WorldWideScience

Sample records for underlying hearing loss

  1. Hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decreased hearing; Deafness; Loss of hearing; Conductive hearing loss; Sensorineural hearing loss; Presbycusis ... Conductive hearing loss (CHL) occurs because of a mechanical problem in the outer or middle ear. This may be ...

  2. Hearing loss impacts neural alpha oscillations under adverse listening conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline Borch Petersen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Degradations in external, acoustic stimulation have long been suspected to increase the load on working memory. One neural signature of working memory load is enhanced power of alpha oscillations (6 ‒ 12 Hz. However, it is unknown to what extent common internal, auditory degradation, that is, hearing impairment, affects the neural mechanisms of working memory when audibility has been ensured via amplification. Using an adapted auditory Sternberg paradigm, we varied the orthogonal factors memory load and background noise level, while the electroencephalogram (EEG was recorded. In each trial, participants were presented with 2, 4, or 6 spoken digits embedded in one of three different levels of background noise. After a stimulus-free delay interval, participants indicated whether a probe digit had appeared in the sequence of digits. Participants were healthy older adults (62 – 86 years, with normal to moderately impaired hearing. Importantly, the background noise levels were individually adjusted and participants were wearing hearing aids to equalize audibility across participants. Irrespective of hearing loss, behavioral performance improved with lower memory load and also with lower levels of background noise. Interestingly, the alpha power in the stimulus-free delay interval was dependent on the interplay between task demands (memory load and noise level and hearing loss; while alpha power increased with hearing loss during low and intermediate levels of memory load and background noise, it dropped for participants with the relatively most severe hearing loss under the highest memory load and background noise level. These findings suggest that adaptive neural mechanisms for coping with adverse listening conditions break down for higher degrees of hearing loss, even when adequate hearing aid amplification is in place.

  3. Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... law Sound level, decibels Duration, daily BASED ON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY & HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, 2008 90 8 hours 92 6 hours 95 4 hours 97 3 hours 100 2 hours 102 1.5 hours 105 1 hour 110 30 minutes 115 15 minutes or less Complications Hearing loss can have a significant effect on your quality ...

  4. Hearing loss following Caesarian Section under Spinal Anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 35-year-old parturient underwent emergency Caesarian section under subarachnoid block. A subarachnoid injection of 2.2ml hyperbaric bupivacaine and fentanyl 5μg was administered after 2 attempts at dural puncture. On the 3rd day postoperatively, she developed hearing impairment associated with postdural ...

  5. Cellular and deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss – A common hereditary deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Wingard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family which encodes gap junctional proteins is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2 mutations are responsible for ~50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential (EP reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Additionally, there is no clear relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Cx30, Cx29, Cx31, and Cx43 mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes and pathogeneses of specific-mutation induced hearing loss remain unclear. Finally, little information is available for humans. Further studies to address these deficiencies are urgently required.

  6. Global Hearing Loss Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford Scott; Emmett, Susan D; Robler, Samantha Kleindienst; Tucci, Debara L

    2018-03-07

    Hearing loss is the fourth leading contributor to years lived with a disability worldwide. Most recent estimates indicate that one-half of a billion people suffer from disabling hearing loss worldwide. The social and economic burden is significant. When attributing monetary value to years lived with disability owing to hearing loss, there is greater than $US750 billion lost each year globally. There are numerous contributors to hearing loss, including congenital, infectious, noise exposure, age-related, traumatic, and immune-mediated causes. Understanding the pathophysiology of these factors allows for the development of preventative and treatment strategies specific to the underlying cause. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use information from the test to fit your child with hearing aids. A hearing aid is a small electronic device that your baby wears in or behind the ear. It makes some sounds louder and helps your baby hear spoken words. ... VRA) . This test is used with children between 6 months and 2½ years old. It ...

  8. OI Issues: Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss can occur at any age, including childhood. Conductive Hearing Loss : Usually results from a physical problem in the ... This type of test can determine if the hearing loss is conductive or sensorineural. Adults who have an identified hearing ...

  9. Hearing Loss in Children: Types of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing. There are four types of hearing loss: Conductive Hearing Loss Hearing loss caused by something that stops sounds ... Hearing Loss Hearing loss that includes both a conductive and a sensorineural hearing loss. Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder Hearing loss that occurs ...

  10. Hearing loss impacts neural alpha oscillations under adverse listening conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Eline B.; Wöstmann, Malte; Obleser, Jonas; Stenfelt, Stefan; Lunner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Degradations in external, acoustic stimulation have long been suspected to increase the load on working memory (WM). One neural signature of WM load is enhanced power of alpha oscillations (6–12 Hz). However, it is unknown to what extent common internal, auditory degradation, that is, hearing impairment, affects the neural mechanisms of WM when audibility has been ensured via amplification. Using an adapted auditory Sternberg paradigm, we varied the orthogonal factors memory load and backgrou...

  11. What's Hearing Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss There are a few different types of hearing loss: conductive , sensorineural , mixed (conductive and sensory combined), neural , and central . Conductive (say: kun- duk -tiv) hearing loss. This happens when there is a problem with ...

  12. Hearing Loss: Screening Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Hearing Loss Screening Newborns Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of ... of newborns in the U.S. are screened for hearing loss before they leave the hospital. Research improves the ...

  13. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  14. Occupational hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001048.htm Occupational hearing loss To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Occupational hearing loss is damage to the inner ear from noise ...

  15. Pediatric Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilay, Ahmet; Koca, Çiğdem Firat

    2016-06-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is defined as sudden unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with at least 30 dB decrease in threshold in 3 contiguous test frequencies occurring over 72 hours or less. It is rare among children. The mechanism of the process and prognosis of the disorder remains unclear. The current incidence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss among pediatric population is unknown. The authors carried out a retrospective chart analysis of patients under 15 years of age from 2004 to 2015, who consulted to the Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department of Inonu University Medical Faculty. Age, sex, number of affected ear and side, audiometric evaluations, medical follow-up, treatment method, duration of treatment recovery, associated complaints; tinnitus and/or vertigo, presence of mumps disease were recorded for each patient. A 4-frequency pure-tone average (500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) was calculated for each ear. Complete recovery, defined as some hearing level compared with the nonaffected ear, was observed in 3 patients (21.4 %) and there was no partial hearing recovery. The hearing loss of 11 patient remained unchanged after prednisolone treatment. Two of the 11 patients had bilaterally total sensorineural hearing loss and evaluated as appropriate for cochlear implantation. Sex of patient and laterality of hearing loss were not correlated with hearing recovery. Sensorineural hearing loss among pediatrics has been the issue of otolaryngologists. The incidence, etiology, and treatment methods should be more studied.

  16. Deafness and Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This brief overview provides information on the definition, incidence, and characteristics of children with hearing impairments and deafness. The federal definitions of hearing impairment and deafness are provided. The different types of hearing loss are noted, including: (1) conductive (caused by diseases or obstructions in the outer or middle…

  17. Effects of hearing loss on speech recognition under distracting conditions and working memory in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Wondo; Kim, Gibbeum; Kim, Gungu; Han, Woojae; Kim, Jinsook

    2017-01-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate hearing-related changes in terms of speech-in-noise processing, fast-rate speech processing, and working memory; and to identify which of these three factors is significantly affected by age-related hearing loss. One hundred subjects aged 65-84 years participated in the study. They were classified into four groups ranging from normal hearing to moderate-to-severe hearing loss. All the participants were tested for speech perception in quiet and noisy conditions and for speech perception with time alteration in quiet conditions. Forward- and backward-digit span tests were also conducted to measure the participants' working memory. 1) As the level of background noise increased, speech perception scores systematically decreased in all the groups. This pattern was more noticeable in the three hearing-impaired groups than in the normal hearing group. 2) As the speech rate increased faster, speech perception scores decreased. A significant interaction was found between speed of speech and hearing loss. In particular, 30% of compressed sentences revealed a clear differentiation between moderate hearing loss and moderate-to-severe hearing loss. 3) Although all the groups showed a longer span on the forward-digit span test than the backward-digit span test, there was no significant difference as a function of hearing loss. The degree of hearing loss strongly affects the speech recognition of babble-masked and time-compressed speech in the elderly but does not affect the working memory. We expect these results to be applied to appropriate rehabilitation strategies for hearing-impaired elderly who experience difficulty in communication.

  18. Hearing Loss in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... services to help you and your child. Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing loss can affect a child’s ability to develop communication, language, and social skills. The earlier children with hearing loss start getting ...

  19. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  20. Hearing Loss and Cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Melvin

    1997-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common cause of congenital virally induced hearing loss. Maternal infection is most often asymptomatic as is the infection in the newborn. Hearing loss occurs in both clinically apparent infection and in the asymptomatic infection. Current methods of detection, treatment, and prevention and research efforts are…

  1. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Maggie; Heman-Ackah, Selena E.; Shaikh, Jamil A.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is commonly encountered in audiologic and otolaryngologic practice. SSNHL is most commonly defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies occurring within a 72-hr period. Although the differential for SSNHL is vast, for the majority of patients an etiologic factor is not identified. Treatment for SSNHL of known etiology is directed toward that agent, with poor hearing outcomes characteristic for discoverable etiologies that cause inner ear hair cell loss. Steroid therapy is the current mainstay of treatment of idiopathic SSNHL in the United States. The prognosis for hearing recovery for idiopathic SSNHL is dependent on a number of factors including the severity of hearing loss, age, presence of vertigo, and shape of the audiogram. PMID:21606048

  2. Effects of hearing loss on speech recognition under distracting conditions and working memory in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na W

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Wondo Na,1 Gibbeum Kim,1 Gungu Kim,1 Woojae Han,2 Jinsook Kim2 1Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Graduate School, 2Division of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Research Institute of Audiology and Speech Pathology, College of Natural Sciences, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Republic of Korea Purpose: The current study aimed to evaluate hearing-related changes in terms of speech-in-noise processing, fast-rate speech processing, and working memory; and to identify which of these three factors is significantly affected by age-related hearing loss.Methods: One hundred subjects aged 65–84 years participated in the study. They were classified into four groups ranging from normal hearing to moderate-to-severe hearing loss. All the participants were tested for speech perception in quiet and noisy conditions and for speech perception with time alteration in quiet conditions. Forward- and backward-digit span tests were also conducted to measure the participants’ working memory.Results: 1 As the level of background noise increased, speech perception scores systematically decreased in all the groups. This pattern was more noticeable in the three hearing-impaired groups than in the normal hearing group. 2 As the speech rate increased faster, speech perception scores decreased. A significant interaction was found between speed of speech and hearing loss. In particular, 30% of compressed sentences revealed a clear differentiation between moderate hearing loss and moderate-to-severe hearing loss. 3 Although all the groups showed a longer span on the forward-digit span test than the backward-digit span test, there was no significant difference as a function of hearing loss.Conclusion: The degree of hearing loss strongly affects the speech recognition of babble-masked and time-compressed speech in the elderly but does not affect the working memory. We expect these results to be applied to appropriate rehabilitation strategies for hearing

  3. Hearing loss and music

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... iPod or MP3 Player The small ear bud style headphones (inserted into the ears) DO NOT block ... chap 152. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Noise-induced hearing loss. NIH Pub. No. ...

  4. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is ... I find additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound ...

  5. Hearing loss in migrant agricultural workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Peter M; Sircar, Kanta D; Tarabar, Sanela; Galusha, Deron; Slade, Martin D

    2005-01-01

    Farmers have high rates of hearing loss, yet little is known about the hearing status of migrant agricultural workers. We performed a cross-sectional survey to assess the prevalence and impact of hearing loss in this population. One hundred fifty migrant and seasonal agricultural workers were surveyed at a series of health fairs held at migrant camps. A bilingual questionnaire included items related to hearing loss risk factors and subjective hearing difficulties. Pure tone audiometry and tympanometry were performed in a mobile testing van. More than half the subjects had some degree of hearing loss at audiometric frequencies between 500 and 6,000 Hz, especially in the higher frequencies. Hispanic males in the sample had significantly greater prevalence of high-frequency hearing loss compared to adults in the national Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES). More than 35% of respondents complained of subjective difficulty hearing or understanding speech, yet no workers reported use of hearing aids. Even after adjusting for measured hearing loss, Hispanic farm workers were more likely than their English- speaking counterparts to complain of difficulty hearing or understanding speech, suggesting that language barriers could worsen the impact of hearing loss. Risk factors for hearing loss included age and abnormal tympanometry. Occupational exposures to noise from tractors and other machinery as well as pesticides were frequently reported, while use of hearing protection was rare. Hearing loss is a significant and under-recognized problem in the migrant worker population. Further preventive and treatment efforts are warranted.

  6. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-01-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems

  7. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  8. Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing loss. Here are the most common ones: Styles of hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Hearing aids ... information, contact us at: NIDCD Information Clearinghouse 1 Communication Avenue Bethesda, MD 20892-3456 Toll-free voice: ( ...

  9. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION Language: English (US) Español ( ... when hazardous noise levels cannot be adequately reduced. Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog ...

  10. Sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wormald, R

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the aetiology of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in a paediatric population presenting to the National Centre of Medical Genetics. A retrospective chart review from 1998 to 2006. One hundred and twenty nine children were investigated for SNHL. The average age of diagnosis of hearing loss was 36 months. The degree of hearing loss was mild in 8 children, moderate in 33 children, severe in 31 children and profound in 57 children. Eighty-five children (66%) were diagnosed with a hereditary hearing loss, 11 (8%) children had an acquired hearing loss and no cause found in 33 (26%) children. This is the first report of the causes of hearing loss in Irish children. The mean age of diagnosis in our cohort is high and emphasises the need for a neonatal screening programme. There remains a number of children for whom the cause of hearing loss remains unknown.

  11. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Programs Recommendations & Guidelines Free Materials Parent’s Guide Multimedia & Tools My ... Hearing plays an essential role in communication, speech and language development, and learning. Even a small amount of hearing loss can ...

  12. Occupational Hearing Loss in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyoo Sang

    2010-01-01

    In this article, current status of noise exposure in workplaces, trend of workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and prevalence of NIHL in workers by industry and job category in Korea were reviewed. In addition, trends of research on the audiological effects such as hearing loss from noise and occupational hearing loss from non-noise in Korea were addressed through reports in industrial audiology. Though noise exposure level has improved, noise still shows the highest rate of cases ...

  13. [Presbycusis - Age Related Hearing Loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, N; Weber, B; Riechelmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Presbycusis or age related hearing loss can be defined as a progressive, bilateral and symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss due to age related degeneration of inner ear structures. It can be considered a multifactorial complex disorder with environmental and genetic factors. The molecular, electrophysiological and histological damage at different levels of the inner ear cause a progressive hearing loss, which usually affects the high frequencies of hearing. The resulting poor speech recognition has a negative impact on cognitive, emotional and social function in older adults. Recent investigations revealed an association between hearing impairment and social isolation, anxiety, depression and cognitive decline in elderly. These findings emphasize the importance of diagnosis and treating hearing loss in the elderly population. Hearing aids are the most commonly used devices for treating presbycusis. The technical progress of implantable hearing devices allows an effective hearing rehabilitation even in elderly with severe hearing loss. However, most people with hearing impairments are not treated adequately. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Acoustic Trauma - Hearing Loss in Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Can Hear It, It's Too Loud: Earbuds & Teen Hearing Loss Page Content ​Many parents will agree ... hearing loss." Recommended Hearing Screenings for Older Children & Teens Kids should be screened at three ages: 11- ...

  15. The Stigma of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhagen, Margaret I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To explore dimensions of stigma experienced by older adults with hearing loss and those with whom they frequently communicate to target interventions promoting engagement and positive aging. Design and Methods: This longitudinal qualitative study conducted interviews over 1 year with dyads where one partner had hearing loss. Participants…

  16. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  17. Infant hearing loss and connexin testing in a diverse population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmenti, Lisa A; Martinez, Ariadna; Telatar, Milhan; Lai, Chih-Hung; Shapiro, Nina; Fox, Michelle; Warman, Berta; McCarra, Matthew; Crandall, Barbara; Sininger, Yvonne; Grody, Wayne W; Palmer, Christina G S

    2008-07-01

    Previous studies of connexin-related hearing loss have typically reported on mixed age groups or adults. To further address epidemiology and natural history of connexin-related hearing loss, we conducted a longitudinal study in an ethnically diverse cohort of infants and toddlers under 3 years of age. Our study compares infants with and without connexin-related hearing loss to examine differences in the prevalence of connexin and non-connexin-related hearing loss by ethnic origin, detection by newborn hearing screening, phenotype, neonatal risk factors, and family history. This is the first study to differentiate infants with and without connexin-related hearing loss. We enrolled 95 infants with hearing loss from whom both exons of Cx26 were sequenced and the Cx30 deletion was assayed. Demographic, family history, newborn hearing screening data, perinatal, and audiologic records were analyzed. Genetic testing identified biallelic Cx26/30 hearing loss-associated variants in 24.7% of infants with a significantly lower prevalence in Hispanic infants (9.1%). Eighty-two infants underwent newborn hearing screening; 12 infants passed, 3 had connexin-related hearing loss. No differences in newborn hearing screening pass rate, neonatal complications, or hearing loss severity were detected between infants with and without connexin-related hearing loss. Family history correlates with connexin-related hearing loss. Connexin-related hearing loss occurs in one quarter of infants in an ethnically diverse hearing loss population but with a lower prevalence in Hispanic infants. Not all infants with connexin-related hearing loss fail newborn hearing screening. Family history correlates significantly with connexin-related hearing loss. Genetic testing should not be deferred because of newborn complications. These results will have an impact on genetic testing for infant hearing loss.

  18. Hearing loss at work? Hearing loss from leisure activities?

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The nurses of the Medical Service would like invite all persons working on the CERN site to take part in a: HEARING LOSS DETECTION WEEK From 28 August to 1st September 2006 At the Infirmary, Building 57 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hearing tests - advice - information - documentation - protective equipment

  19. Definition of fluctuant hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, J J

    1975-06-01

    In summary, fluctuant hearing loss is defined as a disorder of the inner ear characterized by fullness, roaring tinnitus, and fluctuations in hearing. It is believed to be caused by an inadequate absorption of endolymph from the endolymphatic sac, with or without one or more metabolic disorders, that interferes with the delicate balance between the production and absorption of endolymph and thus produces cochlear hydrops. This triad of fullness, roaring tinnitus, and fluctuant hearing loss resulting from cochlear hydrops is much more common than the quadrad of true turning vertigo, fullness, roaring tinnitus, and fluctuant hearing loss due to vestibular and cochlear hydrops known as Meniere's disease. Although patients with fluctuant hearing loss only may eventually develop vertigo as the chief complaint and then be said to have Meniere's disease, it is remarkable how many patients continue to suffer mainly from cochlear symptoms at all times. It would appear, because of the greater frequency of fluctuant hearing loss than in Meniere's disease, that the cochlear labyrinth is more susceptible to hydrops than the vestibular labyrinth. For the purposes of diagnosis and treatment it is very useful to separate patients into those with fluctuant hearing loss and those with Meniere's disease.

  20. Intellectual Disabilities and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herer, Gilbert R.

    2012-01-01

    Undetected/untreated hearing loss imposes significant limitations upon individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). It can interfere with cognitive development, impede communicative and social interactions, and limit vocational aspirations. Over the past decade, the hearing of 9961 people with ID was evaluated at Special Olympics sports…

  1. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catlin, F.I.

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. 19 references.

  2. Occupational hearing loss in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoo Sang

    2010-12-01

    In this article, current status of noise exposure in workplaces, trend of workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and prevalence of NIHL in workers by industry and job category in Korea were reviewed. In addition, trends of research on the audiological effects such as hearing loss from noise and occupational hearing loss from non-noise in Korea were addressed through reports in industrial audiology. Though noise exposure level has improved, noise still shows the highest rate of cases exceeding exposure limit among workplace hazards. NIHL is the most common occupational disease except work-related disease such as musculoskeletal disorders and cerebrovascular diseases, and NIHL prevalence is thought to be much higher than reported in official publications. Noise affecting hearing comes from various sources such as workplaces, military settings, areas with exposure to high noise, and specific noise sources. There is also occupational hearing loss by non-noise including chemicals such as organic solvents and heavy metals, barotrauma, and trauma due to welding spark. Noise affects daily life through audiological effects such as hearing loss and tinnitus, non-audiological physical effects (e.g., cardiovascular), and psychosocial and behavioral effects. Development of systematic and comprehensive hearing conservation programs for lowering the noise level in workplaces and preventing the NIHL, and preparation of technological, administrative system for its settlement at workplace are urgently needed.

  3. Age-related hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genes and loud noise (from rock concerts or music headphones) may play a large role. The following ... hearing loss) Speech reading (lip reading and using visual cues to aid communication) A cochlear implant may ...

  4. Occupational hearing loss in farmers.

    OpenAIRE

    Plakke, B L; Dare, E

    1992-01-01

    Studies have shown that there is a great deal of high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss among farmers. The studies have failed, however, to differentiate farmers who have occupational noise exposure only from other potential hearing loss etiologies. This study, through extensive case history information, has isolated a farm noise-exposure group and matched its members by age with persons with no significant noise exposure. Results indicate that farmers exposed only to noise from farming ha...

  5. Devices for hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the sounds you want to hear. Assistive listening devices bring certain sounds directly to your ears. This can ... a small room or on a stage. Other devices can bring the sound from your TV, radio, or music ...

  6. 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Hearing Loss 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents If ... gov Internet: www.nidcd.nih.gov Read More "Hearing Loss" Articles Managing Hearing Loss / Symptoms, Devices, Prevention & Research / ...

  7. Sudden Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, John C.

    1997-01-01

    Patients with a sudden dramatic decline in hearing usually require rapid diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, the treatment of this condition continues to be controversial and an exact etiology in most cases has been inconclusive. Nevertheless, physicians have reached a consensus regarding several broad principles, which are presented in this…

  8. A common SLC26A4-linked haplotype underlying non-syndromic hearing loss with enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattaraj, Parna; Munjal, Tina; Honda, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is the most common radiological abnormality in children with sensorineural hearing loss. Mutations in coding regions and splice sites of the SLC26A4 gene are often detected in Caucasians with EVA. Approximately one-fourth of patients with EVA.......0042). CONCLUSIONS: The CEVA haplotype causally contributes to most cases of Caucasian M1 EVA and, possibly, some cases of M0 EVA. The CEVA haplotype of SLC26A4 defines the most common allele associated with hereditary hearing loss in Caucasians. The diagnostic yield and prognostic utility of sequence analysis...

  9. Genetic Counseling for Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnos, Kathleen S.

    1997-01-01

    This article addresses epidemiologic and demographic characteristics of hereditary hearing loss and genetic evaluation and counseling. It discusses who should have genetic counseling, the genetic counseling process, and effects of genetics technology on the genetic counseling process. A case study of a 2-year-old with severe sensorineural hearing…

  10. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English, which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment.

  11. Talking to someone with hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000361.htm Talking to someone with hearing loss To use the sharing features on this page, ... It may be hard for a person with hearing loss to understand a conversation with another person. Being ...

  12. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infections, and Deafness Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss On this page: What are vestibular aqueducts? How ... How are enlarged vestibular aqueducts related to childhood hearing loss? Research suggests that most children with enlarged vestibular ...

  13. Hearing Aid Acquisition in Chinese Older Adults With Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Wen, Xu; Hu, Xiangyang; Gong, Rui; Luo, Yanan; Guo, Chao; Chen, Gong; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence and associated factors of hearing aid acquisition in Chinese older adults. We obtained data from a population-based survey on ear and hearing disorders, which was conducted in 4 provinces of China in 2014 to 2015. Trained examiners conducted pure tone audiometry and audiologists further ascertained for hearing loss. We relied on hearing conditions and audiologists' recommendations to identify 1503 participants who needed to wear hearing aids. Among those 1503 participants, the estimated prevalence of hearing aid acquisition was 6.5% (95% confidence interval = 5.3%, 7.8%). Urban residency, having severe hearing loss, understanding hearing aid function, and receiving a hearing test in the past 12 months were associated with elevated prevalence of hearing aid acquisition. The top-3 reported reasons for not acquiring a hearing aid were not understanding its function (25.4%), not needing it (22.3%), and not being able to afford it (21.3%). Hearing aid use, as a widespread rehabilitation and treatment of hearing loss, remains a big challenge in China. Apart from providing low-cost hearing aids, more efforts should focus on improving hearing knowledge and disseminating information about hearing aid function among older adults.

  14. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker...... after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months of followup....

  15. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Jackson, Andrew; Eisbruch, Avraham; Pan, Charlie C.; Flickinger, John C.; Antonelli, Patrick; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-01-01

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  16. Methadone Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadi Saifan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL caused by opiate abuse or overuse has been well documented in the medical literature. Most documented case reports have involved either heroin or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. Recently, case reposts of methadone induced SSHL have been published. Case Report. We present the case of a 31-year-old man who developed SSHL after a methadone overdose induced stupor. He was subsequently restarted on methadone at his regular dose. On follow-up audiometry exams, he displayed persistent moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss bilaterally. Discussion. This case is notable because unlike all but one previously reported case, the patient—who was restated on methadone—did not make a complete recovery. Conclusion. Methadone overuse in rare cases causes SSHL.

  17. Psychosocial Aspects of Hearing Loss in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Donna L; Gates-Ulanet, Patricia; Mellon, Nancy K

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric hearing loss changed more in the past two decades than it had in the prior 100 years with children now identified in the first weeks of life and fit early with amplification. Dramatic improvements in hearing technology allow children the opportunity to listen, speak and read on par with typically hearing peers. National laws mandate that public and private schools, workplaces, and anywhere people go must be accessible to individuals with disabilities. In 2015, most children with hearing loss attended mainstream schools with typically hearing peers. Psychosocial skills still present challenges for some children with hearing loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk factors for hearing loss in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Luh Putu Maharani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background An estimated 6 of 1,000 children with live births suffer from permanent hearing loss at birth or the neonatal period. At least 90% of cases occur in developing countries. Hearing loss should be diagnosed as early as possible so that intervention can be done before the age of 6 months. Objective To determine risk factors for hearing loss in neonates. Methods We performed a case-control study involving 100 neonates with and without hearing loss who were born at Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar from November 2012 to February 2013. Subjects were consisted of 2 groups, those with hearing loss (case group of 50 subjects and without hearing loss (control group of 50 subjects. The groups were matched for gender and birth weight. We assessed the following risk factors for hearing loss: severe neonatal asphyxia, hyperbilirubinemia, meningitis, history of aminoglycoside therapy, and mechanical ventilation by Chi-square analysis. The results were presented as odds ratio and its corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Results Seventy percent of neonates with hearing loss had history of aminoglycoside therapy. Multivariable analysis revealed that aminoglycoside therapy of 14 days or more was a significant risk factor for hearing loss (OR 2.7; 95%CI 1.1 to 6.8; P=0.040. There were no statistically significant associations between hearing loss and severe asphyxia, hyperbilirubinemia, meningitis, or mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Aminoglycoside therapy for >=14 days was identified as a risk factor for hearing loss in neonates.

  19. Sudden bilateral hearing loss after organophosphate inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Dundar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden bilateral hearing loss are seen rarely and the toxic substance exposure constitutes a small part of etiology. A Fifty-eight-year-old woman admitted to our clinic with sudden bilateral hearing loss shortly after chlorpyrifos-ethyl exposure. Otolaryngologic examination findings were normal. The patient had 40 dB sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL on the right ear and 48 dB SNHL on the left ear. Additional diagnostic tests were normal. The conventional treatment for sudden hearing loss was performed. On the second week following organophosphate (OP exposure the patient's hearing loss almost completely resolved. OP's are heavily used in agriculture and should be taken into consideration as an etiologic factor in sudden hearing loss. Keywords: Organophosphates, Hearing loss, Sudden

  20. Hearing Loss in Children: Screening and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Hearing Loss in Children Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... if a child may be at risk for hearing loss . If a child does not pass a hearing screening, it’s very ...

  1. Hearing loss among classical-orchestra musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esko Toppila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study intended to evaluate classical musicians′ risk of hearing loss. We studied 63 musicians from four Helsinki classical orchestras. We measured their hearing loss with an audiometer, found their prior amount of exposure to sound and some individual susceptibility factors with a questionnaire, measured their present sound exposure with dosimeters, and tested their blood pressure and cholesterol levels, then compared their hearing loss to ISO 1999-1990′s predictions. The musicians′ hearing loss distribution corresponded to that of the general population, but highly exposed musicians had greater hearing loss at frequencies over 3 kHz than less-exposed ones. Their individual susceptibly factors were low. Music deteriorates hearing, but by less than what ISO 1999-1990 predicted. The low number of individual susceptibility factors explained the difference, but only reduced hearing loss and not the prevalence of tinnitus.

  2. Introduction to audiology: Some basics about hearing loss, hearing technologies and barriers to hearing aid use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtou, Eleni; Meis, Markus

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides background information for researchers who wish to become familiar with some basic medical and audiological aspects of hearing loss and the technology of hearing aids. It introduces (1) the disciplines involved in research on hearing loss, (2) the medical categories of hearing...... loss and their various effects on communication, (3) the different degrees of hearing loss as defined by different national and international organizations, (4) statistics on the preva- lence of hearing loss worldwide, (5) some technological aspects of hearing instruments, (6) sta- tistics on non......-usage of hearing instruments worldwide, and (7) barriers to using hearing aids. Since hearing loss is a worldwide pervasive phenomenon which is likely to increase even further in the future, the authors point out that an understanding of the non-use of hearing aids is crucial....

  3. Managing Hearing Loss | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over (37.5 million) report some trouble hearing. Conductive hearing loss occurs when sound waves cannot reach the inner ... eardrum. Medical treatment or surgery can usually restore conductive hearing loss. A common problem is age-related hearing loss ( ...

  4. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup....

  5. Risk factors for hearing loss in elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly Vasconcelos Chaves Martins; Marília Fontenele e Silva Câmara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify risk factors related to sensorineural hearing loss in elderly. Methods: The sample consisted of 60 selected elderly, divided into two groups: the Case Group, composed by 30 individuals, 21 females and 9 males, aged at least 60 years, presenting sensorineural hearing loss, and the Control Group, composed by 30 individuals matched on gender and age, with normal hearing. The patients were submitted to audiological anamnesis and tonal audiometry. The hearing impairment ...

  6. Sensorineural hearing loss in hemorrhagic dengue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Bruna Natália Freire; Guimarães, Alexandre Caixeta; Yazawa, Felipe; Takara, Tammy Fumiko Messias; de Carvalho, Guilherme Machado; Zappelini, Carlos Eduardo Monteiro

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is an acute febrile infectious disease, with high fever followed by symptoms flu-like. Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is a vascular leak syndrome and could present spontaneous bleeding and worsening of symptoms after some days. Dengue could have some ENT manifestations, however hearing loss is not one of them. Sudden hearing loss is considered as sensorineural or perceptual hearing loss with a sudden onset in a person without other prior otological history. The relation between infectious diseases and sudden hearing are been investigated, some viruses were already linked, but the relation between dengue virus and sudden hearing still remains unknown. This article has the goal of presenting a case of DHF that evolved with SSHL in his hospitalization process. We report a 60 years-male patient of with DHF who developed bilateral secretory otitis media and sensorineural hearing loss after the fifth day of onset of symptoms. His hearing loss remained even after 7 months and the patient was referred for hearing aid fitting. This is the first case report that brings together DHF and sudden hearing loss. In the development of this case no other cause to sudden hearing loss was found and the correlation between dengue and hearing loss was questioned. In the literature review was found that some viruses, as mumps virus, varicella-zoster virus and HSV-1 and HSV-2 are related to sudden hearing loss, all of them fit in the viral theory. Besides the viral theory of sudden hearing loss, there is the vascular theory that is the occlusion of the end artery that supplies the cochlea. DHF has a vascular commitment, and the hypothesis of a vascular cause could be elicited in this case. Many studies in this area are needed and this article has the objective of elicit the discussion about the subject. Could dengue be associated with sensorineural hearing loss? Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Sudden bilateral hearing loss after organophosphate inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Mehmet Akif; Derin, Serhan; Aricigil, Mitat; Eryilmaz, Mehmet Akif

    2016-12-01

    Sudden bilateral hearing loss are seen rarely and the toxic substance exposure constitutes a small part of etiology. A Fifty-eight-year-old woman admitted to our clinic with sudden bilateral hearing loss shortly after chlorpyrifos-ethyl exposure. Otolaryngologic examination findings were normal. The patient had 40 dB sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) on the right ear and 48 dB SNHL on the left ear. Additional diagnostic tests were normal. The conventional treatment for sudden hearing loss was performed. On the second week following organophosphate (OP) exposure the patient's hearing loss almost completely resolved. OP's are heavily used in agriculture and should be taken into consideration as an etiologic factor in sudden hearing loss.

  8. Sensorineural hearing loss in hemorrhagic dengue?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Natália Freire Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: This is the first case report that brings together DHF and sudden hearing loss. In the development of this case no other cause to sudden hearing loss was found and the correlation between dengue and hearing loss was questioned. In the literature review was found that some viruses, as mumps virus, varicella-zoster virus and HSV-1 and HSV-2 are related to sudden hearing loss, all of them fit in the viral theory. Besides the viral theory of sudden hearing loss, there is the vascular theory that is the occlusion of the end artery that supplies the cochlea. DHF has a vascular commitment, and the hypothesis of a vascular cause could be elicited in this case. Many studies in this area are needed and this article has the objective of elicit the discussion about the subject. Could dengue be associated with sensorineural hearing loss?

  9. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss; Prognostic Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Arjun, Dass; Neha, Goel; Surinder K, Singhal; Ravi, Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a frightening and frustrating symptom for the patient as well as the physician. Prognosis is affected by multiple factors including duration of hearing loss, presence of associated vertigo and tinnitus, and co-morbidities such as hypertension and diabetes.   Materials and Methods: Forty subjects presenting to our department with features of sudden hearing loss were included in the study. Detailed otological history and examination, se...

  10. Sudden bilateral hearing loss after organophosphate inhalation

    OpenAIRE

    Dundar, Mehmet Akif; Derin, Serhan; Aricigil, Mitat; Eryilmaz, Mehmet Akif

    2016-01-01

    Sudden bilateral hearing loss are seen rarely and the toxic substance exposure constitutes a small part of etiology. A Fifty-eight-year-old woman admitted to our clinic with sudden bilateral hearing loss shortly after chlorpyrifos-ethyl exposure. Otolaryngologic examination findings were normal. The patient had 40 dB sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) on the right ear and 48 dB SNHL on the left ear. Additional diagnostic tests were normal. The conventional treatment for sudden hearing loss was...

  11. [Hearing loss associated with smoking in male workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Yasumitsu

    2011-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was designed to examine the effect of smoking habit on hearing loss at 1000 and 4000 Hz in the workplace. Among 1,875 male workers, including 287 subjects with occupational noise exposure, the ratio of the number with hearing loss at 1000 or 4000 Hz increased with smoking habits and that relation at 4000 Hz was statistically significant. These hearing losses showed a significant relation with age but not with working- duration under occupational noise exposure by multiple regression analysis. The amount of smoking showed a weak but significant association with hearing loss at 4000 Hz. However, among the 287 male subjects with occupational noise exposure, there was no significant relation between smoking habits and hearing loss. Therefore, both hearing loss induced by occupational noise exposure and that related with smoking habit were well controlled in this workplace. These results indicate that hearing check-ups and education to prevent noise-induced hearing impairment in the workplace might be useful to prevent the hearing loss associated with smoking habit among male workers.

  12. Hearing Loss in Children: Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children with hearing loss can help them develop communication skills. (Published: July 10, 2017) Can Your Baby Hear You Say “I Love You?” Find out why hearing screening is important, how to get your baby screened, and what ...

  13. Individual Hearing Loss: Characterization, Modelling, Compensation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that hearing loss does not only lead to a reduction of hearing sensitivity. Large individual differences are typically observed among listeners with hearing impairment in a wide range of suprathreshold auditory measures. In many cases, audiometric thresholds cannot fully...... account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR...

  14. Hearing Loss in Cryptococcal Meningitis Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Lofgren, Sarah; Montgomery, Martha; Yueh, Nathan; Namudde, Alice; Rhein, Joshua; Abassi, Mahsa; Musubire, Abdu; Meya, David; Boulware, David

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Hearing loss is a known complication cryptococcal meningitis (CM); however, there is a paucity of data. We aimed to describe hearing loss in CM survivors. Methods We assessed hearing via audiometry 8 and 18 weeks after diagnosis of CM in Kampala, Uganda from 2015-2016. We measured at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 Hz. Normal hearing was defined as minimum hearing level at 25 cm H2O 113 24 (71%) 28 (45%) 0.017 Average Opening Pressure >20 cm H20 96 34 (81%) 43 (61%) 0.025 Quantitative Cultur...

  15. Hearing aids for mild to moderate hearing loss in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Melanie A; Kitterick, Pádraig T; Chong, Lee Yee; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; Barker, Fiona; Hoare, Derek J

    2017-09-25

    The main clinical intervention for mild to moderate hearing loss is the provision of hearing aids. These are routinely offered and fitted to those who seek help for hearing difficulties. By amplifying and improving access to sounds, and speech sounds in particular, the aim of hearing aid use is to reduce the negative consequences of hearing loss and improve participation in everyday life. To evaluate the effects of hearing aids for mild to moderate hearing loss in adults. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the ENT Trials Register; the Cochrane Register of Studies Online; MEDLINE; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 23 March 2017. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of hearing aids compared to a passive or active control in adults with mild to moderate hearing loss. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcomes in this review were hearing-specific health-related quality of life and the adverse effect pain. Secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life, listening ability and the adverse effect noise-induced hearing loss. We used GRADE to assess the quality of the evidence for each outcome; this is indicated in italics. We included five RCTs involving 825 participants. The studies were carried out in the USA and Europe, and were published between 1987 and 2017. Risk of bias across the studies varied. Most had low risk for selection, reporting and attrition bias, and a high risk for performance and detection bias because blinding was inadequate or absent.All participants had mild to moderate hearing loss. The average age across all five studies was between 69 and 83 years. The duration of the studies ranged between six weeks and six months.There was a large beneficial effect of hearing aids on hearing-specific health-related quality of life associated with participation in daily life as

  16. Molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of hydrogen-saturated saline on noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liwei; Han, Mingkun; Lu, Yan; Chen, Daishi; Sun, Xuejun; Yang, Shiming; Sun, Wei; Yu, Ning; Zhai, Suoqiang

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the molecular mechanism of the protective effects of hydrogen-saturated saline on NIHL. Guinea pigs were divided into three groups: hydrogen-saturated saline; normal saline; and control. For saline administration, the guinea pigs were given daily abdominal injections 3 d before and 1 h before noise exposure. ABR were tested to examine cochlear physiology changes. The changes of 8-hydroxy-desoxyguanosine (8-HOdG), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) in the cochlea were also examined. The results showed that pre-treatment with hydrogen-saturated saline could significantly attenuate noise-induced hearing loss. The concentration of 8-HOdG was also significantly decreased in the hydrogen-saturated saline group compared with the normal saline group. After noise exposure, the concentrations of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 in the cochlea of guinea pigs in the hydrogen-saturated saline group were dramatically reduced compared to those in the normal saline group. The concentrations of HMGB-1 and IL-10 in the hydrogen-saturated saline group were significantly higher than in those in the normal saline group immediately and at 7 d after noise exposure. This study revealed for the first time the protective effects of hydrogen-saturated saline on noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) are related to both the anti-oxidative activity and anti-inflammatory activity.

  17. A Clinical Analysis of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Soo; Lee, You Jae; Kang, Bo Sung; Lee, Ji Sung

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives High-dose systemic steroid therapy is the mainstay treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). Recovery rates from SSNHL range are about 47-63% and are influenced by various prognostic factors. To evaluate the prognostic value of specific clinical parameters, we reviewed 289 cases by clinical and statistical analysis. Subjects and Methods This study included 289 patients with SSNHL who visited the Department of Otolaryngology at Soonchunhyang University Hospital from January 2005 to December 2012. The cases were reviewed retrospectively based on clinical charts. Hearing improvement was evaluated in relation to pure-tone audiogram results, duration between SSNHL onset and time of initial treatment, seasonal incidence, dizziness, patient age, degree of hearing loss, patterns of initial pure-tone audiogram and presence of underlying disease. Results Hearing improvement was observed in 196 of 289 (67.8%) patients; such improvement began within 7 days in most patients, followed by rapid hearing recovery. Cases that failed to show improvement within 14 days were unlikely to achieve hearing recovery. The more severe the hearing loss during the early stage, the lower the hearing recovery rates. Patients aged less than 60 years appear to have better prognosis of hearing improvement compared to those who are over 60 years. Conclusions Important prognostic factors for recovery in patients with SSNHL include the time of initiating treatment after symptom onset, the degree of early-stage hearing loss, and the age of the affected patient. PMID:25279228

  18. Prognostic factors in sudden hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Enache, R; Sarafoleanu, I

    2008-01-01

    Sudden hearing loss is a sensorineural hypoacusis, unilateral in most of the cases, with an incidence peak in young adult. This article is the result of a four years retrospective study, in which we have tried to see how age, severity of hearing loss, presence or absence of vertigo, the timing of treatment initiation can influence the hearing recovery. 47 patients were included in this inpatient study. They were investigated (clinical, lab and imaging studies) and the treatment protocol inclu...

  19. Sudden (reversible) sensorineural hearing loss in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenny, R

    2011-03-01

    Sudden hearing loss directly associated with pregnancy or birth is a little known and rare occurrence. The temporary, unilateral, low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss in this case was reported after the birth of the patient\\'s first child, and again during the third trimester of her second pregnancy.

  20. Conductive hearing loss and bone conduction devices: restored binaural hearing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agterberg, Martijn J H; Hol, Myrthe K S; Cremers, Cor W R J; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; van Opstal, John; Snik, Ad F M

    2011-01-01

    An important aspect of binaural hearing is the proper detection of interaural sound level differences and interaural timing differences. Assessments of binaural hearing were made in patients with acquired unilateral conductive hearing loss (UCHL, n = 11) or congenital UCHL (n = 10) after unilateral application of a bone conduction device (BCD), and in patients with bilateral conductive or mixed hearing loss after bilateral BCD application. Benefit (bilateral versus unilateral listening) was assessed by measuring directional hearing, compensation of the acoustic head shadow, binaural summation and binaural squelch. Measurements were performed after an acclimatization time of at least 10 weeks. Unilateral BCD application was beneficial, but there was less benefit in the patients with congenital UCHL as compared to patients with acquired UCHL. In adults with bilateral hearing loss, bilateral BCD application was clearly beneficial as compared to unilateral BCD application. Binaural summation was present, but binaural squelch could not be proven. To explain the poor results in the patients with congenital UCHL, two factors seemed to be important. First, a critical period in the development of binaural hearing might affect the binaural hearing abilities. Second, crossover stimulation, referring to additional stimulation of the cochlea contralateral to the BCD side, might deteriorate binaural hearing in patients with UCHL. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Conversion Deafness Presenting as Sudden Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Piao Wang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Conversion deafness is a somatoform disorder characterized by hearing loss without an anatomic or pathophysiologic lesion. Clinically, discrepancies between behavior hearing thresholds and objective electrophysiologic examinations, such as impedance audiometry, otoacoustic emissions (OAE, and auditory brainstem response (ABR, will raise the suspicion of this disorder. It is judged to be due to psychological factors and that patients do not intentionally produce the symptom. Conversion deafness is sometimes reported in children but is extremely rare among adults. Two young adults with this disease are presented. These 2 patients were both under enormous stress from the national entrance examinations for universities. Pure tone audiometry showed bilateral hearing deterioration, but OAE and ABR were normal. The hearing of both patients recovered after treatment. The diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this disorder are also discussed. It is important to discover the psychological stress in patients with conversion deafness. This report aims to increase awareness of this condition and avoid unnecessary steroid use in its treatment.

  2. Age-related hearing loss or presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi; Tang, Jianguo

    2010-08-01

    Aging is a natural consequence of a society developing process. Although many adults retain good hearing as they aging, hearing loss related with age-presbycusis which can vary in severity from mild to substantial is common among elderly persons. There are a number of pathophysiological processes underlying age-related changes in the auditory system as well as in the central nervous systems. Many studies have been dedicated to the illustration of risk factors accumulating presbycusis such as heritability, environment factors, medical conditions, free radical (reactive oxygen species, ROS) and damage of mitochondrial DNA. Left untreated, presbycusis can not only lead sufferers to reduced quality of life, isolation, dependence and frustration, but also affect the healthy people around. These can be partly corrected using hearing aids, but it is not enough, more and more strategies of treatment based on the findings associating with presbycusis should be added rather than using single hearing aids. We review here the pathophysiology; heritability, susceptibility genes and other risk factors including environmental, medical, especially free radical (ROS) and damage of mitochondrial DNA; and some strategies of treatment, as well as promising rehabilitations associating with presbycusis.

  3. State of contemporary research in hearing function and hearing loss

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syka, Josef

    -, - (2006), s. 223-226. ISBN 80-228-1673-6. [International Acoustical Conference /33./. 04.10.2006-06.10.2006, Štrbské pleso] R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8113; GA MŠk LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Hearing loss * Hearing function Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  4. Identifying Hearing Loss in Young Children: Technology Replaces the Bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiserman, William; Shisler, Lenore

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss can too easily be misdiagnosed or overlooked by providers serving young children. Parents and professionals may observe a language delay--an "invisible" condition--while failing to identify the underlying cause. Otoacoustic emissions (OAE) hearing screening technology, used extensively with newborns, is becoming an essential tool,…

  5. Relationship between hearing complaint and hearing loss among older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Presbycusis is a public health problem. Despite its high prevalence, many elders do not have their hearing ability investigated periodically, because they do not have a specific complaint. Objective: To check whether there is a relationship between the complaint and the presence of hearing loss in elder people. Method: Transversal study in elders from a neighborhood in the city of Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul. After the definition of the neighborhood's geographic boundaries, all houses were visited, the older people's addresses were ascertained and the invitations to take part in the research were provided. A questionnaire survey was applied which had a question about hearing loss complaint and air-conducted hearing thresholds were obtained and studied. Out of the 72 identified elders 50 elders agreed to participate, 35 (70% women, and 15 (30% men. Results: It was confirmed that only 12 (24% elders showed a specific complaint of hearing loss, although 33 (66% elders showed slight, moderate, severe and profound hearing losses. Conclusion: Data analysis confirmed there was no relationship between the complaint and the presence of hearing loss in the assessed group, and demonstrated the need to forward the elders for audiological evaluation even without any specific complaint.

  6. Drug Induced Hearing Loss: Researchers Study Strategies to Preserve Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Drug-Induced Hearing Loss Researchers Study Strategies to Preserve ... brain there was a sound. What are ototoxic drugs and why are they important? Ototoxic drugs are ...

  7. Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mollasadeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI devices produce noise, which may affect patient’s or operators’ hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus. In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient’s hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.

  8. Sudden hearing loss associated with methylphenidate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapinar, Ugur; Saglam, Omer; Dursun, Engin; Cetin, Bilal; Salman, Nergis; Sahan, Murat

    2014-01-01

    An 8-year-old child diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder presented to our Department of Otolaryngology 4 days after suffering hearing loss, loss of balance, tinnitus, and fullness sensation of the left ear. Her symptoms occured with the first dose of methylphenidate. The medical history and physical examination revealed no other diseases associated with sudden hearing loss. The audiogram revealed a total hearing loss on the left ear. Stapedial reflexes, distortion product and transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions were absent in left ear. The absence of clinical, laboratory and radiological evidence of a possible cause for complaints, an association between methylphenidate and sudden hearing loss was suggested. The patient received a standard course of oral corticosteroid and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Weekly otological and audiological examinations were performed. Conservative and medical treatments offered no relief from hearing loss. Sudden hearing loss is a serious and irreversible adverse effect of methylphenidate. Therefore, the risk of hearing loss should be taken into consideration when initiating methylphenidate therapy.

  9. Hearing Parents of Children with Hearing Loss: Perceptions of the IEP Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Robin Fern

    2016-01-01

    Under federal guidelines, parents of school-aged children with hearing loss are required to attend an individualized education program (IEP) meeting on behalf of their child. However, it remains unclear how prepared hearing parents are to oversee development of IEPs that guarantee their children the best educational outcomes, as well as how much…

  10. Prognostic factors in sudden hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, R

    2008-01-01

    Sudden hearing loss is a sensorineural hypoacusis, unilateral in most of the cases, with an incidence peak in young adult. This article is the result of a four years retrospective study, in which we have tried to see how age, severity of hearing loss, presence or absence of vertigo, the timing of treatment initiation can influence the hearing recovery. 47 patients were included in this inpatient study. They were investigated (clinical, lab and imaging studies) and the treatment protocol included vasodilators, anti–inflammatory agents, vitamins, plasma expander. In conclusion, a good prognosis in the hearing recovery was associated with absence of vertigo, early treatment (the first 7 days), and hearing loss less than 50dB. Age had no influence upon the recovery process. PMID:20108511

  11. Does erythropoietin augment noise induced hearing loss?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Lund, Søren Peter

    2007-01-01

    of EPO upon damage to the central nervous system and the retina. This paper reports three separate trials, conducted to investigate the hypothesis that noise-induced hearing loss is prevented or reduced by erythropoietin. The trials employed three different modes of drug application, different......Noise-induced hearing loss may result from excessive release of glutamate, nitrogen oxide and reactive oxygen species. The effects of these factors on the inner ear may potentially be prevented or reduced by erythropoietin (EPO), as indicated by previously demonstrated neuro-protective effects...... and auditory brainstem responses (at 16kHz) were recorded before and after noise exposure in all trials. The noise exposure induced a hearing loss in all animals. In trial 1, no recovery and no improvement of hearing occurred in any treatment group. In trial 2 and 3, a partial hearing recovery was seen...

  12. Comparing amikacin and kanamycin-induced hearing loss in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment under programmatic conditions in a Namibian retrospective cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagwa, Evans L; Ruswa, Nunurai; Mavhunga, Farai; Rennie, Timothy; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amikacin and kanamycin are mainly used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), especially in developing countries where the burden of MDR-TB is highest. Their protracted use in MDR-TB treatment is known to cause dose-dependent irreversible hearing loss, requiring hearing

  13. Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara, S A; Teh, B M; Friedland, P

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral and bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss represent different disease entities. The unilateral condition is more common and predominantly idiopathic, and up to 65 per cent of patients spontaneously recover hearing. Conversely, the bilateral condition is rare, mostly associated with serious systemic conditions, and has a higher prevalence of morbidity and mortality. A literature search using the PubMed database was conducted using the MeSH terms 'sudden', 'bilateral' and 'sensorineural hearing loss'. One hundred and three reported cases of bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss were identified. The condition is most often associated with toxic, autoimmune, neoplastic and vascular conditions. A younger age of onset, with a bimodal age distribution, was seen for bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss, compared with the unilateral condition. Patients with the bilateral condition had more profound hearing loss, with poorer recovery and a 35 per cent mortality rate. Vestibular symptoms were also less common than in the unilateral condition. The presentation of bilateral sudden onset sensorineural hearing loss is a medical emergency requiring thorough and urgent investigation to exclude life-threatening and reversible conditions.

  14. Recovery of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edizer, Deniz Tuna; Çelebi, Özlem; Hamit, Bahtiyar; Baki, Ahmet; Yiğit, Özgür

    2015-08-01

    The objective was to identify and evaluate factors that may influence the recovery rate in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). A retrospective analysis was performed for patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss between 2009 and 2013. Those with an identified etiology were excluded. The patients were divided into four treatment groups: (i) systemic corticosteroids (SC) only, (ii) SC+low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), (iii) SC+hyperbaric oxygen (HBO), and (iv) SC+LMWH+HBO. Recovery was evaluated according to Siegel's criteria. Age, initial hearing level, onset, treatment and audiogram types, comorbidities, and associated tinnitus and vestibular symptoms were investigated for their impact on prognosis. Two hundred five patients with ISSNHL were included. Recovery was seen in 59% of the patients. The complete recovery rate was significantly lower in patients older than 60 years and in patients presenting with profound hearing loss. Different audiogram curves had no significant effect on recovery. Sudden hearing loss was accompanied by tinnitus in 107 (52.1%) patients and vestibular symptoms in 55 (26.8%); however, neither was noted to affect prognosis. Different treatment combinations did not significantly affect prognosis. However, hypertension and a delay in treatment by more than 10 days from the onset of hearing loss were associated with a worse prognosis. Profound hearing loss, older than 60 years, a delay in treatment by more than 10 days, and hypertension were negative prognostic factors in this study, whereas, the type of audiogram curve and addition of HBO to SC did not affect prognosis.

  15. Cochlear implant candidates with psychogenic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompis, Martin; Senn, Pascal; Mantokoudis, Georgios; Caversaccio, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Specific requests for cochlear implantations by persons with psychogenic hearing loss are a relatively new phenomenon. A number of features seems to be over-represented in this group of patients. The existence of these requests stresses the importance of auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurements before cochlear implantation. To describe the phenomenon of patients with psychogenic hearing losses specifically requesting cochlear implantation, and to gain first insights into the characteristics of this group. Analysis of all cases seen between 2004 and 2013 at the University Hospital of Bern, Switzerland. Four cochlear implant candidates with psychogenic hearing loss were identified. All were female, aged 23-51 years. Hearing thresholds ranged from 86 dB to 112 dB HL (pure-tone average 500-4000 Hz). ABRs and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) showed bilaterally normal hearing in two subjects, and hearing thresholds between 30 and 50 dB in the other two subjects. Three subjects suffered from depression and one from a pathologic fear of cancer. Three had a history of five or more previous surgeries. Three were smokers and three reported other close family members with hearing losses. All four were hearing aid users at the time of presentation.

  16. Communicating with patients who have hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, R; Hock, I

    2000-02-01

    Access to health care services is of paramount interest to all New Jerseyans. For people with varying degrees of hearing loss, affordable health insurance, while important, is not the only barrier to quality health care. Doctors are required by law to ensure effective communication between themselves and their deaf or hard-of-hearing patients.

  17. Pre-enlistment hearing loss and hearing loss disability among US soldiers and marines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene E Gubata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a common condition among US adults, with some evidence of increasing prevalence in young adults. Noise-induced hearing loss attributable to employment is a significant source of preventable morbidity world-wide. The US military population is largely comprised of young adult males serving in a wide variety of occupations, many in high noise-level conditions, at least episodically. To identify accession and service-related risk factors for hearing-related disability, matched case-control study of US military personnel was conducted. Individuals evaluated for hearing loss disability in the US Army and Marine Corps were frequency matched to controls without history of disability evaluation on service and enlistment year. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine the association between accession and service-related factors and hearing-related disability evaluations between October 2002 and September 2010. Individuals with medically disqualifying audiograms or hearing loss diagnoses at application for military service were 8 and 4 times more likely, respectively, to have a disability evaluation related to hearing loss, after controlling for relevant accession, demographic, and service-related factors. Conservative hearing loss thresholds on pre-enlistment audiograms, stricter hearing loss medical waiver policies or qualified baseline audiograms pre-enlistment are needed in the U.S military. Industrial corporations or labor unions may also benefit from identifying individuals with moderate hearing loss at the time of employment to ensure use of personal protective equipment and engineer controls of noise.

  18. Treatment of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    d'Aldin, Gervais

    1999-01-01

    .... Guinea pigs are subjected to an acoustic trauma. The recovery of the noise-induced hearing loss is followed up to 14 days post exposure by electrocochleography and morphologic examination of the cochlea is performed...

