12. Exosomes as novel regulators of adult neurogenic niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Federico Batiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles. SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb. The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs, which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as neurogenic niche. Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs. EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs, proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their roles in adult

  13. Leiomyoma of Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of leiomyoma of urinary bladder, a rare benign tumor, is presented. The patient was a 45-year-old woman with long duration history of dysuria. Intravenous urography (IVU, ultrasound (US, computed tomography (CT and biopsy diagnosed this case accurately. The clinical presentation, imaging findings and management of this benign tumor are discussed.

  14. Radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    Methods of treating bladder cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, as well as various combinations of these. The author investigated clinically and histopathologically the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation in cases of bladder cancer. 1. The survival rates (crude survival rates) in forty cases of bladder cancer were 90% after one year, 62.5% after three years and 46% after five years from the treatment. 2. As the result of irradiation, urogram improved in 25%, which was comparatively remarkable in high stage cases. There were no cases of deterioration of urogram findings caused by irradiation. Cystoscopy revealed disappearance or remarkable shrinkage of the tumors in 35% of the total cases and effects of the irradiation was observed not correlated to the stage and grade. 3. With respect to the histopathological changes, the changes became greater as the dosage increased and the higher the stage and grade were the more remarkable tendency was observed. 4. From our clinical observations such as urogram, cystoscopy and histopathologically, we estimated the optimum dosage of preoperative irradiation for bladder cancer is 3000 - 4000 rad. Thus, we concluded that the radiotherapy is effective in reducing both surgical invasion and postoperative recurrence. (author)

  15. MiR-124 promotes bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into neurogenic cells for accelerating recovery in the spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Xin-Wei; Xiang, Liang-Bi; Zhou, Da-Peng; Chen, Jian-Ting

    2015-04-01

    In this research, mouse BMMSCs were isolated from bone marrow, induced to differentiate into neurogenic cells in vitro, and transplanted into the injured spinal cord after over-expression of miR-124. The results showed that the BMMSCs could induce the differentiation to neurogenic cells under the special condition medium, but when the miR-124 was over-expressed, the differentiation efficiency of neurogenic cells from BMMSCs could be promoted. This reason was demonstrated that polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) showed a repressor for polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 2 (PTBP2) during neuronal differentiation, miR-124 reduces PTBP1 levels, leading to the accumulation of correctly spliced PTBP2 mRNA and a dramatic increase in PTBP2 protein. miR-124 promoted neurogenic cells from BMMSCs were successful colonized into injured spinal cord for participation in tissue-repair. In conclusion, our research shows that the miR-124 promoted the differentiation of neuronal cells from BMMSCs, and this mechanism was miR-124 reduced the expression of PTBP1, increased the expression of PTBP2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Fan Hsieh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA and European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  17. Experience with different botulinum toxins for the treatment of refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano M. Gomes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report our experience with the use of the botulinum toxin-A (BoNT/A formulations Botox® and Prosigne® in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single institution, 45 consecutive patients with refractory urinary incontinence due to NDO received a single intradetrusor (excluding the trigone treatment with botulinum toxin type A 200 or 300 units. Botox was used for the first 22 patients, and Prosigne for the subsequent 23 patients. Evaluations at baseline and week 12 included assessment of continence and urodynamics. Safety evaluations included monitoring of vital signs, hematuria during the procedure, hospital stay, and spontaneous adverse event reports. RESULTS: A total of 42 patients were evaluated (74% male; mean age, 34.8 years. Significant improvements from baseline in maximum cystometric capacity (MCC, maximum detrusor pressure during bladder contraction, and compliance were observed in both groups (P < 0.05. Improvement in MCC was significantly greater with Botox versus Prosigne (+103.3% vs. +42.2%; P = 0.019. Continence was achieved by week 12 in 16 Botox recipients (76.2% and 10 Prosigne recipients (47.6%; P = 0.057. No severe adverse events were observed. Mild adverse events included 2 cases of transient hematuria on the first postoperative day (no specific treatment required, and 3 cases of afebrile urinary tract infection. CONCLUSIONS: Botox and Prosigne produce distinct effects in patients with NDO, with a greater increase in MCC with Botox. Further evaluation will be required to assess differences between these formulations.

  18. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering

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    Bing Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1. After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering.

  19. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bing; Jiang, Wenkai; Alraies, Amr; Liu, Qian; Gudla, Vijay; Oni, Julia; Wei, Xiaoqing; Sloan, Alastair; Ni, Longxing; Agarwal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin) increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering.

  20. Using Mitrofanoff's principle and Monti's technique as a surgical option for bladder augmentation with a continent stoma: a case report

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    Martins Antonio CP

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hydronephrosis, reflux and renal failure are serious complications that occur in patients with neurogenic bladder associated with myelomeningocele. When the bladder compliance is lost, it is imperative to carry out surgery aimed at reducing bladder storage pressure. An ileocystoplasty, and for patients not suitable for intermittent catheterization, using the Mitrofanoff principle to form a continent stoma and the subsequent closure of the bladder neck, can be used. We report here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, an association between two previously described techniques (the Mitrofanoff principle and the technique of Monti, that can solve the problem of a short appendix in obese patients. Case presentation A 33-year-old male Caucasian patient with myelomeningocele and neurogenic bladder developed low bladder compliance (4.0 mL/cm H2O while still maintaining normal renal function. A bladder augmentation (ileocystoplasty with continent derivation principle (Mitrofanoff was performed. During surgery, we found that the patient's appendix was too short and was insufficient to reach the skin. We decided to make an association between the Mitrofanoff conduit and the ileal technique of Monti, through which we performed an anastomosis of the distal stump of the appendix to the bladder (with an antireflux valve. Later, the proximal stump of the appendix was anastomosed to an ileal segment of 2.0 cm that was open longitudinally and reconfigured transversally (Monti technique, modeled by a 12-Fr urethral catheter, and finally, the distal stump was sutured at the patient's navel. After the procedure, a suprapubic cystostomy (22 Fr and a Foley catheter (10 Fr through the continent conduit were left in place. The patient had recovered well and was discharged on the tenth day after surgery. He remained with the Foley catheter (through the conduit for 21 days and cystostomy for 30 days. Six months after surgery he was

  1. Effectiveness of transurethral resection under the control of photodynamic diagnosis and intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette–Guérin in case of poorly differentiated non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

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    A. I. Rolevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. High-grade non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is characterized by a high rate of recurrence, progression, and mortality associated with this disease. Organ-preserving treatment by transurethral resection and immunotherapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is an initial approach to therapy in these patients. However, the efficacy of such therapy is limited. This justifies the use of other methods of treatment, such as TUR under the control of photodynamic diagnosis (PDD. Aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions in patients with high-grade NMIBC.Materials and methods. We have retrospectively analyzed results of follow-up of patients with primary or recurrent high-grade transitional cell NMIBC, treatment by TUR in conjunction with BCG or without it N.N. Alexandrov National Cancer Centre in the period from 2004 to 2013. In total, the study included 113 patients (27 women and 86 men, in the median age of 72 years. We have evaluated 5-year recurrence- and progression-free survival, analyzed an influence of prognostic factors and methods of treatment on the risk of recurrence and progression with Cox model and Kaplan–Meier method.Results. With a median of follow up of 59 (12–116 months the rates of 5-year recurrence- and progression-free survival were respectively 42.5 and 71.6 %. Statistically significant association with the risk of recurrence was observed in multivariate Cox regression analysis for recurrent tumors (hazard ratio (HR 2.73; 95 % confidence interval (CI 1.61–4.62 and immunotherapy with BCG (HR 0.56; 95 % CI 0.31–0.99. BCG significantly increased recurrence-free survival in patients with both primary tumors, and with recurrent ones. Significant factors in the multivariate analysis with regard to the risk of progression were suspicion for muscle-invasive tumors according to the cystoscopic picture (HR 3.36; 95 % CI 1.09–10.4, abnormal tumor-free bladder mucosa

  2. Clinical and Treatment Features of Orbital Neurogenic Tumors

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    Pınar Bingöl Kızıltunç

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and treatment features of orbital neurogenic tumors. Material and Method: The records of 35 patients with orbital neurogenic tumors who were diagnosed and treated at Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, between 1998 and 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Orbitotomy via a cutaneous approach was performed in 21 (60% cases and orbitotomy via a transconjunctival approach was performed in 7 (20% cases. Three (8% cases had been operated at different centers. Four (12% cases were diagnosed clinically. Total excisional biopsy was performed in 11 (31.4% cases, subtotal excisional biopsy was performed in 7 (20%, and incisional biopsy was performed in 10 (28.6% cases. 14 (40% 35 cases were diagnosed as meningioma, 12 (34% as peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and 9 (26% cases were diagnosed as optic nerve glioma. Six (43% meningioma cases were optic nerve sheath meningioma, 5 (36% were sphenoid wing meningioma, 2 (14% were ectopic meningioma, and 1 (7% was perisellar meningioma. Six (50% of peripheral nerve sheath tumors were schwannoma, 2 (16% were solitary neurofibroma, 4 (34% were plexiform neurofibroma. External beam radiotherapy was performed in 15 (42.8% cases, cyberknife radiosurgery in 1 (2.8% , chemotherapy in 1 (2.8%, and enucleation ( because of neovascular glaucoma and vitreous hemorrhage was performed in 1 (2.8% case. Discussion: The most common orbital neurogenic tumors are meningioma, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and optic nerve glioma. For meningioma and glioma, external beam radiotherapy is required; for schwannoma and solitary neurofibroma, total excisional biopsy is the preferred treatment. The success of visual and anatomic results are high after treatment. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 335-9

  3. Neurogenic mucosal bicarbonate secretion in guinea pig duodenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, G; Fang, X; Wang, GD; Liu, S; Wang, XY; Xia, Y; Wood, JD

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose To test a hypothesis that: (i) duodenal pH and osmolarity are individually controlled at constant set points by negative feedback control centred in the enteric nervous system (ENS); (ii) the purinergic P2Y1 receptor subtype is expressed by non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons, which represent the final common excitatory pathway from the ENS to the bicarbonate secretory glands. Experimental Approach Ussing chamber and pH-stat methods investigated involvement of the P2Y1 receptor in neurogenic stimulation of mucosal bicarbonate (HCO3−) secretion in guinea pig duodenum. Key Results ATP increased HCO3− secretion with an EC50 of 160 nM. MRS2179, a selective P2Y1 purinergic receptor antagonist, suppressed ATP-evoked HCO3− secretion by 47% and Cl− secretion by 63%. Enteric neuronal blockade by tetrodotoxin or exposure to a selective vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, VPAC1) receptor antagonist suppressed ATP-evoked HCO3− secretion by 61 and 41%, respectively, and Cl- by 97 and 70% respectively. Pretreatment with the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine did not alter ATP-evoked HCO3− or Cl− secretion. Conclusion and Implications Whereas acid directly stimulates the mucosa to release ATP and stimulate HCO3− secretion in a cytoprotective manner, neurogenically evoked HCO3− secretion accounts for feedback control of optimal luminal pH for digestion. ATP stimulates duodenal HCO3− secretion through an excitatory action at purinergic P2Y1 receptors on neurons in the submucosal division of the ENS. Stimulation of the VIPergic non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons, which are one of three classes of secretomotor neurons, accounts for most, if not all, of the neurogenic secretory response evoked by ATP. PMID:22994306

  4. Neurogenic mucosal bicarbonate secretion in guinea pig duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, G; Fang, X; Wang, G D; Liu, S; Wang, X Y; Xia, Y; Wood, J D

    2013-02-01

    To test a hypothesis that: (i) duodenal pH and osmolarity are individually controlled at constant set points by negative feedback control centred in the enteric nervous system (ENS); (ii) the purinergic P2Y(1) receptor subtype is expressed by non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons, which represent the final common excitatory pathway from the ENS to the bicarbonate secretory glands. Ussing chamber and pH-stat methods investigated involvement of the P2Y(1) receptor in neurogenic stimulation of mucosal bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) secretion in guinea pig duodenum. ATP increased HCO(3)(-) secretion with an EC(50) of 160 nM. MRS2179, a selective P2Y(1) purinergic receptor antagonist, suppressed ATP-evoked HCO(3)(-) secretion by 47% and Cl(-) secretion by 63%. Enteric neuronal blockade by tetrodotoxin or exposure to a selective vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, VPAC(1)) receptor antagonist suppressed ATP-evoked HCO(3)(-) secretion by 61 and 41%, respectively, and Cl- by 97 and 70% respectively. Pretreatment with the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine did not alter ATP-evoked HCO3(-) or Cl(-) secretion. Whereas acid directly stimulates the mucosa to release ATP and stimulate HCO(3)(-) secretion in a cytoprotective manner, neurogenically evoked HCO(3)(-) secretion accounts for feedback control of optimal luminal pH for digestion. ATP stimulates duodenal HCO(3)(-) secretion through an excitatory action at purinergic P2Y(1) receptors on neurons in the submucosal division of the ENS. Stimulation of the VIPergic non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons, which are one of three classes of secretomotor neurons, accounts for most, if not all, of the neurogenic secretory response evoked by ATP. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. A One Year Prospective Study of Neurogenic Stuttering Following Stroke: Incidence and Co-Occurring Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theys, C.; van Wieringen, A.; Sunaert, S.; Thijs, V.; De Nil, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study, data on incidence, stuttering characteristics, co-occurring speech disorders, and recovery of neurogenic stuttering in a large sample of stroke participants were assessed. Following stroke onset, 17 of 319 participants (5.3%; 95% CI, 3.2-8.3) met the criteria for neurogenic stuttering. Stuttering persisted in at least…

  6. [Psychological profile of children with neurogenic syncope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Roberta; Placidi, Silvia; Pennacchia, Massimo; Gentile, Simonetta; Drago, Fabrizio

    2014-10-01

    At present, syncope is still a matter of great concern and anxiety for both parents and children. Neurocardiogenic syncope is the most common type of syncope in children with an incidence of 70%. It usually has a benign etiology, with rapid loss of consciousness and spontaneous resolution. In case of neurocardiogenic syncope, it is important to assess the emotional and/or adaptive capacity of the patient. From a psychological point of view, the presence of a traumatic area of development has been reported in pediatric patients with syncope. This area is characterized by symptoms of anxiety and/or depression, self-withdrawal, somatic complaints and dissociation. Neurocardiogenic syncope in pediatric age can be the expression of a psychosomatic disorder underlying psychopathological vulnerability.

  7. Innovation in Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, H Barton; Lamm, Donald L; Kamat, Ashish M; Keefe, Stephen; Taylor, John A; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer is understudied despite its high prevalence and its remarkable response to immunotherapy. Indeed, funding for studies to explore mechanisms of tumor immunity and novel new therapeutics is disproportionately lower for bladder cancer in comparison with malignancies of the breast, prostate, or lung. However, the recent successes of checkpoint blockade therapy suggest that new therapeutic strategies are on the horizon for bladder cancer. Here, we give a perspective into the evolution of bladder cancer therapy, focusing on strategies to treat high-risk nonmuscle invasive disease, followed by a discussion of recent advances in the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and their potential applicability to lower stage disease. Finally, we explore immunotherapeutic strategies, which have been demonstrated to be successful in the treatment of other malignancies, for their potential to treat and cure patients with nonmuscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  8. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly with neurogenic muscular atrophy: case report

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    Scola Rosana Herminia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 3-1/2-year-old girl with hypotonia, multiple joint contractures, hip luxation, arachnodactyly, adducted thumbs, dolichostenomelia, and abnormal external ears suggesting the diagnosis of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA. The serum muscle enzimes were normal and the needle electromyography showed active and chronic denervation. The muscle biopsy demonstrated active and chronic denervation compatible with spinal muscular atrophy. Analysis of exons 7 and 8 of survival motor neuron gene through polymerase chain reaction did not show deletions. Neurogenic muscular atrophy is a new abnormality associated with CCA, suggesting that CCA is clinically heterogeneous.

  9. Work-Related Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Gary M

    2015-08-01

    Outcomes of surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) in workers' compensation are poor in a majority of patients, partly due to nonspecificity of diagnosis. Most cases have no objective evidence of the presence of brachial plexus dysfunction. Up to 20% of patients experience a new adverse event. Objective neurologic signs and electrodiagnostic evidence of brachial plexus dysfunction must be present before proceeding with invasive procedures. This guideline includes objective criteria that must be met before thoracic outlet syndrome surgery can be approved in Washington State. Evidence does not support the use of scalene blocks, botulinum toxin therapy, or vascular studies to diagnose NTOS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiotherapy in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozan, R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992, the problem of the vesical radiotherapy is not resolved. The author presents the situation and the different techniques of radiotherapy in bladder cancers: external radiotherapy, only and associated with surgery, interstitial curietherapy and non-classical techniques as per operative radiotherapy, neutron therapy and concurrent radiotherapy with chemotherapy. In order to compare their efficiency, the five-year survival are given in all cases.(10 tabs)

  11. Clinical implications of underactive bladder

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    Kwang Jin Ko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underactive bladder (UAB is a common urologic condition but a complex disease that causes troublesome lower urinary tract symptoms. Currently, management of UAB remains unsatisfactory. Also, many urological diseases can be combined with UAB. In these combined cases, the treatment results may be affected by UAB component. This review focuses on the clinical implications of UAB in patients with common urologic conditions, including bladder outlet obstruction, overactive bladder syndrome and stress urinary incontinence.

  12. Interstitial cystitis: painful bladder syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    R F Sholan; G Sh Garaev; G M Nasrullaeva

    2018-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of a bladder of unknown etiology. It negatively affects the quality of life, causes depressive disorders, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of interstitial cystitis is still unclear and it’s considered as painful bladder syndrome with multifactorial origin. According to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 470/100 000 people (60/100 000 men, 850/100 0...

  13. Contemporary Management of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David; Fradet, Yves

    1991-01-01

    Bladder cancer is currently the fifth most common cancer in Western society, and its incidence appears to be increasing. Important advances have recently occurred in both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to bladder neoplasms. Presentation is not unique, and physician awareness is important to identify patients who are at risk for bladder neoplasia and consequently require further investigation. A diagnostic approach and contemporary management are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4 PMID:21229043

  14. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  15. Permeability and ultrastructure of human bladder epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, J; Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Nielsen, S L

    1983-01-01

    Leakage of tight junctions as observed with electron microscopy and demonstration of solute transport across bladder epithelium was investigated in 13 patients with different bladder diseases: urinary retention and infection, bladder tumours and interstitial cystitis. The latter group showed cons...

  16. Bladder Outlet Obstruction: Causes in Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder outlet obstruction: Causes in men? My doctor says I might have bladder outlet obstruction. What does that mean? Answers from Erik P. Castle, M.D. Bladder outlet obstruction in men is a blockage that slows ...

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Sacral and Percutaneous Tibial Neuromodulation in Non-neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction and Chronic Pelvic Pain: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutolo, Manuela; Ammirati, Enrico; Heesakkers, John; Kessler, Thomas M; Peters, Kenneth M; Rashid, Tina; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Spinelli, Michele; Novara, Giacomo; Van der Aa, Frank; De Ridder, Dirk

    2018-01-11

    Neuromodulation is considered in patients with non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) not responsive to conservative treatment. To systematically review the available studies on efficacy and safety of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in non-neurogenic LUTDs not responsive to conservative treatments. A literature research was conducted in PubMed/Medline and Scopus, restricted to articles in English, published between January 1998 and June 2017, with at least 20 patients and 6 mo of follow-up. Twenty-one reports were identified. Concerning SNM, the improvement of ≥50% in leakage episodes ranged widely between 29% and 76%. Overall dry rate ranged between 43% and 56%. Overall success/improvement rate in PTNS varied between 54% and 59%. Symptom improvement or efficacy in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome patients appeared to be lower compared with other indications in both techniques. Safety data showed fewer side effects in patients submitted to PTNS. Neuromodulation gives good results and is a safe therapy for patients with overactive bladder or chronic nonobstructive urinary retention with long-lasting efficacy. Moreover, PTNS has been shown to have good success rates and fewer side effects compared with SNM. These data have to be confirmed with long-term follow-up. Sacral neuromodulation can improve low urinary tract symptoms in selected patients; it appears to be a safe therapy for nonresponders to standard medical therapies. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) is a less invasive technique that gives good results in short time with fewer side effects. However, we must consider that PTNS has not been tested in the long term and results are lower if compared with SNM. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. All rights reserved.

  18. OVERACTIVE BLADDER SYNDROME IN CHILDREN

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    E.L. Vishnevskiy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder is a specific syndrome characterized by bladder dysfunction that is clinically manifested by imperative urination (pollakiuria, urgency, urgent incontinence and nocturia. This state is very widely spread among children: every fifth child aged 4 to 7 shows typical bladder dysfunction. Quite often if urinary distresses are not studied well enough such children are falsely diagnosed with monosymptom enuresis, which, according to our information, actually happens in only 3,9% of cases. When examining children with urinary disorders it is reasonable to be geared to the protocol of European urologist association. According to this protocol, treatment should be started with antimuscarinimedications. The only antimuscarinic medication for treating children with hyperactive bladder that is legal in Russia is oxybutinin (Driptane, that is presently considered to be the «golden standard» of pharmaceutical treatment of overactive bladder for patients of any age. This statement is based on the modern idea of overactive bladder pathogenesis, that presupposes detrusorhypersensibility to acetylcholine. However, in some cases it might be reasonable to use some other medications, physiotherapy, sometimes as part of complex therapy. If individual dosage is observed, which will enable preventing or significantly lowering possible side effects, oxybutinin will be still considered «the golden standard» for treating overactive bladder for years to come in cases when detrusor hypersensibility to acetylcholine is the key component of bladder dysfunction pathogenesis.Key words: overactive bladder, oxybutinin, urination disorder, children.

