WorldWideScience

Sample records for underlying genetic etiology

  1. [Genetic etiology of eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raevuori, Anu

    2013-01-01

    Most twin studies suggest a heritability of SO to 80% for liability to eating disorders. At least moderate heritability is further supported by family and adoption studies. Polymorphisms of the 5-HT2A and BDNF genes appear robust candidates for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, while linkage studies suggest loci for anorexia nervosa in chromosome 1 and a locus in chromosome 10 for bulimia nervosa. Contemporary Western culture has a salient role in the rising incidence of eating disorders, and epigenetic mechanisms are suggested to be involved. In the near future, GWAS will likely provide compelling new data of genetic etiology and mechanisms of eating disorders.

  2. Etiologies underlying sex differences in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, Sara M; Pfaff, Donald W

    2014-08-01

    The male predominance of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is one of the best-known, and at the same time, one of the least understood characteristics of these disorders. In this paper we review genetic, epigenetic, hormonal, and environmental mechanisms underlying this male preponderance. Sex-specific effects of Y-linked genes (including SRY expression leading to testicular development), balanced and skewed X-inactivation, genes that escape X-inactivation, parent-of-origin allelic imprinting, and the hypothetical heterochromatin sink are reviewed. These mechanisms likely contribute to etiology, instead of being simply causative to ASD. Environments, both internal and external, also play important roles in ASD's etiology. Early exposure to androgenic hormones and early maternal immune activation comprise environmental factors affecting sex-specific susceptibility to ASD. The gene-environment interactions underlying ASD, suggested here, implicate early prenatal stress as being especially detrimental to boys with a vulnerable genotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic Correlation between Body Fat Percentage and Cardiorespiratory Fitness Suggests Common Genetic Etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnurr, Theresia M; Gjesing, Anette P; Sandholt, Camilla H

    2016-01-01

    reflect a common genetic origin. In this study we aimed to 1) examine genetic correlations between body fat% and CRF; 2) determine whether CRF can be attributed to a genetic risk score (GRS) based on known body fat% increasing loci; and 3) examine whether the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) locus...... findings suggest a shared genetic etiology between whole body fat% and CRF. © 2016 Schnurr et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original...... author and source are credited....

  4. Genetic Correlation between Body Fat Percentage and Cardiorespiratory Fitness Suggests Common Genetic Etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnurr, Theresia Maria; Gjesing, Anette Marianne Prior; Sandholt, Camilla Helene

    2016-01-01

    reflect a common genetic origin. In this study we aimed to 1) examine genetic correlations between body fat% and CRF; 2) determine whether CRF can be attributed to a genetic risk score (GRS) based on known body fat% increasing loci; and 3) examine whether the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) locus...... findings suggest a shared genetic etiology between whole body fat% and CRF....

  5. Genetics of infectious diseases: hidden etiologies and common pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Marianna; Di Pietrantonio, Tania; Schurr, Erwin

    2011-09-01

    Since the completion of the human genome sequence, the study of common genetic polymorphisms in complex human diseases has become a main activity of human genetics. Employing genome-wide association studies, hundreds of modest genetic risk factors have been identified. In infectious diseases the identification of common risk factors has been varied and as in other common diseases it seems likely that important genetic risk factors remain to be discovered. Nevertheless, the identification of disease-specific genetic risk factors revealed an unexpected overlap in susceptibility genes of diverse inflammatory and infectious diseases. Analysis of the multi-disease susceptibility genes has allowed the definition of shared key pathways of inflammatory dysregulation and suggested unexpected infectious etiologies for other "non-infectious" common diseases.

  6. Molecular Genetic Evidence for Shared Etiology of Autism and Prodigy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthsatz, Joanne; Petrill, Stephen A; Li, Ning; Wolock, Samuel L; Bartlett, Christopher W

    2015-01-01

    Child prodigies are rare individuals with an exceptional working memory and unique attentional skills that may facilitate the attainment of professional skill levels at an age well before what is observed in the general population. Some characteristics of prodigy have been observed to be quantitatively similar to those observed in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), suggesting possible shared etiology, though objectively validated prodigies are so rare that evidence has been sparse. We performed a family-based genome-wide linkage analysis on 5 nuclear and extended families to search for genetic loci that influence the presence of both prodigy and ASD, assuming that the two traits have the same genetic etiology in the analysis model in order to find shared loci. A shared locus on chromosome 1p31-q21 reached genome-wide significance with two extended family-based linkage methods consisting of the Bayesian PPL method and the LOD score maximized over the trait parameters (i.e., MOD), yielding a simulation-based empirical significance of p = 0.000742 and p = 0.000133, respectively. Within linkage regions, we performed association analysis and assessed if copy number variants could account for the linkage signal. No evidence of specificity for either the prodigy or the ASD trait was observed. This finding suggests that a locus on chromosome 1 increases the likelihood of both prodigy and autism in these families. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Beliefs about the Etiology of Homosexuality and about the Ramifications of Discovering Its Possible Genetic Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Jane P.; Pfeffer, Carla A.; Jayaratne, Toby Epstein; Feldbaum, Merle; Petty, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Homosexuality is viewed by many as a social problem. As such, there has been keen interest in elucidating the origins of homosexuality among many scholars, from anthropologists to zoologists, psychologists to theologians. Research has shown that those who believe sexual orientation is inborn are more likely to have tolerant attitudes toward gay men and lesbians, whereas those who believe it is a choice have less tolerant attitudes. The current qualitative study used in-depth, open-ended telephone interviews with 42 White and 44 Black Americans to gain insight into the public's beliefs about the possible genetic origins of homosexuality. Along with etiological beliefs (and the sources of information used to develop those beliefs), we asked respondents to describe the benefits and dangers of scientists discovering the possible genetic basis for homosexuality. We found that although limited understanding and biased perspectives likely led to simplistic reasoning concerning the origins and genetic basis of homosexuality, many individuals appreciated complex and interactive etiological perspectives. These interactive perspectives often included recognition of some type of inherent aspect, such as a genetic factor(s), that served as an underlying predisposition that would be manifested after being influenced by other factors such as choice or environmental exposures. We also found that beliefs in a genetic basis for homosexuality could be used to support very diverse opinions, including those in accordance with negative eugenic agendas. PMID:17594974

  8. Beliefs about the etiology of homosexuality and about the ramifications of discovering its possible genetic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Jane P; Pfeffer, Carla A; Jayaratne, Toby Epstein; Feldbaum, Merle; Petty, Elizabeth M

    2007-01-01

    Homosexuality is viewed by many as a social problem. As such, there is a keen interest in elucidating the origins of homosexuality among many scholars, from anthropologists to zoologists, from psychologists to theologians. Research has shown that those who believe sexual orientation is inborn are more likely to have tolerant attitudes toward gay men and lesbians, whereas those who believe it is a choice have less tolerant attitudes. The current qualitative study used in-depth, open-ended telephone interviews with 42 White and 44 Black Americans to gain insight into the public's beliefs about the possible genetic origins of homosexuality. Along with etiological beliefs (and the sources of information used to develop these beliefs), we asked respondents to describe the benefits and dangers of scientists discovering the possible genetic basis for homosexuality. We found that although limited understanding and biased perspectives likely led to simplistic reasoning concerning the origins and genetic basis of homosexuality, many individuals appreciated the complex and interactive etiological perspectives. These interactive perspectives often included recognition of some type of inherent aspect, such as a genetic factor(s), that served as an underlying predisposition that would be manifested after being influenced by other factors such as choice or environmental exposures. We also found that beliefs in a genetic basis for homosexuality could be used to support very diverse opinions including those in accordance with negative eugenic agendas.

  9. Present status of understanding on the genetic etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasgupta S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age with a prevalence of approximately 7-10% worldwide. PCOS reflects multiple potential aetiologies and variable clinical manifestations. This syndrome is characterized by serious health implications such as diabetes, coronary heart diseases and cancer and also leads to infertility. PCOS can be viewed as a heterogeneous androgen excess disorder with varying degrees of reproductive and metabolic abnormalities determined by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this paper, we have attempted a comprehensive review of primarily molecular genetic studies done so far on PCOS. We have also covered the studies focusing on the environmental factors and impact of ethnicity on the presentation of this syndrome. A large number of studies have been attempted to understand the aetiological mechanisms behind PCOS both at the clinical and molecular genetic levels. In the Indian context, majority of the PCOS studies have been confined to the clinical dimensions. However, a concrete genetic mechanism behind the manifestation of PCOS is yet to be ascertained. Understanding of this complex disorder requires comprehensive studies incorporating relatively larger homogenous samples for genetic analysis and taking into account the ethnicity and the environmental conditions of the population/cohort under study. Research focused on these aspects may provide better understanding on the genetic etiology and the interaction between genes and environment, which may help develop new treatment methods and possible prevention of the syndrome.

  10. Unraveling the genetic etiology of adult antisocial behavior: a genome-wide association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorim J Tielbeek

    Full Text Available Crime poses a major burden for society. The heterogeneous nature of criminal behavior makes it difficult to unravel its causes. Relatively little research has been conducted on the genetic influences of criminal behavior. The few twin and adoption studies that have been undertaken suggest that about half of the variance in antisocial behavior can be explained by genetic factors. In order to identify the specific common genetic variants underlying this behavior, we conduct the first genome-wide association study (GWAS on adult antisocial behavior. Our sample comprised a community sample of 4816 individuals who had completed a self-report questionnaire. No genetic polymorphisms reached genome-wide significance for association with adult antisocial behavior. In addition, none of the traditional candidate genes can be confirmed in our study. While not genome-wide significant, the gene with the strongest association (p-value = 8.7×10(-5 was DYRK1A, a gene previously related to abnormal brain development and mental retardation. Future studies should use larger, more homogeneous samples to disentangle the etiology of antisocial behavior. Biosocial criminological research allows a more empirically grounded understanding of criminal behavior, which could ultimately inform and improve current treatment strategies.

  11. Unraveling the Genetic Etiology of Adult Antisocial Behavior: A Genome-Wide Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielbeek, Jorim J.; Medland, Sarah E.; Benyamin, Beben; Byrne, Enda M.; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wray, Naomi R.; Verweij, Karin J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Crime poses a major burden for society. The heterogeneous nature of criminal behavior makes it difficult to unravel its causes. Relatively little research has been conducted on the genetic influences of criminal behavior. The few twin and adoption studies that have been undertaken suggest that about half of the variance in antisocial behavior can be explained by genetic factors. In order to identify the specific common genetic variants underlying this behavior, we conduct the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) on adult antisocial behavior. Our sample comprised a community sample of 4816 individuals who had completed a self-report questionnaire. No genetic polymorphisms reached genome-wide significance for association with adult antisocial behavior. In addition, none of the traditional candidate genes can be confirmed in our study. While not genome-wide significant, the gene with the strongest association (p-value = 8.7×10−5) was DYRK1A, a gene previously related to abnormal brain development and mental retardation. Future studies should use larger, more homogeneous samples to disentangle the etiology of antisocial behavior. Biosocial criminological research allows a more empirically grounded understanding of criminal behavior, which could ultimately inform and improve current treatment strategies. PMID:23077488

  12. Genetic etiology and clinical consequences of complete and incomplete achromatopsia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Slingerland, N.W.; Roosing, S.; Schooneveld, M.J. van; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Moll-Ramirez, N.G. van; Born, L.I. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Klaver, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the genetic causes of complete and incomplete achromatopsia (ACHM) and assess the association between disease-causing mutations, phenotype at diagnosis, and visual prognosis. DESIGN: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. PARTICIPANTS: Probands with complete ACHM (n

  13. Genetic etiology and clinical consequences of complete and incomplete achromatopsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, Alberta A. H. J.; Slingerland, Niki W. R.; Roosing, Susanne; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; van Lith-Verhoeven, Janneke J. C.; van Moll-Ramirez, Norka; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the genetic causes of complete and incomplete achromatopsia (ACHM) and assess the association between disease-causing mutations, phenotype at diagnosis, and visual prognosis. DESIGN: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. PARTICIPANTS: Probands with complete ACHM (n

  14. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) etiology as revealed by pathway genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Sibel; Donahoe, Patricia K

    2007-05-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common birth defect with high mortality and morbidity. Two hundred seventy CDH patients were ascertained, carefully phenotyped, and classified as isolated (diaphragm defects alone) or complex (with additional anomalies) cases. We established different strategies to reveal CDH-critical chromosome loci and genes in humans. Candidate genes for sequencing analyses were selected from CDH animal models, genetic intervals of recurrent chromosomal aberration in humans, such as 15q26.1-q26.2 or 1q41-q42.12, as well as genes in the retinoic acid and related pathways and those known to be involved in embryonic lung development. For instance, FOG2, GATA4, and COUP-TFII are all needed for both normal diaphragm and lung development and are likely all in the same genetic and molecular pathway. Linkage analysis was applied first in a large inbred family and then in four multiplex families with Donnai-Barrow syndrome (DBS) associated with CDH. 10K SNP chip and microsatellite markers revealed a DBS locus on chromosome 2q23.3-q31.1. We applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) techniques to over 30, mostly complex, CDH patients and found a de novo microdeletion in a patient with Fryns syndrome related to CDH. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) techniques allowed us to further define the deletion interval. Our aim is to identify genetic intervals and, in those, to prioritize genes that might reveal molecular pathways, mutations in any step of which, might contribute to the same phenotype. More important, the elucidation of pathways may ultimately provide clues to treatment strategies. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Identification of Genetic Factors in the Etiology of Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argel Aguilar Valles

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that affects approximately 1% of the worldwide population. It is characterized by psychotic episodes in which individuals have hallucinations or delusions. This disorder also involves a strong element of social dysfunction, lack of motivation and profound cognitive deficits. The causes of this disorder remain largely unknown, but evidence indicates that arises from changes in the development of the central nervous system. Among the identified risk factors for this disorder are several environmental events, including prenatal infections and malnutrition, and complications during childbirth. However, the most important factor seems to be genetics. Despite this, the identification of genes involved in the development of this disorder has emerged as one of the most difficult tasks facing modern genetics and genomics. The development of techniques for studying the human genome has allowed a more systematic approach to determine variations in the genome sequence and structure that area casually involved in schizophrenia. These studies suggest the participation hundreds of genes in schizophrenia development. In addition, it has been suggested that many of these genes are involved in various mental illnesses that today are diagnosed as separate entities, but whose biological substrate may be shared. Key words: schizophrenia, deletions, development, duplications, polymorphisms.

  16. Identification of genetic factors in the etiology of schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar Valles, Argel

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that affects approximately 1% of the worldwide population. It is characterized by psychotic episodes in which individuals have hallucinations or delusions. This disorder also involves a strong element of social dysfunction, lack of motivation and profound cognitive deficits. The causes of this disorder remain largely unknown, but evidence indicates that arises from changes in the development of the central nervous system. Among the identified risk factors for this disorder are several environmental events, including prenatal infections and malnutrition, and complications during childbirth. However, the most important factor seems to be genetics. Despite this, the identification of genes involved in the development of this disorder has emerged as one of the most difficult tasks facing modern genetics and genomics. The development of techniques for studying the human genome has allowed a more systematic approach to determine variations in the genome sequence and structure that area casually involved in schizophrenia. These studies suggest the participation of hundreds of genes in schizophrenia development. In addition, it has been suggested that many of these genes are involved in various mental illnesses that today are diagnosed as separate entities, but whose biological substrate may be shared.

  17. Genetic and Environmental Etiologies of the Longitudinal Relations between Prereading Skills and Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Micaela E.; Hulslander, Jacqueline; Byrne, Brian; Samuelsson, Stefan; Keenan, Janice M.; Pennington, Bruce; DeFries, John C.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; Willcutt, Erik; Olson, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored the environmental and genetic etiologies of the longitudinal relations between prereading skills and reading and spelling. Twin pairs (n = 489) were assessed before kindergarten (M = 4.9 years), post-first grade (M = 7.4 years), and post-fourth grade (M = 10.4 years). Genetic influences on five prereading skills (print…

  18. Genetic and Environmental Etiologies of the Longitudinal Relations between Pre-reading Skills and Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Micaela E.; Hulslander, Jacqueline; Byrne, Brian; Samuelsson, Stefan; Keenan, Janice M.; Pennington, Bruce; DeFries, John C.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; Willcutt, Erik; Olson, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the environmental and genetic etiologies of the longitudinal relations between pre-reading skills and reading and spelling. Twin pairs (n = 489) were assessed before kindergarten (M = 4.9 years), post-1st grade (M = 7.4 years), and post-4th grade (M = 10.4 years). Genetic influences on five pre-reading skills (print knowledge, rapid naming, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and verbal memory) were primarily responsible for relations with word reading and spelling. However, relations with post-4th-grade reading comprehension were due both to genetic and shared environmental influences. Genetic and shared environmental influences that were common among the pre-reading variables covaried with reading and spelling, as did genetic influences unique to verbal memory (only post-4th-grade comprehension), print knowledge, and rapid naming. PMID:25263167

  19. Adrenocortical Tumors and Hyperplasias in Childhood - Etiology, Genetics, Clinical Presentation and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sutter, Jennifer A.; Grimberg, Adda

    2006-01-01

    Adrenocortical tumors are rare in children and are associated with a poor prognosis when malignant. The fund of knowledge regarding etiology, presentation and clinical outcomes remains limited. Evaluation of genetic disorders associated with the development of adrenocortical disorders has allowed researchers to identify a number of mutations that may be involved in tumorigenesis, including alterations in the GNAS1, PRKAR1A, TP53 and IGF2 genes. Clinical presentation in children is associated ...

  20. Importance of genetic factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Kyvik, Kirsten O

    2007-01-01

    The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis can be attributed both to genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis in a population-based sample of twins. From the birth cohorts of 1953-1982 who wer...... dermatitis both in male and female patients (p = 0.98). The estimates were adjusted for age. The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis is attributable to mainly genetic differences between people. However, differences in environmental exposures also are of importance......The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis can be attributed both to genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis in a population-based sample of twins. From the birth cohorts of 1953-1982 who were...... with a threefold increased risk among cotwins of an affected fraternal twin, relative to the general population. Genes accounted for 82% and nonshared environmental factors accounted for 18% of the individual susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis. The same genes contributed to the susceptibility to atopic...

  1. Elucidating the etiology of individual differences in parenting: A meta-analysis of behavioral genetic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahr, Ashlea M; Burt, S Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Decades of research have indicated the foundational importance of parenting to offspring outcomes during childhood and beyond. Unearthing the specific origins of parenting is therefore a critically important research objective. Extant research on this topic has suggested that parenting behaviors are multidetermined (Belsky, 1984) and are associated with a wide range of contextual and familial characteristics (e.g., ethnicity, community, family financial stress), as well as characteristics of the parents (e.g., personality) and their children (e.g., temperament). Behavioral genetic studies have further indicated that parenting behaviors are in fact heritable-that is, individual differences in parenting are at least partially a function of genetic differences between persons. Critically, however, the estimates of these genetic influences have varied dramatically across studies. It is also unclear how factors such as parent gender, child age, and methodological considerations may impact genetic influences on parenting behavior. In the current set of meta-analyses, we sought to quantitatively synthesize twin and adoption studies (n = 56) examining the etiology of parenting behavior, with the goal of more definitively cataloguing genetic and environmental effects on parenting. Results reveal significant effects of parental genetic makeup on parental behavior, but also highlight the genetic makeup of the child as a particularly prominent source of genetic transmission (via evocative gene-environment correlation). Environmental contributions to parenting also emerged as important, including both shared and nonshared environmental effects. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Importance of genetic factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Kyvik, Kirsten O

    2007-01-01

    ?" Latent factor models of genetic and environmental influences were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. The overall lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 7.3%. A cotwin of an affected identical twin had a sevenfold increased risk of atopic dermatitis compared......The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis can be attributed both to genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis in a population-based sample of twins. From the birth cohorts of 1953-1982 who were...... enrolled in The Danish Twin Registry, a total of 11,515 twin pairs were identified in a nationwide questionnaire survey. Subjects were classified as atopic dermatitis cases when responding affirmatively to the question, "Do you have, or have you ever had, eczema in the folds of your elbows or knees...

  3. Etiological theories of addiction: A comprehensive update on neurobiological, genetic and behavioural vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzir, Mounir; Errami, Mohammed

    2016-09-01

    Currently, about 246 million people around the world have used an illicit drug. The reasons for this use are multiple: e.g. to augment the sensation of pleasure or to reduce the withdrawal and other aversive effects of a given substance. This raises the problem of addiction, which remains a disease of modern society. This review offers a comprehensive update of the different theories about the etiology of addictive behaviors with emphasis on the neurobiological, environmental, psychopathological, behavioural and genetic aspects of addictions, discussed from an evolutionary perspective. The main conclusion of this review is that vulnerability to drug addiction suggests an interaction between many brain systems (including the reward, decision-making, serotonergic, oxytocin, interoceptive insula, CRF, norepinephrine, dynorphin/KOR, orexin and vasopressin systems), genetic predisposition, sociocultural context, impulsivity and drugs types. Further advances in biological and psychological science are needed to address the problems of addiction at its roots. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The genetic etiology of Tourette Syndrome: Large-scale collaborative efforts on the precipice of discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianthi Georgitsi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by multiple motor and phonic tics. It has a complex etiology with multiple genes likely interacting with environmental factors to lead to the onset of symptoms. The genetic basis of the disorder remains elusive;however, multiple resources and large-scale projects are coming together, launching a new era in the field and bringing us on the verge of discovery. The large-scale efforts outlined in this report, are complementary and represent a range of different approaches to the study of disorders with complex inheritance. The Tourette Syndrome Association International Consortium for Genetics (TSAICG has focused on large families, parent-proband trios and cases for large case-control designs such as genomewide association studies (GWAS, copy number variation (CNV scans and exome/genome sequencing. TIC Genetics targets rare, large effect size mutations in simplex trios and multigenerational families. The European Multicentre Tics in Children Study (EMTICS seeks to elucidate gene-environment interactions including the involvement of infection and immune mechanisms in TS etiology. Finally, TS-EUROTRAIN, a Marie Curie Initial Training Network, aims to act as a platform to unify large-scale projects in the field and to educate the next generation of experts. Importantly, these complementary large-scale efforts are joining forces to uncover the full range of genetic variation and environmental risk factors for TS, holding great promise for indentifying definitive TS susceptibility genes and shedding light into the complex pathophysiology of this disorder.

  5. Retinal artery occlusion and associated recurrent vascular risk with underlying etiologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Ho Hong

    Full Text Available RAO is caused by various etiologies and subsequent vascular events may be associated with underlying etiologies. Our aim is to investigate the etiologies of RAO, the occurrence of subsequent vascular events and their association in patients with RAO.We analyzed data from 151 consecutive patients presenting with acute non-arteritic RAO between 2003 and 2013 in a single tertiary-care hospital. The primary outcome was the occurrence of a vascular event defined as stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular death within 365 days of the RAO onset. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard model were used to estimate the hazard ratio of the vascular events.Large artery atherosclerosis (LAA was the etiology more frequently associated with of RAO (41.1%, 62/151. During the one year follow-up, ischemic stroke and vascular events occurred in 8.6% and 9.9% of patients, respectively. Ten vascular events occurred in RAO patients attributed to LAA and 4 occurred in undetermined etiology. RAO patients with LAA had a nearly four times higher risk of vascular events compared to those without LAA (hazard ratio 3.94, 95% confidence interval 1.21-12.81. More than a half of all events occurred within one month and over three fourths of ischemic strokes occurred ipsilateral to the RAO.After occurrence of RAO, there is a high risk of a subsequent vascular event, particularly ipsilateral stroke, within one month. LAA is an independent factor for the occurrence of a subsequent vascular event. Management for the prevention of secondary vascular events is necessary in patients with RAO especially with LAA. Large clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  6. Etiology and Population Genetics of Colletotrichum spp. Causing Crown and Fruit Rot of Strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureña-Padilla, A R; Mackenzie, S J; Bowen, B W; Legard, D E

    2002-11-01

    ABSTRACT Isolates of Colletotrichum spp. from diseased strawberry fruit and crowns were evaluated to determine their genetic diversity and the etiology of the diseases. Isolates were identified to species using polymerase chain reaction primers for a ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region and their pathogenicity was evaluated in bioassays. Isolates were scored for variation at 40 putative genetic loci with random amplified polymorphic DNA and microsatellite markers. Only C. acutatum was recovered from diseased fruit. Nearly all isolates from crowns were C. gloeosporioides. In crown bioassays, only isolates of C. gloeosporioides from strawberry caused collapse and death of plants. A dendrogram generated from the genetic analysis identified several primary lineages. One lineage included isolates of C. acutatum from fruit and was characterized by low diversity. Another lineage included isolates of C. gloeosporioides from crowns and was highly polymorphic. The isolates from strawberry formed distinctive clusters separate from citrus isolates. Evaluation of linkage disequilibrium among polymorphic loci in isolates of C. gloeosporioides from crowns revealed a low level of disequilibrium as would be expected in sexually recombining populations. These results suggest that epidemics of crown rot are caused by Glomerella cingulata (anamorph C. gloeosporioides) and that epidemics of fruit rot are caused by C. acutatum.

  7. Adrenocortical tumors and hyperplasias in childhood--etiology, genetics, clinical presentation and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Jennifer A; Grimberg, Adda

    2006-09-01

    Adrenocortical tumors are rare in children and are associated with a poor prognosis when malignant. The fund of knowledge regarding etiology, presentation and clinical outcomes remains limited. Evaluation of genetic disorders associated with the development of adrenocortical disorders has allowed researchers to identify a number of mutations that may be involved in tumorigenesis, including alterations in the GNAS1, PRKAR1A, TP53 and IGF2 genes. Clinical presentation in children is associated most commonly with young age, female gender and symptoms of virilization. Most children have localized disease at presentation which may be associated with a better prognosis when compared to adults. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment and mitotane, the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agent, has a poor response rate and is highly toxic. Broader participation in multi-center research, such as the International Pediatric Adrenocortical Tumor Registry, is needed to collect sufficient data to better guide our clinical management.