  19. Gd enhanced MRI in sensorineural hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, Mika; Tono, Tetsuya; Toyama, Katsuhiro; Kano, Kiyo; Morimitsu, Tamotsu [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    The enhanced MRI hearing findings of the inner ear in 124 patients with sensorineural hearing loss were evaluated. MR images were obtained before and after the intravenous administration of gadolinium (0.1 mmol/kg). In three out of seventy-nine patients with unilateral healing loss, cochlear and/or the vestibular enhancement was noted on the symptomatic side. The positive cases included those with Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, mumps and so-called sudden deafness. Forty-five patients with bilateral hearing loss showed no enhancement within the inner ear. Although positive gadolinium enhancement of the inner ear may detect inflammatory lesions due to a viral infection, its incidence in sensorineural hearing loss, including cases of sudden deafness. seems to be extremely rare. (author)

  20. Altered Brain Functional Activity in Infants with Congenital Bilateral Severe Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study under Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Xia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early hearing deprivation could affect the development of auditory, language, and vision ability. Insufficient or no stimulation of the auditory cortex during the sensitive periods of plasticity could affect the function of hearing, language, and vision development. Twenty-three infants with congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss (CSSHL and 17 age and sex matched normal hearing subjects were recruited. The amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF and regional homogeneity (ReHo of the auditory, language, and vision related brain areas were compared between deaf infants and normal subjects. Compared with normal hearing subjects, decreased ALFF and ReHo were observed in auditory and language-related cortex. Increased ALFF and ReHo were observed in vision related cortex, which suggest that hearing and language function were impaired and vision function was enhanced due to the loss of hearing. ALFF of left Brodmann area 45 (BA45 was negatively correlated with deaf duration in infants with CSSHL. ALFF of right BA39 was positively correlated with deaf duration in infants with CSSHL. In conclusion, ALFF and ReHo can reflect the abnormal brain function in language, auditory, and visual information processing in infants with CSSHL. This demonstrates that the development of auditory, language, and vision processing function has been affected by congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss before 4 years of age.

  1. Altered Brain Functional Activity in Infants with Congenital Bilateral Severe Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study under Sedation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Jing; Li, Qiang; Chai, Chao; Zheng, Meizhu; Shen, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Early hearing deprivation could affect the development of auditory, language, and vision ability. Insufficient or no stimulation of the auditory cortex during the sensitive periods of plasticity could affect the function of hearing, language, and vision development. Twenty-three infants with congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss (CSSHL) and 17 age and sex matched normal hearing subjects were recruited. The amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) of the auditory, language, and vision related brain areas were compared between deaf infants and normal subjects. Compared with normal hearing subjects, decreased ALFF and ReHo were observed in auditory and language-related cortex. Increased ALFF and ReHo were observed in vision related cortex, which suggest that hearing and language function were impaired and vision function was enhanced due to the loss of hearing. ALFF of left Brodmann area 45 (BA45) was negatively correlated with deaf duration in infants with CSSHL. ALFF of right BA39 was positively correlated with deaf duration in infants with CSSHL. In conclusion, ALFF and ReHo can reflect the abnormal brain function in language, auditory, and visual information processing in infants with CSSHL. This demonstrates that the development of auditory, language, and vision processing function has been affected by congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss before 4 years of age. PMID:28255465

  2. Management of Conductive Hearing Loss in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, William; Kesser, Bradley W

    2015-12-01

    Conductive hearing loss (CHL), far more common than sensorineural hearing loss in children, can be acquired or congenital, can range from mild to moderately severe, and can be caused by a simple cerumen impaction, middle ear fluid, or complex middle ear abnormalities with or without the absence of the ear canal (congenital aural atresia). This article presents evidence-based recommendations for the evaluation and management of the child with both acquired and congenital CHL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-Esteem in Children and Adolescents With Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D.; Loy, Betty A.; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty chil...

  4. Current amplification models of sensorineurall and conductive hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ostojić, Sanja; Mikić, Branka; Mirić, Danica

    2012-01-01

    The main function of a hearing aid is to improve auditory and language abilities of hearing impaired users. The amplification model has to be adapted according to age, degree and type of hearing loss. The goal of this paper is to analyze the current amplification models of sensorineural and conductive hearing loss which can provide a high quality of speech perception and sounds at any degree of hearing loss. The BAHA is a surgically implantable system for treatment of conductive hearing loss ...

  5. Hearing Screening and Diagnostic Evaluation of Children With Unilateral and Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Danielle S.; Holstrum, W. June; Gaffney, Marcus; Green, Denise; Oyler, Robert F.; Gravel, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    More than 90% of newborns in the United States are now being screened for hearing loss. A large fraction of cases of unilateral hearing loss and mild bilateral hearing loss are not currently identified through newborn hearing screening. This is of concern because a preponderance of research has demonstrated that unilateral hearing loss and mild bilateral hearing loss can lead to developmental delays and educational problems for some children. To help address this probable underidentification ...

  6. [Dependency of APHAB score in the ECusubscale on age, gender and subjective hearing loss : Hearing aid fitting in two subjective hearing loss groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhler, J; Wegner, O; Wollenberg, B; Schönweiler, R

    2018-03-12

    The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) determines subjective impairment by hearing loss in four situations before and after hearing aid fitting. The first part (APHAB u ) of the questionnaire can be used independently of hearing aid fitting. Previous research has demonstrated that the answers in the EC u subscale for hearing under easy conditions are concentrated in two groups: one with subjectively better, one with subjectively worse hearing. This study aimed to investigate in a large collective whether there are differences between these two groups in terms of age, gender, and individual hearing loss. The data of 1755 patients were analyzed, whose APHAB answers and pure-tone thresholds had been collected during hearing aid fitting. Group 1 had an average EC u score ≤37.5%; in group 2 it was ≥67.5%. The individual hearing losses was determined. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U, χ 2 , Spearman, and Pearson tests. The 616 members of group 1 were significantly younger (68.7 vs. 73.0 years) and comprised more females (53.9 vs. 46.1%) than the 1139 members of group 2. Hearing was frequency specific in group 1, and hearing loss as classified using standard audiograms and according to the three-frequency table was significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2, CONCLUSION: The distribution with two maximums in the EC u subscale can be explained by individual differences in terms of age and hearing loss, in part also by gender. The lower absolute number of patients in group 1 could be explained by the still relatively late fitting of hearing aids in general.

  7. Noise Induced Hearing Loss among Khartoum International Airport ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Noise-induced hearing loss [NIHL] was incriminated to be the second most common sensorineural hearing loss, after age-related hearing loss. Objective: This study aimed to investigate noise induced hearing loss among employees of Khartoum international air port. Material and Methods: The study ...

  8. An Auditory Model with Hearing Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Bramsløw

    An auditory model based on the psychophysics of hearing has been developed and tested. The model simulates the normal ear or an impaired ear with a given hearing loss. Based on reviews of the current literature, the frequency selectivity and loudness growth as functions of threshold and stimulus...... level have been found and implemented in the model. The auditory model was verified against selected results from the literature, and it was confirmed that the normal spread of masking and loudness growth could be simulated in the model. The effects of hearing loss on these parameters was also...... in qualitative agreement with recent findings. The temporal properties of the ear have currently not been included in the model. As an example of a real-world application of the model, loudness spectrograms for a speech utterance were presented. By introducing hearing loss, the speech sounds became less audible...

  9. Risk factors for hearing loss in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Vasconcelos Chaves Martins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify risk factors related to sensorineural hearing loss in elderly. Methods: The sample consisted of 60 selected elderly, divided into two groups: the Case Group, composed by 30 individuals, 21 females and 9 males, aged at least 60 years, presenting sensorineural hearing loss, and the Control Group, composed by 30 individuals matched on gender and age, with normal hearing. The patients were submitted to audiological anamnesis and tonal audiometry. The hearing impairment was defined according to average threshold greater than 35dBNA, in the frequencies of 1,000; 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, in the best ear. Results: Statistically significant odds ratios were: a to audiological history: noise exposure and family history of deafness; b to situations involving hearing difficulty: television, church, telephone, silent environment, spatial location of sound, difficulty with voices and noisy environment; c to otologic history: tinnitus, otorrhea and nausea; and d to medical history: visual problems, smoke, alcohol, thyroid problems and kidney disease. Conclusion: The findings of this study highlighted, for sensorineural hearing loss, risk factors related to audiologic, otologic and medical history, and to situations involving hearing difficulty.

  10. Experiences of adult patients hearing loss postlingually with Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa María Lizcano Tejado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a significant public health problem. The incidence is difficult to establish because of the lack of data in people under age three, but is estimated about 1 per thousand for severe and profound hearing loss.A cochlear implant (CI is a device that converts sounds into electrical energy that triggers a sensation of hearing. The IC is indicated in patients with severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with null or poor benefit use of hearing aids.The general objective of this project is to understand the experiences of adult patients with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss with IC postlingually throughout the implementation process.A personal vision of those implemented will allow us to learn how to face the possibility to hear and interact with their environment, applying this information to improve health care provided to them and identifying those areas where such assistance should be improved. Also allow us to compare the initial expectations and have been achieved, creating realistic expectations for future candidates.For its development we have designed a qualitative study, based on the principles and procedures of grounded theory, semistructured interviews, participant observation and discussion groups.The data will be analyzed using the software Nudist ViVo 9.

  11. Uncovering effective strategies for hearing loss prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morata, Thais C.; Meinke, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health agencies, researchers and policy makers have recognized the need for evidence on the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce or prevent workplace injuries and illnesses. While many workplaces comply with legal or obligatory requirements and implement recommended interventions, few publications exist documenting the effectiveness of these actions. Additionally, some workplaces have discovered through their own processes, novel ways to reduce the risk of injury. Peer-reviewed information on the effectiveness of the many strategies and approaches currently in use could help correct weaknesses, or further encourage their adoption and expansion. The evaluation of intervention effectiveness would certainly contribute to improved worker health and safety. This need is particularly relevant regarding noise exposure in the workplace and hearing loss prevention interventions. In a 2006 review of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Hearing Loss Research Program, the independent National Academies of Sciences recommended that NIOSH place greater emphasis on identifying the effectiveness of hearing loss prevention measures on the basis of outcomes that are as closely related as possible to reducing noise exposure and work related hearing loss (http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11721). NIOSH used two different approaches to address that recommendation: the first one was to conduct research, including broad systematic reviews on the effectiveness of interventions to prevent occupational noise-induced hearing loss. The second was to create an award program, the Safe-In-Sound Excellence in Hearing Loss Prevention Award™, to identify and honor excellent real-world examples of noise control and other hearing loss prevention practices and innovations. PMID:27397968

  12. Early Hearing Detection and Vocabulary of Children With Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Sedey, Allison L; Wiggin, Mallene; Chung, Winnie

    2017-08-01

    To date, no studies have examined vocabulary outcomes of children meeting all 3 components of the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) guidelines (hearing screening by 1 month, diagnosis of hearing loss by 3 months, and intervention by 6 months of age). The primary purpose of the current study was to examine the impact of the current EHDI 1-3-6 policy on vocabulary outcomes across a wide geographic area. A secondary goal was to confirm the impact of other demographic variables previously reported to be related to language outcomes. This was a cross-sectional study of 448 children with bilateral hearing loss between 8 and 39 months of age (mean = 25.3 months, SD = 7.5 months). The children lived in 12 different states and were participating in the National Early Childhood Assessment Project. The combination of 6 factors in a regression analysis accounted for 41% of the variance in vocabulary outcomes. Vocabulary quotients were significantly higher for children who met the EHDI guidelines, were younger, had no additional disabilities, had mild to moderate hearing loss, had parents who were deaf or hard of hearing, and had mothers with higher levels of education. Vocabulary learning may be enhanced with system improvements that increase the number of children meeting the current early identification and intervention guidelines. In addition, intervention efforts need to focus on preventing widening delays with chronological age, assisting mothers with lower levels of education, and incorporating adults who are deaf/hard-of-hearing in the intervention process. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Hearing Loss and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information.) Cochlear (COKE-lee-ur) implants are small electronic devices surgically implanted in the inner ear that help ... have less space available for batteries and additional devices, such as a telecoil. ... for young children or for people with severe to profound hearing ...

  14. Analysis of risk factors associated with unilateral hearing loss in children who initially passed newborn hearing screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Eric N; Howell, Jessica B; Chapman, Derek; Pandya, Arti; Dodson, Kelley M

    2018-03-01

    To analyze 2007 Joint Committee on Infant Hearing (JCIH) risk factors in children with confirmed unilateral hearing loss (UHL) who initially passed newborn hearing screening. Retrospective record review of 16,108 infants who passed newborn hearing screening but had one or more JCIH risk factors prompting subsequent follow-up through the universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) program in Virginia from 2010 to 2012. The study was reviewed and qualified as exempt by the Virginia Commonwealth University Institutional Review Board (IRB) and the Virginia Department of Health. Over the 2-year study period, 14896 (4.9% of total births) children passed UNHS but had the presence of one or more JCIH risk factor. Ultimately, we identified 121 babies from this group with confirmed hearing loss (0.7%), with 48 babies (0.2%) showing UHL. The most common risk factors associated with the development of confirmed UHL after passing the initial screen were neonatal indicators, craniofacial anomalies, family history, and stigmata of syndrome associated with hearing loss. Neonatal indicators and craniofacial anomalies were the categories most often found in children with confirmed unilateral hearing loss who initially passed their newborn hearing screen. While neonatal indicators were also the most common associated risk factor in all hearing loss, craniofacial abnormalities are relatively more common in children with UHL who initially passed newborn hearing screening. Further studies assessing the etiology underlying the hearing loss and risk factor associations are warranted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Perda auditiva sensorioneural em pacientes com acromegalia em tratamento Sensorineural hearing loss in acromegalic patients under treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Alexandre Carvalho

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Acromegalia é uma doença endócrina rara. Poucos estudos avaliaram sua associação com deficiência auditiva (DA e os resultados são conflitantes. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a prevalência e características da DA em um grupo de pacientes com acromegalia em tratamento. Analisar a transmissão auditiva central e periférica. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal. Um grupo de 34 pacientes com acromegalia submeteu-se à avaliação metabólica, audiometria tonal e potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco encefálico (PEATE. Considerou-se DA quando a média dos tons puros foi > 25 DBNA para baixas frequências (250, 500, 1000 e 2000 Hz ou altas frequências (3000, 4000, 6000 e 8000 Hz. Os pacientes foram divididos em grupo A (com DA e B (sem DA. RESULTADOS: Doze pacientes (35,3% mostraram DA sensorioneural (grupo A, sendo oito bilateral e quatro unilateral. Nenhum apresentou DA mista ou condutiva. A prevalência de diabetes/intolerância à glicose de jejum foi similar entre os grupos. As frequências de 3000, 4000, 6000 e 8000 Hz foram as mais afetadas e com padrão similar em ambos os lados. CONCLUSÃO: DA sensorioneural esteve presente em 35,3% dos casos. Não foram notadas diferenças clínicas ou metabólicas significativas entre os grupos, bem como na transmissão neural auditiva periférica e central.Acromegaly is a rare endocrine disease. Few studies have evaluated its association with hearing loss (HL and the results are conflicting. AIM: To evaluate the prevalence and features of HL in a group of patients being treated for acromegaly. To analyze peripheral and central auditory transmission. METHODS: Cross-sectional study. A group of 34 patients with acromegaly were submitted to metabolic evaluation, tonal audiometry and brainstem auditory evoked potentials. HL was considered when pure tone average was > 25 DBHL for low frequencies (250, 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz or high frequencies (3000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 Hz. The patients were divided in group

  16. Prognostic Factors in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Atay

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL is still a complex and challenging process which requires clinical evidence regarding its etiology, treatment and prognostic factors. Therefore, determination of prognostic factors might aid in the selection of proper treatment modality. Aims: The aim of this study is to analyze whether there is correlation between SSNHL outcomes and (1 systemic steroid therapy, (2 time gap between onset of symptoms and initiation of therapy and (3 audiological pattern of hearing loss. Study Design: Retrospective chart review. Methods: Patients diagnosed at our clinic with SSNHL between May 2005 and December 2011were reviewed. A detailed history of demographic features, side of hearing loss, previous SSNHL and/or ear surgery, recent upper respiratory tract infection, season of admission, duration of symptoms before admission and the presence of co-morbid diseases was obtained. Radiological and audiological evaluations were recorded and treatment protocol was assessed to determine whether systemic steroids were administered or not. Treatment started ≤5 days was regarded as “early” and >5 days as “delayed”. Initial audiological configurations were grouped as “upward sloping”, “downward sloping”, “flat” and “profound” hearing loss. Significant recovery was defined as thresholds improved to the same level with the unaffected ear or improved ≥30 dB on average. Slight recovery was hearing improvement between 10-30dB on average. Hearing recovery less than 10 dB was accepted as unchanged. Results: Among the 181 patients who met the inclusion criteria, systemic steroid was administered to 122 patients (67.4%, whereas 59 (32.6% patients did not have steroids. It was found that steroid administration did not have any statistically significant effect in either recovered or unchanged hearing groups. Early treatment was achieved in 105 patients (58% and 76 patients (42% had delayed treatment

  17. Hearing Loss, Control, and Demographic Factors Influencing Hearing Aid Use among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garstecki, Dean C.; Erler, Susan F.

    1998-01-01

    Older adults (N=131) with hearing loss completed measures of hearing, hearing handicap, psychological control, depression, and ego strength. Older adults who accepted advice from hearing professionals to acquire and use hearing aids differed from those not accepting such advice on measures of hearing sensitivity, psychological control, and…

  18. Childhood Hearing Health: Educating for Prevention of Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacerda, Adriana Bender Moreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The presence of noise in our society has attracted the attention of health professionals, including speech-language pathologists, who have been charged along with educators with developing hearing conservation programs in schools. Objective To describe the results of three strategies for awareness and hearing preservation in first to fourth grades in public elementary schools. Methods The level of environmental noise in classrooms was assessed, and 638 elementary school students from first to fourth grades, 5 to 10 years of age, were audiologically evaluated. After the evaluations, educational activities were presented to children and educators. Results The noise level in the classroom ranged from 71.8 to 94.8 A-weighted decibels. The environment of the classroom was found to promote sound reverberation, which hinders communication. Thirty-two students (5.1% presented hearing alterations. Conclusion The application of strategies for a hearing conservation program at the school showed that noise is present in the room, and hearing loss, sometimes silent, affects schoolchildren. Students and teachers were aware that hearing problems can be prevented. Avoiding exposure to noise and improving the acoustics in classrooms are essential.

  19. Childhood Hearing Health: Educating for Prevention of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Adriana Bender Moreira; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Lacerda, Giselle; Lobato, Diolén Conceição Barros; Santos, Luciana; Moreira, Aline Carlezzo; Ribas, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The presence of noise in our society has attracted the attention of health professionals, including speech-language pathologists, who have been charged along with educators with developing hearing conservation programs in schools. Objective To describe the results of three strategies for awareness and hearing preservation in first to fourth grades in public elementary schools. Methods The level of environmental noise in classrooms was assessed, and 638 elementary school students from first to fourth grades, 5 to 10 years of age, were audiologically evaluated. After the evaluations, educational activities were presented to children and educators. Results The noise level in the classroom ranged from 71.8 to 94.8 A-weighted decibels. The environment of the classroom was found to promote sound reverberation, which hinders communication. Thirty-two students (5.1%) presented hearing alterations. Conclusion The application of strategies for a hearing conservation program at the school showed that noise is present in the room, and hearing loss, sometimes silent, affects schoolchildren. Students and teachers were aware that hearing problems can be prevented. Avoiding exposure to noise and improving the acoustics in classrooms are essential. PMID:25992146

  20. Age-related hearing impairment and the triad of acquired hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Hui; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex and, importantly, it has become clear that pharmacological protection successful against one form of hearing loss will not necessarily protect against another. This review will summarize pathological and pathophysiological features of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in human and animal models and address selected aspects of the commonality (or lack thereof) of cellular responses in ARHI to drugs and noise. PMID:26283913

  1. Age-related Hearing Impairment and the Triad of Acquired Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hui eYang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss ¬¬displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex and, importantly, it has become clear that pharmacological protection successful against one form of hearing loss will not necessarily protect against another. This review will summarize pathological and pathophysiological features of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI in human and animal models and address selected aspects of the commonality (or lack thereof of cellular responses in ARHI to drugs and noise.

  2. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss; Prognostic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Dass

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL is a frightening and frustrating symptom for the patient as well as the physician. Prognosis is affected by multiple factors including duration of hearing loss, presence of associated vertigo and tinnitus, and co-morbidities such as hypertension and diabetes.   Materials and Methods: Forty subjects presenting to our department with features of sudden hearing loss were included in the study. Detailed otological history and examination, serial audiometric findings and course of disease were studied.   Results: Subjects presenting late (in older age, having associated vertigo, hypertension and diabetes had a significantly lower rate of recovery.   Conclusion:  Only 60–65% of patients experiencing SSNHL recover within a period of 1 month; this rate is further affected by presence of multiple prognostic indicators.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: age-related hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Description Age-related hearing loss (also known as presbycusis) is a decrease in hearing ability that happens ... age-related old-aged sensorineural hearing impairment presbyacusia presbycusis Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes ...

  4. Diagnostics and therapy of sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plontke, Stefan K

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews recent aspects of diagnostics, differential diagnostics, and evidence in systemic and local therapy of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL). Since a number of disorders can be accompanied by sudden hearing loss, a meaningful and targeted diagnostic strategy is of utmost importance. An important differential diagnosis of sudden hearing loss are intralabyrinthine schwannomas (ILS). The incidence of ILS is probably significantly underestimated. This may be due to the lack of awareness or lack of explicit search for an intralabyrinthine tumor on MRI or an inappropriate MRI technique for the evaluation of sudden hearing loss ("head MRI" instead of "temporal bone MRI" with too high slice thicknesses). Therefore, the request to the radiologist should specifically include the question for (or exclusion of) an ILS. With special MRI techniques, it is possibly today to visualize an endolymphatic hydrops. The evidence in the therapy of ISSHL is - with respect to the quality and not quantity of studies - unsatisfying. The value of systemically (low dose) or intratympanically applied corticosteroids in the primary treatment of ISSHL is still unclear. In order to investigate the efficacy and safety of high dose corticosteroids as primary therapy for ISSHL, a national, multicenter, three-armed, randomized, triple-blind controlled clinical trial is currently performed in Germany (http://hodokort-studie.hno.org/). After insufficient recovery of the threshold with systemic therapy of ISSHL, intratympanic corticosteroid therapy appears to be associated with a significantly higher chance of an improved hearing threshold than no therapy or placebo. Both, hearing gain and final hearing threshold, however, appear to be independent from the onset of secondary therapy. Based on currently available data from clinical studies, no recommendation can be made with respect to the type of corticosteroid and specifics of the intratympanic application protocol.

  5. Sensorineural hearing loss in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Varun; Etinger, Veronica; Orjuela, Andres F

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a common nonspecific vasculitis seen in childhood. The most significant long-term sequela is coronary artery aneurysm. However, the spectrum of complications involves not only the heart, but also other organs such as the eyes, skin, kidneys, gallbladder, liver, and central nervous system. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a relatively unrecognized complication of the disease. Although most of the complications (except coronary artery aneurysm) are self-limiting, SNHL can be persistent. It is, especially important in infants and young children who might not be able to report the hearing deficits and are most likely to have cognitive and speech delays if this hearing loss is not addressed in a timely manner. We report a child with Kawasaki disease who had SNHL during the 2(nd) week of the illness. The aim of this article is to briefly review the pathophysiology behind this hearing loss and strongly emphasize the importance of universal hearing evaluation in all children diagnosed with Kawasaki disease. This screening in children with Kawasaki disease may provide some timely intervention if needed. Since most Kawasaki disease patients will be seen by cardiologists, we hope to create more awareness about this complication to the cardiology community as well.

  6. Development of conductive hearing loss due to posterior semicircular canal dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Marie; Kubo, Kazuhiko; Yasui, Tetsuro; Matsumoto, Nozomu; Komune, Shizuo

    2015-06-01

    We herein report a case of posterior semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) syndrome who had been audiologically followed up for eight years. The patient originally had sensorineural hearing loss. The audiogram had gradually transformed to pure conductive hearing loss. The posterior SCD was identified in CT scan. The reported case showed the possibility to distinguish the mechanism at play underlying the typical conductive hearing loss in SCD patients by tracing the transition of the hearing loss pattern. This information is of much help to predict the hearing outcomes if surgical intervention were chosen for the treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Wal, A W; Van Ooij, P J A M; De Ru, J A

    2016-11-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss in divers may be caused by either inner-ear barotrauma or inner-ear decompression sickness. There is no consensus on the best treatment option. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic value of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in divers. A literature review and three cases of divers with sudden sensorineural hearing loss treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy are presented. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy resulted in hearing improvement in 80 per cent of patients: 39 per cent had hearing improvement and 41 per cent had full recovery. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improved hearing in divers with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

  8. Auditory neuroplasticity, hearing loss and cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryugo, David

    2015-07-01

    Data from our laboratory show that the auditory brain is highly malleable by experience. We establish a base of knowledge that describes the normal structure and workings at the initial stages of the central auditory system. This research is expanded to include the associated pathology in the auditory brain stem created by hearing loss. Utilizing the congenitally deaf white cat, we demonstrate the way that cells, synapses, and circuits are pathologically affected by sound deprivation. We further show that the restoration of auditory nerve activity via electrical stimulation through cochlear implants serves to correct key features of brain pathology caused by hearing loss. The data suggest that rigorous training with cochlear implants and/or hearing aids offers the promise of heretofore unattained benefits.

  9. Working Memory and Speech Recognition in Noise under Ecologically Relevant Listening Conditions: Effects of Visual Cues and Noise Type among Adults with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christi W.; Stewart, Erin K.; Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Bishop, Christopher; Bentler, Ruth A.; Tremblay, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the relationship between working memory (WM) and speech recognition in noise with different noise types as well as in the presence of visual cues. Method: Seventy-six adults with bilateral, mild to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss (mean age: 69 years) participated. Using a cross-sectional design, 2…

  10. Print Knowledge of Preschool Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Krystal L.; Lund, Emily; Schuele, C. Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Measures of print knowledge were compared across preschoolers with hearing loss and normal hearing. Alphabet knowledge did not differ between groups, but preschoolers with hearing loss performed lower on measures of print concepts and concepts of written words than preschoolers with normal hearing. Further study is needed in this area.

  11. Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing loss. How does otitis media affect a child’s hearing? All children with middle ear infection or fluid have some degree of ... words and speaks louder than normal. Essentially, a child experiencing hearing loss from middle ear infections will hear muffled sounds and misunderstand ...

  12. Alcohol Use among Students with and without Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinquart, Martin; Pfeiffer, Jens P.

    2015-01-01

    We compared alcohol use among adolescents with and without hearing loss. Adolescents with hearing loss reported consuming less alcohol, less binge drinking, fewer episodes of drunkenness, and a higher age at first drunkenness than their hearing peers. Alcohol use did not vary between students who were deaf or hard of hearing or between students…

  13. Skin mastocytosis, hearing loss and mental retardation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.; Beemer, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    A girl with skin mastocytosis, hearing loss, microcephaly, mild dysmorphic features and severe mental retardation is described. The symptoms of the child resemble those reported in 1990 by Wolach et al. in another patient sufficiently to suspect the same entity in both. Inheritance may be autosomal

  14. Cochlear synaptopathy in acquired sensorineural hearing loss: Manifestations and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, M Charles; Kujawa, Sharon G

    2017-06-01

    Common causes of hearing loss in humans - exposure to loud noise or ototoxic drugs and aging - often damage sensory hair cells, reflected as elevated thresholds on the clinical audiogram. Recent studies in animal models suggest, however, that well before this overt hearing loss can be seen, a more insidious, but likely more common, process is taking place that permanently interrupts synaptic communication between sensory inner hair cells and subsets of cochlear nerve fibers. The silencing of affected neurons alters auditory information processing, whether accompanied by threshold elevations or not, and is a likely contributor to a variety of perceptual abnormalities, including speech-in-noise difficulties, tinnitus and hyperacusis. Work described here will review structural and functional manifestations of this cochlear synaptopathy and will consider possible mechanisms underlying its appearance and progression in ears with and without traditional 'hearing loss' arising from several common causes in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 'Ecstasy' enhances noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Michael W; Zhang, Jinsheng S; Langford, Megan M; Perrine, Shane A

    2013-08-01

    'Ecstasy' or 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine (MDMA) is an amphetamine abused for its euphoric, empathogenic, hallucinatory, and stimulant effects. It is also used to treat certain psychiatric disorders. Common settings for Ecstasy use are nightclubs and "rave" parties where participants consume MDMA and dance to loud music. One concern with the club setting is that exposure to loud sounds can cause permanent sensorineural hearing loss. Another concern is that consumption of MDMA may enhance such hearing loss. Whereas this latter possibility has not been investigated, this study tested the hypothesis that MDMA enhances noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) by exposing rats to either MDMA, noise trauma, both MDMA and noise, or neither treatment. MDMA was given in a binge pattern of 5 mg/kg per intraperitoneal injections every 2 h for a total of four injections to animals in the two MDMA-treated groups (MDMA-only and Noise + MDMA). Saline injections were given to the animals in the two non-MDMA groups (Control and Noise-only). Following the final injection, noise trauma was induced by a 10 kHz tone at 120 dB SPL for 1 h to animals in the two noise trauma-treated groups (Noise-only and Noise + MDMA). Hearing loss was assessed by the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and cochlear histology. Results showed that MDMA enhanced NIHL compared to Noise-only and that MDMA alone caused no hearing loss. This implies that "clubbers" and "rave-goers" are exacerbating the amount of NIHL when they consume MDMA and listen to loud sounds. In contrast to earlier reports, the present study found that MDMA by itself caused no changes in the click-evoked ABR's wave latencies or amplitudes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Developmental plasticity of spatial hearing following asymmetric hearing loss: context-dependent cue integration and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eKeating

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Under normal hearing conditions, comparisons of the sounds reaching each ear are critical for accurate sound localization. Asymmetric hearing loss should therefore degrade spatial hearing and has become an important experimental tool for probing the plasticity of the auditory system, both during development and adulthood. In clinical populations, hearing loss affecting one ear more than the other is commonly associated with otitis media with effusion, a disorder experienced by approximately 80% of children before the age of two. Asymmetric hearing may also arise in other clinical situations, such as after unilateral cochlear implantation. Here, we consider the role played by spatial cue integration in sound localization under normal acoustical conditions. We then review evidence for adaptive changes in spatial hearing following a developmental hearing loss in one ear, and argue that adaptation may be achieved either by learning a new relationship between the altered cues and directions in space or by changing the way different cues are integrated in the brain. We next consider developmental plasticity as a source of vulnerability, describing maladaptive effects of asymmetric hearing loss that persist even when normal hearing is provided. We also examine the extent to which the consequences of asymmetric hearing loss depend upon its timing and duration. Although much of the experimental literature has focused on the effects of a stable unilateral hearing loss, some of the most common hearing impairments experienced by children tend to fluctuate over time. We therefore argue that there is a need to bridge this gap by investigating the effects of recurring hearing loss during development, and outline recent steps in this direction. We conclude by arguing that this work points toward a more nuanced view of developmental plasticity, in which plasticity may be selectively expressed in response to specific sensory contexts, and consider the clinical

  17. Sensorineural hearing loss in insulin-dependent diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koosha A.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Among patients who have sensorineural hearing loss of unknown etiology, diabetes is one of the diseases to be routinely investigated. The relationship between diabetes mellitus and hearing loss is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM compared to control group.Methods: In a cross-sectional study pure tone audiometry (PTA and speech audiometry was performed in 62 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM, aged under 40 years, and in 62 randomly selected age-matched non-diabetic control subjects. Subjects with otological and other metabolic diseases were excluded from the study. We applied the SPSS.10 statistical analysis software Chi-square and student's test. Results: Statistical analysis showed that the hearing of the diabetic patients were significantly worsen than the control subjects. The hearing level tended to be worsen in the diabetic patients than that in control subjects, but the differences were statistically significant only at frequencies of 250,500, 4000 and 8000 Hz p>0.05(. There wasn't statistical significant difference between sex in two study groups p>0.05(. The mean duration of diabetes was no statistically significant with hearing loss p>0.05(. The frequency of complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy in the diabetic groups had no correlation with speech threshold (p>0.05(.‏ There were no significant differences between speech reception threshold, speech discrimination score and acoustic reflex in two groups.Conclusions: We conclude that type I diabetes mellitus can cause sensorineural hearing loss.

  18. Mobile phone induced sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Dousary, Surayie H.

    2007-01-01

    The increased use of mobile phones worldwide has focused interest on the biological effects and possible health outcomes of exposure to radiofrequency fields from mobile phones, and their base stations. Various reports suggest that mobile phone use can cause health problems like fatigue, headache, dizziness, tension and sleep disturbances, however, only limited research data is available in medical literature regarding interaction between electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones and auditory function and the possible impact on hearing. We report a case of sensorineural hearing loss due to Global System for Mobile Communication mobile phone use in a 42-year-old male. (author)

  19. Hear here: children with hearing loss learn words by listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Joyce; Purcell, Alison A; Doble, Maree; Lim, Lynne H

    2014-10-01

    Early use of hearing devices and family participation in auditory-verbal therapy has been associated with age-appropriate verbal communication outcomes for children with hearing loss. However, there continues to be great variability in outcomes across different oral intervention programmes and little consensus on how therapists should prioritise goals at each therapy session for positive clinical outcomes. This pilot intervention study aimed to determine whether therapy goals that concentrate on teaching preschool children with hearing loss how to distinguish between words in a structured listening programme is effective, and whether gains in speech perception skills impact on vocabulary and speech development without them having to be worked on directly in therapy. A multiple baseline across subjects design was used in this within-subject controlled study. 3 children aged between 2:6 and 3:1 with moderate-severe to severe-profound hearing loss were recruited for a 6-week intervention programme. Each participant commenced at different stages of the 10-staged listening programme depending on their individual listening skills at recruitment. Speech development and vocabulary assessments were conducted before and after the training programme in addition to speech perception assessments and probes conducted throughout the intervention programme. All participants made gains in speech perception skills as well as vocabulary and speech development. Speech perception skills acquired were noted to be maintained a week after intervention. In addition, all participants were able to generalise speech perception skills learnt to words that had not been used in the intervention programme. This pilot study found that therapy directed at listening alone is promising and that it may have positive impact on speech and vocabulary development without these goals having to be incorporated into a therapy programme. Although a larger study is necessary for more conclusive findings, the

  20. The hearing benefit of cochlear implantation for individuals with unilateral hearing loss, but no tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarzynski, Henryk; Lorens, Artur; Kruszynska, Marika; Obrycka, Anita; Pastuszak, Dorota; Skarzynski, Piotr Henryk

    2017-07-01

    Cochlear implants improve the hearing abilities of individuals with unilateral hearing loss and no tinnitus. The benefit is no different from that seen in patients with unilateral hearing loss and incapacitating tinnitus. To evaluate hearing outcomes after cochlear implantation in individuals with unilateral hearing loss and no tinnitus and compare them to those obtained in a similar group who had incapacitating tinnitus. Six cases who did not experience tinnitus before operation and 15 subjects with pre-operative tinnitus were evaluated with a structured interview, a monosyllabic word test under difficult listening situations, a sound localization test, and an APHAB (abbreviated profile of hearing aid benefit) questionnaire. All subjects used their cochlear implant more than 8 hours a day, 7 days a week. In 'no tinnitus' patients, mean benefit of cochlear implantation was 19% for quiet speech, 15% for speech in noise (with the same signal-to-noise ratio in the implanted and non-implanted ear), and 16% for a more favourable signal-to-noise ratio at the implanted ear. Sound localization error improved by an average of 19°. The global score of APHAB improved by 16%. The benefits across all evaluations did not differ significantly between the 'no tinnitus' and 'tinnitus' groups.

  1. Age of diagnosis for congenital hearing loss at Universitas Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Congenital hearing loss affects 3 - 6/1 000 children worldwide. The benefits of early identification of hearing loss and early intervention have been clearly established. There are no previous studies reporting on the age of diagnosis of congenital hearing loss in the Free State province. Objectives. To determine ...

  2. Identifying Hearing Loss By Means Of Iridology | Stearn | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolated reports of hearing loss presenting as markings on the iris exist, but to date the effectiveness of iridology to identify hearing loss has not been investigated. This study therefore aimed to determine the efficacy of iridological analysis in the identification of moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss in adolescents ...

  3. The relationship between nonverbal cognitive functions and hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zekveld, A.A.; Deijen, J.B.; Goverts, S.T.; Kramer, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between hearing loss and memory and attention when nonverbal, visually presented cognitive tests are used. Method: Hearing loss (pure-tone audiometry) and IQ were measured in 30 participants with mild to severe hearing loss. Participants performed

  4. 76 FR 62093 - Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss: Stakeholder Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... stakeholder meeting on preventing occupational hearing loss. Every year, between 20,000 and 25,000 workers suffer from preventable hearing loss due to high workplace noise levels. The purpose of this meeting is... nearly 125,000 workers have suffered significant, permanent hearing loss since 2004. Neither surgery nor...

  5. Vibroplasty for mixed and conductive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luers, Jan Christoffer; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd; Zahnert, Thomas; Bornitz, Matthias; Beutner, Dirk

    2013-08-01

    To summarize new application methods of an active middle ear implant (Vibrant Soundbridge) in patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss. Publications listed in the Medline/PubMed database. All publications published in English language; search term Vibrant Soundbridge AND floating mass transducer in all fields. Structured analysis of all publications. Extraction of significant findings and conclusions and audiometric data. Modern application methods of an active middle ear implant (VSB) open new therapeutic options for patients with various outer and middle ear diseases resulting in conductive or mixed hearing loss. Titanium couplers can help to couple the active middle ear implant in a standardized way to remnants of the ossicular chain or to the round window. Thus, the active middle ear implant has been established as an alternative treatment option for patients with mixed and conductive hearing. However, the heterogeneity of the studies published so far complicates the analysis of the audiometric results, and thus, the functional hearing gain after VSB implantation varies a lot.

  6. Nonorganic hearing loss in children: audiometry, clinical characteristics, biographical history and recovery of hearing thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Claus-Michael; am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette; Matulat, Peter; Knief, Arne; Rosslau, Ken; Deuster, Dirk

    2013-07-01

    The term "nonorganic hearing loss" (NOHL) (pseudohypacusis, functional or psychogenic hearing loss) describes a hearing loss without a detectable corresponding pathology in the auditory system. It is characterized by a discrepancy between elevated pure tone audiometry thresholds and normal speech discrimination. The recommended audiological management of NOHL in children comprises history taking, diagnosis, and counseling. According to the literature, prognosis depends on the severity of the patient's school and/or personal problems. Routine referral to a child psychiatrist is discussed as being controversial. The clinical history of 34 children with NOHL was retrospectively evaluated. In 15 children, follow up audiometry was performed. Results of biographical history, subjective and objective audiometry, additional speech and language assessment, psychological investigations and follow up audiometry are presented and discussed. The prevalence of NOHL was 1.8% in children with suspected hearing loss. Mean age at diagnosis was 10.8 years. Girls were twice as often affected as boys. Patient history showed a high prevalence of emotional and school problems. Pre-existing organic hearing loss can be worsened by nonorganic causes. Children with a fast recovery of hearing thresholds (n=6) showed a high rate (4/6) of family, social and emotional problems. In children with continuous threshold elevation (n=9), biographical history showed no recognizable or obvious family, social or emotional problems; learning disability (4/9) was the most frequently presented characteristic. Due to advances in objective audiometry, the diagnosis of NOHL is less challenging than management and counseling. Considering the high frequency of personal and school problems, a multidisciplinary setting is helpful. On the basis of our results, drawing conclusions from hearing threshold recovery on the severity of underlying psychic problems seems inappropriate. As a consequence, a referral to a

  7. Auditory Memory deficit in Elderly People with Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shahidipour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss is one of the most common problems in elderly people. Functional side effects of hearing loss are various. Due to the fact that hearing loss is the common impairment in elderly people; the importance of its possible effects on auditory memory is undeniable. This study aims to focus on the hearing loss effects on auditory memory.   Materials and Methods: Dichotic Auditory Memory Test (DVMT was performed on 47 elderly people, aged 60 to 80; that were divided in two groups, the first group consisted of elderly people with hearing range of 24 normal and the second one consisted of 23 elderly people with bilateral symmetrical ranged from mild to moderate Sensorineural hearing loss in the high frequency due to aging in both genders.   Results: Significant difference was observed in DVMT between elderly people with normal hearing and those with hearing loss (P

  8. Complex Treatment of Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandruk, N. V.

    2014-01-01

    Recent data on use of Ginkgo Biloba extract in otorhinolaryngological practice were presented. The mechanism of the curative action of Ginkgo Biloba extract (vasoprotective, antioxidative, rheological, and edematous) was described. Effectiveness of Ginkgo Biloba as a part of complex treatment of sensorineural hearing loss in children was elucidated. Results of the research proved effectiveness of treatment with Ginkgo Biloba and showed perspectives of Ginkgo Biloba use in treatment programs f...

  9. Hearing Loss, Dizziness, and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Albernaz, Pedro L. Mangabeira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Metabolic activity of the inner ear is very intense, and makes it sensitive to changes in the body homeostasis. This study involves a group of patients with inner ear disorders related to carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, including hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and episodes of vertigo. Objectives To describe the symptoms of metabolic inner ear disorders and the examinations required to establish diagnoses. These symptoms are often the first to allow for an e...

  10. Predictors of hearing recovery in patients with severe sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel; Böcker, Armin Julius; Koopmann, Mario; Savvas, Eleftherios; Borowski, Matthias; Rudack, Claudia

    2017-04-04

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is a disease, which severely affects the patient's social and relational life. The underlying pathomechanisms have not been finally clarified yet and outcome is not predictable. We conducted a retrospective study in order to identify parameters that influence hearing recovery. The data base contains results of basic otoneurological tests and clinical parameters of 198 patients with idiopathic SSHL of at least 60 dB in at least four frequencies, diagnosed and treated at the University Hospital of Münster, Germany, between 1999 and 2015. Hearing recovery was measured by pure tone audiometry. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses indicate that the chance as well as the magnitude of hearing recovery is higher for patients with normal caloric testing than for patients with pathological caloric testing. However, for the subgroup of patients who attained a hearing recovery, the caloric testing result was not found to influence the magnitude. Instead, the magnitude was noticeably lower for patients within this subgroup who had a previous hearing loss. Furthermore, we found indications that the magnitude is higher for men than for women and that receiving a high-dose steroid therapy is associated with a higher chance and magnitude of a hearing recovery. We conclude that SSHL associated with disorders of the vestibular system or previous hearing loss represent special sub-entities of SSHL that may be caused by unique pathophysiological mechanisms and are associated with worse outcome. Furthermore, our data support the importance of elevated dosage of steroids in SSHL therapy.

  11. HEARING LOSS, ITS IMPLICATIONS AND PUBLIC HEALTH INTERVENTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Suneela; Kalika

    2015-01-01

    Globally, over 5% of world’s population (More than 360 million population), have disabling hearing loss according to new global estimates on prevalence; 91% of these are adults and 9% of these are children. Overall, prevalence of disabling hearing loss in children all over the world is 1.7%.1 Prevalence of hearing loss in South Asia in pediatric age group is 2.4%. Consequences of hearing impairment include inability to interpret speech sounds, often producing a reduced ability to ...

  12. Conductive hearing loss and middle ear pathology in young infants referred through a newborn universal hearing screening program in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aithal, Sreedevi; Aithal, Venkatesh; Kei, Joseph; Driscoll, Carlie

    2012-10-01

    over time with 66.67% of ATSI infants reviewed showing persistent conductive hearing loss compared to 17.86% of non-ATSI infants. Medical management of 17 infants with persistent conductive hearing loss included monitoring, antibiotic treatment, examination under anesthesia, and grommet insertion. Conductive hearing loss was found to be a common diagnosis among infants referred through screening. ATSI infants had significantly higher rates of middle ear pathology and conductive hearing loss at birth and showed poor resolution of middle ear pathology over time compared to non-ATSI infants. Future research using a direct measure of middle ear function as an adjunct to the automated auditory brainstem response screening tool to distinguish conductive from sensorineural hearing loss may facilitate prioritization of infants for assessment, thus reducing parental anxiety and streamlining the management strategies for the respective types of hearing loss. American Academy of Audiology.

  13. Hearing Loss in HIV-Infected Children in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrapcak, Susan; Kuper, Hannah; Bartlett, Peter; Devendra, Akash; Makawa, Atupele; Kim, Maria; Kazembe, Peter; Ahmed, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    With improved access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV infection is becoming a chronic illness. Preliminary data suggest that HIV-infected children have a higher risk of disabilities, including hearing impairment, although data are sparse. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence and types of hearing loss in HIV-infected children in Lilongwe, Malawi. This was a cross-sectional survey of 380 HIV-infected children aged 4-14 years attending ART clinic in Lilongwe between December 2013-March 2014. Data was collected through pediatric quality of life and sociodemographic questionnaires, electronic medical record review, and detailed audiologic testing. Hearing loss was defined as >20 decibels hearing level (dBHL) in either ear. Predictors of hearing loss were explored by regression analysis generating age- and sex-adjusted odds ratios. Children with significant hearing loss were fitted with hearing aids. Of 380 patients, 24% had hearing loss: 82% conductive, 14% sensorineural, and 4% mixed. Twenty-one patients (23% of those with hearing loss) were referred for hearing aid fitting. There was a higher prevalence of hearing loss in children with history of frequent ear infections (OR 7.4, 4.2-13.0) and ear drainage (OR 6.4, 3.6-11.6). Hearing loss was linked to history of WHO Stage 3 (OR 2.4, 1.2-4.5) or Stage 4 (OR 6.4, 2.7-15.2) and history of malnutrition (OR 2.1, 1.3-3.5), but not to duration of ART or CD4. Only 40% of caregivers accurately perceived their child's hearing loss. Children with hearing impairment were less likely to attend school and had poorer emotional (p = 0.02) and school functioning (p = 0.04). There is an urgent need for improved screening tools, identification and treatment of hearing problems in HIV-infected children, as hearing loss was common in this group and affected school functioning and quality of life. Clear strategies were identified for prevention and treatment, since most hearing loss was conductive in nature, likely due to

  14. Hearing Loss in HIV-Infected Children in Lilongwe, Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrapcak, Susan; Kuper, Hannah; Bartlett, Peter; Devendra, Akash; Makawa, Atupele; Kim, Maria; Kazembe, Peter; Ahmed, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With improved access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV infection is becoming a chronic illness. Preliminary data suggest that HIV-infected children have a higher risk of disabilities, including hearing impairment, although data are sparse. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence and types of hearing loss in HIV-infected children in Lilongwe, Malawi. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey of 380 HIV-infected children aged 4–14 years attending ART clinic in Lilongwe between December 2013-March 2014. Data was collected through pediatric quality of life and sociodemographic questionnaires, electronic medical record review, and detailed audiologic testing. Hearing loss was defined as >20 decibels hearing level (dBHL) in either ear. Predictors of hearing loss were explored by regression analysis generating age- and sex-adjusted odds ratios. Children with significant hearing loss were fitted with hearing aids. Results Of 380 patients, 24% had hearing loss: 82% conductive, 14% sensorineural, and 4% mixed. Twenty-one patients (23% of those with hearing loss) were referred for hearing aid fitting. There was a higher prevalence of hearing loss in children with history of frequent ear infections (OR 7.4, 4.2–13.0) and ear drainage (OR 6.4, 3.6–11.6). Hearing loss was linked to history of WHO Stage 3 (OR 2.4, 1.2–4.5) or Stage 4 (OR 6.4, 2.7–15.2) and history of malnutrition (OR 2.1, 1.3–3.5), but not to duration of ART or CD4. Only 40% of caregivers accurately perceived their child’s hearing loss. Children with hearing impairment were less likely to attend school and had poorer emotional (p = 0.02) and school functioning (p = 0.04). Conclusions There is an urgent need for improved screening tools, identification and treatment of hearing problems in HIV-infected children, as hearing loss was common in this group and affected school functioning and quality of life. Clear strategies were identified for prevention and treatment, since most

  15. Sensorineural and conductive hearing loss in infants diagnosed in the program of universal newborn hearing screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewska-Seniuk, Katarzyna; Dabrowski, Piotr; Greczka, Grazyna; Szabatowska, Katarzyna; Glowacka, Agata; Szyfter, Witold; Mazela, Jan

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze infants diagnosed with sensorineural or conductive hearing deficit and to identify risk factors associated with these defects. A retrospective analysis of infants diagnosed with hearing deficit based on the database of the universal newborn hearing screening program and medical records of the patients. 27 935 infants were covered by the universal neonatal hearing screening program. 109 (0.39%) were diagnosed with hearing deficit and referred for treatment and rehabilitation. 56 (51.4%) children were diagnosed with conductive, 38 (34.9%) with sensorineural and 15 (13.8%) with mixed type of hearing deficit. Children with sensorineural hearing deficit more frequently suffered from hyperbilirubinemia (p conductive hearing loss were more frequently diagnosed with isolated craniofacial anomalies (p hearing deficit occurred almost 3 times more often bilaterally than unilaterally (p hearing deficit, the difference was not significant. In children with conductive and mixed type of hearing loss the impairment was mainly mild while among those with sensorineural hearing deficit in almost 45% it was severe and profound (p hearing screening test by means of otoacoustic emissions and the final diagnosis of hearing deficit we found that the highest agreement rate was observed in children with sensorineural hearing loss (p hearing deficit was similar in children with sensorineural, conductive and mixed type of hearing loss, only hyperbilirubinemia seemed to predispose to sensorineural hearing deficit and isolated craniofacial malformations seemed to be associated with conductive hearing loss. Sensorineural hearing deficit usually occurred bilaterally and was severe or profound, while conductive and mixed type of hearing deficit were most often of mild degree. Most children with the final diagnosis of sensorineural hearing deficit had positive result of hearing screening by means of otoacoustic emissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  16. Management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metrailer, Aaron M; Babu, Seilesh C

    2016-10-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is an otologic emergency and should be managed quickly and effectively. This review focuses on the management of sudden SNHL, primarily idiopathic sudden SNHL as it is the most common cause. Management options include observation, oral steroids, intratympanic steroids, or combined oral/intratympanic steroids. One-third to two-thirds of patients will achieve spontaneous recovery, most likely within the first 2 weeks. Despite the lack of randomized controlled trials on steroid therapy efficacy, all patients should be offered steroid treatment given low risk and possible significant benefits. All patients should undergo MRI with gadolinium to rule out retrocochlear disorder. Bilateral sudden hearing loss should alert the clinician to possible systemic disease. Sudden hearing loss is an otologic emergency. Appropriate counseling of patients is necessary to allow physician and patient to make a joint, educated decision. It is paramount to rule out retrocochlear disorder and to follow patients closely for improvement or need for future auditory rehabilitation.

  17. Leupeptin reduces impulse noise induced hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavriel Haim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to continuous and impulse noise can induce a hearing loss. Leupeptin is an inhibitor of the calpains, a family of calcium-activated proteases which promote cell death. The objective of this study is to assess whether Leupeptin could reduce the hearing loss resulting from rifle impulse noise. Methods A polyethelene tube was implanted into middle ear cavities of eight fat sand rats (16 ears. Following determination of auditory nerve brainstem evoked response (ABR threshold in each ear, the animals were exposed to the noise of 10 M16 rifle shots. Immediately after the exposure, saline was then applied to one (control ear and non-toxic concentrations of leupeptin determined in the first phase of the study were applied to the other ear, for four consecutive days. Results Eight days after the exposure, the threshold shift (ABR in the control ears was significantly greater (44 dB than in the leupeptin ears (27 dB. Conclusion Leupeptin applied to the middle ear cavity can reduce the hearing loss resulting from exposure to impulse noise.

  18. The relationship between hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaorong; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Xinda; Han, Peng; Cheng, Ying; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Yintong; Chen, Zichen; Hu, Juan; Chen, Yanfei; Xu, Min

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL). Clinical data including the symptom of vertigo of 149 SSHL patients were investigated retrospectively. Pure tone audiometry, ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) evoked by air-conducted sound (ACS), and caloric test were employed for cochlear and vestibular function assessment. The relationship between hearing level and vestibular dysfunction was analyzed. The pure tone averages (PTAs) (mean ± SD) of SSHL patients with and without vertigo were 88.81 ± 21.74 dB HL and 72.49 ± 21.88 dB HL (Z = -4.411, p = 0.000), respectively. The PTAs of SSHL patients with abnormal and normal caloric test were 84.71 ± 22.54 dB HL and 70.41 ± 24.07 dB HL (t = -2.665, p = 0.009), respectively. Conversely, vertigo and abnormal caloric results also happened more frequently in patients with profound hearing loss. However, no consistent tendency could be found among vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) responses or hearing loss. SSHL patients with vertigo or abnormal caloric test displayed worse hearing loss; and vice versa, vertigo and abnormal caloric results happened more frequently in SSHL patients with profound hearing loss.

  19. [Prognostic factors of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengjiao; Xue, Xijun; Wang, Li; Yang, Fengbo; Wang, Hongyang; Guan, Jing; Du, Wan; Xiong, Wenping; Wu, Kaiwen; Wu, Mukun; Yin, Zifang; Lan, Lan; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Qiuju

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the recovery rate of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in children, and explore the prognostic factors in order to guide the clinical diagnosis and treatment. A retrospective review was conducted for the prognosis of children with sudden sensorineural hearing loss during the past 5 years (from November 2010 to May 2015) in Chinese PLA General Hospital. This paper have a complete clinical data of 101 patients (113 ears)with sudden hearing loss, ranging from 0 to 18 years old Patients were divided into four groups according to hearing recovery and eight putative prognostic factors were analyzed. Among 101 patients (113 ears), the ratio of male and female was 60:53. Treatment was initiated from 1 to 183 days after disease onset, with an average of (18.5 ± 22.1) d. Bilateral and unilateral hearing loss were 24 ears and 89 ears, respectively. The proportion of mild hearing loss, moderate hearing loss, severe hearing loss and profound hearing loss were 7.1%, 6.2%, 23.9% and 62.8%, respectively. Vertigo and tinnitus occurred in 54.9% and 77.9% of the patients, respectively. After the treatment, the complete recovery rate was 9.7% and the overall recovery rate was 36.3%. The degree of hearing loss, earlier treatment onset, sex and bilateral involvement were significantly associated with hearing recovery (P Sudden sensorineural hearing loss in children was generally identified as severe and profound hearing loss, but after positive and timely treatment, it can be improved or even cured. The mild hearing loss, earlier treatment onset, unilateral hearing loss and female were positive prognostic factors. The concurrence of tinnitus or vertigo, the results of ABR and DPOAE had no significant influence on prognosis.

  20. Histone deacetylases in hearing loss: Current perspectives for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daishi Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is one of the most frequent health issues in industrialized countries. The pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms of hearing loss are still unclear. Histone deacetylases (HDACs are emerging as key enzymes in many physiological processes, including chromatin remodeling, regulation of transcription, DNA repair, metabolism, genome stability and protein secretion. Recent studies indicated that HDACs are associated with the development and progression of hearing loss. Dysfunction of HDACs could promote the oxidative stress and aging in the inner ear. In light of considering the current stagnation in the development of therapeutic options, the need for new strategies in the treatment of hearing loss has never been so pressing. In this review, we will summarize the reported literatures for HDACs in hearing loss and discuss how HDAC family members show different performances for the possibility of process of diseases development. The possibility of pharmacological intervention on hearing loss opens a novel path in the treatment of hearing loss.