  19. Urinary diversion and bladder reconstruction/replacement using intestinal segments for intractable incontinence or following cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, June D; Nabi, Ghulam; Dublin, Norman; McClinton, Samuel; Neal, David E; Pickard, Robert; Yong, Sze M

    2012-02-15

    Surgery performed to improve or replace the function of the diseased urinary bladder has been carried out for over a century. Main reasons for improving or replacing the function of the urinary bladder are bladder cancer, neurogenic bladder dysfunction, detrusor overactivity and chronic inflammatory diseases of the bladder (such as interstitial cystitis, tuberculosis and schistosomiasis). There is still much uncertainty about the best surgical approach. Options available at the present time include: (1) conduit diversion (the creation of various intestinal conduits to the skin) or continent diversion (which includes either a rectal reservoir or continent cutaneous diversion), (2) bladder reconstruction and (3) replacement of the bladder with various intestinal segments. To determine the best way of improving or replacing the function of the lower urinary tract using intestinal segments when the bladder has to be removed or when it has been rendered useless or dangerous by disease. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register (searched 28 October 2011), which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and CINAHL, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings, and the reference lists of relevant articles. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of surgery involving transposition of an intestinal segment into the urinary tract. Trials were evaluated for appropriateness for inclusion and for risk of bias by the review authors. Three review authors were involved in the data extraction. Data were combined in a meta-analysis when appropriate. Five trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 355 participants. These trials addressed only five of the 14 comparisons pre-specified in the protocol. One trial reported no statistically significant differences in the incidence of upper urinary tract infection, uretero-intestinal stenosis and renal deterioration in

  20. Pain during ice water test distinguishes clinical bladder hypersensitivity from overactivity disorders

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    Bountra Chas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bladder cooling reflex (BCR i.e. uninhibited detrusor contractions evoked by intravesical instillation of cold saline, is a segmental reflex believed to be triggered by menthol sensitive cold receptors in the bladder wall, with the afferent signals transmitted by C fibres. The BCR is a neonatal reflex that becomes suppressed by descending signals from higher centres at approximately the time when the child gains full voluntary control of voiding. It re-emerges in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity as a consequence of loss of central descending inhibition, resulting from conditions such as spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. We have recently shown an increase of nerve fibres expressing the cool and menthol receptor TRPM8 in both overactive (IDO and painful bladder syndrome (PBS, but its functional significance is unknown. We have therefore studied the bladder cooling reflex and associated sensory symptoms in patients with PBS and overactivity disorders. Methods The BCR, elicited by ice water test (IWT was performed in patients with painful bladder syndrome (PBS, n = 17, idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO, n = 22, neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO, n = 4 and stress urinary incontinence (as controls, n = 21. The IWT was performed by intravesical instillation of cold saline (0 – 4°C. A positive IWT was defined as presence of uninhibited detrusor contraction evoked by cold saline, associated with urgency or with fluid expulsion. Patients were asked to report and rate any pain and cold sensation during the test. Results A positive IWT was observed in IDO (6/22, 27.3% and NDO (4/4, 100% patients, but was negative in all control and PBS patients. Thirteen (76.5% PBS patients reported pain during the IWT, with significantly higher pain scores during ice water instillation compared to the baseline (P = 0.0002, or equivalent amount of bladder filling (100 mls with saline at room temperature (P = 0.015. None

  1. Contemporary management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall’Era, Marc A; Cheng, Liang; Pan, Chong-Xian

    2012-01-01

    The current standard treatment for muscle-invasive nonmetastatic bladder cancer is neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy. However, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is not widely accepted even with level 1 evidence. Adjuvant chemotherapy should be discussed if patients have not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery and have high-risk pathologic features. Although not considered standard of care, bladder-sparing therapy can be considered for highly selected patients and for those medically unfit for surgery. Even though there are no level 1 data, the treatment outcomes for highly select patients given bladder-sparing therapy appear promising, with many patients retaining a functional bladder. Personalized chemotherapy is currently being actively pursued to target the underlying molecular changes and tailor to individual needs. PMID:22845409

  2. Reducing recurrence in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer using photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-transurethral resection of the bladder chemoprophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Malene Bøg; Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Zieger, Karsten Egbert Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fluorescence cystoscopy and immediate post-transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) chemoprophylaxis on the risk of recurrence of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) under routine clinical conditions. Materials...

  3. Neurogenic muscle hypertrophy in a 12-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutelija Fattorini, Matija; Gagro, Alenka; Dapic, Tomislav; Krakar, Goran; Marjanovic, Josip

    2017-01-01

    Muscular hypertrophy secondary to denervation is very rare, but well-documented phenomena in adults. This is the first report of a child with neurogenic unilateral hypertrophy due to S1 radiculopathy. A 12-year-old girl presented with left calf hypertrophy and negative history of low back pain or trauma. The serum creatinine kinase level and inflammatory markers were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging showed muscle hypertrophy of the left gastrocnemius and revealed a protruded lumbar disc at the L5-S1 level. The protruded disc abuts the S1 root on the left side. Electromyography showed mild left S1 radiculopathy. Passive stretching and work load might clarify the origin of neurogenic hypertrophy but there is still a need for further evidence. Clinical, laboratory, magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography findings showed that S1 radiculopathy could be a cause of unilateral calf swelling in youth even in the absence of a history of back or leg pain. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurogenic gene regulatory pathways in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng; Angerer, Lynne M; Angerer, Robert C

    2016-01-15

    During embryogenesis the sea urchin early pluteus larva differentiates 40-50 neurons marked by expression of the pan-neural marker synaptotagmin B (SynB) that are distributed along the ciliary band, in the apical plate and pharyngeal endoderm, and 4-6 serotonergic neurons that are confined to the apical plate. Development of all neurons has been shown to depend on the function of Six3. Using a combination of molecular screens and tests of gene function by morpholino-mediated knockdown, we identified SoxC and Brn1/2/4, which function sequentially in the neurogenic regulatory pathway and are also required for the differentiation of all neurons. Misexpression of Brn1/2/4 at low dose caused an increase in the number of serotonin-expressing cells and at higher dose converted most of the embryo to a neurogenic epithelial sphere expressing the Hnf6 ciliary band marker. A third factor, Z167, was shown to work downstream of the Six3 and SoxC core factors and to define a branch specific for the differentiation of serotonergic neurons. These results provide a framework for building a gene regulatory network for neurogenesis in the sea urchin embryo. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Evidence for Bladder Urothelial Pathophysiology in Functional Bladder Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Susan K.; Birder, Lori A.; Chai, Toby C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), feline interstitial cystitis (FIC), and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB). These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology. PMID:24900993

  6. Evidence for Bladder Urothelial Pathophysiology in Functional Bladder Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K. Keay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC, feline interstitial cystitis (FIC, and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB. These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology.

  7. A novel bioreactor to simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties and compliance for bladder functional tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Li, Dao-bing; Xu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu-chun; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-jie

    2011-02-01

    Bioreactors are pivotal tools for generating mechanical stimulation in functional tissue engineering study. This study aimed to create a bioreactor that can simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties, and to investigate the effects of a mechanically stimulated culture on urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. We designed a bioreactor to simulate the mechanical properties of bladder. A pressure-record system was used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the bioreactor by measuring the pressure in culture chambers. To test the biocompatibility of the bioreactor, viabilities of urothelial cells and smooth muscle cells cultured in the bioreactor under static and mechanically changed conditions were measured after 7-day culture. To evaluate the effect of mechanical stimulations on the vital cells, urethral cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in the simulated mechanical conditions. After that, the viability and the distribution pattern of the cells were observed and compared with cells cultured in non-mechanical stimulated condition. The bioreactor system successfully generated waveforms similar to the intended programmed model while maintaining a cell-seeded elastic membrane between the chambers. There were no differences between viabilities of urothelial cells ((91.90 ± 1.22)% vs. (93.14 ± 1.78)%, P > 0.05) and bladder smooth muscle cells ((93.41 ± 1.49)% vs. (92.61 ± 1.34)%, P > 0.05). The viability of cells and tissue structure observation after cultured in simulated condition showed that mechanical stimulation was the only factor affected cells in the bioreactor and improved the arrangement of cells on silastic membrane. This bioreactor can effectively simulate the physiological and mechanical properties of the bladder. Mechanical stimulation is the only factor that affected the viability of cells cultured in the bioreactor. The bioreactor can change the growth behavior of urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells, resulting in

  8. B cell infiltration and lymphonodular hyperplasia in bladder submucosa of patients with persistent bacteriuria and recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, T A; LeGallo, Robin; Innes, D; Hendley, J O; Peters, C A

    2011-12-01

    We defined chronic inflammatory cell types in bladder submucosa and the presence of umbrella cells on the surface of bladder epithelium in patients 5 to 21 years old with persistent bacteriuria due to neurogenic bladder and recurrent urinary tract infections associated with vesicoureteral reflux. Bladder mucosa biopsies from 12 patients and 6 controls were fixed in Carnoy's solution and examined for T cells (CD3, CD4, CD8), B cells (CD79) and plasma cells (CD138). The number of cells in a defined area of submucosa was determined by counting all nuclei in the area. A contiguous section was also stained for uroplakin expression with a monoclonal antibody against uroplakin III to ascertain the integrity of bladder umbrella cells. B cells, plasma cells and lymphoid nodules were found only in patient biopsies. T cell expression was evident in patient and control biopsies. Uroplakin staining of surface epithelium was uniform from control biopsies but spotty or entirely absent from patient biopsies. Patients with persistent bacteriuria or recurrent urinary tract infections had significant B cell infiltration in the submucosa, including lymphoid nodules. These inflammatory changes are likely due to antigenic stimulation from repeated exposure to bacteria. These changes are associated with frequent absence of uroplakin on surface epithelium. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neurogenic vision loss: Causes and outcome. An experience from a tertiary center in Northern India

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    Rajesh Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vision loss can be a consequence of numerous disorders of eye and neural pathway conveying visual input to brain. A variety of conditions can affect visual pathway producing neurogenic vision loss. The presentation and course of vision loss depends on the site of involvement and underlying etiology. We conducted this unprecedented study to evaluate the characteristics and outcome of various diseases of the visual pathway. Materials and Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we evaluated 64 patients with neurogenic visual impairment. Ophthalmological causes were excluded in all of them. Their presentation, ophthalmological characteristics and investigation findings were recorded. These patients were followed up till 6 months. Results: Out of 69 patients evaluated, 5 were excluded as they had ophthalmological abnormalities. The remaining 64 cases (113 eyes were enrolled. 54 cases were due to diseases of anterior visual pathway and rest 10 had cortical vision loss. The etiologic distribution is as follows: Isolated optic neuritis- 12 (19%, multiple sclerosis- 4 (6.3%, neuromyelitis optica- 5 (7.9%, tubercular meningitis- 15 (23.8%, non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy, ischemic optic neuropathy complicating cavernous sinus thrombosis, cryptococcal meningitis, malignant infiltration of optic nerve, Crouzon′s syndrome, calvarial thickening and traumatic occipital gliosis- 1 (1.6% case each, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, pituitary adenoma, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy- 3 (4.8% cases each, cortical venous thrombosis 5 (7.9%, subacute scleroing panencephalitis- 4 (6.3% cases. Conclusions: The diseases of anterior visual pathway were much more common than cortical vision loss. A majority of our patients had severe impairment of vision at presentation.

  10. The 'ventral organs' of Pycnogonida (Arthropoda) are neurogenic niches of late embryonic and post-embryonic nervous system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneis, Georg; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Early neurogenesis in arthropods has been in the focus of numerous studies, its cellular basis, spatio-temporal dynamics and underlying genetic network being by now comparably well characterized for representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, hexapods and crustaceans. By contrast, neurogenesis during late embryonic and/or post-embryonic development has received less attention, especially in myriapods and chelicerates. Here, we apply (i) immunolabeling, (ii) histology and (iii) scanning electron microscopy to study post-embryonic ventral nerve cord development in Pseudopallene sp., a representative of the sea spiders (Pycnogonida), the presumable sister group of the remaining chelicerates. During early post-embryonic development, large neural stem cells give rise to additional ganglion cell material in segmentally paired invaginations in the ventral ectoderm. These ectodermal cell regions - traditionally designated as 'ventral organs' - detach from the surface into the interior and persist as apical cell clusters on the ventral ganglion side. Each cluster is a post-embryonic neurogenic niche that features a tiny central cavity and initially still houses larger neural stem cells. The cluster stays connected to the underlying ganglionic somata cortex via an anterior and a posterior cell stream. Cell proliferation remains restricted to the cluster and streams, and migration of newly produced cells along the streams seems to account for increasing ganglion cell numbers in the cortex. The pycnogonid cluster-stream-systems show striking similarities to the life-long neurogenic system of decapod crustaceans, and due to their close vicinity to glomerulus-like neuropils, we consider their possible involvement in post-embryonic (perhaps even adult) replenishment of olfactory neurons - as in decapods. An instance of a potentially similar post-embryonic/adult neurogenic system in the arthropod outgroup Onychophora is discussed. Additionally, we document two transient posterior

  11. The 'ventral organs' of Pycnogonida (Arthropoda are neurogenic niches of late embryonic and post-embryonic nervous system development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Brenneis

    Full Text Available Early neurogenesis in arthropods has been in the focus of numerous studies, its cellular basis, spatio-temporal dynamics and underlying genetic network being by now comparably well characterized for representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, hexapods and crustaceans. By contrast, neurogenesis during late embryonic and/or post-embryonic development has received less attention, especially in myriapods and chelicerates. Here, we apply (i immunolabeling, (ii histology and (iii scanning electron microscopy to study post-embryonic ventral nerve cord development in Pseudopallene sp., a representative of the sea spiders (Pycnogonida, the presumable sister group of the remaining chelicerates. During early post-embryonic development, large neural stem cells give rise to additional ganglion cell material in segmentally paired invaginations in the ventral ectoderm. These ectodermal cell regions - traditionally designated as 'ventral organs' - detach from the surface into the interior and persist as apical cell clusters on the ventral ganglion side. Each cluster is a post-embryonic neurogenic niche that features a tiny central cavity and initially still houses larger neural stem cells. The cluster stays connected to the underlying ganglionic somata cortex via an anterior and a posterior cell stream. Cell proliferation remains restricted to the cluster and streams, and migration of newly produced cells along the streams seems to account for increasing ganglion cell numbers in the cortex. The pycnogonid cluster-stream-systems show striking similarities to the life-long neurogenic system of decapod crustaceans, and due to their close vicinity to glomerulus-like neuropils, we consider their possible involvement in post-embryonic (perhaps even adult replenishment of olfactory neurons - as in decapods. An instance of a potentially similar post-embryonic/adult neurogenic system in the arthropod outgroup Onychophora is discussed. Additionally, we document two

  12. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Brendan R. [St George' s Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Weber, Martin A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Bockenhauer, Detlef [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  13. Molecular Diagnosis in Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C.M. Zuiverloon (Tahlita)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEpidemiologyBladder cancer (BC) is the most prevalent type of urothelial cancer and is associated with thehighest costs of all cancer types due to intensive patient surveillance. Because bladder tumorsfrequently recur, patients need to be monitored extensively [1-4]. Incidence increases

  14. Vulvar Metastasis from Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Aoun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is a very rare entity; few cases are reported in the English literature. In this paper, we describe the clinical and pathological characteristics, evolution, and treatment of a patient with vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder followed by a brief review of the reported cases in the literature.

  15. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Brendan R.; Weber, Martin A.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran

    2011-01-01

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  16. Stimulation of the pelvic nerve increases bladder capacity in the prostaglandin E2rat model of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdale, Christopher L; Hokanson, James A; Sridhar, Arun; Grill, Warren M

    2017-09-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is a highly prevalent condition that may lead to medical complications and decreased quality of life. Emerging therapies focusing on selective electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves associated with lower urinary tract function may provide improved efficacy and reduced side effects compared with sacral neuromodulation for the treatment of OAB symptoms. Prior studies investigating the effects of pelvic nerve (PelN) stimulation on lower urinary tract function were focused on promoting bladder contractions, and it is unclear whether selective stimulation of the PelN would be beneficial for the treatment of OAB. Therefore our motivation was to test the hypothesis that PelN stimulation would increase bladder capacity in the prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) rat model of OAB. Cystometry experiments were conducted in 17 urethane-anesthetized female Sprague-Dawley rats. The effects of intravesical PGE 2 vs. vehicle and PelN stimulation after intravesical PGE 2 on cystometric parameters were quantified. Intravesical infusion of PGE 2 resulted in decreased bladder capacity and increased voiding efficiency without a change in bladder contraction area under the curve, maximum contraction pressure, or contraction duration. Bladder capacity was also significantly decreased compared with vehicle (1% ethanol in saline) confirming that the change in bladder capacity was mediated by PGE 2 PelN stimulation reversed the PGE 2 -induced change in bladder capacity and increased the external urethral sphincter electromyogram activity at a specific stimulation condition (amplitude of 1.0 times threshold at 10 Hz). These results confirm that the urodynamic changes reported in conscious rats are also observed under urethane anesthesia and that PelN stimulation is a novel and promising approach for the treatment of the symptoms of OAB. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuge O

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Oliver Fuge,1 Nikhil Vasdev,1 Paula Allchorne,2 James SA Green2 1Department of Urology, Lister Hospital, Stevenage, UK; 2Department of Urology, Bartshealth NHS Trust, Whipps Cross Rd, London, UK Abstract: It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest

  18. Basic bladder neurophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, J Quentin

    2010-11-01

    Maintenance of normal lower urinary tract function is a complex process that requires coordination between the central nervous system and the autonomic and somatic components of the peripheral nervous system. This article provides an overview of the basic principles that are recognized to regulate normal urine storage and micturition, including bladder biomechanics, relevant neuroanatomy, neural control of lower urinary tract function, and the pharmacologic processes that translate the neural signals into functional results. Finally, the emerging role of the urothelium as a sensory structure is discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Ozisler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efficacy of bowel program on gastrointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-five spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysreflexia and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral medication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identified in 44 (80% of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55 and incontinence (42%, 23/55 were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55 and after (73%, 40/55 bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were significantly decreased and constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were significantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury.

  20. Increased bladder wall thickness is associated with severe symptoms and reduced bladder capacity in patients with bladder pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yu Wu

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: There are obvious differences in bladder CT scans of patients with symptoms of bladder pain due to different etiology. Increased BWT was associated with increased pain scores and decreased bladder capacity in patients with KC and IC. BWT on a CT scan might be considered a marker for the severity of bladder inflammation.

  1. Neurogenic claudication secondary to degenerative spondylolisthesis: is fusion always necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, W J; Mohamed, Mohamed; Bhojak, Manesh; Wilby, Martin

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the efficacy and long-term safety of a midline sparing decompression for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). We specifically looked at the rate of re-operation with a lumbar fusion. Of the patients that did require a secondary fusion procedure, we examined retrospectively any risk factors (both clinical and radiological) that could have been identified pre-operatively to predict the necessity of a primary fusion procedure. Data was collected prospectively within a single surgeon practice at our institution. All patients had a diagnosis of neurogenic claudication secondary to DS. Radiological and clinical risk factors that could have predicted the requirement of a fusion procedure were retrospectively analysed. This is a study of 70 patients (46F:24M). The median age at surgery was 68 years. All patients had a diagnosis of neurogenic claudication and were treated with a mid-line sparing decompression. Following the primary procedure, patients' VAS and ODI scores for both leg and back pain improved significantly both at short-term follow-up (mean seven months) and sustained at long-term follow-up (range 16-57 months, mean 33 months; p < 0.0001 Wilcoxon matched pair ranks). Eight (11%) patients had symptom progression and required a further fusion procedure. We found that if on the pre-operative MRI, the patient had a facet joint angle of greater than 60°, and a preserved disc height (greater than 7 mm) this would increase the likelihood of the requirement for fusion. Of the patients that required a secondary fusion procedure, 6/8 patients (75%) had sagittal facets, hyperlordosis and a preserved disc height pre-operatively. A primary decompression using a midline sparing osteotomy is an effective procedure for the treatment of neurogenic claudication caused by DS. The second message is that on inspection of the pre-operative imaging, sagittally placed facet joints, a hyperlordosis and a preserved disc height then a fusion

  2. Programmed hyperphagia in offspring of obese dams: Altered expression of hypothalamic nutrient sensors, neurogenic factors and epigenetic modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mina; Han, Guang; Ross, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Maternal overnutrition results in programmed offspring obesity, mediated in part, by hyperphagia. This is remarkably similar to the effects of maternal undernutrition on offspring hyperphagia and obesity. In view of the marked differences in the energy environment of the over and under-nutrition exposures, we studied the expression of select epigenetic modifiers associated with energy imbalance including neurogenic factors and appetite/satiety neuropeptides which are indicative of neurogenic differentiation. HF offspring were exposed to maternal overnutrition (high fat diet; HF) during pregnancy and lactation. We determined the protein expression of energy sensors (mTOR, pAMPK), epigenetic factors (DNA methylase, DNMT1; histone deacetylase, SIRT1/HDAC1), neurogenic factors (Hes1, Mash1, Ngn3) and appetite/satiety neuropeptides (AgRP/POMC) in newborn hypothalamus and adult arcuate nucleus (ARC). Despite maternal obesity, male offspring born to obese dams had similar body weight at birth as Controls. However, when nursed by the same dams, male offspring of obese dams exhibited marked adiposity. At 1 day of age, HF newborn males had significantly decreased energy sensors, DNMT1 including Hes1 and Mash1, which may impact neuroprogenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. This is consistent with increased AgRP in HF newborns. At 6 months of age, HF adult males had significantly increased energy sensors and decreased histone deactylases. In addition, the persistent decreased Hes1, Mash1 as well as Ngn3 are consistent with increased AgRP and decreased POMC. Thus, altered energy sensors and epigenetic responses which modulate gene expression and adult neuronal differentiation may contribute to hyperphagia and obesity in HF male offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Rare Complication of Transurethral Resection of the Prostate: Explosion of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Buldu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Monopolar and bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate is currently the gold standard modality in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic enlargement. A rare complication of transurethral resection is the explosion of the bladder as may occur during resection of the prostate. The etiology of explosion is thought to be a result of ignition due to mixture of oxygen and hydrogen gas occurring during the resection under increased pressure of the bladder. To the best of our knowledge, our case is the first report of bladder explosion during transurethral resection with bipolar energy using saline solution.

  4. Bladder stones after bladder augmentation are not what they seem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Konrad M; Misseri, Rosalia; Whittam, Benjamin; Lingeman, James E; Amstutz, Sable; Ring, Joshua D; Kaefer, Martin; Rink, Richard C; Cain, Mark P

    2016-04-01

    Bladder and renal calculi after bladder augmentation are thought to be primarily infectious, yet few studies have reported stone composition. The primary aim was to assess bladder stone composition after augmentation, and renal stone composition in those with subsequent nephrolithiasis. The exploratory secondary aim was to screen for possible risk factors for developing infectious stones. Patients treated for bladder stones after bladder augmentation at the present institution between 1981 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected on demographics, surgeries and stone composition. Patients without stone analysis were excluded. Stones containing struvite, carbonate apatite or ammonium acid ureate were classified as infectious. The following variables were analyzed for a possible association with infectious bladder stone composition: gender, history of cloacal exstrophy, ambulatory status, nephrolithiasis, recurrent urea-splitting urinary tract infections, first vs recurrent stones, timing of presentation with a calculus, history of bladder neck procedures, catheterizable channel and vesicoureteral reflux. Fisher's exact test was used for analysis. Of the 107 patients with bladder stones after bladder augmentation, 85 met inclusion criteria. Median age at augmentation was 8.0 years (follow-up 10.8 years). Forty-four patients (51.8%) recurred (14 multiple recurrences, 143 bladder stones). Renal calculi developed in 19 (22.4%) patients with a bladder stone, and 10 (52.6%) recurred (30 renal stones). Overall, 30.8% of bladder stones were non-infectious (Table). Among patients recurring after an infectious bladder stone, 30.4% recurred with a non-infectious one. Among patients recurring after a non-infectious stone, 84.6% recurred with a non-infectious one (P = 0.005). Compared with bladder stones, renal stones were more likely to be non-infectious (60.0%, P = 0.003). Of patients with recurrent renal calculi after an infectious stone, 40.0% recurred with

  5. Effect of Naftopidil on Bladder Microcirculation in a Rat Model of Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majima, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Takai, Shun; Matsukawa, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Masaki; Gotoh, Momokazu

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of naftopidil on bladder capillary blood flow using bladder outlet obstruction model rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control group, bladder-outlet-obstruction group, and bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group. Bladder-outlet-obstruction surgery was performed in the bladder-outlet-obstruction and bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil groups. The control group received sham-operation. The bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group were treated with naftopidil (30 mg/kg) for 14 days after bladder-outlet-obstruction operation, while the control and bladder-outlet-obstruction groups were treated with vehicle. Continuous cystometry was performed 14 days after the surgery. Bladder blood flow was measured after 14 days using a pencil lens charge-coupled device microscopy system. The bladder was then harvested for histology and measuring 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine tissue level by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In cystometry, the bladder-outlet-obstruction rats showed bladder overactivity, while naftopidil treatment improved the cystometric pattern. The blood flow through the submucosal capillaries of the bladder base in the bladder-outlet-obstruction group was lesser than that in the control, whereas the bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group showed significantly greater blood flow than the bladder-outlet-obstruction group. The bladder tissue in the bladder-outlet-obstruction group showed a tendency to contain more hypertrophic detrusor muscle and inflammatory cells compared to those in the control group, while naftopidil treatment suppressed these histological changes. The 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels in the bladder tissue significantly differed among the three groups (the bladder-outlet-obstruction group > the bladder-outlet-obstruction + naftopidil group > the control group). Naftopidil improved bladder overactivity as well as the impaired bladder

  6. Atropine may prevent the development of neurogenic pulmonary edema

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 1 (2009), s. 42-44 ISSN 0306-9877 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/06/1246; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538; EC FP6 RESCUE(FR) LSHB-CT-2005-518233; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0021620803 Program:1M; 1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : central nervous system * neurogenic pulmonary edema Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.393, year: 2009

  7. Endobronchial neurogenic tumor: A combination of traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Tandon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic neuromas are uncommon and benign lesions arising from a peripheral nerve injury during surgery. Here we describe a case with histopathologic features of both a traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma in a patient without integumentary physical exam findings nor prior surgical history. A 54 year old male was admitted for surgical debridement of a foot ulcer. During pre-operative evaluation and review of imaging multiple CT scans revealed a stable, 4 mm endobronchial lesion in the left lower lobe. Given history of nicotine abuse, bronchoscopy was performed. Bronchoscopy showed a pearly, polypoid lesion. Histopathological results showed strong positivity for S-100 protein and spindle cell proliferation. Repeat CT chest showed no new lesions in the bronchial tree. The rarity of this case is noted not only by the limited number of bronchial neurogenic tumors, but the combined features in this case of a traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma which has not been described.