  8. [An analysis of etiological and genetic factors of a patient with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Xing; Tong, Chun-Rong; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Juan; Wang, Fang; Cai, Peng; Teng, Wen; Yang, Jun-Fang; Zhang, Ya-Li; Lu, Dao-Pei

    2011-02-01

    To analyze the etiological factor and genetic feature of a familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis patient with PRF1 mutation (FHL2) with human herpesvirus 7 (HHV7) infection and its family constellation. Clinical characteristics, laboratory examinations of a FHL2 case with HHV7 infection were reported. HHV1-HHV8 virus DNA was screened by PCR; NK cell function was analyzed by flow cytometry; PRF1 gene mutations were analyzed by PCR and direct sequencing, structure of mutant PRF1 proteins were analyzed using ExPasy and I-TASSER server and genetics pedigree were analyzed. The patient's HHV7 viral was detected positive with DNA copy number of 350/10(6) peripheral nucleated cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed decrease both in proportion of perforin positive NK cells and perforin protein expression. Genetic testing showed PRF1 biallelic heterozygote mutations (c.503G > A/p.S168N and c.1177T > C/p.C393R) and pedigree analysis showed they were inherited. The patient was then treated with antivirus therapy, dexamethasone and VP16 therapy, but only achieved partial response. The patient was then followed by human leukocyte antigen 10/10 allele identical non-consanguinity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (allo-HSCT) and soon the successful implantation of donor hematopoietic cells and persistent recovery was achieved. The patient was now surviving without recurrence for 9 months after allo-HSCT. FHL is prone to be misdiagnosed as lymphoma. Genetic analysis of related gene mutation and herpes simplex virus detection will help in early and accurate diagnosis. Allo-HSCT is a fundamental treatment of FHL.

  9. [Research progress in genetic abnormalities and etiological factors of congenital anorectal malformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Ren, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    Congenital anorectal malformation (ARM) is one of the most common gastrointestinal congenital diseases, accounting for 1/4 in digestive tract malformation, and is one of the congenital malformations in routine surveillance by the World Health Organization. Because of the variety of risk factors and the complexity of the pathological changes, etiology of ARM is still not clear. It is mostly considered that ARM is resulted from hereditary factors and environmental factors in the development of embryogenesis. Through animal experiments, scholars have found that Hox, Shh, Fgf, Wnt, Cdx and TCF4, Eph and ephrin play crucial role during the development of digestive tract. When the genes/signaling pathway dysfunction occurs, ARM may happen. In addition, ARM is related to the external factors in pregnancy. Because of the complexity of related factors in the development of human embryogenesis, the research progress of human ARM is very slow. This paper reviews relevant literatures in genetic factors and environmental factors, in order to provide the theoretical basis for the treatment and prevention of ARM.

  10. Mathematical Ability of 10-Year-Old Boys and Girls: Genetic and Environmental Etiology of Typical and Low Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovas, Yulia; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Petrill, Stephen A.; Plomin, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The genetic and environmental etiologies of 3 aspects of low mathematical performance (math disability) and the full range of variability (math ability) were compared for boys and girls in a sample of 5,348 children age 10 years (members of 2,674 pairs of same-sex and opposite-sex twins) from the United Kingdom (UK). The measures, which we developed for Web-based testing, included problems from 3 domains of mathematics taught as part of the UK National Curriculum. Using quantitative genetic model-fitting analyses, similar results were found for math disabilities and abilities for all 3 measures: Moderate genetic influence and environmental influence were mainly due to nonshared environmental factors that were unique to the individual, with little influence from shared environment. No sex differences were found in the etiologies of math abilities and disabilities. We conclude that low mathematical performance is the quantitative extreme of the same genetic and environmental factors responsible for variation throughout the distribution. PMID:18064980

  11. Mathematical ability of 10-year-old boys and girls: genetic and environmental etiology of typical and low performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovas, Yulia; Haworth, Claire M A; Petrill, Stephen A; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The genetic and environmental etiologies of 3 aspects of low mathematical performance (math disability) and the full range of variability (math ability) were compared for boys and girls in a sample of 5,348 children age 10 years (members of 2,674 pairs of same-sex and opposite-sex twins) from the United Kingdom (UK). The measures, which we developed for Web-based testing, included problems from 3 domains of mathematics taught as part of the UK National Curriculum. Using quantitative genetic model-fitting analyses, similar results were found for math disabilities and abilities for all 3 measures: Moderate genetic influence and environmental influence were mainly due to nonshared environmental factors that were unique to the individual, with little influence from shared environment. No sex differences were found in the etiologies of math abilities and disabilities. We conclude that low mathematical performance is the quantitative extreme of the same genetic and environmental factors responsible for variation throughout the distribution.

  12. Etiological relationships in atopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Backer, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    respiratory allergic symptoms, that is, asthma and hay fever, to be between .47 and .95. Furthermore, atopic traits share a portion of their genetic determinants with other complex disorders like obesity and behavioral traits. A correlation of about .3 and .34 has been reported between genes associated...... with asthma and obesity, and between genes associated with asthma and depression, respectively. We emphasize that multivariate methods applied to twin studies, especially when genetic marker information is available, provide a valuable framework within which complex etiological mechanisms underlying atopy can...

  13. Sleeping Beauty transposon system for genetic etiological research and gene therapy of cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaomei; Du, Yan; Deng, Yang; Wu, Jianfeng; Cao, Guangwen

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is etiologically associated with somatic mutations of critical genes. Recently, a number of somatic mutations and key molecules have been found to be involved in functional networks affecting cancer progression. Suitable animal models are required to validate cancer-promoting or -inhibiting capacities of these mutants and molecules. Sleeping Beauty transposon system consists of a transposon that carries gene(s) of interest and a transposase that recognizes, excises, and reinserts genes in given location of the genome. It can create both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations, thus being frequently chosen to investigate the etiological mechanisms and gene therapy for cancers in animal models. In this review, we summarized current advances of Sleeping Beauty transposon system in revealing molecular mechanism of cancers and improving gene therapy. Understanding molecular mechanisms by which driver mutations contribute to carcinogenesis and metastasis may pave the way for the development of innovative prophylactic and therapeutic strategies against malignant diseases.

  14. [CONTEMPORARY MOLECULAR-GENETIC METHODS USED FOR ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSTICS OF SEPSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, S N; Skachkova, T S; Shipulina, O Yu; Savochkina, Yu A; Shipulin, G A; Maleev, V V

    2016-01-01

    Etiologic diagnostics of sepsis is one of the most difficult problems of contemporary medicine due to a wide variety of sepsis causative agents, many of which are components of normal human microflora. Disadvantages of contemporary "golden standard" of microbiologic diagnostics of sepsis etiology by seeding of blood for sterility are duration of cultivation, limitation in detection of non-cultivable forms of microorganisms, significant effect of preliminary empiric antibiotics therapy on results of the analysis. Methods of molecular diagnostics that are being actively developed and integrated during the last decade are deprived of these disadvantages. Main contemporary methods of molecular-biological diagnostics are examined in the review, actualdata on their diagnostic characteristic are provided. Special attention is given to methods of PCR-diagnostics, including novel Russian developments. Methods of nucleic acid hybridization and proteomic analysis are examined in comparative aspect. Evaluation of application and perspectives of development of methods of molecular diagnostics of sepsis is given.

  15. Role of Genetics in the Etiology of Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Towards a Hierarchical Diagnostic Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Cyrille; Pasquier, Laurent; Cohen, David; Fradin, Mélanie; Canitano, Roberto; Damaj, Léna; Odent, Sylvie; Tordjman, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    Progress in epidemiological, molecular and clinical genetics with the development of new techniques has improved knowledge on genetic syndromes associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The objective of this article is to show the diversity of genetic disorders associated with ASD (based on an extensive review of single-gene disorders, copy number variants, and other chromosomal disorders), and consequently to propose a hierarchical diagnostic strategy with a stepwise evaluation, helping general practitioners/pediatricians and child psychiatrists to collaborate with geneticists and neuropediatricians, in order to search for genetic disorders associated with ASD. The first step is a clinical investigation involving: (i) a child psychiatric and psychological evaluation confirming autism diagnosis from different observational sources and assessing autism severity; (ii) a neuropediatric evaluation examining neurological symptoms and developmental milestones; and (iii) a genetic evaluation searching for dysmorphic features and malformations. The second step involves laboratory and if necessary neuroimaging and EEG studies oriented by clinical results based on clinical genetic and neuropediatric examinations. The identification of genetic disorders associated with ASD has practical implications for diagnostic strategies, early detection or prevention of co-morbidity, specific treatment and follow up, and genetic counseling. PMID:28287497

  16. Current status of understanding of the genetic etiology of coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Pranavchand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD, synonymously known as coronary artery disease (CAD is the most predominant among the cardiovascular diseases and ranked number one in prevalence among the developing countries. CHD is a multifactorial disease involving both genetic and environmental factors and is primarily caused due to a process of progressive damage of coronary arteries called atherosclerosis. We present here a comprehensive review of molecular genetic studies conducted so far on CAD. The information was gathered through the internet using appropriate search terms for CHD/CAD. We also compiled the relevant information from the following websites: http://www.bioguo.org/CADgene/and http://www.genome.gov. Besides several Mendelian forms of the CHD, ~300 more genes have been identified in different studies through candidate gene approach. Additionally 32 more loci have been identified through genome wide association studies that include 9p21.3 as the most replicated genetic locus across the globe. Nevertheless, overall, these studies have been characterized by a relative lack of consistency in the association pattern across the populations. A fair degree of ethnic variation in the nature of association of different genetic variants with the disease has also been apparent. Pleiotropic effects of genes, existence of subclinical phenotypes and genetic heterogeneity appear to have been the limiting factors for developing a genetic risk profile test for the disease. Given the high prevalence of this disease in India, the presence of environmental triggers and genetic variation, it would be prudent to conduct multi-ethnic large-scale studies in India, representing the subcontinent as a whole-there have been a very limited number of molecular genetic studies on Indian populations.

  17. The genetic and environmental etiology of antisocial behavior from childhood to emerging adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvblad, Catherine; Narusyte, Jurgita; Grann, Martin; Sarnecki, Jerzy; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Previous research suggests that both genetic and environmental influences are important for antisocial behavior across the life span, even though the prevalence and incidence of antisocial behavior varies considerably across ages. However, little is known of how genetic and environmental effects influence the development of antisocial behavior. A total of 2,600 male and female twins from the population-based Swedish Twin Registry were included in the present study. Antisocial behavior was measured on four occasions, when twins were 8-9, 13-14, 16-17, and 19-20 years old. Longitudinal analyses of the data were conducted using structural equation modeling. The stability of antisocial behavior over time was explained by a common latent persistent antisocial behavior factor. A common genetic influence accounted for 67% of the total variance in this latent factor, the shared environment explained 26%, and the remaining 7% was due to the non-shared environment. Significant age-specific shared environmental factors were found at ages 13-14 years, suggesting that common experiences (e.g., peers) are important for antisocial behavior at this age. Results from this study show that genetic as well as shared environmental influences are important in antisocial behavior that persists from childhood to emerging adulthood.

  18. The Etiology and Pathogenesis of Hepatitis and Liver Cirrhosis under the Influence of Dysentery Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Alimova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic intoxication of white rats by intravenous administration of dysentery toxin causes in animals within 2–4 months the development of liver cirrhosis. A particularly intensive development of cirrhosis is observed in simultaneous application of dysentery toxin and very low doses of heliotrope containing hepatotoxic alkaloids. Heliotrope was added to the food for animals and was given once in 7 days. The research results are considered as an evidence of the etiologic role of chronic toxic-infectious intestinal diseases in the development of liver cirrhosis.

  19. Importance of genetic factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Kyvik, Kirsten O

    2007-01-01

    with a threefold increased risk among cotwins of an affected fraternal twin, relative to the general population. Genes accounted for 82% and nonshared environmental factors accounted for 18% of the individual susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis. The same genes contributed to the susceptibility to atopic...... dermatitis both in male and female patients (p = 0.98). The estimates were adjusted for age. The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis is attributable to mainly genetic differences between people. However, differences in environmental exposures also are of importance....

  20. The genetic basis of female reproductive disorders: Etiology and clinical testing ☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Lawrence C.

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of improved molecular biology techniques, the genetic basis of an increasing number of reproductive disorders has been elucidated. Mutations in at least 20 genes cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism including Kallmann syndrome in about 35–40% of patients. The two most commonly involved genes are FGFR1 and CHD7. When combined pituitary hormone deficiency includes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism as a feature, PROP1 mutations are the most common of the six genes involved. For hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, mutations in 14 genes cause gonadal failure in 15% of affected females, most commonly in FMR1. In eugonadal disorders, activating FSHR mutations have been identified for spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome; and WNT4 mutations have been described in mullerian aplasia. For other eugonadal disorders, such as endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and leiomyomata, specific germline gene mutations have not been identified, but some chromosomal regions are associated with the corresponding phenotype. Practical genetic testing is possible to perform in both hypogonadotropic and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. However, clinical testing for endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and leiomyomata is not currently practical for the clinician. PMID:23499866

  1. Present and future etiological treatment of bacterial pneumonia 3. The antibacterial drugs under development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Abaturov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The rapid spread of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains necessitates the development of new antibacterial agents and a review of the guidelines for etiological treatment of bacterial infections, including pneumonia. Currently, new antibacterial agents are being developed that disrupt the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, teichoic and lipoteichoic acids, and also block the attachment of virulent factors to the bacterial wall. New molecules of old classes of antibiotics and representatives of new classes of antibiotics with their targets (lipid II and III, teichoic and lipoteichoic acids, alanine racemase, and sortase A will become practical tools in clinical practice in the very near future. The goals and mechanisms of action of new antibacterial compounds predetermine their clinical prospects in future strategies for the treatment of infectious bacterial diseases.

  2. Argument-predicate distance as a filter for enhancing precision in extracting predications on the genetic etiology of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang François-Michel

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic functional information is valuable for biomedical research. However, such information frequently needs to be extracted from the scientific literature and structured in order to be exploited by automatic systems. Natural language processing is increasingly used for this purpose although it inherently involves errors. A postprocessing strategy that selects relations most likely to be correct is proposed and evaluated on the output of SemGen, a system that extracts semantic predications on the etiology of genetic diseases. Based on the number of intervening phrases between an argument and its predicate, we defined a heuristic strategy to filter the extracted semantic relations according to their likelihood of being correct. We also applied this strategy to relations identified with co-occurrence processing. Finally, we exploited postprocessed SemGen predications to investigate the genetic basis of Parkinson's disease. Results The filtering procedure for increased precision is based on the intuition that arguments which occur close to their predicate are easier to identify than those at a distance. For example, if gene-gene relations are filtered for arguments at a distance of 1 phrase from the predicate, precision increases from 41.95% (baseline to 70.75%. Since this proximity filtering is based on syntactic structure, applying it to the results of co-occurrence processing is useful, but not as effective as when applied to the output of natural language processing. In an effort to exploit SemGen predications on the etiology of disease after increasing precision with postprocessing, a gene list was derived from extracted information enhanced with postprocessing filtering and was automatically annotated with GFINDer, a Web application that dynamically retrieves functional and phenotypic information from structured biomolecular resources. Two of the genes in this list are likely relevant to Parkinson's disease but are not

  3. Venezuelan equine encephalitis in Panama: fatal endemic disease and genetic diversity of etiologic viral strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Evelia; Aguilar, Patricia V; Cisneros, Julio; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C

    2009-06-30

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a reemerging, mosquito-borne viral disease of the neotropics that is severely debilitating and sometimes fatal to humans. Periodic epidemics mediated by equine amplification have been recognized since the 1920s, but interepidemic disease is rarely recognized. We report here clinical findings and genetic characterization of 42 cases of endemic VEE detected in Panama from 1961-2004. Recent clusters of cases occurred in Darien (eastern Panama) and Panama provinces (central Panama) near rainforest and swamp habitats. Patients ranged from 10 months to 48 years of age, and the more severe cases with neurological complications, including one fatal infection, were observed in children. The VEE virus strains isolated from these cases all belonged to an enzootic, subtype ID lineage known to circulate among sylvatic vectors and rodent reservoir hosts in Panama and Peru. These findings underscore endemic VEE as an important but usually neglected arboviral disease of Latin America.

  4. Venezuelan equine encephalitis in Panama: fatal endemic disease and genetic diversity of etiologic viral strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelia Quiroz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE is a reemerging, mosquito-borne viral disease of the neotropics that is severely debilitating and sometimes fatal to humans. Periodic epidemics mediated by equine amplification have been recognized since the 1920s, but interepidemic disease is rarely recognized. We report here clinical findings and genetic characterization of 42 cases of endemic VEE detected in Panama from 1961-2004. Recent clusters of cases occurred in Darien (eastern Panama and Panama provinces (central Panama near rainforest and swamp habitats. Patients ranged from 10 months to 48 years of age, and the more severe cases with neurological complications, including one fatal infection, were observed in children. The VEE virus strains isolated from these cases all belonged to an enzootic, subtype ID lineage known to circulate among sylvatic vectors and rodent reservoir hosts in Panama and Peru. These findings underscore endemic VEE as an important but usually neglected arboviral disease of Latin America.

  5. Epileptic activity is a surrogate for an underlying etiology and stopping the activity has a limited impact on developmental outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korff, Christian M; Brunklaus, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2015-10-01

    The concept of epileptic encephalopathy is important in clinical practice, but its relevance to an individual must be assessed in the appropriate context. Except in rare situations, epileptic activity is a surrogate for an underlying etiology, and stopping the activity has a limited impact on developmental outcome. Labeling a group of epilepsies as "the epileptic encephalopathies," risks minimizing the impact of epileptic activity on cognition and behavior more widely in epilepsy. Similarly, describing the encephalopathy associated with many infantile onset epilepsies as "epileptic" may be misleading. Finally, concentrating on the epileptic activity alone and not considering the wider consequences of the underlying etiology on cognitive and behavioral development, may focus research efforts and the search for improved therapies on too narrow a target. Therefore, epileptic encephalopathies should not be considered as a specific group of epilepsies but, rather, the concept of epileptic encephalopathy should be applicable to all types of epilepsies and epilepsy syndromes, whenever it is relevant in the clinical course of a particular individual, at any age. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. The Genetic and Environmental Factors Underlying Hypospadias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pask, Andrew; Heloury, Yves; Sinclair, Andrew H.

    2016-01-01

    Hypospadias results from a failure of urethral closure in the male phallus and affects 1 in 200–300 boys. It is thought to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The development of the penis progresses in 2 stages: an initial hormone-independent phase and a secondary hormone-dependent phase. Here, we review the molecular pathways that contribute to each of these stages, drawing on studies from both human and mouse models. Hypospadias can occur when normal development of the phallus is disrupted, and we provide evidence that mutations in genes underlying this developmental process are causative. Finally, we discuss the environmental factors that may contribute to hypospadias and their potential immediate and transgen erational epigenetic impacts. PMID:26613581

  7. Genetic diversity of cosaviruses in nonpolio acute flaccid paralysis cases of undefined etiology, Northern India, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Harjeet Singh; Chowdhary, Rashmi; Shakya, Akhalesh Kumar; Dhole, Tapan N

    2013-09-01

    No cases of wild poliovirus have been reported for more than one and a half years from India. Cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) of undefined etiology continue to occur in the region. Despite the recent discovery of the human Cosavirus (HCoSV) in the feces of children from developing countries, there have been no studies of cosavirus infection in India. To detect and characterize HCoSVs in stool specimens of nonpolio AFP cases by RT-PCR followed by sequencing. A total of 387 fecal samples collected from AFP cases in Uttar Pradesh, India, between May 2010 and April 2011, tested negative on cell culture according to WHO algorithm, were subjected to 5'-UTR region specific RT-PCR followed by sequencing to detect HCoSV. Molecular characterization of HCoSV strains was done by sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis. 123 (32%) samples tested positive for cosaviruses and 87 (70.7%) were identified for genetic variants by sequencing a 316-nucleotide interval in the partial 5'-UTR region. Cosavirus strains were characterized as putative species HCoSV-A (n=70; 82%), HCoSV-B (n=7; 8%), HCoSV-C (n=1; 1.1) and HCoSV-D (n=4; 4.5%) while 5 (5%) strains remain uncharacterized. The cosavirus infection appeared highest (63.5%) in younger children, and showed a distinct seasonality, with a late summer peak and winter low. This study demonstrates a diversity of cosavirus strains in circulation, and reports the first investigation of HCoSV infection in children with nonpolio acute flaccid paralysis in India. Currently, this study provides baseline data for further studies of HCoSV infections in children with common enteric infections in India. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Epileptic Encephalopathy in Childhood: A Stepwise Approach for Identification of Underlying Genetic Causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jaina; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2016-10-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in childhood. Epilepsy associated with global developmental delay and cognitive dysfunction is defined as epileptic encephalopathy. Certain inherited metabolic disorders presenting with epileptic encephalopathy can be treated with disease specific diet, vitamin, amino acid or cofactor supplementations. In those disorders, disease specific therapy is successful to achieve good seizure control and improve long-term neurodevelopmental outcome. For this reason, intractable epilepsy with global developmental delay or history of developmental regression warrants detailed metabolic investigations for the possibility of an underlying treatable inherited metabolic disorder, which should be undertaken as first line investigations. An underlying genetic etiology in epileptic encephalopathy has been supported by recent studies such as array comparative genomic hybridization, targeted next generation sequencing panels, whole exome and whole genome sequencing. These studies report a diagnostic yield up to 70%, depending on the applied genetic testing as well as number of patients enrolled. In patients with epileptic encephalopathy, a stepwise approach for diagnostic work-up will help to diagnose treatable inherited metabolic disorders quickly. Application of detailed genetic investigations such as targeted next generation sequencing as second line and whole exome sequencing as third line testing will diagnose underlying genetic disease which will help for genetic counseling as well as guide for prenatal diagnosis. Knowledge of underlying genetic cause will provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of epileptic encephalopathy and pave the ground towards the development of targeted neuroprotective treatment strategies to improve the health outcome of children with epileptic encephalopathy.

  9. [Investigation of Genetic Etiology in Neurodegenerative Dementias: Recommendations from the Centro Hospitalar São João Neurogenetics Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massano, João; Leão, Miguel; Garrett, Carolina

    2016-10-01

    In the past few years several gene mutations have been identified as causative of the most frequent neurodegenerative dementias (Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia). These advances, along with the complex phenotype-genotype relationships and the costs associated with genetic testing, have often made it difficult for clinicians to decide with regard to a rational plan for the investigation of the genetic etiology of the degenerative dementias. The Centro Hospitalar São João Neurogenetics Group, a multidisciplinary team of Neurologists and Geneticists with special interest in neurogenetic disorders, devised consensus recommendations for the investigation of the genetic etiology of Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia in clinical practice, based on international consensus documents (currently containing partly outdated information) and published scientific evidence on this topic. Alzheimer disease may be caused by mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2 and APP. APOE genotyping is not recommended for the diagnostic or genetic counseling purposes in Alzheimer disease. Frontotemporal dementia may be caused by mutations in several genes such as c9orf72, PGRN, MAPT, TBK1, VCP, SQSTM1, and UBQLN2. This paper pragmatically approaches the process of genetic diagnosis in Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia, with specific recommendations for both disorders.

  10. Generator scheduling under competitive environment using genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, genetic algorithm (GA) is used to solve the GENCOs profit based unit commitment problem (PBUCP) in a dayahead competitive electricity markets considering power and reserve generations simultaneously, whereas enhanced lambda iteration (ELI) method is used to solve the economic dispatch (ED) ...

  11. Intraspecific Genetic dynamics under Climate Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Florez Rodriguez, Alexander

    Climate change has a deep influence on the maintenance and generation of global biodiversity. Past contractions, expansions and shifts in species’ ranges drove to changes in species genetic diversity. Noteworthy, the interaction among: climate change, range, population size and extinction is ofte...

  12. Etiologies, Risk Factors and Impact of Severe Diarrhea in the Under-Fives in Moramanga and Antananarivo, Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randremanana, Rindra Vatosoa; Razafindratsimandresy, Richter; Andriatahina, Todisoa; Randriamanantena, Arthur; Ravelomanana, Lovaniaina; Randrianirina, Frédérique; Richard, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Diarrheal disease remains a leading cause of death in children in low-income countries. We investigated the etiology, risk factors and effects on nutritional status of severe diarrhea in children from two districts in Madagascar. We performed a matched case-control study in 2011 to 2014, on children under the age of five years from Moramanga and Antananarivo. The cases were children hospitalized for severe diarrhea and the controls were children without diarrhea selected at random from the community. Stool samples were collected from both groups. Anthropometric measurements were made during follow-up visits about one and two months after enrolment. We enrolled 199 cases and 199 controls. Rotavirus infection was the most frequently detected cause of diarrhea. It was strongly associated with severe diarrhea (OR: 58.3; 95% CI: 7.7-439.9), accounting for 42.4% (95% CI: 37.6-43.1) of severe diarrhea cases. At the household level, possession of cattle (OR = 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-0.6) and living in a house with electricity (OR = 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2-0.8) were protective factors. The presence of garbage around the house was a risk factor for severe diarrhea (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.9-5.4). We found no significant association between severe diarrhea and the nutritional status of the children at follow-up visits, but evident wasting at enrolment was associated with a higher risk of severe diarrhea (OR = 9; 95% CI: 4.5-17.9). Severe childhood diarrhea is mostly caused by rotavirus infection. An anti-rotavirus vaccine has already been introduced in Madagascar and should be promoted more widely. However, post-licensing surveillance is required. Interventions to improve the nutritional status of children, preventive measures focused on household and personal hygiene and nutritional rehabilitation during severe diarrheal disease should be reinforced.