  1. Vision loss and hearing loss in painting and musical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    This article considers the impact of vision and hearing loss on great painters and musical composers. The visual work of Mary Cassatt, Georgia O'Keeffe, Edgar Degas, and Claude Monet all showed alterations as their vision failed. In contrast, Gabriel Fauré, Bedřich Smetana, and Ludwig von Beethoven wrote many of their best compositions while totally deaf, and Georg Friedrich Handel and Frederick Delius struggled to compose late in life when they lost their vision (although their hearing remained excellent). There are 2 major distinctions between the role of vision and hearing for these artistic disciplines. First, there is a surrogate means of "hearing" music, through the musical score, which allows composers to write and edit music while totally deaf. The greatest problem with deafness for a skilled composer is interference from internal noise (tinnitus). There is no surrogate for vision to allow a painter to work when the subject is a blur or the colors on the canvas cannot be distinguished. Second, although the appreciation of art is visual and that of music is auditory, the transcription of both art and musical composition is visual. Thus, visual loss does pose a problem for a composer accustomed to working with good sight, because it disrupts habitual methods of writing and editing music. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of caloric test responses in sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Cheng-Ping; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chen, Hsin-Chien; Lee, Jih-Chin; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is characterized by a rapid-onset hearing loss that develops within 3 days. Vertigo may also be present. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether the severity of a loss of caloric function is associated with the initial hearing loss and with hearing recovery. Our study population was made up of 135 patients-67 men and 68 women, aged 25 to 71 years (mean: 50.9)-with sudden sensorineural hearing loss who had undergone bithermal caloric testing. We compared various patient factors according to patients' hearing level and their response to caloric testing. We also analyzed the canal paresis (CP) value in patients with an abnormal caloric response according to three factors: disease severity, vertigo, and hearing recovery, and we evaluated the correlation between the loss of caloric function and hearing outcomes. We found that an abnormal caloric response was significantly associated with a profound hearing loss at presentation, the presence of vertigo, and poor hearing recovery. Among patients with an abnormal caloric response, the CP value was significantly correlated with hearing recovery (r = 0.503, p = 0.001). Poor hearing recovery was seen in 80% of patients with a CP value of ≥40% but in only 25% of patients with a value of hearing recovery was worse in the patients with a CP value of ≥40% (p = 0.002). We conclude that a CP value of ≥40% is a significant prognostic factor for an unfavorable treatment outcome.

  3. Predictors of flourishing among children with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Laura; Odar Stough, Cathleen; Merianos, Ashley; Peugh, James

    2016-12-01

    To examine parent report of flourishing in children with hearing impairments compared to children without hearing impairments, and to explore whether school engagement and bullying related to child flourishing. Participants were 655 children with hearing impairments and 44, 618 children without hearing impairments who were 10-17 years of age. Caregivers completed telephone interviews about their child's functioning for the National Survey of Children's Health. Children without hearing loss had higher parent-reported flourishing compared to children with hearing loss when controlling for child demographics (i.e., race, age, sex). School engagement was positively related to flourishing of children with hearing loss. Bullying behaviors were not related to flourishing of children with hearing loss. Improving school engagement may increase flourishing of children with hearing loss, which is critical given that children with hearing loss experience lower flourishing than children without hearing loss. Examining the relationships among other risk and resilience factors and flourishing for children with hearing loss will provide information for interventions to enhance the adaptation of these children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Disabling Hearing Loss In Two Industries In Lagos, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hearing loss was significantly associated with age older than 35 years (p= 0.009) and duration of employment greater than 5 years ( p = 0.02 ). Conclusion: Disabling hearing loss was significantly higher in the noise – exposed subjects and indicates the need for a hearing conservation programme amongst these workers.

  5. Musical hallucination associated with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Tanit Ganz; Rocha, Savya Cybelle Milhomem; Knobel, Keila Alessandra Baraldi; Kii, Márcia Akemi; Santos, Rosa Maria Rodrigues dos; Pereira, Cristiana Borges

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the fact that musical hallucination have a significant impact on patients' lives, they have received very little attention of experts. Some researchers agree on a combination of peripheral and central dysfunctions as the mechanism that causes hallucination. The most accepted physiopathology of musical hallucination associated to hearing loss (caused by cochlear lesion, cochlear nerve lesion or by interruption of mesencephalon or pontine auditory information) is the disinhibition of auditory memory circuits due to sensory deprivation. Concerning the cortical area involved in musical hallucination, there is evidence that the excitatory mechanism of the superior temporal gyrus, as in epilepsies, is responsible for musical hallucination. In musical release hallucination there is also activation of the auditory association cortex. Finally, considering the laterality, functional studies with musical perception and imagery in normal individuals showed that songs with words cause bilateral temporal activation and melodies activate only the right lobe. The effect of hearing aids on the improvement of musical hallucination as a result of the hearing loss improvement is well documented. It happens because auditory hallucination may be influenced by the external acoustical environment. Neuroleptics, antidepressants and anticonvulsants have been used in the treatment of musical hallucination. Cases of improvement with the administration of carbamazepine, meclobemide and donepezil were reported, but the results obtained were not consistent.

  6. Musical hallucination associated with hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T G Sanchez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that musical hallucination have a significant impact on patients' lives, they have received very little attention of experts. Some researchers agree on a combination of peripheral and central dysfunctions as the mechanism that causes hallucination. The most accepted physiopathology of musical hallucination associated to hearing loss (caused by cochlear lesion, cochlear nerve lesion or by interruption of mesencephalon or pontine auditory information is the disinhibition of auditory memory circuits due to sensory deprivation. Concerning the cortical area involved in musical hallucination, there is evidence that the excitatory mechanism of the superior temporal gyrus, as in epilepsies, is responsible for musical hallucination. In musical release hallucination there is also activation of the auditory association cortex. Finally, considering the laterality, functional studies with musical perception and imagery in normal individuals showed that songs with words cause bilateral temporal activation and melodies activate only the right lobe. The effect of hearing aids on the improvement of musical hallucination as a result of the hearing loss improvement is well documented. It happens because auditory hallucination may be influenced by the external acoustical environment. Neuroleptics, antidepressants and anticonvulsants have been used in the treatment of musical hallucination. Cases of improvement with the administration of carbamazepine, meclobemide and donepezil were reported, but the results obtained were not consistent.

  7. Relation between Glaucoma and Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mollasadeghi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness throughout the world. Some studies have suggested a relationship between glaucoma and sensorineural hearing loss, while others have found no evidence of an association. We performed a study to determine whether there is a significant difference in hearing of patients with glaucoma and a match control population. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, from February, 2005 till April, 2006, 44 patients with glaucoma were studied. The age range was between 15 to 60 years. After taking a complete medical history, those suffering from presbycusis, history of exposure to ototoxic drugs and substances and history of ear surgery were excluded from the study. All of the patients were cases of open-angle glaucoma, and were surveyed separately for normal-pressure glaucoma. Then complete audiometric tests (PTA, SDS, SRT, Impedance were conducted for all of them, and the results compared with a control group. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the case group and control group in PTA, SDS, and SRT, except for Normal Tension Glaucoma (NTG. There wasn't any statistically significant difference between two groups with respect to age, gender, and history of diseases. In the NTG group, significant difference was seen only in high frequencies. Conclusion: As mentioned, there was a statistically significant difference between NTG group and control group. It is therefore recommended to conduct complete audiometric tests and histopathologic examinations in this group for early detection of hearing loss and application of rehabilitative measures.

  8. Characterization of hearing loss in aged type II diabetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, Susan T.; Mapes, Frances; Kim, SungHee; Frisina, D. Robert; Frisina, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Presbycusis – age-related hearing loss – is the number one communicative disorder and a significant chronic medical condition of the aged. Little is known about how type II diabetes, another prevalent age-related medical condition, and presbycusis interact. The present investigation aimed to comprehensively characterize the nature of hearing impairment in aged type II diabetics. Hearing tests measuring both peripheral (cochlea) and central (brainstem and cortex) auditory processing were utilized. The majority of differences between the hearing abilities of the aged diabetics and their age-matched controls were found in measures of inner ear function. For example, large differences were found in pure-tone audiograms, wideband noise and speech reception thresholds, and otoacoustic emissions. The greatest deficits tended to be at low frequencies. In addition, there was a strong tendency for diabetes to affect the right ear more than the left. One possible interpretation is that as one develops presbycusis, the right ear advantage is lost, and this decline is accelerated by diabetes. In contrast, auditory processing tests that measure both peripheral and central processing showed fewer declines between the elderly diabetics and the control group. Consequences of elevated blood sugar levels as possible underlying physiological mechanisms for the hearing loss are discussed. PMID:16309862

  9. Evaluating a prediction model for infant hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Judith E C; Ratnaraj, Felicia; Ead, Banan

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a prognostic model using risk factors for hearing loss could predict the chance that infants who failed a newborn hearing screen would subsequently be found to have hearing loss diagnosed by auditory brainstem response testing. Individual retrospective case-control study. We studied 229 infants with hearing loss compared with 458 infants with normal hearing. All infants had undergone natural sleep or sedated auditory brainstem response, predominantly for not passing a newborn hearing screen. Risk factors, birth history, and other information were extracted via medical record review. Multiple logistic regression analyses identified independent predictors of hearing loss. Four risk factors were independently predictive of hearing loss diagnosed by sleep or sedated auditory brainstem response: prematurity, 5-minute APGAR score ≤ 6, intracranial complication, and craniofacial abnormality. A prognostic model developed from these risk factors was associated with a 15% rate of hearing loss in stage I, 52% rate of hearing loss in stage II, and 96% rate of hearing loss in stage III. The presence of any one of four independently predictive risk factors in infants who did not pass newborn hearing screen was associated with a 50% rate of hearing loss; having three or more was associated with a 90% rate of hearing loss. Knowing that an infant is at high risk of hearing loss can motivate parents to follow up with diagnostic auditory brainstem response testing so that early identification can lead to early intervention. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Reversible hearing loss following cryptococcal meningitis: case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, W L; Durisala, N; Ho, E C

    2016-07-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a recognised complication of cryptococcal meningitis. The mechanism of hearing loss in patients with cryptococcal meningitis is different from that in bacterial meningitis. An immune-competent man with cryptococcal meningitis presented with sudden onset, bilateral, severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. He was initially evaluated for cochlear implantation. However, he had a significant recovery; he no longer required surgery and was able to cope without a hearing aid. Typically, cochlear implantation is performed with some urgency in patients with hearing loss post-bacterial meningitis, because of the risk of labyrinthitis ossificans. However, this process has not been described in patients with cryptococcal meningitis. Furthermore, patients with hearing loss associated with cryptococcal meningitis have shown varying degrees of reversibility. In this case report, hearing loss from cryptococcal meningitis is compared with that from bacterial meningitis, and the need for cochlear implantation in patients with cryptococcal meningitis is discussed.

  11. Aging, cognitive load, dementia and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Alessandro; Castiglione, Alessandro; Bovo, Roberto; Vallesi, Antonino; Gabelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Sensorineural systems play a crucial role in the diagnosis, treatment and management of several neurological disorders. The function of the eye and ear represents a unique window for testing various conditions in cognitive decline or dementia. Touch and smell have also been found to be strongly involved in neurodegenerative conditions, and their decline has been significantly associated with the progression of the disease; hence, the idea that restoring sensory function in cognitively impaired adults might enable a significant improvement in their cognitive status, reducing the worldwide incidence and prevalence of dementia. Not all sensorineural 'windows' can benefit equally from the same procedures; however, hearing and vision can certainly gain the most from dependable therapeutic and other diagnostic options. The ear, including the vestibular system, deserves an honored place among the sensory organs in this context due mainly to the sophisticated electrical devices available that have amply demonstrated their effectiveness in treating hearing loss. Restoring an individual's hearing can reduce the cognitive 'load', i.e. the neural activity needed to understand/recognize the spoken word - an activity that becomes more demanding if the brain is obliged to recruit different neural populations to achieve the same performance, as happens in older adults with sensory impairments. The sensory interfaces may also facilitate the early diagnosis of conditions characterized by a lengthy preclinical phase, as well as enabling noninvasive, follow-up procedures to assess the outcome of rehabilitation measures and distinguish physiological brain aging from neurodegenerative disorders. The present study is a brief literature review on the issues and prospects relating to the unique relationship between hearing and cognitive decline, with a general introduction to the main topics before focusing on rehabilitation training with hearing aids and cochlear implants to combat

  12. Interventions to prevent occupational noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikka, Christina; Verbeek, Jos H; Kateman, Erik; Morata, Thais C; Dreschler, Wouter A; Ferrite, Silvia

    2017-07-07

    This is the second update of a Cochrane Review originally published in 2009. Millions of workers worldwide are exposed to noise levels that increase their risk of hearing disorders. There is uncertainty about the effectiveness of hearing loss prevention interventions. To assess the effectiveness of non-pharmaceutical interventions for preventing occupational noise exposure or occupational hearing loss compared to no intervention or alternative interventions. We searched the CENTRAL; PubMed; Embase; CINAHL; Web of Science; BIOSIS Previews; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; and OSH UPDATE to 3 October 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCT), controlled before-after studies (CBA) and interrupted time-series (ITS) of non-clinical interventions under field conditions among workers to prevent or reduce noise exposure and hearing loss. We also collected uncontrolled case studies of engineering controls about the effect on noise exposure. Two authors independently assessed study eligibility and risk of bias and extracted data. We categorised interventions as engineering controls, administrative controls, personal hearing protection devices, and hearing surveillance. We included 29 studies. One study evaluated legislation to reduce noise exposure in a 12-year time-series analysis but there were no controlled studies on engineering controls for noise exposure. Eleven studies with 3725 participants evaluated effects of personal hearing protection devices and 17 studies with 84,028 participants evaluated effects of hearing loss prevention programmes (HLPPs). Effects on noise exposure Engineering interventions following legislationOne ITS study found that new legislation in the mining industry reduced the median personal noise exposure dose in underground coal mining by 27.7 percentage points (95% confidence interval (CI) -36.1 to -19.3 percentage points) immediately after the implementation of stricter legislation. This roughly translates to a 4.5 dB(A) decrease in

  13. The pathogenesis of Noise Induced Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Abbas Mir Vakili

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available NIHL occurs when too much sound intensity is transmitted into and through the auditory system and can be occur following a shot gun or the exposure to a moderately intense sound for a long period of time. NIHL caused by acoustic trauma refers to permanent cochlear damage from a one-time exposure to excessive sound pressure. This form of NIHL commonly results from exposure to high-intensity sounds such as explosions, gunfire, a large drum hit loudly and firecrackers. Meanwhile the sound intensity, duration of exposure and personal hearing thresholds as the effective factors in the amount of noise induced hearing loss should not be overlooked.  Since numerous investigations have been performed about intense sudden sound we will discuss it in detail in the current article.

  14. Interventions to prevent occupational noise induced hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Jos H.; Kateman, Erik; Morata, Thais C.; Dreschler, Wout; Sorgdrager, Bas

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Millions of workers worldwide are exposed to noise levels that increase their risk of hearing impairment. Little is known about the effectiveness of hearing loss prevention interventions. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of non-pharmaceutical interventions for preventing

  15. Interventions to prevent occupational noise-induced hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Jos H.; Kateman, Erik; Morata, Thais C.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Mischke, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Background Millions of workers worldwide are exposed to noise levels that increase their risk of hearing impairment. Little is known about the effectiveness of hearing loss prevention interventions. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of non-pharmaceutical interventions for preventing

  16. Curing Hearing Loss: Patient Expectations, Health Care Practitioners, and Basic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kazuo; Suchert, Steffen; Blevins, Nikolas H.; Heller, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Millions of patients are debilitated by hearing loss, mainly caused by degeneration of sensory hair cells in the cochlea. The underlying reasons for hair cell loss are highly diverse, ranging from genetic disposition, drug side effects, traumatic noise exposure, to the effects of aging. Whereas modern hearing aids offer some relief of the symptoms…

  17. Genetic mutation susceptibility of hearing loss in child with severe neonatal jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahedi, F.D.; Rahman, R.A.; Abdullah, A.

    2015-01-01

    This case report demonstrates a case of 5-year-old non-syndromic Malay boy who passed the hearing screening test however he was confirmed has bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss diagnosed at 3 months of age by brain stem evoked response (BSER). He has background history of severe neonatal jaundice and male siblings of hearing impairment. The antenatal and birth history was uneventful apart from maternal hypothyroidism. His other two elder brothers have bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and history of severe neonatal jaundice as well. The ear examinations, computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging revealed normal findings. Right sided cochlear implantation was done at the age of 3 years old and he is still under audiology follow-up. Conclusion: Genetic studies are important to determine the cause of genetic mutation in susceptibility to hearing impairment that run in his family after severe neonatal jaundice. Those baby with risk of developing hearing loss required diagnostic hearing assessment. (author)

  18. Elderly With Different Types of Hearing Loss and Comorbidities: Satisfaction With Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Hearing loss is developing when age is rising. Initiation and progression rates of hearing loss vary among different individuals and groups. Objectives The current study aimed to determine satisfaction of the elderly with their hearing aids in different types of hearing loss and comorbidities. Patients and Methods The study was conducted on 40 elderly subjects suffering from hearing loss and using hearing aids. The data collection method included assessment of hearing loss in addition to using a questionnaire to estimate respondents' satisfaction with their hearing aids in daily life. The Persian version of the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL questionnaire was administered. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics by SPSS software version19. Results The mean satisfaction scores of the elderly were 4.83 ± 0.51 and 5.36 ± 0.30 in the sensorineural loss groups. There was no significant difference between different comorbidities. There was a significant difference between satisfaction level of cost and services subscales in the symmetrical styles of hearing loss (P value = 0.04. Conclusions The findings of the study indicated a high satisfaction of the elderly with their hearing aids, considering the type of hearing loss. Despite all the efforts to improve the audiologic services during verification process, the elderly should be consulted specifically in order to fit their hearing aid as well as their expectations from aid.

  19. Measurement of conductive hearing loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhaobing; Wood, Melissa; Rosowski, John J

    2010-05-01

    In order to discriminate conductive hearing loss from sensorineural impairment, quantitative measurements were used to evaluate the effect of artificial conductive pathology on distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and laser-Doppler vibrometry (LDV) in mice. The conductive manipulations were created by perforating the pars flaccida of the tympanic membrane, filling or partially filling the middle-ear cavity with saline, fixing the ossicular chain, and interrupting the incudo-stapedial joint. In the saline-filled and ossicular-fixation groups, averaged DPOAE thresholds increased relative to the control state by 20-36 and 25-39 dB, respectively with the largest threshold shifts occurring at frequencies less than 20kHz, while averaged ABR thresholds increased 12-19 and 12-25 dB, respectively without the predominant low-frequency effect. Both DPOAE and ABR thresholds were elevated by less than 10 dB in the half-filled saline condition; no significant change was observed after pars flaccida perforation. Conductive pathology generally produced a change in DPOAE threshold in dB that was 1.5-2.5 times larger than the ABR threshold change at frequencies less than 30 kHz; the changes in the two thresholds were nearly equal at the highest frequencies. While mild conductive pathology (ABR threshold shifts of conductive hearing losses (ABR threshold shifts >10 dB) were associated with significant deceases in DPOAE growth rate. Our LDV measurements are consistent with others and suggest that measurements of umbo velocity are not an accurate indicator of conductive hearing loss produced by ossicular lesions in mice. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Association between hearing loss and depressive symptoms in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss causes difficulties in speech understanding, which leads away from the family and social environment. This isolation may be associated with depressive disorders. Type of study: clinical prospective. Objective: To determine the association between hearing loss and depression in a group of non-institutionalized elderly. Method: The sample consisted of individuals aged over 60 years, undergoing complete audiological evaluation and screening for depressive symptoms with the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS. Results: We evaluated 54 elderly, 26 (48.1% were female and 28 (51.9% males. It was found that 39 (72.2% had hearing thresholds change, and 17 (31.5% with mild hearing loss and 22 (40.7% with moderate hearing loss. Were evident signs of depression in 25 elderly (46.3%, and 22 (40.7% had hearing loss. Data analysis showed an association between hearing loss and depression (p = 0.016. Although not significant (p = 0.18, the association between the degree of hearing loss was positive in relation to the severity of the signs of depression. Conclusion: In elderly people surveyed, there was a strong association between hearing loss and signs of depression and tendency to be an association between the degree of hearing loss and the severity of the signs of depression.

  1. Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D; Loy, Betty A; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A

    2015-03-09

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t = 2.38, p = .02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r = .42, p = .002) and attention (r = .45, p = .001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r = - .60, p children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Self-Esteem in Children and Adolescents With Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea D. Warner-Czyz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years. Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t = 2.38, p = .02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r = .42, p = .002 and attention (r = .45, p = .001 temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r = − .60, p < .0001. No significant correlations emerged between self-esteem and demographic factors, communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population.

  3. Self-Esteem in Children and Adolescents With Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Betty A.; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t = 2.38, p = .02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r = .42, p = .002) and attention (r = .45, p = .001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r = − .60, p self-esteem and demographic factors, communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. PMID:25755025

  4. Viral Causes of Hearing Loss: A Review for Hearing Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Brandon E.; Durstenfeld, Anne

    2014-01-01

    A number of viral infections can cause hearing loss. Hearing loss induced by these viruses can be congenital or acquired, unilateral or bilateral. Certain viral infections can directly damage inner ear structures, others can induce inflammatory responses which then cause this damage, and still others can increase susceptibility or bacterial or fungal infection, leading to hearing loss. Typically, virus-induced hearing loss is sensorineural, although conductive and mixed hearing losses can be seen following infection with certain viruses. Occasionally, recovery of hearing after these infections can occur spontaneously. Most importantly, some of these viral infections can be prevented or treated. For many of these viruses, guidelines for their treatment or prevention have recently been revised. In this review, we outline many of the viruses that cause hearing loss, their epidemiology, course, prevention, and treatment. PMID:25080364

  5. Helping Others Hear Better: Turning First-Hand Experience into Hearing Loss Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the association and eventually was offered her dream job there. Lise is now the director of ... and Other Communication Disorders - Hearing Aids Fact Sheet (pdf) Hearing Loss Association of America Fall 2017 Issue: ...

  6. Dietary glycemic load is a predictor of age-related hearing loss in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Bamini; Flood, Victoria M; McMahon, Catherine M; Burlutsky, George; Brand-Miller, Jennie; Mitchell, Paul

    2010-12-01

    Age-related hearing loss is a frequent disability in older adults and nutrition could play a role in the development of this condition. Carbohydrate nutrition [including dietary glycemic index (GI) and load (GL)] may be linked to hearing loss. We aimed to determine the association between carbohydrate nutrition (including mean dietary GI and GL, and the dietary intakes of carbohydrate and sugar), starch, cereal and total fiber, and age-related hearing loss. The Blue Mountains Hearing Study is a population-based survey of age-related hearing loss (1997-1999 to 2002-2004). Hearing loss was measured in 2956 participants (aged ≥50 y) and was defined as the pure-tone average of frequencies 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 kHz > 25 dB hearing level. Dietary data were collected in a semiquantitative FFQ. A purpose-built database based on Australian GI values was used to calculate the mean GI. A higher mean dietary GI was associated with an increased prevalence of any hearing loss, comparing quintiles 1 (lowest) and 5 (highest), [multivariable-adjusted odds ratio = 1.41 (95% CI = 1.01-1.97)]. Participants in the highest quartile of mean dietary GL intake compared with those in the lowest quartile had a 76% greater risk of developing incident hearing loss (P-trend = 0.04). Higher carbohydrate and sugar intakes were associated with incident hearing loss (P-trend = 0.03 and P-trend = 0.05, respectively). In summary, a high-GL diet was a predictor of incident hearing loss, as was higher intake of total carbohydrate. Hence, high postprandial glycemia might be a potential underlying biological mechanism in the development of age-related hearing loss.

  7. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss in the Only Hearing Ear: Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Koray Bal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden hearing loss in the only hearing ear cases are rarely published in the English literature; most of the cases are idiopathic. It is an otologic emergency needing urgent treatment. Delayed diagnosis can interfere with patient’s social life with interrupting the verbal communication. In this case report we presented a 33-year-old female patient having sudden sensorineural hearing loss in the only hearing ear diagnosed as bilateral large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

  8. Prevalence and factors associated with hearing loss and hearing aid use in korean elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Su

    2015-03-01

    This study examined hearing loss prevalence and hearing aid usage rates among Korean elders by comparing the differences between those with and without hearing loss, and between those who used and did not use hearing aids. This study was based on data collected during the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010-2012). The study sample consisted of 5,447 Koreans aged ≥60 years who received a hearing assessment. Hearing loss was measured using a pure tone audiometry test and classified according to the World Health Organization's criteria. Hearing aid use was assessed by self-report. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the associations between hearing loss, hearing aid use, and related variables. Hearing loss was found in 16.8% of the elders and only 15.9% of them used a hearing aid. Male (95% CI: 1.27-2.15), tinnitus (95% CI: 1.58-2.32), dizziness (95% CI: 1.05-1.73), and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.32-2.38) were the variables most strongly associated with hearing loss after multivariate adjustment. Tinnitus (95% CI: 1.34-4.13) and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.01-5.02) were strongly associated with hearing aid use after multivariate adjustment. More than half of South Korean elders aged ≥60 and older have hearing loss but the rate of hearing aid use is very low. An aural public health program should address modifiable risk factors, such as tinnitus and noise exposure, and non-modifiable risk factors associated with hearing loss in the elderly.

  9. Neural Alterations in Acquired Age-Related Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mudar, Raksha A.; Husain, Fatima T.

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions in older adults. Growing evidence suggests that hearing loss is associated with reduced cognitive functioning and incident dementia. In this mini-review, we briefly examine literature on anatomical and functional alterations in the brains of adults with acquired age-associated hearing loss, which may underlie the cognitive consequences observed in this population, focusing on studies that have used structural and functional m...

  10. Macrocytosis and sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurran, A E L; Adair, R A

    2015-11-01

    Although other blood dyscrasias are known to cause sudden sensorineural hearing loss, macrocytosis has not previously been implicated in the absence of another causative agent. We present a case of bilateral sequential sudden sensorineural hearing loss in a patient with significant macrocytosis (mean corpuscular volume at presentation 124 fl) secondary to alcohol-induced liver dysfunction. A possible pathophysiological mechanism linking macrocytosis and sudden sensorineural hearing loss was identified, suggesting areas for further investigation.

  11. Studying VEMP in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Rajati

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL has a prevalence of 10 in 100,000. Viral infections, vascular obstruction and rupture of the intracochlear membranes are supposed to be its most common etiologies. About 40% of patients experience vertigo or imbalance. The VEMP (vestibular evoked myogenic potentials test is a known approach for detailed study of the labyrinth. The advantage of this test in comparison to other tests is the selected study of sacculus and sacculocochlear pathways. Materials and Methods:  In this cross sectional study all patients with SSNHL diagnosis were admitted and underwent routine standard treatments and diagnostic tests. Clinical symptoms and paraclinic findings were recorded in especially designed forms and VEMP test was performed on admission. Results: Among the 43 cases with sudden sensorineural hearing loss, 14 (32.6% had vertigo. Thirteen patients (39.2% out of 43 had a negative (abnormal VEMP, 6 of which (42.9% had vertigo, while in the 30 VEMP positive (normal cases, vertigo was detected in 8 (26.6%. Discussion: Saccular dysfunction seems to be an important finding in SSNHL. Although it is more prevalent in the patients with vertigo, it can be found in the non-dizzy cases. VEMP disturbance in SSNHL shows more extensive pathological involvement. Conclusion: In SSNHL the pathology isn’t limited to the cochlea and even in patients with no vestibular symptoms sacculus might be involved.

  12. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss after non-otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Joshua Cody; Peters, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss following non-otologic surgery is a rare event described in the medical literature. Cardiopulmonary bypass surgery is most commonly associated with this type of hearing loss. Our case report and review of the literature describe two cases with postoperative hearing loss - neither of which are cardiac surgeries - making them exceedingly rare in the medical literature. Regardless of the rarity of this unfortunate event, the possibility for permanent hearing loss is a potentially devastating unanticipated complication and one that all surgeons should be aware. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Immersive simulation of hearing loss and auditory prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Patrick M.; Desloge, Joseph G.

    2004-05-01

    Simulation of hearing loss is useful for demonstrating the communication challenges facing hearing-impaired people. However, current simulations, most of which are only recordings, do not actually elevate thresholds; i.e., they do not simulate hearing loss, per se. The hearing loss simulator described in this talk is immersive; the user's detection thresh- olds for ambient sounds are shifted by a prescribed degree. This threshold shift is achieved through a combination of passive attenuation (from muff-type hearing protectors) and additive masking noise (introduced by within-muff earphones). Acoustic signals picked up by microphones near each ear are processed through bandpass AGC channels and delivered via the earphones to complete the simulation of frequency-dependent hearing loss and loudness recruitment. Preliminary results validating the accuracy of specified threshold shift will be presented, along with speech-reception data comparing simulated with actual hearing losses. Subjective reactions of users engaged in one-on-one conversation suggest that strong feelings of communication disability are engendered by even moderate degrees of simulated hearing loss. The system, which is capable of simulating any degree of recruiting hearing loss along with hearing aids or cochlear implants, can provide effective interactive demonstrations of both auditory communication handicap and rehabilitation options. [Work supported by NIDCD.

  14. Age-Related Hearing Loss: Implications for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Pamela E.; Hoyer, William J.

    1996-01-01

    Examines adaptation strategies used by hearing-impaired listeners and considers the implications of age-related hearing loss for counseling, intervention, and self-management. Outlines information on hearing aids and on practical communication strategies and the growing importance of these strategies as the population grows increasingly older.…

  15. Deafness and Hearing Loss. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #3

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Hearing is one of the five senses. Hearing gives access to sounds in the world--people's voices, their words, a car horn blown in warning or as hello! When a child has a hearing loss, it is cause for immediate attention. That is because language and communication skills develop most rapidly in childhood, especially before the age of 3. When…

  16. Hearing loss in children with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muus, John S; Weir, Forest W; Kreicher, Kathryn L; Bowlby, Deborah A; Discolo, Christopher M; Meyer, Ted A

    2017-09-01

    Although insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has been shown to be important for inner-ear development in animal models, little is known about the otologic and audiologic findings of children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). The goal of this study is to evaluate the prevalence, type, and severity of hearing impairment in children with GHD. Audiologic, otologic, and demographic data were recorded for children with a diagnosis of GHD in the AudGen database. Data for each patient were selected based on the first encounter with available complete audiometric data or the first encounter with a type of hearing loss documented. The patients were then stratified by type and severity of hearing loss, and otologic issues were documented. A separate cohort comprised of children with GHD without hearing loss was compared as a control. 209 children with GHD met inclusion criteria. 173 (83%) of these patients had hearing loss. 79% of losses were bilateral and 21% were unilateral (309 total ears with hearing loss). 293 of the 309 ears with hearing loss had audiograms with ear-specific thresholds; 47 had conductive, 24 had sensorineural, 65 had mixed and 157 had undefined hearing loss with incomplete audiograms. Pure-tone averages (PTA) were higher among patients with mixed hearing loss compared to patients with all other loss types. Hearing loss is prevalent in children with GHD with a predisposition to be bilateral. These findings suggest the need for increased awareness and routine hearing screening for patients with GHD. Further studies may elucidate the etiology of the hearing impairment in children with GHD to better aid pediatricians, endocrinologists, otolaryngologists and audiologists when assessing and managing these children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Current amplification models of sensorineurall and conductive hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main function of a hearing aid is to improve auditory and language abilities of hearing impaired users. The amplification model has to be adapted according to age, degree and type of hearing loss. The goal of this paper is to analyze the current amplification models of sensorineural and conductive hearing loss which can provide a high quality of speech perception and sounds at any degree of hearing loss. The BAHA is a surgically implantable system for treatment of conductive hearing loss that works through direct bone conduction. BAHA is used to help people with chronic ear infections, congenital external auditory canal atresia and single sided deafness who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. The last generation of hearing aid for sensorineural hearing loss is cochlear implant. Bimodal amplification improves binaural hearing. Hearing aids alone do not make listening easier in all situations. The things that can interfere with listening are background noises, distance from a sound and reverberation or echo. The device used most often today is the Frequency Modulated (FM system.

  18. Hearing aid-related satisfaction based on type and degree of hearing loss in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad FarajiKhiavi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the elderly; using a hearing aid to alleviate auditory impairment can positively affect their quality of life. This research aimed to determine the level of satisfaction concerning hearing aids in elderly people with hearing impairment based on the type and degree of hearing loss.Methods: An analytic cross-sectional research design was used ; the sample included 40 elderly people who used hearing aids. According to the World Health Organization (WHO age classification, participants were divided into two age groups: 65-74 years (n=20 and 75-90 years (n=20. Satisfaction levels were assessed using a standard satisfaction with amplification in daily life (SADL questionnaire.Results: Satisfaction levels in the 65-74 age group were significantly higher than that in the 75-90 age group (p=0.02. Participants with mixed hearing loss revealed higher satisfaction levels than participants with sensorineural hearing loss (p=0.02. On the negative effects dimension, participants with severe hearing loss exhibited significantly higher satisfaction levels than participants with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss (p=0.01.Conclusion: Total satisfaction mean scores were relatively high in the elderly participants . Negative features could be reduced via careful consultation regarding the aids’ amplifying capabilities and limitations in groups with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss.

  19. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss in children: Etiology, management, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitaro, Jacob; Bechor-Fellner, Avital; Gavriel, Haim; Marom, Tal; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is uncommon, and the current guidelines for its management refer to adults. Our objective was to review cases of SSNHL in children and examine their etiologies, management, and outcome. We performed a retrospective chart review of all children under the age of 18 years treated for SSNHL between January 2003 and September 2014. Data recorded included age, gender, symptoms, onset of hearing loss, audiometric results, diagnostic studies, treatment, and outcome. Nineteen children were included. Mean age was 14 years (range 7-18 years). Male: female ratio was 9:10. Degree of hearing loss varied from mild to profound across the tested frequencies. Most common accompanying symptom was tinnitus. Serologic tests demonstrated recent Epstein-Barr virus infection in one patient and previous cytomegalovirus infection in six patients. Imaging studies included computed tomography scan (n=3) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (n=12). All imaging studies did not demonstrate any pathology. Treatment included systemic steroids in 19 (100%) children and intratympanic steroids in eight (42%). Hearing completely improved in three (16%) children, partially improved in nine (47%), and there was no improvement in six (32%). One child was lost to follow-up. Viral infection was a common finding in children with SSNHL and no pathological changes were demonstrated on imaging studies. In most patients (63%), hearing improvement was observed. Intratympanic steroid injection can benefit these children. Further studies are required to investigate the etiologies and establish guidelines for the management of SSNHL in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Perda auditiva genética Genetic hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Godinho

    2003-01-01

    : Advances in the genetics of hearing loss have enhanced our comprehension of auditory function and have enabled more accurate diagnosis. Hopefully, as we further understand the molecular elements of the auditory system, this knowledge will help in the development of new therapies for the treatment of the underlying genetic defects.

  1. Communication Assessment and Intervention: Implications for Pediatric Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobsin, Lori L; Houston, K Todd

    2015-12-01

    Historically, children with hearing loss have fallen well behind their hearing peers in the areas of speech and language development, which has often limited their participation in a range of social, educational, and vocational activities. However, with early identification and appropriate intervention coupled with current hearing technology, children with hearing loss can achieve speech and language milestones at rates commensurate with hearing peers. To attain the best outcomes for these children, an early intervention system that provides thorough and unbiased information to families and allows for the efficient and coordinated efforts of qualified professionals must be present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Menopause and postmenopausal hormone therapy and risk of hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curhan, Sharon G; Eliassen, A Heather; Eavey, Roland D; Wang, Molin; Lin, Brian M; Curhan, Gary C

    2017-09-01

    Menopause may be a risk factor for hearing loss, and postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) has been proposed to slow hearing decline; however, there are no large prospective studies. We prospectively examined the independent relations between menopause and postmenopausal HT and risk of self-reported hearing loss. Prospective cohort study among 80,972 women in the Nurses' Health Study II, baseline age 27 to 44 years, followed from 1991 to 2013. Baseline and updated information was obtained from detailed validated biennial questionnaires. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to examine independent associations between menopausal status and postmenopausal HT and risk of hearing loss. After 1,410,928 person-years of follow-up, 18,558 cases of hearing loss were reported. There was no significant overall association between menopausal status, natural or surgical, and risk of hearing loss. Older age at natural menopause was associated with higher risk. The multivariable-adjusted relative risk of hearing loss among women who underwent natural menopause at age 50+ years compared with those aged less than 50 years was 1.10 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03, 1.17). Among postmenopausal women, oral HT (estrogen therapy or estrogen plus progestogen therapy) was associated with higher risk of hearing loss, and longer duration of use was associated with higher risk (P trend menopause and longer duration of postmenopausal HT are associated with higher risk of hearing loss.

  3. Isolated Sensorineural Hearing Loss as a Sequela after Lightning Strike

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfuz Turan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In most of the surviving patients after a lightning strike, audiovestibular abnormalities have been reported. The most frequently reported type of abnormalities is a tympanic membrane perforation with hearing loss and external ear canal burn. However a sensor neural hearing loss and mixed type hearing loss can also occur, but these occur rarely. A nineteen-year-old female patient had, after a lightning strike, serious burns on the left ear, behind the ear, and on the chest and neck. She also had in her left ear 108 dB hearing loss with irregular central perforation and in her right ear 52 dB sensorineural hearing loss. There was no hearing loss before the strike. A hearing aid was recommended for the right ear and good care and follow-up were recommended for the left ear. A lightning strike can cause serious audiological damage. Therefore, it is necessary to make a careful audiovestibular evaluation of the patients. Although there exist rarely healed cases from sensorineural hearing loss after lightning strike in literature, in our case hearing loss occurred bilaterally and then it healed unilaterally. This condition is quite rare in literature.

  4. Vibrant Soundbridge rehabilitation of conductive and mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüers, Jan-Christoffer; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2014-12-01

    The Vibrant Soundbridge is the world's most often implanted active middle ear implant or hearing aid. During the last few years, the device indications have expanded from sensorineural hearing loss to conductive and mixed hearing loss. Titanium couplers have led to improved contact of the floating mass transducer with the middle ear structures. The resulting hearing gain is satisfying for most patients, but so far, there is no clear audiologic advantage over conventional hearing aids. Currently, the indications are mainly related to intolerance of conventional hearing aids (eg, chronic otitis externa), severe mixed hearing loss with a destructed middle ear and certain medical diagnosis (eg, congenital atresia). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Noise Exposure and Hearing Loss Among Sand and Gravel Miners

    OpenAIRE

    Landen, Deborah; Wilkins, Steve; Stephenson, Mark; McWilliams, Linda

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe workplace noise exposures, risk factors for hearing loss, and hearing levels among sand and gravel miners, and to determine whether full shift noise exposures resulted in changes in hearing thresholds from baseline values. Sand and gravel miners (n = 317) were interviewed regarding medical history, leisure-time and occupational noise exposure, other occupational exposures, and use of hearing protection. Audiometric tests were performed both before...

  6. Alcohol use among students with and without hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinquart, Martin; Pfeiffer, Jens P

    2015-01-01

    We compared alcohol use among adolescents with and without hearing loss. Adolescents with hearing loss reported consuming less alcohol, less binge drinking, fewer episodes of drunkenness, and a higher age at first drunkenness than their hearing peers. Alcohol use did not vary between students who were deaf or hard of hearing or between students with congenital versus acquired hearing loss. Although higher age, male gender, and larger friend networks predicted higher alcohol consumption among adolescents with and without hearing loss, worse grades at school were associated only with alcohol use among hearing students. Lower alcohol use among students with hearing loss when compared with hearing peers was, in part, explained by their lower level of peer-group integration. Although alcohol use is a less serious problem among students with hearing loss, a minority with risky consumption would benefit from interventions aimed at reducing alcohol use. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Prediction of hearing outcomes by multiple regression analysis in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hideaki; Tabata, Takahisa; Koizumi, Hiroki; Hohchi, Nobusuke; Takeuchi, Shoko; Kitamura, Takuro; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Ohbuchi, Toyoaki

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to create a multiple regression model for predicting hearing outcomes of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). The participants were 205 consecutive patients (205 ears) with ISSNHL (hearing level ≥ 40 dB, interval between onset and treatment ≤ 30 days). They received systemic steroid administration combined with intratympanic steroid injection. Data were examined by simple and multiple regression analyses. Three hearing indices (percentage hearing improvement, hearing gain, and posttreatment hearing level [HLpost]) and 7 prognostic factors (age, days from onset to treatment, initial hearing level, initial hearing level at low frequencies, initial hearing level at high frequencies, presence of vertigo, and contralateral hearing level) were included in the multiple regression analysis as dependent and explanatory variables, respectively. In the simple regression analysis, the percentage hearing improvement, hearing gain, and HLpost showed significant correlation with 2, 5, and 6 of the 7 prognostic factors, respectively. The multiple correlation coefficients were 0.396, 0.503, and 0.714 for the percentage hearing improvement, hearing gain, and HLpost, respectively. Predicted values of HLpost calculated by the multiple regression equation were reliable with 70% probability with a 40-dB-width prediction interval. Prediction of HLpost by the multiple regression model may be useful to estimate the hearing prognosis of ISSNHL. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Advances in the Understanding of the Genetic Causes of Hearing Loss in Children Inform a Rational Approach to Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John C; Palumbos, Janice C

    2016-10-01

    Hearing loss represents the most common sensory disability of children. Remarkable advances in the identification of genes underlying nonsyndromic and syndromic hearing loss in just the last 2 decades have led to the ability to determine the specific genetic cause of hearing loss in many children. Surprisingly one gene, GJB2, encoding the protein connexin-26, accounts for about 20 % of sensorineural hearing loss (including in India) and is considered the first tier test in evaluating an infant with unexplained congenital hearing loss. Using the knowledge of the etiology of hearing loss, the authors propose a diagnostic reasoning process for the assessment of a child in the pediatric setting. Second tier testing consists of the multiple gene panels using whole exome sequencing strategies, and is becoming available in some regions of the world including the US. Referral to medical genetics is always a consideration in a child with no explanation for the hearing loss and in families with questions about recurrence risk.

  9. Applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchaiah V

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Vinaya Manchaiah,1–4 Brian Taylor,5 Ashley L Dockens,1 Nicole R Tran,1 Kayla Lane,1 Mariana Castle,1 Vibhu Grover1 1Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; 2The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 3Audiology India, Mysore, 4Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, India; 5Taylor Audio LLC, Minneapolis, MN, USA Background: This systematic literature review is aimed at investigating applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss. This review discusses three categories of direct-to-consumer hearing devices: 1 personal sound amplification products (PSAPs, 2 direct-mail hearing aids, and 3 over-the-counter (OTC hearing aids.Method: A literature review was conducted using EBSCOhost and included the databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO. After applying prior agreed inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 reports were included in the review.Results: Included studies fell into three domains: 1 electroacoustic characteristics, 2 consumer surveys, and 3 outcome evaluations. Electroacoustic characteristics of these devices vary significantly with some meeting the stringent acoustic criteria used for hearing aids, while others producing dangerous output levels (ie, over 120-dB sound pressure level. Low-end (or low-cost devices were typically poor in acoustic quality and did not meet gain levels necessary for most adult and elderly hearing loss patterns (eg, presbycusis, especially in high frequencies. Despite direct-mail hearing aids and PSAPs being associated with lower satisfaction when compared to hearing aids purchased through hearing health care professionals, consumer surveys suggest that 5%–19% of people with hearing loss purchase hearing aids through direct-mail or online. Studies on outcome evaluation suggest positive

  10. Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Yazdani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To determine hearing thresholds at sound frequencies important for speech comprehension in subjects with ocular pseudoexfoliation (PXF and to compare them with that of controls without PXF. METHODS: Eighty-three subjects with ocular PXF and 83 age and sex matched controls without PXF were enrolled in this case-control study. Pure tone audiometry (bone conduction was performed at 1, 2 and 3 kilohertz (KHz in all subjects. Thresholds were compared to an age and sex stratified standard (ISO7029 and between study groups. Hearing loss was defined as sum of tested hearing thresholds (HTL-1,2,3 lower than the ISO7029 standard median. RESULTS: The study included 60 male and 23 female subjects in each group. Hearing loss was present in 147 of 166 (88.6% of examined ears in the case group vs 89 of 166 (53.6% in the control group (P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR] = 6.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.49-11.79. Overall 78 subjects (94.0% in the case group vs 58 subjects (69.9% in the control group had hearing loss in one or both ears (P < 0.001; OR=6.72; 95%CI, 2.42-18.62. Hearing thresholds at each of the examined frequencies and the HTL-1,2,3 were also significantly higher in individuals with PXF. Although glaucoma was significantly more common in subjects with PXF (51.8% vs 22.9%, P < 0.001, it was not associated with hearing

  11. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Hartmut; Rählmann, Sebastian; Walger, Martin; Margolf-Hackl, Sabine; Kießling, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons. Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated. Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity - as determined by the fluid intelligence measure - was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered. The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive function in experienced hearing aid users. However, it was found that lower fluid intelligence scores were related to higher hearing thresholds. Since greater hearing loss was associated with a greater objective benefit, these results strongly support the advice of using hearing aids regardless of age and cognitive function to counter hearing loss and the adverse effects of age-related hearing impairment. Still, individual cognitive capacity might

  12. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  13. Occupational Noise-induced Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Azizi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is a well-known entity in daily practice of otolaryngology. A wide variety of NIHLs are work-related. Occupational noise is the most common cause of NIHL in adults which is up to now considered incurable and the best approach to it is to utilize maximal protection. An effective noise exposure prevention program consists of identification of sources of noise and implementation of controlling measures and regulations at working environments as well as performing periodic audiologic evaluation of those who are working at noisy environments. The present paper, briefly reviews occupational NIHL mainly based on the related data available on PubMed up to early 2010.

  14. Neuro-rehabilitation Approach for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Kenichi; Fukushima, Munehisa; Teismann, Henning; Lagemann, Lothar; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo; Okamoto, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is characterized by acute, idiopathic hearing loss. The estimated incidence rate is 5-30 cases per 100,000 people per year. The causes of SSHL and the mechanisms underlying SSHL currently remain unknown. Based on several hypotheses such as a circulatory disturbance to the cochlea, viral infection, and autoimmune disease, pharmaco-therapeutic approaches have been applied to treat SSHL patients; however, the efficacy of the standard treatment, corticosteroid therapy, is still under debate. Exposure to intense sounds has been shown to cause permanent damage to the auditory system; however, exposure to a moderate level enriched acoustic environment after noise trauma may reduce hearing impairments. Several neuroimaging studies recently suggested that the onset of SSHL induced maladaptive cortical reorganization in the human auditory cortex, and that the degree of cortical reorganization in the acute SSHL phase negatively correlated with the recovery rate from hearing loss. This article reports the development of a novel neuro-rehabilitation approach for SSHL, "constraint-induced sound therapy (CIST)". The aim of the CIST protocol is to prevent or reduce maladaptive cortical reorganization by using an enriched acoustic environment. The canal of the intact ear of SSHL patients is plugged in order to motivate them to actively use the affected ear and thereby prevent progress of maladaptive cortical reorganization. The affected ear is also exposed to music via a headphone for 6 hr per day during hospitalization. The CIST protocol appears to be a safe, easy, inexpensive, and effective treatment for SSHL. PMID:26863274

  15. Hearing devices for children with unilateral hearing loss: Patient- and parent-reported perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Patricia L; Jones-Goodrich, Rose; Wisneski, Meghan; Edwards, Todd C; Sie, Kathleen C Y

    2016-11-01

    Management of children with unilateral hearing loss is not standardized. The primary goal of this study was to elicit patient- and parent-reported perspectives regarding usage of hearing devices in pediatric UHL and to suggest a basic algorithmic approach to management. Our tertiary care center recruited families of youth ages 5-19 years with unilateral hearing loss from January 2014 through October 2015. Parents of all youths completed a 36-item survey, and some youth ages 11-19 years participated in hour-long interviews. We assessed patterns of hearing device usage among participants, and performed qualitative data analysis to understand factors considered by youths when deciding whether or not to use a hearing device. Survey information was collected for 50 patients. Distribution of hearing loss severity in affected ear was mild 14%, moderate 26%, severe 22%, and profound 38%. The majority of children had sensorineural hearing loss (57%), followed by mixed (32%), and then conductive (11%). 34 children (68%) had tried a hearing device; 20 continued to use the device. Retention rates were similar among children with different degrees of hearing loss: mild 66%, moderate 50%, severe 60%, profound 64%. Sixteen children tried a wireless contralateral routing of signal (CROS) device, and 15 tried a behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid. Retention rates for CROS and BTE devices were 69% and 47%, respectively. The most common reason for cessation of use was discomfort, followed by lack of benefit. A majority of children with unilateral hearing loss who tried a hearing device continued to use it, and retention rates were similar across all degrees of hearing loss. These findings suggest that personal hearing devices should be included in management protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characteristics of noise induced hearing loss in gold miners: research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The characteristics of Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) in gold miners of different ages and occupation types were examined and the incidence of tinnitus, vertigo/balance problems and nausea were determined. The results indicate that as a group these subjects had symmetrical bilateral, mild hearing loss in the ...

  17. Prevalence of noise induced hearing loss among employees at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) is within the top five occupational illnesses in Zimbabwe. Workers at a mining company complained about loss of hearing at the mine clinic. Objective: To determine the prevalence of NIHL among employees at the Mine. Methods: We conducted a descriptive cross sectional ...

  18. Noise induced hearing loss among industrial workers in Dar es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine whether sound in the study areas was of sufficient intensity to cause hearing loss and if so whether those exposed have been affected and to determine whether workers/employees in the study areas were aware that sound can cause hearing loss and if so whether they knew that this can be ...

  19. Teaching Vocabulary to Preschool Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Emily; Douglas, W. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Despite poor vocabulary outcomes for children with hearing loss, few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of specific vocabulary teaching methods on vocabulary learning for this group. The authors compared three vocabulary instruction conditions with preschool children with hearing loss: (a) explicit, direct instruction; (b) follow-in…

  20. Salivary Cortisol Profiles of Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Fred H.; Gustafson, Samantha J.; Corbett, Blythe A.; Lambert, E. Warren; Camarata, Stephen M.; Hornsby, Benjamin W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: It has long been speculated that effortful listening places children with hearing loss at risk for fatigue. School-age children with hearing loss experiencing cumulative stress and listening fatigue on a daily basis might undergo dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity resulting in elevated or flattened…

  1. A honey bee can threat ear: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzenli, Ufuk; Bozan, Nazım; Ayral, Abdurrahman; Yalınkılıç, Abdülaziz; Kıroğlu, Ahmet Faruk

    2017-11-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is an otologic emergency. Many etiological factors can lead to this pathology. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) sting may lead to local and systemic reactions due to sensitization of the patient. In this paper we described a sudden sensorineural hearing loss occurred after honey bee sting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Is hearing loss a feature of Joubert syndrome, a ciliopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, H.Y.; Van Zanten, B.G.A.; De Ru, S.A.; Boon, M.; Mancini, G.M.S.; van der Knaap, M.S.; Poll-The, B.; Lindhout, D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess if hearing loss is a feature of Joubert syndrome (JBS), one of the ciliopathies and therefore possibly associated with hearing loss. Design: Retrospective case series. Setting: University Children's Hospital. Patients: Dutch patients with JBS. Main outcome measures: Audiological

  3. Is hearing loss a feature of Joubert syndrome, a ciliopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, Hester Y.; Van Zanten, Bert G. A.; De Ru, Sander A.; Boon, Maartje; Mancini, Grazia M. S.; Van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Lindhout, Dick

    Objective To assess if hearing loss is a feature of Joubert syndrome (JBS). one of the ciliopathies and therefore possibly associated with hearing loss Design: Retrospective case series. Setting University Children's Hospital Patients Dutch patients with JBS. Main outcome measures Audiological data.

  4. Is hearing loss a feature of Joubert syndrome, a ciliopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, Hester Y.; van Zanten, Bert G. A.; de Ru, Sander A.; Boon, Maartje; Mancini, Grazia M. S.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Lindhout, Dick

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess if hearing loss is a feature of Joubert syndrome (JBS). one of the ciliopathies and therefore possibly associated with hearing loss Design: Retrospective case series. Setting University Children's Hospital Patients Dutch patients with JBS. Main outcome measures Audiological data.

  5. Pathophysiology of Age-Related Hearing Loss (Peripheral and Central)

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) refers to bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss resulting from aging process. Presbycusis is a complex phenomenon characterized by audiometric threshold shift, deterioration in speech-understanding and speech-perception difficulties in noisy environments. Factors contributing to presbycusis include mitochondria DNA mutation, genetic disorders including Ahl, hypertension, diabetes, metabolic disease and other systemic diseases in the intrinsic aspects. Ext...

  6. Educational Implications of Conductive Hearing Loss in School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, David J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The study investigated specific linguistic abilities/disabilities of 15 children with conductive hearing loss and a history of middle ear dysfunction. Results found significant deficits in verbal intelligence, word recognition, and receptive syntactic skills substantiating the finding that conductive hearing loss due to otitis media is deleterious…

  7. Effects of Hearing Loss and Cognitive Load on Speech Recognition with Competing Talkers

    OpenAIRE

    Meister, Hartmut; Schreitmüller, Stefan; Ortmann, Magdalene; Rählmann, Sebastian; Walger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Everyday communication frequently comprises situations with more than one talker speaking at a time. These situations are challenging since they pose high attentional and memory demands placing cognitive load on the listener. Hearing impairment additionally exacerbates communication problems under these circumstances. We examined the effects of hearing loss and attention tasks on speech recognition with competing talkers in older adults with and without hearing impairment. We hypothesized tha...

  8. Curing hearing loss: Patient expectations, health care practitioners, and basic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kazuo; Suchert, Steffen; Blevins, Nikolas H; Heller, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Millions of patients are debilitated by hearing loss, mainly caused by degeneration of sensory hair cells in the cochlea. The underlying reasons for hair cell loss are highly diverse, ranging from genetic disposition, drug side effects, traumatic noise exposure, to the effects of aging. Whereas modern hearing aids offer some relief of the symptoms of mild hearing loss, the only viable option for patients suffering from profound hearing loss is the cochlear implant. Despite their successes, hearing aids and cochlear implants are not perfect. Particularly frequency discrimination and performance in noisy environments and general efficacy of the devises vary among individual patients. The advent of regenerative medicine, the publicity of stem cells and gene therapy, and recent scientific achievements in inner ear cell regeneration have generated an emerging spirit of optimism among scientists, health care practitioners, and patients. In this review, we place the different points of view of these three groups in perspective with the goal of providing an assessment of patient expectations, health care reality, and potential future treatment options for hearing disorders. (1) Readers will be encouraged to put themselves in the position of a hearing impaired patient or family member of a hearing impaired person. (2) Readers will be able to explain why diagnosis of the underlying pathology of hearing loss is difficult. (3) Readers will be able to list the main directions of current research aimed to cure hearing loss. (4) Readers will be able to understand the different viewpoints of patients and their relatives, health care providers, and scientists with respect to finding novel treatments for hearing loss. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hearing loss and cognition: the role of hearing AIDS, social isolation and depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piers Dawes

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is associated with poor cognitive performance and incident dementia and may contribute to cognitive decline. Treating hearing loss with hearing aids may ameliorate cognitive decline. The purpose of this study was to test whether use of hearing aids was associated with better cognitive performance, and if this relationship was mediated via social isolation and/or depression. Structural equation modelling of associations between hearing loss, cognitive performance, social isolation, depression and hearing aid use was carried out with a subsample of the UK Biobank data set (n = 164,770 of UK adults aged 40 to 69 years who completed a hearing test. Age, sex, general health and socioeconomic status were controlled for as potential confounders. Hearing aid use was associated with better cognition, independently of social isolation and depression. This finding was consistent with the hypothesis that hearing aids may improve cognitive performance, although if hearing aids do have a positive effect on cognition it is not likely to be via reduction of the adverse effects of hearing loss on social isolation or depression. We suggest that any positive effects of hearing aid use on cognition may be via improvement in audibility or associated increases in self-efficacy. Alternatively, positive associations between hearing aid use and cognition may be accounted for by more cognitively able people seeking and using hearing aids. Further research is required to determine the direction of association, if there is any direct causal relationship between hearing aid use and better cognition, and whether hearing aid use results in reduction in rates of cognitive decline measured longitudinally.