  8. Neurogenic inflammation: a study of rat trigeminal ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kim Anker; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is linked to neurogenic inflammation and to migraine. Activation of the trigeminovascular system plays a prominent role during migraine attacks with the release of CGRP. The trigeminal ganglion (TG) contains three main cell types: neurons, satellite glial...... cells (SGC) and Schwann cells; the first two have before been studied in vitro separately. Culture of rat TG provides a method to induce inflammation and the possibility to evaluate the different cell types in the TG simultaneously. We investigated expression levels of various inflammatory cytokines...... inhibitor SP600125. This method may be of value to examine local TG inflammation, putatively involved in the pathophysiology of some forms of primary headaches....

  9. Evaluation of the NMP22 BladderChek test for detecting bladder cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zijie; Que, Hongliang; Suo, Chuanjian; Han, Zhijian; Tao, Jun; Huang, Zhengkai; Ju, Xiaobin; Tan, Ruoyun; Gu, Min

    2017-11-21

    We examined the usefulness of the nuclear matrix protein 22 (NMP22) BladderChek test for detecting bladder cancer. A literature search was performed using PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. The diagnostic accuracy of the NMP22 BladderChek test was evaluated via pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under curve (AUC). Inter-study heterogeneity was explored using meta-regression and subgroup analyses. We included 23 studies in the systematic review and 19 in the quantitative meta-analysis. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 56% (52-59%) and 88% (87-89%), respectively; pooled PLR and NLR were 4.36 (3.02-6.29) and 0.51 (0.40-0.66), respectively; DOR was 9.29 (5.55-15.55) with an AUC of 0.8295. The mean sensitivity for Ta, T1, ≥ T2, Tis, G1, G2, and G3 disease was 13.68%, 29.49%, 74.03%, 34.62%, 44.16%, 56.25%, and 67.34%, respectively. The NMP22 BladderChek test shows good discrimination ability for detecting bladder cancer and a high-specificity algorithm that can be used for early detection to rule out patients with higher bladder cancer risk. It also has better potential for screening higher-grade and higher-stage tumors, and better diagnostic performance in Asians.

  10. Urethral morphology and bladder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausegger, K A; Fotter, R; Sorantin, E; Schmidt, P

    1991-01-01

    In order to calculate the relationship between Spinning top urethra (STU) and bladder instability 160 voiding cystourethrogramms (VCU), performed in 102 girls, have been analysed retrospectively. 28 girls had STU, 16 of those had bladder instability as well (57%). We could not find the highly positive correlation between unstable bladder and STU as reported by other authors, although there was a statistically positive correlation between STU and bladder instability. However the confidence interval was very broad (38%-75%). We conclude that bladder instability may contribute to STU but cannot render the etiological explanation for all cases. STU seems to be a polyetiological sign. In our opinion only the combination of STU and bladder instability has a diagnostic impact, since several therapeutical concepts are available in cases of bladder instability. The finding of STU in the VCU should alert the examiner's attention to functional disorders of the lower urinary tract. If no instability can be found, STU should be considered to be a normal variant.

  11. Urethral morphology and bladder instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.A.; Fotter, R.; Sorantin, E. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Radiologische Klinik); Schmidt, P. (Rehabilitationszentrum, Schallerbach (Austria))

    1991-05-01

    In order to calculate the relationship between Spinning top urethra (STU) and bladder instability 160 voiding cystourethrogramms (VCU), performed in 102 girls, have been analysed retrospectively. 28 girls had STU, 16 of those had bladder instability as well (57%). We could not find the highly positive correlation between unstable bladder and STU as reported by other authors, although there was a statistically positive correlation between STU and bladder instability. However the confidence interval was very broad (38%-75%). We conclude that bladder instability may contribute to STU but cannot render the etiological explanation for all cases. STU seems to be a polyetiological sign. In our opinion only the combination of STU and bladder instability has a diagnostic impact, since several therapeutical concepts are available in cases of bladder instability. The finding of STU in the VCU should alert the examiner's attention to functional disorders of the lower urinary tract. If no instability can be found, STU should be considered to be a normal variant. (orig.).

  12. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  13. Continent Catheterizable Vesicostomy: An Alternative Surgical Modality for Pediatric Patients With Large Bladder Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peard, Leslie; Fox, Patrick J; Andrews, William M; Chen, Roger; McCraw, Casey O; Klaassen, Zachary; Neal, Durwood E

    2016-07-01

    To present a modified technique and early outcomes of a continent catheterizable vesicostomy in pediatric patients with either flaccid neurogenic bladder or intractable voiding dysfunction and large capacity bladder. Six patients underwent the procedure from October 2014 to December 2015. A 4-cm Pfannenstiel incision was made, avoiding intraperitoneal dissection. After adequate mobilization, a 2-cm vertical flap at the dome of the bladder was identified and tubularized over a 12Fr catheter with 4-0 vicryl suture. The tubularized flap was then intussuscepted into the bladder with four 4-0 polydioxanone sutures, creating a continent mechanism. The catheterizable channel was then tunneled to the umbilicus, the channel ostomy matured, and the cystotomy closed in two layers. The median patient age was 8 (interquartile range [IQR] 12) years. All patients had urinary dysfunction requiring drainage from etiologies that included Eagle-Barrett syndrome (n = 2), Noonan syndrome (n = 1), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 1), and Spina bifida (n = 2). Median hospital length of stay was 8 (IQR 3) days. One patient had a superficial wound infection treated with antibiotics, and 1 patient required balloon dilation of the catheterizable channel at 3 months postoperatively, secondary to difficulty self-catheterizing. Five patients were successfully self-catheterizing at last follow-up. Median follow-up was 6 (IQR 5) months and there were no intra- or perioperative complications. Continent catheterizable vesicostomy is a novel technique for urinary drainage in patients with large bladder capacity that spares use of the appendix or ileum. Early results are encouraging, providing a catheterizable channel through the umbilicus without urinary leakage between catheterization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. THC/CBD oromucosal spray in patients with multiple sclerosis overactive bladder: a pilot prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniscalco, Giorgia Teresa; Aponte, R; Bruzzese, D; Guarcello, G; Manzo, V; Napolitano, M; Moreggia, O; Chiariello, F; Florio, C

    2018-01-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunctions (LUTDs) are commonly reported in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and are mainly related to neurogenic overactive bladder (OAB). The aim of this observational study was to assess the effect of a tetrahydrocannabinol-cannabidiol (THC/CBD) oromucosal spray on resistant OAB by means of clinical and instrumental tools. Twenty-one MS patients were screened, and 15 cases have been evaluated. They underwent a specific clinical assessment (overactive bladder symptom score, OABSS) and a urodynamic assessment evaluating the maximal cystometric capacity (CCmax), bladder compliance (Qmax), maximum detrusor pressure (Pdet max), detrusor pressure at the first desire (Pdet first), bladder volume at the first desire (BVFD), leakage volume (LV), and post-void residual volume (PVR), before and after 4 weeks of THC/CBD administration. A complete neurological evaluation, including the assessment of their spasticity using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and the spasticity 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS), was performed at the same times. Mobility was evaluated through the 25-ft walking-time test (T25-WT). The THC/CBD treatment successfully reduced the OAB symptoms (p = 0.001). Regarding the urodynamic findings after the end of treatment, PVR was significantly reduced (p = 0.016). Regarding the urodynamic findings after the end of treatment, PVR was significantly reduced (p = 0.016), while BVFD and CCmax were increased although the difference was not statistically significant. THC/CBD oromucosal spray has shown to be effective in improving overactive bladder symptoms in MS patients demonstrating a favorable impact on detrusor overactivity.

  15. Stepwise cystometry : a new method to investigate properties of the urinary bladder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.L.R.A. Coolsaet (Bo)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractThe urinary bladder has a twofold function : 1. to store urine and 2. to expel it if necessary under complete voluntary control. The bladder can store various volumes of urine at a low and approximately constant intravesical pressure until capacity is reached. In the literature, this

  16. Lymphatic vessel density and function in experimental bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saban, Marcia R; Wu, Xue-Ru; Saban, Ricardo; Towner, Rheal; Smith, Nataliya; Abbott, Andrew; Neeman, Michal; Davis, Carole A; Simpson, Cindy; Maier, Julie; Mémet, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    The lymphatics form a second circulatory system that drains the extracellular fluid and proteins from the tumor microenvironment, and provides an exclusive environment in which immune cells interact and respond to foreign antigen. Both cancer and inflammation are known to induce lymphangiogenesis. However, little is known about bladder lymphatic vessels and their involvement in cancer formation and progression. A double transgenic mouse model was generated by crossing a bladder cancer-induced transgenic, in which SV40 large T antigen was under the control of uroplakin II promoter, with another transgenic mouse harboring a lacZ reporter gene under the control of an NF-κB-responsive promoter (κB-lacZ) exhibiting constitutive activity of β-galactosidase in lymphatic endothelial cells. In this new mouse model (SV40-lacZ), we examined the lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and function (LVF) during bladder cancer progression. LVD was performed in bladder whole mounts and cross-sections by fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC) using LYVE-1 antibody. LVF was assessed by real-time in vivo imaging techniques using a contrast agent (biotin-BSA-Gd-DTPA-Cy5.5; Gd-Cy5.5) suitable for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, IHC of Cy5.5 was used for time-course analysis of co-localization of Gd-Cy5.5 with LYVE-1-positive lymphatics and CD31-positive blood vessels. SV40-lacZ mice develop bladder cancer and permitted visualization of lymphatics. A significant increase in LVD was found concomitantly with bladder cancer progression. Double labeling of the bladder cross-sections with LYVE-1 and Ki-67 antibodies indicated cancer-induced lymphangiogenesis. MRI detected mouse bladder cancer, as early as 4 months, and permitted to follow tumor sizes during cancer progression. Using Gd-Cy5.5 as a contrast agent for MRI-guided lymphangiography, we determined a possible reduction of lymphatic flow within the tumoral area. In addition, NIRF

  17. Bladder Diverticulitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Silberman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder diverticulum, an outpouching of the mucosa through the muscular wall of the bladder, is a multifactorial disease process that can be either acquired or congenital. Although small diverticuli are usually asymptomatic, a large diverticulum may result in hematuria, urinary tract infection, acute abdomen due to its rupture, acute urinary retention, or neoplasm formation. We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and was ultimately diagnosed with bladder diverticulitis, a disease not previously described in the literature.

  18. Dose Distribution in Bladder and Surrounding Normal Tissues in Relation to Bladder Volume in Conformal Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, Wojciech; Wesolowska, Iwona; Urbanczyk, Hubert; Hawrylewicz, Leszek; Schwierczok, Barbara; Miszczyk, Leszek

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate bladder movements and changes in dose distribution in the bladder and surrounding tissues associated with changes in bladder filling and to estimate the internal treatment margins. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with bladder cancer underwent planning computed tomography scans with 80- and 150-mL bladder volumes. The bladder displacements associated with the change in volume were measured. Each patient had treatment plans constructed for a 'partially empty' (80 mL) and a 'partially full' (150 mL) bladder. An additional plan was constructed for tumor irradiation alone. A subsequent 9 patients underwent sequential weekly computed tomography scanning during radiotherapy to verify the bladder movements and estimate the internal margins. Results: Bladder movements were mainly observed cranially, and the estimated internal margins were nonuniform and largest (>2 cm) anteriorly and cranially. The dose distribution in the bladder worsened if the bladder increased in volume: 70% of patients (11 of 16) would have had bladder underdosed to 70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 23%, 20%, and 15% for the rectum and 162, 144, 123 cm 3 for the intestines, respectively) than with a 'partially full' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 28%, 24%, and 18% for the rectum and 180, 158, 136 cm 3 for the intestines, respectively). The change in bladder filling during RT was significant for the dose distribution in the intestines. Tumor irradiation alone was significantly better than whole bladder irradiation in terms of organ sparing. Conclusion: The displacements of the bladder due to volume changes were mainly related to the upper wall. The internal margins should be nonuniform, with the largest margins cranially and anteriorly. The changes in bladder filling during RT could influence the dose distribution in the bladder and intestines. The dose distribution in the rectum and bowel was slightly better with

  19. Increased bladder permeability in interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Wisniewski, Amy B.; VanGordon, Samuel; Lin, HsuehKung; Kropp, Bradley P.; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    The definition of interstitial cystitis (IC) has evolved over the years from being a well-defined entity characterized by diagnostic lesion (Hunner’s ulcer) in the urothelium to a clinical diagnosis by exclusion [painful bladder syndrome (PBS)]. Although the etiology is unknown, a central theme has been an association with increased permeability of the bladder. This article reviews the evidence for increased permeability being important to the symptoms of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and in treating the disorder. Recent work showing cross-communication among visceral organs is also reviewed to provide a basis for understanding IC/PBS as a systemic disorder of a complex, interconnected system consisting of the bladder, bowel and other organs, nerves, cytokine-responding cells and the nervous system. PMID:26751576

  20. Invasive bladder cancer: Our experience with bladder sparing approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervek, Jozica; Cufer, Tanja; Zakotnik, Branko; Kragelj, Borut; Borstnar, Simona; Matos, Tadeja; Zumer-Pregelj, Mirjana

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is a disease associated with several unresolved therapeutic questions. Radical cystectomy still represents the most frequent treatment approach. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect and feasibility of bladder-sparing treatment by transurethral resection (TUR) and sequential chemoradiotherapy in patients with biopsy-proven invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: After maximal TUR, 105 patients were treated with two to four cycles of methotrexate, cisplatinum, and vinblastine polychemotherapy. In complete responders, the treatment was continued by radiotherapy (50 Gy to the bladder and 40 Gy to the regional lymph nodes), whereas in nonresponders, cystectomy was performed when feasible. Results: Complete response after TUR and chemotherapy was achieved in 52% of patients. After a median follow-up of 42 months, 52 of 75 patients (69%) selected for bladder preservation were without evidence of disease in the bladder. Freedom from local failure in complete responders to chemotherapy was 80% [95% confidence interval (CI), 69-91%) at 4 years. The actuarial survival of the entire group was 58% (95% CI, 47-69%), whereas the survival rate with the bladder intact was 45% (95% CI, 34-56%) at 4 years. Survival was significantly better in patients who responded to chemotherapy (79%) than in nonresponders (35%, p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in survival between nonresponders who underwent cystectomy and nonresponders who completed treatment with radiotherapy (approximately 30% at 3 years). Conclusion: The present study confirms that MIBC is a heterogeneous disease, and that in more than half of patients who are affected, a bladder-sparing approach is safe. Our study has also demonstrated that in nonresponders, radical cystectomy as the treatment of choice is questionable

  1. Does phosphorylation of cofilin affect the progression of human bladder cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hong; Kim, Hong Sup; Kim, Bokyung; Jung, Seung-Hyo; Won, Kyung-Jong; Jiang, Xiaowen; Lee, Chang-Kwon; Lim, So Dug; Yang, Sang-Kuk; Song, Ki Hak

    2013-01-01

    We determined the differently expressed protein profiles and their functions in bladder cancer tissues with the aim of identifying possible target proteins and underlying molecular mechanisms for taking part in their progression. We examined the expression of proteins by proteomic analysis and western blot in normal urothelium, non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers (NMIBCs), and muscle-invasive bladder cancers (MIBCs). The function of cofilin was analyzed using T24 human bladder cancer cells. The expression levels of 12 proteins were altered between bladder cancers and normal bladder tissues. Of these proteins, 14-3-3σ was upregulated in both NMIBCs and MIBCs compared with controls. On the other hand, myosin regulatory light chain 2, galectin-1, lipid-binding AI, annexin V, transthyretin, CARD-inhibitor of NF-κB-activating ligand, and actin prepeptide were downregulated in cancer samples. Cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing factor, was prominent in both NMIBCs and MIBCs compared with normal bladder tissues. Furthermore, we confirmed that cofilin phosphorylation was more prominent in MIBCs than in NMIBCs using immunoblotting and immunohistochemcal analyses. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) increased the phosphorylation of cofilin and elevated the migration in T24 cells. Knockdown of cofilin expression with small interfering RNA attenuated the T24 cell migration in response to EGF. These results demonstrate that the increased expression and phosphorylation of cofilin might play a role in the occurrence and invasiveness of bladder cancer. We suspected that changes in cofilin expression may participate in the progression of the bladder cancer

  2. Transcutaneous stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve for treating refractory urge incontinence of idiopathic and neurogenic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles-Antuña, C; Pérez-Haro, M L; González-Ruiz de L, C; Quintás-Blanco, A; Tamargo-Diaz, E M; García-Rodríguez, J; San Martín-Blanco, A; Fernandez-Gomez, J M

    2017-09-01

    To assess the efficacy of treatment with transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation (TPTNS) in patients with urge urinary incontinence, of neurogenic or nonneurogenic origin, refractory to first-line therapeutic options. We included 65 patients with urge urinary incontinence refractory to medical treatment. A case history review, a urodynamic study and a somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) study were conducted before the TPTNS, studying the functional urological condition by means of a voiding diary. The treatment consisted of 10 weekly sessions of TPTNS lasting 30minutes. Some 57.7% of the patients showed abnormal tibial SEPs, and 42% showed abnormal pudendal SEPs. A statistically significant symptomatic improvement was observed in all clinical parameters after treatment with TPTNS, and 66% of the patients showed an overall improvement, regardless of sex, the presence of underlying neurological disorders, detrusor hyperactivity in the urodynamic study or SEP disorders. There were no adverse effects during the treatment. TPTNS is an effective and well tolerated treatment in patients with urge incontinence refractory to first-line therapies and should be offered early in the treatment strategy. New studies are needed to identify the optimal parameters of stimulation, the most effective treatment protocols and long-term efficacy, as well as its applicability to patients with a neurogenic substrate. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. The thoracic outlet syndromes: Part 1. Overview of the thoracic outlet syndromes and review of true neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Mark A; Ferrante, Nicole D

    2017-06-01

    The thoracic outlet syndromes (TOSs) are a group of etiologically and clinically distinct disorders with 1 feature in common: compression of 1 or more neurovascular elements as they traverse the thoracic outlet. The medical literature reflects 5 TOSs: arterial; venous; traumatic neurovascular; true neurogenic; and disputed. Of these, the first 4 demonstrate all of the features expected of a syndrome, whereas disputed TOS does not, causing many experts to doubt its existence altogether. Thus, some categorize disputed TOS as a cervicoscapular pain syndrome rather than as a type of TOS. To better understand these disorders, their distinctions, and the reasoning underlying the categorical change of disputed TOS from a form of TOS to a cervicoscapular pain syndrome, a thorough understanding of the pertinent anatomy, pathology, pathophysiology, and the electrodiagnostic manifestations of their pathophysiologies is required. This review of the TOSs is provided in 2 parts. In this first part we address information pertinent to all 5 TOSs and reviews true neurogenic TOS. In part 2 we review the other 4 TOSs. Muscle Nerve 55: 782-793, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vesicoureteral Reflux The Urinary Tract & How It Works Interstitial Cystitis (Painful Bladder Syndrome) View or Print All Sections Definition & Facts Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic, or long-lasting, condition ...

  5. An overview of treatment of overactive bladder syndrome in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahdin, S; Oo, N

    2012-04-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is a common, often under-reported and under-treated condition that significantly affects the quality of life (QoL) of the sufferer and is associated with enormous related costs. Treatments options for OAB include lifestyle modifications, behavioural therapy, pharmacotherapy, neuromodulation, Botulinum toxin therapy and surgical interventions. For this paper, the Embase, Cochrane and Medline databases were searched for studies relating to the treatment options for OAB with (urge urinary incontinence) UUI from 1975 to 2010. Studies were also obtained from references of published reviews. Search terms used for retrieval were: overactive bladder syndrome, urge urinary incontinence, anticholinergics, Botulinum toxin A, sacral neuromodulation and clam bladder augmentation. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the treatment options currently available for women with OAB.

  6. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis....

  7. Effects of four antitussives on airway neurogenic inflammation in a guinea pig model of chronic cough induced by cigarette smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu-long; Li, Pei-bo; Zhang, Chen-chen; Zheng, Yan-fang; Wang, Sheng; Nie, Yi-chu; Zhang, Ke-jian; Su, Wei-wei

    2013-12-01

    The effects of four antitussives, including codeine phosphate (CP), moguisteine, levodropropizine (LVDP) and naringin, on airway neurogenic inflammation and enhanced cough were investigated in guinea pig model of chronic cough. Guinea pigs were exposed to CS for 8 weeks. At the 7th and 8th week, the animals were treated with vehicle, CP (4.8 mg/kg), moguisteine (24 mg/kg), LVDP (14 mg/kg) and naringin (18.4 mg/kg) respectively. Then the cough and the time-enhanced pause area under the curve (Penh-AUC) during capsaicin challenge were recorded. The substance P (SP) content, NK-1 receptor expression and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) activity in lung were determined. Chronic CS exposure induced a bi-phase time course of cough responsiveness to capsaicin. Eight weeks of CS exposure significantly enhanced the airway neurogenic inflammation and cough response in guinea pigs. Two weeks of treatment with CP, moguisteine, LVDP or naringin effectively attenuated the chronic CS-exposure enhanced cough. Only naringin exerted significant effect on inhibiting Penh-AUC, SP content and NK-1 receptor expression, as well as preventing the declining of NEP activity in lung. Chronic CS-exposed guinea pig is suitable for studying chronic pathological cough, in which naringin is effective on inhibiting both airway neurogenic inflammation and enhanced cough.