  13. Genetic Etiology of Renal Agenesis : Fine Mapping of Renag1 and Identification of Kit as the Candidate Functional Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samanas, Nyssa Becker; Commers, Tessa W.; Dennison, Kirsten L.; Harenda, Quincy Eckert; Kurz, Scott G.; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Wavrin, Kristen Leland; Bowler, Michael; Nijman, Isaac J.; Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin; Hubner, Norbert; Sullivan, Ruth; Vezina, Chad M.; Shull, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urogenital tract (CAKUT) occur in approximately 0.5% of live births and represent the most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease in neonates and children. The genetic basis of CAKUT is not well defined. To understand more fully the genetic basis of one type

  14. Developmental Etiologies of Alcohol Use and Their Relations to Parent and Peer Influences Over Adolescence and Young Adulthood: A Genetically Informed Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Arielle R; Wood, Phillip K; Slutske, Wendy S

    2017-12-01

    Distinct changes in alcohol use etiologies occur during adolescence and young adulthood. Additionally, measured environments known to influence alcohol use such as peers and parenting practice can interact or be associated with this genetic influence. However, change in genetic and environmental influences over age, as well as how associations with measured environments change over age, is understudied. The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) sibling subsample was used to examine data-driven biometric models of alcohol use over ages 13 to 27. Associations between friends' drinking, parental autonomy granting, and maternal closeness were also examined. The best-fitting model included a 5-factor model consisting of early (ages 13 to 20) and overall (ages 13 to 27) additive genetic and unique environmental factors, as well as 1 overall common environment factor. The overall additive genetic factor and the early unique environment factor explained the preponderance of mean differences in the alcohol use over this portion of the life span. The most important factors explaining variance attributed to alcohol use changed over age. Additionally, friend use had the strongest associations with genetic and environmental factors at all ages, while parenting practices had almost no associations at any age. These results supplement previous studies indicating changes in genetic and environmental influences in alcohol use over adolescence and adulthood. However, prior research suggesting that constraining exogenous predictors of genetic and environmental factors to have effects of the same magnitude across age overlooks the differential role of factors associated with alcohol use during adolescence. Consonant with previous research, friend use appears to have a more pervasive influence on alcohol use than parental influence during this age. Interventions and prevention programs geared toward reducing alcohol use in younger populations may benefit from

  15. Candidate genes and their interactions with other genetic/environmental risk factors in the etiology of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, K M; Talkowski, M E; Chowdari, K V; McClain, L; Yolken, R H; Nimgaonkar, V L

    2010-09-30

    Identification of causative factors for common, chronic disorders is a major focus of current human health science research. These disorders are likely to be caused by multiple etiological agents. Available evidence also suggests that interactions between the risk factors may explain some of their pathogenic effects. While progress in genomics and allied biological research has brought forth powerful analytic techniques, the predicted complexity poses daunting analytic challenges. The search for pathogenesis of schizophrenia shares most of these challenges. We have reviewed the analytic and logistic problems associated with the search for pathogenesis. Evidence for pathogenic interactions is presented for selected diseases and for schizophrenia. We end by suggesting 'recursive analyses' as a potential design to address these challenges. This scheme involves initial focused searches for interactions motivated by available evidence, typically involving identified individual risk factors, such as candidate gene variants. Putative interactions are tested rigorously for replication and for biological plausibility. Support for the interactions from statistical and functional analyses motivates a progressively larger array of interactants that are evaluated recursively. The risk explained by the interactions is assessed concurrently and further elaborate searches may be guided by the results of such analyses. By way of example, we summarize our ongoing analyses of dopaminergic polymorphisms, as well as infectious etiological factors in schizophrenia genesis. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic Etiology of Renal Agenesis: Fine Mapping of Renag1 and Identification of Kit as the Candidate Functional Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanas, Nyssa Becker; Commers, Tessa W.; Dennison, Kirsten L.; Harenda, Quincy Eckert; Kurz, Scott G.; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Wavrin, Kristen Leland; Bowler, Michael; Nijman, Isaac J.; Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin; Hubner, Norbert; Sullivan, Ruth; Vezina, Chad M.; Shull, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urogenital tract (CAKUT) occur in approximately 0.5% of live births and represent the most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease in neonates and children. The genetic basis of CAKUT is not well defined. To understand more fully the genetic basis of one type of CAKUT, unilateral renal agenesis (URA), we are studying inbred ACI rats, which spontaneously exhibit URA and associated urogenital anomalies at an incidence of approximately 10%. URA is inherited as an incompletely dominant trait with incomplete penetrance in crosses between ACI and Brown Norway (BN) rats and a single responsible genetic locus, designated Renag1, was previously mapped to rat chromosome 14 (RNO14). The goals of this study were to fine map Renag1, identify the causal genetic variant responsible for URA, confirm that the Renag1 variant is the sole determinant of URA in the ACI rat, and define the embryologic basis of URA in this rat model. Data presented herein localize Renag1 to a 379 kilobase (kb) interval that contains a single protein coding gene, Kit (v-kit Hardy-Zukerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog); identify an endogenous retrovirus-derived long terminal repeat located within Kit intron 1 as the probable causal variant; demonstrate aberrant development of the nephric duct in the anticipated number of ACI rat embryos; and demonstrate expression of Kit and Kit ligand (Kitlg) in the nephric duct. Congenic rats that harbor ACI alleles at Renag1 on the BN genetic background exhibit the same spectrum of urogenital anomalies as ACI rats, indicating that Renag1 is necessary and sufficient to elicit URA and associated urogenital anomalies. These data reveal the first genetic link between Kit and URA and illustrate the value of the ACI rat as a model for defining the mechanisms and cell types in which Kit functions during urogenital development. PMID:25693193

  17. Genetic etiology of renal agenesis: fine mapping of Renag1 and identification of Kit as the candidate functional gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyssa Becker Samanas

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urogenital tract (CAKUT occur in approximately 0.5% of live births and represent the most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease in neonates and children. The genetic basis of CAKUT is not well defined. To understand more fully the genetic basis of one type of CAKUT, unilateral renal agenesis (URA, we are studying inbred ACI rats, which spontaneously exhibit URA and associated urogenital anomalies at an incidence of approximately 10%. URA is inherited as an incompletely dominant trait with incomplete penetrance in crosses between ACI and Brown Norway (BN rats and a single responsible genetic locus, designated Renag1, was previously mapped to rat chromosome 14 (RNO14. The goals of this study were to fine map Renag1, identify the causal genetic variant responsible for URA, confirm that the Renag1 variant is the sole determinant of URA in the ACI rat, and define the embryologic basis of URA in this rat model. Data presented herein localize Renag1 to a 379 kilobase (kb interval that contains a single protein coding gene, Kit (v-kit Hardy-Zukerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog; identify an endogenous retrovirus-derived long terminal repeat located within Kit intron 1 as the probable causal variant; demonstrate aberrant development of the nephric duct in the anticipated number of ACI rat embryos; and demonstrate expression of Kit and Kit ligand (Kitlg in the nephric duct. Congenic rats that harbor ACI alleles at Renag1 on the BN genetic background exhibit the same spectrum of urogenital anomalies as ACI rats, indicating that Renag1 is necessary and sufficient to elicit URA and associated urogenital anomalies. These data reveal the first genetic link between Kit and URA and illustrate the value of the ACI rat as a model for defining the mechanisms and cell types in which Kit functions during urogenital development.

  18. Genetic and environmental etiology of the relationship between childhood hyperactivity/inattention and conduct problems in a South Korean twin sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2015-06-01

    Recently, there has been increased research into the etiology of the comorbidity between hyperactivity/inattention problems (HIP) and conduct problems (CP). However, the nature of the etiology of the comorbidity has remained unclear. Mothers of 507 pairs of twins, comprised of 221 monozygotic (MZ) and 286 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs aged from 6 to 13 years (mean = 9.6 years; SD = 2.0 years), completed the HIP and the CP scale of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) via a telephone interview. The phenotypic correlation between HIP and CP was 0.43 (p environmental correlation (r e = 0.37) between HIP and CP. CP was additionally influenced by shared family environmental influences. While the results of the present study are generally consistent with the findings from Western twin studies of the relationship between HIP and CP, they add a new finding to the extant literature by showing that it is additive rather than non-additive genetic factors that are responsible for the co-occurrence of HIP and CP.

  19. Androgenetic Alopecia: Identification of Four Genetic Risk Loci and Evidence for the Contribution of WNT Signaling to Its Etiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heilmann, S.; Kiefer, A.K.; Fricker, N.; Drichel, D.; Hillmer, A.M.; Herold, C.; Tung, J.Y.; Eriksson, N.; Redler, S.; Betz, R.C.; Li, R.; Karason, A.; Nyholt, D.R.; Song, K.; Vermeulen, S.; Kanoni, S.; Dedoussis, G.; Martin, N.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Mooser, V.; Stefansson, K.; Richards, J.B.; Becker, T.; Brockschmidt, F.F.; Hinds, D.A.; Nothen, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia (AGA, male-pattern baldness) is driven by androgens, and genetic predisposition is the major prerequisite. Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have reported that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at eight different genomic loci are

  20. A common genetic factor underlies hypertension and other cardiovascular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spector Tim D

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain conditions characterised by blood vessel occlusion or vascular spasm have been found to cluster together in epidemiological studies. However the biological causes for these associations remain controversial. This study used a classical twin design to examine whether these conditions are linked through shared environmental exposures or by a common underlying genetic propensity to vasospasm. Methods We investigated the association between hypertension, migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon and coronary artery disease in twins from a national register. Phenotype status was determined using a questionnaire and the genetic and environmental association between phenotypes was estimated through variance components analysis. Results Responses were obtained from 2,204 individuals comprising 525 monozygotic and 577 dizygotic pairs. There was a significant genetic contribution to all four traits with heritabilities ranging from 0.34 to 0.64. Multivariate model-fitting demonstrated that a single common genetic factor underlies the four conditions. Conclusions We have confirmed an association between hypertension, migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon and coronary artery disease, and shown that a single genetic factor underlies them. The demonstration of a shared genetic factor explains the association between them and adds weight to the theory of an inherited predisposition to vasospasm.

  1. Etiology of Food Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Gulec Oyekcin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Food addiction is a new topic of focus in the scientific literature. Food intake might be concerned as food addiction in some cases, especially in obese cases and over-eaters. Addiction like behaviours are commonly observed mong these people. Recent animal, epidemiological, clinical and genetic studies partly shows the clinical validity of food addiction while the neurobiological studies focused on the similarity between the reward systems present in obesity and drug addiction. However some studies still emphasizes the differences between two. The aim of this article was to review clinical and biological aspects of etiological perspectives of food addiction via available clinical, preclinical and genetic studies.

  2. Pathogenesis, Molecular Genetics, and Genomics of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the Etiologic Agent of Johne’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govardhan Rathnaiah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease in ruminants causing chronic diarrhea, malnutrition, and muscular wasting. Neonates and young animals are infected primarily by the fecal–oral route. MAP attaches to, translocates via the intestinal mucosa, and is phagocytosed by macrophages. The ensuing host cellular immune response leads to granulomatous enteritis characterized by a thick and corrugated intestinal wall. We review various tissue culture systems, ileal loops, and mice, goats, and cattle used to study MAP pathogenesis. MAP can be detected in clinical samples by microscopy, culturing, PCR, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There are commercial vaccines that reduce clinical disease and shedding, unfortunately, their efficacies are limited and may not engender long-term protective immunity. Moreover, the potential linkage with Crohn’s disease and other human diseases makes MAP a concern as a zoonotic pathogen. Potential therapies with anti-mycobacterial agents are also discussed. The completion of the MAP K-10 genome sequence has greatly improved our understanding of MAP pathogenesis. The analysis of this sequence has identified a wide range of gene functions involved in virulence, lipid metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and main metabolic pathways. We also review the transposons utilized to generate random transposon mutant libraries and the recent advances in the post-genomic era. This includes the generation and characterization of allelic exchange mutants, transcriptomic analysis, transposon mutant banks analysis, new efforts to generate comprehensive mutant libraries, and the application of transposon site hybridization mutagenesis and transposon sequencing for global analysis of the MAP genome. Further analysis of candidate vaccine strains development is also provided with critical discussions on their benefits and shortcomings, and strategies to develop a highly

  3. Obsessive-compulsive disorder, which genes? Which functions? Which pathways? An integrated holistic view regarding OCD and its complex genetic etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgmehr, Ali; Ghadirivasfi, Mohammad; Shahsavand Ananloo, Esmaeil

    2017-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by recurrent obtrusive and repetitive acts typically occurred following anxiety. In the last two decades, studies done on the gene sequences, large-scale and point mutations and gene-gene, gene-environment and gene-drug interactions have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes associated with OCD. Although each gene in turn is a part of the etiology of this disorder; however, OCD, like other mental disorders is complex and a comprehensive and integrated view is necessary to understand its genetic basis. In this study, through an extensive review of existing published studies, all genes associated with OCD were found. Then, in order to integrate the results, all the interactions between these genes were explored and the achievement was represented as an interactive genetic network. Furthermore, the reconstructed network was analyzed. It was found that GRIN2A, GRIN2B and GRIA2 are the most central nodes in the network. Functional and pathway enrichment analysis showed that glutamate-related pathways are the main deficient systems in patients with OCD. By studying genes shared between OCD and other diseases, it was cleared that OCD, epilepsy and some types of cancer have the most number of shared genes. The results of this study, in addition to reviewing the available results as a comprehensive and integrated manner, provide new hypotheses for future studies.

  4. Occlusal and facial features in Amazon indigenous: An insight into the role of genetics and environment in the etiology dental malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Bento Sousa; Bichara, Livia Monteiro; Guerreiro, João Farias; Quintão, Cátia Cardoso Abdo; Normando, David

    2015-09-01

    Indigenous people of the Xingu river present a similar tooth wear pattern, practise exclusive breast-feeding, no pacifier use, and have a large intertribal genetic distance. To revisit the etiology of dental malocclusion features considering these population characteristics. Occlusion and facial features of five semi-isolated Amazon indigenous populations (n=351) were evaluated and compared to previously published data from urban Amazon people. Malocclusion prevalence ranged from 33.8% to 66.7%. Overall this prevalence is lower when compared to urban people mainly regarding posterior crossbite. A high intertribal diversity was found. The Arara-Laranjal village had a population with a normal face profile (98%) and a high rate of normal occlusion (66.2%), while another group from the same ethnicity presented a high prevalence of malocclusion, the highest occurrence of Class III malocclusion (32.6%) and long face (34.8%). In Pat-Krô village the population had the highest prevalence of Class II malocclusion (43.9%), convex profile (38.6%), increased overjet (36.8%) and deep bite (15.8%). Another village's population, from the same ethnicity, had a high frequency of anterior open bite (22.6%) and anterior crossbite (12.9%). The highest occurrence of bi-protrusion was found in the group with the lowest prevalence of dental crowding, and vice versa. Supported by previous genetic studies and given their similar environmental conditions, the high intertribal diversity of occlusal and facial features suggests that genetic factors contribute substantially to the morphology of occlusal and facial features in the indigenous groups studied. The low prevalence of posterior crossbite in the remote indigenous populations compared with urban populations may relate to prolonged breastfeeding and an absence of pacifiers in the indigenous groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Persistent human papillomavirus infection in the etiology of cervical carcinoma: The role of immunological, genetic, viral and cellular factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živadinović Radomir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to present the role of human papillomavirus (HPV in cervical carcinogenesis from several aspects. By explaining the HPV virus lifecycle and structure, its effect on cervical cell cycle and subversion of immune response can be better understood. Early E region of the viral genome encodes proteins that are directly involved in carcinogenesis. The E6 protein binds to p53 protein (product of tumor-suppressor gene blocking and degrading it, which in turn prevents cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. E6 is also capable of telomerase activation, which leads to cell immortalization; it also reacts with host proto-oncogene c-jun, responsible for transcription, shortens G1 phase and speeds up the transition from G1 to S phase of the cells infected by HPV. E7 forms bonds with retinoblastoma protein (product of tumor-suppressor gene and inactivates it. It can inactivate cyclin inhibitors p21, p27, and abrogate the mitotic spindle checkpoint with the loss of protective effect of pRB and p53. The immune system cannot initiate early immunological reaction since the virus is non-lytic, while the concentration of viral proteins - antigens is low and has a basal intracellular position. Presentation through Langerhans cells (LC is weak, because the number of these cells is low due to the effect of HPV. E7 HPV reduces the expression of E-cadherin, which is responsible for LC adhesion to HPVtransformed keratinocytes. Based on these considerations, it may be concluded that the process of cervical carcinogenesis includes viral, genetic, cellular, molecular-biological, endocrine, exocrine and immunological factors.

  6. Genetic and physiological controls of growth under water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, François; Parent, Boris; Caldeira, Cecilio F; Welcker, Claude

    2014-04-01

    The sensitivity of expansive growth to water deficit has a large genetic variability, which is higher than that of photosynthesis. It is observed in several species, with some genotypes stopping growth in a relatively wet soil, whereas others continue growing until the lower limit of soil-available water. The responses of growth to soil water deficit and evaporative demand share an appreciable part of their genetic control through the colocation of quantitative trait loci as do the responses of the growth of different organs to water deficit. This result may be caused by common mechanisms of action discussed in this paper (particularly, plant hydraulic properties). We propose that expansive growth, putatively linked to hydraulic processes, determines the sink strength under water deficit, whereas photosynthesis determines source strength. These findings have large consequences for plant modeling under water deficit and for the design of breeding programs.

  7. Search for Genetic Variants Underlying Musical Aptitude and Related Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Music perception and practice represents complex cognitive functions of the brain. There is an abundance of data about the neurophysiological effects of music on the human brain, but heritability and especially molecular studies have been lacking. The development of genome technologies and bioinformatics has enabled the identification of genetic variants underlying complex human traits. These methods can be applied to normal human traits like music perception and performance. Prior to th...

  8. Comprehensive investigation of CASK mutations and other genetic etiologies in 41 patients with intellectual disability and microcephaly with pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia (MICPCH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hayashi

    Full Text Available The CASK gene (Xp11.4 is highly expressed in the mammalian nervous system and plays several roles in neural development and synaptic function. Loss-of-function mutations of CASK are associated with intellectual disability and microcephaly with pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia (MICPCH, especially in females. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of 41 MICPCH patients, analyzed by mutational search of CASK and screening of candidate genes using an SNP array, targeted resequencing and whole-exome sequencing (WES. In total, we identified causative or candidate genomic aberrations in 37 of the 41 cases (90.2%. CASK aberrations including a rare mosaic mutation in a male patient, were found in 32 cases, and a mutation in ITPR1, another known gene in which mutations are causative for MICPCH, was found in one case. We also found aberrations involving genes other than CASK, such as HDAC2, MARCKS, and possibly HS3ST5, which may be associated with MICPCH. Moreover, the targeted resequencing screening detected heterozygous variants in RELN in two cases, of uncertain pathogenicity, and WES analysis suggested that concurrent mutations of both DYNC1H1 and DCTN1 in one case could lead to MICPCH. Our results not only identified the etiology of MICPCH in nearly all the investigated patients but also suggest that MICPCH is a genetically heterogeneous condition, in which CASK inactivating mutations appear to account for the majority of cases.

  9. Identifying the genetic components underlying the pathophysiology of movement disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezquerra M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mario Ezquerra, Yaroslau Compta, Maria J MartiParkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Unit, Service of Neurology, Institute of Clinical Neurosciences, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERNED, SpainAbstract: Movement disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions, few of which have been classically described as bona fide hereditary illnesses (Huntington’s chorea, for instance. Most are considered to be either sporadic or to feature varying degrees of familial aggregation (parkinsonism and dystonia. In the late twentieth century, Mendelian monogenic mutations were found for movement disorders with a clear and consistent family history. Although important, these findings apply only to very rare forms of movement disorders. Already in the twenty-first century, and taking advantage of the modern developments in genetics and molecular biology, growing attention is being paid to the complex genetics of movement disorders. The search for risk genetic variants (polymorphisms in large cohorts and the identification of different risk variants across different populations and ethnic groups are under way, with the most relevant findings to date corresponding to recent genome wide association studies in Parkinson’s disease. These new approaches focusing on risk variants may enable the design of screening tests for early or even preclinical disease, and the identification of likely therapeutic targets.Keywords: genetics, movement disorders, Parkinson’s disease, parkinsonism, dystonia

  10. Potential Allergens in Disposable Diaper Wipes, Topical Diaper Preparations, and Disposable Diapers: Under-recognized Etiology of Pediatric Perineal Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, JiaDe; Treat, James; Chaney, Keri; Brod, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis in young children may be an under-recognized cause of perineal dermatitis. The diapered infant skin is uniquely susceptible to allergic contact dermatitis because of more permeable neonatal skin, a moist environment, frequent contact with irritants and resultant skin barrier breakdown, and exposure to topical products such as diaper wipes, diaper preparations, and disposable diapers. To our knowledge, potential allergens in these products have not been thoroughly catalogued or studied. We explore and review potential allergenic ingredients in diaper wipes, topical diaper preparations, and disposable diapers. We analyzed 63 diaper wipes, 41 topical diaper preparations, and the 3 top selling diaper brands available from two of the largest retailers in the United States. Each potential allergen is discussed, and epidemiologic studies of rates of sensitization to potential allergens in children are also reported. Botanical extracts, including members of the Compositae family, were the most commonly represented potential allergen in both diaper wipes and topical preparations. Other potential allergens identified with high frequency include α-tocopherol, fragrances, propylene glycol, parabens, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, and lanolin. Frequent culprits such as formaldehyde releasers and methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone were not prevalent in our analyzed products.

  11. The Etiology of Primary Hyperhidrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashmonai, Moshe; Cameron, Alan E.P.; Connery, Cliff P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Primary hyperhidrosis is a pathological disorder of unknown etiology, affecting 0.6-5% of the population, and causing severe functional and social handicaps. As the etiology is unknown, it is not possible to treat the root cause. Recently some differences between affected and non...... with hyperhidrosis have been identified. Histological differences were observed in sympathetic ganglia of hyperhidrotic subjects: the ganglia were larger and contained a higher number of ganglion cells. A higher expression of acetylcholine and alpha-7 neuronal nicotinic receptor subunit in the sympathetic ganglia...... of patients with hyperhidrosis has been reported. Conclusions: Despite these accumulated data, the etiology of primary hyperhidrosis remains obscure. Nevertheless, three main lines for future research seem to be delineated: genetics, histological observations, and enzymatic studies....

  12. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and rational choice under risk or uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuradzki, Tomasz

    2014-11-01

    In this paper I present an argument in favour of a parental duty to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). I argue that if embryos created in vitro were able to decide for themselves in a rational manner, they would sometimes choose PGD as a method of selection. Couples, therefore, should respect their hypothetical choices on a principle similar to that of patient autonomy. My thesis shows that no matter which moral doctrine couples subscribe to, they ought to conduct the PGD procedure in the situations when it is impossible to implant all of the created embryos and if there is a significant risk for giving birth to a child with a serious condition. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Review: Recent Finding about Etiology of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Karim-Zadeh

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Autism and the other disorders in the autism spectrum are behaviorally defined syndromes that can be a prolonged disorder. The specific underlying neurophysiologic mechanisms simply not known, but probably several causes lead to disorders in the autism spectrum. This article is summary of recent research about etiology of autism but the search must continue. 1 Neurobiological origin, the neurobiological investigations show the role of dopamine and serotonin in pathogenesis of autism. 2 Genetic, studies in autism was established the hypothesis that genetic factors can be etiologically significant in subsets of patients. 3 With the Regional cerebral glucose metabolism measurement, autistic children had a left> right anterior rectal gyrus asymmetry as opposed to the normal right> left asymmetry in that region. 4 With the Regional cerebral blood flow measurement no cortical regional abnormalities were found. 5 Association of epilepsy and autism pediatric epilepsy lead to autistic regression. 6 Association of tuberous sclerosis and autism the number of tubers was significantly greater in individuals with a diagnosis of autism than in those without this diagnosis. 7 Embryological origin for autism, the results and two new lines of evidence that place the initiating injury for autism around the time of neural tube closure. 8 Obstetric complications and later autistic disorder, these data do not support the view that obstetric complications increase the risk for later autism. 9 Food allergy, recent findings show a relationship between food allergy and infantile autism. 10 Head circumferences measurement in children with autism show the large head circumference and increased growth.

  14. Expression Profile of Three Splicing Factors in Pleural Cells Based on the Underlying Etiology and Its Clinical Values in Patients with Pleural Effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-Lum Han

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Splicing factors (SFs are involved in oncogenesis or immune modulation, the common underlying processes giving rise to pleural effusion (PE. The expression profiles of three SFs (HNRNPA1, SRSF1, and SRSF3 and their clinical values have never been assessed in PE. The three SFs (in pellets of PE and conventional tumor markers were analyzed using PE samples in patients with PE (N = 336. The sum of higher–molecular weight (Mw forms of HNRNPA1 (Sum-HMws-HNRNPA1 and SRSF1 (Sum-HMws-SRSF1 and SRSF3 levels were upregulated in malignant PE (MPE compared to benign PE (BPE; they were highest in cytology-positive MPE, followed by tuberculous PE and parapneumonic PE. Meanwhile, the lowest-Mw HNRNPA1 (LMw-HNRNPA1 and SRSF1 (LMw-SRSF1 levels were not upregulated in MPE. Sum-HMws-HNRNPA1, Sum-HMws-SRSF1, and SRSF3, but neither LMw-HNRNPA1 nor LMw-SRSF1, showed positive correlations with cancer cell percentages in MPE. The detection accuracy for MPE was high in the order of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, 85%, Sum-HMws-HNRNPA1 (76%, Sum-HMws-SRSF1 (68%, SRSF3, cytokeratin-19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1, LMw-HNRNPA1, and LMw-SRSF1. Sum-HMws-HNRNPA1 detected more than half of the MPE cases that were undetected by cytology and CEA. Sum-HMws-HNRNPA1, but not other SFs or conventional tumor markers, showed an association with longer overall survival among patients with MPE receiving chemotherapy. Our results demonstrated different levels of the three SFs with their Mw-specific profiles depending on the etiology of PE. We suggest that Sum-HMws-HNRNPA1 is a supplementary diagnostic marker for MPE and a favorable prognostic indicator for patients with MPE receiving chemotherapy.