  10. Prevention of the Evolution of Workers' Hearing Loss from Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Noisy Environments through a Hearing Conservation Program

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Vinicius Ribas; Marques, Jair; Panegalli, Flavio; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Souza, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a serious problem for workers and therefore for businesses. The hearing conservation program (HCP) is a set of coordinated measures to prevent the development or evolution of occupational hearing loss, which involves a continuous and dynamic process of implementation of hearing conservation routines through anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and subsequent control of the occurrence of existing environmental risks or of those thatmay exist...

  11. MR Imaging in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Time to Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, G; Di Berardino, F; Sina, C; Zanetti, D; Scola, E; Gavagna, C; Gaini, L; Palumbo, G; Capaccio, P; Triulzi, F

    2017-08-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is defined as acute hearing loss of the sensorineural type of at least 30 dB over 3 contiguous frequencies that occurs within a 72-hour period. Although many different causative factors have been proposed, sudden sensorineural hearing loss is still considered "idiopathic" in 71%-85% of cases, and treatments are empiric, not based on etiology. MR imaging implemented with a 3D FLAIR sequence has provided new insights into the etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Herein, we review the current management trends for patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss, from the initial clinical diagnosis to therapeutic strategies and diagnostic work-up. We focused primarily on MR imaging assessment and discuss the relevance that MR imaging findings might have for patient management, pointing out different perspectives for future clinical research. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. Mobile phone usage does not affect sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagiv, D; Migirov, L; Madgar, O; Nakache, G; Wolf, M; Shapira, Y

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies found that mobile phone users had a significantly greater risk of having elevated thresholds in speech frequencies. This study investigated the correlation between the laterality of sudden sensorineural hearing loss, handedness and the preferred ear for mobile phone use. The study included all patients who presented with sudden sensorineural hearing loss to the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery in our tertiary referral medical centre between 2014 and 2016. Patients were asked to indicate their dominant hand and preferred ear for mobile phone use. The study comprised 160 patients. No correlation was found between the dominant hand or preferred ear for mobile phone use and the side of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. There was no correlation between the side of the sudden sensorineural hearing loss (preferable or non-preferable for mobile phone use) and audiometric characteristics. No correlation was found between the laterality of ears used for mobile phone and sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

  13. Children's Performance in Complex Listening Conditions: Effects of Hearing Loss and Digital Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of hearing loss (HL) on children's performance for an auditory task under demanding listening conditions and to determine the effect of digital noise reduction (DNR) on that performance. Method: Fifty children with normal hearing (NH) and 30 children with HL (8-12 years of age) categorized words in the presence of…

  14. Hearing loss in enlarged vestibular aqueduct and incomplete partition type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadizadeh, Emily; Ascha, Mustafa; Manzoor, Nauman; Gupta, Amit; Semaan, Maroun; Megerian, Cliff; Otteson, Todd

    The purpose of this work is to identify the role of incomplete partition type II on hearing loss among patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA). EVA is a common congenital inner ear malformation among children with hearing loss, where vestibular aqueduct morphology in this population has been shown to correlate to hearing loss. However, the impact of incomplete partition between cochlear turns on hearing loss has not been, despite meaningful implications for EVA pathophysiology. A retrospective review of radiology reports for patients who had computed tomography (CT) scans with diagnoses of hearing loss at a tertiary medical center between January 2000 and June 2016 were screened for EVA. CT scans of the internal auditory canal (IAC) for those patients with EVA were examined for evidence of incomplete partition type II (IP-II), measurements of midpoint width and operculum width a second time, and patients meeting Cincinnati criteria for EVA selected for analysis. Statistical analysis including chi-square, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and t-tests were used to identify differences in outcomes and clinical predictors, as appropriate for the distribution of the data. Linear mixed models of hearing test results for all available tests were constructed, both univariable and adjusting for vestibular aqueduct morphometric features, with ear-specific intercepts and slopes over time. There were no statistically significant differences in any hearing test results or vestibular aqueduct midpoint and operculum widths. Linear mixed models, both univariable and those adjusting for midpoint and operculum widths, did not indicate a statistically significant effect of incomplete partition type II on hearing test results. Hearing loss due to enlarged vestibular aqueduct does not appear to be affected by the presence of incomplete partition type II. Our results suggest that the pathophysiological processes underlying hearing loss in enlarged vestibular aqueduct may not be a result of

  15. Hearing in young adults. Part I: The effects of attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, Hannah; Dhooge, Ingeborg; Vinck, Bart

    2015-01-01

    There is great concern regarding the development of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in youth caused by high sound levels during various leisure activities. Health-orientated behavior of young adults might be linked to the beliefs and attitudes toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices (HPDs). The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and HPDs on young adults' hearing status. A questionnaire and an audiological test battery were completed by 163 subjects (aged 18-30 years). The questionnaire contained the Youth Attitude to Noise Scale (YANS) and Beliefs about Hearing Protection and Hearing Loss (BAHPHL). A more positive attitude or belief represented an attitude where noise or hearing loss is seen as unproblematic and attitudes and beliefs regarding HPDs is worse. Hearing was evaluated using (high frequency) pure tone audiometry (PTA), transient evoked and distortion product otoacoustic emissions. First, mean differences in hearing between the groups with different attitudes and beliefs were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Second, a χ² test was used to examine the usage of HPDs by the different groups with different attitudes and beliefs. Young adults with a positive attitude had significantly more deteriorated hearing and used HPDs less than the other subjects. Hearing conservation programs (HCPs) for young adults should provide information and knowledge regarding noise, hearing loss, and HPDs. Barriers wearing HPDs should especially be discussed. Further, those campaigns should focus on self-experienced hearing related symptoms that might serve as triggers for attitudinal and behavioral changes.

  16. Hearing loss in children treated for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, James A; Thee, Stephanie; Jacobs, Kayleen; Ebrahim, Adam; Hesseling, Anneke C; Schaaf, H Simon

    2013-04-01

    The aminoglycosides and polypeptides are vital drugs for the management of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB). Both classes of drug cause hearing loss. We aimed to determine the extent of hearing loss in children treated for MDR-TB. In this retrospective study, children (Hearing was assessed and classified using audiometry and otoacoustic emissions. Ninety-four children were included (median age: 43 months). Of 93 tested, 28 (30%) were HIV-infected. Twenty-three (24%) children had hearing loss. Culture-confirmed, as opposed to presumed, diagnosis of TB was a risk factor for hearing loss (OR: 4.12; 95% CI: 1.13-15.0; p = 0.02). Seven of 11 (64%) children classified as having hearing loss using audiometry had progression of hearing loss after finishing the injectable drug. Hearing loss is common in children treated for MDR-TB. Alternative drugs are required for the treatment of paediatric MDR-TB. Copyright © 2012 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Screening of Connexin 26 in Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira, Danielle

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The first locus for nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss is on chromosome 13q11–22. The 35delG mutation is present in 80% of cases in which GJB2 is involved, which makes the study of this mutation very important. The viability and benefits of screening for mutations in the connexin 26 gene are now beginning to change the diagnostic evaluation and identification of the etiology of hearing loss. Objective To investigate the occurrence of the 35delG mutation in patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and their first degree relatives. Methods This transversal study included 72 patients from the local hospital. The patients were divided into three groups: group A, sensorineural hearing loss (n = 58; group B, first-degree relatives of group A with sensorineural hearing loss (n = 09; and group C, first-degree relatives of patients from group A without hearing loss (n = 05. All patients had audiological evaluation and genetic testing of the 35delG mutation. Results The 35delG mutation was found in four heterozygous mutations (three of them found in the same family. The other heterozygous mutation was found in a female patient with bilateral, moderate, prelingual, sensorineural hearing loss. A single homozygous mutation was found in a male patient, with severe sensorineural hearing loss in his right ear and profound hearing loss in the left ear. Conclusions The 35delG mutation was found in 7% of the cases. The test is easy to perform and inexpensive, but it is necessary to investigate other genes related to hearing loss.

  18. Screening of connexin 26 in nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Danielle; Silva, Daniela da; Lopez, Priscila; Mantovani, Jair Cortez

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The first locus for nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss is on chromosome 13q11-22. The 35delG mutation is present in 80% of cases in which GJB2 is involved, which makes the study of this mutation very important. The viability and benefits of screening for mutations in the connexin 26 gene are now beginning to change the diagnostic evaluation and identification of the etiology of hearing loss. Objective To investigate the occurrence of the 35delG mutation in patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and their first degree relatives. Methods This transversal study included 72 patients from the local hospital. The patients were divided into three groups: group A, sensorineural hearing loss (n = 58); group B, first-degree relatives of group A with sensorineural hearing loss (n = 09); and group C, first-degree relatives of patients from group A without hearing loss (n = 05). All patients had audiological evaluation and genetic testing of the 35delG mutation. Results The 35delG mutation was found in four heterozygous mutations (three of them found in the same family). The other heterozygous mutation was found in a female patient with bilateral, moderate, prelingual, sensorineural hearing loss. A single homozygous mutation was found in a male patient, with severe sensorineural hearing loss in his right ear and profound hearing loss in the left ear. Conclusions The 35delG mutation was found in 7% of the cases. The test is easy to perform and inexpensive, but it is necessary to investigate other genes related to hearing loss.

  19. The Effects of Prognostic Factors in Idiopathic Sudden Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulğurcu, Suphi; Şahin, Behçet; Akgül, Gökhan; Arslan, İlker Burak; Çukurova, İbrahim

    2018-01-01

    Introduction  Sudden hearing loss is one of the otologic emergencies. The treatment of this disease is affected negatively by some prognostic factors. Objective  In this study, the effects of early treatment initiation in patients with idiopathic sudden hearing loss and of prognostic factors in early treated patients were investigated. Methods  Out of the 216 patients admitted between September 2007 and September 2015, 154 were identified as having idiopathic sudden hearing loss; they were followed-up for a mean time of 7.4 months, and evaluated retrospectively. The effects of several parameters on the success of the treatment were statistically evaluated, such as the time the treatment was initiated, being of the female gender, the severity of the hearing loss, having descending type audiogram patterns, being older than 60 years old, and the co-presence of vertigo. Results  Success rates were found to be significantly higher in idiopathic hearing loss patients that were admitted within the first week ( p  hearing loss. However, the outcomes were found to be similar when patients admitted within the first 3 days and 4-7 days after the occurrence of the hearing loss were compared ( p  > 0.05). Parameters such as female gender, severe hearing loss, descending type audiogram, being older than 60 years old, and co-presence of vertigo didn't reveal statistically significant effects on the outcome ( p >0.05). Conclusion  The aforementioned prognostic factors, which are well-known in the literature, did not have significant effects when the idiopathic sudden hearing loss treatment was initiated within the first 7 days of the onset of the hearing loss.

  20. Genetic and audiologic study in elderly with sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Kelly; Fontenele, Marília; Câmara, Silva; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to correlate probable predisposing factors for sensorineural hearing loss in elderly by investigating the audiologic characteristics and frequency of mutations in genes considered responsible for non-syndromic hearing loss. Sixty elderly patients were separated into two groups: the Case Group, composed of 30 individuals, 21 females and nine males, all 60 years old or older and presenting diagnoses of sensorineural hearing loss, and the Control Group, composed of 30 elderly individuals matched to the experimental group by age and gender, presenting normal hearing. The patients underwent anamnesis and pure tone audiometry in frequencies of 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000 and 6000 Hz. Blood samples were collected from each patient for analysis of mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial genes related to non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss. It was observed a greater tendency to noise exposure and consumption of alcohol in the Case Group. The statistically significant symptoms between the groups were tinnitus and hearing difficulty in several situations as: silent environment, telephone, television, sound location and in church. All the individuals of Case Group presented sensorineural and bilateral hearing loss. The symmetry and progression of the hearing impairment were also statistically significant between the groups. No genetic mutations were identified. The most reported symptoms were communication difficulties and tinnitus. The predominant auditory characteristics included sensorineural, bilateral, progressive and symmetrical hearing loss. It was not evidenced a relationship between sensorineural hearing loss in elderly and genes considered responsible for non-syndromic hearing loss as no genetic mutation was found in this study.

  1. Comparison of Carina active middle-ear implant with conventional hearing aids for mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaş, V A; Gündüz, B; Karamert, R; Cevizci, R; Düzlü, M; Tutar, H; Bayazit, Y A

    2016-04-01

    To compare the auditory outcomes of Carina middle-ear implants with those of conventional hearing aids in patients with moderate-to-severe mixed hearing loss. The study comprised nine patients (six males, three females) who underwent middle-ear implantation with Carina fully implantable active middle-ear implants to treat bilateral moderate-to-severe mixed hearing loss. The patients initially used conventional hearing aids and subsequently received the Carina implants. The hearing thresholds with implants and hearing aids were compared. There were no significant differences between: the pre-operative and post-operative air and bone conduction thresholds (p > 0.05), the thresholds with hearing aids and Carina implants (p > 0.05), or the pre-operative (mean, 72.8 ± 19 per cent) and post-operative (mean, 69.9 ± 24 per cent) speech discrimination scores (p > 0.05). One of the patients suffered total sensorineural hearing loss three months following implantation despite an initial 38 dB functional gain. All except one patient showed clinical improvements after implantation according to quality of life questionnaire (Glasgow Benefit Inventory) scores. Acceptance of Carina implants is better than with conventional hearing aids in patients with mixed hearing loss, although both yield similar hearing amplification. Cosmetic reasons appear to be critical for patient acceptance.

  2. Positive, Neutral, and Negative Connotations Associated with Social Representation of 'Hearing Loss' and 'Hearing Aids'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchaiah, Vinaya; Stein, Gretchen; Danermark, Berth; Germundsson, Per

    2015-12-01

    In our previous studies we explored the social representation of hearing loss and hearing aids. In this study we aimed at exploring if the positive, neutral and negative connotations associated with the social representation of 'hearing loss' and 'hearing aids' for the same categories vary across countries. In addition, we also looked at if there is an association between connotations and demographic variables. A total of 404 individuals from four countries were asked to indicate the words and phrases that comes to mind when they think about 'hearing loss' and 'hearing aids'. They also indicated if the words and phrases they reported had positive, neutral or negative association, which were analyzed and reported in this paper. There are considerable differences among the countries in terms of positive, neutral and negative associations report for each category in relation to hearing loss and hearing aids. However, there is limited connection between demographic variables and connotations reported in different countries. These results suggesting that the social representation about the phenomenon hearing loss and hearing aids are relatively stable within respondents of each country.

  3. Changes in auditory perceptions and cortex resulting from hearing recovery after extended congenital unilateral hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill B Firszt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monaural hearing induces auditory system reorganization. Imbalanced input also degrades time-intensity cues for sound localization and signal segregation for listening in noise. While there have been studies of bilateral auditory deprivation and later hearing restoration (e.g. cochlear implants, less is known about unilateral auditory deprivation and subsequent hearing improvement. We investigated effects of long-term congenital unilateral hearing loss on localization, speech understanding, and cortical organization following hearing recovery. Hearing in the congenitally affected ear of a 41 year old female improved significantly after stapedotomy and reconstruction. Pre-operative hearing threshold levels showed unilateral, mixed, moderately-severe to profound hearing loss. The contralateral ear had hearing threshold levels within normal limits. Testing was completed prior to, and three and nine months after surgery. Measurements were of sound localization with intensity-roved stimuli and speech recognition in various noise conditions. We also evoked magnetic resonance signals with monaural stimulation to the unaffected ear. Activation magnitudes were determined in core, belt, and parabelt auditory cortex regions via an interrupted single event design. Hearing improvement following 40 years of congenital unilateral hearing loss resulted in substantially improved sound localization and speech recognition in noise. Auditory cortex also reorganized. Contralateral auditory cortex responses were increased after hearing recovery and the extent of activated cortex was bilateral, including a greater portion of the posterior superior temporal plane. Thus, prolonged predominant monaural stimulation did not prevent auditory system changes consequent to restored binaural hearing. Results support future research of unilateral auditory deprivation effects and plasticity, with consideration for length of deprivation, age at hearing correction, degree and type

  4. Prevalence of occupational noise induced hearing loss amongst traffic police personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, V K; Mehta, A K

    1999-01-01

    Traffic branch personnel of Pune traffic police were screened for presence of noise induced hearing loss. A very significant number (81.2%) showed sensorineural hearing loss. The various factors responsible for noise induced hearing loss are discussed.

  5. Effect of conductive hearing loss on central auditory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Arash; Farhadi, Mohammad; Emamdjomeh, Hesam; Saki, Nader; Mirmomeni, Golshan; Rahim, Fakher

    It has been demonstrated that long-term Conductive Hearing Loss (CHL) may influence the precise detection of the temporal features of acoustic signals or Auditory Temporal Processing (ATP). It can be argued that ATP may be the underlying component of many central auditory processing capabilities such as speech comprehension or sound localization. Little is known about the consequences of CHL on temporal aspects of central auditory processing. This study was designed to assess auditory temporal processing ability in individuals with chronic CHL. During this analytical cross-sectional study, 52 patients with mild to moderate chronic CHL and 52 normal-hearing listeners (control), aged between 18 and 45 year-old, were recruited. In order to evaluate auditory temporal processing, the Gaps-in-Noise (GIN) test was used. The results obtained for each ear were analyzed based on the gap perception threshold and the percentage of correct responses. The average of GIN thresholds was significantly smaller for the control group than for the CHL group for both ears (right: p=0.004; left: phearing for both sides (phearing loss in either group (p>0.05). The results suggest reduced auditory temporal processing ability in adults with CHL compared to normal hearing subjects. Therefore, developing a clinical protocol to evaluate auditory temporal processing in this population is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Sudden hearing loss: Our experience in treatment with vasoactive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živić Ljubica

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A specific title "sudden hearing loss" refers to illness which is characterized by a sudden, rapid sensoneural hearing loss mostly in one ear without obvious causes, accompanied with dizziness, and without vestibular symptomatology. It is defined as a hearing loss for more than 30 dB on 3 or more successive frequencies which appear in 72 hours. Objective The main goal of our paper was to estimate success of implementation of vasoactive method in patients with sudden hearing loss of senso-neural type in different ranges in hospital conditions. METHOD Our research covered 37 patients hospitalized because of a sudden hearing loss of sensoneural type in different ranges. Diagnosis, in all patients, was established by clinical ORL examination, audiology and vestibular examination. R including CT and MR, neurological, internist and laboratory examinations were used in order to exclude other aetiology. In monitored patients, we started treatment with vasoactive therapy, ampules of xanthinol nicotinate (one ampule of 2 ml, 300 mg or ampules of pentoxiphylline (one ampule of 5 ml, 100 mg in form of infusions with addition of vitamins with an everyday gradual increase of dosage up to 12 ampules of xanthinol nicotinate and up to 5 ampules of pentoxiphylline. Then we started with an everyday decrease of dosage down to the first one. Results After the complete curing protocol, we found out that in patients with light and medium senso-neural damages of hearing sense (23 or 62%, hearing recovery was complete. In patients with heavy damage of hearing (9 or 24%, partial success was evidenced. The most difficult cases, with complete hearing loss, heavy buzzing and vertiginous problem (5 or 14% responded to therapy, so buzzing and vertiginous problems disappeared but hearing was not improved. Conclusion Usage of vasoactive medicaments in hospital conditions in treatment of sudden hearing loss gives good results and it is the closest to aetiological

  7. Long-term courses of hearing loss in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakigi, Akinobu; Nakatani, Hiroaki; Takeda, Taizo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the long-term prognosis of young children with congenital or acquired hearing loss. The subjects consisted of 9 young children (18 ears) in whom auditory training was performed in the Kochi Prefectural Center for Hearing Impaired Children, and the course of hearing could be observed until the age of at least 10 years. The annual course of hearing was evaluated based on the results of play audiometry and pure-tone audiometry that facilitated the differentiation of hearing between the left and right ears. In the first examination, stable values were obtained after some tests and used as reference values. As the representative value at each age, the arithmetic mean of the pure-tone averages obtained by all hearing tests performed during the year was used. The course of hearing was observed from 2 to 24 years of age, and the observation period was 6-18 years (mean 13.2 years). Hearing was aggravated in 13 ears, of which 8 (4 patients) showed marked and 5 (3 patients) showed slight aggravation. Hearing was unchanged in 5 ears (3 patients). Hearing loss often progressed bilaterally. There were two progression patterns: rapid aggravation during early childhood, followed by gradual aggravation, and gradual aggravation over the entire course. The aggravation of hearing may be associated with the degree of impairment and vulnerability of the auditory organs.

  8. Evaluation and management of cytomegalovirus-associated congenital hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbie, Allison M

    2017-10-01

    The current article reviews the current literature related to congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV)-related hearing loss. The discussion will focus on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical presentation of human CMV infection as it pertains to hearing loss. Current methods of CMV diagnosis with a focus on the evolving trend toward broader neonatal screening protocols will also be explored. Discussion of medical, surgical, and audiologic management of the condition will also be addressed. Much of the current research on this topic is focused on improving detection of CMV through screening programs. Some advances in understanding cochlear pathogenesis have also been made. Congenital CMV infection remains an important cause of hearing loss in infants and children. Early detection of CMV infection can broaden treatment options and allow for improved hearing and language outcome for patients with CMV-associated sensorineural hearing loss.

  9. Shortened stapedius tendon: a rare cause of conductive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, F; Varshney, R; Schloss, M D

    2014-01-01

    Anomalies of the stapedius tendon have been reported to cause conductive hearing loss; in theory, such anomalies limit the movement of the stapes. To demonstrate a rare cause of conductive hearing loss resulting from anomaly of the stapedius tendon and to compare the clinical findings of this patient to other stapedius tendon anomalies reported in the literature. Case report of a single case of shortened stapedius tendon and a review of the English literature on stapedius tendon anomalies. This is a case report of a 15-year-old boy with shortened stapedius tendon causing unilateral hearing loss, accompanied by a review of the literature. Contrary to other reported cases, this patient did not have an ossified tendon, but rather an extremely short tendon. The boy regained normal hearing following excision of the stapedius tendon. A shortened stapedius tendon is a very rare diagnosis, yet it should be considered as a possible cause of conductive hearing loss.

  10. Categorical loudness scaling and equal-loudness contours in listeners with normal hearing and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M; Trevino, Andrea C; Gombert, Jessa N; Liebig-Trehearn, Lauren; Kopun, Judy G; Jesteadt, Walt; Neely, Stephen T; Gorga, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    This study describes procedures for constructing equal-loudness contours (ELCs) in units of phons from categorical loudness scaling (CLS) data and characterizes the impact of hearing loss on these estimates of loudness. Additionally, this study developed a metric, level-dependent loudness loss, which uses CLS data to specify the deviation from normal loudness perception at various loudness levels and as function of frequency for an individual listener with hearing loss. CLS measurements were made in 87 participants with hearing loss and 61 participants with normal hearing. An assessment of the reliability of CLS measurements was conducted on a subset of the data. CLS measurements were reliable. There was a systematic increase in the slope of the low-level segment of the CLS functions with increase in the degree of hearing loss. ELCs derived from CLS measurements were similar to standardized ELCs (International Organization for Standardization, ISO 226:2003). The presence of hearing loss decreased the vertical spacing of the ELCs, reflecting loudness recruitment and reduced cochlear compression. Representing CLS data in phons may lead to wider acceptance of CLS measurements. Like the audiogram that specifies hearing loss at threshold, level-dependent loudness loss describes deficit for suprathreshold sounds. Such information may have implications for the fitting of hearing aids.

  11. Disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada Immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma de Oliveira Penido

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available A disacusia neurossensorial imunomediada (DNSI é caracterizada geralmente por uma disacusia neurossensorial bilateral, progressiva e assimétrica, acompanhada ou não por outros sintomas da orelha interna. Três pacientes com DNSI cujo quadro clínico e audiométrico eram sugestivos de doença auto-imune, e apresentaram resposta positiva à terapia imunossupressora ou pesquisa positiva de anticorpo anti hsp-70 68kD, foram estudados com relação às características clínicas, testes diagnósticos, alternativas terapêuticas e evolução da doença. Dois pacientes apresentaram quadro de disacusia neurossensorial rapidamente progressiva, associado a quadro vestibular, e outro, quadro de surdez súbita unilateral. Nenhum paciente apresentou positividade às provas reumatológicas, e apenas um paciente apresentou aumento na velocidade de hemossedimentação. Nenhum paciente obteve resposta adequada sustentada à corticoterapia, mas dois deles melhoraram com outras terapias imunossupressoras. O diagnóstico da DNSI é clínico e baseado na resposta positiva ao teste terapêutico com imunossupressores. A pesquisa de anticorpo anti-hsp70 de 68 kD pelo Western Blot é o único exame laboratorial específico para seu diagnóstico, possuindo sensibilidade de 42% e especificidade de 90%. Apenas 1 paciente apresentou positividade para este teste e não respondeu à terapia imunossupressora. Os dois pacientes com teste negativo responderam satisfatoriamente ao tratamento. A baixa sensibilidade do Western Blot e seu alto custo dificultam sua difusa utilização em nosso meio. A introdução precoce do tratamento é de suma importância por auxiliar no diagnóstico e por proporcionar um melhor prognóstico auditivo.The immunomediated sensorineural hearing loss (ISHL is characterized as an asymmetric and progressive sensorineural hearing loss. Tree patients with ISHL were studied, regarding clinical aspects, diagnostic tests, treatment options and disease

  12. Childhood Hearing Health: Educating for Prevention of Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Lacerda,Adriana Bender Moreira; Gonçalves,Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Lacerda,Giselle; Lobato,Diolén Conceição Barros; Santos,Luciana; Moreira,Aline Carlezzo; Ribas,Angela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The presence of noise in our society has attracted the attention of health professionals, including speech-language pathologists, who have been charged along with educators with developing hearing conservation programs in schools. Objective To describe the results of three strategies for awareness and hearing preservation in first to fourth grades in public elementary schools.Methods The level of environmental noise in classrooms was assessed, and 638 elementary school students f...

  13. The interaction of hearing loss and level-dependent hearing protection on speech recognition in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Christian; Laroche, Chantal; Vaillancourt, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effects of different control settings of level-dependent hearing protectors on speech recognition performance in interaction with hearing loss. Controlled laboratory experiment with two level-dependent devices (Peltor® PowerCom Plus™ and Nacre QuietPro®) in two military noises. Word recognition scores were collected in protected and unprotected conditions for 45 participants grouped into four hearing profile categories ranging from within normal limits to moderate-to-severe hearing loss. When the level-dependent mode was switched off to simulate conventional hearing protection, there were large differences across hearing profile categories regarding the effects of wearing the devices on speech recognition in noise; participants with normal hearing showed little effect while participants in the most hearing-impaired category showed large decrements in scores compared to unprotected listening. Activating the level-dependent mode of the devices produced large speech recognition benefits over the passive mode at both low and high gain pass-through settings. The category of participants with the most impaired hearing benefitted the most from the level-dependent mode. The findings indicate that level-dependent hearing protection circuitry can provide substantial benefits in speech recognition performance in noise, compared to conventional passive protection, for individuals covering a wide range of hearing losses.

  14. Sudden hearing loss: Our experiences in treatment with vasoactive and corticosteroid therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živić Ljubica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sudden hearing loss is a clinical entity of ambiguously defined aetiology manifested by hearing loss of more than 30 dB on three contiguous frequencies occurring within 72 hours. The lack of standard therapy protocol led to the use of variety of different therapies, thus making difficult objective quantification of their effect. Objective. The aim of the study was to present our experience in the treatment of sudden hearing loss with administration of vasoactive and corticosteroid therapy. Methods. Our research included 59 hospitally treated patients with a sudden hearing loss. During the period 1995-2004, 37 patients were treated using vasoactive agents (xanthinol nicotinate and pentoxifylline, and from 2004-2009, 22 patients were treated using parenteral corticosteroids (dexamethasone. All patients had unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of different level at frequencies from 500-4000 Hz, while other diagnostic procedures (laboratory tests, internist and neurology examinations, X-ray were within normal limits. Evaluation of therapy effect was done by follow-up of hearing threshold changes and subjective complaints. Results. The results showed that full recovery was achieved in patients with a mild and not fully severe hearing loss, with the majority of those (73% under corticosteroid treatment. In these patients recovery was also achieved more rapidly. A partial recovery of hearing was detected in patients with hearing loss of more than 80 dB, and mostly in patients treated with corticosteroids. Conclusion. Although statistical evaluation does not indicate significant differences between the application of vasoactive drugs or corticosteroids, clinical findings support advantages of corticosteroid therapy. Treatment of hearing loss, although controversial, requires change of some up-to-now used agents. Advantages should go in favour of contricosteroids.

  15. Hearing loss in hydrocephalus: a review, with focus on mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satzer, David; Guillaume, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    While neither hydrocephalus nor cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt placement is traditionally considered in the differential diagnosis of hearing loss, there is substantial evidence that CSF circulation and pressure abnormalities can produce auditory dysfunction. Several indirect mechanisms may explain association between hydrocephalus and hearing loss, including mass effect, compromise of the auditory pathway, complications of prematurity, and genetically mediated hydrocephalus and hearing loss. Nevertheless, researchers have proposed a direct mechanism, which we term the hydrodynamic theory. In this hypothesis, the intimate relationship between CSF and inner ear fluids permits relative endolymphatic or perilymphatic hydrops in the setting of CSF pressure disturbances. CSF is continuous with perilymph, and CSF pressure changes are known to produce parallel perilymphatic pressure changes. In support of the hydrodynamic theory, some studies have found an independent association between hydrocephalus and hearing loss. Moreover, surgical shunting of CSF has been linked to both resolution and development of auditory dysfunction. The disease burden of hydrocephalus-associated hearing loss may be large, and because hydrocephalus and over-shunting are reversible, this relationship merits broader recognition. Hydrocephalic patients should be monitored for hearing loss, and hearing loss in a patient with shunted hydrocephalus should prompt further evaluation and possibly adjustment of shunt settings.

  16. Weather conditions and sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateri Maria

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climatic or meteorological condition changes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSHL. We investigated the seasonal distribution of ISSHL and evaluated the influence of meteorological parameters (such as temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure, their variation and covariation on the incidence of the disease. Methods A total of 82 cases of ISSHL, admitted to our department over a five-year period, were enrolled in the study. Seasonal distribution of the disease was investigated by dividing the year in four seasons. Meteorological data included daily values of 13 distinct parameters recorded at the meteorological station of the University of Ioannina during this period. A relationship between each meteorological variable and the incidence of ISSHL was investigated by applying (χ2 test on data from 13 contingency tables as well as by using logistic regression and t-test approaches. In addition, the influence of different weather types on the incidence of ISSHL was investigated using Cluster Analysis in order to create eight clusters (weather types characteristic for the prefecture of Ioannina. Results The results of the study could not indicate any seasonal distribution of the disease. The incidence of ISSHL could not be significantly correlated either to any distinct meteorological parameter or to any specific weather type. Conclusions Meteorological conditions, such as those dominating in the Northwestern Greece, and/or their changes, have no proven effect on the incidence of ISSHL.

  17. Hearing Loss, Dizziness, and Carbohydrate Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albernaz, Pedro L Mangabeira

    2016-07-01

    Metabolic activity of the inner ear is very intense, and makes it sensitive to changes in the body homeostasis. This study involves a group of patients with inner ear disorders related to carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, including hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and episodes of vertigo. To describe the symptoms of metabolic inner ear disorders and the examinations required to establish diagnoses. These symptoms are often the first to allow for an early diagnosis of metabolic disorders and diabetes. Retrospective study of 376 patients with inner ear symptoms suggestive of disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism. The authors present patientś clinical symptoms and clinical evaluations, with emphasis on the glucose and insulin essays. Authors based their conclusions on otolaryngological findings, diagnostic procedures and treatment principles. They found that auditory and vestibular symptoms usually occur prior to other manifestations of metabolic changes, leading to an early diagnosis of hyperinsulinemia, intestinal sugar malabsorption or diabetes. Previously undiagnosed diabetes mellitus type II was found in 39 patients. The identification of carbohydrate metabolism disturbances is important not only to minimize the patients' clinical symptoms, but also to help maintain their general health.

  18. Hearing Loss, Dizziness, and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albernaz, Pedro L. Mangabeira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Metabolic activity of the inner ear is very intense, and makes it sensitive to changes in the body homeostasis. This study involves a group of patients with inner ear disorders related to carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, including hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and episodes of vertigo. Objectives To describe the symptoms of metabolic inner ear disorders and the examinations required to establish diagnoses. These symptoms are often the first to allow for an early diagnosis of metabolic disorders and diabetes. Methods Retrospective study of 376 patients with inner ear symptoms suggestive of disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism. The authors present patientś clinical symptoms and clinical evaluations, with emphasis on the glucose and insulin essays. Results Authors based their conclusions on otolaryngological findings, diagnostic procedures and treatment principles. They found that auditory and vestibular symptoms usually occur prior to other manifestations of metabolic changes, leading to an early diagnosis of hyperinsulinemia, intestinal sugar malabsorption or diabetes. Previously undiagnosed diabetes mellitus type II was found in 39 patients. Conclusions The identification of carbohydrate metabolism disturbances is important not only to minimize the patients' clinical symptoms, but also to help maintain their general health.

  19. Clinical study on unilateral hearing loss in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Sawako; Usui, Satoko

    2007-01-01

    A series of 60 children was studied (aged 0 to 10 years, 32 boys, 28 girls) with severe unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of unknown etiology. There were two peaks, at 0 and 6 years. In 19 children, hearing loss was identified during a conservative general health checkup for school or preschool children. In 21 children aged 0 years, 16 were suspected of hearing loss by newborn hearing screening. Temporal bone computed tomography scans were examined in 51 patients. Sixteen ears (31.4%) with hearing loss had inner ear and/or internal auditory canal abnormalities. In one patient, the anomaly was the presence of a bony wall dividing the internal auditory canal into two separate compartments associated with severe inner ear hypoplasia. Two patients had a common cavity. In one of these patients, the anomaly was revealed because of severe bacterial meningitis, and another was detected by newborn hearing screening. Six patients had a narrow internal auditory canal, 4 had a narrow internal auditory canal and hypoplastic cochlea, and 1 had a narrow internal auditory canal and cystic vestibule, and lateral semicircular canal dysplasia. Two patients had a cystic vestibule and lateral semicircular canal dysplasia. One case showed fluctuation of the hearing level in the contralateral ear with normal hearing during the observation period at an average of 20 months. The number of children whose unilateral hearing loss is detected early by newborn hearing screening has enormously increased. Strategies for follow-up, early intervention, and support for families are necessary for young children with unilateral hearing impairment. (author)

  20. Assessment of Behavioral Problems in Children With Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorillo, Caitlin E; Rashidi, Vania; Westgate, Philip M; Jacobs, Julie A; Bush, Matthew L; Studts, Christina R

    2017-12-01

    To compare the prevalence of disruptive behavior problems between preschool-aged children with hearing loss and normal hearing. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary academic center. Caregivers of children (2-5 yr old) with normal hearing (NH) (n = 39), hearing loss using hearing aid(s) (HA) (n = 29), or cochlear implant(s) (CI) (n = 21). Demographic information and a mental health history were obtained. Child behavior and language development were assessed. The Young Child-Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-IV and the MacArthur-Bates Communication Development Inventory III. Distributions of race, socioeconomic status, insurance status, and parental home situation (single versus two parent family) were similar across all groups. Parents of children with hearing loss were significantly more likely to report behavior problems (HA = 41%, CI = 38%) than parents of NH children (10%; p = 0.002). Children with hearing loss were significantly more likely to meet diagnostic criteria for oppositional defiant disorder (HA = 48%, CI = 48%) than NH children (23%; p = 0.02). More NH children (8%) than hearing impaired children (0%) had accessed mental health services (p = 0.08). NH children were found to have more advanced language development than hearing-impaired children (p hearing loss have higher prevalence of and impairment from disruptive behaviors than their NH peers. These children are less likely to receive appropriate behavioral interventions. Further research is warranted to investigate the impact of disruptive behaviors on speech and hearing rehabilitation. Methods to improve access to effective behavioral interventions in this population are needed.

  1. Asymmetrical noise exposure and hearing loss among shingle sawyers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, D Y; Mason, K; Willson, G N; Gannon, R P

    1983-07-01

    Shingle sawyers are exposed to noise predominantly from the left side. This study examined the asymmetry in hearing loss among shingle sawyers and its possible relation to the difference in noise exposure to the two ears. The results suggest that the lateral difference in noise exposure in industry, even in the obvious case of a shingle sawyer, is small. The resulting asymmetrical noise-induced hearing loss is also relatively small. Therefore, significant asymmetry in hearing loss in this type of occupation should be viewed with caution. Special tests and medical examination should be undertaken to determine if there are other contributing factors.

  2. Sudden Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Secondary to Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad-Nu’aim Ishak

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL is an important otological emergency. Up to 90% of the cases are idiopathic. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is an extremely rare identifiable cause as it only represents 0.5% of all strokes.   Case Report: In this paper, an unusual case of bilateral SSNHL secondary to bilateral CVT with rapid and complete recovery is reported. The patient presented with sudden bilateral hearing loss associated with some neurological symptoms. Initial computed tomography (CT venography revealed a CVT of bilateral transverse sinuses. The patient was started on an anticoagulant and imaging was repeated after five days, revealing the absence of the thrombosis. Serial pure tone audiometry (PTA showed complete recovery of bilateral hearing within 10 days.   Conclusion: Early detection and intervention may fasten hearing recovery and improve the quality of life. The immediate restoration of venous blood flow and intracranial pressure may lead to the complete recovery of bilateral hearing loss.

  3. Adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen treatment for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chun-Shih; Lee, Tsai-Yun; Wu, Ming-Feng

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the hearing gain efficacy from adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen (HBO₂) treatment in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL). A retrospective analysis of chart reviews was performed on patients with ISSHL between January 2013 through December 2015. All patients were referred to us from our ENT Department for adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen treatment. The results were assessed through pure-tone audiometry (PTA) data change (hearing gain), both before and after HBO₂) treatment. Age, gender, affected ear side, HBO₂) treatment sessions, both before and after HBO₂ treatment PTA were all recorded. Ninety-three (93) patients with ISSHL were included in the study. The average hearing gain in this study was 17.9 dB (p=0.001), where a total of 46 (49.46%) patients showed an improvement (hearing gain≥dB) in response to HBO₂ treatment (p=0.002). Patients with the poorest initial severity of hearing loss who displayed a greater degree of hearing improvement after HBO₂ treatment were male and in the 40- to 59-year-old age group. This study found that adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen treatment was efficacious for patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The total average hearing gain was recorded to be 17.9 dB.

  4. Mitochondrial mutations in maternally inherited hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutai, Hideki; Watabe, Takahisa; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Ogawa, Kaoru; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2017-03-20

    Although the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations m.1555A > G and m.3243A > G are the primary causes of maternally inherited sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), several other mtDNA mutations are also reported to be associated with SNHL. Screening of m.1555A > G and m.3243A > G mutations was performed for 145 probands. Nine probands fulfilled the following criteria: 1) bilateral and symmetric SNHL, 2) ≥ 4 family members with SNHL with a maternal trait of inheritance in ≥ 2 generations, 3) onset of SNHL before the age of 40 years, 4) high-frequency SNHL, and 5) no record of environmental factors related to SNHL. Sequencing of additional mtDNA regions was performed for five subjects meeting the clinical criteria, but the screening results were negative. Among the nine cases meeting the five clinical criteria detailed above, three had the m.1555A > G mutation in MTRNR1, one had a m.3243A > G mutation in MTTL1, and one case had a m.7511T > C mutation in MTTS1. In the family with the m.7511T > C mutation, penetrance of SNHL among maternally related subjects was 9/17 (53%). The age at onset varied from birth (congenital) to adulthood. Hearing levels varied from normal to moderately impaired, unlike previously reported subjects with this mutation, where some maternal family members presented with profound SNHL. Family members with the m.7511T > C mutation and SNHL did not exhibit any specific clinical characteristics distinct from those of other individuals with SNHL and different mtDNA mutations. Among the 136 probands who did not meet the criteria detailed above, one case had the m.1555A > G mutation, and three cases had the m.3243A > G mutation. Since five of nine probands with the clinical criteria used in this study had mtDNA mutations, these criteria may be helpful for identification of candidate patients likely to have mtDNA mutations.

  5. Interventions to prevent occupational noise-induced hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tikka, Christina; Verbeek, Jos H.; Kateman, Erik; Morata, Thais C.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Ferrite, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This is the second update of a Cochrane Review originally published in 2009. Millions of workers worldwide are exposed to noise levels that increase their risk of hearing disorders. There is uncertainty about the effectiveness of hearing loss prevention interventions. To assess the effectiveness of

  6. Hearing loss in the Treacher-Collins syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marres, H.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    About 50% of patients with the TCS have conductive hearing loss, caused by characteristic major and/or minor ear anomalies. It is also common for these patients to have microtia or severe malformation of the pinna. The results of [figure: see text] reconstructive surgery to improve hearing are

  7. Young People: Taking Few Precautions Against Hearing Loss in Discotheques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, I.; Brug, J.; Ploeg, C.P.B. van der; Raat, H.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated adolescents' music-listening risk and protective behaviors in discotheques. While frequently standing close to the loudspeakers, taking few breaks, and hardly using hearing-protection devices, many are at risk of developing permanent hearing loss. Assessing visiting mode may be

  8. Late-Onset Hearing Loss: Strategies for Effective Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. Mae; Kampfe, Charlene M.

    1999-01-01

    Late-onset hearing loss is one of the major chronic conditions experienced by older individuals. The term "presbycusis" is typically used when describing this condition. Presbycusis refers to many degenerative changes that affect older people's hearing. This article provides practical suggestions for working with persons with this…

  9. Effective Practices in Teaching Indigenous Students with Conductive Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partington, Gary; Galloway, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Hearing impairment due to conductive hearing loss can have a devastating effect on children's language development, and consequently educational outcomes, especially for Indigenous students, for whom there may be the additional issue of being educated in their second or third language. With appropriate interventions, however, Indigenous students…

  10. Editorial: Equal opportunities for children with hearing loss by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the complications of otitis media. Although the South African governmental policy guidelines favour the philosophy of screening for hearing loss in infants the implementation is not realised. Widespread newborn and infant hearing screening programmes must be established to ensure equal opportunities for children with ...

  11. Auditory Outcomes with Hearing Rehabilitation in Children with Unilateral Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appachi, Swathi; Specht, Jessica L; Raol, Nikhila; Lieu, Judith E C; Cohen, Michael S; Dedhia, Kavita; Anne, Samantha

    2017-10-01

    Objective Options for management of unilateral hearing loss (UHL) in children include conventional hearing aids, bone-conduction hearing devices, contralateral routing of signal (CROS) aids, and frequency-modulating (FM) systems. The objective of this study was to systematically review the current literature to characterize auditory outcomes of hearing rehabilitation options in UHL. Data Sources PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library were searched from inception to January 2016. Manual searches of bibliographies were also performed. Review Methods Studies analyzing auditory outcomes of hearing amplification in children with UHL were included. Outcome measures included functional and objective auditory results. Two independent reviewers evaluated each abstract and article. Results Of the 249 articles identified, 12 met inclusion criteria. Seven articles solely focused on outcomes with bone-conduction hearing devices. Outcomes favored improved pure-tone averages, speech recognition thresholds, and sound localization in implanted patients. Five studies focused on FM systems, conventional hearing aids, or CROS hearing aids. Limited data are available but suggest a trend toward improvement in speech perception with hearing aids. FM systems were shown to have the most benefit for speech recognition in noise. Studies evaluating CROS hearing aids demonstrated variable outcomes. Conclusions Data evaluating functional and objective auditory measures following hearing amplification in children with UHL are limited. Most studies do suggest improvement in speech perception, speech recognition in noise, and sound localization with a hearing rehabilitation device.

  12. Effects of hearing loss and cognitive load on speech recognition with competing talkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut eMeister

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Everyday communication frequently comprises situations with more than one talker speaking at a time. These situations are challenging since they pose high attentional and memory demands placing cognitive load on the listener. Hearing impairment additionally exacerbates communication problems under these circumstances. We examined the effects of hearing loss and attention tasks on speech recognition with competing talkers in older adults with and without hearing impairment. We hypothesized that hearing loss would affect word identification, talker separation and word recall and that the difficulties experienced by the hearing impaired listeners would be especially pronounced in a task with high attentional and memory demands. Two listener groups closely matched regarding their age and neuropsychological profile but differing in hearing acuity were examined regarding their speech recognition with competing talkers in two different tasks. One task required repeating back words from one target talker (1TT while ignoring the competing talker whereas the other required repeating back words from both talkers (2TT. The competing talkers differed with respect to their voice characteristics. Moreover, sentences either with low or high context were used in order to consider linguistic properties. Compared to their normal hearing peers, listeners with hearing loss revealed limited speech recognition in both tasks. Their difficulties were especially pronounced in the more demanding 2TT task. In order to shed light on the underlying mechanisms, different error sources, namely having misunderstood, confused, or omitted words were investigated. Misunderstanding and omitting words were more frequently observed in the hearing impaired than in the normal hearing listeners. In line with common speech perception models it is suggested that these effects are related to impaired object formation and taxed working memory capacity (WMC. In a post hoc analysis the

  13. Effects of Hearing Loss and Cognitive Load on Speech Recognition with Competing Talkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Hartmut; Schreitmüller, Stefan; Ortmann, Magdalene; Rählmann, Sebastian; Walger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Everyday communication frequently comprises situations with more than one talker speaking at a time. These situations are challenging since they pose high attentional and memory demands placing cognitive load on the listener. Hearing impairment additionally exacerbates communication problems under these circumstances. We examined the effects of hearing loss and attention tasks on speech recognition with competing talkers in older adults with and without hearing impairment. We hypothesized that hearing loss would affect word identification, talker separation and word recall and that the difficulties experienced by the hearing impaired listeners would be especially pronounced in a task with high attentional and memory demands. Two listener groups closely matched for their age and neuropsychological profile but differing in hearing acuity were examined regarding their speech recognition with competing talkers in two different tasks. One task required repeating back words from one target talker (1TT) while ignoring the competing talker whereas the other required repeating back words from both talkers (2TT). The competing talkers differed with respect to their voice characteristics. Moreover, sentences either with low or high context were used in order to consider linguistic properties. Compared to their normal hearing peers, listeners with hearing loss revealed limited speech recognition in both tasks. Their difficulties were especially pronounced in the more demanding 2TT task. In order to shed light on the underlying mechanisms, different error sources, namely having misunderstood, confused, or omitted words were investigated. Misunderstanding and omitting words were more frequently observed in the hearing impaired than in the normal hearing listeners. In line with common speech perception models, it is suggested that these effects are related to impaired object formation and taxed working memory capacity (WMC). In a post-hoc analysis, the listeners were further

  14. Simplified risk assessment of noise induced hearing loss by means of 2 spreadsheet models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Arve; Engdahl, Bo; Tambs, Kristian

    2016-11-18

    The objective of this study has been to test 2 spreadsheet models to compare the observed with the expected hearing loss for a Norwegian reference population. The prevalence rates of the Norwegian and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) definitions of hearing outcomes were calculated in terms of sex and age, 20-64 years old, for a screened (with no occupational noise exposure) (N = 18 858) and unscreened (N = 38 333) Norwegian reference population from the Nord-Trøndelag Hearing Loss Study (NTHLS). Based on the prevalence rates, 2 different spreadsheet models were constructed in order to compare the prevalence rates of various groups of workers with the expected rates. The spreadsheets were then tested on 10 different occupational groups with varying degrees of hearing loss as compared to a reference population. Hearing of office workers, train drivers, conductors and teachers differed little from the screened reference values based on the Norwegian and the NIOSH criterion. The construction workers, miners, farmers and military had an impaired hearing and railway maintenance workers and bus drivers had a mildly impaired hearing. The spreadsheet models give a valid assessment of the hearing loss. The use of spreadsheet models to compare hearing in occupational groups with that of a reference population is a simple and quick method. The results are in line with comparable hearing thresholds, and allow for significance testing. The method is believed to be useful for occupational health services in the assessment of risk of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) and the preventive potential in groups of noise-exposed workers. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(6):991-999. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  15. Changed crossmodal functional connectivity in older adults with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, Sebastian; Thiel, Christiane M

    2017-01-01

    Previous work compellingly demonstrates a crossmodal plastic reorganization of auditory cortex in deaf individuals, leading to increased neural responses to non-auditory sensory input. Recent data indicate that crossmodal adaptive plasticity is not restricted to severe hearing impairments, but may also occur as a result of high-frequency hearing loss in older adults and affect audiovisual processing in these subjects. We here used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the effect of hearing loss in older adults on auditory cortex response patterns as well as on functional connectivity between auditory and visual cortex during audiovisual processing. Older participants with a varying degree of high frequency hearing loss performed an auditory stimulus categorization task, in which they had to categorize frequency-modulated (FM) tones presented alone or in the context of matching or non-matching visual motion. A motion only condition served as control for a visual take-over of auditory cortex. While the individual hearing status did not affect auditory cortex responses to auditory, visual, or audiovisual stimuli, we observed a significant hearing loss-related increase in functional connectivity between auditory cortex and the right motion-sensitive visual area MT+ when processing matching audiovisual input. Hearing loss also modulated resting state connectivity between right area MT+ and parts of the left auditory cortex, suggesting the existence of permanent, task-independent changes in coupling between visual and auditory sensory areas with an increasing degree of hearing loss. Our data thus indicate that hearing loss impacts on functional connectivity between sensory cortices in older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pediatric hearing impairment caregiver experience: impact of duration of hearing loss on parental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Lim, Lynne H Y; Choo, Daniel I; Buyniski, Samantha; Wiley, Susan

    2008-11-01

    Caregivers of children who are deaf/hard of hearing have been reported to have greater stress than caregivers of children with normal hearing. The time of diagnosis is a particularly stressful time and stress levels may change over time based on varying needs at different life events. Thus, we hypothesized that stress experienced by caregivers evolves over time and is impacted by the duration since the diagnosis of hearing loss. The 68-item pediatric hearing impairment caregiver experience (PHICE) is a validated questionnaire used to measure stress. The PHICE was administered to 152 caregivers of children with permanent hearing loss. Domain scores were converted into z-scores for analysis of trends of stress over time. Parents of children whose hearing loss was identified more than 60 months ago reported higher stress levels regarding educational aspects of their child's needs as compared to parents of children with less than 24 months or 24-60 months duration since diagnosis. Parents of children diagnosed with hearing loss within the preceding 24 months reported higher stress levels in the area of healthcare than parents of children diagnosed greater than 24 months ago. Parental stressors change over time with respect to the time of diagnosis of hearing impairment. This phenomenon was observed irrespective of the age of diagnosis of hearing loss. As professionals serving families of children with hearing loss, we should be aware of changing stressors over time and identify the appropriate support services for families to meet those changing needs. By addressing those evolving stressors, the families' ability to support and improve the outcomes for their children who are deaf or hard of hearing may be enhanced.

  17. Effect of conductive hearing loss on central auditory function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Bayat

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: It has been demonstrated that long-term Conductive Hearing Loss (CHL may influence the precise detection of the temporal features of acoustic signals or Auditory Temporal Processing (ATP. It can be argued that ATP may be the underlying component of many central auditory processing capabilities such as speech comprehension or sound localization. Little is known about the consequences of CHL on temporal aspects of central auditory processing. Objective: This study was designed to assess auditory temporal processing ability in individuals with chronic CHL. Methods: During this analytical cross-sectional study, 52 patients with mild to moderate chronic CHL and 52 normal-hearing listeners (control, aged between 18 and 45 year-old, were recruited. In order to evaluate auditory temporal processing, the Gaps-in-Noise (GIN test was used. The results obtained for each ear were analyzed based on the gap perception threshold and the percentage of correct responses. Results: The average of GIN thresholds was significantly smaller for the control group than for the CHL group for both ears (right: p = 0.004; left: p 0.05. Conclusion: The results suggest reduced auditory temporal processing ability in adults with CHL compared to normal hearing subjects. Therefore, developing a clinical protocol to evaluate auditory temporal processing in this population is recommended.

  18. Single-sided deafness & directional hearing: contribution of spectral cues and high-frequency hearing loss in the hearing ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Johannes Hermanus Agterberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Direction-specific interactions of sound waves with the head, torso and pinna provide unique spectral-shape cues that are used for the localization of sounds in the vertical plane, whereas horizontal sound localization is based primarily on the processing of binaural acoustic differences in arrival time (interaural time differences, or ITDs and sound level (interaural level differences, or ILDs. Because the binaural sound-localization cues are absent in listeners with total single-sided deafness (SSD, their ability to localize sound is heavily impaired. However, some studies have reported that SSD listeners are able, to some extent, to localize sound sources in azimuth, although the underlying mechanisms used for localization are unclear. To investigate whether SSD listeners rely on monaural pinna-induced spectral-shape cues of their hearing ear for directional hearing, we investigated localization performance for low-pass filtered (LP, 3 kHz and broadband (BB, 0.5 – 20 kHz noises in the two-dimensional frontal hemifield. We tested whether localization performance of SSD listeners further deteriorated when the pinna cavities of their hearing ear were filled with a mold that disrupted their spectral-shape cues. To remove the potential use of perceived sound level as an invalid azimuth cue, we randomly varied stimulus presentation levels over a broad range (45-65 dB SPL. Several listeners with SSD could localize HP and BB sound sources in the horizontal plane, but inter-subject variability was considerable. Localization performance of these listeners strongly reduced after diminishing of their spectral pinna-cues. We further show that inter-subject variability of SSD can be explained to a large extent by the severity of high-frequency hearing loss in their hearing ear.

  19. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss - A Preventable Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas W.; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H.; Stokholm, Zara A.

    2017-01-01

    statistically significant among baseline participants with first exposure before the 1980s (odds ratio: 1.90, 95% CI: 1.11; 3.22). CONCLUSIONS: We observed declining industrial noise levels, increased use of HPD and no significant impact on hearing thresholds from current ambient industrial noise levels, which...... insignificant, inverse association between higher ambient cumulative noise exposure and poorer hearing (-0.10 dB hearing threshold shift per dB-year (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.36; 0.16)). The risk of hearing loss seemed to increase with earlier first year of noise exposure, but odds ratios were only...

  20. Gambling among adolescents with and without hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Geidne

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This exploratory study investigates the prevalence of gambling, preferred types of gambling, and problem gambling in Swedish young people aged 15–18 years with and without hearing loss. Methods A cross-sectional health survey was conducted in Örebro County, Sweden in 2014. A standardized questionnaire was distributed to 4888 students, and 4329 filled it. There were 318 (8 % students with hearing loss. The response rate was 82 %. The 2-item Lie/Bet questionnaire (Johnson et al. in Psychol Rep 80:83–88, 1997 was used for measuring problem gambling. Results More students with hearing loss had gambled during their lifetime (35 % and in the past year (25 % than their hearing counterparts (lifetime: 24 %; past-year: 19 %. More students with hearing loss compared to normal hearing students were identified as problem gamblers (7.7 % compared to 4.3 %. Conclusion More research is needed on gambling among people with hearing loss as well as other disabilities.