  8. Interstitial cystitis: painful bladder syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R F Sholan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of a bladder of unknown etiology. It negatively affects the quality of life, causes depressive disorders, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of interstitial cystitis is still unclear and it’s considered as painful bladder syndrome with multifactorial origin. According to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 470/100 000 people (60/100 000 men, 850/100 000 women are diagnosed with interstitial cystitis. Diagnosis of the disease is difficult and is substantially based on clinical symptoms. Pelvic pain, urinary urgency, frequency and nocturia are the basic complaints in this pathology. The diagnosis requires exclusion of diseases with similar manifestations. So interstitial cystitis is frequently misdiagnosed as urinary tract infection, overactive bladder, urethral obstruction or diverticulosis, chronic prostatitis, bladder cancer, vulvodynia, endometriosis, and chronic pelvic pain. Etiopathogenesis of the disease is uncertain, which makes etiologic treatment impossible. Currently scientific discussions on the causes of disease continue as well as different treatment regimens are offered, but are often ineffective, palliative and temporary. The treatment for intersticial cystitis should focus on restoring normal bladder function, prevention of relapse of symptoms and improvement of patients’ quality of life. The literature review presents current view on the terminology, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis.

  9. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Sillén

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB and the dysfunctional voiding (DV, have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome, most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB, with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed.

  10. Mitomycin C Intravesical Chemotherapy in Conjunction With Synergo® Radiofrequency-Induced Hyperthermia for Treatment of Carcinoma in Situ Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Patients Unresponsive to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, With or Without Papillary Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-20

    Bladder Cancer; Bladder Neoplasm; Bladder Tumors; Cancer of Bladder; Cancer of the Bladder; Malignant Tumor of Urinary Bladder; Neoplasms, Bladder; Urinary Bladder Cancer; Carcinoma in Situ of Bladder; Papillary Carcinoma of Bladder (Diagnosis); BCG-Unresponsive Bladder Cancer

  11. Safety of a new compact catheter for men with neurogenic bladder dysfunction: a randomised, crossover and open-labelled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chartier-Kastler, E; Lauge, I; Ruffion, A

    2011-01-01

    Self-catheterising males aged ≥18 years with spinal cord lesion and normal/impaired urethral sensation were enrolled in this comparative, randomised, crossover and open-labelled multicentre trial.......Self-catheterising males aged ≥18 years with spinal cord lesion and normal/impaired urethral sensation were enrolled in this comparative, randomised, crossover and open-labelled multicentre trial....

  12. Safety of a new compact catheter for men with neurogenic bladder dysfunction: a randomised, crossover and open-labelled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chartier-Kastler, E; Lauge, I; Ruffion, A

    2011-01-01

    Self-catheterising males aged =18 years with spinal cord lesion and normal/impaired urethral sensation were enrolled in this comparative, randomised, crossover and open-labelled multicentre trial.......Self-catheterising males aged =18 years with spinal cord lesion and normal/impaired urethral sensation were enrolled in this comparative, randomised, crossover and open-labelled multicentre trial....

  13. Urodynamics post stroke in patients with urinary incontinence: Is there correlation between bladder type and site of lesion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Anupam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Assessment of bladder by urodynamic study (UDS in patients with urinary incontinence following stroke, and correlation with site of lesion. Study Design and Setting: Retrospective cross-sectional study in the neurological rehabilitation unit of a tertiary care institute. Materials and Methods: Forty patients (22 males with arterial or venous, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, with urinary incontinence in the acute phase following the event, underwent UDS. Seventeen patients had right hemiplegia, 18 had left hemiplegia, and five had posterior circulation stroke with brainstem/cerebellar features. Bladder type was correlated with age, side, and site of lesion. Results: The mean age was 46.80 ± 16.65 years (range: 18-80 years. Thirty-six patients had arterial stroke and four had cortical venous thrombosis. UDS was performed after a mean of 28.32 ± 10.27 days (range: 8-53 days after the stroke. All but one patient had neurogenic bladder dysfunction, with 36 patients (90% having overactive detrusor (OD and three having underactive/areflexic detrusor. Among the 36 patients with OD, 25 patients (62.5% had OD without detrusor-sphincter dyssynergy (DSD and 11 (27.5% had OD with DSD. Bladder management was advised based on the UDS findings. No significant correlation ( P > 0.05 was found between type of bladder and age or side and site of lesion. Conclusions: UDS is a useful tool to assess and manage the bladder following stroke with urinary incontinence. In this study, no significant correlation was found between UDS findings and site of lesion.

  14. Bladder preservation using chemoradiation therapy for locally invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Toyofumi; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Sato, Mototaka; Mori, Naoki; Sekii, Ken-Ichiro; Itatani, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the long-term results and molecular markers of outcome with selective organ preservation in invasive bladder cancer using chemoradiation therapy. We examined locally invasive bladder cancer in 32 patients (30 men, 2 women; mean age at treatment 68.1 years) who underwent bladder-sparing protocols in the Department of Urology at Sumitomo Hospital between 2000 and 2005. The clinical stage was T2, T3, and T4 in 13, 16, and 3 patients, respectively. Our protocol includes aggressive transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) and 46 Gy radiotherapy (2 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week) to the pelvis with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy (20 mg/body/day, 5 days/week, the first and fourth week, intravenously). The initial evaluation included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), urine cytology, and cystoscopy with a biopsy. During follow-up, if the patients developed superficial recurrence, they was treated with TURBT and intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), while patients with invasive recurrence were advised to undergo a salvage cystectomy. We examined the association between the expression of the Bcl-2 family in pretreatment TUR specimens and patient outcome. The mean follow-up was 54.6 months. The first assessment after the induction chemoradiotherapy showed that bladder preservation was achieved in 27 patients (84.4%). The actuarial local control rate with an intact bladder was 56.3% (18 patients) at 3 years. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 90.6, 84.0, and 66.9%, respectively. The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 75.0, 67.2, and 33.3% in T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Bcl-x positivity was significantly associated with a poor cancer-specific survival rate (log-rank test, p=0.038). Chemoradiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer can achieve survival rates similar to those in patients treated with radical cystectomy, with successful bladder preservation. Our results suggest that the expression of Bcl-x is a

  15. Imaging of urinary bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekov, G.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Primary bladder neoplasms account for 2%-6% of all tumors, with urinary bladder cancer ranked as the fourth most common cancer in males. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common subtype of urothelial tumour accounting for approximately 90% of all urothelial cancers. It is typically observed in men aged 50-70 years with history of smoking or occupational exposure to carcinogens. Most urothelial neoplasms are low-grade papillary tumors, with high incidence of recurrence, requires rigorous follow-up but have a relatively good prognosis. Other bladder neoplasm include squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 2%-15% mainly according to geographic location; adenocarcinoma - less than 2% /both occurring in the context of chronic bladder infection and irritation/; mesenchymal tumors in 5%, with the most common examples being rhabdomyosarcoma in children and leiomyosarcoma in adults. More rare mesenchymal tumors include paraganglioma, lymphoma, leiomyoma and solitary fibrous tumor which have no specific typical imaging findings to be differentiated. Multidetector computed tomography urography is an efficient tool for diagnosis and follow-up in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and it can be considered the primary radiologic method for detection, staging and assessment of the entire urothelium regarding the multicentric nature of TCC. MRI is rapidly expanding modality of choice especially in locally staging the tumor and in controversies. Accurate TNM staging is primordial in choosing treatment and prognosis for patients with bladder carcinoma. Correct interpretation and classification of the tumour is helpful for the urologists to determine further management in these cases. The learning objectives of the presentation are: to illustrate the spectrum of CT and MRI findings and to assess their clinical value in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and some other bladder neoplasm; to discuss the TNM staging based on the imaging findings; to be

  16. Bedside lung ultrasound: a case of neurogenic pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenkov, Vladimir V; Kovalev, Alexey N; Gorbunov, Vyacheslav V

    2013-06-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is an acute life-threatening complication associated with many forms of central nervous system injury. NPE usually appears within minutes to hours after injury and has a high mortality rate if not recognized and treated appropriately. Lung ultrasound quickly provides at the bedside relevant information on the state of aeration and ventilation of the lung. We describe a case report of acute respiratory insufficiency after posterior cranial fossa surgery. The patient underwent a subtotal meningiomectomy. Postoperative course was complicated by respiratory failure with unstable hemodynamic parameters. The pulmonary edema was suspected, and sonography examination was performed. Lung ultrasound showed typical signs for non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Transthoracic echocardiography showed preserved left ventricle systolic function, but signs of the severe hypovolemia were found. We corrected for the preload and ventilator support settings. Within 24 h, her respiratory status improved with a resolution of the pulmonary edema. Lung ultrasound at the bedside can provide accurate information on lung status in neurocritically ill patients with acute respiratory failure. The addition of transthoracic echocardiography to lung sonography provides an additive insight on the eventual pulmonary involvement. Lung ultrasound has the potential to become a reference tool for bedside dynamic respiratory monitoring in the Neuro ICU.

  17. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome treatment by the supraclavicular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Ziyad; Baram, Aram

    2014-02-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome refers to compression of one or more of the neurovascular structures traversing the superior aperture of the thoracic cavity. A symptom-based patient-directed questionnaire was used to evaluate the outcome of the supraclavicular approach for treatment of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. A prospective study was performed between April 2007 and October 2010. During this period, 97 patients in different age groups, with signs and symptoms of thoracic outlet syndrome, were surgically treated by the supraclavicular approach. The patients were aged between 14 and 60 years (mean 32.5 years), and the majority were female (89.69%). Surgery was performed on the left side in 52 patients and on the right side in 48, including 3 who had bilateral operations. The median follow-up was 11.2 months. In 78% of the 100 operations, excellent improvement in symptoms was noted, there was partial improvement in 18%, and 4% resulted in no response. First rib resection remains an important and essential step in the management of the thoracic outlet syndrome, in the absence of bony abnormalities. The supraclavicular approach can be employed with minimal morbidity and an excellent outcome.

  18. Developing a functional urinary bladder: a neuronal context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet R Keast

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of organs occurs in parallel with the formation of their nerve supply. The innervation of pelvic organs (lower urinary tract, hindgut, and sexual organs is complex and we know remarkably little about the mechanisms that form these neural pathways. The goal of this short review is to use the urinary bladder as an example to stimulate interest in this question. The bladder requires a healthy mature nervous system to store urine and release it at behaviourally appropriate times. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the construction of these neural circuits is not only relevant to defining the basis of developmental problems but may also suggest strategies to restore connectivity and function following injury or disease in adults. The bladder nerve supply comprises multiple classes of sensory, and parasympathetic or sympathetic autonomic effector (motor neurons. First, we define the developmental endpoint by describing this circuitry in adult rodents. Next we discuss the innervation of the developing bladder, identifying challenges posed by this area of research. Last we provide examples of genetically modified mice with bladder dysfunction and suggest potential neural contributors to this state.

  19. [Overactive bladder syndrome--a public health challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit-Rubin, N; Meyer, S; Achtari, C

    2015-10-28

    Overactive bladder is a highly prevalent clinical syndrome affecting up to 17% of women. It is often associated with urodynamic detrusor overactivity, leads to embarrassment and is frequently under-diagnosed and insufficiently treated. Its pathophysiology is complex and the numerous treatment modalities, some of them of poor evidence, aim to improve quality of life. When physiotherapy fails, anticholinergics are recommended as first-line medical treatment. They can be combined with or replaced by beta3-adrenergic agonists whereas sacral neuromodulation or posterior tibia nerve stimulation are considered an efficient alternative. Addidtionally, cystoscopic injection of botulinum toxine in the bladder has recently been validated in Switzerland as a treatment option for idiopathic overactive bladder.

  20. Biomarkers for patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Tzu Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis or bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS is a disease of unknown etiology manifested with bladder pain and frequency urgency symptoms. Although several pathophysiologic mechanisms have been proposed, the underlying mechanism of IC/BPS is still unclear. Accumulated evidence supports that IC/BPS is actually a spectrum of clinical phenomena that involves several different genes and environmental factors. Heterogeneous syndromes are seen in patients with IC/PBS, which suggests that the disease should be classified into different subtypes. Abnormal expressions of several bladder epithelial markers, including mast cells, epithelial differentiation proteins, cell membrane proteins, neurotransmitters, and cytokines, are present in IC/BPS. This review discusses the possible biomarkers that may play crucial roles in IC/BPS, and especially focuses on those that have the potential to be used as biomarkers for prognosis and for the determination of the best treatment for patients.

  1. Microcirculatory Detrusor Changes in Medicinally Denervated Bladder Patients Scientific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R. Valiyev

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present article the results of the study of microcirculation in abnormal urinary bladder detrusor are reported. The neurotoxic effect of botulinic toxin has been shown. The dynamics of microcirculatory changes in detrusor under the action of botulinic toxin has been evaluated

  2. Role of P2X purinoceptor 7 in neurogenic pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE is an acute and serious complication after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH with high mortality. The present study aimed to test the therapeutic potential of brilliant blue G (BBG, a selective P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7R antagonist, on NPE in a rat SAH model. METHODS: SAH was induced by endovascular perforation. 86 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham, vehicle-, or BBG-treatment groups. Mortality, body weight, SAH grading, neurological deficits, NPE clinical symptoms, and pulmonary index were measured at 24 hours following SAH. Western blot, gelatin zymography, lung histopathology, and immunofluorescence staining were performed in the left lung lobe to explore the underlying mechanisms at 24 hours post-surgery. RESULTS: The incidence of clinical symptoms was correlated with pulmonary index. P2X7R and the marker of alveolar type I epithelial cells (the mucin-type glycoprotein T1-α immunoreactivities were generally co-localized. BBG administration decreased mature interleukin-1β, myeloperoxidase, and matrix metallopeptidase-9 activation, but increased tight junction proteins, such as ZO-1 and occludin, which ameliorated pulmonary edema via anti-inflammation and improved neurological deficits. CONCLUSION: P2X7R inhibition prevented NPE after SAH by attenuating inflammation. Thus, BBG is a potential therapeutic application for NPE after SAH and warrants further research.

  3. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-01-01

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is

  4. Medical management of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvpreet S Ubee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB, as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat.

  5. Bladder hernia: Multidetector computed tomography findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Gadodia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herniation of bladder in inguinal hernia is rare, with most cases diagnosed intraoperatively. Preoperative diagnosis is even rarer. We report a case of bladder as content of inguinal hernia diagnosed using multidetector computed tomography.

  6. Bladder Morphology Using 2 Different Catheter Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Urologic Injuries; Urologic Diseases; Bladder Infection; Urinary Tract Infections; Mucosal Inflammation; Mucosal Infection; Bladder Injury; Catheter-Related Infections; Catheter Complications; Catheter; Infection (Indwelling Catheter); Pelvic Floor Disorders; Urinary Incontinence

  7. Differential perturbation of the interstitial cystitis-associated genes of bladder and urethra in rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo-Hwa; You, Sungyong; Park, Chang-Shin; Cho, Eun-Ho; Park, Taeeun D; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Young-Ju; Lee, Tack; Kim, Jayoung

    2017-04-18

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic bladder dysfunction characterized as urinary frequency, urgency, nocturia, and pelvic pain. The changes in urethra may wind up with the bladder changes in structure and functions, however, the functions of the urethra in IC remains elusive. The aim of this study was to understand the perturbed gene expression in urethra, compared with urinary bladder, associated with the defected urodynamics. Using female IC mimic rats, a comprehensive RNA-sequencing combined with a bioinformatics analysis was performed and revealed that IC-specific genes in bladder or urethra. Gene ontology analysis suggested that the cell adhesion or extracellular matrix regulation, intracellular signaling cascade, cardiac muscle tissue development, and second messenger-mediated signaling might be the most enriched cellular processes in IC context. Further study of the effects of these bladder- or urethra-specific genes may suggest underlying mechanism of lower urinary tract function and novel therapeutic strategies against IC.

  8. Transvaginal bladder neck closure with posterior urethral flap for devastated urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Eric S; Goudelocke, Colin M; Gilchrist, Alienor; Lebed, Brett

    2011-07-01

    To present a modified transvaginal bladder neck closure (TV BNC) technique using a posterior urethral flap to minimize the potential risk of ureteral injury and fistula formation. Urethral and bladder neck destruction owing to chronic indwelling urethral catheters in female neurogenic patients is a devastating complication. A retrospective review was performed of all patients undergoing TV BNC at a single institution during a 3-year period. All patients had had a nonfunctional or destroyed urethra because of a long-term indwelling urethral catheter. In brief, the devastated outlet was closed using the dorsally bivalved urethra as a flap that was rotated cephalad onto the incised anterior bladder wall for closure, thereby rotating the suture line high into the retropubic space. A postoperative cystogram was obtained at 2-3 weeks. A total of 11 consecutive female patients with a devastated outlet underwent TV BNC, as described, with placement of a suprapubic tube. One patient experienced failure at 6 weeks postoperatively. The mean follow-up for the entire cohort was 9.6 months (range 1-36). Serial upper tract imaging at the last follow-up visit revealed no new hydroureteronephrosis. The results of our study have shown that TV BNC with a posterior urethral flap provides satisfactory early results. This technique creates a suture line far removed from the ureteral orifices, minimizing the risk of upper tract injury during closure. Also, the rotation of the posterior urethra onto the anterior bladder wall secures the suture line high into the retropubic space, minimizing the risk of failure and postoperative fistula formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Utility of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection in setting of bladder and ureteral anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routh, Jonathan C; Kramer, Stephen A; Inman, Brant A; Ashley, Richard A; Wolpert, James J; Vandersteen, David R; Husmann, Douglas A; Reinberg, Yuri

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that the cure rates after dextranomer/hyaluronic acid (Dx/HA) injection can be decreased in patients with neurogenic bladder, previous ureteroneocystostomy, duplicated ureters, or periureteral diverticula. We attempted to determine whether these factors reduce the efficacy of Dx/HA injection compared with that in otherwise normal patients. All children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) undergoing Dx/HA injection from April 2002 to March 2006 at two institutions were eligible for this study. Multivariate logistic regression models were built to assess the effect of bladder/ureteral anomalies on the success of Dx/HA injection. We adjusted for previously described predictors of injection success, including VUR grade, sex, age, surgeon experience, and injection technique. A total of 543 refluxing ureters (373 patients) were included, of which 145 (27%) had persistent VUR on postoperative voiding cystourethrography; 86 ureters (16%) had anatomic anomalies. On univariate analysis, the most important predictors of injection failure were increasing VUR grade, male sex, younger age, subureteral injection, ureteral duplication anomaly, increasing Dx/HA volume, and surgeon experience. On multivariate analysis, however, the only significant predictors of injection failure were increasing VUR grade, subureteral injection technique, and surgeon experience. No anatomic or functional abnormalities, considered individually or grouped, significantly affected the probability of injection failure. In our experience, children with functional and anatomic bladder/ureteral anomalies were no more likely to have Dx/HA injection fail than were children with uncomplicated VUR. The most important predictors of Dx/HA success remained VUR grade, injection technique, and surgeon experience. Dx/HA injection in patients with complex bladders could be a reasonable therapeutic option.

  10. Is repeat Botulinum Toxin A injection valuable for neurogenic detrusor overactivity-A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jianshu; Wang, Xiaohu; Cao, Nailong; Si, Jiemin; Gu, Baojun

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the value of repeat botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, and EBSCO databases for articles published until June 2016. Studies that reported the efficacy and safety of repeat BTX-A injections for adult patients with NDO were eligible. The effect size for each outcome was calculated as the standardized mean difference ± standard error and 95% confidence interval, and was graded as small, >0.2; moderate, >0.5; or large, >0.8. The outcomes included maximum cystometric capacity (MCC), maximum detrusor pressure (MDP), reflex volume (RV), bladder compliance (BC), quality of life (QOL), and injection interval. Descriptive reviews were performed for urinary incontinence (UI) and adverse events (AEs). Eighteen studies involving 1533 patients whose level of evidence ranged from 3 to 4 were included in this study. We noted non-significant changes in MCC, MDP, RV, and BC between the first and last injections. Patients who had received ≤4 injections were found to have stable QOL improvements after the first and last injections, whereas patients who had received ≥5 injections were found to have a significant decrease in QOL after the last injection. No significant differences in injection intervals were noted after repeat BTX-A injections, and the repeat injection failure rate was low. Our study demonstrated that repeat BTX-A injections allow sustained improvements in patients with NDO. The rate of AEs was stable and low. However, additional high-quality, large-scale, and long-term trials are necessary to establish the efficacy and safety of ≥5 repeat BTX-A injections. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effect of the anticonvulsant medications pregabalin and lamotrigine on urodynamic parameters in an animal model of neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutochin, Oleg; Al Afraa, Tala; Campeau, Lysanne; Mahfouz, Wally; Elzayat, Ehab; Corcos, Jacques

    2012-09-01

    To assess the effects of different doses and treatment durations of pregabalin and lamotrigine on the urodynamic parameters of an animal model of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). Ninety rats were used; six as normal controls and the remaining 84 were divided as follows: Six "paraplegic controls," 6 "paraplegic-vehicle controls," and the remaining 72 divided into two equal groups. Group 1 was divided into six subgroups; pregabalin was given in doses of 10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg, or 30 mg/kg for 1 or 2 weeks. Group 2 was similarly subdivided; lamotrigine was given in doses of 1.5 mg/kg, 3 mg/kg, or 6 mg/kg for 1 or 2 weeks. All paraplegic controls developed NDO within 3 weeks from spinalization. Their baseline bladder pressure (BBP) 19 ± 4.4 cmH(2) O, detrusor pressure at maximum capacity (DPMaxC) 47.6 ± 4.3 cmH(2) O, bladder capacity (BC) 0.45 ± 0.1 ml, and frequency of detrusor overactivity (FDO) 3.7 ± 0.9/min. Both pregabalin and lamotrigine produced significant improvement. Urodynamic values in those treated with 20 mg pregabalin for 1 or 2 weeks were: BBP 11.7 ± 1.3 and 9 ± 0.2 cmH(2) O, BC 0.6 ± 0.1 and 0.7 ± 0.01 ml, DPMaxC 17.3 ± 4.0 and 23 ± 2.6 cmH(2) O, FDO 2.1 ± 0.2/min and 1.7 ± 0.1/min. Urodynamic values in those treated with 3 mg/kg lamotrigine for 1 or 2 weeks were: BBP 9.7 ± 2.2 and 8.6 ± 1.9 cmH(2) O, DPMaxC 17.2 ± 1.8 and 29 ± 1.2 cmH(2) O, BC 0.7 ± 0.1 and 0.8 ± 0.1 ml, FDO 1.9 ± 0.2/min and 1.9 ± 0.2/min (P < 0.001). Pregabalin and lamotrigine may represent novel alternative treatments of NDO. Clinical trials remain to be performed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Modifying factors in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Shoji; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Ryohei; Imaida, Katsumi

    1983-01-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is a potent carcinogen in the urinary bladder of animals. The BBN model of bladder cancer is an excellent model of human urinary bladder cancer and has already led to a greater knowledge of its pathogenesis. In our studies, histogenesis and morphological characteristics of BBN urinary bladder cancer were analyzed in different animal species such as rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs and also in different rat strains. Papillary or nodular hyperplas...