  15. A Realistic Model Under Which the Genetic Code is Optimal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhrman, Harry; van der Gulik, Peter T. S.; Klau, Gunnar W.; Schaffner, Christian; Speijer, Dave; Stougie, Leen

    2013-01-01

    The genetic code has a high level of error robustness. Using values of hydrophobicity scales as a proxy for amino acid character, and the mean square measure as a function quantifying error robustness, a value can be obtained for a genetic code which reflects the error robustness of that code. By

  16. Coeliac disease : investigation of the genetic factors underlying coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, M.J. (Martine Juliana) van

    2003-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a common food intolerance with a complex genetic aetiology. It is caused by ingestion of gluten peptides from wheat and related proteins from barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. The disease affects the small intestine and leads to abnormalities ranging from the

  17. Genetic Circuit Performance under Conditions Relevant for Industrial Bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, Felix; Broers, Nicolette J.; Hartmans, Sybe; Tamsir, Alvin; Kerkman, Richard; Roubos, Johannes A.; Bovenberg, Roel; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic genetic programs promise to enable novel applications in industrial processes. For such applications, the genetic circuits that compose programs will require fidelity in varying and complex environments. In this work, we report the performance of two synthetic circuits in Escherichia coli

  18. Worms under stress: unravelling genetic complex traits through perturbation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Sanchez, M.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic architecture of an organism could be considered ‘the most amazing piece of engineering’ existing in nature. Looking from a certain distance, the genetic complexity of an organism could be described as an immense jigsaw puzzle. As in a real jigsaw, the connection between two pieces

  19. A Realistic Model under which the Genetic Code is Optimal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhrman, H.; van der Gulik, P.T.S.; Klau, G.W.; Schaffner, C.; Speijer, D.; Stougie, L.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic code has a high level of error robustness. Using values of hydrophobicity scales as a proxy for amino acid character, and the mean square measure as a function quantifying error robustness, a value can be obtained for a genetic code which reflects the error robustness of that code. By

  20. Etiology and factors associated with pneumonia in children under 5 years of age in Mali: A prospective case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Bénet (Thomas); M. Sylla (Mariam); M. Messaoudi (Mélina); V.S. Picot (Valentina Sánchez); J.-N. Telles (Jean-Noël); A.-A. Diakite (Abdoul-Aziz); F. Komurian-Pradel (Florence); H. Endtz (Hubert); S. Diallo (Souleymane); G. Paranhos-Baccalà (Gláucia); P. Vanhems (Philippe)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: There are very limited data on children with pneumonia in Mali. The objective was to assess the etiology and factors associated with community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized children <5 years of age in Mali. Methods: A prospective hospital-based case-control study was

  1. Genetic studies on leaf rolling and some root traits under drought ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic studies on leaf rolling and some root traits under drought conditions in rice (Oryza sativa L.) AA Allah. Abstract. Crossing was made between three resistant and two susceptible parents to determine the genetic characteristics under drought conditions during 2002 and 2003 rice growing seasons. The resistant ...

  2. Genetic analysis of fertility restoration under CGMS system in rice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cytoplasmic genetic male sterility (CGMS) resulting from nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction has been commercially exploited for the production of F1 hybrid seed in rice. The. CGMS system involves three lines, namely a cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) line, a maintainer line and a restorer line where restorer line (R line) ...

  3. Genetic analysis of fertility restoration under CGMS system in rice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We studied the genetics of fertility restoration by producing three-way test cross (TWTC) hybrids involved different combi- nations of restorers, maintainers and partial restorers of rice. Pollen and spikelet fertility of 16 TWTC hybrids were studied. Six TWTC involving restorer/restorer combinations as male parents ...

  4. Adaptive genetic potential of coniferous forest tree species under climate change: implications for sustainable forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Georgeta; Birsan, Marius-Victor; Teodosiu, Maria; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Daia, Mihai; Mirancea, Ionel; Ivanov, Paula; Alin, Alexandru

    2017-04-01

    Mountain ecosystems are extremely vulnerable to climate change. The real potential for adaptation depends upon the existence of a wide genetic diversity in trees populations, upon the adaptive genetic variation, respectively. Genetic diversity offers the guarantee that forest species can survive, adapt and evolve under the influence of changing environmental conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the genetic diversity and adaptive genetic potential of two local species - Norway spruce and European silver fir - in the context of regional climate change. Based on data from a long-term provenance experiments network and climate variables spanning over more than 50 years, we have investigated the impact of climatic factors on growth performance and adaptation of tree species. Our results indicate that climatic and geographic factors significantly affect forest site productivity. Mean annual temperature and annual precipitation amount were found to be statistically significant explanatory variables. Combining the additive genetic model with the analysis of nuclear markers we obtained different images of the genetic structure of tree populations. As genetic indicators we used: gene frequencies, genetic diversity, genetic differentiation, genetic variance, plasticity. Spatial genetic analyses have allowed identifying the genetic centers holding high genetic diversity which will be valuable sources of gene able to buffer the negative effects of future climate change. Correlations between the marginal populations and in the optimal vegetation, between the level of genetic diversity and ecosystem stability, will allow the assessment of future risks arising from current genetic structure. Therefore, the strategies for sustainable forest management have to rely on the adaptive genetic variation and local adaptation of the valuable genetic resources. This work was realized within the framework of the project GENCLIM (Evaluating the adaptive potential of the main

  5. Shared genetics underlying epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Yi; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Painter, Jodie N

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address...... this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3194 cases and 7060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customized Illumina Infinium iSelect (iCOGS) arrays (10 065 cases and 21 663 controls). Previous work has suggested...... that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here, using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We...

  6. Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE study: An integrative population-based case-control study of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombi Antonio

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Tobacco smoking is its primary cause, and yet the precise molecular alterations induced by smoking in lung tissue that lead to lung cancer and impact survival have remained obscure. A new framework of research is needed to address the challenges offered by this complex disease. Methods/Design We designed a large population-based case-control study that combines a traditional molecular epidemiology design with a more integrative approach to investigate the dynamic process that begins with smoking initiation, proceeds through dependency/smoking persistence, continues with lung cancer development and ends with progression to disseminated disease or response to therapy and survival. The study allows the integration of data from multiple sources in the same subjects (risk factors, germline variation, genomic alterations in tumors, and clinical endpoints to tackle the disease etiology from different angles. Before beginning the study, we conducted a phone survey and pilot investigations to identify the best approach to ensure an acceptable participation in the study from cases and controls. Between 2002 and 2005, we enrolled 2101 incident primary lung cancer cases and 2120 population controls, with 86.6% and 72.4% participation rate, respectively, from a catchment area including 216 municipalities in the Lombardy region of Italy. Lung cancer cases were enrolled in 13 hospitals and population controls were randomly sampled from the area to match the cases by age, gender and residence. Detailed epidemiological information and biospecimens were collected from each participant, and clinical data and tissue specimens from the cases. Collection of follow-up data on treatment and survival is ongoing. Discussion EAGLE is a new population-based case-control study that explores the full spectrum of lung cancer etiology, from smoking addiction to lung cancer outcome, through

  7. Etiology of Spastic Diplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and etiologic profile of spastic diplegia was studied in a retrospective chart review of 54 patients diagnosed during a 12-year period at Montreal Children’s Hospital, Quebec, Canada.

  8. Biology, Genetics, and Environment: Underlying Factors Influencing Alcohol Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Tamara L; Luczak, Susan E; Hiller-Sturmhöfel, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Gene variants encoding several of the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), are among the largest genetic associations with risk for alcohol dependence. Certain genetic variants (i.e., alleles)--particularly the ADH1B*2, ADH1B*3, ADH1C*1, and ALDH2*2 alleles--have been associated with lower rates of alcohol dependence. These alleles may lead to an accumulation of acetaldehyde during alcohol metabolism, which can result in heightened subjective and objective effects. The prevalence of these alleles differs among ethnic groups; ADH1B*2 is found frequently in northeast Asians and occasionally Caucasians, ADH1B*3 is found predominantly in people of African ancestry, ADH1C*1 varies substantially across populations, and ALDH2*2 is found almost exclusively in northeast Asians. Differences in the prevalence of these alleles may account at least in part for ethnic differences in alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorder (AUD). However, these alleles do not act in isolation to influence the risk of AUD. For example, the gene effects of ALDH2*2 and ADH1B*2 seem to interact. Moreover, other factors have been found to influence the extent to which these alleles affect a person's alcohol involvement, including developmental stage, individual characteristics (e.g., ethnicity, antisocial behavior, and behavioral undercontrol), and environmental factors (e.g., culture, religion, family environment, and childhood adversity).

  9. Legume genetic resources and transcriptome dynamics under abiotic stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Mostafa; Jogaiah, Sudisha; Burritt, David J; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2018-01-04

    Grain legumes are an important source of nutrition and income for billions of consumers and farmers around the world. However, the low productivity of new legume varieties, due to the limited genetic diversity available for legume breeding programmes and poor policymaker support, combined with an increasingly unpredictable global climate is resulting in a large gap between current yields and the increasing demand for legumes as food. Hence, there is a need for novel approaches to develop new high-yielding legume cultivars that are able to cope with a range of environmental stressors. Next-generation technologies are providing the tools that could enable the more rapid and cost-effective genomic and transcriptomic studies for most major crops, allowing the identification of key functional and regulatory genes involved in abiotic stress resistance. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent achievements regarding abiotic stress resistance in a wide range of legume crops and highlight the transcriptomic and miRNA approaches that have been used. In addition, we critically evaluate the availability and importance of legume genetic resources with desirable abiotic stress resistance traits. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A simple genetic architecture underlies morphological variation in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Boyko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Domestic dogs exhibit tremendous phenotypic diversity, including a greater variation in body size than any other terrestrial mammal. Here, we generate a high density map of canine genetic variation by genotyping 915 dogs from 80 domestic dog breeds, 83 wild canids, and 10 outbred African shelter dogs across 60,968 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Coupling this genomic resource with external measurements from breed standards and individuals as well as skeletal measurements from museum specimens, we identify 51 regions of the dog genome associated with phenotypic variation among breeds in 57 traits. The complex traits include average breed body size and external body dimensions and cranial, dental, and long bone shape and size with and without allometric scaling. In contrast to the results from association mapping of quantitative traits in humans and domesticated plants, we find that across dog breeds, a small number of quantitative trait loci (< or = 3 explain the majority of phenotypic variation for most of the traits we studied. In addition, many genomic regions show signatures of recent selection, with most of the highly differentiated regions being associated with breed-defining traits such as body size, coat characteristics, and ear floppiness. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of mapping multiple traits in the domestic dog using a database of genotyped individuals and highlight the important role human-directed selection has played in altering the genetic architecture of key traits in this important species.

  11. Genetic dissection of seed vigour traits in maize (Zea mays L.) under ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Shi Y., Li G., Tian Z., Wang Z., Wang X., Zhu Y., Chen Y., Guo S., Qi J., Zhang X. and Ku L. 2016 Genetic dissection of seed vigour traits in maize (Zea mays L.) under low-temperature conditions. J. Genet. 95, 1017–1022]. Introduction. Seed vigour, an important factor governing the seed qual- ity, reflects potential seed ...

  12. Performance of diverse wheat genetic stocks under moisture stress condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seher, M.; Shabbir, G.; Rasheed, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate divergent wheat germplasm for their performance under drought and control conditions. The germplasm consists of wheat land races of Pakistan, advanced D-genome synthetic derivatives and high yielding varieties of Pakistan. This wide array of germplasm was selected to identify sources, which can be opted later by the wheat breeders while breeding for drought tolerance. The evaluation parameters involved some important physiochemical testing and morphological characteristics in the field under drought and control conditions. Based on these parameters, 13 wheat genotypes were selected on the basis of their best performance regarding morphological and physiological parameters. These genotypes exhibited higher yield under drought stress conditions and increased percentage of proline, sugar, SOD and protein content under laboratory conditions as compared to the susceptible genotypes. Correlation studies revealed that grains per spike (GPS) and thousand grain weight (TGW) had direct relationship with spike length (SL), proline and sugar content under both control and drought conditions. Thus, these parameters can be used as selection criteria for the identification of tolerant genotypes. (author)

  13. Genetic variation of loci potentially under selection confounds species-genetic diversity correlations in a fragmented habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Angeline; Gouin, Nicolas; Baumel, Alex; Gianoli, Ernesto; Serratosa, Juan; Osorio, Rodomiro; Manel, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Positive species-genetic diversity correlations (SGDCs) are often thought to result from the parallel influence of neutral processes on genetic and species diversity. Yet, confounding effects of non-neutral mechanisms have not been explored. Here, we investigate the impact of non-neutral genetic diversity on SGDCs in high Andean wetlands. We compare correlations between plant species diversity and genetic diversity (GD) calculated with and without loci potentially under selection (outlier loci). The study system includes 2188 specimens from five species (three common aquatic macroinvertebrate and two dominant plant species) that were genotyped for 396 amplified fragment length polymorphism loci. We also appraise the importance of neutral processes on SGDCs by investigating the influence of habitat fragmentation features. Significant positive SGDCs were detected for all five species (mean SGDC = 0.52 ± 0.05). While only a few outlier loci were detected in each species, they resulted in significant decreases in GD and in SGDCs. This supports the hypothesis that neutral processes drive species-genetic diversity relationships in high Andean wetlands. Unexpectedly, the effects on genetic diversity GD of the habitat fragmentation characteristics in this study increased with the presence of outlier loci in two species. Overall, our results reveal pitfalls in using habitat features to infer processes driving SGDCs and show that a few loci potentially under selection are enough to cause a significant downward bias in SGDC. Investigating confounding effects of outlier loci thus represents a useful approach to evidence the contribution of neutral processes on species-genetic diversity relationships. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The possible involvement of genetic variants of NET1 in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder comorbid with oppositional defiant disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Cheng, Jia; Li, Haimei; Yang, Li; Qian, Qiujin; Wang, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) often coexist and shared some genetic influences. Evidence from the existing literature indicated that comorbid with ODD may increase the heterogeneity of ADHD genetics. Our present study sought to investigate the role of norepinephrine transporter gene (NET1) for ADHD comorbid with ODD. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of NET1 were genotyped for a total of 1,815 ADHD cases, including 587 subjects (32.3%) with ODD. Chi-square tests were conducted for pseudo case-control study comparing allelic and genotypic distributions between ADHD with and without ODD. Among them, there were 1,249 probands together with their parents composing trios for family-based association studies using transmission disequilibrium tests (TDTs). In addition, 1,337 ADHD probands have detailed information of ODD symptoms and were included for quantitative analyses with genotypes using analyses of covariance (ANCOVA). To consider the overlap and correlation of other comorbidities with ODD and eliminate their potential confounding effect, we further repeated above analyses for 'pure ADHD+ODD' versus 'ADHD-only' after excluding other comorbidities except for ODD. The pseudo case-control study showed different allelic and genotypic distributions of SNP rs3785143 between ADHD with ODD and those without ODD. Family-based association tests indicated overtransmission of the T allele of rs3785143 in ADHD with ODD trios, but no biased transmission in those without ODD. ANCOVA showed association between genotypes of rs3785143 with ODD symptoms in ADHD probands, especially with 'Argumentative/Defiant Behavior (ADB)' dimension after controlling gender, age, clinical subtypes and intelligence. Above association still existed after removing the samples with other comorbidities. NET1 was associated with comorbidity of ODD and ODD symptoms in ADHD probands. Our findings emphasize the importance of considering the

  15. Genetics of susceptibility for radiation-induced leukemia. Mapping of genes involved to chromosomes 1, 2, and 4, and implications for a viral etiology in the disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meruelo, D.; Offer, M.; Flieger, N.

    1981-01-01

    Susceptibility to radiation-induced leukemia in (A/J x B10)F2 mice is encoded for by genes in chromosomes 1, 2, and 4. The loci involved in chromosomes 1 and 4 are close to or similar to xenotropic virus inducibility locus on chromosome 1 and a locus-affecting expression of xenotropic MuLV envelope-related cell surface antigens. Radiation-induced leukemia-1 (Ril-1) on chromosome 2 plays an overriding influence in susceptibility to the disease. This locus might encode ecotropic viral-associated genetic information or might contain cellular sequences with oncogenic potential. These findings are of interest in view of the importance of recombinant viruses to leukemogenesis. Furthermore, it is intriguing that Ril-1 is located in a chromosomal site rich in thymus differentiation-specific loci. An explanation for tissue-specific activation of endogenous viruses is that activation of the virus in question is dependent on differentiation-specific steps

  16. [Pedophilia: etiology, diagnostics and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromberger, P; Jordan, K; Müller, J L

    2013-09-01

    Child sexual abuse is one of the most destructive events for healthy child development. Following psychiatric classification systems, pedophilia must be distinguished from child sexual abuse. Approximately only one half of all child abusers fulfill the diagnostic criteria for pedophilia which is defined as a persistent or dominating sexual preference for prepubescent children characterized by persistent thoughts, fantasies, urges, sexual arousal or behavior. This article describes the diagnostic criteria and potential differential diagnoses as well as epidemiological and etiological findings. From an etiological point of view multifactorial mechanisms are currently considered to be responsible especially genetic factors, learning theoretical and neurobiological factors. Psychotherapeutic and pharmaceutical treatment options will be discussed. According to the current state of knowledge cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy is the method of choice in the treatment of pedophilia and has demonstrated positive treatment effects in meta-analyses regarding relapse prevention. Medicinal treatment of pedophilia is only indicated for severe forms of pedophilia. Important aspects of risk management in the treatment of pedophilia and aspects which must be considered in the forensic psychiatric assessment are presented.

  17. Etiology and Factors Associated with Pneumonia in Children under 5 Years of Age in Mali: A Prospective Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénet, Thomas; Sylla, Mariam; Messaoudi, Mélina; Sánchez Picot, Valentina; Telles, Jean-Noël; Diakite, Abdoul-Aziz; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Endtz, Hubert; Diallo, Souleymane; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    There are very limited data on children with pneumonia in Mali. The objective was to assess the etiology and factors associated with community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized children pneumonia; Controls were hospitalized children without respiratory features, matched for age and period. Respiratory specimens, were collected to identify 19 viruses and 5 bacteria. Whole blood was collected from cases only. Factors associated with pneumonia were assessed by multivariate logistic regression. Overall, 118 cases and 98 controls were analyzed; 44.1% were female, median age was 11 months. Among pneumonia cases, 30.5% were hypoxemic at admission, mortality was 4.2%. Pneumonia cases differed from the controls regarding clinical signs and symptoms but not in terms of past medical history. Multivariate analysis of nasal swab findings disclosed that S. pneumoniae (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.6-7.0), human metapneumovirus (aOR = 17.2, 95% CI: 2.0-151.4), respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] (aOR = 7.4, 95% CI: 2.3-23.3), and influenza A virus (aOR = 10.7, 95% CI: 1.0-112.2) were associated with pneumonia, independently of patient age, gender, period, and other pathogens. Distribution of S. pneumoniae and RSV differed by season with higher rates of S. pneumoniae in January-June and of RSV in July-September. Pneumococcal serotypes 1 and 5 were more frequent in pneumonia cases than in the controls (P = 0.009, and P = 0.04, respectively). In this non-PCV population from Mali, pneumonia in children was mainly attributed to S. pneumoniae, RSV, human metapneumovirus, and influenza A virus. Increased pneumococcal conjugate vaccine coverage in children could significantly reduce the burden of pneumonia in sub-Saharan African countries.

  18. Etiology and Factors Associated with Pneumonia in Children under 5 Years of Age in Mali: A Prospective Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaoudi, Mélina; Sánchez Picot, Valentina; Telles, Jean-Noël; Diakite, Abdoul-Aziz; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Endtz, Hubert; Diallo, Souleymane; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background There are very limited data on children with pneumonia in Mali. The objective was to assess the etiology and factors associated with community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized children pneumonia; Controls were hospitalized children without respiratory features, matched for age and period. Respiratory specimens, were collected to identify 19 viruses and 5 bacteria. Whole blood was collected from cases only. Factors associated with pneumonia were assessed by multivariate logistic regression. Results Overall, 118 cases and 98 controls were analyzed; 44.1% were female, median age was 11 months. Among pneumonia cases, 30.5% were hypoxemic at admission, mortality was 4.2%. Pneumonia cases differed from the controls regarding clinical signs and symptoms but not in terms of past medical history. Multivariate analysis of nasal swab findings disclosed that S. pneumoniae (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.6–7.0), human metapneumovirus (aOR = 17.2, 95% CI: 2.0–151.4), respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] (aOR = 7.4, 95% CI: 2.3–23.3), and influenza A virus (aOR = 10.7, 95% CI: 1.0–112.2) were associated with pneumonia, independently of patient age, gender, period, and other pathogens. Distribution of S. pneumoniae and RSV differed by season with higher rates of S. pneumoniae in January-June and of RSV in July-September. Pneumococcal serotypes 1 and 5 were more frequent in pneumonia cases than in the controls (P = 0.009, and P = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions In this non-PCV population from Mali, pneumonia in children was mainly attributed to S. pneumoniae, RSV, human metapneumovirus, and influenza A virus. Increased pneumococcal conjugate vaccine coverage in children could significantly reduce the burden of pneumonia in sub-Saharan African countries. PMID:26696249

  19. XEROSTOMIA: FAKTOR ETIOLOGI, ETIOLOGI DAN PENANGGULANGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayuti Hasibuan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Saliva is a complex oral secretion, which producd by major and minor salivary glans about 1.5 liters in 24 hours. In the oral cavity, saliva has several important functions include cleansing action, lubrication, facilitates for chewing and swallowing, food, speaking, buffer system.protecting teeth and a paart of mucosal immune system. These functions will be optimum if salivary secretion produced in normal quantitiy and quality. When salivary flow is diminished, it may express disorder in the form of xerostomia or oral dryness. Several factors can contribute as causing this condition, such as radiation to head and neck region, local diseases that affect salivary gland, systemic diseases, side effect of drugs and age. There are many problems usually presented by patients with xerostomia. These problems reflect the major funcitonal roles of saliva. So, the dentist must know the management of xerostomic patients, that aimed at elimination of the etiology of xerostomia, clinical manifestationsa and the management of xerostomia so that the dentist can arrange treatment planning rationally.id

  20. Etiology and Factors Associated with Pneumonia in Children under 5 Years of Age in Mali: A Prospective Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bénet

    Full Text Available There are very limited data on children with pneumonia in Mali. The objective was to assess the etiology and factors associated with community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized children <5 years of age in Mali.A prospective hospital-based case-control study was implemented in the Pediatric department of Gabriel Touré University Hospital at Bamako, Mali, between July 2011-December 2012. Cases were children with radiologically-confirmed pneumonia; Controls were hospitalized children without respiratory features, matched for age and period. Respiratory specimens, were collected to identify 19 viruses and 5 bacteria. Whole blood was collected from cases only. Factors associated with pneumonia were assessed by multivariate logistic regression.Overall, 118 cases and 98 controls were analyzed; 44.1% were female, median age was 11 months. Among pneumonia cases, 30.5% were hypoxemic at admission, mortality was 4.2%. Pneumonia cases differed from the controls regarding clinical signs and symptoms but not in terms of past medical history. Multivariate analysis of nasal swab findings disclosed that S. pneumoniae (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.6-7.0, human metapneumovirus (aOR = 17.2, 95% CI: 2.0-151.4, respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] (aOR = 7.4, 95% CI: 2.3-23.3, and influenza A virus (aOR = 10.7, 95% CI: 1.0-112.2 were associated with pneumonia, independently of patient age, gender, period, and other pathogens. Distribution of S. pneumoniae and RSV differed by season with higher rates of S. pneumoniae in January-June and of RSV in July-September. Pneumococcal serotypes 1 and 5 were more frequent in pneumonia cases than in the controls (P = 0.009, and P = 0.04, respectively.In this non-PCV population from Mali, pneumonia in children was mainly attributed to S. pneumoniae, RSV, human metapneumovirus, and influenza A virus. Increased pneumococcal conjugate vaccine coverage in children could significantly reduce the

  1. Genetic testing for autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sarah C; Msall, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have unique developmental and behavioral phenotypes, and they have specific challenges with communication, social skills, and repetitive behaviors. At this time, no single etiology for ASD has been identified. However, evidence from family studies and linkage analyses suggests that genetic factors play a pivotal role in the etiology of ASD. However, ASD appear to be influenced by complex genetic and environmental factors, and evidence suggests that this is not a single gene disorder. In particular, ASD has a complex behavioral phenotype, and this variation reflects complex genotypes under the influence of external factors. With these considerations in mind, it is important to recognize that genetic testing is a vital component of the diagnostic evaluation of children with ASD. For example, children with ASD who have definitive etiologies may be able to access more specific resources, they may be spared long, emotionally and financially exhausting diagnostic journeys, and associated medical conditions and comorbidities can be managed proactively. Most importantly, children with disabilities of unknown origin should have an ongoing evaluation of potential etiologies for their symptoms (Crocker, 1987). Our purpose is to describe current trends in genetic testing for ASD, potential genetic etiologies of ASD, known genetic disorders associated with ASD, and recommendations for genetic testing in ASD. We will also emphasize the importance of access to informed health professionals, especially in the contexts of stigma and community supports. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Genetic variation underlying psychosis-inducing effects of cannabis: critical review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoster, Jeroen; van Os, Jim; Myin-Germeys, Inez; De Hert, Marc; van Winkel, Ruud

    2012-01-01

    Cannabis use is associated with an increased risk for psychotic disorder, yet most cannabis users do not develop psychosis, suggesting that other factors are also involved. This paper reviews the available evidence suggesting that differential sensitivity to the psychosis-inducing effects of cannabis may be related to underlying genetic liability. There is robust evidence that persons at psychometric risk for psychosis are most vulnerable to display psychotic symptoms subsequent to the use of cannabis. Multiple studies have also found that persons at familial risk for psychosis have an increased sensitivity to the effects of cannabis. Together, these findings support the concept of a biological interaction between cannabis use and one's underlying genetic vulnerability. At the molecular-genetic level, however, few (if any) interactions have been consistently replicated, although a reported interaction with variation in AKT1 is promising and deserves further follow-up. The apparent lack of consistent replication can be ascribed to problems of initial gene selection, statistical power, a bias towards positive results and insufficient attempts at true replication, leading to the conclusion that increased sample sizes, greater density of genetic markers and a stronger focus on true replication are necessary. The major challenge for molecular-genetic gene-environment interaction research will be to combine the agnostic detection of disorder-associated genetic variants from genome-wide studies with the hypothesis-based approach from epidemiological and neurobiological studies. Possible strategies for future cannabis interaction studies are discussed.

  3. HIV lipodystrophy etiology and pathogenesis. Body composition and metabolic alterations: etiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Donald P

    2003-04-01

    The results of epidemiologic investigations have clearly indicated that the development of lipodystrophy is multifactorial. Factors related to HIV infection, hormonal influences, mitochondrial dysfunction, cytokine activation related to immune reconstitution, and individual genetic predisposition all have been hypothesized as etiologic. Recent studies suggest that immune dysregulation rather than HIV infection per se may be the predominant factor in the development of lipodystrophy.