  1. Hearing loss among patients with Turner's syndrome: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cresio Alves

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Turner's syndrome (TS is caused by a partial or total deletion of an X chromosome, occurring in 1:2,000 to 1:5,000 live born females. Hearing loss is one of its major clinical manifestations. However, there are few studies investigating this problem. OBJECTIVES: To review the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations and diagnosis of hearing impairment in patients with TS. METHODS: A bibliographic search was performed in the Medline and Lilacs databanks (1980-2012 to identify the main papers associating Turner's syndrome, hearing impairment and its clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Recurrent otitis media, dysfunction of the Eustachian tube, conductive hearing loss during infancy and sensorineural hearing loss in adolescence are the audiologic disorders more common in ST. The karyotype appears to be important in the hearing loss, with studies demonstrating an increased prevalence in patients with monosomy 45,X or isochromosome 46,i(Xq. Morphologic studies of the cochlea are necessary to help out in the clarifying the etiology of the sensorineural hearing loss.

  2. Audiological results with Baha in conductive and mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiffner, Flurin; Caversaccio, Marco-Domenico; Kompis, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The level of improvement in the audiological results of Baha(®) users mainly depends on the patient's preoperative hearing thresholds and the type of Baha sound processor used. This investigation shows correlations between the preoperative hearing threshold and postoperative aided thresholds and audiological results in speech understanding in quiet of 84 Baha users with unilateral conductive hearing loss, bilateral conductive hearing loss and bilateral mixed hearing loss. Secondly, speech understanding in noise of 26 Baha users with different Baha sound processors (Compact, Divino, and BP100) is investigated. Linear regression between aided sound field thresholds and bone conduction (BC) thresholds of the better ear shows highest correlation coefficients and the steepest slope. Differences between better BC thresholds and aided sound field thresholds are smallest for mid-frequencies (1 and 2 kHz) and become larger at 0.5 and 4 kHz. For Baha users, the gain in speech recognition in quiet can be expected to lie in the order of magnitude of the gain in their hearing threshold. Compared to its predecessor sound processors Baha(®) Compact and Baha(®) Divino, Baha(®) BP100 improves speech understanding in noise significantly by +0.9 to +4.6 dB signal-to-noise ratio, depending on the setting and the use of directional microphone. For Baha users with unilateral and bilateral conductive hearing loss and bilateral mixed hearing loss, audiological results in aided sound field thresholds can be estimated with the better BC hearing threshold. The benefit in speech understanding in quiet can be expected to be similar to the gain in their sound field hearing threshold. The most recent technology of Baha sound processor improves speech understanding in noise by an order of magnitude that is well perceived by users and which can be very useful in everyday life. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Characteristics and Progression of Hearing Loss in Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreicher, Kathryn L; Weir, Forest W; Nguyen, Shaun A; Meyer, Ted A

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate hearing impairment in children with Down syndrome, and to describe the factors that influence the severity of hearing loss or changes in hearing over time. Using the Audiological and Genetic Database (AudGenDB), audiograms of children with Down syndrome were analyzed retrospectively for type, severity, and laterality of hearing loss, as well as changes over time. Medical charts and imaging results were reviewed to identify factors influencing hearing loss. Among the 1088 patients with Down syndrome included in the study, 921 had hearing loss in at least 1 ear, 91.1% had bilateral hearing loss, and 8.9% had unilateral hearing loss (1760 total ears with hearing loss). Of the ears with hearing loss, 18.8% (n = 180) had moderate or worse hearing loss. "Undefined" hearing loss and pure conductive hearing loss (CHL) were the most common types, followed by mixed hearing loss and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Three-quarters (75.4%) of the children had experienced chronic otitis media or more than 2 episodes of acute otitis media. Patients with bilateral, mixed hearing loss or a history of seizures were at risk for more severe hearing loss. CHL, absence of cholesteatoma, and placement of first ear tubes before age 2 years were associated with greater improvement in hearing over time, whereas SNHL and mixed hearing loss were associated with progressive decline. Children with Down syndrome who have bilateral, mixed hearing loss or a history of seizures are at risk for more severe hearing loss. SNHL and mixed hearing loss should not be overlooked in patients with CHL. All patients with Down syndrome will benefit from serial audiograms, especially those children with SNHL or mixed hearing loss, which is likely to worsen over time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of Unilateral Hearing Loss by Stationary Wavelet Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yudong; Nayak, Deepak Ranjan; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Liu, Bin; Lu, Huimin; Wang, Shuihua

    2017-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is correlated to massive neurological or psychiatric disease. T1-weighted volumetric images were acquired from fourteen subjects with right-sided hearing loss (RHL), fifteen subjects with left-sided hearing loss (LHL), and twenty healthy controls (HC). We treated a three-class classification problem: HC, LHL, and RHL. Stationary wavelet entropy was employed to extract global features from magnetic resonance images of each subject. Those stationary wavelet entropy features were used as input to a single-hidden layer feedforward neuralnetwork classifier. The 10 repetition results of 10-fold cross validation show that the accuracies of HC, LHL, and RHL are 96.94%, 97.14%, and 97.35%, respectively. Our developed system is promising and effective in detecting hearing loss. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Celiac Disease: A Coincidental Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Volta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD can be associated with a variety of extraintestinal manifestations, including neurological diseases. A new neurological correlation has been found between CD and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL.

  6. Hearing loss among older construction workers: Updated analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dement, John; Welch, Laura S; Ringen, Knut; Cranford, Kim; Quinn, Patricia

    2018-04-01

    A prior study of this construction worker population found significant noise-associated hearing loss. This follow-up study included a much larger study population and consideration of additional risk factors. Data included audiometry, clinical chemistry, personal history, and work history. Qualitative exposure metrics for noise and solvents were developed. Analyses compared construction workers to an internal reference group with lower exposures and an external worker population with low noise exposure. Among participants (n = 19 127) an overall prevalence of hearing loss of 58% was observed, with significantly increased prevalence across all construction trades. Construction workers had significantly increased risk of hearing loss compared to reference populations, with increasing risk by work duration. Noise exposure, solvent exposure, hypertension, and smoking were significant risk factors in multivariate models. Results support a causal relationship between construction trades work and hearing loss. Prevention should focus on reducing exposure to noise, solvents, and cigarette smoke. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Use of a hearing loss grading system and an owner-based hearing questionnaire to assess hearing loss in pet dogs with chronic otitis externa or otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Carly L; Paterson, Susan; Cripps, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Hearing loss is important when assessing the suitability of dogs with otitis externa/media for medical or surgical therapy. To assess an owner-completed questionnaire as an indicator of hearing loss and a canine hearing loss scoring system in chronic canine otitis. One hundred hospital population dogs referred for chronic otitis investigation. Owners completed a questionnaire to assess their dog's response to common household noises. The presence of otitis externa or media was determined and brainstem auditory-evoked response measurements were performed on each dog. The minimal hearing threshold (MHT) in decibels normal hearing level (dB NHL) was recorded and categorized according to the human World Health Organization grading system into five grades from 0 to 4 with cut-off values of ≤25 dB NHL, 26-40 dB NHL, 41-60 dB NHL, 60-80 dB NHL and ≥81 dB NHL. The questionnaire correctly determined normal hearing in grade 0 cases, but did not reliably detect unilateral or grade 1 bilateral hearing loss. For dogs with bilateral hearing loss ≥ grade 2, questionnaire sensitivity was 83% [24 of 29, 95% confidence interval, (CI) 64-94%] and specificity was 94% (67 of 71, 95% CI 86-98%). Higher grades of hearing loss were significantly associated with the presence of otitis media (P < 0.01). The questionnaire may be a useful in-practice screening tool in chronic canine otitis for moderate to severe bilateral hearing deficits (MHT ≥41 dB NHL). The hearing loss grading system may help clinicians make therapeutic decisions. Chronic otitis media may be associated with higher grades of hearing loss. © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  8. Analysis of Predisposing Factors for Hearing Loss in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joong Seob; Choi, Hyo Geun; Jang, Jeong Hun; Sim, Songyong; Hong, Sung Kwang; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Bumjung; Kim, Hyung-Jong

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to estimate the effects of various risk factors on hearing level in Korean adults, using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We examined data from 13,369 participants collected between 2009 and 2011. Average hearing thresholds at low (0.5, 1, and 2 kHz) and high frequencies (3, 4, and 6 kHz), were investigated in accordance with various known risk factors via multiple regression analysis featuring complex sampling. We additionally evaluated data from 4,810 participants who completed a questionnaire concerned with different types of noise exposure. Low body mass index, absence of hyperlipidemia, history of diabetes mellitus, low incomes, low educational status, and smoking were associated with elevated low frequency hearing thresholds. In addition, male sex, low body mass index, absence of hyperlipidemia, low income, low educational status, smoking, and heavy alcohol consumption were associated with elevated high frequency hearing thresholds. Participants with a history of earphone use in noisy circumstances demonstrated hearing thresholds which were 1.024 dB (95% CI: 0.176 to 1.871; P = 0.018) higher, at low-frequencies, compared to participants without a history of earphone use. Our study suggests that low BMI, absence of hyperlipidemia, low household income, and low educational status are related with hearing loss in Korean adults. Male sex, smoking, and heavy alcohol use are related with high frequency hearing loss. A history of earphone use in noisy circumstances is also related with hearing loss.

  9. Transient Hearing Loss in Adults Associated With Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinhaes, Eriko S; Santos, Luciane A; Dias, Lislane; Andrade, Nilvano A; Bezerra, Victor H; de Carvalho, Anderson T; de Moraes, Laise; Henriques, Daniele F; Azar, Sasha R; Vasilakis, Nikos; Ko, Albert I; Andrade, Bruno B; Siqueira, Isadora C; Khouri, Ricardo; Boaventura, Viviane S

    2017-03-01

    In 2015, during the outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) in Brazil, we identified 3 cases of acute hearing loss after exanthematous illness. Serology yielded finding compatible with ZIKV as the cause of a confirmed (n = 1) and a probable (n = 2) flavivirus infection, indicating an association between ZIKV infection and transient hearing loss. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  10. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldonate, J; Mercuri, C; Reta, J; Biurrun, J; Bonell, C; Gentiletti, G; Escobar, S; Acevedo, R

    2007-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory

  11. Association between hearing loss and depressive symptoms in elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Andréa Krüger; Freitas, Cíntia de La Rocha; Soldera, Cristina Loureiro Chaves; Bós, Angelo José Gonçalves; Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira dos; Dornelles, Sílvia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Hearing loss causes difficulties in speech understanding, which leads away from the family and social environment. This isolation may be associated with depressive disorders. Type of study: clinical prospective. Objective: To determine the association between hearing loss and depression in a group of non-institutionalized elderly. Method: The sample consisted of individuals aged over 60 years, undergoing complete audiological evaluation and screening for depressive symptoms with...

  12. Supporting communicative development of infants and toddlers with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiser, Kristina

    2012-11-01

    Newborn hearing screening has increased the number of families enrolled in early intervention during a sensitive period of communication development. The primary role of the speech-language pathologist in early intervention is to facilitate natural parent-infant interactions and support parents' feelings of confidence in communicating with their child. Feelings of self-efficacy can be increased when parents understand how hearing loss impacts their child's communication development, understand how to monitor hearing technology and hearing status, and receive consistent feedback related to their child's progress. This article reviews the evidence behind benefits of early parent-child interactions and outlines strategies and resources for speech-language pathologists to use in supporting communication development with infants and toddlers with hearing loss. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. P300 in individuals with sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Mirandola Barbosa Reis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Behavioral and electrophysiological auditory evaluations contribute to the understanding of the auditory system and of the process of intervention.OBJECTIVE: To study P300 in subjects with severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss.METHODS: This was a descriptive cross-sectional prospective study. It included 29 individuals of both genders with severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss without other type of disorders, aged 11 to 42 years; all were assessed by behavioral audiological evaluation and auditory evoked potentials.RESULTS: A recording of the P3 wave was obtained in 17 individuals, with a mean latency of 326.97 ms and mean amplitude of 3.76 V. There were significant differences in latency in relation to age and in amplitude according to degree of hearing loss. There was a statistically significant association of the P300 results with the degrees of hearing loss (p = 0.04, with the predominant auditory communication channels (p < 0.0001, and with time of hearing loss.CONCLUSIONS: P300 can be recorded in individuals with severe and profound congenital sensorineural hearing loss; it may contribute to the understanding of cortical development and is a good predictor of the early intervention outcome.

  14. Hearing loss in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreicher, Kathryn L; Schopper, Heather K; Naik, Akash N; Hatch, Jonathan L; Meyer, Ted A

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the type and severity of hearing impairment in pediatric patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and relate these measures to patient demographics, treatment options, and other otologic factors. A retrospective analysis of children with a diagnosis of PCD, Kartagener's syndrome, or situs inversus in the AudGen Database was conducted. Audiograms were analyzed for type of hearing loss (HL), severity, laterality, and progression. Medical charts were reviewed to identify factors that influence severity and progression of hearing loss. 56 patients met inclusion criteria and 42 patients had HL. 66.6% had bilateral and 33.3% had unilateral loss (70 total ears with HL). Conductive hearing loss (CHL) was the most common type of HL, though 30% of children had some sensorineural component to their hearing loss. 92.9% of children with HL received at least one diagnosis of otitis media, but HL did not improve in the majority (77.8%) of ears in our study regardless of ear tube placement. Slight to mild CHL and all types of otitis media are prevalent among patients with PCD, and some of these children have sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). All patients diagnosed with situs inversus at birth should be evaluated by an otolaryngologist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hearing Loss: Communicating With the Patient Who Is Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael M; Moreland, Christopher; Atcherson, Samuel R; Zazove, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss impairs health care communication and adversely affects patient satisfaction, treatment adherence, and use of health services. Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition among older patients after hypertension and arthritis, but only 15% to 18% of older adults are screened for hearing loss during health maintenance examinations. Patients with hearing loss may be reluctant to disclose it because of fear of ageism, perceptions of disability, and vanity. Lipreading and note writing often are ineffective ways to communicate with deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) patients who use American Sign Language; use of medical sign language interpreters is preferred. A variety of strategies can improve the quality of health care communication for DHH patients, such as the physician facing the patient, listening attentively, and using visual tools. Physicians should learn what hearing loss means to the DHH patient. Deaf American Sign Language users may not perceive hearing loss as a disability but as a cultural identity. Patients' preferred communication strategies will vary. Relay services, electronic communication, and other telecommunications methods can be helpful, but family physicians and medical staff should learn from each DHH patient about which communication strategies will work best. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  16. Does tinnitus, hearing asymmetry, or hearing loss predispose to occupational injury risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, Linda F; Galusha, Deron; Cullen, Mark R; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Slade, Martin D; Rabinowitz, Peter M; Neitzel, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    To determine the relative contributions of tinnitus, asymmetrical hearing loss, low frequency hearing loss (pure tone average of 0.5, 1, 2, 3 kHz; PTA.5123), or high frequency hearing loss (pure tone average of 4, 6 kHz; PTA46), to acute injury risk among a cohort of production and maintenance workers at six aluminum manufacturing plants, adjusting for ambient noise exposure and other recognized predictors of injury risk. Retrospective analysis. The study considered 9920 workers employed during 2003 to 2008. The cohort consisted of 8818 workers (89%) whose complete records were available. Adjusting for noise exposure and other recognized injury predictors, a 25% increased acute injury risk was observed among workers with a history of tinnitus in conjunction with high-frequency hearing loss (PTA46). Low frequency hearing loss may be associated with minor, yet less serious, injury risk. We did not find evidence that asymmetry contributes to injury risk. These results provide evidence that tinnitus, combined with high-frequency hearing loss, may pose an important safety threat to workers, especially those who work in high-noise exposed environments. These at risk workers may require careful examination of their communication and hearing protection needs.

  17. Round window stimulation for conductive and mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Margaret T; Tubbs, Rhonda S; Adunka, Marcia C; King, English R; Hillman, Todd A; Adunka, Oliver F; Chen, Douglas A; Buchman, Craig A

    2014-10-01

    Assess surgical complications, postoperative residual hearing, and speech perception outcomes of placement of a middle ear implant on the round window in conductive and mixed hearing loss cases. Single-subject, repeated-measures design where each subject served as his or her own control. Tertiary referral medical systems. Eighteen subjects with either conductive or mixed hearing loss who could not benefit from conventional amplification were enrolled in a clinical trial investigating vibratory stimulation of the round window. The floating mass transducer (FMT) was positioned in the round window niche. Unaided residual hearing, and aided sound field thresholds and speech perception abilities were evaluated preoperatively, and at 1, 3, 6, and 10 months post-activation of the external speech processor. Six subjects experienced complications that either required further medical management or resolved on their own. There was no difference in residual bone conduction thresholds or unaided word discrimination over time. All subjects experienced a significant improvement in aided speech perception abilities as compared to preoperative performance. Subjects with conductive and mixed hearing loss with placement of the FMT in the round window niche experienced improved sound field thresholds and speech perception, without compromising residual hearing thresholds. Vibratory stimulation of the round window via a middle ear implant may be an appropriate treatment option for patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss. Additional research is needed on the preferred placement of the FMT, improvement of functional gain, and methods to limit postoperative complications and need for revision surgery.

  18. Prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Cintra Lopes1, , , ,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Work-related hearing loss is one of the most common occupational illness progresses over the years of noise exposure associated with the work environment, may cause damage to undertake physical activity, the individual's physiological and mental besides causing hearing damage irreversible interfering with communication and quality of life. With high prevalence of male evaluates which is the second leading cause of hearing loss. Since there is no medical treatment for this type of hearing loss, it is evident the importance of preventive and conferences aimed at preserving hearing and health as a whole. Objective: To assess the prevalence of hearing loss in audiometry admission of drivers. Methods: Retrospective study. By 76 charts of professional drivers in leased transport companies. We analyzed data from specific interview and pure tone audiometry. Results: The prevalence of abnormal tests was 22.36% with the lowest thresholds for tritonal average of 3,000, 4,000 and 6,000 Hz. The higher the age, the higher thresholds. Conclusion: This study has highlighted the occurrence of hearing in the absence of complaints. Considering that PAIR is preventable, justifies the importance of coordinated and multidisciplinary involving not only health teams and safety, but also the institutions involved in preserving the health of workers, as the team SESMET, unions or prosecutors.

  19. (De)stigmatizing the silent epidemic: representations of hearing loss in entertainment television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Katherine A

    2014-01-01

    The number of adolescents, young adults, and senior citizens experiencing hearing loss has significantly increased over the last 30 years. Despite this prevalence, hearing loss receives little attention in popular and political discourse, except in its connection to aging. Thus, hearing loss and the use of hearing aids have been stigmatized, discouraging adults from seeking hearing evaluation and screening, and justifying the lack of insurance coverage for hearing devices. This research explored how and why hearing loss continues to be stigmatized through a study of media messages about hearing loss. A textual analysis was conducted on 276 television episodes that involved d/Deaf characters and/or storylines about hearing loss and deafness from 1987 through 2013 (see Table 1). Only 11 fictional programs addressed the experience of hearing loss through 47 episodes, including Criminal Minds, Switched at Birth, House, M.D., and New Girl. Contrary to the assumption that hearing loss exclusively impacts older people, characters were typically young, attractive, working professionals who held prominent roles in the programs. For most characters, hearing loss developed suddenly and was restored by the end of the episode, with only four characters using hearing aids. Hearing loss was depicted as comical, embarrassing, lonely, and threatening to one's work. The scarcity of hearing loss portrayals, combined with the negative representations of hearing loss, could help explain why hearing loss continues to be stigmatized and overlooked, even though almost half of all Americans will eventually experience difficulty hearing.

  20. Risk factors for sensorineural hearing loss in NICU infants compared to normal hearing NICU controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenraad, S.; Goedegebure, A.; van Goudoever, J. B.; Hoeve, L. J.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate independent etiologic factors associated with sensorineural hearing loss in infants who have been admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit compared to normal hearing controls. Between 2004 and 2009, 3366 infants were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Sophia Children's

  1. Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and School Psychology: Preparing To Serve More Children with Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Gary W.

    While the commitment to technology for neonatal and infant hearing screening in this country has come a long way and is evolving rapidly, the average age of 18-30 months, at which young children with auditory disabilities are identified, is still unacceptable. The promise of earlier detection, diagnosis, and habilitation of hearing loss is within…

  2. Exploring the Identities of Hearing Parents Who Chose Cochlear Implantation for Their Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharp, Kristina M.; Barker, Brittan A.; Rucker, Sidney N.; Jones, Hannah D.

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to determine the types of identities hearing parents construct when telling online stories about their children with hearing loss (HL) who use cochlear implants (CIs). To do so, we employed a qualitative design and sampled 20 different blogs United States origins and written by parents of children who use CIs. We then used thematic…

  3. Vowel production of Mandarin-speaking hearing aid users with different types of hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Hung

    Full Text Available In contrast with previous research focusing on cochlear implants, this study examined the speech performance of hearing aid users with conductive (n = 11, mixed (n = 10, and sensorineural hearing loss (n = 7 and compared it with the speech of hearing control. Speech intelligibility was evaluated by computing the vowel space area defined by the Mandarin Chinese corner vowels /a, u, i/. The acoustic differences between the vowels were assessed using the Euclidean distance. The results revealed that both the conductive and mixed hearing loss groups exhibited a reduced vowel working space, but no significant difference was found between the sensorineural hearing loss and normal hearing groups. An analysis using the Euclidean distance further showed that the compression of vowel space area in conductive hearing loss can be attributed to the substantial lowering of the second formant of /i/. The differences in vowel production between groups are discussed in terms of the occlusion effect and the signal transmission media of various hearing devices.

  4. The Influence of Hearing Aid Use on Outcomes of Children with Mild Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Holte, Lenore; McCreery, Ryan W.; Spratford, Meredith; Page, Thomas; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of consistent hearing aid (HA) use on outcomes in children with mild hearing loss (HL). Method: Five- or 7-year-old children with mild HL were separated into 3 groups on the basis of patterns of daily HA use. Using analyses of variance, we compared outcomes between groups on speech and language tests and a…

  5. Predictors of Hearing Aid Use Time in Children with Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Spratford, Meredith; Moeller, Mary Pat; Oleson, Jacob; Ou, Hua; Roush, Patricia; Jacobs, Shana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated predictors of hearing aid (HA) use time for children with mild-to-severe hearing loss (HL). Barriers to consistent HA use and reliability of parent report measures were also examined. Method: Participants included parents of 272 children with HL. Parents estimated the amount of time the child used HAs daily.…

  6. Exposure to loud noise, bilateral high-frequency hearing loss and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Wen Qi; Moline, Jacqueline; Kim, Hyun; Mannino, David M

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral high-frequency hearing loss is an indicator for chronic exposure to loud noise. This study aimed to examine the association between bilateral high-frequency hearing loss and the presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). This study included 5223 participants aged 20-69 years who participated in the audiometry examination of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. Bilateral high-frequency hearing loss was defined as the average high-frequency (3, 4 and 6 kHz) hearing threshold ≥25 dB in both ears. CHD was defined as self-reported diagnoses by doctors or other health professionals. Compared with those with normal high-frequency hearing, participants with bilateral high-frequency hearing loss were more likely to have CHD (OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.28 to 2.85) after adjustment for various covariates. This association was particularly strong for currently employed workers who were exposed to loud occupational noise (OR 4.23; 95% CI 1.32 to 13.55). For this subgroup, there was no significant association of CHD with unilateral high-frequency hearing loss, and unilateral or bilateral low-frequency hearing loss. Furthermore, there was no significant association of CHD with any types of hearing loss for participants who were not exposed to loud noise. Stratified analyses for participants exposed to loud noise showed that the observed association was particularly strong for those who were less than 50 years of age, less educated and current smokers. On the basis of an objective indicator for personal chronic exposure to loud noise, this study confirmed that exposure to loud occupational noise is associated with the presence of CHD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. The relationship between neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corujo-Santana, Cándido; Falcón-González, Juan Carlos; Borkoski-Barreiro, Silvia Andrea; Pérez-Plasencia, Daniel; Ramos-Macías, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Severe jaundice that requires exchange transfusion has become a relatively rare situation today. About 60% of full term neonates and 80% of premature ones will suffer from jaundice within the first week of life. Hyperbilirubinemia at birth is a risk factor associated with hearing loss that is usually further linked to other factors that might have an effect on hearing synergistically. This study aimed to identify the relationship between hyperbilirubinemia at birth as a risk factor for sensorineural hearing loss in children born at Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Insular Materno-Infantil de Gran Canaria, in the 2007-2011 period. This was a retrospective study of 796 newborns that had hyperbilirubinemia at birth, using transient evoked otoacoustic emissions and evoked auditory brainstem response. Hundred eighty-five newborns (23.24%) were referred for evoked auditory brainstem response. Hearing loss was diagnosed for 35 (4.39%): 18 neonates (51.43%) with conductive hearing loss and 17 (48.57%) with sensorineural hearing loss, 3 of which were diagnosed as bilateral profound hearing loss. Half of the children had other risk factors associated, the most frequent being exposure to ototoxic medications. The percentage of children diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss that suffered hyperbilirubinemia at birth is higher than for the general population. Of those diagnosed, none had levels of indirect bilirubin≥20mg/dl, only 47% had hyperbilirubinemia at birth as a risk factor and 53% had another auditory risk factor associated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  8. [Acute hearing loss and tinnitus caused by amplified recreational music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metternich, F U; Brusis, T

    1999-11-01

    Hearing loss resulting from exposure to permanent or repeated amplified music in professional musicians and music consumers is described in literature. The risk of hearing loss does not exist only after prolonged exposure to music. Short-term exposure to very high sound levels, for example in concerts, can also cause hearing loss and tinnitus. The retrospective study includes 24 patients who required rheologic therapy between 1994 and 1997 due to a music related acoustic trauma. The type, intensity, and length of music exposure as well as the distance and the position to the source of noise were examined. The type of hearing damage and its development during rheological treatment was studied by pure-tone audiometry. In the majority of examined patients (67%) the hearing loss developed on the basis of one-time exposure at a rock concert or pop concert, followed by hearing loss from attending discotheques (17%) or parties (12%), and music exposure from personal cassette players (4%). The majority of patients showed a maximum hearing loss of 40-60 dB (A) in a frequency between 3 kHz and 4 kHz. Pure-tone audiometry in 58% of the patients exhibited a unilateral threshold in a frequency between 3 kHz and 4 kHz combined with ipsilateral tinnitus of the same frequency. Twenty-one percent of the patients showed a symmetric bilateral threshold and tinnitus between 3 kHz and 4 kHz. In 8% there was a unilateral tinnitus, and in 13% a bilateral tinnitus without any hearing loss. All patients improved their hearing loss during rheologic treatment. Improvement in the tinnitus was only achieved in 33% of the examined cases. The risk of permanent hearing loss resulting from short-term exposure to amplified music is low compared to the risk of continuous tinnitus. Given the lack of acceptance of personal ear protectors, the risk of acute hearing damage due to amplified music could be reduced by avoiding the immediate proximity to the speakers.

  9. Quality of Life and Hearing Eight Years After Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härkönen, Kati; Kivekäs, Ilkka; Rautiainen, Markus; Kotti, Voitto; Vasama, Juha-Pekka

    2017-04-01

    To explore long-term hearing results, quality of life (QoL), quality of hearing (QoH), work-related stress, tinnitus, and balance problems after idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). Cross-sectional study. We reviewed the audiograms of 680 patients with unilateral ISSNHL on average 8 years after the hearing impairment, and then divided the patients into two study groups based on whether their ISSNHL had recovered to normal (pure tone average [PTA] ≤ 30 dB) or not (PTA > 30 dB). The inclusion criteria were a hearing threshold decrease of 30 dB or more in at least three contiguous frequencies occurring within 72 hours in the affected ear and normal hearing in the contralateral ear. Audiograms of 217 patients fulfilled the criteria. We reviewed their medical records; measured present QoL, QoH, and work-related stress with specific questionnaires; and updated the hearing status. Poor hearing outcome after ISSNHL was correlated with age, severity of hearing loss, and vertigo together with ISSNHL. Quality of life and QoH were statistically significantly better in patients with recovered hearing, and the patients had statistically significantly less tinnitus and balance problems. During the 8-year follow-up, the PTA of the affected ear deteriorated on average 7 dB, and healthy ear deteriorated 6 dB. Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss that failed to recover had a negative impact on long-term QoL and QoH. The hearing deteriorated as a function of age similarly both in the affected and the healthy ear, and there were no differences between the groups. The cumulative recurrence rate for ISSNHL was 3.5%. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:927-931, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. [Analyses prognostic factors relevant to sudden sensorineural hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Xiao, Shuifang; Zeng, Zhengang; Zhen, Zhen; Zhang, Xuexi; Lin, Feng; Dong, Mingmin; Lu, Wei; Qin, Zhaobing; Zuo, Bin; Bai, Xianfeng

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the prognostic factors relevant to sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The internationally accepted standardized clinical research methods, unified design, and unified program were adopted to conduct the prospective clinical multi-center study. The sudden deafness patients between 18 to 65 years old, with the course of this disorder less than two weeks, and without any medical treatments were collected, and then, divided into four types according to the hearing curve: type A, acute sensorineural hearing loss in low tone frequencies; type B, acute sensorineural hearing loss in high tone frequencies; type C, acute sensorineural hearing loss in all frequencies; and type D, total deafness. The factors, in terms of age, gender, type of initial audiogram, time delay before the first visit, and severity of hearing loss, were included in the analyses. A total of 1 024 cases with single side sudden deafness were collected in the study from 33 hospitals in China from August 2007 to October 2011, inclusive of for 492 males (48.05%) and 532 females (51.95%). The average age was (41.2 ± 12.8) years old. There were 553 cases (54.00%) in left ear, and 471 cases (46.00%) in right ear. The curative effects of different types were shown as follows: the type in low tone frequencies had the highest rate of 90.73%, the type in all frequencies was 82.59%; the type of total deafness was 70.29%; and the type in high tone frequencies had the lowest rate of 65.96%. It had significant difference of the effective rate between different types (χ(2) = 231.58, P = 0.000). Age, time delay before first visit, and severity of initial hearing loss were significantly correlated with hearing improvement. Initial audiogram of SSNHL might predict hearing recovery. The young in age and a short time delay before starting treatment are positive prognostic factors for hearing recovery in SSNHL. The initial severity of hearing loss is negative prognostic factor of hearing recovery.

  11. RNA Interference Prevents Autosomal-Dominant Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Seiji B; Ranum, Paul T; Moteki, Hideaki; Pan, Bifeng; Goodwin, Alexander T; Goodman, Shawn S; Abbas, Paul J; Holt, Jeffrey R; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-06-02

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory deficit. It is frequently caused by the expression of an allele carrying a single dominant missense mutation. Herein, we show that a single intracochlear injection of an artificial microRNA carried in a viral vector can slow progression of hearing loss for up to 35 weeks in the Beethoven mouse, a murine model of non-syndromic human deafness caused by a dominant gain-of-function mutation in Tmc1 (transmembrane channel-like 1). This outcome is noteworthy because it demonstrates the feasibility of RNA-interference-mediated suppression of an endogenous deafness-causing allele to slow progression of hearing loss. Given that most autosomal-dominant non-syndromic hearing loss in humans is caused by this mechanism of action, microRNA-based therapeutics might be broadly applicable as a therapy for this type of deafness. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Coping together with hearing loss: a qualitative meta-synthesis of the psychosocial experiences of people with hearing loss and their communication partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Alex B; Leighton, Paul; Ferguson, Melanie A

    2017-05-01

    To examine the psychosocial experiences of hearing loss from the perspectives of both the person with hearing loss and their communication partner. A meta-synthesis of the qualitative literature. From 880 records, 12 qualitative papers met the inclusion criteria, (i) adults with hearing loss, communication partners, or both, and (ii) explored psychosocial issues. Four themes related to the psychosocial experience of hearing loss were found, (i) the effect of the hearing loss, (ii) the response to hearing aids, (iii) stigma and identity, and (iv) coping strategies. Hearing loss affected both people with hearing loss and communication partners. Hearing aids resulted in positive effects, however, these were often outnumbered by negative effects. Non-use of hearing aids was often influenced by stigma. Coping strategies used were related to how the person with hearing loss perceived their self and how the communication partner perceived the relationship. Aligned coping strategies appeared to have a positive effect. Hearing loss affects both people with hearing loss and their communication partners. Aligned coping strategies can facilitate adjustment to hearing loss.

  13. Efficient estimates of cochlear hearing loss parameters in individual listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the level corresponding to the knee-point of the basilar membrane (BM) input/output (I/O) function can be used to estimate the amount of inner- and outer hair-cell loss (IHL, OHL) in listeners with a moderate cochlear hearing impairment Plack et al. (2004). According...... to Jepsen and Dau (2011) IHL + OHL = HLT [dB], where HLT stands for total hearing loss. Hence having estimates of the total hearing loss and OHC loss, one can estimate the IHL. In the present study, results from forward masking experiments based on temporal masking curves (TMC; Nelson et al., 2001...... estimates of the knee-point level. Further, it is explored whether it is possible to estimate the compression ratio using only on-frequency TMCs. 10 normal-hearing and 10 hearing-impaired listeners (with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss) were tested at 1, 2 and 4 kHz. The results showed...

  14. Hearing loss in mild OSAS and simple snoring patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinosi, Maria Carla; D'Amico, Francesca; Passali, Giulio; Cingi, Cemal; Rodriguez, Hugo; Passali, Desiderio

    2017-04-30

    Introduction Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by recurrent episodes of prolonged partial or complete obstruction of the upper airways. Several study groups studied the effect of snoring and OSAS on auditory function, showing an increase in the incidence of hearing loss in apneic patients, an earlier onset and/or a degree of hearing loss deeper than in peers. The aim of our study is to evaluate the audiological performance of a population of simple-snoring patients and patients suffering from mild OSAS, and the impact that such pathological condition can have on the auditory function, considering the significant levels of chronic noise. Materials and Methods Data was collected by analyzing audiometric exams on snoring patients and a control group of non-snoring patients. Our study included simple snoring patients without OSAS (AHI < 5) or with low level of OSAS (5< AHI < 15). Possible hearing loss was classified in a crescent scale (A-B-C-D-E), from greater to minor auditory performance, according to the indications of the national protocol of occupational medicine for evaluation of hearing loss in patients exposed to chronic noise. Results We have found independence between simple snorers, mild-OSAS snorers and non-snoring patients compared to the scale of hearing performance classification. Conclusions Our results show a distribution of hearing loss in the different groups that appear independent of the presence or absence of snoring, complicated or uncomplicated by mild OSAS.

  15. Working Memory, Sleep, and Hearing Problems in Patients with Tinnitus and Hearing Loss Fitted with Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarenoe, Reza; Hällgren, Mathias; Andersson, Gerhard; Ledin, Torbjörn

    2017-02-01

    Tinnitus is a common condition and there is a need to evaluate effects of tinnitus management in relation to moderating factors such as degree of hearing loss. As it is possible that tinnitus influences concentration, and thus is likely to disturb cognitive processing, the role of cognitive functioning also needs to be investigated. To compare a group of patients with sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus to a control group with only sensorineural hearing loss (and no tinnitus). To investigate working memory, sleep, and hearing problems measured before and after hearing rehabilitation. A prospective study. The sample consisted of 100 patients, 50 with hearing loss and tinnitus, and 50 controls with hearing loss but no tinnitus. All patients were between 40 and 82 yr old and had a pure-tone average (PTA; average of 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) memory capacity, sleep quality, hearing problems, speech recognition, and tinnitus annoyance. Eight patients dropped out of the study. Thus, a total of 92 patients were included for analysis, with 46 in each group. As a consequence of unplanned age and PTA differences between the groups, an age-matched subsample (n = 30 + 30) was selected for further analysis. Tests including the Reading Span, Hearing-in-Noise Test (HINT), Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were administered before and after hearing aid rehabilitation. There were no between-group differences at baseline in the full sample (n = 92), with the exception of the THI (p < 0.001) and the PSQI (p < 0.002), on which the hearing loss and tinnitus group had significantly higher scores. Pre/post changes were significant for both groups on the Reading Span, and HHIE. However, these improvements were significantly larger for the patients in the hearing loss and tinnitus group on the Reading Span test (p < 0.001) and the PSQI (p < 0.001). Patients with tinnitus and hearing loss also

  16. Predicting hearing thresholds and occupational hearing loss with multiple-frequency auditory steady-state responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ruey-Fen; Ho, Chi-Kung; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Shun-Sheng

    2010-10-01

    An objective investigation is needed to verify the existence and severity of hearing impairments resulting from work-related, noise-induced hearing loss in arbitration of medicolegal aspects. We investigated the accuracy of multiple-frequency auditory steady-state responses (Mf-ASSRs) between subjects with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) with and without occupational noise exposure. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary referral medical centre. Pure-tone audiometry and Mf-ASSRs were recorded in 88 subjects (34 patients had occupational noise-induced hearing loss [NIHL], 36 patients had SNHL without noise exposure, and 18 volunteers were normal controls). Inter- and intragroup comparisons were made. A predicting equation was derived using multiple linear regression analysis. ASSRs and pure-tone thresholds (PTTs) showed a strong correlation for all subjects (r = .77 ≈ .94). The relationship is demonstrated by the equationThe differences between the ASSR and PTT were significantly higher for the NIHL group than for the subjects with non-noise-induced SNHL (p hearing thresholds. Predictive value may be lower in subjects with occupational hearing loss. Regardless of carrier frequencies, the severity of hearing loss affects the steady-state response. Moreover, the ASSR may assist in detecting noise-induced injury of the auditory pathway. A multiple linear regression equation to accurately predict thresholds was shown that takes into consideration all effect factors.

  17. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meister H

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hartmut Meister,1 Sebastian Rählmann,1 Martin Walger,2 Sabine Margolf-Hackl,3 Jürgen Kießling3 1Jean Uhrmacher Institute for Clinical ENT-Research, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Othorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany Purpose: To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons.Methods: Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated.Results: Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity – as determined by the fluid intelligence measure – was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered.Conclusion: The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive

  18. Outcomes for conservative management of traumatic conductive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jonathan R; Arganbright, Jill; Friedland, David R

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the natural history of traumatic conductive hearing loss. Retrospective chart review. Otologic and audiometric evaluations of patients in the early posttraumatic phase were compared with evaluations at follow-up. Assessment included etiologies of trauma, classification of hearing loss, factors causing conductive loss, and analyses of changes in air-bone gaps, pure-tone averages and hearing loss class. There were 45 patients, representing 47 ears, with sufficient initial and follow-up documentation to analyze the natural history of traumatic conductive hearing loss. Overall, 77% of ears showed an improvement in pure-tone averages without surgical intervention. Air-bone gaps closed from an average of 24.8 +/- 12.1 to 13.2 +/- 11.1 dB. Only 11% of ears demonstrated a decrease in pure-tone averages, and 12% showed no change in thresholds. All forms of injury contributing to the conductive hearing loss had good outcomes. Specifically, tympanic membrane perforations showed final air-bone gaps of 14.9 +/- 11.2 dB; cases of hemotympanum had final air-bone gaps of 10.0 +/- 8.1 dB; and suspected ossicular chain disruptions had final air-bone gaps of 13.9 +/- 12.3 dB. Only 5 of 47 ears ultimately required surgical intervention for persistent pathology. Patients with all forms of traumatic conductive hearing loss can be initially managed conservatively. Even suspected ossicular chain disruptions have a high rate of spontaneous reparation. Surgical intervention for perforation or conductive hearing loss should be undertaken in the rare cases when these conditions persist greater than 6 months.

  19. Oral steroid treatment for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei T.; Lee, Jui W.; Yuan, Chien H.; Chen, Rong F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the efficacy of long-term oral steroids in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL), and to explore potential prognosis factors, the relationship of hearing recovery outcome, and the recovery time-course in ISSHL. Methods: In this retrospective study, we analyzed 215 cases diagnosed with idiopathic unilateral sudden deafness between January 2003 and December 2012 at a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. All of them received oral steroid therapy and were followed for at least 3 months. Results: Young age, the presence of no other disease (diabetes, hypertension, or cardiovascular disease), treatment within 7 days of the onset of ISSHL, mild hearing loss, and audiograms with ascending curves had a statistically significant better hearing recovery. The average pure-tone audiometry (PTA) was 67.8±23.9 dB initially, and was improved between one month (51.6±28.7 dB) and 2 months post treatment (49.7±28.6 dB). The average last-visit PTA was 49.9±29.2 dB. Conclusion: Approximately one third of patients had full recovery in hearing, one third had partial recovery, and approximately one third did not recover from hearing loss. In addition, the hearing level remained relatively stable following 2 months of treatment. More than 2 months of oral steroid therapy for ISSHL is not recommended because no additional benefits were evidenced. PMID:25737170

  20. Pediatric unilateral sensorineural hearing loss: implications and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornhoffer, James R; Dornhoffer, John L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize current studies detailing the impact of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss in children and the most current modalities of treatment used in its management. Current studies corroborate historic views on the impact of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss on patient wellbeing and academic success and stress the use of additional surveillance and studies to diagnose those patients that may pass standard screening practices and suffer from lack of prompt and proper care. With respect to management, notable findings include the continuous development of improved conventional and contralateral routing of signal amplification devices that may act to provide alternatives to percutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid implantation. These include improvements in more conventional hearing aid technology, so as to bridge the performance gap with the classical bone-anchored hearing aid implant, and the development of partially implanted transcutaneous bone conduction hearing devices. Due to dissatisfaction with sound localization, a new and significant development is the burgeoning accumulation of research on cochlear implantation for the treatment of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss in children. With advances in technology in historic modalities of treatment, and the advent of new modalities such as cochlear implantation, the clinician has a wide armamentarium by which to provide treatment to patients based on clinical circumstances and patient desires.

  1. Hearing loss in the elderly: History of occupational noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses-Barriviera, Caroline Luiz; Melo, Juliana Jandre; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2013-04-01

     Noise exposure is one of the most common health risk factors, and workers are exposed to sound pressure levels capable of producing hearing loss.  To assess the prevalence of hearing loss in the elderly and its possible association with a history of occupational noise exposure and with sex.  A prospective study in subjects aged over 60 years. The subjects underwent anamnesis and audiological assessment. The Mann-Whitney test and multiple logistic regression, with 95% confidence interval and p hearing I (500, 1000, and 2000 Hz p = 0.8318) and the mean hearing II (3000, 4000, and 6000 Hz; p occupational noise exposure, we obtained the medium hearing I (p = 0.9542) and the mean hearing II (p = 0.0007).  There was a statistically significant association between hearing loss at high frequencies and the risk factors being male and occupational noise exposure.

  2. Prognostic predictors of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in defibrinogenation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Ryohei; Horii, Arata; Akazawa, Hitoshi; Osaki, Yasuhiro; Inohara, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Defibrinogenation therapy rather than corticosteroids therapy should be chosen for patients specifically with profound hearing loss and with initial high fibrinogen. Corticosteroids therapy is the standard treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) and prognostic factors by this therapy were reported. Defibrinogenation therapy is one of the treatment options for SSNHL. Aims of this study were to identify prognostic factors and correlative markers with hearing improvement in treating SSNHL by defibrinogenation therapy. During the early phase of the study, consecutive 61 patients were treated by defibrinogenation therapy with batroxobin (50 units), whereas corticosteroids (500 mg/day of hydrocortisone tapered by 9 days) were used for consecutive 64 patients during the late phase. Blood data that could predict a complete recovery were identified. Coagulation/fibrinolysis markers correlated with hearing improvement by defibrinogenation therapy were investigated. Although there were no overall differences in hearing improvement between the two therapies, recovery rate in profound hearing loss patients was better in defibrinogenation therapy. In patients who showed complete recovery, serum fibrinogen level before treatment was significantly higher in the defibrinogenation group than the corticosteroid group. Responses of several fibrinolysis markers to defibrinogenation therapy evaluated by post-/pre-values were negatively correlated with hearing improvement.

  3. Amplified hearing device use in acute care settings for patients with hearing loss: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Amber R; Roscigno, Cecelia I; Jenerette, Coretta M; Hughart, Kimberly M; Jenkins, Wendy W; Hsu, Wesley

    2017-11-10

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of using amplified hearing devices (AHD) in acute care settings for patients with hearing loss. Secondary objectives include patient and nurse satisfaction, and nursing perceived productivity. Twenty-five adult hard of hearing patients and 15 nurses were evaluated. Patients with a perceived hearing handicap were identified through the Hearing Handicap for the Elderly Screening Version. Patient and staff nurse surveys were used to assess for satisfaction with using the AHD. Nurses were surveyed to evaluate whether they felt the AHD made patient communication more efficient and effective. Twenty-four patients expressed satisfaction with the AHD and would use it in future hospitalizations. Nurses also reported satisfaction, perceived improvement of patient communication and decreased time spent communicating with patients. Results demonstrate the feasibility of using an AHD in acute care inpatient settings where elderly hard of hearing patients are common. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Are open-fit hearing aids a possible alternative to bone-anchored hearing devices in patients with mild to severe hearing loss? A preliminary trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amberley V. Ostevik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Open-fit hearing aids (OFHAs may be of benefit for some individuals with chronic outer and middle ear conditions for which boneanchored hearing devices (BAHDs are normally recommended. The purpose of this study was to compare performance between OFHAs and BAHDs. A Starkey Destiny 800 OFHA was fit on eight adult BAHD users and speech perception measures in quiet and in background noise were compared under two different test conditions: i BAHD only and ii OFHA only. Equivalent outcome measure performance between these two conditions suggests that the OFHA was able to provide sufficient amplification for mild to moderate degrees of hearing loss (pure-tone averages (PTAs less than 47 dB HL. The improved speech perception performances and increased loudness ratings observed for several of the participants with moderately-severe to severe degrees of hearing loss (PTAs of 47 dB HL or greater in the BAHD only condition suggest that the OFHA did not provide sufficient amplification for these individuals. Therefore, OFHAs may be a successful alternative to the BAHD for individuals with no more than a moderate conductive hearing loss who are unable or unwilling to undergo implant surgery or unable to wear conventional hearing aids due to allergies, irritation, or chronic infection associated with the ear being blocked with a shell or earmold.

  5. Disrupted functional brain connectome in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haibo; Fan, Wenliang; Zhao, Xueyan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenjuan; Lei, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is generally defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30 dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies and within a three-day period. This hearing loss is usually unilateral and can be associated with tinnitus and vertigo. The pathogenesis of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss is still unknown, and the alterations in the functional connectivity are suspected to involve one possible pathogenesis. Despite scarce findings with respect to alterations in brain functional networks in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss, the alterations of the whole brain functional connectome and whether these alterations were already in existence in the acute period remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of brain functional connectome in two large samples of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients and to investigate the correlation between unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss characteristics and changes in the functional network properties. Pure tone audiometry was performed to assess hearing ability. Abnormal changes in the peripheral auditory system were examined using conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The graph theoretical network analysis method was used to detect brain connectome alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Compared with the control groups, both groups of unilateral SSNHL patients exhibited a significantly increased clustering coefficient, global efficiency, and local efficiency but a significantly decreased characteristic path length. In addition, the primary increased nodal strength (e.g., nodal betweenness, hubs) was observed in several regions primarily, including the limbic and paralimbic systems, and in the auditory network brain areas. These findings suggest that the alteration of network organization already exists in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period

  6. [New aspects of hearing aid fitting in noise-induced hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, J

    2006-07-01

    In the past hearing aid fitting frequently turned out to be a problem in patients with noise-induced hearing loss. Selective amplification in the high frequency range and at the same time natural sound and appropriate wearing comfort (open fitting) could not be achieved in numerous cases. Today these problems can be tackled by modern hearing aid technology providing us with efficient feedback suppression algorithms making open fittings possible for many more patients. This development is particularly beneficial for patients with noise-induced hearing loss. Unfortunately, open fitting is in opposition to wearing hearing aids at noisy workplaces. Tight fittings, however, can be used at work if a special listening program for noisy conditions is available. This dilemma is discussed and possible solutions are pointed out.

  7. Discovering the Unexpected with the Utilization of NGS in Diagnostics of Non-syndromic Hearing Loss Disorders: The Family Case ofILDR1-Dependent Hearing Loss Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, Jernej; Klančar, Gašper; Trebušak Podkrajšek, Katarina; Battelino, Saba

    2017-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a heterogeneous family of hearing disabilities with congenital (including genetic) as well as acquired etiology. Congenital SNHL of genetic etiology is further sub-divided into autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked SNHL. More than 60 genes are involved in the etiology of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) commonly manifesting as heterogeneous pre-lingual profound to severe non-progressive clinical phenotype. ILDR1 -dependent ARNSHL (DFNB42, OMIM: # 609646) is a very rare sub-type of hearing disability, with unknown prevalence, caused by function-damaging genetic variants in ILDR1 gene reported in families of Middle-Eastern origin. ILDR1 (Immunoglobulin-Like Domain-containing Receptor 1) is involved in the development of semicircular canal, tricellular tight junction and auditory hair cells. An apparently non-consanguineous family of European ancestry with two affected siblings with profound progressive hearing loss characterized in their infancy and successfully treated with cochlear implants (CI) is presented. Genetic analysis of common ARNSHL genetic causes in the population of origin was negative, thus the next-generation sequencing (NGS) and family segregation analysis to identify underlying causative genetic variant was performed. Unexpectedly and atypical for the population of origin a homozygous non-sense variant ILDR1 c.942C > A (p.Cys314Ter) inherited from both heterozygous parents was identified in both patients. Contrary to the commonly reported phenotype, indices of a progressive hearing loss and potential compensatory mechanism of vestibular function were revealed with the analysis of clinical data. The utilization of NGS was demonstrated as an invaluable tool for the detection of atypical rare variants in diagnostics of unidentified hearing loss disorders.

  8. Discovering the Unexpected with the Utilization of NGS in Diagnostics of Non-syndromic Hearing Loss Disorders: The Family Case of ILDR1-Dependent Hearing Loss Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Kovač

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is a heterogeneous family of hearing disabilities with congenital (including genetic as well as acquired etiology. Congenital SNHL of genetic etiology is further sub-divided into autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked SNHL. More than 60 genes are involved in the etiology of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL commonly manifesting as heterogeneous pre-lingual profound to severe non-progressive clinical phenotype. ILDR1-dependent ARNSHL (DFNB42, OMIM: # 609646 is a very rare sub-type of hearing disability, with unknown prevalence, caused by function-damaging genetic variants in ILDR1 gene reported in families of Middle-Eastern origin. ILDR1 (Immunoglobulin-Like Domain-containing Receptor 1 is involved in the development of semicircular canal, tricellular tight junction and auditory hair cells. An apparently non-consanguineous family of European ancestry with two affected siblings with profound progressive hearing loss characterized in their infancy and successfully treated with cochlear implants (CI is presented. Genetic analysis of common ARNSHL genetic causes in the population of origin was negative, thus the next-generation sequencing (NGS and family segregation analysis to identify underlying causative genetic variant was performed. Unexpectedly and atypical for the population of origin a homozygous non-sense variant ILDR1 c.942C > A (p.Cys314Ter inherited from both heterozygous parents was identified in both patients. Contrary to the commonly reported phenotype, indices of a progressive hearing loss and potential compensatory mechanism of vestibular function were revealed with the analysis of clinical data. The utilization of NGS was demonstrated as an invaluable tool for the detection of atypical rare variants in diagnostics of unidentified hearing loss disorders.

  9. Novel-word learning in children with normal hearing and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmachowicz, Patricia G; Pittman, Andrea L; Hoover, Brenda M; Lewis, Dawna E

    2004-02-01

    The goal of this study was to assess performance on a novel-word learning task by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired children for words varying in form (noun versus verb), stimulus level (50 versus 60 dB SPL), and number of repetitions (4 versus 6). It was hypothesized that novel-word learning would be significantly poorer in the subjects with hearing loss, would increase with both level and repetition, and would be better for nouns than verbs. Twenty normal-hearing and 11 hearing-impaired children (6 to 9 yr old) participated in this study. Each child viewed a 4-minute animated slide show containing 8 novel words. The effects of hearing status, word form, repetition, and stimulus level were examined systematically. The influence of audibility, word recognition, chronological age, and lexical development also were evaluated. After hearing the story twice, children were asked to identify each word from a set of four pictures. Overall performance was 60% for the normal-hearing children and 41% for the children with hearing loss. Significant predictors of performance were PPVT raw scores, hearing status, stimulus level, and repetitions. The variables age, audibility, word recognition scores, and word form were not significant predictors. Results suggest that a child's ability to learn new words can be predicted from vocabulary size, stimulus level, number of exposures, and hearing status. Further, the sensitivity to presentation level observed in this novel-word learning task suggests that this type of paradigm may be an effective tool for studying various forms of hearing aid signal processing algorithms.

  10. Occupational Hearing Loss from Non-Gaussian Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Alice H

    2017-08-01

    Noise levels are truly continuous in relatively few occupations, with some degree of intermittency the most common condition. The sound levels of intermittent noise are often referred to as non-Gaussian in that they are not normally distributed in the time domain. In some conditions, intermittent noise affects the ear differently from continuous noise, and it is this assumption that underlies the selection of the 5-dB exchange rate (ER). The scientific and professional communities have debated this assumption over recent decades. This monograph explores the effect of non-Gaussian noise on the auditory system. It begins by summarizing an earlier report by the same author concentrating on the subject of the ER. The conclusions of the earlier report supported the more conservative 3-dB ER with possible adjustments to the permissible exposure limit for certain working conditions. The current document has expanded on the earlier report in light of the relevant research accomplished in the intervening decades. Although some of the animal research has supported the mitigating effect of intermittency, a closer look at many of these studies reveals certain weaknesses, along with the fact that these noise exposures were not usually representative of the conditions under which people actually work. The more recent animal research on complex noise shows that intermittencies do not protect the cochlea and that many of the previous assumptions about the ameliorative effect of intermittencies are no longer valid, lending further support to the 3-dB ER. The neurologic effects of noise on hearing have gained increasing attention in recent years because of improvements in microscopy and immunostaining techniques. Animal experiments showing damage to auditory synapses from noise exposures previously considered harmless may signify the need for a more conservative approach to the assessment of noise-induced hearing loss and consequently the practice of hearing conservation programs.

  11. Relationship between conductive hearing loss and maxillary constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyvandi, A A; Jamilian, A; Moradi, E

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the relationship between conductive hearing loss and maxillary constriction. A total of 120 people, aged from 7 to 40 years, who were referred to an audiologist when taking out health insurance or for school pre-registration check-up, were selected for this study. A total of 60 participants who had hearing threshold levels greater than 15 dB in both ears were chosen as the conductive hearing loss group. The remaining 60, with normal hearing thresholds of less than 15 dB, were used as the control group. All participants were referred to an orthodontic clinic. Participants who had a posterior crossbite and high palatal vault were considered to suffer from maxillary constriction. There were no significant differences between the sex ratios and mean ages of the groups. However, participants with conductive hearing loss were 3.5 times more likely than controls to suffer from maxillary constriction. Patients who suffer from conductive hearing loss are likely to show a maxillary abnormality when examined by an orthodontist.

  12. Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: vascular or viral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linthicum, Fred H; Doherty, Joni; Berliner, Karen I

    2013-12-01

    To demonstrate that sudden sensorineural hearing loss is possibly of viral origin rather than vascular. The histopathologic morphology in 7 temporal bones with known vascular impairment due to surgical interventions was compared with that of 11 bones with a history of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). Attention was paid to the spiral ligament, stria vascularis, organ of Corti hair cells, tectorial membrane, ganglion cell population, and degree of perilymph fibrosis and the auditory nerve. A temporal bone laboratory that has been in operation for more than 50 years and includes a database consisting of clinical and histopathological information that facilitates quantitative and qualitative analysis. Eight hundred forty-nine individuals who pledged their temporal bones for scientific study, of which 18 were selected for this study by means of the database criteria of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and postmiddle fossa and retro sigmoid sinus tumor removal or vestibular nerve section. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss bones exhibited no perilymph fibrosis compared with 6 of 7 vascular cases with fibrosis (P ≤ .001), exhibited less loss of ganglion cells (P ≤ .026), exhibited greater survival of spiral ligament (P ≤ .029), and averaged twice the survival of hair cells and more widespread tectorial membrane abnormalities. Analysis of human temporal bones from patients with a sudden sensorineural hearing loss does not support a vascular insufficiency but is more suggestive of a viral etiology.