  13. Bladder dysfunction in Wolfram syndrome is highly prevalent and progresses to megacystis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wragg, Ruth; Dias, Renuka P; Barrett, Timothy; McCarthy, Liam

    2018-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare genetic defect in WFS1 or WSF2(CISD2). It includes diabetes mellitus and insipidis, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, but not bladder dysfunction. However, this has appeared a common finding in our national referral clinic, and we sought to quantify this problem. Data were collected from a multidisciplinary team managing all Wolfram patients in the UK. The following was analyzed: age, date of non-invasive urodynamics (NIU), symptoms, bladder capacity, voided volume, post-void residual and uroflow pattern. Bladder capacity was given as percentage predicted bladder capacity (PBC). Bladders were divided into normal, overactive (OAB), and underactive (UAB). Symptoms, bladder behavior, and genotyping were correlated. Data were expressed as median (interquartile range). Forty patients with Wolfram syndrome were identified, and 38 underwent NIU. This showed normal bladder function (n=4), OAB (n=9), UAB (n=25). Symptoms were present in only 11 children. The different patterns of bladder behavior (OAB vs. normal vs. UAB) were significantly associated with different %PBC (36 (29-59)% vs. 105 (93-233)% vs. 100 (77.5-337)%; pWolfram syndrome (~90%), but most children cope (symptoms ~30%). With time there is a significant progression to megacystis, which may represent an underlying neuropathic myogenic failure and is likely to require intervention in the future. Level II (National cohort study of prognosis). Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Elderly patient with atypical leiomyoma of the bladder presenting as flank pain: A case report

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    Mojtaba Ameli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Atypical leiomyoma is a rare tumor of the bladder whose correct diagnosis with imaging techniques and cystoscopy is difficult. This tumor is prevalent in females and more common in middle age. In the present study we report a rare case of atypical leiomyoma presenting as flank pain and history of recurrent urinary tract infections in an elderly female. Ultrasound (US showed that the wall of bladder was thickening and irregular, especially in the lower part of the bladder. US revealed hypoechoic solid mass with dimensions of 37 x 26 mm in the posterior bladder wall protruding into the bladder. Computed Tomography scan of the patient showed a mass with dimensions of 29 x 38 mm in the posterior wall of the bladder that infiltrated the mesenteric fat and also seemed to be invading the intestinal wall. According to the general condition and age of our patient, we removed all of the mass under spinal anesthesia by transurethral bladder resection (TURBT. Biopsy results showed atypical leiomyoma. About 6 months after the patient follow-up, no recurrence was observed and symptoms had completely resolved. According to the non-specificity of the imaging, of the age of presentation and of clinical manifestations of atypical leiomyoma differential diagnosis for bladder cancer it is recommended. Only with histopathologic findings, the diagnosis can be confirmed.

  15. Non-neurogenic SVZ-like niche in dolphins, mammals devoid of olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolisi, Roberta; Cozzi, Bruno; Bonfanti, Luca

    2017-08-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been implicated in brain plasticity and brain repair. In mammals, it is mostly restricted to specific brain regions and specific physiological functions. The function and evolutionary history of mammalian adult neurogenesis has been elusive so far. The largest neurogenic site in mammals (subventricular zone, SVZ) generates neurons destined to populate the olfactory bulb. The SVZ neurogenic activity appears to be related to the dependence of the species on olfaction since it occurs at high rates throughout life in animals strongly dependent on this function for their survival. Indeed, it dramatically decreases in humans, who do not depend so much on it. This study investigates whether the SVZ neurogenic site exists in mammals devoid of olfaction and olfactory brain structures, such as dolphins. Our results demonstate that a small SVZ-like region persists in these aquatic mammals. However, this region seems to have lost its neurogenic capabilities since neonatal stages. In addition, instead of the typical newly generated neuroblasts, some mature neurons were observed in the dolphin SVZ. Since cetaceans evolved from terrestrial ancestors, non-neurogenic SVZ may indicate extinction of adult neurogenesis in the absence of olfactory function, with the retention of an SVZ-like anatomical region either vestigial or of still unknown role.

  16. A study of bladder dysfunction in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Ritu Karoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus has been associated with an earlier onset and increased severity of urologic diseases that often result in debilitating urologic complications. Diabetic bladder dysfunction refers to a group of bladder symptoms occurring in patients with diabetes mellitus ranging from bladder over activity to impaired bladder contractility. Aim: Bladder dysfunction is an under evaluated issue in women with diabetes. Aim of our study was to investigate prevalence of bladder dysfunction and its relation with other chronic complications of diabetes in women with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: In a hospital-based cross sectional study, a cohort of women with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS were enrolled. We used the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUA-SI to assess the severity of LUTS and the Indevus Urgency Severity Scale (IUSS to assess presence of overactive bladder (OAB. Age-BMI- matched controls that did not have diabetes but had lower urinary tract symptoms were also studied and compared with women with type 2 diabetes. Urodynamic evaluation was done in willing patients. Results: LUTS attributable to bladder dysfunction were reported in 67% of women with type 2 diabetes after exclusion of other causes. Out of them, 36% had moderate to severe LUTS (total AUA-SI score >7. Prevalence of OAB was 53%. Urodynamic evaluation revealed presence of stress urinary incontinence in 48% patients and changes of detrusor over activity and detrusor under activity in 23% and 11% patients, respectively. Among the chronic complications of diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, nephropathy, and presence of metabolic syndrome were significantly associated with moderate to severe LUTS and OAB. Conclusion: Bladder dysfunction is a highly prevalent complication in women with diabetes. Chronic complications of diabetes especially neuropathy, nephropathy, and presence of metabolic syndrome are

  17. Pathophysiology of the underactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Aizawa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underactive bladder (UAB, which has been described as a symptom complex suggestive of detrusor underactivity, is usually characterized by prolonged urination time with or without a sensation of incomplete bladder emptying, usually with hesitancy, reduced sensation on filling, and slow stream often with storage symptoms. Several causes such as aging, bladder outlet obstruction, diabetes mellitus, neurologic disorders, and nervous injury to the spinal cord, cauda equine, and peripheral pelvic nerve have been assumed to be responsible for the development of UAB. Several contributing factors have been suggested in the pathophysiology of UAB, including myogenic failure, efferent and/or afferent dysfunctions, and central nervous system dysfunction. In this review article, we have described relationships between individual contributing factors and the pathophysiology of UAB based on previous reports. However, many pathophysiological uncertainties still remain, which require more investigations using appropriate animal models.

  18. Tumour cell expansion in bladder epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.J. Rebel (Annemarie)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBladder cancer is common in western society. The major problem of patients with superficial bladder cancer is the high recurrence rate and multifocality of these tumours. In 70 % of the patients superficial bladder cancer recurs after local resection of the tumour within 15 years. The

  19. Bladder Dysfunction and Urinary Incontinence

    OpenAIRE

    F. faizi

    2009-01-01

      "nIn the name of God. Dear colleagues, ladies and gentlemen, it is a great honor to be here. Bladder dysfunction is serious enough to seek serious help. If you may know I am working in a private clinic which it is impossible to follow the patients so this lecture is based on unusual and rare cases who came to me. Bladder dysfunction (BD) is common among 30% of young and old people who are suffering from it, however it is more common in old ages. According to a research, women ...

  20. The effect of penile vibratory stimulation on male fertility potential, spasticity and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Læssøe, Line; Sønksen, J

    2005-01-01

    Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS).......Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS)....

  1. Blocking neurogenic inflammation for the treatment of acute disorders of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kate Marie; Turner, Renée Jade; Vink, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Classical inflammation is a well-characterized secondary response to many acute disorders of the central nervous system. However, in recent years, the role of neurogenic inflammation in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases has gained increasing attention, with a particular focus on its effects on modulation of the blood-brain barrier BBB. The neuropeptide substance P has been shown to increase blood-brain barrier permeability following acute injury to the brain and is associated with marked cerebral edema. Its release has also been shown to modulate classical inflammation. Accordingly, blocking substance P NK1 receptors may provide a novel alternative treatment to ameliorate the deleterious effects of neurogenic inflammation in the central nervous system. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of substance P and neurogenic inflammation in acute injury to the central nervous system following traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, and meningitis.

  2. Blocking Neurogenic Inflammation for the Treatment of Acute Disorders of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Marie Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical inflammation is a well-characterized secondary response to many acute disorders of the central nervous system. However, in recent years, the role of neurogenic inflammation in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases has gained increasing attention, with a particular focus on its effects on modulation of the blood-brain barrier BBB. The neuropeptide substance P has been shown to increase blood-brain barrier permeability following acute injury to the brain and is associated with marked cerebral edema. Its release has also been shown to modulate classical inflammation. Accordingly, blocking substance P NK1 receptors may provide a novel alternative treatment to ameliorate the deleterious effects of neurogenic inflammation in the central nervous system. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of substance P and neurogenic inflammation in acute injury to the central nervous system following traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, and meningitis.

  3. Unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation for neurogenic hypoventilation in Arnold Chiari malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Garg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Long- term ventilator dependence in patients with neurogenic hypoventilation is associated with significant morbidity and restricts mobility. Diaphragmatic pacing by phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS is a viable alternative. This is a case report of patient with Arnold-Chiari malformation with extensive syrinx who had neurogenic hypoventilation during sleep even after foramen magnum decompression and resolution of the syrinx. Unilateral PNS was done using spinal cord stimulator. With intermittent stimulation for 8 h while asleep, patient could be weaned off the ventilator completely. At 2 years follow- up, patient is ambulant and has returned to his routine activities. PNS is a good treatment tool in patients with neurogenic hypoventilation. Spinal cord stimulator can be used with optimal results. This is first such reported case of using spinal cord stimulator for PNS from India.

  4. Laparoscopic partial cystectomy for urachal and bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose R. Colombo Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report our initial experiences with laparoscopic partial cystectomy for urachal and bladder malignancy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between March 2002 and October 2004, laparoscopic partial cystectomy was performed in 6 cases at 3 institutions; 3 cases were urachal adenocarcinomas and the remaining 3 cases were bladder transitional cell carcinomas. All patients were male, with a median age of 55 years (45-72 years. Gross hematuria was the presenting symptom in all patients, and diagnosis was established with trans-urethral resection bladder tumor in 2 patients and by means of cystoscopic biopsy in the remaining 4 patients. Laparoscopic partial cystectomy was performed using the transperitoneal approach under cystoscopic guidance. In each case, the surgical specimen was removed intact entrapped in an impermeable bag. One patient with para-ureteral diverticulum transitional cell carcinoma required concomitant ureteral reimplantation. RESULTS: All six procedures were completed laparoscopically without open conversion. The median operating time was 110 minutes (90-220 with a median estimated blood loss of 70 mL (50-100. Frozen section evaluations of bladder margins were routinely obtained and were negative for cancer in all cases. The median hospital stay was 2.5 days (2-4 and the duration of catheterization was 7 days. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Final histopathology confirmed urachal adenocarcinoma in 3 cases and bladder transitional cell carcinoma in 3 cases. At a median follow-up of 28.5 months (range: 26 to 44 months, there was no evidence of recurrent disease as evidenced by radiologic or cystoscopic evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic partial cystectomy in carefully selected patients with urachal and bladder cancer is feasible and safe, offering a promising and minimally invasive alternative for these patients.

  5. Measurement of lower limb blood flow in patients with neurogenic claudication using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, G F; Ashcroft, G P; Roditi, G H; Hutchison, J D; Evans, N T; Mikecz, P; Chaloner, F; Dodd, M; Leonard, C; Porter, R W

    1995-02-15

    Ten subjects (seven with neurogenic claudication and three control subjects) underwent examination of lower limb muscle blood flow before and after exercise using positron emission tomography. To investigate the hypothesis that lower limb muscle ischemia was the origin of symptoms in neurogenic claudication. Patients with neurogenic claudication secondary to spinal stenosis experience lower limb discomfort after exercise similar to that of ischemic claudication. However, they do not have clinical evidence of peripheral vascular disease. The authors postulated that the lower limb discomfort in patients with neurogenic claudication may arise from muscle ischemia due to inadequate dilatation of arterioles in response to exercise, this itself arising secondary to sympathetic dysfunction due to spinal stenosis. Using O15-labeled water and positron emission tomography measured thigh and leg muscle blood flow response to exercise bilaterally in seven patients with unilateral neurogenic claudication and three control subjects were measured. The average values obtained for mid-thigh and mid-calf muscle perfusion at rest were 2.57 ml/min/100 g tissue (2.23-3.90) and 2.39 ml/min/100 g tissue (2.03-3.46), respectively. The average values obtained from mid-thigh and mid-calf perfusion after exercise were 4.41 ml/min/100 g tissue (2.8-6.0) and 4.87 ml/min/100 g (2.2-11.7). We found no difference in muscle perfusion between symptomatic and asymptomatic limbs in this group of patients. These studies suggest that muscle ischemia is not the origin of symptoms in most patients with neurogenic claudication.

  6. Autonomic nervous system activity assessement by heart rate variability in experimental bladder outlet obstruction 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Dobrek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A syndrome with urgency, with or without associated urine incontinence and usually accompanied by higher urinary frequency and nocturia has been named “overactive bladder; OAB”. OAB is an entity with complex pathophysiology, involving both myogenic and neurogenic (afferent / efferent bladder innervation disturbances. OAB symptoms accompany benign prostatic hypertrophy - BPH (“obstructive OAB”. The aim of the study was to estimate the autonomic nervous system activity (ANS in the experimental bladder outlet obstruction (BOO which was an animal model of the human BPH. The study was conducted using 30 female rats, divided into two groups: BOO animals (n=15, with surgically induced BOO (by partial ligation of the proximal urethra and control ones (n=15, which underwent sham procedure (without urethral ligation. Two weeks after the surgery, in both groups, ANS activity was estimated using time- and spectral analysis of the heart rate variability recordings. The bladder overactivity in BOO animals was confirmed using urodynamic recordings and bladder histological assessment, juxtaposed against the results of the control group. The key finding of our study was the development of autonomic disturbances in bladder outlet obstruction (BOO rats. Our study revealed that BOO animals were characterised by diminished rMSSD and spectral HRV parameters: TP, LF and HF, in comparison with the control group. The normalised nLF and nHF parameters did not differ significantly in both groups, although slight changes in the nLF (increased and nHF (decreased were noted in BOO group. The absolute VLF value was almost the same in both studied populations, however, the percentage part of this component in the appropriate HRV spectrum differed considerably in both studied groups. In BOO animals, VLF percentage amounted to about 90�20whereas in control animals this parameter reached only about 53�0of the total power spectrum.Thus, to sum up, our findings suggest

  7. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  8. Leiomyoma of the bladder and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabbaj, N.; Dafiri, R.; Imani, F.; Benslimane, L.; Benchekroun, A.

    1998-01-01

    Unlike epithelial tumors, connective tissue tumors are uncommon, representing only 3 % of all bladder tumors. Leiomyoma of the bladder is the most frequent non-epithelial benign tumor of the bladder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MIR) is highly useful for diagnostic purposes and to determine the degree of extension. Only few reports of sonographic findings have been reported for leiomyoma of the bladder. The tumor usually develops within the bladder. Extra-vesicular formations have also been reported as well as a few intramural localizations. The characteristic feature is the absence of mucosal involvement. We analyzed the MRI findings in a case of leiomyoma of the bladder with intra and extra-vesicular development inflammatory reaction of the bladder wall and uterine adherences in a woman with a past history of chronic cystitis. The role of diagnostic MRI is discussed. (author)

  9. Targeting classical but not neurogenic inflammation reduces peritumoral oedema in secondary brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kate M; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Vink, Robert; Ghabriel, Mounir N

    2012-09-15

    Dexamethasone, the standard treatment for peritumoral brain oedema, inhibits classical inflammation. Neurogenic inflammation, which acts via substance P (SP), has been implicated in vasogenic oedema in animal models of CNS injury. SP is elevated within and outside CNS tumours. This study investigated the efficacy of NK1 receptor antagonists, which block SP, compared with dexamethasone treatment, in a rat model of tumorigenesis. Dexamethasone reverted normal brain water content and reduced Evans blue and albumin extravasation, while NK1 antagonists did not ameliorate oedema formation. We conclude that classical inflammation rather than neurogenic inflammation drives peritumoral oedema in this brain tumour model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  11. Bladder carcinoma. Apport MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, C.; Spittler, G.; Jacqmin, D.; Morel, M.

    1991-01-01

    Bladder carcinoma is the second most commun cause of urogenital tumor. It is suspected by abdominal ultrasound and prouved by cystoscopy with biopsy. At present, MR Imaging is the most accurate diagnostic modality for loco-regional staging. Urography is still useful to appreciate urinary tract [fr

  12. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    promote angiogenesis and neurogenesis of the regenerated organs. The choice of the scaffold and the type of cells is a crucial and fundamental step in regenerative medicine. In this review article, we demonstrated these three crucial factors of bladder tissue engineering, with the pros and cons of each scaffold type and.

  13. Urinary Bladder Dysfunction in Transgenic Sickle Cell Disease Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudino, Mário Angelo; Leiria, Luiz Osório Silveira; da Silva, Fábio Henrique; Alexandre, Eduardo Costa; Renno, Andre; Mónica, Fabiola Zakia; de Nucci, Gilberto; Fertrin, Kleber Yotsumoto; Antunes, Edson; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Franco-Penteado, Carla Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Urological complications associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), include nocturia, enuresis, urinary infections and urinary incontinence. However, scientific evidence to ascertain the underlying cause of the lower urinary tract symptoms in SCD is lacking. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate urinary function, in vivo and ex vivo, in the Berkeley SCD murine model (SS). Urine output was measured in metabolic cage for both wild type and SS mice (25-30 g). Bladder strips and urethra rings were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. In isolated detrusor smooth muscle (DSM), relaxant response to mirabegron and isoproterenol (1nM-10μM) and contractile response to (carbachol (CCh; 1 nM-100μM), KCl (1 mM-300mM), CaCl2 (1μM-100mM), α,β-methylene ATP (1, 3 and 10 μM) and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1-32 Hz) were measured. Phenylephrine (Phe; 10nM-100μM) was used to evaluate the contraction mechanism in the urethra rings. Cystometry and histomorphometry were also performed in the urinary bladder. SS mice present a reduced urine output and incapacity to produce typical bladder contractions and bladder emptying (ex vivo), compared to control animals. In DSM, relaxation in response to a selective β3-adrenergic agonist (mirabegron) and to a non-selective β-adrenergic (isoproterenol) agonist were lower in SS mice. Additionally, carbachol, α, β-methylene ATP, KCl, extracellular Ca2+ and electrical-field stimulation promoted smaller bladder contractions in SS group. Urethra contraction induced by phenylephrine was markedly reduced in SS mice. Histological analyses of SS mice bladder revealed severe structural abnormalities, such as reductions in detrusor thickness and bladder volume, and cell infiltration. Taken together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that SS mice display features of urinary bladder dysfunction, leading to impairment in urinary continence, which may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the enuresis and infections

  14. Urinary Bladder Dysfunction in Transgenic Sickle Cell Disease Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Angelo Claudino

    Full Text Available Urological complications associated with sickle cell disease (SCD, include nocturia, enuresis, urinary infections and urinary incontinence. However, scientific evidence to ascertain the underlying cause of the lower urinary tract symptoms in SCD is lacking.Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate urinary function, in vivo and ex vivo, in the Berkeley SCD murine model (SS.Urine output was measured in metabolic cage for both wild type and SS mice (25-30 g. Bladder strips and urethra rings were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. In isolated detrusor smooth muscle (DSM, relaxant response to mirabegron and isoproterenol (1nM-10μM and contractile response to (carbachol (CCh; 1 nM-100μM, KCl (1 mM-300mM, CaCl2 (1μM-100mM, α,β-methylene ATP (1, 3 and 10 μM and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1-32 Hz were measured. Phenylephrine (Phe; 10nM-100μM was used to evaluate the contraction mechanism in the urethra rings. Cystometry and histomorphometry were also performed in the urinary bladder.SS mice present a reduced urine output and incapacity to produce typical bladder contractions and bladder emptying (ex vivo, compared to control animals. In DSM, relaxation in response to a selective β3-adrenergic agonist (mirabegron and to a non-selective β-adrenergic (isoproterenol agonist were lower in SS mice. Additionally, carbachol, α, β-methylene ATP, KCl, extracellular Ca2+ and electrical-field stimulation promoted smaller bladder contractions in SS group. Urethra contraction induced by phenylephrine was markedly reduced in SS mice. Histological analyses of SS mice bladder revealed severe structural abnormalities, such as reductions in detrusor thickness and bladder volume, and cell infiltration.Taken together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that SS mice display features of urinary bladder dysfunction, leading to impairment in urinary continence, which may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the enuresis and infections

  15. Associations between volume changes and spatial dose metrics for the urinary bladder during local versus pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Moiseenko, Vitali; Hopper, Austin; Pettersson, Niclas Johan; Thor, Maria; Knopp, Rick; Deasy, Joseph O; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Einck, John

    2017-06-01

    Inter-fractional variation in urinary bladder volumes during the course of radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer causes deviations between planned and delivered doses. This study compared planned versus daily cone-beam CT (CBCT)-based spatial bladder dose distributions, for prostate cancer patients receiving local prostate treatment (local treatment) versus prostate including pelvic lymph node irradiation (pelvic treatment). Twenty-seven patients (N = 15 local treatment; N = 12 pelvic treatment) were treated using daily image-guided RT (1.8 Gy@43-45 fx), adhering to a full bladder/empty rectum protocol. For each patient, 9-10 CBCTs were registered to the planning CT, using the clinically applied translations. The urinary bladder was manually segmented on each CBCT, 3 mm inner shells were generated, and semi and quadrant sectors were created using axial/coronal cuts. Planned and delivered DVH metrics were compared across patients and between the two groups of treatment (t-test, p bladder volume variations and the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the bladder and its sectors were evaluated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r s ). Bladder volumes varied considerably during RT (coefficient of variation: 16-58%). The population-averaged planned and delivered DVH metrics were not significantly different at any dose level. Larger treatment bladder volumes resulted in increased absolute volume of the posterior/inferior bladder sector receiving intermediate-high doses, in both groups. The superior bladder sector received less dose with larger bladder volumes for local treatments (r s  ± SD: -0.47 ± 0.32), but larger doses for pelvic treatments (r s  ± SD: 0.74 ± 0.24). Substantial bladder volume changes during the treatment course occurred even though patients were treated under a full bladder/daily image-guided protocol. Larger bladder volumes resulted in less bladder wall spared at the posterior-inferior sector, regardless the

  16. Neurogenic detrusor overactivity is associated with decreased expression and function of the large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+-activated K(+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiril L Hristov

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from a variety of neurological diseases such as spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis often develop neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO, which currently lacks a universally effective therapy. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NDO is associated with changes in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM large conductance Ca(2+-activated K(+ (BK channel expression and function. DSM tissue samples from 33 patients were obtained during open bladder surgeries. NDO patients were clinically characterized preoperatively with pressure-flow urodynamics demonstrating detrusor overactivity, in the setting of a clinically relevant neurological condition. Control patients did not have overactive bladder and did not have a clinically relevant neurological disease. We conducted quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR, perforated patch-clamp electrophysiology on freshly-isolated DSM cells, and functional studies on DSM contractility. qPCR experiments revealed that DSM samples from NDO patients showed decreased BK channel mRNA expression in comparison to controls. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated reduced whole cell and transient BK currents (TBKCs in freshly-isolated DSM cells from NDO patients. Functional studies on DSM contractility showed that spontaneous phasic contractions had a decreased sensitivity to iberiotoxin, a selective BK channel inhibitor, in DSM strips isolated from NDO patients. These results reveal the novel finding that NDO is associated with decreased DSM BK channel expression and function leading to increased DSM excitability and contractility. BK channel openers or BK channel gene transfer could be an alternative strategy to control NDO. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate the value of BK channel opening drugs or gene therapies for NDO treatment and to identify any possible adverse effects.