  4. Cytoplasmic FMR1-Interacting Protein 2 Is a Major Genetic Factor Underlying Binge Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Stacey L; Goldberg, Lisa R; Yazdani, Neema; Babbs, R Keith; Wu, Jiayi; Reed, Eric R; Jenkins, David F; Bolgioni, Amanda F; Landaverde, Kelsey I; Luttik, Kimberly P; Mitchell, Karen S; Kumar, Vivek; Johnson, W Evan; Mulligan, Megan K; Cottone, Pietro; Bryant, Camron D

    2017-05-01

    Eating disorders are lethal and heritable; however, the underlying genetic factors are unknown. Binge eating is a highly heritable trait associated with eating disorders that is comorbid with mood and substance use disorders. Therefore, understanding its genetic basis will inform therapeutic development that could improve several comorbid neuropsychiatric conditions. We assessed binge eating in closely related C57BL/6 mouse substrains and in an F 2 cross to identify quantitative trait loci associated with binge eating. We used gene targeting to validate candidate genetic factors. Finally, we used transcriptome analysis of the striatum via messenger RNA sequencing to identify the premorbid transcriptome and the binge-induced transcriptome to inform molecular mechanisms mediating binge eating susceptibility and establishment. C57BL/6NJ but not C57BL/6J mice showed rapid and robust escalation in palatable food consumption. We mapped a single genome-wide significant quantitative trait locus on chromosome 11 (logarithm of the odds = 7.4) to a missense mutation in cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting protein 2 (Cyfip2). We validated Cyfip2 as a major genetic factor underlying binge eating in heterozygous knockout mice on a C57BL/6N background that showed reduced binge eating toward a wild-type C57BL/6J-like level. Transcriptome analysis of premorbid genetic risk identified the enrichment terms morphine addiction and retrograde endocannabinoid signaling, whereas binge eating resulted in the downregulation of a gene set enriched for decreased myelination, oligodendrocyte differentiation, and expression. We identified Cyfip2 as a major significant genetic factor underlying binge eating and provide a behavioral paradigm for future genome-wide association studies in populations with increased genetic complexity. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. GENETIC VARIABILITY OF CULTURED PLANT TISSUES UNDER NORMAL CONDITIONS AND UNDER STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgikh Yu.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variability induced by in vitro conditions known as somaclonal variation is of practical interest due to its potential uses in plant breeding but, on the other hand, if clonal propagation or transformation is main goal, it becomes an unwelcome phenomenon. Thus, it is important to know frequency, the genomic distribution, the mechanisms and factors influencing somaclonal variation. We studied variability of PCR-based DNA markers of cultured tissues and regenerated plants of maize and bread wheat. The original A188 line of maize and the somaclones obtained were tested using 38 RAPD and 10 ISSR primers. None of the A188 plants showed variation in the RAPD and ISSR spectra for any of the primers used. However, the PCR spectra obtained from the somaclones demonstrated some variations, i.e., 22 RAPD primers and 6 ISSR primers differentiated at least one somaclonal variant from the progenitor line. Six SCAR markers were developed based on several RAPD and ISSR fragments. The inheritance of these SCAR markers was verified in the selfing progeny of each somaclone in the R1–R4 generations and in the hybrids, with A188 as the parental line in the F1 and F2 generations. These markers were sequenced and bioinformatic searches were performed to understand the molecular events that may underlie the variability observed in the somaclones. All changes were found in noncoding sequences and were induced by different molecular events, such as the insertion of long terminal repeat transposon, precise miniature inverted repeat transposable element (MITE excision, microdeletion, recombination, and a change in the pool of mitochondrial DNA. In two groups of independently produced somaclones, the same features (morphological, molecular were variable, which confirms the theory of ‘hot spots’ occurring in the genome. The presence of the same molecular markers in the somaclones and in different non-somaclonal maize variants suggests that in some cases

  6. Cognitive mechanisms underlying disorganization of thought in a genetic syndrome (47,XXY)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rijn, Sophie; Aleman, Andre; De Sonneville, Leo; Swaab, Hanna

    Because of the risk for development of psychopathology such as psychotic symptoms, it has been suggested that studying men with the XXY karyotype may help in the search for underlying cognitive, neural and genetic mechanisms. The aim of this study was to identify cognitive mechanisms that may

  7. Genetic influence on blood pressure measured in the office, under laboratory stress and during real life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Ding, Xiuhua; Su, Shaoyong; Harshfield, Gregory; Treiber, Frank; Snieder, Harold

    To determine to what extent the genetic influences on blood pressure (BP) measured in the office, under psychologically stressful conditions in the laboratory and during real life are different from each other. Office BP, BP during a video game challenge and a social stressor interview, and 24-h

  8. A genetic analysis of relative growth rate and underlying components in Hordeum spontaneum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorter, H.; Van Rijn, C.P.E.; Vanhala, T.K.; Verhoeven, K.J.F.; de Jong, Y.E.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lambers, H.

    2005-01-01

    Species from productive and unproductive habitats differ inherently in their relative growth rate (RGR) and a wide range of correlated quantitative traits. We investigated the genetic basis of this trait complex, and specifically assessed whether it is under the control of just one or a few genes

  9. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Etiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico Bellato; Eleonora Marini; Filippo Castoldi; Nicola Barbasetti; Lorenzo Mattei; Davide Edoardo Bonasia; Davide Blonna

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is mainly characterized by pain, fatigue, and sleep disruption. The etiology of fibromyalgia is still unclear: if central sensitization is considered to be the main mechanism involved, then many other factors, genetic, immunological, and hormonal, may play an important role. The diagnosis is typically clinical (there are no laboratory abnormalities) and the physician must concentrate on pain and on its features. Additional symptoms (e.g., Raynaud's phenomenon, irritable ...

  10. Burning mouth syndrome: etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerchiari, Dafne Patrícia; de Moricz, Renata Dutra; Sanjar, Fernanda Alves; Rapoport, Priscila Bogar; Moretti, Giovana; Guerra, Marja Michelin

    2006-01-01

    The Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is an oral mucosa pain--with or without inflammatory signs--without any specific lesion. It is mostly observed in women aged 40-60 years. This pain feels like a moderate/severe burning, and it occurs more frequently on the tongue, but it may also be felt at the gingiva, lips and jugal mucosa. It may worsen during the day, during stress and fatigue, when the patient speaks too much, or through eating of spicy/hot foods. The burning can be diminished with cold food, work and leisure. The goal of this review article is to consider possible BMS etiologies and join them in 4 groups to be better studied: local, systemic, emotional and idiopathic causes of pain. Knowing the different diagnoses of this syndrome, we can establish a protocol to manage these patients. Within the local pain group, we must investigate dental, allergic and infectious causes. Concerning systemic causes we need to look for connective tissue diseases, endocrine disorders, neurological diseases, nutritional deficits and salivary glands alterations that result in xerostomia. BMS etiology may be of difficult diagnosis, many times showing more than one cause for oral pain. A detailed interview, general physical examination, oral cavity and oropharynx inspection, and lab exams are essential to avoid a try and error treatment for these patients.

  11. Focal venous hypertension as a pathophysiologic mechanism for tissue hypertrophy, port-wine stains, the Sturge-Weber syndrome, and related disorders: proof of concept with novel hypothesis for underlying etiological cause (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Cameron F

    2013-09-01

    To provide an in-depth re-examination of assumed causes of tissue hypertrophy, port-wine stains, and the Sturge-Weber, Cobb, Klippel-Trénaunay, and related syndromes to support an alternative unifying pathophysiologic mechanism of venous dysplasia producing focal venous hypertension with attendant tissue responses; to provide proof of concept with new patient data; to propose a novel etiological hypothesis for the venous dysplasia in these syndromes and find supportive evidence. Data from 20 patients with port-wine stains and corneal pachymetry readings was collected prospectively by the author in an institutional referral-based practice. The literature was searched using MEDLINE, and articles and textbooks were obtained from the bibliographies of these publications. Newly obtained dermatologic, corneal pachymetry, fundus ophthalmoscopic, ocular and orbital venous Doppler ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with the Sturge-Weber syndrome or isolated port-wine stains, along with published data, reveal diffusely thickened tissues and neural atrophy in all areas associated with venous congestion. Contrary to traditional understanding, signs and symptoms in the Sturge-Weber and related syndromes, including both congenital and acquired port-wine stains, are shown to arise from effects of localized primary venous dysplasia or acquired venous obstruction rather than neural dysfunction, differentiating these syndromes from actual phacomatoses. Effects of focal venous hypertension are transmitted to nearby areas via compensatory collateral venous channels in the above conditions, as in the Parkes Weber syndrome. A novel underlying etiology-prenatal venous thrombo-occlusion-is proposed to be responsible for the absence of veins with persistence and enlargement of collateral circulatory pathways with data in the literature backing this offshoot hypothesis. The mechanism for isolated pathologic tissue hypertrophy in these syndromes clarifies

  12. AFLPs reveal different population genetic structure under contrasting environments in the marine snail Nucella lapillus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Carro

    Full Text Available Dispersal has received growing attention in marine ecology, particularly since evidence obtained with up-to-date techniques challenged the traditional view. The dogwhelk Nucella lapillus L., a sedentary gastropod with direct development, is a good example: dispersal was traditionally assumed to be limited until studies with microsatellites disputed this idea. To shed some light on this controversy, the genetic structure of dogwhelk populations in northwest Spain was investigated with highly polymorphic AFLP markers giving special attention to the influence of hydrodynamic stress. In agreement with the expectations for a poor disperser, our results show a significant genetic structure at regional (<200 km and areal scales (<15 km. However, the spatial genetic structure varied with wave-exposure in the present case study: IBD was evident under sheltered conditions but absent from the exposed area where genetic differentiation was stronger. Our results provide evidence that differences in wave-exposure can exert a detectable influence on the genetic structure of coastal organisms, even in species without a planktonic larva.

  13. Cervicitis of unknown etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephanie N

    2014-07-01

    Cervicitis has been described by some as the female counterpart of urethritis in men. Over the years a number of clinical and microscopy-based definitions have been suggested in the literature. Clinical manifestations include mucopurulent discharge from the cervix, cervical friability (easy bleeding from the cervix with passage of a swab) and cervical ectopy. Microscopic definitions involving the use of Gram stain of cervical secretions have included either more than 10 white blood cells (WBCs) or more than 30 WBCs per high-power field. Combinations of these clinical and microscopic findings have been used in attempts to increase the accuracy of cervicitis diagnosis. When cervicitis was initially recognized as a clinical entity, several investigators reported the primary pathogens causing cervicitis as Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. It is now well established that most cases of cervicitis are not caused by these two organisms. Most cases of cervicitis are of unknown etiology.

  14. Genetic Adaptation to Growth Under Laboratory Conditions in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Knöppel

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental evolution under controlled laboratory conditions is becoming increasingly important to address various evolutionary questions, including, for example, the dynamics and mechanisms of genetic adaptation to different growth and stress conditions. In such experiments, mutations typically appear that increase the fitness under the conditions tested (medium adaptation, but that are not necessarily of interest for the specific research question. Here, we have identified mutations that appeared during serial passage of E. coli and S. enterica in four different and commonly used laboratory media and measured the relative competitive fitness and maximum growth rate of 111 genetically re-constituted strains, carrying different single and multiple mutations. Little overlap was found between the mutations that were selected in the two species and the different media, implying that adaptation occurs via different genetic pathways. Furthermore, we show that commonly occurring adaptive mutations can generate undesired genetic variation in a population and reduce the accuracy of competition experiments. However, by introducing media adaptation mutations with large effects into the parental strain that was used for the evolution experiment, the variation (standard deviation was decreased 10-fold, and it was possible to measure fitness differences between two competitors as small as |s| < 0.001.

  15. CoaSim: A Flexible Environment for Simulating Genetic Data under Coalescent Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailund; Schierup, Mikkel Heide; Pedersen, Christian Nørgaard Storm

    2005-01-01

    Background Coalescent simulations are playing a large role in interpreting large scale intra- polymorphism surveys and for planning and evaluating association studies. Coalescent of data sets under different models can be compared to the actual data to test different evolutionary factors and thus...... get insight into these. Results We have created the CoaSim application as a flexible environment for Monte various types of genetic data under equilibrium and non-equilibrium coalescent variety of applications. Interaction with the tool is through the Guile version scripting language. Scheme scripts...

  16. Sexually antagonistic selection on genetic variation underlying both male and female same-sex sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, David; You, Tao; Minano, Maravillas R; Grieshop, Karl; Lind, Martin I; Arnqvist, Göran; Maklakov, Alexei A

    2016-05-13

    Intralocus sexual conflict, arising from selection for different alleles at the same locus in males and females, imposes a constraint on sex-specific adaptation. Intralocus sexual conflict can be alleviated by the evolution of sex-limited genetic architectures and phenotypic expression, but pleiotropic constraints may hinder this process. Here, we explored putative intralocus sexual conflict and genetic (co)variance in a poorly understood behavior with near male-limited expression. Same-sex sexual behaviors (SSBs) generally do not conform to classic evolutionary models of adaptation but are common in male animals and have been hypothesized to result from perception errors and selection for high male mating rates. However, perspectives incorporating sex-specific selection on genes shared by males and females to explain the expression and evolution of SSBs have largely been neglected. We performed two parallel sex-limited artificial selection experiments on SSB in male and female seed beetles, followed by sex-specific assays of locomotor activity and male sex recognition (two traits hypothesized to be functionally related to SSB) and adult reproductive success (allowing us to assess fitness consequences of genetic variance in SSB and its correlated components). Our experiments reveal both shared and sex-limited genetic variance for SSB. Strikingly, genetically correlated responses in locomotor activity and male sex-recognition were associated with sexually antagonistic fitness effects, but these effects differed qualitatively between male and female selection lines, implicating intralocus sexual conflict at both male- and female-specific genetic components underlying SSB. Our study provides experimental support for the hypothesis that widespread pleiotropy generates pervasive intralocus sexual conflict governing the expression of SSBs, suggesting that SSB in one sex can occur due to the expression of genes that carry benefits in the other sex.

  17. Modern views on the epidemiology, etiology and pathogenesis of gynecomastia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Yashina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with one of the pressing andrological issues – gynecomastia, its etiology and pathogenesis. Based on the current epidemiological and experimental data, most common etiological factors of gynecomastia were investigated. A multiple-valued role of various causes of gynecomastia in several age-groups was revealed. Literature data show that gynecomastia may be a manifestation of various diseases: endocrine, genetic, systematic. As well as that, gynecomastia may occur in patients with oncological diseases. However, gynecomastia can be an iatrogenic complication. Currently, we continue to make insights to the problem of gynecomastia in order to be able to classify its etiological factors and determine its basic pathogenesis pathways.

  18. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Hieab HH; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Rentería, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivières, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Bis, Joshua C; Blanken, Laura ME; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher RK; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Filippi, Irina; Ge, Tian; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Greven, Corina U; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hilal, Saima; Hofer, Edith; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liao, Jiemin; Liewald, David CM; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mazoyer, Bernard; McKay, David R; McWhirter, Rebekah; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin; Muetzel, Ryan L; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pappa, Irene; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pudas, Sara; Pütz, Benno; Rajan, Kumar B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Thomson, Russell; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein MJ; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo GM; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Xu, Bing; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chen, Christopher; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Geus, Eco JC; De Jager, Philip L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita L; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Evans, Denis A; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald HH; Grabe, Hans J; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Ikeda, Masashi; Ikram, M Kamran; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Longstreth, WT; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Katie L; McMahon, Francis J; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five novel loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci are also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height. We found a high genetic correlation with child head circumference (ρgenetic=0.748), which indicated a similar genetic background and allowed for the identification of four additional loci through meta-analysis (Ncombined = 37,345). Variants for intracranial volume were also related to childhood and adult cognitive function, Parkinson’s disease, and enriched near genes involved in growth pathways including PI3K–AKT signaling. These findings identify biological underpinnings of intracranial volume and provide genetic support for theories on brain reserve and brain overgrowth. PMID:27694991

  19. Determination of the Genetic Architecture Underlying Short Wavelength Sensitivity in Lake Malawi Cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandamuri, Sri Pratima; Dalton, Brian E; Carleton, Karen L

    2017-06-01

    African cichlids are an exemplary system to study organismal diversity and rapid speciation. Species differ in external morphology including jaw shape and body coloration, but also differ in sensory systems including vision. All cichlids have 7 cone opsin genes with species differing broadly in which opsins are expressed. The differential opsin expression results in closely related species with substantial differences in spectral sensitivity of their photoreceptors. In this work, we take a first step in determining the genetic basis of opsin expression in cichlids. Using a second generation cross between 2 species with different opsin expression patterns, we make a conservative estimate that short wavelength opsin expression is regulated by a few loci. Genetic mapping in 96 F2 hybrids provides clear evidence of a cis-regulatory region for SWS1 opsin that explains 34% of the variation in expression between the 2 species. Additionally, in situ hybridization has shown that SWS1 and SWS2B opsins are coexpressed in individual single cones in the retinas of F2 progeny. Results from this work will contribute to a better understanding of the genetic architecture underlying opsin expression. This knowledge will help answer long-standing questions about the evolutionary processes fundamental to opsin expression variation and how this contributes to adaptive cichlid divergence. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Comparative proteomic analysis of genetically modified maize grown under different agroecosystems conditions in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Profiling technologies allow the simultaneous measurement and comparison of thousands of cell components without prior knowledge of their identity. In the present study, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry to evaluate protein expression of Brazilian genetically modified maize hybrid grown under different agroecosystems conditions. To this effect, leaf samples were subjected to comparative analysis using the near-isogenic non-GM hybrid as the comparator. Results In the first stage of the analysis, the main sources of variation in the dataset were identified by using Principal Components Analysis which correlated most of the variation to the different agroecosystems conditions. Comparative analysis within each field revealed a total of thirty two differentially expressed proteins between GM and non-GM samples that were identified and their molecular functions were mainly assigned to carbohydrate and energy metabolism, genetic information processing and stress response. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this study represents the first evidence of protein identities with differentially expressed isoforms in Brazilian MON810 genetic background hybrid grown under field conditions. As global databases on outputs from “omics” analysis become available, these could provide a highly desirable benchmark for safety assessments. PMID:24304660

  1. The Sea Lamprey as an Etiological Model for Biliary Atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chu-Yin; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive, inflammatory, and fibrosclerosing cholangiopathy in infants that results in obstruction of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts. It is the most common cause for pediatric liver transplantation. In contrast, the sea lamprey undergoes developmental BA with transient cholestasis and fibrosis during metamorphosis, but emerges as a fecund adult with steatohepatitis and fibrosis in the liver. In this paper, we present new histological evidence and compare the sea lamprey to existing animal models to highlight the advantages and possible limitations of using the sea lamprey to study the etiology and compensatory mechanisms of BA and other liver diseases. Understanding the signaling factors and genetic networks underlying lamprey BA can provide insights into BA etiology and possible targets to prevent biliary degeneration and to clear fibrosis. In addition, information from lamprey BA can be used to develop adjunct treatments for patients awaiting or receiving surgical treatments. Furthermore, the cholestatic adult lamprey has unique adaptive mechanisms that can be used to explore potential treatments for cholestasis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). PMID:26101777

  2. STUDY ON ETIOLOGY OF ASCITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konatham

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study 100 cases of ascites, evaluated for the etiological causes. And observed as cirrhosis with portal hypertension 82%, heart failure 8%, chronic kidney disease 3%, nephritic syndrome 2%, peritoneal calcinomatosis 2%, chronic pancreatitis 1% por tal vein thrombosis 1%, Budd - chiari syndrome 1%. AIM OF THE STUDY: To study the various etiologies and their incidence of Ascites.

  3. Managing genetic tests, surveillance, and preventive medicine under a public health insurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipova-Neumann, Lilia; Hoy, Michael

    2014-03-01

    There is a prospect in the medium to long term future of substantial advancements in the understanding of the relationship between disease and genetics. We consider the implications of increased information from genetic tests about predisposition to diseases from the perspective of managing health care provision under a public health insurance scheme. In particular, we consider how such information may potentially improve the targeting of medical surveillance (or prevention) activities to improve the chances of early detection of disease onset. We show that the moral hazard implications inherent in surveillance and prevention decisions that are chosen to be privately rather than socially optimal may be exacerbated by increased information about person-specific predisposition to disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploring the genetics underlying autoimmune diseases with network analysis and link prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Alanis Lobato, Gregorio

    2014-02-01

    Ever since the first Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) was carried out we have seen an important number of discoveries of biological and clinical relevance. However, there are some scientists that consider that these research outcomes and their utility are far from what was expected from this experimental design. We instead believe that the thousands of genetic variants associated with complex disorders by means of GWASs are an extremely valuable source of information that needs to be mined in a different way. Based on this philosophy, we followed a holistic perspective to analyze GWAS data and explored the structural properties of the network representation of one of these datasets with the aim to advance our understanding of the genetic intricacies underlying autoimmune human diseases. The simplicity, computational efficiency and precision of the tools proposed in this paper represent a new means to address GWAS data and contribute to the better exploitation of these rich sources of information. © 2014 IEEE.

  5. The joint regulation of genetic gain and inbreeding under mate selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klieve, H M; Kinghorn, B P; Barwick, S A

    1994-01-12

    Stochastic simulation was used to evaluate a range of selection strategies with respect to both additive genetic response and inbreeding. Strategies involving selection on BLUP ebvs or individual phenotype, followed by random mating, were compared with mate selection strategies which used portfolio analysis to give joint consideration to genetic merit and inbreeding. An adapted Mean Of Total Absolute Deviations (MOTAD) method was used in a mate selection model to define optimal matings with regard to aggregate genetic merit and inbreeding for a base population h(2) of 0.2. Compared with random mating following selection on BLUP ebvs, inbreeding levels after 10 years of selection were able to be reduced under BLUP plus mate selection from ∼.23 to as little as .11. Additive genetic gain was either little compromised or increased. The results suggest that information linking expected levels of genetic merit and inbreeding can be used to find the preferred selection strategy. ZUSAMMENFASSUNG: Gemeinsame Kontrolle von Zuchtfortschritt und Inzucht bei Partnerselektion Es wurde stochastische Simulation zur Auswertung einer Reihe von Selektionsstrategien hinsichtlich Zuchtwertzuwachs und Inzucht verwendet. Strategien mit Selektion auf der Basis von BLUP ebvs oder individuellem Phänotyp mit nachfolgender Zufallspaarung wurden mit Partnerselektionsstrategien verglichen, die Portfolioanalyse zur gemeinsamen Beachtung von Zuchtwert und Inzucht verwendeten. Eine Methode adaptierter MITTELWERTE TOTALER ABSOLUTER ABWEICHUNGEN (MOTAD) Methode wurde beim Partnerselektionsmodell zur Definition optimaler Paarungen in Hinblick auf Gesamtzuchtwert und Inzucht bei einer Populationsheritabilität von 0,2 verwendet. Verglichen mit Zufallspaarung nach Selektion auf BLUP ebvs waren die Inzuchtgrade nach 10 Selektionsjahren von 0,23 auf 0,11 reduziert und additiver Zuchtfortschritt war dabei wenig beeinträchtigt oder nahm sogar zu. Die Ergebnisse weisen darauf hin, daß Information, die

  6. Etiology of cervical inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavonen, J; Critchlow, C W; DeRouen, T; Stevens, C E; Kiviat, N; Brunham, R C; Stamm, W E; Kuo, C C; Hyde, K E; Corey, L

    1986-03-01

    We studied the relationships of selected microbial, clinical, demographic, and behavioral variables to mucopurulent cervicitis in two clinical settings, a sexually transmitted disease clinic and a student health clinic. From each clinic, we studied a group of women referred for suspected mucopurulent cervicitis and a representative sample of other women attending the clinic. After the women were stratified by patient group and summary odds ratios for all groups were obtained, mucopurulent cervicitis was most strongly associated with the isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis; other variables associated with mucopurulent cervicitis included the isolation of Ureaplasma urealyticum, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Trichomonas vaginalis, the presence of serum antibody to C. trachomatis, the clinical diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis, and oral contraceptive use (positive associations) or isolation of yeast (negative association). After adjustment for cervical culture results for C. trachomatis, mucopurulent cervicitis was positively associated with oral contraceptive use (p = 0.02) and isolation of U. urealyticum (p = 0.02) and negatively associated with isolation of yeast (p = 0.03). Among women with a positive cervical culture for C. trachomatis, isolation of U. urealyticum was significantly associated with mucopurulent cervicitis, while among the subgroup of women with a negative cervical culture for C. trachomatis and positive serum antibody to C. trachomatis, oral contraceptive use was strongly associated with mucopurulent cervicitis. These results confirm that in both clinical settings C. trachomatis is the major cause of mucopurulent cervicitis. The roles of U. urealyticum, T. vaginalis, G. vaginalis, bacterial vaginosis, and oral contraceptive use in the etiology of mucopurulent cervicitis deserve further study.

  7. Genetic Parameter Estimates of Carcass Traits under National Scale Breeding Scheme for Beef Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChangHee Do

    2016-08-01

    productivity and carcass quality could be obtained under the national scale breeding scheme of Korea for Hanwoo and that continuous efforts to improve the breeding scheme should be made to increase genetic progress.

  8. Delimiting genetic units in Neotropical toads under incomplete lineage sorting and hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomé Maria Tereza C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delimiting genetic units is useful to enhance taxonomic discovery and is often the first step toward understanding evolutionary mechanisms generating diversification. The six species within the Rhinella crucifer group of toads were defined under morphological criteria alone. Previous data suggest limited correspondence of these species to mitochondrial lineages, and morphological intergradation at transitions between forms suggests hybridization. Here we extensively sampled populations throughout the geographic distribution of the group and analyzed mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data to delimit genetic units using tree–based and allele frequency–based approaches. Results These approaches yielded complementary results, with allele frequency-based methods performing unexpectedly well given the limited number of loci examined. Both mitochondrial and nuclear markers supported a genetic structure of five units within the group, with three of the inferred units distributed within its main range, while two other units occur in separate isolates. The inferred units are mostly discordant with currently described forms: unequivocal association exists for only two of the six species in the group. Genetic evidence for hybridization exists for two pairs of units, with clear cyto–nuclear allele mixing observed in one case. Conclusions Our results confirmed that current taxonomy does not represent evolutionary units in the Rhinella crucifer group. Correspondence between genetically distinguishable units and the currently recognized species is only possible for Rhinella henseli and R. inopina. The recognition of other species relies on the reassessment of the geographic range of R. crucifer, the examination of the type series of R. ornata for hybrids, and on the use of additional markers to verify the genetic distinctiveness of R. abei. We state that R. pombali should not remain a valid species since its description appears to be

  9. Etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatakis, Dimitris N; Kumar, Purnima S

    2005-07-01

    The two most prevalent and most investigated periodontal diseases are dental plaque-induced gingivitis and chronic periodontitis. The last 10 to 15 years have seen the emergence of several important new findings and concepts regarding the etiopathogenesis of periodontal diseases. These findings include the recognition of dental bacterial plaque as a biofilm, identification and characterization of genetic defects that predispose individuals to periodontitis, host-defense mechanisms implicated in periodontal tissue destruction, and the interaction of risk factors with host defenses and bacterial plaque. This article reviews current aspects of the etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.