  13. No Association Between Time of Onset of Hearing Loss (Childhood Versus Adulthood) and Self-Reported Hearing Handicap in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarhus, Lisa; Tambs, Kristian; Engdahl, Bo

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the association between time of onset of hearing loss (childhood vs. adulthood) and self-reported hearing handicap in adults. This is a population-based cohort study of 2,024 adults (mean = 48 years) with hearing loss (binaural pure-tone average 0.5-4 kHz ≥ 20 dB HL) who completed a hearing handicap questionnaire. In childhood, the same persons (N = 2,024) underwent audiometry in a school investigation (at ages 7, 10, and 13 years), in which 129 were diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss (binaural pure-tone average 0.5-4 kHz ≥ 20 dB HL), whereas 1,895 had normal hearing thresholds. Hearing handicap was measured in adulthood as the sum-score of various speech perception and social impairment items (15 items). The sum-score increased with adult hearing threshold level (p handicap sum-score between the group with childhood-onset hearing loss (n = 129) and the group with adult-onset hearing loss (n = 1,895; p = .882). Self-reported hearing handicap in adults increased with hearing threshold level. After adjustment for adult hearing threshold level, this cohort study revealed no significant association between time of onset of hearing loss (childhood vs. adulthood) and self-reported hearing handicap.

  14. Congenital hearing loss. Is CT enough?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mahmoud Agha

    2014-01-24

    Jan 24, 2014 ... a Medical Research Institute, Alexandria University, Egypt b Almana General Hospital, ... Hearing is a complex physiological process, which is mediated through .... Coronal reformat HRCT temporal bone of patient with combined left external and middle ear anomalies with low Jahrsdoerfer score: (A) Atretic ...

  15. Auditory and language outcomes in children with unilateral hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M; Gaboury, Isabelle; Durieux-Smith, Andrée; Coyle, Doug; Whittingham, JoAnne; Nassrallah, Flora

    2018-03-13

    Children with unilateral hearing loss (UHL) are being diagnosed at younger ages because of newborn hearing screening. Historically, they have been considered at risk for difficulties in listening and language development. Little information is available on contemporary cohorts of children identified in the early months of life. We examined auditory and language acquisition outcomes in a contemporary cohort of early-identified children with UHL and compared their outcomes at preschool age with peers with mild bilateral loss and with normal hearing. As part of the Mild and Unilateral Hearing Loss in Children Study, we collected auditory and spoken language outcomes on children with unilateral, bilateral hearing loss and with normal hearing over a four-year period. This report provides a cross-sectional analysis of results at age 48 months. A total of 120 children (38 unilateral and 31 bilateral mild, 51 normal hearing) were enrolled in the study from 2010 to 2015. Children started the study at varying ages between 12 and 36 months of age and were followed until age 36-48 months. The median age of identification of hearing loss was 3.4 months (IQR: 2.0, 5.5) for unilateral and 3.6 months (IQR: 2.7, 5.9) for the mild bilateral group. Families completed an intake form at enrolment to provide baseline child and family-related characteristics. Data on amplification fitting and use were collected via parent questionnaires at each annual assessment interval. This study involved a range of auditory development and language measures. For this report, we focus on the end of follow-up results from two auditory development questionnaires and three standardized speech-language assessments. Assessments included in this report were completed at a median age of 47.8 months (IQR: 38.8, 48.5). Using ANOVA, we examined auditory and language outcomes in children with UHL and compared their scores to children with mild bilateral hearing loss and those with normal hearing. On most

  16. Automated screening for high-frequency hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaming, Marcel S M G; MacKinnon, Robert C; Jansen, Marije; Moore, David R

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss at high frequencies produces perceptual difficulties and is often an early sign of a more general hearing loss. This study reports the development and validation of two new speech-based hearing screening tests in English that focus on detecting hearing loss at frequencies above 2000 Hz. The Internet-delivered, speech-in noise tests used closed target-word sets of digit triplets or consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words presented against a speech-shaped noise masker. The digit triplet test uses the digits 0 to 9 (excluding the disyllabic 7), grouped in quasi-random triplets. The CVC test uses simple words (e.g., "cat") selected for the high-frequency spectral content of the consonants. During testing, triplets or CVC words were identified in an adaptive procedure to obtain the speech reception threshold (SRT) in noise. For these new, high-frequency (HF) tests, the noise was low-pass filtered to produce greater masking of the low-frequency speech components, increasing the sensitivity of the test for HF hearing loss. Individual test tokens (digits, CVCs) were first homogenized using a group of 10 normal-hearing (NH) listeners by equalizing intelligibility across tokens at several speech-in-noise levels. Both tests were then validated and standardized using groups of 24 NH listeners and 50 listeners with hearing impairment. Performance on the new high frequency digit triplet (HF-triplet) and CVC (HF-CVC) tests was compared with audiometric hearing loss, and with that on the unfiltered, broadband digit triplet test (BB-triplet) test, and the ASL (Adaptive Sentence Lists) speech-in-noise test. The HF-triplet and HF-CVC test results (SRT) both correlated positively and highly with high-frequency audiometric hearing loss and with the ASL test. SRT for both tests as a function of high-frequency hearing loss increased at nearly three times the rate as that of the BB-triplet test. The intraindividual variability (SD) on the tests was about 2.1 (HF-triplet) and 1

  17. Prevention of the Evolution of Workers' Hearing Loss from Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Noisy Environments through a Hearing Conservation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Vinicius Ribas; Marques, Jair; Panegalli, Flavio; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Souza, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a serious problem for workers and therefore for businesses. The hearing conservation program (HCP) is a set of coordinated measures to prevent the development or evolution of occupational hearing loss, which involves a continuous and dynamic process of implementation of hearing conservation routines through anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and subsequent control of the occurrence of existing environmental risks or of those that may exist in the workplace and lead to workers' hearing damage. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the HCP in preventing further hearing loss in workers with audiograms suggestive of NIHL. The audiometric tests and medical records of 28 furniture company workers exposed to noise were reviewed and monitored for 2 years. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined five audiometric tests in the medical records (on admission and every semester) of 28 workers in a furniture company (totaling 140 audiometric exams) following the introduction of the HCP. Results Data analysis showed no differences between the audiometric tests conducted on admission and those performed every semester. Conclusions The HCP implemented was effective in preventing the worsening of hearing loss in workers already with NIHL when exposed to occupational noise. Therefore, such a measure could be useful for the employment of workers with hearing loss in job sectors that have noise exposure.

  18. Temporal bone imaging in osteogenesis imperfecta patients with hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinnen, F.K.R.; Casselman, J.W.; Leenheer, E.M. De; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Dhooge, I.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an autosomal-dominant connective-tissue disorder, predominantly characterized by bone fragility. Conductive hearing loss develops in half of the OI patients and often progresses to mixed loss. Findings of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic

  19. Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Selective Immunglobulin A Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eşki, Erkan; Usta, Belgin Emine; Asilsoy, Suna; Yılmaz, İsmail

    2017-03-01

    To assess hearing functions in pediatric patients with selective immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency (SIGAD). Pure-tone audiometry, acoustic impedance, otoacoustic emission, and brainstem audiometric measurements were taken during a non-infectious period in 28 patients with SIGAD and 28 healthy children with normal otoscopic examination. The results of the hearing tests were compared between the two groups. Two male patients and one female patient in the SIGAD group were found to have sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). However, a comparison of the average pure tone cut-off values at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz did not reveal any statistically significant difference between the groups (p>0.05). Pediatric patients with SIGAD may exhibit SNHL at certain frequencies and require follow-up for the potential development of hearing loss.

  20. Clinical Study on 136 Children with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Jiao; Wang, Da-Yong; Wang, Hong-Yang; Wang, Li; Yang, Feng-Bo; Lan, Lan; Guan, Jing; Yin, Zi-Fang; Rosenhall, Ulf; Yu, Lan; Hellstrom, Sten; Xue, Xi-Jun; Duan, Mao-Li; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2016-04-20

    The prevalence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in children (CSSNHL) is consistently increasing. However, the pathology and prognosis of CSSNHL are still poorly understood. This retrospective study evaluated clinical characteristics and possible associated factors of CSSNHL. One hundred and thirty-six CSSNHL patients treated in Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Institute of Otolaryngology at Chinese PLA General Hospital between July 2008 and August 2015 were included in this study. These patients were analyzed for clinical characteristics, audiological characteristics, laboratory examinations, and prognostic factors. Among the 136 patients (151 ears), 121 patients (121 ears, 80.1%) were diagnosed with unilaterally CSSNHL, and 15 patients (30 ears, 19.9%) with bilateral CSSNHL. The complete recovery rate of CSSNHL was 9.3%, and the overall recovery rate was 37.7%. We found that initial degree of hearing loss, onset of treatment, tinnitus, the ascending type audiogram, gender, side of hearing loss, the recorded auditory brainstem response (ABR), and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) had prognostic significance. Age, ear fullness, and vertigo had no significant correlation with recovery. Furthermore, the relevant blood tests showed 30.8% of the children had abnormal white blood cell (WBC) counts, 22.1% had elevated homocysteine levels, 65.8% had high alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 33.8% had high IgE antibody levels, and 86.1% had positive cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG antibodies. CSSNHL commonly occurs unilaterally and results in severe hearing loss. Initial severe hearing loss and bilateral hearing loss are negative prognostic factors for hearing recovery, while positive prognostic factors include tinnitus, gender, the ascending type audiogram, early treatment, identifiable ABR waves, and DPOAEs. Age, vertigo, and ear fullness are not correlated with the recovery. Some serologic indicators, including the level of WBC, platelet

  1. Clinical Study on 136 Children with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Jiao; Wang, Da-Yong; Wang, Hong-Yang; Wang, Li; Yang, Feng-Bo; Lan, Lan; Guan, Jing; Yin, Zi-Fang; Rosenhall, Ulf; Yu, Lan; Hellstrom, Sten; Xue, Xi-Jun; Duan, Mao-Li; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in children (CSSNHL) is consistently increasing. However, the pathology and prognosis of CSSNHL are still poorly understood. This retrospective study evaluated clinical characteristics and possible associated factors of CSSNHL. Methods: One hundred and thirty-six CSSNHL patients treated in Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Institute of Otolaryngology at Chinese PLA General Hospital between July 2008 and August 2015 were included in this study. These patients were analyzed for clinical characteristics, audiological characteristics, laboratory examinations, and prognostic factors. Results: Among the 136 patients (151 ears), 121 patients (121 ears, 80.1%) were diagnosed with unilaterally CSSNHL, and 15 patients (30 ears, 19.9%) with bilateral CSSNHL. The complete recovery rate of CSSNHL was 9.3%, and the overall recovery rate was 37.7%. We found that initial degree of hearing loss, onset of treatment, tinnitus, the ascending type audiogram, gender, side of hearing loss, the recorded auditory brainstem response (ABR), and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) had prognostic significance. Age, ear fullness, and vertigo had no significant correlation with recovery. Furthermore, the relevant blood tests showed 30.8% of the children had abnormal white blood cell (WBC) counts, 22.1% had elevated homocysteine levels, 65.8% had high alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 33.8% had high IgE antibody levels, and 86.1% had positive cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG antibodies. Conclusions: CSSNHL commonly occurs unilaterally and results in severe hearing loss. Initial severe hearing loss and bilateral hearing loss are negative prognostic factors for hearing recovery, while positive prognostic factors include tinnitus, gender, the ascending type audiogram, early treatment, identifiable ABR waves, and DPOAEs. Age, vertigo, and ear fullness are not correlated with the recovery. Some serologic indicators

  2. STUDY OF HEARING OUTCOMES IN SUDDEN SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS TREATED WITH TISSUE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR (TPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Krishna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSHNL is a clinical condition that requires immediate management. There are many treatment options, which may not always revert the hearing to normal. Not only recording the degree of hearing loss, but also establishing the concurrent dysfunction of saccule by VEMP has facilitated a new approach to treatment strategy. Recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator ((rtPA proved its efficacy in stroke and subsequently considered an option in the management of ISSNHL. The curren t study, conducted at different centres, on 15 patients utilized rtPA. The results showed a promising trend when saccular pathology is also evident by VEMP in association with Hearing loss. We recommend use of rtPA as primary modality in cases of ISSNHL wi th Saccular involvement.

  3. Hearing loss in the Treacher-Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marres, Henri A M

    2002-01-01

    About 50% of patients with the TCS have conductive hearing loss, caused by characteristic major and/or minor ear anomalies. It is also common for these patients to have microtia or severe malformation of the pinna. The results of [figure: see text] reconstructive surgery to improve hearing are usually moderate to poor, because of combinations of anomalies. In general, it is recommended to start hearing rehabilitation at the earliest possible stage. Owing to the above-described anomalies, rehabilitation usually involves fitting a BAHA, whether or not in combination with a pinna epithesis.

  4. Quantification of hearing loss in patients with posterior semicircular canal dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Zachary W; McEvoy, Timothy P; Mikulec, Anthony A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with posterior semicircular canal dehiscence (PSCD) have low frequency conductive hearing loss similar to patients with superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SSCD) secondary to a pathologic third window. PSCD can result in conductive hearing loss, but the magnitude of this hearing loss remains to be quantified. Patients with SSCD have been shown to have low frequency conductive hearing loss. The underlying pathophysiology of hearing loss from PSCD and SSCD is similar and related to a pathologic third window. A PubMed search was completed for a meta-analysis of patients with PSCD. Articles with quality audiograms were obtained. Air conduction thresholds for ears with posterior semicircular canal dehiscence were compared to the opposite ear as well as normal control data. Eight articles with 21 patients with PSCD and quality audiograms were included. Two patients had bilateral PSCD and one of those was excluded because hearing thresholds were at the limit of the audiometer. Patients with posterior semicircular canal dehiscence have statistically significant lower air conduction thresholds in frequencies at and below 2000 Hz.

  5. The application of genome editing in studying hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bing; Mittal, Rahul; Grati, M'hamed; Lu, Zhongmin; Shu, Yilai; Tao, Yong; Feng, Youg; Xie, Dinghua; Kong, Weijia; Yang, Shiming; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Liu, Xuezhong

    2015-09-01

    Targeted genome editing mediated by clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) technology has emerged as one of the most powerful tools to study gene functions, and with potential to treat genetic disorders. Hearing loss is one of the most common sensory disorders, affecting approximately 1 in 500 newborns with no treatment. Mutations of inner ear genes contribute to the largest portion of genetic deafness. The simplicity and robustness of CRISPR/Cas9-directed genome editing in human cells and model organisms such as zebrafish, mice and primates make it a promising technology in hearing research. With CRISPR/Cas9 technology, functions of inner ear genes can be studied efficiently by the disruption of normal gene alleles through non-homologous-end-joining (NHEJ) mechanism. For genetic hearing loss, CRISPR/Cas9 has potential to repair gene mutations by homology-directed-repair (HDR) or to disrupt dominant mutations by NHEJ, which could restore hearing. Our recent work has shown CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing can be efficiently performed in the mammalian inner ear in vivo. Thus, application of CRISPR/Cas9 in hearing research will open up new avenues for understanding the pathology of genetic hearing loss and provide new routes in the development of treatment to restore hearing. In this review, we describe major methodologies currently used for genome editing. We will highlight applications of these technologies in studies of genetic disorders and discuss issues pertaining to applications of CRISPR/Cas9 in auditory systems implicated in genetic hearing loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A FAMILY WITH HEARING LOSS ACCOMANIED WITH HETEROCHROMIA IRIDIS

    OpenAIRE

    源河, 朝博; 楠見, 彰; 喜友名, 千佳子; 野田, 寛; Genka, Tomohiro; Kusumi, Akira; Kiyuna, Chikako; Noda, Yutaka; 琉球大学保健学部附属病院耳鼻咽喉科

    1980-01-01

    The case with hearing loss accompanied with heterochromia iridis have been rarely reported. It had been discussed that the hard of hearing was caused by the pigmentary defect in cochlea such as heterochromia iridis caused by the pigmentary defect in iris, but such presumptions are now denied with the autopsy findings by Fisch. However, the authors believe still now that there is alikely connection between the eye and ear affections. The patient was a seven years old girl with a completely dea...

  7. Neural Alterations in Acquired Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudar, Raksha A.; Husain, Fatima T.

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions in older adults. Growing evidence suggests that hearing loss is associated with reduced cognitive functioning and incident dementia. In this mini-review, we briefly examine literature on anatomical and functional alterations in the brains of adults with acquired age-associated hearing loss, which may underlie the cognitive consequences observed in this population, focusing on studies that have used structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and event-related electroencephalography. We discuss structural and functional alterations observed in the temporal and frontal cortices and the limbic system. These neural alterations are discussed in the context of common cause, information-degradation, and sensory-deprivation hypotheses, and we suggest possible rehabilitation strategies. Although, we are beginning to learn more about changes in neural architecture and functionality related to age-associated hearing loss, much work remains to be done. Understanding the neural alterations will provide objective markers for early identification of neural consequences of age-associated hearing loss and for evaluating benefits of intervention approaches. PMID:27313556

  8. Neural Alterations in Acquired Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raksha Anand Mudar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions in older adults. Growing evidence suggests that hearing loss is associated with reduced cognitive functioning and incident dementia. In this mini-review, we briefly examine literature on anatomical and functional alterations in the brains of adults with acquired age-associated hearing loss, which may underlie the cognitive consequences observed in this population, focusing on studies that have used structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and event-related electroencephalography. We discuss structural and functional alterations observed in the temporal and frontal cortices and the limbic system. These neural alterations are discussed in the context of common cause, information-degradation, and sensory-deprivation hypotheses, and we suggest possible rehabilitation strategies. Although we are beginning to learn more about changes in neural architecture and functionality related to age-associated hearing loss, much work remains to be done. Understanding the neural alterations will provide objective markers for early identification of neural consequences of age-associated hearing loss and for evaluating benefits of intervention approaches.

  9. Gait performance of children and adolescents with sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Renato de Souza

    2017-09-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that children with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) may exhibit balance disorders, which can compromise the gait performance of this population. Compare the gait performance of normal hearing (NH) children and those with SNHL, considering the sex and age range of the sample, and analyze gait performance according to degrees of hearing loss and etiological factors in the latter group. This is a cross-sectional study that assessed 96 students, 48 NH and 48 with SNHL, aged between 7 and 18 years. The Brazilian version of the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) was used to analyze gait and the Mann-Whitney test for statistical analysis. The group with SNHL obtained lower average gait performance compared to NH subjects (p=0.000). This was also observed when the children were grouped by sex female and male (p=0.000). The same difference occurred when the children were stratified by age group: 7-18 years (p=0.000). The group with severe and profound hearing loss exhibited worse gait performance than those with mild and moderate loss (p=0.048) and children with prematurity as an etiological factor demonstrated the worst gait performance. The children with SNHL showed worse gait performance compared to NH of the same sex and age group. Those with severe and profound hearing loss and prematurity as an etiological factor demonstrated the worst gait performances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sudden onset unilateral sensorineural hearing loss after rabies vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhovat, Saleh; Fox, Richard; Magill, Jennifer; Narula, Antony

    2015-12-15

    A 33-year-old man developed profound sudden onset right-sided hearing loss with tinnitus and vertigo, within 24 h of pretravel rabies vaccination. There was no history of upper respiratory tract infection, systemic illness, ototoxic medication or trauma, and normal otoscopic examination. Pure tone audiograms (PTA) demonstrated right-sided sensorineural hearing loss (thresholds 90-100 dB) and normal left-sided hearing. MRI internal acoustic meatus, viral serology (hepatitis B, C, HIV and cytomegalovirus) and syphilis screen were normal. Positive Epstein-Barr virus IgG, viral capsid IgG and anticochlear antibodies (anti-HSP-70) were noted. Initial treatment involved a course of high-dose oral prednisolone and acyclovir. Repeat PTAs after 12 days of treatment showed a small improvement in hearing thresholds. Salvage intratympanic steroid injections were attempted but failed to improve hearing further. Sudden onset sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is an uncommon but frightening experience for patients. This is the first report of SSNHL following rabies immunisation in an adult. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. [Current aspects of harmonization of classification of occupational hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, V B; Sinëva, E L; Tavartkiladze, G A; Fedina, I N; Preobrazhenskaia, E A; Mukhamedova, G R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop unified criteria for the evaluation of the severity of noise-induced hearing loss. Current approaches to taking expert decisions based on the results of medical examination of the patients with impaired hearing are substantially different due to the considerable difference between the criteria for the estimation of hearing envisaged by the international classification, occupational pathology classification, and the national system of medico-social expertise. We undertook an attempt to correct and harmonize the existing criteria for the estimation of severity of occupational hearing loss based on the integration of all the three classification in order to "reduce them to a common denominator" and thereby to ensure the basis for the unified diagnostic and expert decisions for the cases of hearing impairment of any etiology. The project proposed in this paper makes it possible to use unified criteria for the assessment of the degree of hearing loss caused by occupational noises for diagnostic purposes and expertise compatible with the internationally accepted approaches.

  12. Hearing Loss in otitis media with effusion- Types and management- A study of hundred cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction- Serous Ottis media or otitis media with effusion is a common cause of hearing loss of acute onset. The common presentation will be a block or reduced hearing possible after a travel or flight. Most of the cases present with conductive hearing loss while some may present with mixed or even pure sensory hearing loss. Background- we study hundred patients diagnosed with serous otitis media for the type of hearing loss and characterize the management strategy. Conclusion- Serous otitis media is a common cause of hearing loss which is mostly conductive and is amenable to treatment while some rare cases which may persist may require assistive hearing with amplification. Although sensorineral hearing loss is rare in otitis media, it is seen in practice along with mixed hearing loss. The pathophysiology of the neural affection of hearing loss remains a mystery although many theories exist.

  13. Dose passive smoking induce sensorineural hearing loss in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Hossam Sanyelbhaa; Metwaly, Mohamed Akram; Khafagy, Ahmed Hafez; Abdelraouf, Hatem Ragaa

    2014-01-01

    Smoking plays major role in development of vascular and respiratory serious diseases. It has been reported that negative smoker children are prone for conductive hearing impairment due to repeated attacks of Eustachian tube dysfunction and middle ear effusion. This study aims to identify negative smoking as potential risk factor for development of sensorineural hearing loss. This study was done between January 2010 and November 2012. 411 children aged 5-11 years (8.2 ± 1.5) participated in this study; they were children attending the Ear, Nose, and Throat clinic of a tertiary care hospital and their siblings. The inclusion criteria were: (i) normal speech and language, (ii) absence of any disease or condition that may cause sensorineural hearing loss, and (iii) normal middle ear function on the day of hearing assessment. They were divided into three groups according to the exposure to second-hand smoke at home; group of "no exposure" whereas no smoker in the family (131 children), group of 'mild exposure" whereas the father was the only smoking parent and smoking was prohibited at home (155 children), and group of "heavy exposure", whereas the mother was smoking, or the father was freely smoking at home and in the presence of his children (125 children). Audiological evaluation in the form of pure tone and speech audiometry and immitancemetry was done for the study group. Audiological evaluation revealed that the prevalence of hearing loss was 3.8%, 4.5% and 12% in the "no exposure", "mild exposure", and "heavy exposure" groups, respectively. Significant difference was only detected between the high exposure group and the other two groups. All children had minimal sensorineural hearing loss, i.e. threshold of frequencies showing hearing loss was 20 or 25 dB HL. The risk ratios (95% confidence interval) for hearing loss in the study subgroups were 1.18 (0.38, 3.64) for mild exposure group (p>0.05), 3.14 (1.18, 8.3) for heavy exposure group (phearing loss, and it is

  14. [Analyses of the clinical characteristics of unilateral conductive hearing loss with intact tympanic membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chaoying; Zhang, Jishuai; Han, Weiju; Shen, Weidong; Liu, Jun; Hou, Zhaohui; Dai, Pu; Yang, Shiming; Han, Dongyi

    2016-05-01

    To analyze the clinical characteristics of unilateral conductive hearing loss with intact tympanic membrane, and summarize the key diagnostic points, differential diagnosis and observe the effects of surgical treatment. We reviewed data from 82 patients with unilateral conductive hearing loss with intact tympanic membranes who accepted the exploratory tympanotomy from April 2011 to September 2013. There were 41 males and 41 females, aged from 7 to 66( averaged 26.5±13.7)years, with a history of one month to 50 years. The history, clinical symptoms, audiological evaluation, high resolution temporal bone CT, the results of surgical exploration and hearing reconstruction were analyzed. The exploratory tympanotomy revealed 43 cases of congenital middle ear malformations (52.4%), 22 cases of otosclerosis (26.8%), eight cases of congenital cholesteatoma (9.8%), six cases of trauma induced conductive hearing loss (7.3%), three cases of congenital ossicular malformations with congenital cholesteatoma (3.7%). Progressive hearing loss was common in patients with otosclerosis and congenital cholesteatoma, and patients with congenital middle ear malformations described their hearing loss since childhood. High resolution temporal bone CT of congenital middle ear malformation, trauma induced conductive hearing loss, congenital cholesteatoma diagnosis rate was 40.0%, 50.0%, and 83.3% respectively. The preoperative air-conductive threshold of patients with absence of the oval window were increased to (66.9±1.1)dBHL, the preoperative bone-conductive threshold achieved (28.3±10.4)dBHL at 2 000 Hz. While patients with stapes fixation and that with ossicular chain discontinuity were (27.2±9.7)dBHL and (17.8±8.8)dBHL(P=0.000)respectively. Through the tympanic exploration with endaural incision under the microscope, different hearing reconstruction were applied according to different lesions. After the operation, the hearing level of 52 patients with return visit were improved, the

  15. [Subclinical sensorineural hearing loss in female patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño-González, José Luis; Villegas-González, Mario Jesús; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo Enrique; Montero-Cantu, Carlos Alberto; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernán; Garza-Elizondo, Mario Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The rheumatoid arthritis is a clinical entity capable to cause hearing impairment that can be diagnosed promptly with high frequencies audiometry. To detect subclinical sensorineural hearing loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Cross-sectional study on patients with rheumatoid arthritis performing high frequency audiometry 125Hz to 16,000Hz and tympanometry. The results were correlated with markers of disease activity and response to therapy. High frequency audiometry was performed in 117 female patients aged from 19 to 65 years. Sensorineural hearing loss was observed at a sensitivity of pure tones from 125 to 8,000 Hz in 43.59%, a tone threshold of 10,000 to 16,000Hz in 94.02% patients in the right ear and in 95.73% in the left ear. Hearing was normal in 8 (6.84%) patients. Hearing loss was observed in 109 (93.16%), and was asymmetric in 36 (30.77%), symmetric in 73 (62.37%), bilateral in 107 (91.45%), unilateral in 2 (1.71%), and no conduction and/or mixed hearing loss was encountered. Eight (6.83%) patients presented vertigo, 24 (20.51%) tinnitus. Tympanogram type A presented in 88.90% in the right ear and 91.46% in the left ear, with 5.98 to 10.25% type As. Stapedius reflex was present in 75.3 to 85.2%. Speech discrimination in the left ear was significantly different (p = 0.02)in the group older than 50 years. No association was found regarding markers of disease activity, but there was an association with the onset of rheumatoid arthritis disease. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had a high prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss for high and very high frequencies. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Wideband aural acoustic absorbance predicts conductive hearing loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H; Sanford, Chris A; Ellison, John C; Fitzpatrick, Denis F; Gorga, Michael P

    2012-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that wideband aural absorbance predicts conductive hearing loss (CHL) in children medically classified as having otitis media with effusion. Absorbance was measured in the ear canal over frequencies from 0.25 to 8 kHz at ambient pressure or as a swept tympanogram. CHL was defined using criterion air-bone gaps of 20, 25, and 30 dB at octaves from 0.25 to 4 kHz. A likelihood-ratio predictor of CHL was constructed across frequency for ambient absorbance, and across frequency and pressure for absorbance tympanometry. Performance was evaluated at individual frequencies and for any frequency at which a CHL was present. Absorbance and conventional 0.226-kHz tympanograms were measured in children of age three to eight years with CHL and with normal hearing. Absorbance was smaller at frequencies above 0.7 kHz in the CHL group than the control group. Based on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, wideband absorbance in ambient and tympanometric tests were significantly better predictors of CHL than tympanometric width, the best 0.226-kHz predictor. Accuracies of ambient and tympanometric wideband absorbance did not differ. Absorbance accurately predicted CHL in children and was more accurate than conventional 0.226-kHz tympanometry.

  17. The R109H variant of fascin-2, a developmentally regulated actin crosslinker in hair-cell stereocilia, underlies early-onset hearing loss of DBA/2J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Bum; Longo-Guess, Chantal M.; Gagnon, Leona H.; Saylor, Katherine W.; Dumont, Rachel A.; Spinelli, Kateri J.; Pagana, James M.; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; David, Larry L.; Gillespie, Peter G.; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    The quantitative trait locus ahl8 is a key contributor to the early-onset, age-related hearing loss of DBA/2J mice. A non-synonymous nucleotide substitution in the mouse fascin-2 gene (Fscn2) is responsible for this phenotype, confirmed by wild-type BAC transgene rescue of hearing loss in DBA/2J mice. In chickens and mice, FSCN2 protein is abundant in hair-cell stereocilia, the actin-rich structures comprising the mechanically sensitive hair bundle, and is concentrated towards stereocilia tips of the bundle's longest stereocilia. FSCN2 expression increases when these stereocilia differentially elongate, suggesting that FSCN2 controls filament growth, stiffens exposed stereocilia, or both. Because ahl8 accelerates hearing loss only in the presence of mutant cadherin 23, a component of hair-cell tip links, mechanotransduction and actin crosslinking must be functionally interrelated. PMID:20660251

  18. Resolution of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Following a Roller Coaster Ride

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Aman; Sinha, Amrita; Al-Waa, Ahmad M.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of sudden onset during an aeroplane flight, which completely resolved during a roller coaster ride at Alton Towers theme park. A review of the literature concerning sudden idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss and spontaneous resolution are discussed. Initially, pure-tone audiometry showed a profound sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear and mild sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear (of note, the hearing was normal p...

  19. Comparison between Bilateral and Unilateral Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Dan; Wang, Da-Yong; Lan, Lan; Zhao, Li-Dong; Yin, Zi-Fang; Yu, Lan; Chen, Guo-Hui; Guan, Jing; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2018-01-01

    Background: Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss (BSSHL) is rare and assumed to be a different clinical entity compared to unilateral SSHL (USSHL). This study examined the differences between the idiopathic BSSHL and USSHL. Methods: Forty-six sequential BSSHL patients (Se-BSSHL) and 68 simultaneous BSSHL (Si-BSSHL) were consecutively admitted between June 2008 and December 2015. Two sets of patients served as control groups: (1) USSHL patients with healthy contralateral ear and (2) USSHL patients with contralateral preexisting hearing loss (USSHLwCHL). We retrospectively analyzed differences among four cohorts using analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis test, Welch's t-test, and Chi-square test as appropriate before and after propensity score matching (PSM) based on age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). Results: The prevalence of idiopathic BSSHL was 8.6% (114/1329) among the total SSHL patients. In the total cohort, USSHL patients tended to be younger, female, and tended to have lower BMI, renal parameters, and total cholesterol in addition to higher high-density lipoprotein compared to the other three groups. Most routine blood indicators, some coagulation markers, and immunoglobulin M (H = 13.4, P = 0.004) were significantly different among the study groups. After PSM, the major significant differences were found in audiometric characteristics. Si-BSSHL and Se-BSSHL patients demonstrated similar hearing thresholds as USSHL but were significantly better than the USSHLwCHL patients across most frequencies before and after treatment (H = 30.0, P hearing and H = 12.0, P = 0.007 for final hearing). Moreover, the BSSHL patients showed different hearing loss distribution patterns (more descending type, χ2 = 33.8, P = 0.001) with less hearing gain (H = 17.5, P hearing outcome rather than being classified as a completely different disease entity compared to USSHL. PMID:29363646

  20. Newborn hearing screening and strategy for early detection of hearing loss in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubíková, Janka; Kabátová, Zuzana; Pavlovcinová, Gabriela; Profant, Milan

    2009-04-01

    More than 80% of permanent hearing losses (HL) in children are congenital. Newborn hearing screening (NHS) is the best method for early detection of suspected hearing loss. If the NHS is not universal more than 30% permanent hearing losses are not identified. There are various methods of NHS: otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE, DPOAE) and automatic auditory brainstem response (AABR). After hearing screening, and when hearing loss is suspected, tympanometry and audiological methods then used for determination of hearing threshold; these include ABR, ASSR or/and behavioral methods. The goal of this study is to evaluate the influence of UNHS on the early detection of hearing loss in children before and after the implementation of obligatory universal newborn hearing screening in Slovakia, and also on the etiologic evaluation of hearing impaired infants identified by screening. In Slovakia NHS started in 1998 and was provided in ENT departments. From May 1, 2006 UNHS has been mandatory in Slovakia, using two stages TEOAE in all newborn departments in Slovakia (64 newborn departments). In year 2005--42% of newborns in Slovakia were screened, in 2006--66% newborns and in 2007--94, 99% (three small newborn departments do not yet have equipment for OAE screening). For determination of hearing thresholds ASSR are used in two ENT departments and ABR in the other four ENT departments. Comparing the number of identified cases with bilateral severe permanent HL or deafness before and after UNHS, 22.8% more cases of PHL were identified in the first year of UNHS. Also the average age of diagnosis of PHL was lower. In the year 2007, 94% of newborns were screened. We found 0.947/1000 newborns with bilateral severe PHL (35.9%) more than before UNHS). After audiologic and etiologic assessment of the 76 infants who failed screening, 5 (6.58%) were found to have normal hearing, 16 (22.54%) had unilateral and 55 (77.46%) had bilateral SNHL. A non-syndromic genetic cause was present in 25

  1. Sensorineural Hearing Loss due to Air Bag Deployment

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    Masafumi Ohki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Deployment of the air bag in a passenger vehicle accident rarely causes otologic injuries. However, sensorineural hearing loss induced by air bag deployment is extremely rare, with only a few cases reported in the English literature. A 38-year-old man involved in a traffic accident while driving his car at 40 km/hour presented with right sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus, without associated vertigo. Pure-tone audiometry demonstrated elevated thresholds of 30 dB and 25 dB at 4 kHz and 8 kHz, respectively, on the right side. Air bag deployment in car accidents is associated with the risk of development of sensorineural hearing loss.

  2. Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss in Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Joanne Wai Ling; Ceranic, Borka; Harris, Robert; Timehin, Elwina

    2015-09-14

    This case highlights the diagnostic challenges in patients presenting with bilateral sudden sensorinueral hearing loss (SNHL). The aetiology of bilateral sudden SNHL may span several medical disciplines. Therefore, clinicians should be mindful of such presentations, and consider aetiologies beyond otological and neurological causes. We present a case of a previously healthy 51-year-old woman who presented with coryzal symptoms and sudden audiovestibular failure. Examination revealed fever, tachycardia, bilateral profound hearing loss and nystagmus. Following investigations, an initial working diagnosis of vasculitis was made. Later, blood cultures revealed methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and a transoesophageal echocardiogram confirmed endocarditis. The patient made a good recovery, but the hearing loss was permanent and managed with a cochlear implant. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Acute unilateral hearing loss as an unusual presentation of cholesteatoma

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    Bickerton Richard C

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesteatomas are epithelial cysts that contain desquamated keratin. Patients commonly present with progressive hearing loss and a chronically discharging ear. We report an unusual presentation of the disease with an acute hearing loss suffered immediately after prolonged use of a pneumatic drill. Case presentation A 41 year old man with no previous history of ear problems presented with a sudden loss of hearing in his right ear immediately following the prolonged use of a pneumatic drill on concrete. The cause was found to be a fractured long process of incus which had been eroded by the presence of an attic cholesteatoma. A tympanomastoidectomy and ossiculoplasty was performed with good result. Conclusion Cholesteatomas may be asymptomatic and insidious in their onset. This case illustrates the point that an indolent disease such as this may present in unusual ways and the clinician must always have a high index of suspicion combined with thorough assessment and examination of every patient.

  4. Professionals with hearing loss: maintaining that competitive edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spry, Jacqueline L; Mauzé, Elizabeth

    2009-08-01

    The goals of this investigation were to gauge how hearing loss affects the self-perceived job performance and psycho-emotional status of professionals in the workforce and to develop a profile of their aural rehabilitation needs. Forty-eight participants who had at least a high school education and who hold salaried positions participated in one of seven focus groups. Participants first answered questions about a hypothetical executive who had hearing loss and considered how she might react to various communication issues. They then addressed questions about their own work-related predicaments. The sessions were audiovideo recorded and later transcribed for analysis. Unlike workers who have occupational hearing loss, the professionals in this investigation seem not to experience an inordinate degree of stigmatization in their workplaces, although most believe that hearing loss has negatively affected their job performance. Some of the participants believe that they have lost their "competitive edge," and some believe that they have been denied promotions because of hearing loss. However, most report that they have overcome their hearing-related difficulties by various means, and many have developed a determination and stamina to remain active in the workforce. The majority of the participants seemed to be unfamiliar with the Americans with Disability Act, Public Law 101-336. The overriding theme to emerge is that professionals desire to maintain their competency to perform their jobs and will do what they have to do to "get the job done." The situations of professionals who have hearing loss can be modeled, with a central theme of maintaining job competency or a competitive edge. It is hypothesized that five factors affect professionals' abilities to continue their optimal work performance in the face of hearing loss: (a) self-concept and sense of internal locus of control, (b) use of hearing assistive technology, (c) supervisor's and co-workers' perceptions and

  5. Hearing Loss in Osteogenesis Imperfecta: Characteristics and Treatment Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillion, Joseph P.; Vernick, David; Shapiro, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is the most common heritable disorder of connective tissue. It is associated with fractures following relatively minor injury, blue sclerae, dentinogenesis imperfecta, increased joint mobility, short stature, and hearing loss. Structures in the otic capsule and inner ear share in the histologic features common to other skeletal tissues. OI is due to mutations involving several genes, the most commonly involved are the COL1A1 or COL1A2 genes which are responsible for the synthesis of the proalpha-1 and proalpha-2 polypeptide chains that form the type I collagen triple helix. A genotype/phenotype relationship to hearing loss has not been established in OI. Hearing loss is commonly found in OI with prevalence rates ranging from 50 to 92% in some studies. Hearing loss in OI may be conductive, mixed, or sensorineural and is more common by the second or third decade. Treatment options such as hearing aids, stapes surgery, and cochlear implants are discussed. PMID:22567374

  6. Pediatric Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Presenting With Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsma, Sietze; Stokroos, Robert; Weber, Jacobiene W; van Tongeren, Joost

    2015-12-01

    To present the rare case of a young boy with idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss developing over several months. This was accompanied by headaches, otalgia, tinnitus, and vertigo. Furthermore, we aim to provide a concise review on this matter, as this report represents the second case in literature of pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting with hearing loss. Workup of a 9-year-old boy with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, including (among others) physical examination, audiometry, diagnostic imaging, and lumbar puncture. Physical examination including fundoscopy as well as imaging showed no abnormalities. At presentation, pure tone audiometry revealed bone conduction thresholds of about 30 dB HL in both ears. Two months later, this declined to about 35 dB HL in both ears. Lumbar puncture revealed an increased intracranial pressure. The boy was thus diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. After the lumbar puncture, the otological complaints gradually resolved, and the hearing normalized (bone conduction thresholds of 0-5 dB HL). Although rare, sensorineural hearing loss in the pediatric population together with otalgia, tinnitus, and vertigo can be due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension and as such can be reversible. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Rescue of inhibitory synapse strength following developmental hearing loss.

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    Vibhakar C Kotak

    Full Text Available Inhibitory synapse dysfunction may contribute to many developmental brain disorders, including the secondary consequences of sensory deprivation. In fact, developmental hearing loss leads to a profound reduction in the strength of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs in the auditory cortex, and this deficit persists into adulthood. This finding is consistent with the general theory that the emergence of mature synaptic properties requires activity during development. Therefore, we tested the prediction that inhibitory strength can be restored following developmental hearing loss by boosting GABAergic transmission in vivo. Conductive or sensorineural hearing loss was induced surgically in gerbils prior to hearing onset and GABA agonists were then administered for one week. IPSCs were subsequently recorded from pyramidal neurons in a thalamocortical brain slice preparation. Administration of either a GABA(A receptor a1 subunit specific agonist (zolpidem, or a selective GABA reuptake inhibitor (SGRI, rescued IPSC amplitude in hearing loss animals. Furthermore, this restoration persisted in adults, long after drug treatment ended. In contrast, a GABA(B receptor agonist baclofen did not restore inhibitory strength. IPSCs could also be restored when SGRI administration began 3 weeks after sensory deprivation. Together, these results demonstrate long-lasting restoration of cortical inhibitory strength in the absence of normal experience. This suggests that in vivo GABA(A receptor activation is sufficient to promote maturation, and this principle may extend to other developmental disorders associated with diminished inhibitory function.

  8. Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as a first symptom of infective endocarditis: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chroni, M; Prappa, E; Kokkevi, I

    2018-02-21

    Septic emboli are an unusual cause of sudden sensorineural hearing loss, for which few reports exist in the literature. This paper presents two cases of sudden sensorineural hearing loss, initially considered as idiopathic, but which were caused by septic emboli. Hearing loss in these cases was bilateral, sequential and total. The first patient had mild fever one week prior to their presentation with sudden sensorineural hearing loss; the other patient had no additional symptoms at presentation. These patients were later diagnosed with infective endocarditis, at two and seven months following the sudden sensorineural hearing loss respectively, showing that septic emboli had been the cause of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Septic emboli should be considered as a possible cause of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in cases of total hearing loss. This form of hearing loss should prompt the otolaryngologist to further investigate for infective endocarditis.

  9. Hearing loss and dementia in the aging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracino, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    For some years, policy makers and medical scientists have both begun to focus more on chronic noncommunicable diseases. It is well known that cardio-cerebrovascular disease, tumors, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are considered areas of major interest in many scientific projects and health programs. The economic impact of cardio-cerebrovascular disease in EU alone is more than EUR 200 billion, while tumors have an impact of EUR 150 billion. The direct and indirect cost of brain disorders exceeds EUR 700 billion a year. Among the brain disorders, the devastating impact of dementia on affected individuals and the burden imposed on their families and society has made prevention and treatment of dementia a public health priority. Interventions that could merely delay the onset of dementia by 1 year would result in a more than 10% decrease in the global prevalence of dementia in 2050. Unfortunately, there are no known interventions that currently have such effectiveness. The manifestations of age-related hearing loss in many older adults are subtle and, thus, hearing loss is often perceived as an unfortunate but inconsequential part of aging. Researchers report that hearing loss seems to speed up age-related cognitive decline. Researchers suggest that treating hearing loss more aggressively could help delay cognitive decline and dementia. Furthermore, there is an increasing interest in better understanding the pathophysiologic correlations between hearing loss and dementia. Hearing loss in older adults, in fact, is associated independently with poorer cognitive functioning, incident dementia, and falls. Further research investigating the basis of this connection as well as the pathomechanism of the two diseases will further our ability to treat dementia. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Cochlear implantation is a therapeutic option for superficial siderosis patients with sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omichi, R; Kariya, S; Maeda, Y; Nishizaki, K

    2016-04-01

    Superficial siderosis is a rare disease that results from chronic bleeding in the subarachnoid space. Haemosiderin deposits throughout the subpial layers of the brain and spinal cord lead to progressive sensorineural hearing loss, which is seen in 95 per cent of patients with superficial siderosis. The impact of cochlear implantation on the quality of life of superficial siderosis patients is under debate. A 38-year-old male with superficial siderosis presented with bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss. The patient underwent cochlear implantation and his quality of life was improved as evaluated by the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit inventory. The remarkable improvement in Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit scores shown in this study indicates that cochlear implantation leads to a better quality of life in superficial siderosis patients.

  11. Outcomes of Children with Hearing Loss: Data Collection and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomblin, J Bruce; Walker, Elizabeth A; McCreery, Ryan W; Arenas, Richard M; Harrison, Melody; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this article was to describe recruitment, data collection, and methods for a longitudinal, multicenter study involving children with bilateral mild to severe hearing loss. The goals of this research program were to characterize the developmental outcomes of children with mild to severe bilateral hearing loss during infancy and the preschool years. Furthermore, the researchers examined how these outcomes were associated with the child's hearing loss and how home background and clinical interventions mediated and moderated these outcomes. The participants in this study were children who are hard of hearing (CHH) and children with normal hearing (CNH) who provided comparison data. CHH were eligible for participation if (1) their chronological age was between 6 months and 7 years of age at the time of recruitment, (2) they had a better-ear pure-tone average of 25 to 75 dB HL, (3) they had not received a cochlear implant, (4) they were from homes where English was the primary language, and (5) they did not demonstrate significant cognitive or motor delays. Across the time span of recruitment, 430 parents of potential children with hearing loss made contact with the research group. This resulted in 317 CHH who qualified for enrollment. In addition, 117 CNH qualified for enrollment. An accelerated longitudinal design was used, in which multiple age cohorts were followed long enough to provide overlap. Specifically, children were recruited and enrolled continuously across an age span of 6.5 years and were followed for at least 3 years. This design allowed for tests of time (period) versus cohort age effects that could arise by changes in services and technology over time, yet still allowed for examination of important developmental relationships. The distribution of degree of hearing loss for the CHH showed that the majority of CHH had moderate or moderate-to-severe hearing losses, indicating that the sample undersampled children with mild HL. For

  12. Mechanism study of laser cochleostomy-induced early hearing loss in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing; Geng, Yang; Zhang, Xian-Zeng; Chen, Wen-Lie; Tian, Tian-Jie; Xie, Shu-Sen; Huang, Zheng

    2014-03-01

    Hearing loss following laser-assisted ear surgery has been reported. However, the mechanism responsible for the hearing loss remains largely speculative. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between laser-induced hearing loss and changes in the number of hair cell ribbon synapses and ultrastructure in the cochlea. Laser cochleostomy was performed with a superpulsed carbon dioxide (CO2) laser at 2 and 5 W in Sprague-Dawley rats. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were measured preoperatively and 2 days after surgery. The synapse numbers in apical and middle cochlear turns were quantified. Transmission electron microscopy was employed to further examine the subcellular changes in the cochlea. Click and tonal ABR threshold shifts in both 2 and 5-W groups displayed a frequency-dependent loss within the frequency range measured. Laser cochleostomy induced a significant decrease of synapse numbers in the middle turn in both groups (p laser-caused hearing loss even under low-energy laser cochleostomy. The high-energy laser-induced hearing loss was associated with more reduction of synapse number.

  13. Acute streptococcal meningitis presenting as bilateral conductive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Matthew J; Smith, Austin T

    2018-04-05

    Bacterial meningitis is a relatively uncommon condition encountered in the emergency department and the constellation of symptoms varies. Hearing loss has been well documented in the literature as a complication of the disease process, but not as the presenting complaint. We describe a case of a 59-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with sudden onset bilateral hearing loss who was found to have S. pneumonia meningitis bacterial meningitis. Even with advances in therapy, bacterial meningitis still carries a significant mortality rate. Early diagnosis and treatment is critical to achieving good outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Screening of Connexin 26 in Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Danielle; Silva, Daniela da; Lopez, Priscila; Mantovani, Jair Cortez

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The first locus for nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss is on chromosome 13q11-22. The 35delGmutation is present in 80% of cases in which GJB2 is involved, which makes the study of this mutation very important. The viability and benefits of screening for mutations in the connexin 26 gene are now beginning to change the diagnostic evaluation and identification of the etiology of hearing loss.Objective To investigate the occurrence of the 35delG mutation in patients with ...

  15. Cochlear implantation for severe sensorineural hearing loss caused by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Il-Woo; Goh, Eui-Kyung; Kong, Soo-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Lightning strike can produce an array of clinical symptoms and injuries. It may damage multiple organs and cause auditory injuries ranging from transient hearing loss and vertigo to complete disruption of the auditory system. Tympanic-membrane rupture is relatively common in patients with lightning injury. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of auditory lesions in lightning survivors have not been fully elucidated. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss caused by a lightning strike, who was successfully rehabilitated after a cochlear implantation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Imaging of Conductive Hearing Loss With a Normal Tympanic Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Hugh D

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an approach to imaging conductive hearing loss in patients with normal tympanic membranes and discusses entities that should be checked as the radiologist evaluates this potentially complicated issue. Conductive hearing loss in a patient with a normal tympanic membrane is a complicated condition that requires a careful imaging approach. Imaging should focus on otosclerosis, and possible mimics and potential surgical considerations should be evaluated. The radiologist should examine the ossicular chain and the round window and keep in mind that a defect in the superior semicircular canal can disturb the hydraulic integrity of the labyrinth.

  17. Hearing Loss in Stranded Odontocete Dolphins and Whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, David; Hill-Cook, Mandy; Manire, Charles; Greenhow, Danielle; Montie, Eric; Powell, Jessica; Wells, Randall; Bauer, Gordon; Cunningham-Smith, Petra; Lingenfelser, Robert; DiGiovanni, Robert; Stone, Abigale; Brodsky, Micah; Stevens, Robert; Kieffer, George; Hoetjes, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The causes of dolphin and whale stranding can often be difficult to determine. Because toothed whales rely on echolocation for orientation and feeding, hearing deficits could lead to stranding. We report on the results of auditory evoked potential measurements from eight species of odontocete cetaceans that were found stranded or severely entangled in fishing gear during the period 2004 through 2009. Approximately 57% of the bottlenose dolphins and 36% of the rough-toothed dolphins had significant hearing deficits with a reduction in sensitivity equivalent to severe (70–90 dB) or profound (>90 dB) hearing loss in humans. The only stranded short-finned pilot whale examined had profound hearing loss. No impairments were detected in seven Risso's dolphins from three different stranding events, two pygmy killer whales, one Atlantic spotted dolphin, one spinner dolphin, or a juvenile Gervais' beaked whale. Hearing impairment could play a significant role in some cetacean stranding events, and the hearing of all cetaceans in rehabilitation should be tested. PMID:21072206

  18. Hearing loss in stranded odontocete dolphins and whales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mann

    Full Text Available The causes of dolphin and whale stranding can often be difficult to determine. Because toothed whales rely on echolocation for orientation and feeding, hearing deficits could lead to stranding. We report on the results of auditory evoked potential measurements from eight species of odontocete cetaceans that were found stranded or severely entangled in fishing gear during the period 2004 through 2009. Approximately 57% of the bottlenose dolphins and 36% of the rough-toothed dolphins had significant hearing deficits with a reduction in sensitivity equivalent to severe (70-90 dB or profound (>90 dB hearing loss in humans. The only stranded short-finned pilot whale examined had profound hearing loss. No impairments were detected in seven Risso's dolphins from three different stranding events, two pygmy killer whales, one Atlantic spotted dolphin, one spinner dolphin, or a juvenile Gervais' beaked whale. Hearing impairment could play a significant role in some cetacean stranding events, and the hearing of all cetaceans in rehabilitation should be tested.

  19. Does occupational noise cause asymmetric hearing loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobie, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Determine whether occupational noise exposure increases audiometric asymmetry. Audiograms were performed on 2044 men from the Occupational Noise and Hearing Survey, representing four groups based on preliminary screening (for previous noise exposure, otologic history, and otoscopy) and current occupational noise exposure. The effects of current noise exposure on audiometric asymmetry were tested using ANCOVA, with binaural average thresholds as covariates. There were no significant differences in asymmetry attributable to current occupational noise exposure. Occupational noise exposure does not usually cause or exacerbate audiometric asymmetry.

  20. Effects of hearing aid amplification on voice F0 variability in speakers with prelingual hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guo-She; Liu, Chialin; Lee, Shao-Hsuan

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the audio-vocal feedback responses of (F0) to hearing amplification in severe-to-profound prelingual hearing loss (SPHL) using power spectral analysis of F0 contour of sustained vowels. Sustained phonations of vowel/a/of seventeen participants with SPHL were acquired with and without hearing-aid amplifications. The vocal intensity was visually fed back to the participants to help controlling the vocal intensity at 65-75 dBA and 85-95 dBA. The F0 contour of the phonations was extracted and submitted to spectral analysis to measure the extent of F0 fluctuations at different frequency ranges. The results showed that both high vocal intensity and hearing-aid amplification significantly improved voice F0 control by reducing the low-frequency fluctuations (low-frequency power, LFP, 0.2-3 Hz) in F0 spectrum. However, the enhanced feedback from higher vocal intensity and/or hearing amplification was not adequate to reduce the LFP to the level of a normal hearing person. Moreover, we found significant and negative correlations between LFP and supra-threshold feedback intensity (phonation intensity - hearing threshold level) for the frequencies of 500-2000 Hz. Increased vocal intensity, as well as hearing-aid amplification, improved voice F0 control by reducing the LFP of F0 spectrum, and the subtle changes in voices could be well explored using spectral analysis of F0. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. CORRELATION BETWEEN TYMPANIC MEMBRANE PERFORATION AND HEARING LOSS

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    Lidija RISTOVSKA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Perforation of the tympanic membrane primarily results from middle ear infections, trauma or iatrogenic causes. The perforation causes conductive hearing loss by reducing the surface area available for sound transmission to the ossicular chain. Objective: The objective was to analyze the characteristics of tympanic membrane perforations in relation to hearing loss and to determine the type and degree of hearing loss. Materials and methods: We analyzed audiometric, otoscopic findings and medical reports of 218 patients, 114 males (52.3% and 104 females (47.7%, aged 9 to 75 years (mean age of 47.9 years, examined during the period of November 2012 to October 2015. For statistical data analysis we used Chi-square test with level of significance p<0.05. Results: Most of the patients had unilateral perforations (89% with right ear predominance and involvement of two quadrants of pars tensa (37.2%. Mean air-bone gap was 23.9 dB. The largest air-bone gap was at frequency of 250 Hz. Most of the patients (73.1% had mixed hearing loss (p=0.032, and average hearing thresholds from 21 to 40 dB. Conclusion: Mean air-bone gap is largest at the lower frequencies, and decreases as frequency increases. Size of the perforation has effect on hearing loss. Mean air-bone gap increases with increasing size of the perforation. There is no big difference between the mean air-bone gap in posterior versus anterior perforations.