  17. Properties of doublecortin-(DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex compared to the neurogenic dentate gyrus of adult mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Klempin

    Full Text Available The piriform cortex receives input from the olfactory bulb and (via the entorhinal cortex sends efferents to the hippocampus, thereby connecting the two canonical neurogenic regions of the adult rodent brain. Doublecortin (DCX is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that is expressed transiently in the course of adult neurogenesis. Interestingly, the adult piriform cortex, which is usually considered non-neurogenic (even though some reports exist that state otherwise, also contains an abundant population of DCX-positive cells. We asked how similar these cells would be to DCX-positive cells in the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Using BAC-generated transgenic mice that express GFP under the DCX promoter, we studied DCX-expression and electrophysiological properties of DCX-positive cells in the mouse piriform cortex in comparison with the dentate gyrus. While one class of cells in the piriform cortex indeed showed features similar to newly generated immature granule neurons, the majority of DCX cells in the piriform cortex was mature and revealed large Na+ currents and multiple action potentials. Furthermore, when proliferative activity was assessed, we found that all DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex were strictly postmitotic, suggesting that no DCX-positive "neuroblasts" exist here as they do in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that DCX in the piriform cortex marks a unique population of postmitotic neurons with a subpopulation that retains immature characteristics associated with synaptic plasticity. DCX is thus, per se, no marker of neurogenesis but might be associated more broadly with plasticity.

  18. The ‘Ventral Organs’ of Pycnogonida (Arthropoda) Are Neurogenic Niches of Late Embryonic and Post-Embryonic Nervous System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneis, Georg; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Early neurogenesis in arthropods has been in the focus of numerous studies, its cellular basis, spatio-temporal dynamics and underlying genetic network being by now comparably well characterized for representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, hexapods and crustaceans. By contrast, neurogenesis during late embryonic and/or post-embryonic development has received less attention, especially in myriapods and chelicerates. Here, we apply (i) immunolabeling, (ii) histology and (iii) scanning electron microscopy to study post-embryonic ventral nerve cord development in Pseudopallene sp., a representative of the sea spiders (Pycnogonida), the presumable sister group of the remaining chelicerates. During early post-embryonic development, large neural stem cells give rise to additional ganglion cell material in segmentally paired invaginations in the ventral ectoderm. These ectodermal cell regions – traditionally designated as ‘ventral organs’ – detach from the surface into the interior and persist as apical cell clusters on the ventral ganglion side. Each cluster is a post-embryonic neurogenic niche that features a tiny central cavity and initially still houses larger neural stem cells. The cluster stays connected to the underlying ganglionic somata cortex via an anterior and a posterior cell stream. Cell proliferation remains restricted to the cluster and streams, and migration of newly produced cells along the streams seems to account for increasing ganglion cell numbers in the cortex. The pycnogonid cluster-stream-systems show striking similarities to the life-long neurogenic system of decapod crustaceans, and due to their close vicinity to glomerulus-like neuropils, we consider their possible involvement in post-embryonic (perhaps even adult) replenishment of olfactory neurons – as in decapods. An instance of a potentially similar post-embryonic/adult neurogenic system in the arthropod outgroup Onychophora is discussed. Additionally, we document two transient

  19. Bladder wall biomechanics: A comprehensive study on fresh porcine urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sami Jokandan, Maryam; Ajalloueian, Fatemeh; Edinger, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    on viscoelastic properties of fresh porcine urinary BW. Three testing modes including Uniaxial tensile, Ball-burst (BB) and Dynamic Mechanical Analyses (DMA) were applied in parallel. Uniaxial tests were applied to study how different circumferential and longitudinal cut-outs of lateral region of BW behave under......, the anisotropic behavior of bladder was evident at strain loads higher than 200%. According to DMA, storage modulus was found to be consistently higher than loss modulus in both directions, revealing the elasticity of the BW. The stress-strain curves of both uniaxial and BB tests showed similar trends. However...

  20. Modifying factors in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Shoji; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Ryohei; Imaida, Katsumi

    1983-01-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is a potent carcinogen in the urinary bladder of animals. The BBN model of bladder cancer is an excellent model of human urinary bladder cancer and has already led to a greater knowledge of its pathogenesis. In our studies, histogenesis and morphological characteristics of BBN urinary bladder cancer were analyzed in different animal species such as rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs and also in different rat strains. Papillary or nodular hyperplasia (PN hyperplasia) is found to be a preneoplastic lesion of the rat urinary bladder. Therefore, the promoting and inhibitory effects of various chemicals in two-stage urinary bladder carcinogenesis were judged by measuring PN hyperplasia in rats. Dose-dependent and organ-specific effects of the urinary bladder promoter, saccharin, in the induction of PN hyperplasia were shown in rats after initiation by BBN. The promoting effect of saccharin was seen more clearly in the urinary bladder of rats after potent initiation. A strain difference in susceptibility of the urinary bladder to the promoter was also shown. These results suggest that the above various factors may also have modifying activities on urinary bladder carcinogenesis in man. PMID:6832095

  1. Exogenous glycosaminoglycans coat damaged bladder surfaces in experimentally damaged mouse bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurst Robert E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstital cystitis is often treated with exogenous glycosaminoglycans such as heparin, chondroitin sulphate (Uracyst, hyaluronate (Cystistat or the semi-synthetic pentosan polysulphate (Elmiron. The mechanism of action is presumed to be due to a coating of the bladder surface to replace the normally present chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate lost as a result of the disease. This study used fluorescent labelled chondroitin sulphate to track the distribution of glycosaminoglycans administered intravesically to mouse bladder that had been damaged on the surface. Methods The surfaces of mouse bladders were damaged by 3 mechanisms – trypsin, 10 mM HCl, and protamine sulphate. Texas Red-labeled chondroitin sulphate was instilled into the bladders of animals with damaged bladders and controls instilled only with saline. Bladders were harvested, frozen, and sectioned for examination by fluorescence. Results The normal mouse bladder bound a very thin layer of the labelled chondroitin sulphate on the luminal surface. Trypsin- and HCl-damaged bladders bound the labelled chondroitin sulphate extensively on the surface with little penetration into the bladder muscle. Protamine produced less overt damage, and much less labelling was seen, presumably due to loss of the label as it complexed with the protamine intercalated into the bladder surface. Conclusion Glycosaminoglycan administered intravesically does bind to damaged bladder. Given that the changes seen following bladder damage resemble those seen naturally in interstitial cystitis, the mechanisms proposed for the action of these agents is consistent with a coating of damaged bladder.

  2. Automatic staging of bladder cancer on CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, Sankeerth S.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Cha, Kenny H.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Weizer, Alon; Alva, Ajjai; Paramagul, Chintana; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Correct staging of bladder cancer is crucial for the decision of neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment and minimizing the risk of under- or over-treatment. Subjectivity and variability of clinicians in utilizing available diagnostic information may lead to inaccuracy in staging bladder cancer. An objective decision support system that merges the information in a predictive model based on statistical outcomes of previous cases and machine learning may assist clinicians in making more accurate and consistent staging assessments. In this study, we developed a preliminary method to stage bladder cancer. With IRB approval, 42 bladder cancer cases with CTU scans were collected from patient files. The cases were classified into two classes based on pathological stage T2, which is the decision threshold for neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment (i.e. for stage >=T2) clinically. There were 21 cancers below stage T2 and 21 cancers at stage T2 or above. All 42 lesions were automatically segmented using our auto-initialized cascaded level sets (AI-CALS) method. Morphological features were extracted, which were selected and merged by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. A leave-one-case-out resampling scheme was used to train and test the classifier using the 42 lesions. The classification accuracy was quantified using the area under the ROC curve (Az). The average training Az was 0.97 and the test Az was 0.85. The classifier consistently selected the lesion volume, a gray level feature and a contrast feature. This predictive model shows promise for assisting in assessing the bladder cancer stage.

  3. Bladder cancer diagnosis during cystoscopy using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbergen, M. C. M.; van Swol, C. F. P.; Draga, R. O. P.; van Diest, P.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Stone, N.; Bosch, J. H. L. R.

    2009-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique that can be used to obtain specific molecular information of biological tissues. It has been used successfully to differentiate normal and pre-malignant tissue in many organs. The goal of this study is to determine the possibility to distinguish normal tissue from bladder cancer using this system. The endoscopic Raman system consists of a 6 Fr endoscopic probe connected to a 785nm diode laser and a spectral recording system. A total of 107 tissue samples were obtained from 54 patients with known bladder cancer during transurethral tumor resection. Immediately after surgical removal the samples were placed under the Raman probe and spectra were collected and stored for further analysis. The collected spectra were analyzed using multivariate statistical methods. In total 2949 Raman spectra were recorded ex vivo from cold cup biopsy samples with 2 seconds integration time. A multivariate algorithm allowed differentiation of normal and malignant tissue with a sensitivity and specificity of 78,5% and 78,9% respectively. The results show the possibility of discerning normal from malignant bladder tissue by means of Raman spectroscopy using a small fiber based system. Despite the low number of samples the results indicate that it might be possible to use this technique to grade identified bladder wall lesions during endoscopy.

  4. Impact of Methadone on Cisplatin Treatment of Bladder Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Marta; Schultze-Seemann, Susanne; Kuckuck, Irina; Katzenwadel, Arndt; Wolf, Philipp

    2018-03-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for advanced bladder cancer. Since many tumor cells show inherent or acquired cisplatin resistance, research is needed to improve the therapeutic efficacy. Since the analgesic methadone is discussed as being a sensitizer for chemotherapy, we tested its effects on the cisplatin treatment of bladder cancer cells. T24 and HT-1376 bladder cancer cells were incubated with cisplatin in combination with methadone. Cytotoxicity was examined using the WST-1 viability assay and induction of apoptosis was analyzed via phase-contrast microscopy, flow cytometry, and western blot analysis. Methadone was shown to enhance the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin on T24 cells based on the induction of apoptosis. In contrast, HT-1376 cells were identified as non-responders to methadone. Methadone could act as a chemosensitizer in the future treatment of advanced bladder cancer. Further research is needed to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  5. [Analysis of pudendal nerve somatosensory evoked potentials in the diagnosis of neurogenic impotence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas Casado, J; Chamorro, M V; Samblas García, R; Esteban Fuertes, M; Aristizábal Agudelo, J M; Delgado Martín, J A; Blázquez Izquierdo, J; Resel Estévez, L

    1997-06-01

    To determine the utility of the somatosensorial evoked potentials of the pudental nerve in the diagnosis of neurogenic impotence. 129 patients with impotence were evaluated by physical examination and neuroandrologic profile. The neuroandrologic profile was assessed by bulbocavernous electromyography, determination of S2-S4 evoked potentials, analysis of the somatosensorial potentials of the pudendal nerve, cavernous smooth muscle electromyography (SPACE), sympathetic skin response and cystometry. The patients with a neurologic lesion presented a significantly longer latency time of the somatosensorial potentials than those with no neurologic lesion. The sensitivity of the somatosensorial potentials was 63% and the specificity was 98%. The sensitivity could be enhanced without significantly lowering specificity by taking 49 msec as the upper limit of normal values in latency time. The determination of the voluntary anal control in the diagnosis of neurogenic impotence was found to have a high specificity (93%), but a low sensitivity (42%). The determination of the somatosensorial potentials, unlike other techniques, could allow diagnosis of lesions of the suprasacral inneveration in the evaluation of neurogenic impotence. The evoked somatosensorial potentials of the pudendal nerve and physical examination have the inconvenience of their low sensitivity in regard to the diagnosis of neurogenic lesion in impotence, mainly because some conditions only affect the peripheral autonomic innervation and the somatic element is spared.

  6. [A swollen, painless calf caused by neurogenic muscle (pseudo)-hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Zwarts, M.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Neurogenic muscle (pseudo) hypertrophy of the calf was diagnosed in a 60-year-old man, who presented with chronic, painless and unilateral calf enlargement caused by a chronic S1 radiculopathy due to a lumbar disc hernia in the L5-S1 interspace. The differential diagnosis of a swelling of the calf

  7. Distribution of affected muscles and degree of neurogenic lesion in patients with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronic, Ivana; Nikolic, Dejan; Cirovic, Dragana; Cvjeticanin, Suzana; Knezevic, Tatjana; Raicevic, Mirjana; Brdar, Radivoj; Dzamic, Dragana; Janic, Nenad; Golubovic, Zoran

    2011-12-31

    Patients with spina bifida in the lumbosacral region usually have various degrees of motor and sensory dysfunctions of the lower extremities and anal sphincter. The aim of our study was to evaluate the distribution and differences in frequencies of affected muscles, number of affected muscles and degree of neurogenic lesion between patients with spina bifida occulta (SBO) and spina bifida aperta (SBA). In 100 patients with SB, 6 muscles in the lower limbs were separately analysed. Due to the number of affected muscles, we evaluated 5 groups of patients: with 1 affected muscle, 2 affected muscles, 3 affected muscles, 4 affected muscles and 5 affected muscles. Three degrees of neurogenic lesions were assessed: mild, moderate and severe. The tibialis anterior muscle was most frequently affected in SB patients. The outer anal sphincter was frequently affected in the group of SBA patients. Single muscle affection is frequent in the group of patients with SBO, while in the group of patients with SBA, 4 muscles were significantly frequently affected. The great majority of patients (45.46%) with affected outer anal sphincter (OAS) in the group of SBO were without affection of other muscles, while for the SBA group it was for every third patient. Mild neurogenic lesion was significantly frequent in SBO patients, while severe form was significantly frequent in SBA patients. Patients with SBO usually present with mild to moderate clinical presentation, while multiple root involvement and severe degree of neurogenic lesion is associated more frequently with SBA.

  8. Central neurogenic hyperventilation related to post-hypoxic thalamic lesion in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Gençpinar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Central neurogenic hyperventilation (CNH is a rare clinical condition, whose mechanism is still unclear. Here, we report a 3-year-old male patient, who had bilateral thalamic, putaminal and globus pallideal infarction resulted in CNH without brainstem involvement. This case may illustrate a possible role for the thalamus in regulating ventilation.

  9. Neurogenic pulmonary edema due to ventriculo-atrial shunt dysfunction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ana Sofia; Menezes, Sónia; Silva, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary edema is caused by the accumulation of fluid within the air spaces and the interstitium of the lung. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of pulmonary edema following a significant central nervous system insult. It may be a less-recognized consequence of raised intracranial pressure due to obstructive hydrocephalus by blocked ventricular shunts. It usually appears within minutes to hours after the injury and has a high mortality rate if not recognized and treated appropriately. We report a patient with acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to ventriculo-atrial shunt dysfunction, proposed to urgent surgery for placement of external ventricular drainage, who presented with neurogenic pulmonary edema preoperatively. She was anesthetized and supportive treatment was instituted. At the end of the procedure the patient showed no clinical signs of respiratory distress, as prompt reduction in intracranial pressure facilitated the regression of the pulmonary edema. This report addresses the importance of recognition of neurogenic pulmonary edema as a possible perioperative complication resulting from an increase in intracranial pressure. If not recognized and treated appropriately, neurogenic pulmonary edema can lead to acute cardiopulmonary failure with global hypoperfusion and hypoxia. Therefore, awareness of and knowledge about the occurrence, clinical presentation and treatment are essential. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute urodynamic effects of posterior tibial nerve stimulation on neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with MS.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fjorback, M.V.; Rey, F. van; Pal, F. van der; Rijkhoff, N.J.M.; Petersen, T.; Heesakkers, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve could suppress detrusor contractions in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. METHODS: Two successive slow-fill cystometries (16 ml/min) were

  11. Impaired Na+/K+-ATPase Function in Patients with Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) is abundantly expressed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells, which is necessary for tight junction formation. The tight junction is an urothelial barrier between urine and the underlying bladder. Impairment of tight junctions allows migration of urinary solutes in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). We evaluated NKA expression and activity in bladder samples from patients with IC/PBS. The study group consisted of 85 patients with IC/PBS, and the control group consisted of 20 volunteers. Bladder biopsies were taken from both groups. We determined the expression and distribution of NKA using NKA activity assays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescent staining. The protein levels and activity of NKA in the study group were significantly lower than the control group (1.08 ± 0.06 vs. 2.39 ± 0.29 and 0.60 ± 0.04 vs. 1.81 ± 0.18 µmol ADP/mg protein/hour, respectively; P < 0.05). Additionally, immunofluorescent staining for detection of CK7, a marker of the bladder urothelium, predominantly colocalized with NKA in patients in the study group. Our results demonstrated the expression and activity of NKA were decreased in bladder biopsies of patients with IC/PBS. These findings suggest that NKA function is impaired in the bladders from patients with IC/PBS. PMID:26839484

  12. Impaired Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Function in Patients with Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jane-Dar; Yang, Wen-Kai; Lee, Ming-Huei

    2016-02-01

    Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) is abundantly expressed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells, which is necessary for tight junction formation. The tight junction is an urothelial barrier between urine and the underlying bladder. Impairment of tight junctions allows migration of urinary solutes in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). We evaluated NKA expression and activity in bladder samples from patients with IC/PBS. The study group consisted of 85 patients with IC/PBS, and the control group consisted of 20 volunteers. Bladder biopsies were taken from both groups. We determined the expression and distribution of NKA using NKA activity assays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescent staining. The protein levels and activity of NKA in the study group were significantly lower than the control group (1.08 ± 0.06 vs. 2.39 ± 0.29 and 0.60 ± 0.04 vs. 1.81 ± 0.18 µmol ADP/mg protein/hour, respectively; P < 0.05). Additionally, immunofluorescent staining for detection of CK7, a marker of the bladder urothelium, predominantly colocalized with NKA in patients in the study group. Our results demonstrated the expression and activity of NKA were decreased in bladder biopsies of patients with IC/PBS. These findings suggest that NKA function is impaired in the bladders from patients with IC/PBS.

  13. Benefits and limitations of animal models in partial bladder outlet obstruction for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitta, Takeya; Kanno, Yukiko; Chiba, Hiroki; Higuchi, Madoka; Ouchi, Mifuka; Togo, Mio; Moriya, Kimihiko; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2018-01-01

    The functions of the lower urinary tract have been investigated for more than a century. Lower urinary tract symptoms, such as incomplete bladder emptying, weak urine stream, daytime urinary frequency, urgency, urge incontinence and nocturia after partial bladder outlet obstruction, is a frequent cause of benign prostatic hyperplasia in aging men. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The use of animal models is absolutely imperative for understanding the pathophysiological processes involved in bladder dysfunction. Surgical induction has been used to study lower urinary tract functions of numerous animal species, such as pig, dog, rabbit, guinea pig, rat and mouse, of both sexes. Several morphological and functional modifications under partial bladder outlet obstruction have not only been observed in the bladder, but also in the central nervous system. Understanding the changes of the lower urinary tract functions induced by partial bladder outlet obstruction would also contribute to appropriate drug development for treating these pathophysiological conditions. In the present review, we discuss techniques for creating partial bladder outlet obstruction, the characteristics of several species, as well as issues of each model, and their translational value. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  14. Feasibility and effectiveness of image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butros, Selim Reha; McCarthy, Colin James; Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Shenoy-Bhangle, Anuradha S; Arellano, Ronald S

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the indications, technique, results, and complications of image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder. This retrospective study included 15 patients (10 male, 5 female) who underwent image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder between January 1999 and December 2013. The medical records, imaging studies, procedural details, and long-term follow-up of each patient were reviewed in detail to assess the feasibility of percutaneous bladder biopsy. Ten patients had focal bladder masses and 5 patients had asymmetric or diffuse bladder wall thickening. Eleven patients had either negative or unsatisfactory cystoscopies prior to the biopsy. Percutaneous biopsies were performed under computed tomography guidance in 12 patients and ultrasound in 3 patients. All procedures were technically successful and there were no procedural complications. Malignancy was confirmed in 8 patients, among whom 6 had transitional cell carcinoma, 1 cervical cancer, and 1 prostate cancer metastasis. Seven patients had a benign diagnosis, including 3 that were later confirmed by pathology following surgery and 2 patients with a false-negative result. The overall sensitivity was 80% and accuracy was 87%. Image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder is a safe and technically feasible procedure with a high sensitivity and accuracy rate. Although image-guided bladder biopsy is an uncommon procedure, it should be considered in selected cases when more traditional methods of tissue sampling are either not possible or fail to identify abnormalities detected by cross-sectional imaging.

  15. A Rare Complication of Transurethral Resection of the Prostate: Explosion of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    İbrahim Buldu; Tuna Karatağ; Mehmet Kaynar; M. Okan İstanbulluoğlu

    2015-01-01

    Monopolar and bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate is currently the gold standard modality in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic enlargement. A rare complication of transurethral resection is the explosion of the bladder as may occur during resection of the prostate. The etiology of explosion is thought to be a result of ignition due to mixture of oxygen and hydrogen gas occurring during the resection under increased pressure of the bladd...

  16. The effects of visual fluorescence marking induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid for endoscopic diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniltchenko, Dmitri I.; Koenig, Frank; Schnorr, Dietmar; Valdman, Alexander; Al-Shukri, Salman; Loening, Stefan A.

    2003-10-01

    During cystoscopy procedure, fluorescence diagnostics induced by 5-ALA improves visual detection of the bladder cancer. Macroscopic ALA-fluorescence allows visualizing of small flat tumors, carcinoma in situ, true neoplasm margins and dysplasias of the bladder. Following ALA instillation, cystoscopy has been performed under both standard and blue light illumination. Totally, 153 biopsies have been carried out at 53 patients with suspicion of bladder cancer. The results were compared to ALA-fluorescence data. In 13% of the patients, bladder cancer and dysplasia were found out in addition, due to red fluorescence. The sensitivity and specificity of ALA-fluorescence technique aggregated 96% and 52% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of 5-ALA-fluorescent detection exceeded standard endoscopy under white light on 20%. The new method does not exclude a false positive and a false negative fluorescent luminescence. The ALA-based fluorescence detection system enhances the diagnosis of malignant/dysplastic bladder lesions significantly.

  17. A new technique of laparoscopic implantation of stimulation electrode to the pudendal nerve for treatment of refractory fecal incontinence and/or overactive bladder with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possover, Marc

    2014-01-01

    To show a new technique of laparoscopic implantation of electrodes for stimulation of the pudendal nerve for treatment of fecal incontinence and/or overactive bladder with urinary incontinence. Step-by-step explanation of the technique using videos and pictures (educative video). Hyperactivity of the bladder with urinary incontinence, in particular the non-neurogenic form of the condition, but also fecal incontinence may affect millions of women worldwide without any comorbidities and in particular without any neurologic disorders or prolapsed organs. First-line conservative treatments do not always result in sufficient improvement of symptoms and are often associated with disabling adverse effects leading to treatment failure. Electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerves has emerged as an alternative and attractive treatment in refractory cases. A novel technique of implantation of an electrode to the pudendal nerve has been developed for treatment of fecal incontinence and of hyperactivity of the bladder with urinary incontinence. The laparoscopic approach is the only technique that enables placement of an electrode in direct contact with the endopelvic portion of the pudendal nerve within the protection of the pelvis. Laparoscopic transperitoneal implantation of a stimulation electrode to the endopelvic portion of the pudendal nerve. This technique of transperitoneal placement of an electrode to the endopelvic portion of the pudendal nerve is an effective, safe, and reproducible day procedure for treatment of intractable hyperactive bladder, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, and a combination of both forms of incontinence. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... chromosome for three tumors. Single locus alterations were detected in three tumors, while three other tumors revealed changes in two or more loci. In one tumor we found microsatellite instability in all five loci analyzed on chromosome 9. The alterations detected were either minor 2-base pair changes...... or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis....