  10. Genetic variability of garlic accessions as revealed by agro-morphological traits evaluated under different environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerheide, E S S; Azevedo Filho, J A; Vencovsky, R; Zucchi, M I; Zago, B W; Pinheiro, J B

    2017-05-31

    The cultivated garlic (Allium sativum L.) displays a wide phenotypic diversity, which is derived from natural mutations and phenotypic plasticity, due to dependence on soil type, moisture, latitude, altitude and cultural practices, leading to a large number of cultivars. This study aimed to evaluate the genetic variability shown by 63 garlic accessions belonging to Instituto Agronômico de Campinas and the Escola Superior de Agricultura "Luiz de Queiroz" germplasm collections. We evaluated ten quantitative characters in experimental trials conducted under two localities of the State of São Paulo: Monte Alegre do Sul and Piracicaba, during the agricultural year of 2007, in a randomized blocks design with five replications. The Mahalanobis distance was used to measure genetic dissimilarities. The UPGMA method and Tocher's method were used as clustering procedures. Results indicated significant variation among accessions (P < 0.01) for all evaluated characters, except for the percentage of secondary bulb growth in MAS, indicating the existence of genetic variation for bulb production, and germplasm evaluation considering different environments is more reliable for the characterization of the genotypic variability among garlic accessions, since it diminishes the environmental effects in the clustering of genotypes.

  11. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Hieab H H; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Rentería, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivières, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Bis, Joshua C; Blanken, Laura M E; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Braber, Anouk Den; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Filippi, Irina; Ge, Tian; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Greven, Corina U; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hilal, Saima; Hofer, Edith; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liao, Jiemin; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mazoyer, Bernard; McKay, David R; McWhirter, Rebekah; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin; Muetzel, Ryan L; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pappa, Irene; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pudas, Sara; Pütz, Benno; Rajan, Kumar B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Thomson, Russell; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo G M; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Xu, Bing; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chen, Christopher; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Geus, Eco J C; De Jager, Philip L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita L; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Evans, Denis A; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald H H; Grabe, Hans J; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Ikeda, Masashi; Ikram, M Kamran; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Longstreth, W T; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Katie L; McMahon, Francis J; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schofield, Peter R; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Srikanth, Velandai; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Tiemeier, Henning; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; Van der Lugt, Aad; Van der Wee, Nic J A; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Van T Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Veltman, Dick J; Vernooij, Meike W; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, H Ronald; Zonderman, Alan B; Deary, Ian J; DeCarli, Charles; Schmidt, Helena; Martin, Nicholas G; De Craen, Anton J M; Wright, Margaret J; Launer, Lenore J; Schumann, Gunter; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Barbara; Debette, Stéphanie; Medland, Sarah E; Ikram, M Arfan; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-12-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height. We found a high genetic correlation with child head circumference (ρ genetic = 0.748), which indicates a similar genetic background and allowed us to identify four additional loci through meta-analysis (N combined = 37,345). Variants for intracranial volume were also related to childhood and adult cognitive function, and Parkinson's disease, and were enriched near genes involved in growth pathways, including PI3K-AKT signaling. These findings identify the biological underpinnings of intracranial volume and their link to physiological and pathological traits.

  12. Genetic dyslexia risk variant is related to neural connectivity patterns underlying phonological awareness in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeide, Michael A; Kirsten, Holger; Kraft, Indra; Schaadt, Gesa; Müller, Bent; Neef, Nicole; Brauer, Jens; Wilcke, Arndt; Emmrich, Frank; Boltze, Johannes; Friederici, Angela D

    2015-09-01

    Phonological awareness is the best-validated predictor of reading and spelling skill and therefore highly relevant for developmental dyslexia. Prior imaging genetics studies link several dyslexia risk genes to either brain-functional or brain-structural factors of phonological deficits. However, coherent evidence for genetic associations with both functional and structural neural phenotypes underlying variation in phonological awareness has not yet been provided. Here we demonstrate that rs11100040, a reported modifier of SLC2A3, is related to the functional connectivity of left fronto-temporal phonological processing areas at resting state in a sample of 9- to 12-year-old children. Furthermore, we provide evidence that rs11100040 is related to the fractional anisotropy of the arcuate fasciculus, which forms the structural connection between these areas. This structural connectivity phenotype is associated with phonological awareness, which is in turn associated with the individual retrospective risk scores in an early dyslexia screening as well as to spelling. These results suggest a link between a dyslexia risk genotype and a functional as well as a structural neural phenotype, which is associated with a phonological awareness phenotype. The present study goes beyond previous work by integrating genetic, brain-functional and brain-structural aspects of phonological awareness within a single approach. These combined findings might be another step towards a multimodal biomarker for developmental dyslexia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sardinians genetic background explained by runs of homozygosity and genomic regions under positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Fiorito, Giovanni; Ortu, Maria Francesca; Rosa, Fabio; Guarrera, Simonetta; Pardini, Barbara; Cusi, Daniele; Frau, Francesca; Barlassina, Cristina; Troffa, Chiara; Argiolas, Giuseppe; Zaninello, Roberta; Fresu, Giovanni; Glorioso, Nicola; Piazza, Alberto; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The peculiar position of Sardinia in the Mediterranean sea has rendered its population an interesting biogeographical isolate. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic population structure, as well as to estimate Runs of Homozygosity and regions under positive selection, using about 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped in 1077 Sardinian individuals. Using four different methods--fixation index, inflation factor, principal component analysis and ancestry estimation--we were able to highlight, as expected for a genetic isolate, the high internal homogeneity of the island. Sardinians showed a higher percentage of genome covered by RoHs>0.5 Mb (F(RoH%0.5)) when compared to peninsular Italians, with the only exception of the area surrounding Alghero. We furthermore identified 9 genomic regions showing signs of positive selection and, we re-captured many previously inferred signals. Other regions harbor novel candidate genes for positive selection, like TMEM252, or regions containing long non coding RNA. With the present study we confirmed the high genetic homogeneity of Sardinia that may be explained by the shared ancestry combined with the action of evolutionary forces.

  14. [Etiology and treatment options of anterior open bite in growing patients: a narrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioglio, Alberto; Fastuca, Rosamaria

    2016-12-01

    Anterior open bite represents a malocclusion that is still under study because of the still lacking evidence about etiology and best treatment options in growing subjects according to success rate and stability. Etiology involves the interaction of environmental factors such as prolonged sucking habits, mouth breathing, tongue or lip thrusting, tongue dimension, eruption disturbances with a genetically determined vertical facial growth pattern. The treatment options for the early treatment of anterior open bite are still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the actual available evidence on treatments of anterior open bite in the mixed dentition in order to assess the effectiveness of the early treatment in reducing open bite, the most efficacious treatment strategy and the stability of the results. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2016.

  15. Pesticides exposure as etiological factors of Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases--a mechanistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar, Maria Teresa; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Duarte, José Alberto; Carvalho, Félix

    2014-10-15

    The etiology of most neurodegenerative disorders is multifactorial and consists of an interaction between environmental factors and genetic predisposition. The role of pesticide exposure in neurodegenerative disease has long been suspected, but the specific causative agents and the mechanisms underlying are not fully understood. For the main neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis there are evidences linking their etiology with long-term/low-dose exposure to pesticides such as paraquat, maneb, dieldrin, pyrethroids and organophosphates. Most of these pesticides share common features, namely the ability to induce oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein fibrillization and neuronal cell loss. This review aims to clarify the role of pesticides as environmental risk factors in genesis of idiopathic PD and other neurological syndromes. For this purpose, the most relevant epidemiological and experimental data is highlighted in order to discuss the molecular mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Etiology of adult insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollander, M

    2002-01-01

    In the article, the author develops an analysis of external and intrapsychic factors related to adults' insomnia. First she undertakes a literature review to describe semiological, evolutive and etiological levels of insomnia. From a semiological point of view, it is usual to differenciate initial insomnia (associated to the first phase of sleeping), intermittent insomnia (related to frequent awakenings) and final insomnia (related to early morning awakenings). From an evolutive point of view, we can identify transitory insomnia (characterized by frequent awakenings) and chronic insomnia. On the other hand, we are allowed to distinguish organic insomnia (disorder where an organic cerebral injury is demonstrated or suspected) from insomnias related to psychiatric or somatic disease or idiopathic one. Then, the author makes a literary review to identify various insomnia causes and points out. Social factors: insomnia rates are higher by divorced, separated or widowed people. Percentages are higher when scholastic level is weak, domestic income is less then 915 O a month, or by unemployed people. Besides, sleep quality is deteriorated by ageing. Sleeping and waking rhythm is able to loose its synchronization. Complaints about insomnia occur far frequently from women than men. Environmental factors: working constraints increase sleep disorders. It is possible to make the same conclusion when we have to face overcharge of external events, deep intrapsychic conflicts (related to grief, unemployment, damage or hospitalization) or interpersonal conflicts' situations where we are confronted to stress related to socio-affective environment, lack of social support or conjugal difficulties. Medical and physiologic causes: legs impatience syndrome, recurrent limbs shakings syndrome, breathe stop during sleep, narcolepsy, excessive medicine or hypnotic drugs use, some central nervous system injuries, every nocturnal awakening (related to aches.), surgical operation

  17. INTUSSUSCEPTION - A RARE ETIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Branco

    2017-02-01

    Discussion / Conclusions: The clinical case described is intended to alert to the importance of investigating an underlying disease in some children and adolescents with intussusception. In this case the study led to the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis

  18. The flowering repressor SVP underlies a novel Arabidopsis thaliana QTL interacting with the genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Vigo, Belén; Martínez-Zapater, José M; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The timing of flowering initiation is a fundamental trait for the adaptation of annual plants to different environments. Large amounts of intraspecific quantitative variation have been described for it among natural accessions of many species, but the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying this genetic variation are mainly being determined in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. To find novel A. thaliana flowering QTL, we developed introgression lines from the Japanese accession Fuk, which was selected based on the substantial transgression observed in an F(2) population with the reference strain Ler. Analysis of an early flowering line carrying a single Fuk introgression identified Flowering Arabidopsis QTL1 (FAQ1). We fine-mapped FAQ1 in an 11 kb genomic region containing the MADS transcription factor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP). Complementation of the early flowering phenotype of FAQ1-Fuk with a SVP-Ler transgen demonstrated that FAQ1 is SVP. We further proved by directed mutagenesis and transgenesis that a single amino acid substitution in SVP causes the loss-of-function and early flowering of Fuk allele. Analysis of a worldwide collection of accessions detected FAQ1/SVP-Fuk allele only in Asia, with the highest frequency appearing in Japan, where we could also detect a potential ancestral genotype of FAQ1/SVP-Fuk. In addition, we evaluated allelic and epistatic interactions of SVP natural alleles by analysing more than one hundred transgenic lines carrying Ler or Fuk SVP alleles in five genetic backgrounds. Quantitative analyses of these lines showed that FAQ1/SVP effects vary from large to small depending on the genetic background. These results support that the flowering repressor SVP has been recently selected in A. thaliana as a target for early flowering, and evidence the relevance of genetic interactions for the intraspecific evolution of FAQ1/SVP and flowering time.

  19. The flowering repressor SVP underlies a novel Arabidopsis thaliana QTL interacting with the genetic background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Méndez-Vigo

    Full Text Available The timing of flowering initiation is a fundamental trait for the adaptation of annual plants to different environments. Large amounts of intraspecific quantitative variation have been described for it among natural accessions of many species, but the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying this genetic variation are mainly being determined in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. To find novel A. thaliana flowering QTL, we developed introgression lines from the Japanese accession Fuk, which was selected based on the substantial transgression observed in an F(2 population with the reference strain Ler. Analysis of an early flowering line carrying a single Fuk introgression identified Flowering Arabidopsis QTL1 (FAQ1. We fine-mapped FAQ1 in an 11 kb genomic region containing the MADS transcription factor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP. Complementation of the early flowering phenotype of FAQ1-Fuk with a SVP-Ler transgen demonstrated that FAQ1 is SVP. We further proved by directed mutagenesis and transgenesis that a single amino acid substitution in SVP causes the loss-of-function and early flowering of Fuk allele. Analysis of a worldwide collection of accessions detected FAQ1/SVP-Fuk allele only in Asia, with the highest frequency appearing in Japan, where we could also detect a potential ancestral genotype of FAQ1/SVP-Fuk. In addition, we evaluated allelic and epistatic interactions of SVP natural alleles by analysing more than one hundred transgenic lines carrying Ler or Fuk SVP alleles in five genetic backgrounds. Quantitative analyses of these lines showed that FAQ1/SVP effects vary from large to small depending on the genetic background. These results support that the flowering repressor SVP has been recently selected in A. thaliana as a target for early flowering, and evidence the relevance of genetic interactions for the intraspecific evolution of FAQ1/SVP and flowering time.

  20. ETIOLOGY OF AUTISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir TRAJKOVSKI

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there is good evidence that autism is a multifactorial disorder, an adequate understanding of the genetic and nongenetic causes has yet to be achieved. With empirical research findings review is made to evidence on possible causal influences. Much the strongest evidence concerns the importance of susceptibility genes, but such genes have yet to be identified. Specific somatic conditions (tuberous sclerosis and the fragile X syndrome account for a small proportion of cases. Over recent decades there has been a major rise in the rate of diagnosed autism. The main explanation for this rise is to be found in better ascertainment and a broadening of the diagnostic concept. Progress on the elucidation of the causes of autism will be crucially dependent on the combination of epidemiology with more basic science laboratory studies.

  1. Syncope: epidemiology, etiology, and prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rose M. F. L.

    2014-01-01

    Syncope is a common medical problem, with a frequency between 15% and 39%. In the general population, the annual number episodes are 18.1–39.7 per 1000 patients, with similar incidence between genders. The first report of the incidence of syncope is 6.2 per 1000 person-years. However, there is a significant increase in the incidence of syncope after 70 years of age with rate annual 19.5 per thousand individuals after 80 years. It presents a recurrence rate of 35% and 29% of physical injury. Among the causes of syncope, the mediated neural reflex, known as neurocardiogenic or vasovagal syncope, is the most frequent. The others are of cardiac origin, orthostatic hypotension, carotid sinus hypersensitivity, neurological and endocrinological causes and psychiatric disorders. The diagnosis of syncope can be made by clinical method associated with the electrocardiogram in up 50% of patients. Its prognosis is determined by the underlying etiology specifically the presence and severity of cardiac disease. The annual mortality can reach between 18 and 33% if cardiac cause, and between 0 and 12% if the non-cardiac cause. Thus, it is imperative to identify its cause and risk stratification for positive impact in reducing morbidity and mortality. PMID:25538626

  2. Syncope: epidemiology, etiology and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose M F Lisboa Da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a common medical problem, with a frequency between 15% and 39%. In the general population, the annual number episodes are 18.1 to 39.7 per 1000 patients, with similar incidence between genders. The first report of the incidence of syncope is 6.2 per 1000 person-years. However, there is a significant increase in the incidence of syncope after 70 years of age with rate annual 19.5 per thousand individuals after 80 years. It presents a recurrence rate of 35% and 29% of physical injury. Among the causes of syncope, the mediated neural reflex, known as neurocardiogenic or vasovagal syncope, is the most frequent. The others are of cardiac origin, orthostatic hypotension, carotid sinus hypersensitivity, neurological and endocrinological causes and psychiatric disorders. The diagnosis of syncope can be made by clinical method associated with the electrocardiogram in up 50% of patients. Its prognosis is determined by the underlying etiology specifically the presence and severity of cardiac disease. The annual mortality can reach between 18 and 33% if cardiac cause, and between 0 and 12% if the noncardiac cause. Thus, it is imperative to identify its cause and risk stratification for positive impact in reducing morbidity and mortality.

  3. Genetic epidemiology of Scheuermann's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Frank; Engell, Vilhelm; Nielsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The genetic/environmental etiology of Scheuermann's disease is unclear. We estimated the heritability of the disease using an etiological model adjusted for sex and time of diagnosis, and examined whether the prevalence of Scheuermann's disease was constant over time....

  4. Unfolding an under-determined neutron spectrum using genetic algorithm based Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suman, V.; Sarkar, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Spallation in addition to the other photon-neutron reactions in target materials and different components in accelerators may result in production of huge amount of energetic protons which further leads to the production of neutron and contributes to the main component of the total dose. For dosimetric purposes in accelerator facilities the detector measurements doesn't provide directly the actual neutron flux values but a cumulative picture. To obtain Neutron spectrum from the measured data, response functions of the measuring instrument together with the measurements are used into many unfolding techniques which are frequently used for unfolding the hidden spectral information. Here we discuss a genetic algorithm based unfolding technique which is in the process of development. Genetic Algorithm is a stochastic method based on natural selection, which mimics Darwinian theory of survival of the best. The above said method has been tested to unfold the neutron spectra obtained from a reaction carried out at an accelerator facility, with energetic carbon ions on thick silver target along with its respective neutron response of BC501A liquid scintillation detector. The problem dealt here is under-determined where the number of measurements is less than the required energy bin information. The results so obtained were compared with those obtained using the established unfolding code FERDOR, which unfolds data for completely determined problems. It is seen that the genetic algorithm based solution has a reasonable match with the results of FERDOR, when smoothening carried out by Monte Carlo is taken into consideration. This method appears to be a promising candidate for unfolding neutron spectrum in cases of under-determined and over-determined, where measurements are more. The method also has advantages of flexibility, computational simplicity and works well without need of any initial guess spectrum. (author)

  5. Presentation of Hypoparathyroidism: Etiologies and Clinical Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoback, Dolores M; Bilezikian, John P; Costa, Aline G; Dempster, David; Dralle, Henning; Khan, Aliya A; Peacock, Munro; Raffaelli, Marco; Silva, Barbara C; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vokes, Tamara; Bouillon, Roger

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the etiology, diagnosis, and symptoms of hypoparathyroidism may help to improve quality of life and long-term disease outcomes. This paper summarizes the results of the findings and recommendations of the Working Group on Presentation of Hypoparathyroidism. Experts convened in Florence, Italy, in May 2015 and evaluated the literature and recent data on the presentation and long-term outcomes of patients with hypoparathyroidism. The most frequent etiology is surgical removal or loss of viability of parathyroid glands. Despite precautions and expertise, about 20-30% of patients develop transient and 1-7% develop permanent postsurgical hypoparathyroidism after total thyroidectomy. Autoimmune destruction is the main reason for nonsurgical hypoparathyroidism. Severe magnesium deficiency is an uncommon but correctable cause of hypoparathyroidism. Several genetic etiologies can result in the loss of parathyroid function or action causing isolated hypoparathyroidism or a complex syndrome with other symptoms apart from those of hypoparathyroidism or pseudohypoparathyroidism. Neuromuscular signs or symptoms due to hypocalcemia are the main characteristics of the disease. Hyperphosphatemia can contribute to major long-term complications such as ectopic calcifications in the kidney, brain, eye, or vasculature. Bone turnover is decreased, and bone mass is increased. Reduced quality of life and higher risk of renal stones, renal calcifications, and renal failure are seen. The risk of seizures and silent or symptomatic calcifications of basal ganglia is also increased. Increased awareness of the etiology and presentation of the disease and new research efforts addressing specific questions formulated during the meeting should improve the diagnosis, care, and long-term outcome for patients.

  6. Sugarcane production under smallholder farming systems: Farmers preferred traits, constraints and genetic resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esayas Tena

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Smallholder sugarcane production sector is under researched and underdeveloped with limited industrial link and support. The objectives of this study were to assess the current state of sugarcane production, farmers’ perceived production constraints and preferred traits, and to collect germplasm grown by smallholder farmers in southern Ethiopia for strategic breeding and conservation. The study was conducted across 16 administrative zones, 28 districts and 56 peasant associations involving 560 smallholder sugarcane growers in southern Ethiopia using a participatory rural appraisal (PRA approach. Sugarcane genetic resources were collected through structured sampling. Findings from this study indicated that monocropping was identified as the predominant sugarcane farming system. Respondent farmers prioritized drought tolerance (21%, increased cane yield (20%, early maturity (18%, marketability (17%, and high biomass (14% as the top preferred traits of sugarcane. Ninety diverse sugarcane landraces were collected from homesteads of smallholder farmers. Findings from this study would serve as baseline information towards sugarcane research and development emphasising the constraints and preferences of smallholder sugarcane growers in Ethiopia or similar agro-ecologies. This is the first study to report farmers preferred traits and constraints, and genetic resources of sugarcane under smallholder farming systems in Ethiopia.

  7. Focal Venous Hypertension as a Pathophysiologic Mechanism for Tissue Hypertrophy, Port-Wine Stains, the Sturge-Weber Syndrome, and Related Disorders: Proof of Concept with Novel Hypothesis for Underlying Etiological Cause (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Cameron F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an in-depth re-examination of assumed causes of tissue hypertrophy, port-wine stains, and the Sturge-Weber, Cobb, Klippel-Trénaunay, and related syndromes to support an alternative unifying pathophysiologic mechanism of venous dysplasia producing focal venous hypertension with attendant tissue responses; to provide proof of concept with new patient data; to propose a novel etiological hypothesis for the venous dysplasia in these syndromes and find supportive evidence. Methods: Data from 20 patients with port-wine stains and corneal pachymetry readings was collected prospectively by the author in an institutional referral-based practice. The literature was searched using MEDLINE, and articles and textbooks were obtained from the bibliographies of these publications. Results: Newly obtained dermatologic, corneal pachymetry, fundus ophthalmoscopic, ocular and orbital venous Doppler ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with the Sturge-Weber syndrome or isolated port-wine stains, along with published data, reveal diffusely thickened tissues and neural atrophy in all areas associated with venous congestion. Conclusions: Contrary to traditional understanding, signs and symptoms in the Sturge-Weber and related syndromes, including both congenital and acquired port-wine stains, are shown to arise from effects of localized primary venous dysplasia or acquired venous obstruction rather than neural dysfunction, differentiating these syndromes from actual phacomatoses. Effects of focal venous hypertension are transmitted to nearby areas via compensatory collateral venous channels in the above conditions, as in the Parkes Weber syndrome. A novel underlying etiology—prenatal venous thrombo-occlusion—is proposed to be responsible for the absence of veins with persistence and enlargement of collateral circulatory pathways with data in the literature backing this offshoot hypothesis. The mechanism for isolated pathologic

  8. ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENTATION IN TRITICUM AESTIVUM L.: GENETIC BASIS AND ROLE UNDER ABIOTIC STRESS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereshchenko O.Yu.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins are secondary metabolites of plants. They have a wide range of biological activity such as antioxidant, photoprotection, osmoregulation, heavy metal ions chelation, antimicrobial and antifungal activities, which help plants to survive under different stress conditions. Bread wheat (T. aestivum L. can have purple pigmentation provided by anthocyanin compounds in different organs, such as grain pericarp, coleoptile, culm, leaf blades, leaf sheaths, glumes and anthers. However, the genetic mechanisms underlying formation of these traits as well as contribution of the pigmentation to stress tolerance have not been widely studied in wheat. The aim of the current study was to investigate molecular-genetic mechanisms underlying anthocyanin pigmentation in different wheat organs and to estimate the role of the pigmentation under different abiotic stress conditions in wheat seedlings. In the current study, near-isogenic lines (NILs: cv. ‘Saratovskaya 29’ (‘S29’ and lines i:S29Pp1Pp2PF and i:S29Pp1Pp3P developed on the ‘S29’ background but having grain pericarp coloration (genes Pp and more intense coleoptile (Rc, culm (Pc, leaf blade (Plb, leaf sheath (Pls pigmentation in comparison with ‘S29’, were used. Comparative transcriptional analysis of the five structural genes Chs, Chi, F3h, Dfr, Ans, encoding enzymes participating in the anthocyanin biosynthesis, was performed in different organs of NILs. It was shown that the presence of the Rc, Pc, Plb, Pls and Pp alleles conferring strong anthocyanin pigmentation induced more intense transcription of the structural genes, suggesting the genes Rc, Pc, Plb, Pls and Pp to play a regulatory role in anthocyanin biosynthesis network. To evaluate the role of anthocyanins in stress response at the seedling stage, growth ability of the NILs and anthocyanin content in their coleoptiles were assessed after treatments with NaCl (100 and 200 mM, CdCl2 (25 and 50 μM and 15% PEG 6000

  9. Congenital orofacial clefts: Etiology and Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Serkan Ağaçayak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Orofacial clefts are congenital structural anomalies of the lip and/or palate. These anomalies affect ~1/1000 in the community. The etiology of orofacial clefts is complex, including various genetic and environmental agents. Syndrome is not accompanied by any isolated orofacial clefts are more common, although environmental factors often play a role in the etiology. Mendelian or teratogenic origins; the non-syndromic forms of orofacial clefts are more common and are likely due to secondary gene–environment interactions. Latest researches in both molecular and quantitative approaches have begun to identify the genes responsible for the rare syndromic forms of cleft and have also identified both candidate genes and loci for the more common and complex non-syndromic variants. Animal models, have also contributed greatly to an comprehension of these anomalies. We aimed to describes genes that are involved in orofacial clefts in humans and animal models and explores genetic approaches to identifying additional genes and gene–environment interactions that constitute the many factors of orofacial clefts in this review.