  2. Contemporary noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułkowski, Wiesław; Owczarek, Kalina; Olszewski, Jurek

    2017-08-31

    Hearing impairment caused by noise, traditionally called - depending on the duration of exposure - acute or chronic acoustic trauma, includes, in addition to presbyacusis, the most common adult population of hearing impaired. In Poland - according to the report of the Central Statistical Office (GUS, 2011), the number of workers employed in NDN exceeded the noise level (85 dB) is about 200 thousand, the highest in the mining, metal and metal products production, textiles and wood production. According to the Regulation of the Council of Ministers of on June 30, 2009, on the list of occupational diseases (Journal of Laws No. 132, item 1115), it is defined as "bilateral permanent hearing loss of the cochlear or sensory-nerve type, expressed as an increase in hearing threshold of at least 45 dB in the ear better heard, calculated as an arithmetic mean for frequencies 1,2 and 3 kHz. Hearing impairments also occur in the military and police during field training and in combat where the source of acoustic injuries are firearms and pulse-inducing explosions (as in some industries) with high C peak levels (Lc peak) Time to rise to a maximum of <1 ms. The prevalence of loud music listening, particularly by personal stereo players, is also affecting children and adolescents with audiometric hearing loss, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates of around 15-20%. The preventive action strategy is defined by the European Union legislation and the national implementing legislation that reduces or eliminates the risk and reduces (if not eliminated), taking into account available technical and organizational solutions to minimize the risk of hearing damage. If you can not reduce the noise levels with technical and organizational methods, you need individual hearing protectors. Ear protectors may be equipped with electronic systems with active noise reduction (which can improve low and medium frequency performance), adjustable attenuation (improves speech

  3. Prevalence of hearing loss among primary school children in Mbarara, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basañez, Irving; Nakku, Doreen; Stangl, Susan; Wanna, George B

    2015-12-01

    Hearing loss in children is a common entity worldwide. We examined the prevalence and etiology of hearing loss among primary school children in Mbarara, Uganda. Cross-sectional study in primary school children aged 5-14 was performed to determine the prevalence of hearing loss. Ugandan primary school children were screened for disabling hearing loss (threshold >30dB) and confirmatory audiometry was performed on those who failed the screening. There were 639 children screened. Thirty-five (5.5%) of children screened failed and were referred for further testing. Two children were lost to follow-up. The percentage of children with true hearing loss was 3.1%. The incidence of failed hearing screening and hearing loss in Mbarara, Uganda is similar to other populations. Hearing loss is a significant problem in Uganda and efforts should be made for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of hearing loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Various Extents of High-Frequency Hearing Loss on Speech Recognition and Gap Detection at Low Frequencies in Patients with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored whether the time-compressed speech perception varied with the degree of hearing loss in high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (HF SNHL individuals. 65 HF SNHL individuals with different cutoff frequencies were recruited and further divided into mildly, moderately, and/or severely affected subgroups in terms of the averaged thresholds of all frequencies exhibiting hearing loss. Time-compressed speech recognition scores under both quiet and noisy conditions and gap detection thresholds within low frequencies that had normal thresholds were obtained from all patients and compared with data from 11 age-matched individuals with normal hearing threshold at all frequencies. Correlations of the time-compressed speech recognition scores with the extents of HF SNHL and with the 1 kHz gap detection thresholds were studied across all participants. We found that the time-compressed speech recognition scores were significantly affected by and correlated with the extents of HF SNHL. The time-compressed speech recognition scores also correlated with the 1 kHz gap detection thresholds except when the compression ratio of speech was 0.8 under quiet condition. Above all, the extents of HF SNHL were significantly correlated with the 1 kHz gap thresholds.

  5. [The treatment effects analysis of 164 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Wen; Xu, Hong; Liu, Yuehui

    2015-05-01

    To explore the effective treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and factors affecting its prognosis. The clinical data and follow-up results of 164 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss were analyzed retrospectively. All the 164 patients were given intravenous vasodilator, neurotrophic drugs treatment, oral prednisone treatment, and intratympanic dexamethasone injection. All patients were divided into low frequency hearing loss type,intermediate frequency hearing loss, high frequency hearing loss, all frequency hearing loss and total deafness group. Pure tone hearing threshold test were performed before and 3 months after treatment. All patients and different groups were compared before and after treatment damage frequency of average air conduction and various frequency air conduction hearing. Analysis of gender, age, process and hearing curve type, frequency hearing of impaired before treatment, the symptoms with or without vertigo. All the patients' hearing improved after treatment. The treatment efficiency was 46.3%, and low frequency hearing improvements were better than the high frequency hearing. Including age, process, frequency hearing of impaired before treatment, with or without vertigo isindependent factors influencing its prognosis. Based on the regular treatment,oral and intratympanic injection glucocorticoid therapy are safe and effective for sudden hearing loss,The prognosis and age, course, impaired hearing before curve type, treatment frequency hearing level is closely related, with or without vertigo.

  6. Outcomes of Hearing Aid Use by Individuals with Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss (USNHL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Charles E; Hamadain, Elgenaid; Galster, Jason A; Johnson, Mary Frances; Spankovich, Christopher; Windmill, Ian

    Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL) can have a negative impact on functions associated with the advantages of balanced, binaural hearing. Although single-sided deafness, which is a complete loss of audibility in one ear, has gained increased interest in the published research, there is a gap in the literature concerning hearing aid outcomes for individuals with residual, or otherwise "aidable," hearing in the affected ear. To assess hearing aid outcomes for a group of individuals with USNHL with residual, aidable function. A quasi-experimental study of hearing aid outcomes with paired comparisons made between unaided and aided test conditions. A convenience sample of twenty-two individuals with USNHL, with sufficient residual hearing in the affected ear as to receive audibility from use of a hearing aid, were recruited into the study from September 2011 to August 2012. Each participant was fit with a digital behind-the-ear hearing aid coupled to a custom ear mold. Assessments were performed at baseline (unaided) and after a three-month field trial (aided) with primary outcomes involving objective measures in sound field yielding signal-to-noise ratio loss (SNR Loss) via the Quick Speech-in-Noise Test and word recognition scores (WRS) via the Northwestern University Auditory Test, No. 6. Outcomes also involved the administration of two well-established subjective benefit questionnaires: The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) and the 49-item Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ49). As a group, participants showed significantly improved median SNR Loss thresholds when aided in a test condition that included spatial separation of speech and noise, with speech stimuli directed toward the worse ear and noise stimuli directed toward the better ear (diff. = -4.5; p Hearing aid use had a small, though statistically significant, negative impact on median SNR Loss thresholds, when speech and noise stimuli originated from the same 0

  7. Hearing loss in vitiligo: current concepts and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Marrigje Aagje; Adelman, Cahtia; Gross, Menachem

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the occurrence, clinical manifestations, audiometric findings, pathogenesis and approach to sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) among patients diagnosed with vitiligo with a review of the literature. We present a systematic review of the literature on cases of SNHL in patients diagnosed with vitiligo and studies conducted to investigate audiometric changes in such patients. Data on presentation, diagnosis and medical approach were reviewed. A total of 21 studies and case reports revealed at least 102 cases of SNHL in patients diagnosed with vitiligo. Arguments for a common causative etiology related to melanocyte function were mentioned in most of the literature. Evaluation of hearing function among all patients diagnosed with vitiligo seems to be an accepted approach; it should include audiometry, otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and ABR measurements. Extra precaution to prevent ototoxic or noise-induced hearing loss is strongly recommended. Further research is needed to better understand its pathogenesis.

  8. Hearing loss in the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensink, R J; Marres, H A; Brunner, H G; Cremers, C W

    1996-10-01

    A three-generation family with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and an isolated case are presented. The proband presented with conductive hearing loss. His mother and grandmother showed minor features of the syndrome including conductive hearing loss. Symptoms of the craniosynostosis syndromes can include stapes ankylosis, a fixed ossicular chain in a too small epitympanum, and small or even absent mastoids. The proband was treated with a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) instead of reconstructive middle ear surgery. Current literature on the results of ear surgery is reviewed. In general, reconstructive middle ear surgery should be considered if congenital anomalies of the middle ear are the only presenting symptom. In cases with additional anomalies such as atresia of the ear canal or damage due to chronic ear infections, the outcome of reconstructive surgery to correct the anomalous ossicular chain is unsatisfactory. In such cases of the BAHA is probably the best solution.

  9. Family Health Team: reports of conduct on child hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jullyane Florencio Pachêco da; Teixeira, Cleide Fernandes; Lima, Maria Luiza Lopes Timóteo de; Sousa, Fabiana de Oliveira Silva; Griz, Silvana Maria Sobral

    2017-05-15

    To analyze the performance of family health teams toward the suspicion and identification of child hearing loss. This is a case study. Data were collected in three focus groups with three family health teams of a health district in the metropolitan area of Recife, Brazil. All data were transcribed and analyzed based on the interview analysis model of condensation of meanings. The family health professionals investigated made use of some resources to assess child reaction to sound stimuli, but they were mostly unaware of risk indicators for hearing loss and presented doubts about conducting referrals. Regarding child monitoring, the family health professionals reported that the lack of counter-reference by other professionals precludes the effective monitoring of children in the family health units. Despite their potential in assisting child health, the role of family health teams is still permeated by weaknesses that hinder their performance with respect to hearing health.

  10. Radiological quiz. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss due to multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabbarzade, Cavid; Özgen, Burçe; Sennaroglu, Levent

    2014-01-01

    A case with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) owing to multiple sclerosis (MS) who had clinical and dramatic radiological improvement just after medical therapy was reported in this article. Case report and review of related literature. A 22-year-old female patient with MS related SSNHL was presented in this article. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an MS plaque localized at pons extending from right cochlear nucleus to proximal part of the right cochlear nerve. Most dramatic recovery was present in the 5th day control MRI, where the plaque located on pons disappeared completely. On the 10th day control audiogram hearing recovery was observed and pure tone audiogram levels were almost normal. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss owing to MS is seen more common than expected. It has good prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is also thought to have an important role in diagnosis and treatment efficacy of SSNHL owing to MS. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o.

  11. Masking Release in Children and Adults with Hearing Loss When Using Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Marc; McCreery, Ryan; Kopun, Judy; Lewis, Dawna; Alexander, Joshua; Stelmachowicz, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared masking release for adults and children with normal hearing and hearing loss. For the participants with hearing loss, masking release using simulated hearing aid amplification with 2 different compression speeds (slow, fast) was compared. Method: Sentence recognition in unmodulated noise was compared with recognition…

  12. The comparative study of reading comprehension in normal-hearing and hearing-loss student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Afrooz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In different language approaches, reading is considered as a major skill. Language skills comprising listening, speaking, reading and writing are completely interlinked with each other. Thus, providing active application of listening and speaking skills, children will learn reading and writing skills easily. The aim of this research was to compare reading skills of hearing-loss students studying at exceptional schools with normal students of different degrees.Methods: The research was conducted post-traumatically using standardized 2006 PIRLS test. 80 students in fifth grade of exceptional primary schools, and first and fourth grade of exceptional high schools in Tehran City who had severe and or profound hearing loss were randomly selected along with 80 normal students in ordinary schools who were selected using available sampling method.Results: There were significant differences between reading comprehension of hearing-loss and normal students of all three grades (p<0.001. Reading comprehension in female students was significantly higher than the male ones (p<0.001. There were not any significant differences in mean reading comprehension scores of hearing-loss students in different grades which demonstrate that their reading skills had not developed in tandem with their age and school educations.Conclusion: This study shows that one of the significant concerns regarding hearing-loss students is their reading comprehension ability. Considering reading ability as one of the most important acquisitive abilities which students learn at school, evaluation of reading skills of hearing loss students as well as recognition of their strengths and weaknesses in this field is indispensable.

  13. Neuroanatomical considerations of isolated hearing loss in thalamic hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Agarwal, M.D.

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Presumably, this neurological deficit was caused by a hypertensive hemorrhage in the posterior right thalamus. The following case and discussion will review the potential neuroanatomical pathways that we suggest could make isolated hearing loss be part of a “thalamic syndrome.”

  14. Platinum-induced hearing loss after treatment for childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van As, Jorrit W.; van den Berg, Henk; van Dalen, Elvira C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Platinum-based therapy, including cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin or a combination of these, is used to treat a variety of paediatric malignancies. Unfortunately, one of the most important adverse effects is the occurrence of hearing loss or ototoxicity. There is a wide variation in

  15. Efficacy of multimodality approach to sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiboğllu, Bariş; Külekçi, Semra; Sürmeli, Mehmet; Verim, Ayşegül; Kalaycik Ertugay, Çiğdem; İhvan, Önder; Şeneldir, Lütfü; Zer Toros, Sema

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether addition of intratympanic steroid (ITS) to systemic steroid and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is effective in the treatment of sudden hearing loss (SHL). Between January 2008 and October 2011, 58 patients diagnosed with SHL were enrolled in the study. Twenty patients (11 males, 9 females; mean age 45.3±21 years; range 24 to 66 years) who received systemic steroid and HBO composed group 1, while 38 patients (19 males, 19 females; mean age 41.6±16 years; range 25 to 61 years) who received ITS in addition to systemic steroid and HBO composed group 2. Post-treatment hearing improvement was statistically significant in both groups in terms of the mean pure tone according to the Siegel's criteria (p0.05). However, there was a strong statistically significant difference in terms of profound hearing loss over 90 dB (phearing loss in group 1 benefited treatment, while addition of ITS to the treatment yielded success in six of 12 patients with profound hearing loss (50%) in group 2 (p<0.05). Addition of ITS to systemic steroid and HBO treatment may yield better results in patients with SHL. However, ITS injection seems beneficial for patients with profound SHL.

  16. Counseling Families of Children with Hearing Loss and Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luterman, David

    2004-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on counseling parents of children with hearing loss and additional special needs. Therefore, we must extrapolate from what we know of counseling parents of children with a single disability and provide information based on experience. The emotional aftermath of the diagnosis appears similar for both groups. Parents…

  17. Steroid Use in Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: What ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a disease of unknown etiology. Controversy in the literature argues whether the condition should be treated by steroid therapy. In this case study, a Medline literature search was completed to find out if there is any evidence to support its use in this condition.

  18. prevalence and awareness of noise induced hearing loss in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    Noise above a certain acceptable level or sustained noise may cause damage to the ears. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and level of awareness of noise induced hearing loss in Calabar. Seventy-five workers from two noise producing companies, in Calabar- Flour mill and Wartsilla were chosen for this ...

  19. Occupational noise-induced hearing loss among workers at Jomo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Occupational noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) occurs among workers exposed to excessive amounts of noise for long durations. The average level of noise in some locations at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) was above the safe limit of 85dB hence workers were thought to be at risk. Objective: To ...

  20. Sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Kim, Young Hyun; Kim, Yeo Hyang; Hyun, Myung Chul; Lee, Young Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Kawasaki disease involves acute febrile systemic vasculitis that can cause a variety of symptoms by affecting various organs. Here, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence, causes, and prognosis of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurring in children with Kawasaki disease. Patients who were diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and received inpatient treatment in the Pediatrics Department at one of three university hospitals in Daegu city from February 2012 to September 2012 were enrolled in the study. The clinical features, hematological results, echocardiography results, audiometry results, and aspirin and salicylic acid serum levels of the patients were evaluated. Of the 59 children enrolled in the study, three showed mild bilateral SNHL on audiometry tests conducted after 48 hours of defervescence; these patients demonstrated normal patterns of recovery on follow-up tests 8 weeks later. Aspirin serum levels were significantly higher in the SNHL group after 48 hours of afebrile condition with high dose aspirin intake (P=0.034). However, no significant differences were found in other laboratory tests or for fever duration (P>0.05). Upon echocardiography, coronary artery abnormality was observed in 9 cases, but none of these patients showed hearing loss. The results indicate that SNHL in children with Kawasaki disease might occur during treatment of the acute phase; this SNHL usually involves mild bilateral hearing loss and recovers naturally. However, this study suggests that determination of the causes and clinical implications of hearing loss in Kawasaki disease requires long-term follow-up studies with more cases.

  1. Chloramphenicol Induced Hearing Loss | Ogisi | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: With the widespread use of the drug Chloramphenicol in treatment of typhoid fever, a number of cases of deafness are coming to light following such ... tragedy by limiting the use of this drug is stressed. (Nig J Surg Res 2001; 3: 75 – 80) KEY WORDS: Hearing Loss, Chloramphenicol, Typhoid Fever, Handicap ...

  2. Is There a Silent Hearing Loss among Children in Jordan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaqrabawi, Wala' S.; Alshawabka, Amneh Z.; Al-Addasi, Zainab M.

    2016-01-01

    This study measured the prevalence of hearing loss among school children in Jordan. A random sample of 1649 children (990 males and 659 females) was collected from randomly chosen 40 schools in Amman. Screening was conducted between November 2010 and October 2014. Otoscopic examination, tympanometry, and audiometry were used for screening. Based…

  3. Subjective Fatigue in Children with Hearing Loss: Some Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, Benjamin W. Y.; Werfel, Krystal; Camarata, Stephen; Bess, Fred H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined the effect of hearing loss on subjective reports of fatigue in school-age children using a standardized measure. Methods: As part of a larger ongoing study, the authors obtained subjective ratings of fatigue using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (Varni,…

  4. Facilitating Emergent Literacy Skills in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupan, Barbra; Dempsey, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To (a) familiarize readers with the components of emergent literacy and the impact hearing loss may have on the development of these skills; (b) demonstrate the importance of parent-professional collaboration and show how specific literacy-based activities can be integrated into existing daily routines and intervention programming; and…

  5. Prevalence of Hearing Loss in Patients with Acute Otitis Media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was a prospective, cross-sectional type conducted at the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) over a six month period from 1st August 2005 to 31st January 2006. Fifty one patients involving 69 ears (few with bilateral and majority with unilateral hearing loss) were ...

  6. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: The Question of Perilymph Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backous, Douglas D.; Niparko, John K.

    1997-01-01

    Perilymph fistula (PLF) is an abnormal communication between the fluid-containing spaces of the inner ear and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone that can cause hearing loss, tinnitus, aural fullness, vertigo, and postural instability. Diagnosis of PLF and management of those with presumed PLF are discussed. (Contains extensive…

  7. Age of diagnosis of congenital hearing loss: Private v. public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to examine whether the private health services in the same city were any better. Objective. To determine whether the age of diagnosis of congenital hearing loss (CHL) in children seen in the private healthcare sector in Bloemfontein, Free State Province, SA, was lower than that in the public healthcare ...

  8. The noise-induced hearing loss milestones: past and future

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Edwards, AL

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available At the 2003 Mine Health and Safety Summit, the milestones for elimination of Noise-induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) in the mining industry were agreed on. The first milestone, December 2008, has passed and the next one in 2013 is looming. The study...

  9. Congenital hearing loss. Is CT enough? | Agha | Alexandria Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients and methods: This is a prospective study including 60 patients, 24 males and 36 females aged from 1 to 7 years, who were presented by unilateral or bilateral congenital conductive (CHL) or/and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). All patients were evaluated by HRCT scan with post-processing multiplanar ...

  10. Noise-induced hearing loss milestones: Past and future

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Edwards, A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available At the 2003 Mine Health and Safety Summit, the milestones for elimination of Noise-induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) in the mining industry were agreed on. The first milestone, December 2008, has passed and the next one in 2013 is looming. The study...

  11. Prevalence of noise induced hearing loss in textile industries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross sectional study measured the prevalence of Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) in textile industries in Dar Es Salaam city and Morogoro municipality. Data were collected from 125 employees randomly selected from each of the textile factory mill in each region through structured questionnaires and audiogram ...

  12. Prevalence and awareness of noise induced hearing loss in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noise above a certain acceptable level or sustained noise may cause damage to the ears. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and level of awareness of noise induced hearing loss in Calabar. Seventy-five workers from two noise producing companies, in Calabar- Flour mill and Wartsilla were chosen for this ...

  13. Auditory Deprivation and Early Conductive Hearing Loss from Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarson, Adele D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews auditory deprivation effects on anatomy, physiology, and behavior in animals and discusses the sequelae of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children. Focused on are central auditory processing disorders associated with early fluctuating hearing loss from OME. (DB)

  14. Nationwide epidemiological survey of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitoh, Ryosuke; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Ogawa, Kaoru; Kanzaki, Sho; Hato, Naohito; Sone, Michihiko; Fukuda, Satoshi; Hara, Akira; Ikezono, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Kotaro; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Kaga, Kimitaka; Kakehata, Seiji; Matsubara, Atsushi; Matsunaga, Tatsuo; Murata, Takaaki; Naito, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Takashi; Nishizaki, Kazunori; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Sano, Hajime; Sato, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Mikio; Shojaku, Hideo; Takahashi, Haruo; Takeda, Hidehiko; Tono, Testuya; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    Using a large-scale nationwide survey database, we investigated the epidemiological characteristics for idiopathic SSNHL in Japan. The subjects for this analysis were patients registered in a Japanese multicentre database between April 2014 and March 2016. A total of 3419 idiopathic SSNHL patients were registered in the database, and the clinical characteristics of the idiopathic SSNHL patients were obtained. Several factors associated with the severity of hearing impairment and prognosis were then investigated. Statistical analysis was performed to clarify the factors associated with the severity of hearing impairment and prognosis. There were significant correlations between the severity of hearing loss and diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, past history of brain infarction, heart disease, age (under 16 years/elderly), and symptoms of vertigo/dizziness. We also analyzed the prognostic factors for idiopathic SSNHL, and found that the severity of hearing loss (Grade 3 or 4), heart disease, aged 65 years or over, time from onset to treatment (over 7 days), and symptoms of vertigo/dizziness were all significantly related to poor prognosis. The present large-scale clinical survey revealed current epidemiological trends for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) and various factors associated with the severity of hearing impairment and prognosis.

  15. Hearing testing in the U.S. Department of Defense: Potential impact on Veterans Affairs hearing loss disability awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J T; Swan, A A; Swiger, B; Packer, M; Pugh, M J

    2017-06-01

    Hearing loss is the second most common disability awarded by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to former members of the U.S. uniformed services. Hearing readiness and conservation practices differ among the four largest uniformed military services (Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy). Utilizing a data set consisting of all hearing loss claims submitted to the VA from fiscal years 2003-2013, we examined characteristics of veterans submitting claims within one year of separation from military service. Our results indicate that having a hearing loss disability claim granted was significantly more likely for men, individuals over the age of 26 years at the time of the claim, individuals most recently serving in the U.S. Army, and those with at least one hearing loss diagnosis. Importantly, individuals with at least one test record in the Defense Occupational and Environmental Health Readiness System-Hearing Conservation (DOEHRS-HC) system were significantly less likely to have a hearing loss disability claim granted by the VA. Within the DOEHRS-HC cohort, those with at least one threshold shift or clinical hearing loss diagnosis while on active duty were more than two and three times more likely to have a hearing loss disability claim granted, respectively. These findings indicate that an established history of reduced hearing ability while on active duty was associated with a significantly increased likelihood of an approved hearing loss disability claim relative to VA claims without such a history. Further, our results show a persistent decreased rate of hearing loss disability awards overall. These findings support increased inclusion of personnel in DoD hearing readiness and conservation programs to reduce VA hearing loss disability awards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Epileptiform electroencephalogram abnormality in children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badry, Mohamed Mohamed; Hamdy, Nermin Aly; Sobhy, Sayed; Gamal, Reham

    2014-04-01

    This work was designed to study electroencephalogram findings in children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss and correlate these findings with the SNHL parameters as duration, etiology, severity, and type. Ninety children with bilateral congenital sensorineural hearing loss served as the study group. They were free from any neurological disorders or symptoms that are commonly associated with abnormal electroencephalogram as convulsions or loss of consciousness. Twenty children having normal hearing with no history of otological or neurological disorders served as the control group. All children participating in the study were subjected to full medical and audiological history, otological examination, neurological examination, audiological evaluation and electroencephalogram recording. Mean age of the children in the control group was 3.56 ± 2.1 years and mean age of the children in the study group was 3.8 ± 2.2 years. While none of the control children had abnormal electroencephalogram, 38 (42.2%) of children with congenital SNHL had epileptiform electroencephalogram abnormality. The epileptiform abnormality was generalized in 14 children (36.8%), focal temporal in 17 children (44.7%) and focal other than temporal in 7 children (18.4%). According to the hemispheric side affected, the abnormality was right in 14 children (36.8%), left in 10 children (26.3%) and bilateral in 14 children (36.8%). No statistically significant predominance of specific site or side of the epileptiform abnormality was found. Similarly, no statistical significant prevalent of the epileptiform abnormality was found in relation to the age or sex of children, duration of hearing loss or etiology of hearing loss (i.e., genetic vs. neonatal insults). On the other hand, the epileptiform abnormality was statistically prevalent in children with moderate degree of hearing loss, and in children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. The epileptiform electroencephalogram abnormality is

  17. High fibrinogen in peripheral blood correlates with poorer hearing recovery in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Kanzaki

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We used hearing tests and peripheral blood sample analyses to characterize the pathology of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL and to identify possible prognostic factors for predicting recovery of hearing loss. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective, multicenter trial was conducted. METHODS: Two hundred three patients examined within 7 days after the onset of ISSNHL received prednisone with lipo-prostaglandin E1. Pure-tone auditory tests were performed before and after treatment with these drugs. Blood tests were performed on blood samples collected during the patients' initial visit to our clinic. RESULTS: In all patients, elevated white blood cell (WBC counts, fasting blood sugar levels, HgbA1c, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR significantly correlated with high hearing threshold measurements obtained on the initial visit. High fibrinogen levels, WBC counts, ESR, and low concentrations of fibrinogen degradation products (FDP were associated with lower hearing recovery rates. Additionally, different audiogram shapes correlated with different blood test factors, indicating that different pathologies were involved. CONCLUSIONS: High fibrinogen levels measured within seven days after ISSNHL onset correlated with poorer hearing recovery. This may be a consequence of ischemia or infections in the inner ear. The high WBC counts also observed may therefore reflect an immune response to inner ear damage induced by ischemic changes or infections. Our data indicate that therapeutic strategies should be selected based on the timing of initial treatment relative to ISSNHL onset.

  18. Bone-anchored hearing aids in conductive and mixed hearing losses: why do patients reject them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, Richard T K; Dhillon, Baljeet; Siau, Derrick; Green, Kevin M J

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to report the bone-anchored hearing aid uptake rate and the reasons for their rejection by patients with conductive and mixed hearing losses. A retrospective review was performed of 113 consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral conductive or mixed hearing loss referred to the Greater Manchester bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) programme between September 2008 and August 2011. 98 (86.7 %) patients were deemed audiologically suitable for BAHA implantation. Of these, 38 (38.8 %) had BAHA implanted; 60 (61.2 %) patients declined. Of those who declined, 27 (45 %) cited anxiety over surgery, 18 (30 %) cited cosmetic reasons, 16 (26.7 %) perceived limited benefit from the device and six (10 %) preferred conventional hearing aids. Our study highlights a 38.8 % BAHA uptake rate in audiologically suitable patients. The main reasons cited for rejection of BAHA were anxiety over surgery and cosmetic concerns. It is important that clinicians address these early during consultation with prospective BAHA recipients and avoid rushing to implant these patients with a bone-anchored hearing aid.

  19. Glucocorticoid influence on prognosis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Amaro Bogaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSHL is defined when a loss of at least 30 dB occurs in over 3 continuous frequencies, in up to 72 hours, of which etiology is not established, despite adequate investigation. Different types of treatment regimens have been proposed, but only glucocorticoids have shown some evidence of benefit in the literature. OBJECTIVE: To analyze whether the type of treatment or time of treatment with glucocorticoids have any influence on hearing recovery in ISSHL. METHODS: Observational retrospective cohort study. One hundred twenty-seven patients with ISSHL, treated at outpatient clinics between the years 2000 and 2010, were studied. We evaluated the prognostic correlation of the type of treatment and time to treatment with glucocorticoids and ISSHL. RESULTS: The absolute hearing gain and the relative hearing gain was as follows: 23.6 dB and 37.2%. Complete recovery was observed in 15.7% of patients, significant recovery in 27.6% and recovery in 57.5%. CONCLUSION: In this study, there was no difference between the use and nonuse of glucocorticoids in hearing improvement. However, when started within seven days after onset, the use of glucocorticoids was a factor of better prognosis.

  20. Finite Verb Morphology in the Spontaneous Speech of Dutch-Speaking Children With Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Annemiek; Coene, Martine

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the acquisition of Dutch finite verb morphology is investigated in children with cochlear implants (CIs) with profound hearing loss and in children with hearing aids (HAs) with moderate to severe hearing loss. Comparing these two groups of children increases our insight into how hearing experience and audibility affect the acquisition of morphosyntax. Spontaneous speech samples were analyzed of 48 children with CIs and 29 children with HAs, ages 4 to 7 years. These language samples were analyzed by means of standardized language analysis involving mean length of utterance, the number of finite verbs produced, and target-like subject-verb agreement. The outcomes were interpreted relative to expectations based on the performance of typically developing peers with normal hearing. Outcomes of all measures were correlated with hearing level in the group of HA users and age at implantation in the group of CI users. For both groups, the number of finite verbs that were produced in 50-utterance sample was on par with mean length of utterance and at the lower bound of the normal distribution. No significant differences were found between children with CIs and HAs on any of the measures under investigation. Yet, both groups produced more subject-verb agreement errors than are to be expected for typically developing hearing peers. No significant correlation was found between the hearing level of the children and the relevant measures of verb morphology, both with respect to the overall number of verbs that were used and the number of errors that children made. Within the group of CI users, the outcomes were significantly correlated with age at implantation. When producing finite verb morphology, profoundly deaf children wearing CIs perform similarly to their peers with moderate-to-severe hearing loss wearing HAs. Hearing loss negatively affects the acquisition of subject-verb agreement regardless of the hearing device (CI or HA) that the child is wearing. The

  1. Management of Children with Mild, Moderate, and Moderately Severe Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharpe, Anne Marie; Gustafson, Samantha

    2015-12-01

    Any degree of hearing loss can have a negative impact on child development. The amount of impact is largely determined by the type, quality, and timeliness of intervention. Early identification and management of hearing loss is essential for minimizing the impact of hearing loss and ensuring that children can reach their cognitive, linguistic, educational, and social potential. Advances in hearing technology and broadening of candidacy for same, have resulted in improved outcomes for many children with hearing loss. Through ongoing hearing monitoring throughout childhood, children with congenital, late-onset, or progressive losses can receive timely management from interprofessional, collaborative teams. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as an initial presentation of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Jung; Yoon, Yong Joo

    2012-01-01

    This study reports an unusual case in which myelodysplastic syndrome presented bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as the first symptom of the disease. The aural symptoms and signs such as tinnitus, dizziness, and hearing impairment of a hematologic disease are common. However, sudden hearing loss as the first manifestation of a hematologic disease is extremely rare. A 76-year-old woman presented with bilateral sudden hearing loss. The patient was found to have myelodysplastic syndrome during a workup for her hearing loss. Unfortunately, the patient's hearing loss did not improve after the medical treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Audiovisual deficits in older adults with hearing loss: biological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, Gabriella; Arum, Laurie; Nicol, Trent; Garstecki, Dean; Kraus, Nina

    2009-10-01

    To examine the impact of hearing loss (HL) on audiovisual (AV) processing in the aging population. We hypothesized that age-related HL would have a pervasive effect on sensory processing, extending beyond the auditory domain. Specifically, we predicted that decreased auditory input to the neural system, in the form of HL over time, would have deleterious effects on multisensory mechanisms. This study compared AV processing between older adults with normal hearing (N = 12) and older adults with mild to moderate sensorineural HL (N = 12). To do this, we recorded cortical evoked potentials that were elicited by watching and listening to recordings of a speaker saying the syllable "bi." Stimuli were presented in three conditions: when hearing the syllable "bi" (auditory), when viewing a person say "bi" (visual), and when seeing and hearing the syllables simultaneously (AV). Presentation level of the auditory stimulus was set to +30 dB SL for each listener to equalize auditory input across groups. In the AV condition, the normal-hearing group showed a clear and consistent decrease in P1 and N1 latencies as well as a reduction in P1 amplitude compared with the sum of the unimodal components (auditory + visual). These integration effects were absent or less consistent in HL participants. Despite controlling for auditory sensation level, visual influence on auditory processing was significantly less pronounced in HL individuals compared with controls, indicating diminished AV integration in this population. These results demonstrate that HL has a deleterious effect on how older adults combine what they see and hear. Although auditory amplification vastly improves the communication abilities in most hearing impaired individuals, the associated atrophy of multisensory mechanisms may contribute to a patient's difficulty in everyday settings. Our findings and related studies emphasize the potential value of multimodal tasks and stimuli in the assessment and rehabilitation of

  4. [Genetic constitution analysis of idiopathic sudden hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Adem; Altuntaş, Emine Elif; Ozdemir, Oztürk; Uysal, Ismail Onder; Müderris, Suphi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to understand the etiology of sudden hearing loss due to genetic factors in Turkish people. Determination of these genetic factors and better understanding of molecular pathogenesis may guide more realistic planning and treatment recommendations. Forty patients (Group 1; 19 males, 21 females; mean age 37.9+/-15.6 years; range 9 to 76 years) who presented with sudden hearing loss to the Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic of Medical Faculty Hospital of Cumhuriyet University between January 2008 and June 2009, and were diagnosed with sudden hearing loss through history, physical examination and review of audiometric findings, and 20 healthy volunteers (Group 2; 14 males, 6 females; mean age 31.7+/-4.4 years; range 24 to 43 years) for the control group were included in this study. All Patients were evaluated by the genetic clinic for the GJB2, GJB3, GJB6 and WFS1 gene using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) method mutation analysis. No difference was found in the peripheral blood sample analyses of the two groups at WFS1 exon 8 and connexin 26, 30 and 31 gene zones using the MLPA method with respect to heterozygous mutation (p=0.291, p>0.05). In four patients in group 1 heterozygous mutation was detected at the target gene zone. Heterozygous mutation was in the WFS1 exon 8 zone in two patients; and in the WFS1 exon 1 zone in other two patients. Sudden hearing loss studies in the future should include connexin 26, connexin 30 and other gene mutations that may affect the function of the gap-junction located in the region of the cochlea stria vascularis (stV), basal membrane (BM), spiral limbus (Li) and spiral ligament (SL). These studies should be performed on larger series, and should include family members of patients with sudden hearing loss.

  5. Risk of hearing loss in small for gestational age neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melani Rakhmi Mantu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Small for gestational age (SGA neonates often have intrauterine growth restriction due to placental insufficiency and chronic hypoxia. These conditions may cause developmental impairment, psychosocial disabilities, or metabolic dysfunction in later life. Previous studies have shown greater incidence of speech and language disabilities, learning impairment, and neuromotor dysfunction in term SGA infants compared to term appropriate for gestational age (AGA infants. Objective To compare hearing loss in SGA and AGA neonates using otoocoustic emission (OAE tests and to study correlations between maternal risk factors and hearing loss in SGA neonates. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in St. Borromeus Hospital, Limijati Hospital, and Melinda Hospital in Bandung from February to May 2010. Study subjects consisted of full-term neonates born in these three hospitals. A retrospective medical record review was performed for this study. Statistical analysis was done by multivariable logistic-regression. Results There was a total of 4279 subjects in our study, including 100 SGA neonates and 4179 AGA neonates. We observed a greater percentage of OAE 'refer' (indicating abnormal OAE results in the SGA group compared to the AGA group (P<0.001, Z=13.247. For suhjects with OAE 'refer' results, we also analyzed the correlation to the following maternal risk factors: smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and asthma. We also found significant differences between  those with and without each of the four maternal risk factors studied (P< 0.001. By using multivariant analysis to compare SGA and AGA neonates, we found the odds ratio (OR to he 4.34 (95% CI 2.52 to 7.49, P=0.001, meaning the SGA group had a 4.34 times higher risk of hearing loss than the AGA group. Conclusion SGA neonates had a higher risk of hearing loss than AGA neonates. In addition, maternal smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and asthma significantly correlated to

  6. ‘Ecstasy’ Enhances Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Michael W.; Zhang, Jinsheng S.; Langford, Megan M.; Perrine, Shane A.

    2013-01-01

    ‘Ecstasy’ or 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine (MDMA) is an amphetamine abused for its euphoric, empathogenic, hallucinatory, and stimulant effects. It is also used to treat certain psychiatric disorders. Common settings for Ecstasy use are nightclubs and “rave” parties where participants consume MDMA and dance to loud music. One concern with the club setting is that exposure to loud sounds can cause permanent sensorineural hearing loss. Another concern is that consumption of MDMA may enhance such hearing loss. Whereas this latter possibility has not been investigated, this study tested the hypothesis that MDMA enhances noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) by exposing rats to either MDMA, noise trauma, both MDMA and noise, or neither treatment. MDMA was given in a binge pattern of 5 mg/kg per intraperitoneal injections every 2 h for a total of four injections to animals in the two MDMA-treated groups (MDMA-only and Noise+MDMA). Saline injections were given to the animals in the two non-MDMA groups (Control and Noise-only). Following the final injection, noise trauma was induced by a 10 kHz tone at 120 dB SPL for 1 h to animals in the two noise trauma-treated groups (Noise-only and Noise+MDMA). Hearing loss was assessed by the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and cochlear histology. Results showed that MDMA enhanced NIHL compared to Noise-only and that MDMA alone caused no hearing loss. This implies that “clubbers” and “rave-goers” are exacerbating the amount of NIHL when they consume MDMA and listen to loud sounds. In contrast to earlier reports, the present study found that MDMA by itself caused no changes in the click-evoked ABR’s wave latencies or amplitudes. PMID:23711768

  7. Classification of Hearing Loss Disorders Using Teoae-Based Descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzopoulos, Stavros Dimitris

    Transiently Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions (TEOAE) are signals produced by the cochlea upon stimulation by an acoustic click. Within the context of this dissertation, it was hypothesized that the relationship between the TEOAEs and the functional status of the OHCs provided an opportunity for designing a TEOAE-based clinical procedure that could be used to assess cochlear function. To understand the nature of the TEOAE signals in the time and the frequency domain several different analyses were performed. Using normative Input-Output (IO) curves, short-time FFT analyses and cochlear computer simulations, it was found that for optimization of the hearing loss classification it is necessary to use a complete 20 ms TEOAE segment. It was also determined that various 2-D filtering methods (median and averaging filtering masks, LP-FFT) used to enhance of the TEOAE S/N offered minimal improvement (less than 6 dB per stimulus level). Higher S/N improvements resulted in TEOAE sequences that were over-smoothed. The final classification algorithm was based on a statistical analysis of raw FFT data and when applied to a sample set of clinically obtained TEOAE recordings (from 56 normal and 66 hearing-loss subjects) correctly identified 94.3% of the normal and 90% of the hearing loss subjects, at the 80 dB SPL stimulus level. To enhance the discrimination between the conductive and the sensorineural populations, data from the 68 dB SPL stimulus level were used, which yielded a normal classification of 90.2%, a hearing loss classification of 87.5% and a conductive-sensorineural classification of 87%. Among the hearing-loss populations the best discrimination was obtained in the group of otosclerosis and the worst in the group of acute acoustic trauma.

  8. A large scale hearing loss screen reveals an extensive unexplored genetic landscape for auditory dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowl, Michael R.; Simon, Michelle M.; Ingham, Neil J.

    2017-01-01

    The developmental and physiological complexity of the auditory system is likely reflected in the underlying set of genes involved in auditory function. In humans, over 150 non-syndromic loci have been identified, and there are more than 400 human genetic syndromes with a hearing loss component. O...

  9. Amalgam dental fillings and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Janet A; Boyd, Paul J

    2008-12-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of amalgam dental fillings on auditory thresholds. Participants (n=39) were non-smoking women age 40 to 45. Regression and correlation analyses were performed between auditory thresholds, measured from 0.25 to 16 kHz, and the number/surface area of dental fillings, using the ASHA criteria for ototoxic change as a reference for comparison. No significant correlation (p>0.05) was found between composite (non-amalgam) filling or drilling data and auditory thresholds. However, there was a significant positive linear correlation between amalgam filling data and auditory thresholds at 8, 11.2, 12.5, 14, and 16 kHz. The strongest association (r=0.587, n=39, pamalgam filling was associated with a 2.4 dB decline in hearing threshold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-3.5 dB). The results suggest an association between more amalgam fillings and poorer thresholds at higher frequencies, which could contribute to presbyacusis in developed countries. This provides further argument for the use of amalgams to be phased out where suitable alternatives exist.

  10. Anisomorphic cortical reorganization in asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Steven W; Atencio, Craig A; Levy, Eliott R J; Froemke, Robert C; Schreiner, Christoph E

    2017-08-01

    Acoustic trauma or inner ear disease may predominantly injure one ear, causing asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). While characteristic frequency (CF) map plasticity of primary auditory cortex (AI) contralateral to the injured ear has been detailed, there is no study that also evaluates ipsilateral AI to compare cortical reorganization across both hemispheres. We assess whether the normal isomorphic mirror-image relationship between the two hemispheres is maintained or disrupted in mild-to-moderate asymmetric SNHL of adult squirrel monkeys. At week 24 after induction of acoustic injury to the right ear, functional organization of the two hemispheres differs in direction and magnitude of interaural CF difference, percentage of recording sites with spectrally nonoverlapping binaural activation, and the concurrence of peripheral and central activation thresholds. The emergence of this anisomorphic cortical reorganization of the two hemispheres is replicated by simulation based on spike timing-dependent plasticity, where 1 ) AI input from the contralateral ear is dominant, 2 ) reestablishment of relatively shorter contralateral ear input timing drives reorganization, and 3 ) only AI contralateral to the injured ear undergoes major realignment of interaural frequency maps that evolve over months. Asymmetric SNHL disrupts isomorphic organization between the two hemispheres and results in relative local hemispheric autonomy, potentially impairing performance of tasks that require binaural input alignment or interhemispheric processing. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Mild-to-moderate hearing loss in one ear and essentially normal hearing in the other triggers cortical reorganization that is different in the two hemispheres. Asymmetry of cochlea sensitivities does not simply propagate to the two auditory cortices in mirror-image fashion. The resulting anisomorphic cortical reorganization may be a neurophysiological basis of clinical deficits in asymmetric hearing loss, such as

  11. Hearing loss and contributing factors among airport workers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, H M; Rampal, K G

    2012-02-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common and important source of disability among the workers and often caused by occupational noise exposure. Aims of the study were to determine the prevalence and contributing factors of hearing loss among airport workers. A cross-sectional study was carried out at an airport in Malaysia. This study used stratified sampling method that involved 358 workers who were working in 3 different units between November 2008 and March 2009. Data for this study were collected by using questionnaires eliciting sociodemographic, occupational exposure history (previous and present), life-style including smoking habits and health-related data. Otoscopic and pure-tone audiometric tests were conducted for hearing assessment. Noise exposure status was categorize by using a noise logging dosimeter to obtain 8-hour Time-Weighted Average (TWA). Data was analyzed by using SPSS version 12.0.1 and EpiInfo 6.04. The prevalence of hearing loss was 33.5%. Age >40 years old (aOR 4.3, 95%CI 2.2-8.3) is the main risk factors for hearing loss followed by duration of noise exposure >5 years (aOR 2.5, 95%CI 1.4-4.7), smoking (aOR 2.1, 95%CI 1.2-3.4), duration of service >5 years (aOR 2.1, 95%CI 1.1-3.9), exposure to explosion (aOR 6.1, 95%CI 1.3-29.8), exposure to vibration (aOR 2.2, 95%CI 1.1-4.3) and working in engineering unit (aOR 5.9, 95%CI 1.1-30.9). The prevalence rate ratio of hearing loss for nonsmokers aged 40 years old and younger, smokers aged 40 years old and younger, non-smokers older than 40 years old and smokers older than 40 years old was 1.0, 1.7, 2.8 and 4.6 respectively. This result contributes towards better understanding of risk factors for hearing loss, which is relatively common among Malaysian workers.

  12. Hearing loss in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis is associated with otitis and pneumococcal serotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, S. G. B.; Brouwer, M. C.; van der Ende, A.; Hensen, E. F.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 849855 Abstract We assessed the incidence of hearing loss and its relationship with clinical characteristics and pneumococcal serotypes in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis. We analysed hearing loss in 531 adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis included in

  13. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss as the first manifestation of chronic myeloid leukaemia: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, M; Tian, F; Sun, J

    2014-11-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss rarely occurs in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia. We present a case report of a patient who presented with sudden sensorineural hearing loss as the first manifestation of chronic myeloid leukaemia, and review the mechanisms responsible for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in leukaemic patients. A 31-year-old female presented to our clinic with unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. Pure tone audiometry revealed profound sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear at all frequencies. During an investigation into her hearing loss, the patient was found to have chronic myeloid leukaemia. Every case of sudden sensorineural hearing loss must be carefully evaluated, and haematological disorders must be considered in the differential diagnosis of sudden hearing loss.

  14. Cochlear implantation: is hearing preservation necessary in severe to profound hearing loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derinsu, Ufuk; Serin, Gediz Murat; Akdaş, Ferda; Batman, Çağlar

    2011-03-01

    The goal of the cochlear implant surgery is to place the electrode array with minimal damage to preserve the residual hearing. Round-window insertion can be performed in a manner that is potentially less traumatic than the standard cochleostomy. The purpose of the study was to investigate audiological results of the round-window approach using standard electrode. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate our experience in patients with implanted through round window between January 2007 and March 2009. Sixty patients had undergone cochlear implant surgery through the round window with full insertion of a standard electrode array. Preoperative and postoperative pure-tone thresholds were measured for implanted ears in the range of 250 to 4000 Hz. Within these 60 cases, 31 patients had been evaluated. The population comprised 16 women and 15 men. The mean age was 15.96 years (range, 4-64 years). Follow-up times ranged from 6 to 26 months. Preservation of low-frequency hearing (250 and 500 Hz) was achieved in 27 (87%) of 31 patients. Complete hearing preservation (all frequencies) was accomplished in 11 patients (35.48%). No hearing could be determined postoperatively in 4 patients (12.9%), having preoperative thresholds of 120 dB at 250, 500, and 1000 Hz. Round-window approach has been widely used for preservation of residual hearing. In our patients with severe to profound hearing loss, we preserved residual hearing. Although the residual hearing cannot be sufficient for using additional acoustic stimulation, the preserved residual hearing means minimal damage and a more convenient cochlea, so this is promising for future development.

  15. Positive family history of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäckler, A; Eickelmann, A K; Brors, D; Dazert, S; Epplen, J T; Kunstmann, E

    2010-12-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) is a heterogenic disease. Multiple factors influencing aetiology and prognosis are discussed. A retrospective clinical characterisation and analysis of family history of ISSNHL patients was performed to investigate influences on the disease. 186 inpatients diagnosed with ISSNHL were characterised by health records and a standardised questionnaire. Audiograms were observed. 75 controls that had never experienced an event of ISSNHL were questioned about family members being affected by ISSNHL. 63.4% of all patients could be assigned to at least one group with similar causes of ISSNHL (noise exposure, positive family history, infectious diseases, hypothyroidism and fibromuscular dysplasia). A positive family history for ISSNHL has not been reported so far. Therefore, we accentuated the characterisation of patients with positive family history. 21.4% affirmed a positive family history. In ten families, at least two family members were reported as ISSNHL patients. In comparison with patients with negative family history, they tend to be younger, experience more events of ISSNHL and show less improvement of hearing abilities under therapeutic treatment (non-significant). Differences intensified between smokers with positive family history and non-smokers with negative family history. Differences concerning average age were statistically significant (p = 0.001). Within 75 controls 11 families were reported with one member being affected by ISSNHL. In the control group we did not detect any family with more than one ISSNHL patient. The results indicated that patients with positive family history tend to have an aggravated course of ISSNHL. Further studies should help to confirm these results and to identify environmental or genetic factors leading to ISSNHL. This might support a better understanding of the aetiology of ISSNHL and offer new possibilities for prevention and therapy.

  16. Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüerssen, K; Ptok, M

    2006-02-01

    Osteopathia striata is a manifestation of several bone dysplasias. In association with cranial sclerosis, it represents a separate entity that is not limited to the bones, but may also affect other structures, leading to an abnormal face, cleft palate, deafness, heart defects and vertebral anomalies. Neurological findings range from normal development to marked retardation with hydrocephalus, cranial nerve deficiencies and deafness. So far, only a few patients have been described in the literature, demonstrating autosomal dominant inheritance. Here, we report a spontaneous mutation of inheritance. The parents and three sisters of the affected child are healthy. In 78.6% of the reported cases with osteopathia striata and hearing loss, a conductive hearing loss was described. Surgical attempts to mobilize the middle-ear bones were unsuccessful because of swelling and augmented growth of the bones in the middle ears. Here the mobilization of the eardrum was not attempted because the middle ear cavities were epidermized. This is the second case in the literature in which a myringotomy was not done because the middle ear was completely epidermized. As a possible alternative, children with osteopathia striata and cranial sclerosis with hearing loss should be fitted with hearing aids because surgery of the middle ear probably will be difficult or perhaps not possible.

  17. Noise-induced hearing loss: an occupational medicine perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucken, Emily Z; Hong, Robert S

    2014-10-01

    Up to 30 million workers in the United States are exposed to potentially detrimental levels of noise. Although reliable medications for minimizing or reversing noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) are not currently available, NIHL is entirely preventable. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of occupational NIHL. We will focus on at-risk populations and discuss prevention programs. Current prevention programs focus on reducing inner ear damage by minimizing environmental noise production and through the use of personal hearing protective devices. NIHL is the result of a complex interaction between environmental factors and patient factors, both genetic and acquired. The effects of noise exposure are specific to an individual. Trials are currently underway evaluating the role of antioxidants in protection from, and even reversal of, NIHL. Occupational NIHL is the most prevalent occupational disease in the United States. Occupational noise exposures may contribute to temporary or permanent threshold shifts, although even temporary threshold shifts may predispose an individual to eventual permanent hearing loss. Noise prevention programs are paramount in reducing hearing loss as a result of occupational exposures.

  18. [Multicenter trial for sudden hearing loss therapy - planning and concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plontke, S K; Girndt, M; Meisner, C; Probst, R; Oerlecke, I; Richter, M; Steighardt, J; Dreier, G; Weber, A; Baumann, I; Plößl, S; Löhler, J; Laszig, R; Werner, J A; Rahne, T

    2016-04-01

    Systemic steroids are widely used worldwide as a standard of care for primary therapy of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL). The German ISSHL guideline recommends high-dose steroids for primary therapy of ISSHL, without evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The rationale for the treatment of ISSHL using high dose steroids is only based on retrospective cohort studies.This article describes the planning and initiation of a multicenter, national, randomized, controlled clinical trial entitled Efficacy and safety of high dose glucocorticosteroid treatment for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss - a three-armed, randomized, triple-blind, multicenter trial (HODOKORT). This clinical trial aims to compare standard dose with two types of high-dose steroids for primary systemic therapy with respect to their efficacy in improving hearing, and thus communication ability, in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.This study is funded by the "Clinical Trials with High Patient Relevance" research program in the health research framework of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. It is one of two studies by the German Study Center of Clinical Trials of the German Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (DSZ-HNO). Planning and initiation was done in cooperation with the DSZ-HNO, the Coordination Center of Clinical Trials of the Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, and the Study Center of the University Hospital Freiburg.

  19. Consensus on Hearing Aid Candidature and Fitting for Mild Hearing Loss, With and Without Tinnitus: Delphi Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Derek J.; Nicholson, Richard; Smith, Sandra; Hall, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In many countries including the United Kingdom, hearing aids are a first line of audiologic intervention for many people with tinnitus and aidable hearing loss. Nevertheless, there is a lack of high quality evidence to support that they are of benefit for tinnitus, and wide variability in their use in clinical practice especially for people with mild hearing loss. The aim of this study was to identify a consensus among a sample of UK clinicians on the criteria for hearing aid candidature and clinical practice in fitting hearing aids specifically for mild hearing loss with and without tinnitus. This will allow professionals to establish clinical benchmarks and to gauge their practice with that used elsewhere. Design: The Delphi technique, a systematic methodology that seeks consensus amongst experts through consultation using a series of iterative questionnaires, was used. A three-round Delphi survey explored clinical consensus among a panel of 29 UK hearing professionals. The authors measured panel agreement on 115 statements covering: (i) general factors affecting the decision to fit hearing aids, (ii) protocol-driven factors affecting the decision to fit hearing aids, (iii) general practice, and (iv) clinical observations. Consensus was defined as a priori ≥70% agreement across the panel. Results: Consensus was reached for 58 of the 115 statements. The broad areas of consensus were around factors important to consider when fitting hearing aids; hearing aid technology/features offered; and important clinical assessment to verify hearing aid fit (agreement of 70% or more). For patients with mild hearing loss, the greatest priority was given by clinicians to patient-centered criteria for fitting hearing aids: hearing difficulties, motivation to wear hearing aids, and impact of hearing loss on quality of life (chosen as top five by at least 64% of panelists). Objective measures were given a lower priority: degree of hearing loss and shape of the

  20. Systemic steroid reduces long-term hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common complication of pneumococcal meningitis. Treatment with corticosteroids reduces inflammatory response and may thereby reduce hearing loss. However, both experimental studies and clinical trials investigating the effect of corticosteroids on hearing loss have...... generated conflicting results. The objective of the present study was to determine whether systemic steroid treatment had an effect on hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis....

  1. The influence of hearing aids on the speech and language development of children with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomblin, J Bruce; Oleson, Jacob J; Ambrose, Sophie E; Walker, Elizabeth; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2014-05-01

    IMPORTANCE Hearing loss (HL) in children can be deleterious to their speech and language development. The standard of practice has been early provision of hearing aids (HAs) to moderate these effects; however, there have been few empirical studies evaluating the effectiveness of this practice on speech and language development among children with mild-to-severe HL. OBJECTIVE To investigate the contributions of aided hearing and duration of HA use to speech and language outcomes in children with mild-to-severe HL. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational cross-sectional design was used to examine the association of aided hearing levels and length of HA use with levels of speech and language outcomes. One hundred eighty 3- and 5-year-old children with HL were recruited through records of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and referrals from clinical service providers in the general community in 6 US states. INTERVENTIONS All but 4 children had been fitted with HAs, and measures of aided hearing and the duration of HA use were obtained. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Standardized measures of speech and language ability were obtained. RESULTS Measures of the gain in hearing ability for speech provided by the HA were significantly correlated with levels of speech (ρ179 = 0.20; P = .008) and language: ρ155 = 0.21; P = .01) ability. These correlations were indicative of modest levels of association between aided hearing and speech and language outcomes. These benefits were found for children with mild and moderate-to-severe HL. In addition, the amount of benefit from aided hearing interacted with the duration of HA experience (Speech: F4,161 = 4.98; P < .001; Language: F4,138 = 2.91; P < .02). Longer duration of HA experience was most beneficial for children who had the best aided hearing. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The degree of improved hearing provided by HAs was associated with better speech and language development in children

  2. Loudness of brief tones in listeners with normal hearing and sensorineural hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Søren; Florentine, Mary; Poulsen, Torben

    1997-01-01

    To investigate how hearing loss affects the loudness of brief tones, loudness matches between 5- and 200-ms tones were obtained as a function of level. Loudness functions derived from these data indicated that the gain required to restore loudness usually is the same for short and long sounds....

  3. Phonological Awareness and Vocabulary Performance of Monolingual and Bilingual Preschool Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Emily; Werfel, Krystal L.; Schuele, C. Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study compared the phonological awareness skills and vocabulary performance of English monolingual and Spanish-English bilingual children with and without hearing loss. Preschool children with varying degrees of hearing loss (n = 18) and preschool children without hearing loss (n = 19) completed measures of phonological awareness and…

  4. Social Skills in Preschool Children with Unilateral and Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugen, Nina J.; Jacobsen, Karl H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Hearing loss may represent a risk for developing social skills difficulties; however, little is known about the potential risk resulting from unilateral or mild bilateral hearing loss (UMHL). We compared the social skills of 14 children with UMHL and 21 children with moderate to severe hearing loss (MSHL) with those of 123 children with typical…

  5. Commentary: Listening Can Be Exhausting--Fatigue in Children and Adults with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Fred H.; Hornsby, Benjamin W.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Anecdotal reports of fatigue after sustained speech-processing demands are common among adults with hearing loss; however, systematic research examining hearing loss-related fatigue is limited, particularly with regard to fatigue among children with hearing loss (CHL). Many audiologists, educators, and parents have long suspected that CHL…

  6. Hearing loss in post-meningitis patients in Komfo Anokye Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meningitis is one of the infective disorders which can complicate with hearing loss. This study evaluates the incidence of hearing loss in patients who had suffered from a bacterial meningitis infection. The aim of this study was to find out the incidence rate of hearing loss in patients after recovering from meningitis.