  19. Neurogenic Potential of the Vestibular Nuclei and Behavioural Recovery Time Course in the Adult Cat Are Governed by the Nature of the Vestibular Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutheil, Sophie; Lacour, Michel; Tighilet, Brahim

    2011-01-01

    Functional and reactive neurogenesis and astrogenesis are observed in deafferented vestibular nuclei after unilateral vestibular nerve section in adult cats. The newborn cells survive up to one month and contribute actively to the successful recovery of posturo-locomotor functions. This study investigates whether the nature of vestibular deafferentation has an incidence on the neurogenic potential of the vestibular nuclei, and on the time course of behavioural recovery. Three animal models that mimic different vestibular pathologies were used: unilateral and permanent suppression of vestibular input by unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN), or by unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL, the mechanical destruction of peripheral vestibular receptors), or unilateral and reversible blockade of vestibular nerve input using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Neurogenesis and astrogenesis were revealed in the vestibular nuclei using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) as a newborn cell marker, while glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) were used to identify astrocytes and GABAergic neurons, respectively. Spontaneous nystagmus and posturo-locomotor tests (static and dynamic balance performance) were carried out to quantify the behavioural recovery process. Results showed that the nature of vestibular loss determined the cellular plastic events occurring in the vestibular nuclei and affected the time course of behavioural recovery. Interestingly, the deafferented vestibular nuclei express neurogenic potential after acute and total vestibular loss only (UVN), while non-structural plastic processes are involved when the vestibular deafferentation is less drastic (UL, TTX). This is the first experimental evidence that the vestibular complex in the brainstem can become neurogenic under specific injury. These new data are of interest for understanding the factors favouring the expression of functional neurogenesis in adult mammals in a brain repair perspective, and are of

  20. Bladder injuries frequently missed in polytrauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanweer Karim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Tanweer Karim, Margaret Topno, Vinod Sharma, Raymond Picardo, Ankur HastirSurgery, MGM Medical College, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, IndiaAbstract: Bladder injuries are very common in patients who have had road traffic accidents. The method of diagnosis and management of such injuries is well established and accepted. However, trauma to the bladder can be associated with other life-threatening injuries which are frequently missed, and often diagnosed during laparotomy for other reasons. The aim of this study was to diagnose bladder injury in polytrauma patients as early as possible, taking into consideration the fact that these patients are hemodynamically unstable and require rapid evaluation and management. In order to achieve our objective, we used bedside sonography with retrograde instillation of normal saline to diagnose bladder injury in addition to use of the conventional retrograde cystogram.Keywords: bladder injury, bladder rupture, retrograde cystogram

  1. SOX4 expression in bladder carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, Mads; Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Wiuf, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    The human transcription factor SOX4 was 5-fold up-regulated in bladder tumors compared with normal tissue based on whole-genome expression profiling of 166 clinical bladder tumor samples and 27 normal urothelium samples. Using a SOX4-specific antibody, we found that the cancer cells expressed...... in the clinical bladder material and a small subset of the genes showed a high correlation to SOX4 expression. The present data suggest a role of SOX4 in the bladder cancer disease....... the SOX4 protein and, thus, did an evaluation of SOX4 protein expression in 2,360 bladder tumors using a tissue microarray with clinical annotation. We found a correlation (P bladder cell line HU609, SOX4...

  2. Scrotal Herniation of Bladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hamidi Madani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Inguinal bladder hernia is a rare clinical condition, with 1–3% of all inguinal hernias involving the bladder. Any portion of the bladder may herniate, from a small portion or a diverticulum to most of the bladder. We present a 55-year-old male with an intermittent right scrotal mass of 6 months’ duration. The mass lesion protruded through the right inguinal canal before voiding and reduced after that. Scrotal sonography revealed a hypoechoic lesion in the scrotum that stretched cranially to the intra-abdominal portion of the bladder. Excretory urography showed a duplicated system in the left kidney and deviation of the left orifice to the right side of the trigon. Finally, cystography illustrated herniation of the bladder to the right scrotum. Surgical repair of the hernia was done with mesh. Follow-up cystography one month postoperatively revealed no herniation.

  3. Neurogenética en el Perú, ejemplo de investigación traslacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mazzetti

    Full Text Available La neurogenética es una disciplina emergente en el Perú que vincula la investigación básica con la práctica clínica. El Centro de Investigación Básica en Neurogenética, es el único centro en el Perú dedicado a la atención especializada de enfermedades neurogenéticas. La investigación en esta área está estrechamente ligada a la enfermedad de Huntington, desde la genotipificación del gen HTT por PCR, hasta los actuales estudios de haplogrupos en esta enfermedad. La investigación en otras enfermedades monogénicas permitió la implementación de metodologías alternativas para la genotipificación del síndrome X frágil y distrofia miotónica tipo 1. Esfuerzos colaborativos nacionales e internacionales han permitido conocer nuevas variantes genéticas en enfermedades complejas, como la enfermedad de Parkinson y Alzheimer. El entrenamiento multidisciplinario y la mentoría fomentan la formación de nuevos especialistas en neurogenética, permitiendo el crecimiento sostenido de esta disciplina en el país. El impulso de la investigación en el Perú ha impulsado el crecimiento de la investigación en neurogenética; sin embargo, las limitaciones en infraestructura, tecnología y capacitación aún son un reto para el crecimiento de investigación en esta disciplina

  4. Analysis of intravesical recurrence after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozawa, Mizuki; Miyanaga, Naoto; Hinotsu, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the pattern of recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The subjects were 77 patients with T2-3N0M0 bladder cancer whose bladder was preserved by intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation. The patterns of the first recurrences were retrospectively analyzed. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, 17 patients (22.1%) experienced intravesical recurrence without metastasis, 14 (82.4%) of which were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence and 3 (17.6%) of which were muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrences. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at the same site as the initial tumor site in all three cases, whereas non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at different sites in 64% of the patients in that group. The peak hazard of the non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence was observed at around a year after treatment. Recurrent non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer was of a significantly lower histological grade with lower Ki-67-labeling indices than the initial muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Twelve (85.7%) of 14 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence achieved disease-free status. The multivariate analysis revealed that multiplicity, grade and tumor size were significantly correlated with the recurrence (P=0.0001, 0.0442 and 0.0412, respectively). Most of the recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The recurrence pattern and characteristics of the tumors did not differ from those of primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients with high-risk factors would be candidates for prophylactic intravesical therapy for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence. (author)

  5. Epitheloid hemangioendothelioma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmada P Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Epitheloid hemangioendothelioma is an uncommon vascular neoplasm and has an unpredictable clinical behavior. It is characterized by round or spindle-shaped endothelial cells with cytoplasmic vacuolation. Most often, epitheloid hemangioendothelioma arise from the soft tissues of the upper and lower extremities and it has borderline malignant potential. We describe the first reported case of epitheloid hemangioendothelioma in the urinary bladder, which was treated by transurethral resection. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry.

  6. Dog Ear-Like Bladder Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Cuce

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The hernia content involving a bladder segment occurs in 1-4 % of cases of the inguinal hernias. Inguinoscrotal bladder hernias are usually found incidentally on radiological examinations or at the time of herniorrhaphy. We present an adult case that has a left inguinal bladder hernia detected and evaluated by sonography, intravenous pyelography (IVP, and computerized tomography (CT. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2014; 3(3.000: 187-189

  7. Pathogenesis of reduced or increased bladder sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoyama, Kuniko; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Yamaguchi, Chiharu; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Osamu; Sugiyama, Megumi; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina

    2011-03-01

    Pathogenesis of reduced or increased bladder sensation is not well known. Hence, we systematically investigated the frequency of reduced or increased bladder sensation in neurologic/mental diseases. We analyzed 911 patients who were referred from within our hospital. Data registries included a diagnosis, a lower urinary tract symptom questionnaire, a urodynamic study, and neurological examinations. Reduced bladder sensation is defined as bladder volume at the first sensation >300 ml. Increased bladder sensation is defined as bladder volume at the first sensation sensation (33.3-43.8% in diabetic neuropathy, etc.). Myelopathies are the second most common cause (17.4-25.0% in multiple sclerosis, etc.). Less common is brain diseases (9.6% in multiple system atrophy, etc.). In contrast, myelopathies are the most common cause of increased bladder sensation without DO (25.0-40.0% in spinal forms of systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, etc.). Neuropathies are the second most common (17.3-22.2% in post-pelvic organ surgery, diabetic neuropathy, etc.). Less common is brain/mental diseases (20.0% in psychogenic bladder dysfunction, 8.1% in Parkinson's disease, etc.). The present study revealed that neuropathies are the most common cause of reduced bladder sensation in neurologic/mental diseases. Increased bladder sensation without DO occurs mainly in peripheral and central sensory pathway lesions, as well as in basal ganglia lesions and psychogenic bladder dysfunction. Reduced and increased bladder sensation should be a major treatment target for maximizing patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Bladder Management in Children: Intermittent Catheterization Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Suzanne Marie; Korcal, Layna; Thomas, Ginger

    2018-03-01

    Clean intermittent catheterization (IC) of the bladder is one example of advanced medical care required by students with special health care needs. The success of a child's intermittent catheterization program in a community setting such as a school is dependent on an educated team. This article discusses indications and problems that arise with IC bladder management in the pediatric population. The article also provides information about current best practice for IC management to assist school nurses in the optimization of bladder health.

  9. Occupational exposure to solvents and bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the relationship between exposure to selected solvents and the risk of bladder cancer. This study is based on the Nordic Occupational Cancer (NOCCA) database and comprises 113,343 cases of bladder cancer diagnosed in Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden...... of occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, aromatic hydrocarbon solvents, benzene and toluene and the risk of bladder cancer....

  10. Nerve growth factor (NGF): a potential urinary biomarker for overactive bladder syndrome (OAB)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Jai H; Sahai, Arun; Khan, Mohammad S; van der Aa, Frank; de Ridder, Dirk; Panicker, Jalesh N; Dasgupta, Prokar; Fowler, Clare J

    2013-03-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: The search for a biomarker in overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is an emerging field of interest, as bladder dysfunction is a common complaint that causes significant morbidity. A biomarker may give us insight as a diagnostic tool, and also inform us about how severe the condition is, how it may progress and how it may best be treated. The protein of interest here is nerve growth factor (NGF) and it has been shown to be a dynamic molecule in the bladder of patients with OAB. Urinary levels have been seen to rise in patients with OAB and fall in those who respond to treatment. However, there have also been many studies that examine this trend in numerous other conditions, e.g. interstitial cystitis, bladder outflow obstruction, renal stone disease and patients with neurological impairment after stroke. As a result the specificity of this as a potential urinary biomarker for OAB is questioned. This is a review of published studies, which discusses the pros and cons of NGF as a potential urinary biomarker. The evidence is examined and the studies are summarised together in a Table. Questions remain about the reliability, practicality and specificity of NGF as a biomarker for OAB. These questions need to be addressed by further studies that could clarify the points raised. To review the current literature on the use of urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) as a potential biomarker for overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). A comprehensive electronic literature search was conducted using the PubMed database to identify publications relating to urinary NGF. There are a growing number of publications that have measured urinary NGF levels in different types of bladder dysfunction. These range from OAB, bladder pain syndrome, idiopathic and neurogenic detrusor overactivity, bladder oversensitivity and bladder outflow obstruction. Urinary NGF levels do appear to be raised in these pathological states when compared with

  11. Bladder wash cytology, quantitative cytology, and the qualitative BTA test in patients with superficial bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, H. G.; van Balken, M. R.; Schamhart, D. H.; Peelen, P.; de Reijke, T.; Debruyne, F. M.; Schalken, J. A.; Witjes, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Two new methods for the detection of transitional tumor cells in bladder wash (karyometry: QUANTICYT) and voided urine material (BARD BTA test) were compared with bladder wash cytology for the prediction of histology and tumor recurrence. Bladder wash material and voided urine were sampled from 138

  12. A bladder diverticulum model in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Süleyman; Kuzdan, Özgür; Özaydın, Seyithan; Başdaş, Cemile Beşik; Özaydın, İpek; Erdoğan, Cankat; Sander, Serdar

    2016-10-01

    Shuttling of some of the bladder volume into the bladder diverticulum (BD) can cause urinary retention, lower urinary tract dysfunction, infection, and stone formation. This experimental study is the first to create a rabbit BD to study micturition physiology (urodynamics and pathology) that mimics clinical findings. The study included 16 New Zealand adult male rabbits in the BD group and 16 sham-operated controls. BD creation consisted of a lower midline laparotomy and bladder entry via the spacing between the detrusor muscle fibers and the mucosa, posterolaterally from the bladder wall. The detrusor was excised to provide a mucosal prolapsus, creating a narrow BD neck (Figure). The sham group underwent bladder exposure with a midline incision. All rabbits underwent urodynamic study preoperatively and postoperatively, consisting of postmicturition residue (PMR), maximum bladder capacity (MBC), voiding detrusor pressure (VPdet), filling detrusor pressure (FPdet), compliance, and urine flow (Qflow). The animals were then sacrificed and their bladders assessed for pathology and stone formation. Preoperative MBC, Pdet, and Qmax were within reference ranges. No animals had PMR or urinary tract infections (UTIs). The BD group showed urodynamic and pathologic bladder changes, including decreased (28%) cystometric bladder capacity and compliance (Sham: 26.8 ± 0.4; BD: 4.46 ± 1.08, p = 0.0001) and increased post-void residual PMR (8.3 ± 2.4 mL). Pathology revealed increased bladder detrusor thickness correlated with urodynamic findings of increased filling detrusor pressures (Sham: 1.58 ± 0.2; BD: 4.89 ± 0.93, p = 0.0001). Urodynamics revealed intermittent BD bladder contraction during the filling phases. Eight BD group rabbits had UTIs; five had stone formation (4-9 mm). In the literature, it has not been determined whether lower urinary tract disorders (LUTD) could cause diverticula, or if a congenital diverticula could be reason for LUTD. Anatomical

  13. Bladder Control Problems and Bedwetting in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Clinical Trials Hematuria: Blood in the Urine Interstitial Cystitis (Painful Bladder Syndrome) Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Kidney Infection Definition & ...

  14. Classification of Bladder Cancer Patients via Penalized Linear Discriminant Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeisi Shahraki, Hadi; Bemani, Peyman; Jalali, Maryam

    2017-05-01

    Objectives: In order to identify genes with the greatest contribution to bladder cancer, we proposed a sparse model making the best discrimination from other patients. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 22 genes with a key role in most cancers were considered in 21 bladder cancer patients and 14 participants of the same age (± 3 years) without bladder cancer in Shiraz city, Southern Iran. Real time-PCR was carried out using SYBR Green and for each of the 22 target genes 2-Δct as a quantitative index of gene expression was reported. We determined the most affective genes for the discriminant vector by applying penalized linear discriminant analysis using LASSO penalties. All the analyses were performed using SPSS version 18 and the penalized LDA package in R.3.1.3 software. Results: Using penalized linear discriminant analysis led to elimination of 13 less important genes. Considering the simultaneous effects of 22 genes with important influence on many cancers, it was found that TGFβ, IL12A, Her2, MDM2, CTLA-4 and IL-23 genes had the greatest contribution in classifying bladder cancer patients with the penalized linear discriminant vector. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve revealed that the proposed vector had good performance with minimal (only 3) mis- classification. The area under the curve (AUC) of our proposed test was 96% (95% CI: 83%- 100%) and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 90.5%, 85.7%, 90.5% and 85.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The penalized discriminant method can be considered as appropriate for classifying bladder cancer cases and searching for important biomarkers. Creative Commons Attribution License

  15. Direct vision bladder catheterization using a short rigid ureteroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, T A; Salazar, F; Thompson, I M

    1998-05-01

    We describe the use of a short, rigid ureteroscope to place a Foley catheter into the bladder under direct vision. The Circon ACMI MICRO-6 short ureteroscope was passed through a 22F Foley catheter modified with a catheter punch device. The catheter was placed rapidly and without difficulty in 2 patients with significant undermining of the trigone after transurethral incision of the prostate. This technique is rapid, simple, and avoids the potential complications of blind catheter placement following difficult transurethral procedures.

  16. Enhanced angiogenesis and relaxation of bladder as early response to bladder outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yun Seob; Lee, Hong Jun; Doo, Seung Whan; An, Jin; Kim, Seung U

    2013-01-01

    To provide insights into the pathogenesis of bladder insult secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Six-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 80) were divided into eight groups, 10 rats each, according to the duration of bladder outlet obstruction, including 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 h and 1 week. Cystometric parameters were evaluated at 72 h and 1 week after bladder outlet obstruction. Bladder tissues were harvested and Masson's trichrome staining was carried out. Each slide was inspected microscopically and the mean percent collagen area was examined. Changes of collagen deposition and pathological expression of several factors including hypoxia inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1 and nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid of bladders were evaluated. A significant time-dependent increase in the bladder weight after 6 h and the percent of collagen area after 24 h of bladder outlet obstruction were found. Increase in hypoxia inducible factor-1α, transforming growth factor-β1, inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid expression, time-dependent increase in vascular endothelial growth factor, neuronal nitric oxide synthase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid expression after 6 h of bladder outlet obstruction was found. The intercontraction interval decreased significantly after 72 h of bladder outlet obstruction. Cellular remodeling in the bladder secondary to bladder outlet obstruction starts in the early hours and it includes enhanced angiogenesis and bladder relaxation. Early relief from bladder outlet obstruction is helpful to preserve bladder structure and function. © 2012 The Japanese Urological Association.

  17. Microvascular Injury in Ketamine-Induced Bladder Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chieh Lin

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of ketamine-induced cystitis (KC remains unclear. In this study, bladder microvascular injury was investigated as a possible contributing mechanism. A total of 36 KC patients with exposure to ketamine for more than 6 months, and 9 control subjects, were prospectively recruited. All participants completed questionnaires, including the O'Leary-Sant interstitial cystitis symptom index (ICSI and the interstitial cystitis problem index (ICPI. All KC patients received a urodynamic study and radiological exams. Bladder tissues were obtained from cystoscopic biopsies in the control group and after hydrodistention in the KC group. Double-immunofluorescence staining of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 1 (NMDAR1 and the endothelial marker, cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31, was performed to reveal the existence of NMDAR1 on the endothelium. Electron microscopy (EM was applied to assess the microvascular change in the urinary bladder and to measure the thickening of the basement membrane (BM. A proximity ligation assay (PLA was used to quantify the co-localization of the endothelial CD31 receptor and the mesenchymal marker [fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP-1]. The Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. The mean ICSI [14.38 (± 4.16] and ICPI [12.67 (± 3.54] scores of the KC group were significantly higher than those (0 and 0, respectively of the control group (both p < 0.001. The KC patients had decreasing cystometric bladder capacity (CBC with a mean volume of 65.38 (± 48.67 mL. NMDAR1 was expressed on endothelial cells in both groups under immunofluorescence staining. Moreover, KC patients had significant BM duplication of microvessels in the mucosa of the urinary bladder under EM. The co-expression of the endothelial marker CD31 and mesenchymal marker FSP1 was significantly stained and calculated under PLA. In conclusion, microvascular injury and mesenchymal phenotypic

  18. Differentiation of human endometrial stem cells into urothelial cells on a three-dimensional nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffold: an autologous cell resource for reconstruction of the urinary bladder wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Sharif, Shiva; Seifalian, Alexander Marcus; Azimi, Alireza; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Verdi, Javad

    2015-11-01

    Reconstruction of the bladder wall via in vitro differentiated stem cells on an appropriate scaffold could be used in such conditions as cancer and neurogenic urinary bladder. This study aimed to examine the potential of human endometrial stem cells (EnSCs) to form urinary bladder epithelial cells (urothelium) on nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds, for construction of the urinary bladder wall. After passage 4, EnSCs were induced by keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) and seeded on electrospun collagen-V, silk and silk-collagen nanofibres. Later we tested urothelium-specific genes and proteins (uroplakin-Ia, uroplakin-Ib, uroplakin-II, uroplakin-III and cytokeratin 20) by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and histology were used to detect cell-matrix interactions. DMEM/F12 supplemented by KGF and EGF induced EnSCs to express urothelial cell-specific genes and proteins. Either collagen, silk or silk-collagen scaffolds promoted cell proliferation. The nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds provided a three-dimensional (3D) structure to maximize cell-matrix penetration and increase differentiation of the EnSCs. Human EnSCs seeded on 3D nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds and differentiated to urothelial cells provide a suitable source for potential use in bladder wall reconstruction in women. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Homing peptide guiding optical molecular imaging for the diagnosis of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-feng; Pang, Jian-zhi; Liu, Jie-hao; Zhao, Yang; Jia, Xing-you; Li, Jun; Liu, Reng-xin; Wang, Wei; Fan, Zhen-wei; Zhang, Zi-qiang; Yan, San-hua; Luo, Jun-qian; Zhang, Xiao-lei

    2014-11-01

    Background: The limitations of primary transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBt) have led the residual tumors rates as high as 75%. The intraoperative fluorescence imaging offers a great potential for improving TURBt have been confirmed. So we aim to distinguish the residual tumors and normal mucosa using fluorescence molecular imaging formed by conjugated molecule of the CSNRDARRC bladder cancer homing peptide with fluorescent dye. The conjugated molecule was abbreviated FIuo-ACP. In our study, we will research the image features of FIuo-ACP probe targeted bladder cancer for fluorescence molecular imaging diagnosis for bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo. Methods: After the FIuo-ACP probe was synthetized, the binding sites, factors affecting binding rates, the specificity and the targeting of Fluo-ACP labeled with bladder cancer cells were studied respectively by laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), immunofluorescence and multispectral fluorescence ex vivo optical molecular imaging system. Results: The binding sites were located in nucleus and the binding rates were correlated linearly with the dose of probe and the grade of pathology. Moreover, the probe has a binding specificity with bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo. Tumor cells being labeled by the Fluo-ACP, bright green spots were observed under LSCM. The tissue samples and tumor cells can be labeled and identified by fluorescence microscope. Optical molecular imaging of xenograft tumor tissues was exhibited as fluorescent spots under EMCCD. Conclusion: The CSNRDARRC peptides might be a useful bladder cancer targeting vector. The FIuo-ACP molecular probe was suitable for fluorescence molecular imaging diagnosis for bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo.

  20. Pathogenic and Diagnostic Potential of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 Nuclear Proteins in Urothelial Cell Carcinoma of Human Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Santoni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder is one of the most common malignancies of genitourinary tract. Patients with bladder cancer need a life-long surveillance, directly due to the relatively high recurrence rate of this tumor. The use of cystoscopy represents the gold standard for the followup of previously treated patients. Nevertheless, several factors, including cost and invasiveness, render cystoscopy not ideal for routine controls. Advances in the identification of specific alterations in the nuclear structure of bladder cancer cells have opened novel diagnostic landscapes. The members of nuclear matrix protein family BLCA-1 and BLCA-4, are currently under evaluation as bladder cancer urinary markers. They are involved in tumour cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. In this paper, we illustrate the role of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 in bladder carcinogenesis and their potential exploitation as biomarkers in this cancer.