  10. New developments on the neurobiological and pharmaco-genetic mechanisms underlying internet and videogame addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Aviv; Lejoyeux, Michel

    2015-03-01

    There is emerging evidence that the psychobiological mechanisms underlying behavioral addictions such as internet and videogame addiction resemble those of addiction for substances of abuse. Review of brain imaging, treatment and genetic studies on videogame and internet addiction. Literature search of published articles between 2009 and 2013 in Pubmed using "internet addiction" and "videogame addiction" as the search word. Twenty-nine studies have been selected and evaluated under the criteria of brain imaging, treatment, and genetics. Brain imaging studies of the resting state have shown that long-term internet game playing affected brain regions responsible for reward, impulse control and sensory-motor coordination. Brain activation studies have shown that videogame playing involved changes in reward and loss of control and that gaming pictures have activated regions similarly to those activated by cue-exposure to drugs. Structural studies have shown alterations in the volume of the ventral striatum possible as result of changes in reward. Furthermore, videogame playing was associated with dopamine release similar in magnitude to those of drugs of abuse and that there were faulty inhibitory control and reward mechanisms videogame addicted individuals. Finally, treatment studies using fMRI have shown reduction in craving for videogames and reduced associated brain activity. Videogame playing may be supported by similar neural mechanisms underlying drug abuse. Similar to drug and alcohol abuse, internet addiction results in sub-sensitivity of dopamine reward mechanisms. Given the fact that this research is in its early stage it is premature to conclude that internet addiction is equivalent to substance addictions. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  11. Genetic Parameters And Selection Response For Yield Traits In Bread Wheat Under Irrigated And Rainfed Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Iftikhar Hussain; at-ur-Rahman, Hiday; Khan, Imran

    2008-01-01

    A set of 22 F5:7 experimental wheat lines along with four check cultivars (Dera-98, Fakhr-e-Sarhad, Ghaznavi-98 and Tatara) were evaluated as independent experiments under irrigated and rainfed environments using a randomized complete block design at NWFP Agricultural University, Peshawar during 2004-05. The two environments were statistically different for days to heading and spike length only. Highly significant genetic variability existed among the wheat lines (P<0.01) in the combined analysis across environments for all traits. Genotype×environment interactions were non-significant for all traits except 1000-grain weight indicating consistent performance of wheat genotypes across the two environments. Wheat lines and check cultivars were 2 to 5 days early in heading under rainfed environment compared to the irrigated. Plant height, spike length, 1000-grain weight, biological and grain yields were generally reduced under rainfed environment. Genetic variances were of greater magnitude than environmental variances for most of the traits in both environments. The heritability estimates were of higher magnitude (0.74 to 0.96) for days to heading, plant height, spike length, biological and grain yield, while medium (0.31 to 0.51) for 1000-grain weight. Selection differentials were negative for heading (-7.3 days in irrigated vs -9.4 days in rainfed) and plant height (-9.0 cm in irrigated vs -8.7 cm in rainfed) indicating possibility of selecting wheat genotypes with early heading and short plant stature. Positive selection differentials of 1.3 vs 1.6 cm for spike length, 3.8 vs 3.4 g for 1000-grain weight, 2488.2 vs 3139.7 kg ha-1 for biological yield and 691.6 vs 565.4 kg ha-1 for grain yield at 20% selection intensity were observed under irrigated and rainfed environments, respectively. Expected selection responses were 7.98 vs 8.91 days for heading, 8.20 vs 9.52 cm for plant height, 1.01 vs 1.61 cm for spike length, 2.12 vs 1.15 g for 1000-grain weight, 1655

  12. Intelligence : shared genetic basis between Mendelian disorders and a polygenic trait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franić, Sanja; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Dolan, Conor V; Kattenberg, Mathijs V; Pool, René; Xiao, Xiangjun; Scheet, Paul A; Ehli, Erik A; Davies, Gareth E; van der Sluis, Sophie; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Hansell, Narelle K; Martin, Nicholas G; Hudziak, James J; van Beijsterveldt, Catherina E M; Swagerman, Suzanne C; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; de Geus, Eco J C; Bartels, Meike; Ropers, H Hilger; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-01-01

    Multiple inquiries into the genetic etiology of human traits indicated an overlap between genes underlying monogenic disorders (eg, skeletal growth defects) and those affecting continuous variability of related quantitative traits (eg, height). Extending the idea of a shared genetic basis between a

  13. Genetic engineering of Trypanosoma (Dutonella vivax and in vitro differentiation under axenic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D'Archivio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma vivax is one of the most common parasites responsible for animal trypanosomosis, and although this disease is widespread in Africa and Latin America, very few studies have been conducted on the parasite's biology. This is in part due to the fact that no reproducible experimental methods had been developed to maintain the different evolutive forms of this trypanosome under laboratory conditions. Appropriate protocols were developed in the 1990s for the axenic maintenance of three major animal Trypanosoma species: T. b. brucei, T. congolense and T. vivax. These pioneer studies rapidly led to the successful genetic manipulation of T. b. brucei and T. congolense. Advances were made in the understanding of these parasites' biology and virulence, and new drug targets were identified. By contrast, challenging in vitro conditions have been developed for T. vivax in the past, and this per se has contributed to defer both its genetic manipulation and subsequent gene function studies. Here we report on the optimization of non-infective T. vivax epimastigote axenic cultures and on the process of parasite in vitro differentiation into metacyclic infective forms. We have also constructed the first T. vivax specific expression vector that drives constitutive expression of the luciferase reporter gene. This vector was then used to establish and optimize epimastigote transfection. We then developed highly reproducible conditions that can be used to obtain and select stably transfected mutants that continue metacyclogenesis and are infectious in immunocompetent rodents.

  14. A genetic-algorithm-aided stochastic optimization model for regional air quality management under uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaosheng; Huang, Guohe; Liu, Lei

    2010-01-01

    A genetic-algorithm-aided stochastic optimization (GASO) model was developed in this study for supporting regional air quality management under uncertainty. The model incorporated genetic algorithm (GA) and Monte Carlo simulation techniques into a general stochastic chance-constrained programming (CCP) framework and allowed uncertainties in simulation and optimization model parameters to be considered explicitly in the design of least-cost strategies. GA was used to seek the optimal solution of the management model by progressively evaluating the performances of individual solutions. Monte Carlo simulation was used to check the feasibility of each solution. A management problem in terms of regional air pollution control was studied to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. Results of the case study indicated the proposed model could effectively communicate uncertainties into the optimization process and generate solutions that contained a spectrum of potential air pollutant treatment options with risk and cost information. Decision alternatives could be obtained by analyzing tradeoffs between the overall pollutant treatment cost and the system-failure risk due to inherent uncertainties.

  15. Effects of trawl selectivity and genetic parameters on fish body length under long-term trawling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Peng; Cui, He; Sheng, Huaxiang; Zhao, Fenfang; Tang, Yanli; Chen, Zelin

    2015-10-01

    Long-term fishing pressure affects the biological characteristics of exploited fish stocks. The biological characteristics of hairtail ( Trichiurus lepturus) in the East China Sea are unable to recover because of long-term trawling. Fishing induces evolutionary effects on the fish's biological characteristics. Evidence of these changes includes small size at age, a shift to earlier age structure, and early maturation. Natural and artificial selection usually affect the fish's life history. Selection can induce different chances of reproduction, and individual fish can give a different genetic contribution to the next generation. In this study, analysis of time-dependent probability of significance and test of sensitivity were used to explore the effects of fish exploitation rate, mesh size, and heritability with long-term trawling. Results showed that fishing parameters were important drivers to exploited fish population. However, genetic traits altered by fishing were slow, and the changes in biological characteristics were weaker than those caused by fishing selection. Exploitation rate and mesh size exhibited similar evolutionary trend tendency under long-term fishing. The time-dependent probability of significance trend showed a gradual growth and tended to be stable. Therefore, the direction of fishing-induced evolution and successful management of fish species require considerable attention to contribute to sustainable fisheries in China.

  16. Epidemiology and Etiology of Young Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Dayna; Sturm, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Stroke in people under 45 years of age is less frequent than in older populations but has a major impact on the individual and society. In this article we provide an overview of the epidemiology and etiology of young stroke. Methods. This paper is based on a review of population-based studies on stroke incidence that have included subgroup analyses for patients under 45 years of age, as well as smaller community-based studies and case-series specifically examining the incidence ...

  17. Genetic Algorithm for Multiuser Discrete Network Design Problem under Demand Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Juan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Discrete network design is an important part of urban transportation planning. The purpose of this paper is to present a bilevel model for discrete network design. The upper-level model aims to minimize the total travel time under a stochastic demand to design a discrete network. In the lower-level model, demands are assigned to the network through a multiuser traffic equilibrium assignment. Generally, discrete network could affect path selections of demands, while the results of the multiuser traffic equilibrium assignment need to reconstruct a new discrete network. An iterative approach including an improved genetic algorithm and Frank-Wolfe algorithm is used to solve the bi-level model. The numerical results on Nguyen Dupuis network show that the model and the related algorithms were effective for discrete network design.

  18. Genetic architecture of factors underlying partial resistance to Alternaria leaf blight in carrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Clerc, Valérie; Pawelec, Anna; Birolleau-Touchard, Christelle; Suel, Anita; Briard, Mathilde

    2009-05-01

    In most production areas, Alternaria leaf blight (ALB) is recognized as the most common and destructive foliage disease in carrot. To assess the genetic architecture of carrot ALB resistance, two parental coupling maps were developed with similar number of dominant markers (around 70), sizes (around 650 cM), densities (around 9.5 cM), and marker composition. The F(2:3) progenies were evaluated in field and tunnel for two scoring dates. The continuous distribution of the disease severity value indicated that ALB resistance is under polygenic control. Three QTLs regions were found on three linkage groups. Two of them were tunnel or field specific and were detected only at the second screening date suggesting that the expression of these two QTLs regions involved in resistance to Alternaria dauci might depend on environment and delay after infection.

  19. An etiological model of perfectionism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle K Maloney

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Perfectionism has been recognized as a transdiagnostic factor that is relevant to anxiety disorders, eating disorders and depression. Despite the importance of perfectionism in psychopathology to date there has been no empirical test of an etiological model of perfectionism. METHOD: The present study aimed to address the paucity of research on the etiology of perfectionism by developing and testing an etiological model using a sample of 311 clients seeking treatment. RESULTS: Structural equation modeling showed a direct relationship between high Parental Expectations and Criticism, and Perfectionism. There was also an indirect relationship between Parental Bonding and Perfectionism that was mediated by core schemas of disconnection and rejection. Finally, it was found that Neuroticism had both an indirect relationship, which was mediated by core schemas, and a direct relationship with perfectionism. CONCLUSIONS: The study provided the first direct test of an etiological model of perfectionism to date. Clinical implications include investigating whether the inclusion of etiological factors in the understanding and treatment of perfectionism is effective.

  20. Population genetics inference for longitudinally-sampled mutants under strong selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Miguel; Seoighe, Cathal

    2014-11-01

    Longitudinal allele frequency data are becoming increasingly prevalent. Such samples permit statistical inference of the population genetics parameters that influence the fate of mutant variants. To infer these parameters by maximum likelihood, the mutant frequency is often assumed to evolve according to the Wright-Fisher model. For computational reasons, this discrete model is commonly approximated by a diffusion process that requires the assumption that the forces of natural selection and mutation are weak. This assumption is not always appropriate. For example, mutations that impart drug resistance in pathogens may evolve under strong selective pressure. Here, we present an alternative approximation to the mutant-frequency distribution that does not make any assumptions about the magnitude of selection or mutation and is much more computationally efficient than the standard diffusion approximation. Simulation studies are used to compare the performance of our method to that of the Wright-Fisher and Gaussian diffusion approximations. For large populations, our method is found to provide a much better approximation to the mutant-frequency distribution when selection is strong, while all three methods perform comparably when selection is weak. Importantly, maximum-likelihood estimates of the selection coefficient are severely attenuated when selection is strong under the two diffusion models, but not when our method is used. This is further demonstrated with an application to mutant-frequency data from an experimental study of bacteriophage evolution. We therefore recommend our method for estimating the selection coefficient when the effective population size is too large to utilize the discrete Wright-Fisher model. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Efficacy of Rosuvastatin in Children With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Association With Underlying Genetic Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Evan A; Dann, Eldad J; Wiegman, Albert

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), a rare genetic disorder, is characterized by extremely elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Statin treatment starts at diagnosis, but no statin has been f...... and adults was related to underlying genetic mutations. (A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Rosuvastatin in Children and Adolescents With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia [HYDRA]; NCT02226198).......BACKGROUND: Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), a rare genetic disorder, is characterized by extremely elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Statin treatment starts at diagnosis, but no statin has been...... formally evaluated in, or approved for, HoFH children. OBJECTIVES: The authors sought to assess the LDL-C efficacy of rosuvastatin versus placebo in HoFH children, and the relationship with underlying genetic mutations. METHODS: This was a randomized, double-blind, 12-week, crossover study of rosuvastatin...

  2. Influence of ethnic traditional cultures on genetic diversity of rice landraces under on-farm conservation in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjie; Wang, Yanli; Sun, Xiaodong; Caiji, Zhuoma; Yang, Jingbiao; Cui, Di; Cao, Guilan; Ma, Xiaoding; Han, Bing; Xue, Dayuan; Han, Longzhi

    2016-10-27

    Crop genetic resources are important components of biodiversity. However, with the large-scale promotion of mono-cropping, genetic diversity has largely been lost. Ex-situ conservation approaches were widely used to protect traditional crop varieties worldwide. However, this method fails to maintain the dynamic evolutionary processes of crop genetic resources in their original habitats, leading to genetic diversity reduction and even loss of the capacity of resistance to new diseases and pests. Therefore, on-farm conservation has been considered a crucial complement to ex-situ conservation. This study aimed at clarifying the genetic diversity differences between ex-situ conservation and on-farm conservation and to exploring the influence of traditional cultures on genetic diversity of rice landraces under on-farm conservation. The conservation status of rice landrace varieties, including Indica and Japonica, non-glutinous rice (Oryza sativa) and glutinous rice (Oryza sativa var. glutinosa Matsum), was obtained through ethno-biology investigation method in 12 villages of ethnic groups from Guizhou, Yunnan and Guangxi provinces of China. The genetic diversity between 24 pairs of the same rice landraces from different times were compared using simple sequence repeat (SSR) molecular markers technology. The landrace paris studied were collected in 1980 and maintained ex-situ, while 2014 samples were collected on-farm in southwest of China. The results showed that many varieties of rice landraces have been preserved on-farm by local farmers for hundreds or thousands of years. The number of alleles (Na), effective number of alleles (Ne), Nei genetic diversity index (He) and Shannon information index (I) of rice landraces were significantly higher by 12.3-30.4 % under on-farm conservation than under ex-situ conservation. Compared with the ex-situ conservation approach, rice landraces under on-farm conservation programs had more alleles and higher genetic diversity. In

  3. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Likelihood of getting certain diseases Mental abilities Natural talents An abnormal trait (anomaly) that is passed down ... one of them has a genetic disorder. Information Human beings have cells with 46 chromosomes . These consist ...

  4. Transcriptomes Reveal Genetic Signatures Underlying Physiological Variations Imposed by Different Fermentation Conditions in Lactobacillus plantarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Roger S.; van Bokhorst-van de Veen, Hermien; Wiersma, Anne; Overmars, Lex; Marco, Maria L.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are utilized widely for the fermentation of foods. In the current post-genomic era, tools have been developed that explore genetic diversity among LAB strains aiming to link these variations to differential phenotypes observed in the strains investigated. However, these genotype-phenotype matching approaches fail to assess the role of conserved genes in the determination of physiological characteristics of cultures by environmental conditions. This manuscript describes a complementary approach in which Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 was fermented under a variety of conditions that differ in temperature, pH, as well as NaCl, amino acid, and O2 levels. Samples derived from these fermentations were analyzed by full-genome transcriptomics, paralleled by the assessment of physiological characteristics, e.g., maximum growth rate, yield, and organic acid profiles. A data-storage and -mining suite designated FermDB was constructed and exploited to identify correlations between fermentation conditions and industrially relevant physiological characteristics of L. plantarum, as well as the associated transcriptome signatures. Finally, integration of the specific fermentation variables with the transcriptomes enabled the reconstruction of the gene-regulatory networks involved. The fermentation-genomics platform presented here is a valuable complementary approach to earlier described genotype-phenotype matching strategies which allows the identification of transcriptome signatures underlying physiological variations imposed by different fermentation conditions. PMID:22802930

  5. Concrete Mix Design for Service Life of RC Structures under Carbonation Using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Jun Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steel corrosion in reinforced concrete (RC structure is such a critical problem to structural safety that many researches have been performed for maintaining required performance during intended service life. This paper is for a numerical technique for obtaining optimum concrete mix proportions through genetic algorithm (GA for RC structures under carbonation which is considered as a serious deterioration in underground sites and big cities. For this study, mix proportions and CO2 diffusion coefficients are analyzed through the previous studies, and then the fitness function of CO2 diffusion coefficient is derived through regression analysis. The fitness function from 69 test results includes 5 variables of mix proportions such as w/c (water to cement ratio, cement content, sand content percentage, coarse aggregate content, and R.H. (relative humidity. Through GA technique, simulated mix proportions are obtained for 12 cases of verification and they show reasonable results with average relative error of 4.6%. Assuming intended service life and design parameters, intended CO2 diffusion coefficients and cement contents are determined and then related mix proportions are simulated. The proposed technique can provide initial concrete mix proportions which satisfy service life under carbonation.

  6. Etiology of obsessions and compulsions: a meta-analysis and narrative review of twin studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steven

    2011-12-01

    The relative importance of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms is unclear. Cognitive-behavioral models propose that shared environment (e.g., parenting style) is important. Family segregation studies suggest that nonadditive genetic factors may be involved. To investigate the etiology of OC symptoms, a meta-analysis was conducted of 37 twin samples from 14 studies, supplemented by a narrative review. Results indicated that in terms of mean effect sizes, (a) additive genetic effects and nonshared environment accounted for most of the variance in OC symptoms, (b) shared environment and nonadditive genetic effects made little or no contribution; (c) these findings did not vary with sex or symptom severity; (d) variance due to nonshared environment increased with age; (e) gene-environment interactions play an etiologic role; (f) OC symptoms are shaped by etiologic factors common to all types of OC symptoms but also have symptom-specific etiologies; and (g) OC symptoms are also shaped by very general etiologic factors (e.g., those influencing negative emotionality). Overall, the findings indicate that OC symptoms have a complex etiologic architecture that is not adequately explained by contemporary etiological models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The etiology of mathematical and reading (dis)ability covariation in a sample of Dutch twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markowitz, E.M.; Willemsen, A.H.M.; Trumbetta, S.L.; van Beijsterveldt, C.E.M.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2005-01-01

    The genetic etiology of mathematical and reading (dis)ability has been studied in a number of distinct samples, but the true nature of the relationship between the two remains unclear. Data from the Netherlands Twin Register was used to determine the etiology of the relationship between mathematical

  8. Genetic Loci Governing Grain Yield and Root Development under Variable Rice Cultivation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Catolos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Drought is the major abiotic stress to rice grain yield under unpredictable changing climatic scenarios. The widely grown, high yielding but drought susceptible rice varieties need to be improved by unraveling the genomic regions controlling traits enhancing drought tolerance. The present study was conducted with the aim to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs for grain yield and root development traits under irrigated non-stress and reproductive-stage drought stress in both lowland and upland situations. A mapping population consisting of 480 lines derived from a cross between Dular (drought-tolerant and IR64-21 (drought susceptible was used. QTL analysis revealed three major consistent-effect QTLs for grain yield (qDTY1.1, qDTY1.3, and qDTY8.1 under non-stress and reproductive-stage drought stress conditions, and 2 QTLs for root traits (qRT9.1 for root-growth angle and qRT5.1 for multiple root traits, i.e., seedling-stage root length, root dry weight and crown root number. The genetic locus qDTY1.1 was identified as hotspot for grain yield and yield-related agronomic and root traits. The study identified significant positive correlations among numbers of crown roots and mesocotyl length at the seedling stage and root length and root dry weight at depth at later stages with grain yield and yield-related traits. Under reproductive stage drought stress, the grain yield advantage of the lines with QTLs ranged from 24.1 to 108.9% under upland and 3.0–22.7% under lowland conditions over the lines without QTLs. The lines with QTL combinations qDTY1.3+qDTY8.1 showed the highest mean grain yield advantage followed by lines having qDTY1.1+qDTY8.1 and qDTY1.1+qDTY8.1+qDTY1.3, across upland/lowland reproductive-stage drought stress. The identified QTLs for root traits, mesocotyl length, grain yield and yield-related traits can be immediately deployed in marker-assisted breeding to develop drought tolerant high yielding rice varieties.

  9. Genetics and Genomics of Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Samir; Brueckner, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect, and due to major advances in medical and surgical management, there are now more adults living with CHD than children. Until recently, the cause of the majority of CHD was unknown. Advances in genomic technologies have discovered the genetic etiology of a significant fraction of CHD, while at the same time pointing to remarkable complexity in CHD genetics. This review will focus on the evidence for genetic causes underlying CHD and discuss data supporting both monogenic and complex genetic mechanisms underlying CHD. The discoveries from CHD genetic studies draw attention to biological pathways that simultaneously open the door to a better understanding of cardiac development, and impact clinical care of CHD patients. Finally, we address clinical genetic evaluation of patients and families affected by CHD. PMID:28302740

  10. Genetically modified parthenocarpic eggplants: improved fruit productivity under both greenhouse and open field cultivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandolfini Tiziana

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parthenocarpy, or fruit development in the absence of fertilization, has been genetically engineered in eggplant and in other horticultural species by using the DefH9-iaaM gene. The iaaM gene codes for tryptophan monoxygenase and confers auxin synthesis, while the DefH9 controlling regions drive expression of the gene specifically in the ovules and placenta. A previous greenhouse trial for winter production of genetically engineered (GM parthenocarpic eggplants demonstrated a significant increase (an average of 33% increase in fruit production concomitant with a reduction in cultivation costs. Results GM parthenocarpic eggplants have been evaluated in three field trials. Two greenhouse spring trials have shown that these plants outyielded the corresponding untransformed genotypes, while a summer trial has shown that improved fruit productivity in GM eggplants can also be achieved in open field cultivation. Since the fruits were always seedless, the quality of GM eggplant fruits was improved as well. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the DefH9-iaaM gene is expressed during late stages of fruit development. Conclusions The DefH9-iaaM parthenocarpic gene is a biotechnological tool that enhances the agronomic value of all eggplant genotypes tested. The main advantages of DefH9-iaaM eggplants are: i improved fruit productivity (at least 30–35% under both greenhouse and open field cultivation; ii production of good quality (marketable fruits during different types of cultivation; iii seedless fruit with improved quality. Such advantages have been achieved without the use of either male or female sterility genes.

  11. Etiology and Pathogenesis of Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2015-11-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic inflammatory skin disease most often appearing in the form of well-demarcated, scaly plaques. These lesions highlight the fundamental processes underlying its pathogenesis, namely, inflammation and epidermal hyperproliferation. Both phenomena are considered consequences of an intimate interplay between the innate and the adaptive immune system. This concept is supported by results of genetic studies, pointing toward the signaling pathways of nuclear factor-κB, interferon-γ, and interleukin (IL)-23 as well as antigen presentation as central axes of the psoriatic inflammation. Efficacy of biologics targeting tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-23, or IL-17 provides further evidence in favor of this model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Genetics of Keratoconus: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Joshua; Hauser, Michael A.; Afshari, Natalie A.; Allingham, R. Rand; Liu, Yutao

    2013-01-01

    Keratoconus is the most common ectatic disorder of the corneal. Genetic and environmental factors may contribute to its pathogenesis. The focus of this article is to summarize current research into the complex genetics of keratoconus. We discuss the evidence of genetic etiology including family-based linkage studies, twin studies, genetic mutations, and genome-wide association studies. The genes implicated potentially include VSX1, miR-184, DOCK9, SOD1, RAB3GAP1, and HGF. Besides the coding mutations, we also highlight the potential contribution of DNA copy number variants in the pathogenesis of keratoconus. Finally, we present future directions for genetic research in the understanding of the complex genetics of keratoconus and its clinical significance. As new functional, candidate genes for keratoconus are being discovered at a rapid pace, the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying keratoconus pathogenesis will advance our understanding of keratoconus and promote the development of a novel therapy. PMID:23795306

  13. Genetic and agronomic assessment of cob traits in corn under low and normal nitrogen management conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Constantin; Zhang, Yongzhong; Liu, Hongjun; Gonzalez-Portilla, Pedro J; Lauter, Nick; Kumar, Bharath; Trucillo-Silva, Ignacio; Martin, Juan Pablo San; Lee, Michael; Simcox, Kevin; Schussler, Jeff; Dhugga, Kanwarpal; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Exploring and understanding the genetic basis of cob biomass in relation to grain yield under varying nitrogen management regimes will help breeders to develop dual-purpose maize. With rising energy demands and costs for fossil fuels, alternative energy from renewable sources such as maize cobs will become competitive. Maize cobs have beneficial characteristics for utilization as feedstock including compact tissue, high cellulose content, and low ash and nitrogen content. Nitrogen is quantitatively the most important nutrient for plant growth. However, the influence of nitrogen fertilization on maize cob production is unclear. In this study, quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been analyzed for cob morphological traits such as cob weight, volume, length, diameter and cob tissue density, and grain yield under normal and low nitrogen regimes. 213 doubled-haploid lines of the intermated B73 × Mo17 (IBM) Syn10 population have been resequenced for 8575 bins, based on SNP markers. A total of 138 QTL were found for six traits across six trials using composite interval mapping with ten cofactors and empirical comparison-wise thresholds (P = 0.001). Despite moderate to high repeatabilities across trials, few QTL were consistent across trials and overall levels of explained phenotypic variance were lower than expected some of the cob trait × trial combinations (R (2) = 7.3-43.1 %). Variation for cob traits was less affected by nitrogen conditions than by grain yield. Thus, the economics of cob usage under low nitrogen regimes is promising.

  14. Etiology, evaluation, and management of xerostomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Wang, Elizabeth A; Fazel, Nasim

    Xerostomia is defined as the complaint of oral dryness. It is a condition that primarily affects older adults and can have a significant negative effect on one's quality of life. Patients with xerostomia often do not have objective signs of hyposalivation. The underlying etiology of xerostomia includes a variety of systemic diseases and local factors. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive review of the differential diagnosis, evaluation, and management of xerostomia. Prompt diagnosis and management can alleviate the clinical manifestations of this debilitating condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hope and major strides for genetic diseases of the eye

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-12-31

    Dec 31, 2009 ... There have been dramatic advances in the elucidation of the genetic etiology of inherited eye diseases and their underly- ing pathophysiology in the last two to three decades. This was made possible by the exponential development of pow- erful molecular biology instrumentation and techniques, the.