  7. Identification of evidence for autoimmune pathology of bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss using proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeon Mi; Kim, Jin Young; Bok, Jinwoong; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Sung Huhn

    2017-10-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (S-SNHL) is an inner ear disorder with an abrupt hearing loss occurring sudden sensorineural hearing loss; LC-MS: liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry; MS: mass spectrometry; autoAb: autoantibody; 1-DE: one-dimensional electrophoresis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hearing loss in children in Østfold county 2000-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Siri; Andersen, Ronny; Anderssen, Sven-Harald

    2015-01-27

    The Directorate of Health recommends hearing screening of all neonates with the aid of otoacoustic emissions (OAE). The goal is to achieve initiation of treatment before the child is six months old. Congenital hearing loss occurs in 1-3 per 1,000 newborns, and the purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence in a large Norwegian dataset. During the period 1 January 2000-31 December 2009, all children who were born in Østfold county, 29,485 neonates in total, were offered hearing screening with the aid of otoacoustic emissions. Those children in whom no emissions were detected were referred to the hearing centre. The dataset also includes children born during the same period who had normal emissions during their neonatal period, but later were diagnosed with hearing loss. The follow-up period of these children lasted until 31 December 2013. Altogether 568 children were referred to the hearing centre after screening. Of these, 73 children underwent brainstem response audiometry under anaesthesia, and 31 (0.11%) were diagnosed with hearing loss through absence of emissions at birth. Eleven (35%) of these received their diagnosis before the age of six months. The median age of diagnosis decreased from 13 (7-74) to 6 (3-23) months, while their number increased from nine to 22 from 2000-04 to 2005-09. Hearing loss after normal otoacoustic emissions at the neonatal stage was diagnosed in ten children (0.03%) and the median age of diagnosis among these was 36 (18-86) months. After the introduction of automated auditory brainstem response audiometry (AABR) during sleep, the use of auditory brainstem response audiometry (ABR) under narcosis fell by half. The prevalence of hearing loss is equal to other Norwegian and international figures. The age of diagnosis decreased during the period. Otoacoustic emissions appear to be an effective screening method in paediatric wards. The use of automated auditory brainstem response audiometry reduces the need for testing under

  9. Decline of Low-Frequency Hearing in People With Ski-Slope Hearing Loss; Implications for Electrode Array Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurbiers, Jasper; Dingemanse, Gertjan; Metselaar, Mick

    2017-12-01

    The decline of low-frequency hearing in people with ski-slope hearing loss varies and might depend on etiology. People with ski-sloping hearing loss might benefit from cochlear implantation with preservation of residual hearing. To reduce the risk of losing low-frequency hearing after implantation, the electrode-array can be inserted partially up to the desired frequency. That, however, obstructs electrical stimulation of lower frequencies. To decide between complete or partial insertion, knowledge regarding the natural decline of low-frequency hearing is helpful. Patients with at least two ski-slope audiograms over time were selected. We calculated progression at lower frequencies for 320 patients. Etiologies for hearing loss were retrieved from medical records. Progression of hearing loss was analyzed separately for patients with uni- and bilateral hearing losses. Relative progression of hearing loss was obtained by comparing progression to a reference group. Average progression of PTA was 1.73 dB/yr and was not significantly different in the bilateral and unilateral group. Etiologies that did not show significantly more progression compared with the reference group could be identified as single or short-lasting pathologic events, whereas long-lasting conditions had significant more progression of PTA. Patients with a ski-slope hearing loss that was caused by a single or short-lasting event have low progression rate and are viable for partial insertion to minimize the risk of damaging residual low-frequency hearing. In the absence of such an event, complete insertion should be considered because faster than normal deterioration of low-frequency hearing over time will probably limit the advantage of preservation of residual hearing.

  10. Sensorineural hearing loss and celiac disease: a coincidental finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Ferri, Gian Gaetano; De Giorgio, Roberto; Fabbri, Angela; Parisi, Claudia; Sciajno, Laura; Castellari, Alessandra; Fiorini, Erica; Piscaglia, Maria; Barbara, Giovanni; Granito, Alessandro; Pirodda, Antonio

    2009-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) can be associated with a variety of extraintestinal manifestations, including neurological diseases. A new neurological correlation has been found between CD and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). To verify the association between SNHL and CD, and to establish whether the neurological hearing impairment in CD is related to nonorgan-specific and antineuronal antibodies, as well as the presence of autoimmune disorders. A sample of 59 consecutive biopsy- and serologically proven CD patients were studied. Among CD patients, 11 were newly diagnosed and 48 were on a gluten-free diet. Hearing function was assessed by audiometric analysis in all CD patients as well as in 59 age- and sex-matched controls. Patients were tested for a panel of immune markers including nonorgan-specific autoantibodies and antineuronal antibodies. SNHL was detected in five CD patients (8.5%) and in two controls (3.4%). In one patient, the SNHL was bilateral, whereas the remaining four had a monolateral impairment. The prevalence of SNHL was not significantly different between CD patients and controls. At least one of the antibodies tested for was positive in two of the five CD patients with SNHL and in 12 of the 54 CD patients without SNHL. Antineuronal antibodies to central nervous system antigens were consistently negative in the five CD patients with SNHL. Only one of the five CD patients with SNHL had Hashimoto thyroiditis. SNHL and CD occur coincidentally. Hearing function should be assessed only in CD patients with clinical signs of hearing deficiency.

  11. Hearing Loss Signals Need for Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are subject to other safety regulations as an electronic product that emits sound vibrations. FDA recently issued ... licensed by states under varied requirements. The Federal Trade Commission advises consumers to avoid businesses that dismiss ...

  12. A Xenograft Model of Vestibular Schwannoma and Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Christine T; Bracho, Olena; Mei, Christine; Bas, Esperanza; Fernandez-Valle, Cristina; Telischi, Fred; Liu, Xue-Zhong

    2018-03-19

    Microsurgical implantation of mouse merlin-deficient Schwann cells (MD-SC) into the cerebellopontine angle of immunodeficient rats will initiate tumor formation, hearing loss, and vestibular dysfunction. The progress in identifying effective drug therapies for treatment of Neurofibromatosis type II (NF2) is limited by the availability of animal models of VS that develop hearing loss and imbalance. A microsurgical technique for implanting MD-SCs onto the cochleovestibular nerve of rats was developed. Ten Rowett Nude rats were implanted with either ∼10 MD-SCs expressing luciferase (N = 5) or vehicle (N = 5). Rats received bioluminescence imaging, auditory brainstem response testing, and were observed for head tilt every 2 weeks after surgery, for a total of 6 weeks. Tumors were harvested and processed with hematoxylin & eosin staining and immunohistochemistry was performed for S100. Rats implanted with MD-SCs developed significantly higher tumor bioluminescence measurements and hearing threshold shifts at multiple frequencies by the 4th and 6th weeks post-implantation, compared with control rats. Rats implanted with MD-SCs also developed gross tumor. The tumor volume was significantly greater than nerve volumes obtained from rats in the control group. All rats with tumors developed a head tilt, while control rats had no signs of vestibular dysfunction. Tumors demonstrated histological features of schwannoma and express S100. Using this microsurgical technique, this xenograft rat model of VS develops tumors involving the cochleovestibular nerve, shifts in hearing thresholds, and vestibular dysfunction. This animal model can be used to investigate tumor-mediated hearing loss and perform preclinical drug studies for NF2.

  13. Toward a Differential Diagnosis of Hidden Hearing Loss in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Charles Liberman

    Full Text Available Recent work suggests that hair cells are not the most vulnerable elements in the inner ear; rather, it is the synapses between hair cells and cochlear nerve terminals that degenerate first in the aging or noise-exposed ear. This primary neural degeneration does not affect hearing thresholds, but likely contributes to problems understanding speech in difficult listening environments, and may be important in the generation of tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. To look for signs of cochlear synaptopathy in humans, we recruited college students and divided them into low-risk and high-risk groups based on self-report of noise exposure and use of hearing protection. Cochlear function was assessed by otoacoustic emissions and click-evoked electrocochleography; hearing was assessed by behavioral audiometry and word recognition with or without noise or time compression and reverberation. Both groups had normal thresholds at standard audiometric frequencies, however, the high-risk group showed significant threshold elevation at high frequencies (10-16 kHz, consistent with early stages of noise damage. Electrocochleography showed a significant difference in the ratio between the waveform peaks generated by hair cells (Summating Potential; SP vs. cochlear neurons (Action Potential; AP, i.e. the SP/AP ratio, consistent with selective neural loss. The high-risk group also showed significantly poorer performance on word recognition in noise or with time compression and reverberation, and reported heightened reactions to sound consistent with hyperacusis. These results suggest that the SP/AP ratio may be useful in the diagnosis of "hidden hearing loss" and that, as suggested by animal models, the noise-induced loss of cochlear nerve synapses leads to deficits in hearing abilities in difficult listening situations, despite the presence of normal thresholds at standard audiometric frequencies.

  14. Front- and rear-facing horizontal sound localization results in adults with unilateral hearing loss and normal hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erin; Reeder, Ruth M; Holden, Laura K; Firszt, Jill B

    2018-03-19

    Binaural hearing allows listeners to take advantage of auditory cues that are necessary for sound localization. Patients with asymmetric or unilateral hearing loss receive degraded or absent binaural cues and often demonstrate decreased sound localization in the horizontal plane. Given the importance of sound localization for everyday function, there is a need for clinically feasible methods to evaluate localization, particularly as validation of intervention for patients with unilateral hearing loss. The present study compared sound localization results obtained for front-facing and rear-facing soundfield systems and for a rear-facing head related transfer function (HRTF) system in two hearing groups, listeners with normal hearing and those with unilateral hearing loss. Results between the three systems were highly correlated and repeatable. Neither age nor a pure-tone average of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz correlated with localization performance among normal hearing participants. Among the UHL group, age and onset of severe to profound hearing loss were positively correlated with localization results; length of deafness was negatively correlated. Behavioral chance performance was established for localization with rear-facing HRTF and rear-facing soundfield test systems; group mean results for unilateral hearing loss participants were significantly better than chance. Continued work is needed in developing clinically feasible evaluation methods for patients with asymmetric or unilateral hearing loss, particularly as the effects of treatment options are assessed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hearing Changes After Intratympanically Applied Steroids for Primary Therapy of Sudden Hearing Loss: A Meta-analysis Using Mathematical Simulations of Drug Delivery Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebau, Arne; Pogorzelski, Olivia; Salt, Alec N; Plontke, Stefan K

    2017-01-01

    Controlled and uncontrolled studies with primary intratympanic or combined intratympanic and systemic application of glucocorticosteroids for idiopathic sudden hearing loss were analyzed by means of a meta-analysis in an attempt to establish optimal local drug delivery protocols. A total of 25 studies with 28 treatment groups between January 2000 and June 2014 were selected that adequately described drug delivery protocols. Cochlear drug levels were calculated by a validated computer model of drug dispersion in the inner ear fluids based on the concentration and volume of glucocorticoids applied, the time the drug remained in the middle ear, and the specific timing of injections. Various factors were compared with hearing outcome, including baseline data, individual parameters of the application protocols, calculated peak concentration (Cmax), and total dose (area under the curve). There was no dependence of hearing outcome on individual parameters of the application protocol, Cmax, or area under the curve. Final hearing threshold was notably independent of delay of treatment. During primary intratympanic or combined steroid therapy of idiopathic sudden hearing loss, the tendency toward early treatment having a positive effect on hearing improvement is thought to be a "sham effect," likely related to spontaneous recovery. Change in pure-tone average may not be an adequate outcome parameter to assess effectiveness of the intervention, as it depends on the degree of initial hearing loss. Final pure-tone average provides a better alternative.

  16. Murine CMV-induced hearing loss is associated with inner ear inflammation and loss of spiral ganglia neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell D Bradford

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV occurs in 0.5-1% of live births and approximately 10% of infected infants develop hearing loss. The mechanism(s of hearing loss remain unknown. We developed a murine model of CMV induced hearing loss in which murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection of newborn mice leads to hematogenous spread of virus to the inner ear, induction of inflammatory responses, and hearing loss. Characteristics of the hearing loss described in infants with congenital HCMV infection were observed including, delayed onset, progressive hearing loss, and unilateral hearing loss in this model and, these characteristics were viral inoculum dependent. Viral antigens were present in the inner ear as were CD(3+ mononuclear cells in the spiral ganglion and stria vascularis. Spiral ganglion neuron density was decreased after infection, thus providing a mechanism for hearing loss. The lack of significant inner ear histopathology and persistence of inflammation in cochlea of mice with hearing loss raised the possibility that inflammation was a major component of the mechanism(s of hearing loss in MCMV infected mice.

  17. Correlation between audiovestibular function tests and hearing outcomes in severe to profound sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi-Te; Huang, Tsung-Wei; Kuo, Shih-Wei; Cheng, Po-Wen

    2009-02-01

    This study investigated whether audiovestibular function tests, namely auditory brain stem response (ABR) and vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests were correlated to hearing outcomes after controlling the effects of other potential confounding factors in severe to profound sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL). Eighty-eight patients with severe to profound SSHL were enrolled in this study. Pretreatment hearing levels, results of audiovestibular function tests, and final hearing outcomes were recorded from retrospective chart reviews. Other factors, including age, gender, delay of treatment, vertigo, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension, were collected as well. Comparative analysis between multiple variables and hearing outcomes was conducted using the cumulative logits model in overall subjects. Further, multivariate analysis of prognostic factors was conducted in the stratified groups of severe (70 dB HL 90 dB HL) SSHL. Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment hearing levels, presence of vertigo, and results of ABR and VEMP testing were significant outcome predictors in the overall subjects. Stratification analysis demonstrated that both the presence of ABR and VEMP waveforms were significantly correlated with better hearing outcomes in the group of severe SSHL [ABR: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 14.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.78 to 122, p = 0.01; VEMP: aOR = 5.91, 95% CI = 1.18 to 29.5, p = 0.03], whereas the presence of vertigo was the only significant negative prognostic factor in the group of profound SSHL (aOR = 0.24, 95% CI = 0.06 to 0.95, p = 0.04). Other variables, including age, gender, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and delay of treatment, were not significantly related to hearing outcomes in both groups (p > 0.05). A predictive hearing recovery table with the combined ABR and VEMP results was proposed for the group of severe SSHL. ABR and VEMP tests should be included in the battery of neurootological examinations in

  18. Evidence of noise-induced hearing loss in young people studying popular music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    The number of students studying popular music, music technology, and sound engineering courses at both school and university to has increased rapidly in the last few years. These students are generally involved in music-making/recording and listening to a high level, usually in environments with amplified music. Recent studies have shown that these students are potentially exposed to a high risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL( and are not covered by the same regulatory framework as employees. This study examined the pure tone air conduction hearing thresholds of 50 undergraduate students, including recent school leavers, on a range of popular music courses, to assess if there was evidence of hearing loss. Forty-four percent of students showed evidence of audiometric notch at 4-6 kHz, and 16% were classified under the UK Occupational Health and Safety guidelines as exhibiting mild hearing loss. Instance of audiometric notch was considerably higher than reported from studies of the general population but was around the same level or lower than that reported from studies of "traditional" music courses and conservatoires, suggesting no higher risk for popular music students than for "classical" music students. No relationship with age was present, suggesting that younger students were as likely to exhibit audiometric notch as mature students. This indicates that these students may be damaging their hearing through leisure activities while still at school, suggesting a need for robust education measures to focus on noise exposure of young people.

  19. Energy transmittance predicts conductive hearing loss in older children and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H.; Simmons, Jeffrey L.

    2003-12-01

    The test performance of a wideband acoustic transfer function (ATF) test and 226-Hz tympanometry was assessed in predicting the presence of conductive hearing loss, based on an air-bone gap of 20 dB or more. Two ATF tests were designed using an improved calibration method over a frequency range (0.25-8 kHz): an ambient-pressure test and a tympanometric test using an excess static pressure in the ear canal. Wideband responses were objectively classified using moment analyses of energy transmittance, which was a more appropriate test variable than energy reflectance. Subjects included adults and children of age 10 years and up, with 42 normal-functioning ears and 18 ears with a conductive hearing loss. Predictors were based on the magnitudes of the moment deviations from the 10th to 90th percentiles of the normal group. Comparing tests at a fixed specificity of 0.90, the sensitivities were 0.28 for peak-compensated static acoustic admittance at 226 Hz, 0.72 for ambient-pressure ATF, and 0.94 for pressurized ATF. Pressurized ATF was accurate at predicting conductive hearing loss with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.95. Ambient-pressure ATF may have sufficient accuracy to use in some hearing-screening applications, whereas pressurized ATF has additional accuracy that may be appropriate for hearing-diagnostic applications.

  20. Bone-anchored hearing devices in children with unilateral conductive hearing loss: a patient-carer perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banga, Rupan; Doshi, Jayesh; Child, Anne; Pendleton, Elizabeth; Reid, Andrew; McDermott, Ann-Louise

    2013-09-01

    We sought to determine the outcome of implantation of a bone-anchored hearing device in children with unilateral conductive hearing loss. A retrospective case note analysis was used in a tertiary referral pediatric hospital to study 17 consecutive cases of pediatric patients with unilateral conductive hearing loss who were fitted with a bone-anchored hearing device between 2005 and 2010. The average age of the patients at the time of bone-anchored hearing device fitting was 10 years 6 months (range, 6 years 3 months to 16 years). Qualitative subjective outcome measures demonstrated benefit. The vast majority of patients reported improved social and physical functioning and improved quality of life. All 17 patients are currently using their bone-anchored hearing device on a daily basis after a follow-up of 6 months. This study has shown improved quality of life in children with unilateral hearing loss after implantation of their bone-anchored hearing device. There was a high degree of patient satisfaction and improvement in health status reported by children and/or carers. Bone-anchored hearing devices have an important role in the management of children with symptomatic unilateral hearing loss. Perhaps earlier consideration of a bone-anchored hearing device would be appropriate in selected cases.

  1. Effects of musical training and hearing loss on pitch discrimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Bianchi, Federica; Dau, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    Our ability to perceive the pitch of complex sounds is essential for melody perception and for our enjoyment of music. It also plays an important role in speech perception to convey intonation and sometimes meaning, e.g., in tonal languages, and greatly helps segregation of competing sound sources...... content of the sound and whether the harmonics are resolved by the auditory frequency analysis operated by cochlear processing. F0DLs are also heavily influenced by the amount of musical training received by the listener and by the spectrotemporal auditory processing deficits that often accompany...... sensorineural hearing loss. This paper reviews the latest evidence for how musical training and hearing loss affect pitch discrimination performance, based on behavioral F0DL experiments with complex tones containing either resolved or unresolved harmonics, carried out in listeners with different degrees...

  2. Importance of early referral in sudden loss of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Michal; Gorlansky, Nicka; Shahin, Eddie; Hacham, Yael; Grant, Pnina; Berger, Miri; Silner, Dina

    To examine the personal and clinical characteristics of patients suffering from sudden hearing loss. The participants were 45 Israeli patients, and the data was collected retrospectively from their medical files. In most cases the injury was sensory, and in one ear. The common symptom was tinnitus, followed by vertigo. In 20 per cent of the cases no preliminary signs were documented. As many as 60 per cent of the participants suffered from high levels of cholesterol. This finding might indicate a link between the events of hearing loss and patients' vascular background. A total of 42 per cent of the participants delayed their appeal to treatment, despite the appearance of symptoms. A significant link was found between quick referral to treatment and recovery. The nurse holds a central role in identifying this group of patients and ensuring their referral to further treatment.

  3. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss: Is antiviral treatment really necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Övet, Gültekin; Alataş, Necat; Kocacan, Fatma Nur; Gürcüoğlu, Sermin Selver; Görgülü, Hakan; Güzelkara, Fatih; Övet, Habibe

    2015-01-01

    It was aimed to investigate the necessity of antiviral agents in the ISSHL treatment. In this study, the patients, diagnosed with sudden hearing loss and admitted in the first 7 days of hearing loss were divided into two groups; a combination therapy was administered to one of the groups, and famciclovir was administered to the other group as an antiviral treatment in addition to the combined therapy. Both groups were compared in terms of levels of recovery. No statistically significant difference was found in the recovery rates between the two groups (p=0.7). In this study, the additional antiviral treatment was found to have no effect on the remission rates in patients with ISSHL treated with combined therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Economic Impact of Adult Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddle, Matthew G; Goman, Adele M; Kernizan, Faradia C; Foley, Danielle M; Price, Carrie; Frick, Kevin D; Lin, Frank R

    2017-10-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) is highly prevalent in older adults and has been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, the overall economic impact of HI is not well described. The goal of this review was to summarize available data on all relevant costs associated with HI among adults. A literature search of PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and Scopus was conducted in August 2015. For this systematic review, data extraction and quality assessment were performed by 2 independent reviewers. Eligibility criteria for included studies were presence of quantitative estimation of economic impact or loss of productivity of patients with HI, full-text English-language access, and publication in an academic, peer-reviewed journal or government report prior to August 2015. This review follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. A meta-analysis was not performed owing to the studies' heterogeneity in outcomes measures, methodology, and study country. The initial literature search yielded 4595 total references. After 2043 duplicates were removed, 2552 publications underwent title and abstract review, yielding 59 articles for full-text review. After full-text review, 25 articles were included. Of the included articles, 8 incorporated measures of disability; 5 included direct estimates of medical expenditures; 8 included other cost estimates; and 7 were related to noise-induced or work-related HI. Estimates of the economic cost of lost productivity varied widely, from $1.8 to $194 billion in the United States. Excess medical costs resulting from HI ranged from $3.3 to $12.8 billion in the United States. Hearing loss is associated with billions of dollars of excess costs in the United States, but significant variance is seen between studies. A rigorous, comprehensive estimate of the economic impact of hearing loss is needed to help guide policy decisions around the management of hearing loss in adults.

  5. ‘Ecstasy’ Enhances Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Church, Michael W.; Zhang, Jinsheng S.; Langford, Megan M.; Perrine, Shane A.

    2013-01-01

    ‘Ecstasy’ or 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine (MDMA) is an amphetamine abused for its euphoric, empathogenic, hallucinatory, and stimulant effects. It is also used to treat certain psychiatric disorders. Common settings for Ecstasy use are nightclubs and “rave” parties where participants consume MDMA and dance to loud music. One concern with the club setting is that exposure to loud sounds can cause permanent sensorineural hearing loss. Another concern is that consumption of MDMA may enha...

  6. Bilateral Sudden Hearing Loss in Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia: MR Appearance

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, Dean K.; Johnston, S. Claiborne

    2015-01-01

    A 46 year-old man with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome presented with sudden development of vertigo and tinnitus and then simultaneous, bilateral, profound, sudden hearing loss. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral high signal within the cochlea, vestibule, and portions of the semicircular canals on the non-enhanced T1-weighted images, most consistent with recent hemorrhage into the otic labyrinth. Serum analysis and bone-marrow biopsy led to diagnosis of Waldenstrom's macroglobulin...

  7. Munchausen Syndrome: A Case with Presenting Sudden Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Munchausen syndrome is a psychiatric disorder that patients direct professionals with plausible, feigned, factitious symptoms. It%u2019s uncommon in otolaryngology clinics. We present a patient, complaint with sudden hearing loss and vertigo, and who underwent additional medical and invasive treatment in this paper. Patients with Munchausen syndrome allow invasive medical care easily, and they can be very convincing. It has to be diagnosed and kept in mind because of avoiding from unnecessary treatment.

  8. Controlling Mitochondrial Dynamics to Mitigate Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    the inner ear resulting from a single acute sound exposure. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Noise induced hearing loss, mitochondria, reactive oxygen species...application for a single loud sound exposure. Dates: 02/15/2016 – 08/14/2016 C. Major Task 3: Identify effective dosing regimen for intraperitoneal mdivi-1...ear canal mdivi-1 application for a single loud sound exposure. We have continued to make progress towards the completion of this Task that involves

  9. Occupational hearing loss of market mill workers in the city of Accra, Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel D Kitcher; Grace Ocansey; Benjamin Abaidoo; Alidu Atule

    2014-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) is an irreversible sensorineural hearing loss associated with exposure to high levels of excessive noise. Prevention measures are not well established in developing countries. This comparative cross sectional study aims to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in both a group of high risk workers and a control group and to assess their knowledge of the effects of noise on hearing health. A total of 101 market mill workers and 103 controls employed within m...

  10. Investigating the Impact of Hearing Aid Use and Auditory Training on Cognition, Depressive Symptoms, and Social Interaction in Adults With Hearing Loss: Protocol for a Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkyekyer, Joanna; Meyer, Denny; Blamey, Peter J; Pipingas, Andrew; Bhar, Sunil

    2018-03-23

    either the first 3 or last 3 months of the 6-month auditory training program. Each participant will be tested at baseline, 3, and 6 months using a neuropsychological battery of computer-based cognitive assessments, together with a depression symptom instrument and a social interaction measure. The primary outcome will be cognitive performance with regard to spatial working memory. Secondary outcome measures include other cognition performance measures, depressive symptoms, social interaction, and hearing satisfaction. Data analysis is currently under way and the first results are expected to be submitted for publication in June 2018. Results from the study will inform strategies for aural rehabilitation, hearing aid delivery, and future hearing loss intervention trials. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03112850; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03112850 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6xz12fD0B). ©Joanna Nkyekyer, Denny Meyer, Peter J Blamey, Andrew Pipingas, Sunil Bhar. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 23.03.2018.

  11. Investigating the Impact of Hearing Aid Use and Auditory Training on Cognition, Depressive Symptoms, and Social Interaction in Adults With Hearing Loss: Protocol for a Crossover Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Denny; Blamey, Peter J; Pipingas, Andrew; Bhar, Sunil

    2018-01-01

    hearing aid (intervention) for either the first 3 or last 3 months of the 6-month auditory training program. Each participant will be tested at baseline, 3, and 6 months using a neuropsychological battery of computer-based cognitive assessments, together with a depression symptom instrument and a social interaction measure. The primary outcome will be cognitive performance with regard to spatial working memory. Secondary outcome measures include other cognition performance measures, depressive symptoms, social interaction, and hearing satisfaction. Results Data analysis is currently under way and the first results are expected to be submitted for publication in June 2018. Conclusions Results from the study will inform strategies for aural rehabilitation, hearing aid delivery, and future hearing loss intervention trials. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03112850; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03112850 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6xz12fD0B). PMID:29572201

  12. Persistent hair cell malfunction contributes to hidden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders, Wilhelmina H A M; Chin, Ian L; Robertson, Donald

    2018-04-01

    Noise exposures that result in fully reversible changes in cochlear neural threshold can cause a reduced neural output at supra-threshold sound intensity. This so-called "hidden hearing loss" has been shown to be associated with selective degeneration of high threshold afferent nerve fiber-inner hair cell (IHC) synapses. However, the electrophysiological function of the IHCs themselves in hidden hearing loss has not been directly investigated. We have made round window (RW) measurements of cochlear action potentials (CAP) and summating potentials (SP) after two levels of a 10 kHz acoustic trauma. The more intense acoustic trauma lead to notch-like permanent threshold changes and both CAP and SP showed reductions in supra-threshold amplitudes at frequencies with altered thresholds as well as from fully recovered regions. However, the interpretation of the results in normal threshold regions was complicated by the likelihood of reduced contributions from adjacent regions with elevated thresholds. The milder trauma showed full recovery of all neural thresholds, but there was a persistent depression of the amplitudes of both CAP and SP in response to supra-threshold sounds. The effect on SP amplitude in particular shows that occult damage to hair cell transduction mechanisms can contribute to hidden hearing loss. Such damage could potentially affect the supra-threshold output properties of surviving primary afferent neurons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A comprehensive study of oxidative stress in sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Fatih; Muderris, Togay; Yalciner, Gokhan; Sevil, Ergun; Bercin, Sami; Ergin, Merve; Babademez, Mehmet Ali; Kiris, Muzaffer

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about the association between idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) and oxidative stress. We investigated changes in a wide range of oxidants and antioxidants to create a comprehensive picture of oxidative imbalance. In the peripheral blood of 50 ISSNHL patients and 50 healthy subjects, total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS), paraoxonase (PON), thiol/disulphide levels were measured. Moreover, a global oxidative stress index, reflecting both oxidative and antioxidant counterparts, was also calculated. One-way analysis between oxidative markers and severity of hearing loss were evaluated. The ISSNHL patients showed significantly higher TOS levels than controls (6.02 ± 3.17 vs. 4.5 ± 2.22; p = 0.018). The oxidative index was also significantly higher in patients than controls (0.39 ± 0.19 vs. 0.3 ± 0.14; p = 0.035). TAS, PON, native thiol, and total thiol were not altered. There was no statistical significance between oxidative markers and severity of hearing loss. The binary logistic regression model revealed that disulphide and TOS were associated with ISSNHL. There are alterations in a wide array of oxidants and antioxidants, with balance shifting toward increased oxidative stress in ISSNHL. Our findings may suggest endothelial dysfunction in ISSNHL etiopathogenesis.

  14. Metabolic disorders in vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierczak, H; Doroszewska, G

    2001-01-01

    Vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss are common complaints among populations of industrial countries, especially in persons older than 40 years. Numerous agents are known to incite vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss, among them hyperinsulinemia, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we proposed to assess the occurrence of hyperinsulinemia, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia in patients suffering from vertigo, tinnitus, or hearing loss of unknown origin. Results of various tests in 48 patients were compared to those in 31 control subjects. Assessments of body mass index, blood pressure, and laryngological, audiometric, and electronystagmographic parameters were performed in all study participants. An oral glucose tolerance test was used to evaluate insulin levels, and lipoprotein phenotyping served to determine cholesterol, triglyceride, and lipoprotein levels. Patients were found to be significantly more overweight (on the basis of body mass index) than were the control subjects. Hypertension was more common among patients than controls, but the difference was significant only between the men in the two groups. Disturbances of glucose metabolism were found in 27.1% of patients but in only 9.7% of controls. Diabetes mellitus was not present in any controls but was identified in four patients. Hyperinsulinemia was almost twice as common in patients as in controls. Only the occurrence of hyperlipoproteinemia seemed not to differ between patients and control subjects. We conclude that such disturbances of glucose metabolism as diabetes mellitus and hyperinsulinemia may be responsible for inner ear diseases, whereas the role of disturbances of lipid metabolism remains vague.

  15. Asymmetric Hearing Loss in Chinese Workers Exposed to Complex Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Nan; Zeng, Lin; Tao, Liyuan; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Qiuling; Qiu, Wei; Zhu, Liangliang; Zhao, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate the audiometric asymmetry in Chinese industrial workers and investigate the effects of noise exposure, sex, and binaural average thresholds on audiometric asymmetry. Data collected from Chinese industrial workers during a cross-sectional study were reanalyzed. Of the 1388 workers, 266 met the inclusion criteria for this study. Each subject underwent a physical examination and an otologic examination and completed a health-related questionnaire. χ and t tests were used to examine the differences between the asymmetric and symmetric hearing loss groups. One hundred thirty-one subjects (49.2%) had a binaural hearing threshold difference of 15 dB or more for at least one frequency, and there was no statistically significant difference between the left and right ears. The asymmetric hearing loss group was not exposed to higher cumulative noise levels (t = 0.522, p = 0.602), and there was no dose-response relation between asymmetry and cumulative noise levels (χ = 6.502, p = 0.165). Men were 1.849 times more likely to have asymmetry than women were (95% confidence interval, 1.051 to 3.253). Among the workers with higher high-frequency hearing thresholds, audiometric asymmetry was 1.024 times more prevalent than that among those with lower high-frequency hearing thresholds (95% confidence interval, 1.004 to 1.044). The results indicated that occupational noise exposure contributed minimally to asymmetry, whereas sex and binaural average thresholds significantly affected audiometric asymmetry. There was no evidence that the left ears were worse than the right ears.

  16. The Importance of Hearing: A Review of the Literature on Hearing Loss for Older People with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Sarah; McShea, Lynzee; Brennan, Siobhan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hearing loss has a significant impact on living well and on communication in all adults, with the numbers affected increasing with age, and adults with learning disabilities being at particular risk. Methods: A review of the literature on hearing loss in older adults with learning disabilities was completed. Results: A significant…

  17. Hearing Health in College Instrumental Musicians and Prevention of Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Anna D; Gooding, Lori F; Shikoh, Fara; Graf, Julie

    2016-03-01

    College musicians exhibit greater declines in hearing than the general population and are at particular risk because they rehearse and perform daily in loud environments. Also, they engage in use of personal listening devices which increases the amount of "exposure" time. Despite increased risk, many do not use hearing protection devices (HPD). The purpose of this study was to (1) to identify the present level of education about hearing health, (2) identify the perceived advantages and disadvantages of using HPD, and (3) evaluate results among different musical instrument groups. A mixed-methods group design was used including both quantitative and qualitative instruments. SPSS was used to generate descriptive statistics, and non-parametric statistical analysis was performed on quantitative data. NVivo software was used to evaluate qualitative responses. Of the 90 college instrumental music students who participated, 12% reported a history of hearing loss, and over one-third reported tinnitus. Seventy-seven percent of participants had never received any training about hearing health and only a small percentage of students used HPD. The most cited reason for lack of protection use was its negative impact on sound quality. However, group differences were noted between brass, woodwind, and percussion musicians in terms of HPD uptake. Improving the type of information disseminated to college musicians may reduce the risk of ear-related deficits. Noise dosage information, HPD information, and prevention education grounded in theories like the Health Belief Model may increase awareness and promote greater use of HPDs in this population.

  18. Bone-anchored hearing aids and unilateral sensorineural hearing loss: why do patients reject them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, D; Dhillon, B; Andrews, R; Green, K M J

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to report the bone-anchored hearing aid uptake and the reasons for their rejection by unilateral sensorineural deafness patients. A retrospective review of 90 consecutive unilateral sensorineural deafness patients referred to the Greater Manchester Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Programme between September 2008 and August 2011 was performed. In all, 79 (87.8 per cent) were deemed audiologically suitable: 24 (30.3 per cent) eventually had a bone-anchored hearing aid implanted and 55 (69.6 per cent) patients declined. Of those who declined, 26 (47.3 per cent) cited perceived limited benefits, 18 (32.7 per cent) cited reservations regarding surgery, 13 (23.6 per cent) preferred a wireless contralateral routing of sound device and 12 (21.8 per cent) cited cosmetic reasons. In all, 32 (40.5 per cent) suitable patients eventually chose the wireless contralateral routing of sound device. The uptake rate was 30 per cent for audiologically suitable patients. Almost half of suitable patients did not perceive a sufficient benefit to proceed to device implantation and a significant proportion rejected it. It is therefore important that clinicians do not to rush to implant all unilateral sensorineural hearing loss patients with a bone-anchored hearing aid.

  19. Voice Handicap Index in Persian Speakers with Various Severities of Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghadoost, Ozra; Moradi, Negin; Dabirmoghaddam, Payman; Aghadoost, Alireza; Naderifar, Ehsan; Dehbokri, Siavash Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the total score and subscale scores of the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) in speakers with and without hearing loss. A further aim was to determine if a correlation exists between severities of hearing loss with total scores and VHI subscale scores. In this cross-sectional, descriptive analytical study, 100 participants, divided in 2 groups of participants with and without hearing loss, were studied. Background information was gathered by interview, and VHI questionnaires were filled in by all participants. For all variables, including mean total score and VHI subscale scores, there was a considerable difference in speakers with and without hearing loss (p handicap related to voice in speakers with hearing loss. In addition, increased severity of hearing loss leads to more severe voice handicap. This finding emphasizes the need for a multilateral assessment and treatment of voice disorders in speakers with hearing loss. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Epidemiological association of olfactory dysfunction with hearing loss and dysphonia in the Korean population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hong; Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Park, Ki Nam; Kim, Jae Wook; Lee, Seung Won; Han, Kyung-do; Chang, Jae Won; Kim, Won Shik; Koh, Yoon Woo; Ban, Myung Jin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to investigate the association between olfactory dysfunction (OD), hearing loss, and dysphonia. The cross-sectional data for 17,984 adults who completed the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2010−12) were analyzed. OD, hearing loss, and dysphonia were assessed using self-reporting questionnaires. The association of OD with hearing loss and dysphonia was evaluated. Hearing loss and dysphonia were significantly more prevalent in patients with OD than in those without OD (hearing loss, 28.1% vs 11.3%; dysphonia, 11.1% vs 5.9%; both P dysphonia, and was greater in those with combined hearing loss and dysphonia than in both patients without these dysfunctions and in those with a single dysfunction (odds ratio 3.115, 95% confidence interval 1.973–4.917). OD was significantly associated with hearing loss and dysphonia. PMID:29382018

  1. A Data-Driven Synthesis of Research Evidence for Domains of Hearing Loss, as Reported by Adults With Hearing Loss and Their Communication Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, Venessa; Akeroyd, Michael A; Hall, Deborah A

    2017-01-01

    A number of assessment tools exist to evaluate the impact of hearing loss, with little consensus among researchers as to either preference or psychometric adequacy. The item content of hearing loss assessment tools should seek to capture the impact of hearing loss on everyday life, but to date no one has synthesized the range of hearing loss complaints from the perspectives of the person with hearing loss and their communication partner. The current review aims to synthesize the evidence on person with hearing loss- and communication partner-reported complaints of hearing loss. Searches were conducted in Cos Conference Papers Index, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Excerpta Medica Database, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar to identify publications from May 1982 to August 2015. A manual search of four relevant journals updated the search to May 2017. Of the 9,516 titles identified, 78 records (comprising 20,306 participants) met inclusion criteria and were taken through to data collection. Data were analyzed using meta-ethnography to form domains representing the person with hearing loss- and communication partner-reported complaints of hearing loss as reported in research. Domains and subdomains mutual to both perspectives are related to "Auditory" (listening, communicating, and speaking), "Social" (relationships, isolation, social life, occupational, and interventions), and "Self" (effort and fatigue, emotions, identity, and stigma). Our framework contributes fundamental new knowledge and a unique resource that enables researchers and clinicians to consider the broader impacts of hearing loss. Our findings can also be used to guide questions during diagnostic assessment and to evaluate existing measures of hearing loss.

  2. Otolithic organ function in patients with profound sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujuan Zhou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Profound sensorineural hearing loss (PSHL is not uncommonly encountered in otology. In clinics, there is a high incidence of otolithic damage in patients with PSHL, but relevant reports are few. Sharing a continuous membranous structure and similar receptor cell ultrastructures, the cochlea and vestibule may be susceptible to the same harmful factors. Disorders of the inner ear may result in a variety of manifestations, including vertigo, spatial disorientation, blurred vision, impaired articulation, and hearing impairment. Considering the diversity of clinical symptoms associated with PSHL with otolithic dysfunction, it may be frequently misdiagnosed, and objective means of testing the function of otolithic organs should be recommended for hearing-impaired patients. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs via air-conducted sound are of great importance for the diagnosis of otolithic function. Hearing devices such as cochlear implants are commonly accepted treatments for PSHL, and early identification and treatment of vestibular disorders may increase the success rate of cochlear implantation. Therefore, it is necessary to increase awareness of otolithic functional states in patients with PSHL.

  3. Developmental Conductive Hearing Loss Reduces Modulation Masking Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, Antje; Chen, Yi-Wen; Sanes, Dan H

    2016-01-01

    Hearing-impaired individuals experience difficulties in detecting or understanding speech, especially in background sounds within the same frequency range. However, normally hearing (NH) human listeners experience less difficulty detecting a target tone in background noise when the envelope of that noise is temporally gated (modulated) than when that envelope is flat across time (unmodulated). This perceptual benefit is called modulation masking release (MMR). When flanking masker energy is added well outside the frequency band of the target, and comodulated with the original modulated masker, detection thresholds improve further (MMR+). In contrast, if the flanking masker is antimodulated with the original masker, thresholds worsen (MMR-). These interactions across disparate frequency ranges are thought to require central nervous system (CNS) processing. Therefore, we explored the effect of developmental conductive hearing loss (CHL) in gerbils on MMR characteristics, as a test for putative CNS mechanisms. The detection thresholds of NH gerbils were lower in modulated noise, when compared with unmodulated noise. The addition of a comodulated flanker further improved performance, whereas an antimodulated flanker worsened performance. However, for CHL-reared gerbils, all three forms of masking release were reduced when compared with NH animals. These results suggest that developmental CHL impairs both within- and across-frequency processing and provide behavioral evidence that CNS mechanisms are affected by a peripheral hearing impairment.

  4. Developmental Conductive Hearing Loss Reduces Modulation Masking Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Ihlefeld

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hearing-impaired individuals experience difficulties in detecting or understanding speech, especially in background sounds within the same frequency range. However, normally hearing (NH human listeners experience less difficulty detecting a target tone in background noise when the envelope of that noise is temporally gated (modulated than when that envelope is flat across time (unmodulated. This perceptual benefit is called modulation masking release (MMR. When flanking masker energy is added well outside the frequency band of the target, and comodulated with the original modulated masker, detection thresholds improve further (MMR+. In contrast, if the flanking masker is antimodulated with the original masker, thresholds worsen (MMR−. These interactions across disparate frequency ranges are thought to require central nervous system (CNS processing. Therefore, we explored the effect of developmental conductive hearing loss (CHL in gerbils on MMR characteristics, as a test for putative CNS mechanisms. The detection thresholds of NH gerbils were lower in modulated noise, when compared with unmodulated noise. The addition of a comodulated flanker further improved performance, whereas an antimodulated flanker worsened performance. However, for CHL-reared gerbils, all three forms of masking release were reduced when compared with NH animals. These results suggest that developmental CHL impairs both within- and across-frequency processing and provide behavioral evidence that CNS mechanisms are affected by a peripheral hearing impairment.

  5. Risk of hearing loss in small for gestational age neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melani Rakhmi Mantu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Small for gestational age (SGA neonates often have intrauterine growth restriction due to placental insufficiency and chronic hypoxia. These conditions may cause developmental impairment, psychosocial disabilities, or metabolic dysfunction in later life. Previous studies have shown greater incidence of speech and language disabilities, learning impairment, and ncuromotor dysfunction in term SGA infants compared to term appropriate for gestational age (AGA infants. Objective To compare hearing loss in SGA and AGA neonates using otoacoustic emission (OAE tests and to study correlations between maternal risk factors and hearing loss in SGA neonates. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in St. Borromeus Hospital, Limijati Hospital, and Melinda Hospital in Bandung from February to May 2010. Study subjects consisted of full-term neonates born in these three hospitals. A retrospective medical record review was performed for this Study. Statistical analysis was done by multivariable logistic-regression. Results There was a total of 4279 subjects in our study, including 100 SGA neonates and 4179 AGA neonates. We observed a greater percentage of OAE 'refer' (indicating abnormal OAE results in the SGA group compared to the AGA group (P<0.001, Z=1.3.247. For subjects with OAE ,refer' results, we also analyzed the correlation to the following maternal risk factors: smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and asthma. We also found significant differences between those with and without each of the four maternal risk factors studied (P<0.001. By using multivariant analysis to compare SGA and AGA neonates, we found the odds ratio (OR to be 4.34 (95% CI 2.52 to'7.49, P = 0.001, meaning the SGA group had a 4.34 times higher risk of hearing loss than the AGA group. Conclusion SGA neonates had a higher risk of hearing loss than A(3A neonates. In addition, maternal smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and asthma significantly correlated to

  6. Temporal and spectral resolution of hearing in patients with precipitous hearing loss: Gap release of masking (GRM) and the role of cognitive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin David

    2005-01-01

    gaps, masking was measured repeatedly over 3 months post-fitting. GRM was characterized as the release from masking under the gap conditions. The cognitive skills of the participants were assessed with two tests for measuring working memory capacity and lexical vigilance. The results showed that while....... For the temporal-gap condition, they performed as normally hearing at both low and high frequencies. These results suggest that patients with precipitous hearing loss do not maintain normal spectral resolution through the low-frequency region, in which the hearing threshold levels are otherwise normal...

  7. Talker Differences in Clear and Conversational Speech: Vowel Intelligibility for Older Adults with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sarah Hargus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the range of talker variability for vowel intelligibility in clear versus conversational speech for older adults with hearing loss and to determine whether talkers who produced a clear speech benefit for young listeners with normal hearing also did so for older adults with hearing loss. Method: Clear and conversational vowels…

  8. HEARING-LOSS AND THE MAYER-ROKITANSKY-KUSTER-HAUSER SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STRUBBE, EH; CREMERS, CWRJ; DIKKERS, FG; WILLEMSEN, WNP

    The hearing of 51 female patients with the Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome was examined using otoscopy and standard audiometry. A unilateral or bilateral hearing loss of more than 15 dB Fletcher index was found in 13 of 51 (25.5%). Four of these 13 patients had a hearing loss of less than 20

  9. Comparisons of Social Competence in Young Children with and without Hearing Loss: A Dynamic Systems Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michael F.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Cejas, Ivette

    2015-01-01

    This study compared levels of social competence and language development in 74 young children with hearing loss and 38 hearing peers aged 2.5-5.3 years. This study was the first to examine the relationship between oral language and social competence using a dynamic systems framework in children with and without hearing loss. We hypothesized that,…

  10. Children with Mild Bilateral and Unilateral Hearing Loss: Parents' Reflections on Experiences and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Grandpierre, Viviane; Durieux-Smith, Andrée; Gaboury, Isabelle; Coyle, Doug; Na, Eunjung; Sallam, Nusaiba

    2016-01-01

    Children with mild bilateral and unilateral hearing loss are now commonly identified early through newborn hearing screening initiatives. There remains considerable uncertainty about how to support parents and about which services to provide for children with mild bilateral and unilateral hearing loss. The goal of this study was to learn about…

  11. Auditory Temporal-Organization Abilities in School-Age Children with Peripheral Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koravand, Amineh; Jutras, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to assess auditory sequential organization (ASO) ability in children with and without hearing loss. Method: Forty children 9 to 12 years old participated in the study: 12 with sensory hearing loss (HL), 12 with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), and 16 with normal hearing. They performed an ASO task in which…

  12. The Relationship between Language Development and Behaviour Problems in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jim; McCann, Donna; Watkin, Peter; Worsfold, Sarah; Kennedy, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Background: There are well-replicated findings that link poor development on a range of communication skills with increased behavioural problems. This paper examines this relationship in children with hearing loss. Method: One hundred and twenty children with hearing loss (67 boys, 53 girls) and 63 hearing children (37 boys, 26 girls) with a mean…

  13. Factors associated with hearing loss in a normal-hearing guinea pig model of Hybrid cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Chiemi; Nguyen-Huynh, Anh; Loera, Katherine; Stark, Gemaine; Reiss, Lina

    2014-10-01

    The Hybrid cochlear implant (CI), also known as Electro-Acoustic Stimulation (EAS), is a new type of CI that preserves residual acoustic hearing and enables combined cochlear implant and hearing aid use in the same ear. However, 30-55% of patients experience acoustic hearing loss within days to months after activation, suggesting that both surgical trauma and electrical stimulation may cause hearing loss. The goals of this study were to: 1) determine the contributions of both implantation surgery and EAS to hearing loss in a normal-hearing guinea pig model; 2) determine which cochlear structural changes are associated with hearing loss after surgery and EAS. Two groups of animals were implanted (n = 6 per group), with one group receiving chronic acoustic and electric stimulation for 10 weeks, and the other group receiving no direct acoustic or electric stimulation during this time frame. A third group (n = 6) was not implanted, but received chronic acoustic stimulation. Auditory brainstem response thresholds were followed over time at 1, 2, 6, and 16 kHz. At the end of the study, the following cochlear measures were quantified: hair cells, spiral ganglion neuron density, fibrous tissue density, and stria vascularis blood vessel density; the presence or absence of ossification around the electrode entry was also noted. After surgery, implanted animals experienced a range of 0-55 dB of threshold shifts in the vicinity of the electrode at 6 and 16 kHz. The degree of hearing loss was significantly correlated with reduced stria vascularis vessel density and with the presence of ossification, but not with hair cell counts, spiral ganglion neuron density, or fibrosis area. After 10 weeks of stimulation, 67% of implanted, stimulated animals had more than 10 dB of additional threshold shift at 1 kHz, compared to 17% of implanted, non-stimulated animals and 0% of non-implanted animals. This 1-kHz hearing loss was not associated with changes in any of the cochlear measures

  14. Screening for hearing loss versus parental concern regarding hearing problems: Subsequent referral and treatment for otitis media in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Willeke; Anteunis, Lucien J. C.; Chenault, Michelene N.; Meesters, Cor; Haggard, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The present study investigates whether general practitioner (GP) consultation initiated by failing the population hearing screening at age nine months or GP consultation because of parental concern over ear/hearing problems was more important in deciding on referral and/or surgical treatment of otitis media (OM). Design A questionnaire covering the history between birth and 21 months of age was used to obtain information on referral after failing the hearing screening, GP consultations for ear/hearing problems, and subsequent referral to a specialist and possible surgical treatment at an ENT department. Setting The province of Limburg, the Netherlands. Subjects Healthy infants invited for the hearing screening at age nine months, who responded in an earlier study called PEPPER (Persistent Ear Problems, Providing Evidence for Referral, response rate 58%). Main outcome measures The odds of a child being surgically treated for OM. Results The response rate for the present questionnaire was 72%. Of all children tested, 3.9% failed the hearing screening and were referred to their GP. Of all 2619 children in this study, 18.6% visited their GP with ear/hearing problems. Children failing the hearing screening without GP consultation for ear/hearing problems were significantly more often treated surgically for OM than children passing the hearing screening but with GP consultation for ear/hearing problems. Conclusion Objectified hearing loss, i.e. failing the hearing screening, was important in the decision for surgical treatment in infants in the Netherlands. PMID:22794165

  15. [FEDERAL CLINICAL RECOMMENDATIONS IN DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF HEARING LOSS DUE TO NOISE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeninskaya, E E; Bukhtiarov, I V; Bushmanov, A Iu; Dayhes, N A; Denisov, E I; Izmerov, N F; Mazitova, N N; Pankova, V B; Preobrazhenskaya, E A; Prokopenko, L V; Simonova, N I; Tavartkiladze, G A; Fedina, I N

    2016-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss is a slowly developing hearing impairment, caused by occupational exposure to excessive noise levels, constitutes a lesion of the auditory analyzer and clinically manifested as chronic bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Currently, there is not a treatment that provide a cure of sensorineural hearing loss. Regular, individually tailored treatment should be directed to the pathogenic mechanisms and specific clinical symptoms of hearing loss, as well as the prevention of complications. We recommend using non-drug therapies that can improve blood flow in labyrinth, tissue and cellular metabolism.

  16. Bilateral bone conduction devices: improved hearing ability in children with bilateral conductive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dun, Catharina A J; Agterberg, Martijn J H; Cremers, Cor W R J; Hol, Myrthe K S; Snik, Ad F M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether children with bilateral conductive hearing loss benefit from their second device (i.e., the bilateral bone conduction device [BCD]). Speech recognition in noise was assessed in 10 children fitted with bilateral BCDs during childhood. Speech recognition was measured in 2 conditions with both BCDs active. Spatial resolution was tested with the Minimum Audible Angle test in the bilateral and monaural listening conditions. Children demonstrated an improvement in speech recognition when speech was presented from the front and noise was presented from the right-hand side as compared with both speech and noise being presented from the front. The minimum audible angle decreased from 57° in the best monaural condition to 13° in the bilateral condition. The audiological outcomes demonstrate the advantage of bilateral BCD fitting in children with bilateral conductive hearing loss.

  17. The comparative study of reading comprehension in normal-hearing and hearing-loss student

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamali Afrooz; Saeid Hasanzadeh; Fatemeh Nikkhou

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: In different language approaches, reading is considered as a major skill. Language skills comprising listening, speaking, reading and writing are completely interlinked with each other. Thus, providing active application of listening and speaking skills, children will learn reading and writing skills easily. The aim of this research was to compare reading skills of hearing-loss students studying at exceptional schools with normal students of different degrees.Methods: The ...

  18. Noise Induced Hearing Loss in Iran: (1997-2012): Systematic Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanzadeh, Ahmad; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Fallahi, Majid; Kamalinia, Mojtaba; Ghassemi, Shadi; Golmohammadi, Rostam

    2014-12-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss, which is one of the 10 leading occupational diseases, is a debilitating and irreversible disease. During the recent 15-years period (1997-2012), several studies have investigated the association between noise, hearing damage and other side effects of noise in Iran. The aim of this study was to review systematically the relevant literature related to noise-induced hearing loss, lead to developing noise exposure limits. In this systematic review, two researchers independently extracted the data from 31 past studies that had considered noise-induced hearing loss (including hearing loss, temporary and permanent hearing threshold shift and auditory trauma). The data were then recorded in a modified form and Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS, version 16.0. In analyzed studies the weighted average equivalent sound pressure level [L Aeq ] was 90.29 dB(A) and average hearing loss was 26.44 dB(A). The Highest degree of hearing loss in the right ear was associated at 4000 Hz, and the highest degree of hearing loss in the left ear was associated to 1000 and 4000 Hz. The majority of the reviewed studies have confirmed that exposure to a noise level above 85 dB (A) can lead to an increased chance of hearing loss. Furthermore, the results of the present review indicated that as L Aeq increased up to 85 dB(A), so did the severity of the hearing loss.

  19. Noise Induced Hearing Loss in Iran: (1997–2012): Systematic Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOLTANZADEH, Ahmad; EBRAHIMI, Hossein; FALLAHI, Majid; KAMALINIA, Mojtaba; GHASSEMI, Shadi; GOLMOHAMMADI, Rostam

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss, which is one of the 10 leading occupational diseases, is a debilitating and irreversible disease. During the recent 15-years period (1997–2012), several studies have investigated the association between noise, hearing damage and other side effects of noise in Iran. The aim of this study was to review systematically the relevant literature related to noise-induced hearing loss, lead to developing noise exposure limits. In this systematic review, two researchers independently extracted the data from 31 past studies that had considered noise-induced hearing loss (including hearing loss, temporary and permanent hearing threshold shift and auditory trauma). The data were then recorded in a modified form and Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS, version 16.0. In analyzed studies the weighted average equivalent sound pressure level [L Aeq ] was 90.29 dB(A) and average hearing loss was 26.44 dB(A). The Highest degree of hearing loss in the right ear was associated at 4000 Hz, and the highest degree of hearing loss in the left ear was associated to 1000 and 4000 Hz. The majority of the reviewed studies have confirmed that exposure to a noise level above 85 dB (A) can lead to an increased chance of hearing loss. Furthermore, the results of the present review indicated that as L Aeq increased up to 85 dB(A), so did the severity of the hearing loss. PMID:26171352

  20. Determinants of Hearing Loss in Perforations of the Tympanic Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ritvik P.; Rosowski, John J.; Voss, Susan E.; O’Neil, Ellen; Merchant, Saumil N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although tympanic membrane perforations are common, there have been few systematic studies of the structural features determining the magnitude of the resulting conductive hearing loss. Our recent experimental and modeling studies predicted that the conductive hearing loss will increase with increasing perforation size, be independent of perforation location (contrary to popular otologic belief), and increase with decreasing size of the middle-ear and mastoid air space (an idea new to otology). Objective To test our predictions regarding determinants of conductive hearing loss in tympanic membrane perforations against clinical data gathered from patients. Study Design Prospective clinical study. Setting Tertiary referral center. Inclusion Criteria Patients with tympanic membrane perforations without other middle-ear disease. Main Outcome Measures Size and location of perforation; air-bone gap at 250, 500, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 Hz; and tympanometric estimate of volume of the middle-ear air spaces. Results Isolated tympanic membrane perforations in 62 ears from 56 patients met inclusion criteria. Air-bone gaps were largest at the lower frequencies and decreased as frequency increased. Air-bone gaps increased with perforation size at each frequency. Ears with small middle-ear volumes, ≤4.3 ml (n = 23), had significantly larger air-bone gaps than ears with large middle-ear volumes, >4.3 ml (n = 39), except at 2,000 Hz. The mean air-bone gaps in ears with small volumes were 10 to 20 dB larger than in ears with large volumes. Perforations in anterior versus posterior quadrants showed no significant differences in air-bone gaps at any frequency, although anterior perforations had, on average, air-bone gaps that were smaller by 1 to 8 dB at lower frequencies. Conclusion The conductive hearing loss resulting from a tympanic membrane perforation is frequency-dependent, with the largest losses occurring at the lowest sound frequencies; increases as size of the