  1. Preferences for antimuscarinic therapy for overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinburn, Paul; Lloyd, Andrew; Ali, Shehzad; Hashmi, Noreen; Newal, David; Najib, Hiba

    2011-09-01

    OBJECTIVE • To examine patient preferences and strength of preferences for treatment for the various symptoms of overactive bladder and adverse events associated with the use of antimuscarinic treatments. PATIENTS AND METHODS • A discrete choice experiment (DCE) survey was developed that detailed treatment choices in terms of attributes relating to their efficacy in reducing symptoms and the likelihood of experiencing typical adverse events. Levels for each attribute were based on a literature review, qualitative interviews and a meta-analysis of clinical trial data. • Attributes were combined into choice sets using a fractional orthogonal design that had been folded over. Pairs of choice sets were presented to overactive bladder (OAB) patients (n= 332), who indicated which treatment alternative they preferred. Data were analysed using the conditional logit model. RESULTS • Participants expressed the strongest preference for the avoidance of urgency incontinence episodes, followed by preference for a reduction in the experience of urinary urgency and the number of micturition episodes. The influence of the likelihood of experiencing an adverse event on treatment preference was also estimated. • Finally, marginal rates of substitution were calculated to demonstrate the relative value of trade-offs between the various attributes. • Treatment preferences were found to be broadly similar across two patient age groups (i.e. under 45 s and 45 and over). CONCLUSION • The study demonstrates that individuals with OAB place significant emphasis on the prospect of reduction in symptoms. Avoidance of incontinence episodes is particularly valued and equivalent to a much greater reduction in the frequency of micturition or experience of urgency. However, even a modest increase in the likelihood of experiencing an adverse event could easily motivate a change in treatment preference. © 2010 OXFORD OUTCOMES LTD.

  2. Giant bladder lithiasis: case report and bibliographic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego Vilar, Daniel; Beltran Persiva, José; Pérez Mestre, Mateo; Povo Martin, Iván José; Miralles Aguado, Jaume; Garau Perelló, Carmen; De Francia, Jose Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Urinary lithiasis is a very frequent urological disease but bladder lithiasis is very uncommon.Patients usually refer voiding symptoms and hematuria. The diagnosis is made after imaging tests. We report a clinical case describing a giant bladder stone and perform a bibliographic review. A 43 year old man with the diagnosis of giant bladder stone (more than 10 cm diameter). We searched Medline using the terms: giant bladder stone, giant bladder lithiasis, bladder lithiasis, giant bladder lithiasis. We made the diagnosis of giant bladder stone after a simple kidney, ureter and bladder (KUB) X Ray. The treatment for this patient was a cystolithotomy. We found more than 230 reports at Medline and chose the most referred ones and the last 10 years reports. Giant bladder lithiasis is a very rare pathology. The gold standard for diagnosis is cystoscopy but sometimes with a KUB Xray or an ultrasound is enough. Because of its size, cistolitotomy is the correct treatment for giant bladder stone.

  3. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.E. Mensah

    ees.elsevier.com/afju · www.sciencedirect.com. Case report. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication: Bladder can be augmented with dorsal urethral mucosa. J.E. Mensaha,∗. , K.N. Ampadua, M.Y. Kyeia, B. Edusieb.

  4. Suprapubic prostatectomy with and without continuous bladder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... without continuous bladder irrigation is simple to perform, safe and easy to learn. This procedure permits patient ambulation as soon as spinal anesthesia wears out, reducing the risk of the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis. With the radical removal of bladder infusion solutions and reduced need for nursing attention ...

  5. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Per-Uno; Agrawal, Sachin; Bläckberg, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has evolved from the first reports on bladder endoscopy and transurethral resection to the introduction of adjuvant intravesical treatment. However, disease recurrence and progression remain an ongoing risk, placing a heavy burden on he...

  6. Bladder diverticulitis on PET/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Wosnitzer, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Diverticula are commonly seen in hollow viscous organs. One common complication of diverticula is infection, known as diverticulitis. Although diverticulitis has been extensively described with respect to the colon, not many cases describe diverticulitis of the urinary bladder. We report a case of diverticulitis of the bladder to emphasize the imaging findings on PET/CT and to discuss management and possible complications.

  7. Bladder pressure sensors in an animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koldewijn, E. L.; van Kerrebroeck, P. E.; Schaafsma, E.; Wijkstra, H.; Debruyne, F. M.; Brindley, G. S.

    1994-01-01

    Urinary incontinence due to detrusor hyperreflexia might be inhibited on demand if changes in bladder pressure could be detected by sensors and transferred into pudendal nerve electrostimulation. The aim of this study is to investigate how the bladder wall reacts on different sensor implants.

  8. NEOADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY FOR BLADDER CARCINOMA IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To evaluate the impact of preoperative accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of bladder carcinoma in Egyptian patients. Patients and Methods Between December 1996 and February 2000, 104 Egyptian patients with pathologically proven infiltrative bladder carcinoma were enrolled in ...

  9. Squamous cell carcinoma in bladder extrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral-Ribeiro, J; Silva, C; Sousa, L; Pérez García, D; Ribeiro dos Santos, A

    2005-01-01

    Bladder extrophy is a rare congenital malformation that nowadays is surgically corrected in neonatal period. We present a case report of a 71-year-old male with a verrucous squamous cell carcinoma arising in a classical uncorrected form of bladder extrophy.

  10. Bladder dysfunction in advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Kristian; Nielsen, Kurt K

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often have lower urinary tract symptoms. Seventy-four percent of patients with early-to-moderate disease report more than one bladder disturbance symptom. Severe bladder symptoms are reported in 27-39% of PD patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  11. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  12. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-21

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  13. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Xiangfei; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan; Van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja

    2012-01-01

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  14. Occupational variation in incidence of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; MacLeod, Jill; Demers, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare occupational variation of the risk of bladder cancer in the Nordic countries and Canada. Methods: In the Nordic Occupational Cancer study (NOCCA), 73 653 bladder cancer cases were observed during follow-up of 141.6 million person......: Elevated risks of bladder cancer were observed among hairdressers, printers, sales workers, plumbers, painters, miners and laundry workers. Teachers and agricultural workers had reduced risk of bladder cancer in both cohorts. Chimney-sweeps, tobacco workers and waiters had about 1.5-fold risk in the Nordic...... countries; no risk estimates for these categories were given from the CanCHEC cohort. Conclusion: We observed different occupational patterns in risk of bladder cancer in Nordic countries and Canada. The only occupation with similarly increased risk was observed among sales workers. Differences in smoking...

  15. Does central sensitization help explain idiopathic overactive bladder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, W Stuart; Dmochowski, Roger; Wein, Alan; Bruehl, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) can include dysfunction of sensory pathways of the peripheral and central nervous systems, resulting in bladder hypersensitivity. Central sensitization describes an induced state of spinal hypersensitivity that is associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders that share many attributes with OAB, albeit without the presence of pain. As such, the concept of central sensitization might be relevant to understanding the mechanisms and clinical manifestations of OAB syndrome. An understanding of the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of central sensitization, and the evidence that supports a role of central sensitization in OAB, including the potential implications of mechanisms of central sensitization for the treatment of patients with OAB could provide a novel approach to the treatment of patients with this disease. Such an approach would be especially relevant to those patients with central sensitization-related comorbidities, and has the potential to improve the outcomes of these patients in particular.

  16. Leukemia inhibitory factor favours neurogenic differentiation of long-term propagated human midbrain precursor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke K; Widmer, Hans R; Zimmer, Jens

    2009-01-01

    There is a lot of excitement about the potential use of multipotent neural stem cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the strategy is compromised by the general loss of multipotency and ability to generate neurons after long-term in vitro propagation. In the present study......-term propagated, our study also suggests that LIF favours neurogenic differentiation of human VM precursor cells....

  17. Cell death and neuronal differentiation of glioblastoma stem-like cells induced by neurogenic transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichet, Pierre-Olivier; Bieche, Ivan; Teigell, Marisa; Serguera, Ché; Rothhut, Bernard; Rigau, Valérie; Scamps, Frédérique; Ripoll, Chantal; Vacher, Sophie; Taviaux, Sylvie; Chevassus, Hugues; Duffau, Hugues; Mallet, Jacques; Susini, Aurélie; Joubert, Dominique; Bauchet, Luc; Hugnot, Jean-Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) are devastating brain tumors containing a fraction of multipotent stem-like cells which are highly tumorigenic. These cells are resistant to treatments and are likely to be responsible for tumor recurrence. One approach to eliminate GBM stem-like cells would be to force their terminal differentiation. During development, neurons formation is controlled by neurogenic transcription factors such as Ngn1/2 and NeuroD1. We found that in comparison with oligodendrogenic genes, the expression of these neurogenic genes is low or absent in GBM tumors and derived cultures. We thus explored the effect of overexpressing these neurogenic genes in three CD133(+) Sox2(+) GBM stem-like cell cultures and the U87 glioma line. Introduction of Ngn2 in CD133(+) cultures induced massive cell death, proliferation arrest and a drastic reduction of neurosphere formation. Similar effects were observed with NeuroD1. Importantly, Ngn2 effects were accompanied by the downregulation of Olig2, Myc, Shh and upregulation of Dcx and NeuroD1 expression. The few surviving cells adopted a typical neuronal morphology and some of them generated action potentials. These cells appeared to be produced at the expense of GFAP(+) cells which were radically reduced after differentiation with Ngn2. In vivo, Ngn2-expressing cells were unable to form orthotopic tumors. In the U87 glioma line, Ngn2 could not induce neuronal differentiation although proliferation in vitro and tumoral growth in vivo were strongly reduced. By inducing cell death, cell cycle arrest or differentiation, this work supports further exploration of neurogenic proteins to oppose GBM stem-like and non-stem-like cell growth. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Heated indoor swimming pools, infants, and the pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a neurogenic hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    McMaster Marianne E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In a case-control study a statistically significant association was recorded between the introduction of infants to heated indoor swimming pools and the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). In this paper, a neurogenic hypothesis is formulated to explain how toxins produced by chlorine in such pools may act deleteriously on the infant's immature central nervous system, comprising brain and spinal cord, to produce the deformity of AIS. Presentation of the hy...

  19. Notch receptor expression in neurogenic regions of the adult zebrafish brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Oliveira-Carlos

    Full Text Available The adult zebrash brain has a remarkable constitutive neurogenic capacity. The regulation and maintenance of its adult neurogenic niches are poorly understood. In mammals, Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance both in embryonic and adult CNS. To better understand how Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance during adult neurogenesis in zebrafish we analysed Notch receptor expression in five neurogenic zones of the adult zebrafish brain. Combining proliferation and glial markers we identified several subsets of Notch receptor expressing cells. We found that 90 [Formula: see text] of proliferating radial glia express notch1a, notch1b and notch3. In contrast, the proliferating non-glial populations of the dorsal telencephalon and hypothalamus rarely express notch3 and about half express notch1a/1b. In the non-proliferating radial glia notch3 is the predominant receptor throughout the brain. In the ventral telencephalon and in the mitotic area of the optic tectum, where cells have neuroepithelial properties, notch1a/1b/3 are expressed in most proliferating cells. However, in the cerebellar niche, although progenitors also have neuroepithelial properties, only notch1a/1b are expressed in a high number of PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. In this region notch3 expression is mostly in Bergmann glia and at low levels in few PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. Additionally, we found that in the proliferation zone of the ventral telencephalon, Notch receptors display an apical high to basal low gradient of expression. Notch receptors are also expressed in subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells. We suggest that the partial regional heterogeneity observed for Notch expression in progenitor cells might be related to the cellular diversity present in each of these neurogenic niches.

  20. Neurogenic pulmonary edema induced by spinal cord injury in spontaneously hypertensive and Dahl salt hypertensive rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2011), s. 975-979 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0336; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : hypertension * neurogenic pulmonary edema * Dahl salt-sensitive rats * SHR Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.555, year: 2011

  1. Neurogenic period of ascending tract neurons in the upper lumbar spinal cord of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, K.N.; Beal, J.A.; Knight, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    Although the neurogenic period for neurons in the lumbar spinal cord has been clearly established (Days 12 through 16 of gestation), it is not known when the neurogenesis of ascending tract neurons is completed within this period. The purpose of the present study was to determine the duration of the neurogenic period for projection neurons of the ascending tracts. To label neurons undergoing mitosis during this period, tritiated thymidine was administered to fetal rats on Embryonic (E) Days E13 through E16 of gestation. Ascending tract neurons of the lumbar cord were later (Postnatal Days 40-50) labeled in each animal with a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold, applied at the site of a hemisection at spinal cord segment C3. Ascending tract neurons which were undergoing mitosis in the upper lumbar cord were double labeled, i.e., labeled with both tritiated thymidine and Fluoro-Gold. On Day E13, 89-92% of the ascending tract neurons were double labeled; on Day E14, 35-37%; and on Day E15, 1-4%. Results showed, then, that some ascending tract neurons were double labeled through Day E15 and were, therefore, proliferating in the final one-third of the neurogenic period. Ascending tract neurons proliferating on Day E15 were confined to laminae III, IV, V, and X and the nucleus dorsalis. Long tract neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (laminae I and II), on the other hand, were found to have completed neurogenesis on Day E14 of gestation. Results of the present study show that spinal neurogenesis of ascending projection neurons continues throughout most of the neurogenic period and does not completely follow the well-established ventral to dorsal gradient

  2. Urothelial mucosal signaling and the overactive bladder-ICI-RS 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birder, Lori A; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Kanai, Anthony J; Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T; Fry, Chris H

    2014-06-01

    There is abundant evidence that the lower urinary tract (LUT) mucosal layer is involved both in mechanosensory functions that regulate bladder contractile activity and in urethral sensation. Changes to the mucosa can be associated with a number of bladder pathologies. For example, alterations of the urothelium and underlying lamina propria at both the molecular and structural levels have been reported in both patients and animals associated with disorders such as bladder pain syndrome and diabetic cystopathy. In contrast to the urinary bladder, much less is known about the urothelium/lamina propria of the bladder neck/proximal urethra. There are important gender differences in the outflow region both anatomically and with respect to innervation, hormonal sensitivity, and location of the external urethral sphincter. There is reasonable evidence to support the view that the mucosal signaling pathway in the proximal urethra is important for normal voiding, but it has also been speculated that the proximal urethra can initiate bladder overactivity. When dysfunctional, the proximal urethra may be an interesting target, for example, botulinum toxin injections aiming at eliminating both urgency and incontinence due to detrusor overactivity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Blocking PAR2 alleviates bladder pain and hyperactivity via TRPA1 signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Daihui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder disorders associated with interstitial cystitis are frequently characterized by increased contractility and pain. The goals of this study were to examine 1 the effects of blocking proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2 on the exaggerated bladder activity and pain evoked by cystitis and 2 the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of PAR2 in regulating cystic sensory activity. The protein expression of PAR2 was amplified in rats with cystitis by inducing it with systemic administration of cyclophosphamide (CYP as compared with control rats. Blocking PAR2 by intrathecal infusion of PAR2 antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 attenuated bladder hyperactivity and pain. In addition, blocking PAR2 attenuated the transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1 signal pathway, whereas inhibition of the TRPA1 decreased bladder hyperactivity and pain. The data revealed specific signaling pathways leading to CYP-induced bladder hyperactivity and pain, including the activation of PAR2 and TRPA1. Inhibition of these pathways alleviates cystic pain. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of overactive bladder and pain often observed in cystitis.

  4. Mechanoreceptor afferent activity compared with receptor field dimensions and pressure changes in feline urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, J W; Armour, J A

    1992-11-01

    The relationship between vesical mechanoreceptor field dimensions and afferent nerve activity recorded in pelvic plexus nerve filaments was examined in chloralose-anesthetized cats. Orthogonal receptor field dimensions were monitored with piezoelectric ultrasonic crystals. Reflexly generated bladder contractile activity made measurements difficult, therefore data were collected from cats subjected to actual sacral rhizotomy. Afferent activity was episodic and was initiated at different pressure and receptor field dimension thresholds. Maximum afferent activity did not correlate with maximum volume or pressure. Furthermore, activity was not linearly related to intravesical pressure, receptor field dimensions, or calculated wall tension. Pressure-length hysteresis of the receptor fields occurred. The responses of identified afferent units and their associated receptor field dimensions to brief contractions elicited by the ganglion stimulant 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (2.5-20 micrograms i.a.), studied under constant volume or constant pressure conditions, are compatible with bladder mechanoreceptors behaving as tension receptors. Because activity generated by bladder mechanoreceptors did not correlate in a simple fashion with intravesical pressure or receptor field dimensions, it is concluded that such receptors are influenced by the viscoelastic properties of the bladder wall. Furthermore, as a result of the heterogeneity of the bladder wall, receptor field tension appears to offer a more precise relationship with the activity of bladder wall mechanoreceptors than does intravesical pressure.

  5. Exploring the FGFR3-related oncogenic mechanism in bladder cancer using bioinformatics strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Ma, Enguang; Zhou, Li; Yuan, Tan; Zhang, Chunying

    2017-03-20

    Aberrant activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is frequently observed in bladder cancer, but how it involved in carcinogenesis is not well understood. The current study was aimed to investigate the underlying mechanism on the progression of bladder cancer. The GSE41035 dataset downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus was used to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between bladder cancer cell line RT112 with or without depletion of FGFR3, and gene ontology enrichment analysis was performed. Then, FGFR3-centered protein-protein interaction (PPI) and regulatory networks were constructed. Combined with the data retrieved from GSE31684, prognostic makers for bladder cancer were predicted. We identified a total of 2855 DEGs, and most of them were associated with blood vessel morphogenesis and cell division. In addition, KIAA1377, POLA2, FGFR3, and EPHA4 were the hub genes with high degree in the FGFR3-centered PPI network. Besides, 17 microRNAs (miRNAs) and 6 transcriptional factors (TFs) were predicted to be the regulators of the nodes in PPI network. Moreover, CSTF2, POLA1, HMOX2, and EFNB2 may be associated with the prognosis of bladder cancer patient. The current study may provide some insights into the molecular mechanism of FGFR3 as a mediator in bladder cancer.

  6. Immunoglobulin G4-associated inflammatory pseudotumor of urinary bladder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghui; Ro, Jae Y; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Choi, Sun Young; Koo, Heasoo

    2013-12-01

    A previously healthy 72-year old woman was admitted with a chief complaint of gross hematuria and fecaluria for 4 months. On initial computed tomographic examination, a lobulated shaped intravesical protruding mass with adhesion to the sigmoid colon was identified. Under a clinical diagnosis of bladder cancer with vesicosigmoid fistula vs sigmoid colon cancer with vesicosigmoid fistula, a frozen section evaluation of the bladder mass was performed to determine the origin of the tumor. Because the frozen section diagnosis of the bladder mass was an inflammatory origin, a partial cystectomy with segmental resection of the adherent sigmoid colon was elected. The microscopic examination of the partial resection of the urinary bladder revealed suburothelial inflammatory mass lesion, involving the entire wall of bladder with extension to the sigmoid colon, which was composed of spindle cells without significant atypia admixed with many lymphocytes, plasma cells, and some scattered eosinophils. Chronic inflammation around nerve bundles, sclerotic fibrosis, and prominent lymphoid follicles with plasma cells were the main features of the mass. No urothelial dysplasia or malignancy was seen. An average of 57 plasma cells per 1 high-power field was immunoreactive for immunoglobulin (Ig) G4 with IgG4/IgG ratio of more than 40%, a diagnostic feature of IgG4-associated inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT), arising in the bladder with the secondary involvement of the sigmoid colon. Recent studies reported many IPTs associated with IgG4 in other locations; however, to the best of our knowledge, IgG4-associated IPT in the urinary bladder has not been reported. We describe herein the first case of IgG4-associated IPT, lymphoplasmacytic type in the urinary bladder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurogenic potential of hESC-derived human radial glia is amplified by human fetal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinchisi, Gisela; Limaye, Pallavi V; Singh, Mandakini B; Antic, Srdjan D; Zecevic, Nada

    2013-07-01

    The efficient production of human neocortical neurons from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is the primary requirement for studying early stages of human cortical development. We used hESC to obtain radial glial cells (hESC-RG) and then compared them with RG cells isolated from human fetal forebrain. Fate of hESC-RG cells critically depends on intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The expression of Pax6 (intrinsic factor) has a similar neurogenic effect on hESC-RG differentiation as reported for human fetal RG cells. Factors from the microenvironment also play a significant role in determining hESC-RG cell fate. In contrast to control cultures, wherein hESC-RG generate mainly astroglia and far fewer neurons, in co-cultures with human fetal forebrain cells, the reverse was found to be true. This neurogenic effect was partly due to soluble factors from human fetal brain cultures. The detected shift towards neurogenesis has significance for developing future efficient neuro-differentiation protocols. Importantly, we established that hESC-RG cells are similar in many respects to human fetal RG cells, including their proliferative capacity, neurogenic potential, and ability to generate various cortical neuronal sub-types. Unlike fetal RG cells, the hESC-RG cells are readily available and can be standardized, features that have considerable practical advantages in research and clinics. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Enhanced Dentate Neurogenesis after Brain Injury Undermines Long-Term Neurogenic Potential and Promotes Seizure Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Neuberger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal dentate gyrus is a focus of enhanced neurogenesis and excitability after traumatic brain injury. Increased neurogenesis has been proposed to aid repair of the injured network. Our data show that an early increase in neurogenesis after fluid percussion concussive brain injury is transient and is followed by a persistent decrease compared with age-matched controls. Post-injury changes in neurogenesis paralleled changes in neural precursor cell proliferation and resulted in a long-term decline in neurogenic capacity. Targeted pharmacology to restore post-injury neurogenesis to control levels reversed the long-term decline in neurogenic capacity. Limiting post-injury neurogenesis reduced early increases in dentate excitability and seizure susceptibility. Our results challenge the assumption that increased neurogenesis after brain injury is beneficial and show that early post-traumatic increases in neurogenesis adversely affect long-term outcomes by exhausting neurogenic potential and enhancing epileptogenesis. Treatments aimed at limiting excessive neurogenesis can potentially restore neuroproliferative capacity and limit epilepsy after brain injury.

  9. Congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy in megaconial myopathy due to a mutation in CHKB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gago, Manuel; Dacruz-Alvarez, David; Pintos-Martínez, Elena; Beiras-Iglesias, Andrés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta gene (CHKB) mutations have been identified in Megaconial Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (MDCMC) patients, a very rare inborn error of metabolism with 21 cases reported worldwide. We report the case of a Spanish boy of Caucasian origin who presented a generalized congenital muscular hypotonia, more intense at lower limb muscles, mildly elevated creatine kinase (CK), serum aspartate transaminase (AST) and lactate. Electromyography (EMG) showed neurogenic potentials in the proximal muscles. Histological studies of a muscle biopsy showed neurogenic atrophy with enlarged mitochondria in the periphery of the fibers, and complex I deficiency. Finally, genetic analysis showed the presence of a homozygous mutation in the gene for choline kinase beta (CHKB: NM_005198.4:c.810T>A, p.Tyr270(∗)). We describe here the second Spanish patient whit mutation in CHKB gene, who despite having the same mutation, presented an atypical aspect: congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy progressing to a combined neuropathic and myopathic phenotype (mixed pattern). Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of C