  16. Genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: genetic effects of high LET radiations; genetic regulation, alteration, and repair; chromosome replication and the division cycle of Escherichia coli; effects of radioisotope decay in the DNA of microorganisms; initiation and termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis; mutagenesis in mouse myeloma cells; lethal and mutagenic effects of near-uv radiation; effect of 8-methoxypsoralen on photodynamic lethality and mutagenicity in Escherichia coli; DNA repair of the lethal effects of far-uv; and near uv irradiation of bacterial cells

  17. The genetics of keratoconus

    OpenAIRE

    Dorota M Nowak; Marzena Gajecka

    2011-01-01

    Keratoconus (KTCN) is non-inflammatory thinning and anterior protrusion of the cornea that results in steepening and distortion of the cornea, altered refractive error, and decreased vision. Keratoconus is a complex condition of multifactorial etiology. Both genetic and environmental factors are associated with KTCN. Evidence of genetic etiology includes familial inheritance, discordance between dizygotic twins, and association with other known genetic disorders. Several loci responsible for ...

  18. Homozygosity mapping and targeted sanger sequencing reveal genetic defects underlying inherited retinal disease in families from pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleeha Maria

    Full Text Available Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD.We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, retinitis pigmentosa (RP, congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB, or cone dystrophy (CD. We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families.Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1.Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future.

  19. [The role of the solar and geomagnetic activity in the etiology of multiple sclerosis: a review of the literature and prospects of research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarov, I D; Goncharova, Z A; Shkilnyuk, G G; Samoylova, N A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great progress in the study of multiple sclerosis (MS), its etiology remains unknown. It is proved that MS occurs in genetically predisposed people under the influence of environmental factors. Among these factors the solar activity (SA) and geomagnetic activity (GA) attract the particular attention. This article presents the review of studies concerning the influence of SA and GA on the incidence and course of MS.

  20. Simultaneous Estimation of Mixing Rates and Genetic Drift Under Successive Sampling of Genetic Markers With Application to the Mud Crab (Scylla paramamosain) in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kitakado, Toshihide; Kitada, Shuichi; Obata, Yasuhiro; Kishino, Hirohisa

    2006-01-01

    In stock enhancement programs, it is important to assess mixing rates of released individuals in stocks. For this purpose, genetic stock identification has been applied. The allele frequencies in a composite population are expressed as a mixture of the allele frequencies in the natural and released populations. The estimation of mixing rates is possible, under successive sampling from the composite population, on the basis of temporal changes in allele frequencies. The allele frequencies in t...

  1. Comparative transcriptome analyses reveal the genetic basis underlying the immune function of three amphibians' skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenqiao; Jiang, Yusong; Zhang, Meixia; Yang, Donglin; Chen, Zhongzhu; Sun, Hanchang; Lan, Xuelian; Yan, Fan; Xu, Jingming; Yuan, Wanan

    2017-01-01

    Skin as the first barrier against external invasions plays an essential role for the survival of amphibians on land. Understanding the genetic basis of skin function is significant in revealing the mechanisms underlying immunity of amphibians. In this study, we de novo sequenced and comparatively analyzed skin transcriptomes from three different amphibian species, Andrias davidianus, Bufo gargarizans, and Rana nigromaculata Hallowell. Functional classification of unigenes in each amphibian showed high accordance, with the most represented GO terms and KEGG pathways related to basic biological processes, such as binding and metabolism and immune system. As for the unigenes, GO and KEGG distributions of conserved orthologs in each species were similar, with the predominantly enriched pathways including RNA polymerase, nucleotide metabolism, and defense. The positively selected orthologs in each amphibian were also similar, which were primarily involved in stimulus response, cell metabolic, membrane, and catalytic activity. Furthermore, a total of 50 antimicrobial peptides from 26 different categories were identified in the three amphibians, and one of these showed high efficiency in inhibiting the growth of different bacteria. Our understanding of innate immune function of amphibian skin has increased basis on the immune-related unigenes, pathways, and antimicrobial peptides in amphibians.

  2. Comparative transcriptome analyses reveal the genetic basis underlying the immune function of three amphibians’ skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meixia; Yang, Donglin; Chen, Zhongzhu; Lan, Xuelian; Yan, Fan; Xu, Jingming; Yuan, Wanan

    2017-01-01

    Skin as the first barrier against external invasions plays an essential role for the survival of amphibians on land. Understanding the genetic basis of skin function is significant in revealing the mechanisms underlying immunity of amphibians. In this study, we de novo sequenced and comparatively analyzed skin transcriptomes from three different amphibian species, Andrias davidianus, Bufo gargarizans, and Rana nigromaculata Hallowell. Functional classification of unigenes in each amphibian showed high accordance, with the most represented GO terms and KEGG pathways related to basic biological processes, such as binding and metabolism and immune system. As for the unigenes, GO and KEGG distributions of conserved orthologs in each species were similar, with the predominantly enriched pathways including RNA polymerase, nucleotide metabolism, and defense. The positively selected orthologs in each amphibian were also similar, which were primarily involved in stimulus response, cell metabolic, membrane, and catalytic activity. Furthermore, a total of 50 antimicrobial peptides from 26 different categories were identified in the three amphibians, and one of these showed high efficiency in inhibiting the growth of different bacteria. Our understanding of innate immune function of amphibian skin has increased basis on the immune-related unigenes, pathways, and antimicrobial peptides in amphibians. PMID:29267366

  3. Genetics of human hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael A.; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2006-01-01

    Human hydrocephalus is a common medical condition that is characterized by abnormalities in the flow or resorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), resulting in ventricular dilatation. Human hydrocephalus can be classified into two clinical forms, congenital and acquired. Hydrocephalus is one of the complex and multifactorial neurological disorders. A growing body of evidence indicates that genetic factors play a major role in the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus. An understanding of the genetic components and mechanism of this complex disorder may offer us significant insights into the molecular etiology of impaired brain development and an accumulation of the cerebrospinal fluid in cerebral compartments during the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus. Genetic studies in animal models have started to open the way for understanding the underlying pathology of hydrocephalus. At least 43 mutants/loci linked to hereditary hydrocephalus have been identified in animal models and humans. Up to date, 9 genes associated with hydrocephalus have been identified in animal models. In contrast, only one such gene has been identified in humans. Most of known hydrocephalus gene products are the important cytokines, growth factors or related molecules in the cellular signal pathways during early brain development. The current molecular genetic evidence from animal models indicate that in the early development stage, impaired and abnormal brain development caused by abnormal cellular signaling and functioning, all these cellular and developmental events would eventually lead to the congenital hydrocephalus. Owing to our very primitive knowledge of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of human hydrocephalus, it is difficult to evaluate whether data gained from animal models can be extrapolated to humans. Initiation of a large population genetics study in humans will certainly provide invaluable information about the molecular and cellular etiology and the developmental mechanisms of human

  4. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  5. The underlying mechanisms of genetic innovation and speciation in the family Corynebacteriaceae: A phylogenomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Jiang, Zhao; Yang, Ling-Ling; Huang, Ying

    2017-02-01

    The pangenome of a bacterial species population is formed by genetic reduction and genetic expansion over the long course of evolution. Gene loss is a pervasive source of genetic reduction, and (exogenous and endogenous) gene gain is the main driver of genetic expansion. To understand the genetic innovation and speciation of the family Corynebacteriaceae, which cause a wide range of serious infections in humans and animals, we analyzed the pangenome of this family, and reconstructed its phylogeny using a phylogenomics approach. Genetic variations have occurred throughout the whole evolutionary history of the Corynebacteriaceae. Gene loss has been the primary force causing genetic changes, not only in terms of the number of protein families affected, but also because of its continuity on the time series. The variation in metabolism caused by these genetic changes mainly occurred for membrane transporters, two-component systems, and metabolism related to amino acids and carbohydrates. Interestingly, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) not only caused changes related to pathogenicity, but also triggered the acquisition of antimicrobial resistance. The Darwinian theory of evolution did not adequately explain the effects of dispersive HGT and/or gene loss in the evolution of the Corynebacteriaceae. These findings provide new insight into the evolution and speciation of Corynebacteriaceae and advance our understanding of the genetic innovation in microbial populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Shared activity patterns arising at genetic susceptibility loci reveal underlying genomic and cellular architecture of human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baillie, J Kenneth; Bretherick, Andrew; Haley, Christopher S

    2018-01-01

    Genetic variants underlying complex traits, including disease susceptibility, are enriched within the transcriptional regulatory elements, promoters and enhancers. There is emerging evidence that regulatory elements associated with particular traits or diseases share similar patterns...... the regulation of the OCT1 cation transporter and genetic variants underlying circulating cholesterol levels. NDA strongly implicates particular cell types and tissues in disease pathogenesis. For example, distinct groupings of disease-associated regulatory regions implicate two distinct biological processes...... in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis; a further two separate processes are implicated in Crohn's disease. Thus, our functional analysis of genetic predisposition to disease defines new distinct disease endotypes. We predict that patients with a preponderance of susceptibility variants in each group are likely...

  7. Modelled in vivo HIV fitness under drug selective pressure and estimated genetic barrier towards resistance are predictive for virological response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deforche, Koen; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Theys, Kristof

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A method has been developed to estimate a fitness landscape experienced by HIV-1 under treatment selective pressure as a function of the genotypic sequence thereby also estimating the genetic barrier to resistance. METHODS: We evaluated the performance of two estimated fitness landsca...

  8. Homozygosity mapping and targeted sanger sequencing reveal genetic defects underlying inherited retinal disease in families from pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maria, M.; Ajmal, M.; Azam, M.; Waheed, N.K.; Siddiqui, S.N.; Mustafa, B.; Ayub, H.; Ali, L.; Ahmad, S.; Micheal, S.; Hussain, A.; Shah, S.T.; Ali, S.H.; Ahmed, W.; Khan, Y.M.; Hollander, A.I. den; Haer-Wigman, L.; Collin, R.W.J.; Khan, M.I.; Qamar, R.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective

  9. [Etiological diagnosis of leg ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debure, Clélia

    2010-09-20

    Etiological diagnosis of leg ulcers must be the first step of treatment, even if we know that veinous disease is often present. We can build a clinical decisional diagram, which helps us to understand and not forget the other causes of chronic wounds and choose some basic examination, like ultrasound and histological findings. This diagnosis helps to choose the right treatment in order to cure even the oldest venous ulcers. Educational programs should be improved to prevent recurrence.

  10. LEARNING DISABILITIES: ETIOLOGY AND TYPES

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Geetha Gopinath,; Tintu Mathew,

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This paper deals with the Etiology and Types of Learning disabilities. Learning disabilities are actually a failure on the part of the child who lacks adequate intelligence, maturation level, cultural background and educational experience to learn a scholastic skill. Such disabilities can only be determined by a psychologist, a paediatrician, or a psychiatrist. People with these disorders can find difficulty to learn as quickly as others who are not aff...

  11. 75 FR 68911 - Regulations Under the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... covered entities, however, might engage in conduct that could cause an employer to discriminate. For... disease or disorder. But just as the number of genetic tests increases, so do the concerns of the general... efforts to develop new medicines and treatments for genetic diseases and disorders would be slowed or...

  12. [Chronic diarrhea with uncommon etiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Borrás, R; Juan Vidal, O; Talavera Encinas, M I; Bixquert Jiménez, M

    2005-03-01

    Chronic diarrhea is a common syndrome. An etiological diagnosis is often reached through clinical history, physical examination and simple tests. In some cases, when the etiology is not found, the syndrome is called functional diarrhea, even though established criteria are often not fulfilled. We present the case of a patient with diarrhea for several months. The most common causes were ruled out through clinical history, physical examination, radiographic studies and laboratory tests, and the patient was diagnosed with functional diarrhea. Three months later, the patient presented a neck mass, and biopsy revealed medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. A review of recommendations for the systematic evaluation of chronic diarrhea is presented. A general approach should include careful history taking characteristics of diarrhea (onset, associated symptoms, epidemiological factors, iatrogenic causes such as laxative ingestion), a thorough physical examination with special attention to the anorectal region, and routine laboratory tests (complete blood count and serum chemistry). In addition, stool analysis including electrolytes (fecal osmotic gap), leukocytes, fecal occult blood, excess stool fat and laxative screening can yield important objective information to classify the diarrhea as: osmotic (osmotic gaps > 125 mOsm/Kg), secretory (osmotic gaps diarrhea described above. A systematic approach to the evaluation of chronic diarrhea is warranted. Medullary thyroid carcinoma and other endocrine syndromes causing chronic diarrhea are very rare. Measurement of serum peptide concentrations should only be performed when clinical presentation and findings in stool or radiographic studies suggest this etiology.

  13. [Progression of tumors: etiologic, morphologic and molecular-biological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turosov, V S

    1992-01-01

    Two aspects can be distinguished in multistage carcinogenesis: etiological one (every stage is induced by a specific for this stage agent) and morphobiological aspect (every stage is characterized by specific morphological, genetic and other properties). The schema of the multistage carcinogenesis is presented in which morphological stages (diffuse and focal hyperplasia, benign tumours, dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, various phases of malignant tumour progression) are placed against genetic alterations. L. Foulds concept of tumour progression is discussed with special emphasis on precancerous stages, possibilities of cancer development de novo, and independent progression of different tumour characters. The following types of carcinogenesis are listed on the basis of interrelationship between etiological and genetic factors: 1) carcinogenesis induced by genotoxic agents; a) one agent is acting at high dose and for a long time thus ensuring the activation of protooncogenes and all stages of tumour progression (initiation, promotion, various phases of malignant tumour); b) those acting during a very short time, however sufficient for developing the genetic program working automatically without further exposure to known carcinogens (irradiation in case of the atomic bomb explosion or effect of short-living alkylating agents): in this case there is no stage of promotion; 2) carcinogenesis by non-genotoxic carcinogens (their mode of action is still unclear, the only human example is carcinogenesis by hormones); 3) development of tumours in frane of the two (or three) stage carcinogenesis when every stage is provoked by its own etiological factor, no human examples are known as yet; 4) development of tumours due to the genetic mechanism making the organism highly susceptible to the minimal doses of carcinogens as is the case with skin cancer by ultraviolet light in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, the genetic damage in itself has nothing to do with tumour formation; 5

  14. Osteoporotic vertebral fractures during pregnancy: be aware of a potential underlying genetic cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Obando, Natalia; Oei, Ling; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Kiewiet, Rosalie M; Klaver, Caroline C W; Simon, Marleen E H; Zillikens, M Carola

    2014-04-01

    Although the baby growing in its mother's womb needs calcium for skeletal development, osteoporosis and fractures very rarely occur during pregnancy. A 27-year-old woman in the seventh month of her first pregnancy contracted midthoracic back pain after lifting an object. The pain was attributed to her pregnancy, but it remained postpartum. Her past medical history was uneventful, except for severely reduced vision of her left eye since birth. Family history revealed that her maternal grandmother had postmenopausal osteoporosis and her half-brother had three fractures during childhood after minor trauma. Her height was 1.58 m; she had no blue sclerae or joint hyperlaxity. Laboratory examination including serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine, β-carboxyterminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and TSH was normal. Multiple thoracic vertebral fractures were diagnosed on x-ray examination, and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning showed severe osteoporosis (Z-scores: L2-L4, -5.6 SD; femur neck, -3.9 SD). DNA analyses revealed two compound heterozygous missense mutations in LRP5. The patient's mother carried one of the LRP5 mutations and was diagnosed with osteoporosis. Her half-brother, treated with cabergoline for a microprolactinoma, also had osteoporosis of the lumbar spine on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and carried the same LRP5 mutation. The patient was treated with risedronate for 2.5 years. Bone mineral density and back pain improved. She stopped bisphosphonate use 6 months before planning a second pregnancy. Our patient was diagnosed with osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome/familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. Potential underlying genetic causes should be considered in pregnancy-associated osteoporosis with implications for patients and relatives. More studies regarding osteoporosis treatment preceding conception are desirable.

  15. Likelihood for transcriptions in a genetic regulatory system under asymmetric stable Lévy noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Cheng, Xiujun; Duan, Jinqiao; Kurths, Jürgen; Li, Xiaofan

    2018-01-01

    This work is devoted to investigating the evolution of concentration in a genetic regulation system, when the synthesis reaction rate is under additive and multiplicative asymmetric stable Lévy fluctuations. By focusing on the impact of skewness (i.e., non-symmetry) in the probability distributions of noise, we find that via examining the mean first exit time (MFET) and the first escape probability (FEP), the asymmetric fluctuations, interacting with nonlinearity in the system, lead to peculiar likelihood for transcription. This includes, in the additive noise case, realizing higher likelihood of transcription for larger positive skewness (i.e., asymmetry) index β, causing a stochastic bifurcation at the non-Gaussianity index value α = 1 (i.e., it is a separating point or line for the likelihood for transcription), and achieving a turning point at the threshold value β≈-0.5 (i.e., beyond which the likelihood for transcription suddenly reversed for α values). The stochastic bifurcation and turning point phenomena do not occur in the symmetric noise case (β = 0). While in the multiplicative noise case, non-Gaussianity index value α = 1 is a separating point or line for both the MFET and the FEP. We also investigate the noise enhanced stability phenomenon. Additionally, we are able to specify the regions in the whole parameter space for the asymmetric noise, in which we attain desired likelihood for transcription. We have conducted a series of numerical experiments in "regulating" the likelihood of gene transcription by tuning asymmetric stable Lévy noise indexes. This work offers insights for possible ways of achieving gene regulation in experimental research.

  16. The etiology of spontaneous intracerebralhemorrhage: Insights from a neuropathological series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Luis; Branco, Mariana; Samões, Raquel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo Pires, Manuel

    The etiology of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is frequently undetermined. We aimed to assess the impact of the neuropathological study on the etiologic diagnosis of ICH. Patients with ICH admitted to a tertiary hospital in the last 14 years were identified, and histological samples of surgically-drained ICH were retrieved. Blinded from neuropathological results, a clinical etiology was hypothesized. Pathological samples were reviewed, and immunohistochemistry study for β-amyloid was performed in all the cases where structural abnormalities were not identified. From 2002 - 2016, 113 patients with ICH underwent surgical drainage and had specimens taken for histology. The mean age was 51.6 years (SD = 19.2). Clinical and imaging data defined a presumable etiology in 47 patients (44.2%), including 30 patients with suspected structural pathology, 11 patients under anticoagulation, and 8 patients with probable hypertensive hemorrhage, while most had an undetermined etiology. Using neuropathological analysis, a definitive diagnosis was possible in 88.5% of the patients. Arteriovenous malformations (38.1%) and cavernous hemangiomas (16.8%) represented the most common findings. In 9.7%, the blood vessels showed cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). The neuropathological study established a definite etiology in an additional 44.3% of patients other than only using the clinical and imaging data.
.

  17. The evolutionary genetics of the genes underlying phenotypic associations for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda, Pinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Andrew J; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Liechty, John D; Lee, Jennifer M; Cumbie, W Patrick; Davis, John M; Goldfarb, Barry; Loopstra, Carol A; Palle, Sreenath R; Quesada, Tania; Langley, Charles H; Neale, David B

    2013-12-01

    A primary goal of evolutionary genetics is to discover and explain the genetic basis of fitness-related traits and how this genetic basis evolves within natural populations. Unprecedented technological advances have fueled the discovery of genetic variants associated with ecologically relevant phenotypes in many different life forms, as well as the ability to scan genomes for deviations from selectively neutral models of evolution. Theoretically, the degree of overlap between lists of genomic regions identified using each approach is related to the genetic architecture of fitness-related traits and the strength and type of natural selection molding variation at these traits within natural populations. Here we address for the first time in a plant the degree of overlap between these lists, using patterns of nucleotide diversity and divergence for >7000 unique amplicons described from the extensive expressed sequence tag libraries generated for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in combination with the >1000 published genetic associations. We show that loci associated with phenotypic traits are distinct with regard to neutral expectations. Phenotypes measured at the whole plant level (e.g., disease resistance) exhibit an approximately twofold increase in the proportion of adaptive nonsynonymous substitutions over the genome-wide average. As expected for polygenic traits, these signals were apparent only when loci were considered at the level of functional sets. The ramifications of this result are discussed in light of the continued efforts to dissect the genetic basis of quantitative traits.

  18. Genetic diversity of Vietnamese lowland rice germplasms as revealed by SSR markers in relation to seedling vigour under submergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien Thi Thu Vu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the direct-seeding rice cultivation system, seedling vigour is one of the most important traits for stable stand establishment during early seedling stages, particularly under submergence that is caused by temporal flash flood. We studied the genetic diversity in a set of 40 Vietnamese lowland rice varieties using 30 simple sequence repeat (SSR markers covering all rice chromosomes. A total of 111 alleles were detected, with a mean of 3.7 alleles per locus. The number of polymorphic alleles detected by each SSR marker ranged from 2 to 6. The fragment size of a given SSR locus varied between 85 and 650 bp and the frequency of a major allele at each locus ranged from 32.5% to 76.9%. Polymorphism information content value varied from 0.355 to 0.774 with an average of 0.594. The genetic similarity calculated between pairs of rice varieties ranged from 0.03 to 0.97 with an average of 0.27. According to a constructed dendrogram of unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean based on the SSR marker analysis, the tested rice varieties were clustered into two major groups consisting of five subgroups. Significant correlations existed between the mean genetic similarity and the mean seedling vigour estimated by shoot length under submergence among the tested varieties. Our results suggested usefulness of the SSR marker system to assess genetic diversity in Vietnamese rice germplasms in relation to their seedling vigour under submergence.

  19. Etiological Distinction of Working Memory Components in Relation to Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukowski, Sarah L; Soden, Brooke; Hart, Sara A; Thompson, Lee A; Kovas, Yulia; Petrill, Stephen A

    2014-11-01

    Working memory has been consistently associated with mathematics achievement, although the etiology of these relations remains poorly understood. The present study examined the genetic and environmental underpinnings of math story problem solving, timed calculation, and untimed calculation alongside working memory components in 12-year-old monozygotic ( n = 105) and same-sex dizygotic ( n = 143) twin pairs. Results indicated significant phenotypic correlation between each working memory component and all mathematics outcomes ( r = 0.18 - 0.33). Additive genetic influences shared between the visuo-spatial sketchpad and mathematics achievement was significant, accounting for roughly 89% of the observed correlation. In addition, genetic covariance was found between the phonological loop and math story problem solving. In contrast, despite there being a significant observed relationship between phonological loop and timed and untimed calculation, there was no significant genetic or environmental covariance between the phonological loop and timed or untimed calculation skills. Further analyses indicated that genetic overlap between the visuo-spatial sketchpad and math story problem solving and math fluency was distinct from general genetic factors, whereas g , phonological loop, and mathematics shared generalist genes. Thus, although each working memory component was related to mathematics, the etiology of their relationships may be distinct.

  20. Genetics of cardiomyopathies in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Vatta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart muscle leading to heart failure and/or an increased risk of arrhythmogenic sudden cardiac death. These disorders represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. In childhood forms of cardiomyopathy, genetic etiologies are frequent, but non-genetic or acquired causes, such viral infection, also play a significant role. In the last twenty years, the genetic causes of cardiomyopathies have been increasingly identified and clinical correlations are beginning to be defined. Here we present an overview of the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of cardiomyopathies in children and what is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these gene-related forms of disease.

  1. Etiological approach to chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa Shankar D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 1769, William Cullen introduced the word "urticaria" (transient edematous papules, plaque with itching. Urticaria affects 15-25% of people at least once in their life time. It is a clinical reaction pattern triggered by many factors causing the liberation of vasoactive substances such as histamine, prostaglandins and kinins. Urticaria is classified according to its duration into acute (< 6 weeks duration and chronic (>6 weeks duration. Various clinical investigations may be initiated to diagnosis the cause. Aims: To evaluate the types of chronic urticaria with reference to etiology from history and investigations . Materials and Methods: A total of 150 patients with chronic urticaria of more than six weeks were studied. Autologous serum skin test (ASST was performed after physical urticarias were excluded. Standard batteries of tests were performed after ASST in all patients; and other specific investigations were done where necessary. Skin prick test was done in idiopathic urticaria. Results: The study sample consisted of 62 male and 88 female patients with a mean age of 21-40 years. About 50% of patients showed an ASST positive reaction, 3.9% were positive for antinuclear antibody (ANA, IgE titer was elevated in 37%, H. pylori antibodies was positive in 26.7%. Thyroid antibodies were positive in 6.2%. Giardia and entamoeba histolytica was reported in 3.3% on routine stool examination and on urinalysis 8% had elevated WBC counts; 12% showed para nasal sinusitis, with maxillary sinusitis of 7.3%. Random blood sugar was high in 5.3%. Four patients had ASOM, two had positive KOH mount for dermatophytes, abdominal USG showed cholecystitis in two patients. Recurrent tonsillitis was noted in two patients. Urticaria following intake of NSAIDs was observed in four patients and with oral contraceptive pills in one patient. Contact urticaria to condom (latex was seen in one patient. Cholinergic (4.7% and dermographic (4.7% urticaria were

  2. Understanding and determining the etiology of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currenti, Salvatore A

    2010-03-01

    Worldwide, the rate of autism has been steadily rising. There are several environmental factors in concert with genetic susceptibilities that are contributing to this rise. Impaired methylation and mutations of mecp2 have been associated with autistic spectrum disorders, and related Rett syndrome. Genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 enzymes have also been linked to autism, specifically CYP27B1 that is essential for proper vitamin D metabolism. Vitamin D is important for neuronal growth and neurodevelopment, and defects in metabolism or deficiency have been implicated in autistic individuals. Other factors that have been considered include: maternally derived antibodies, maternal infection, heavy metal exposure, folic acid supplementation, epigenetics, measles, mumps, rubella vaccination, and even electromagnetic radiation. In each case, the consequences, whether direct or indirect, negatively affect the nervous system, neurodevelopment, and environmental responsive genes. The etiology of autism is a topic of controversial debate, while researchers strive to achieve a common objective. The goal is to identify the cause(s) of autism to understand the complex interplay between environment and gene regulation. There is optimism that specific causes and risk factors will be identified. The results of future investigations will facilitate enhanced screening, prevention, and therapy for "at risk" and autistic patients.

  3. Sarcomas: etiología y síntomas Sarcomas: etiology and symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gabriel Albín Cano

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Debido a la amplia diversidad de sarcomas, casi son inexistentes los textos que incluyen todas las variedades de este tipo de cáncer. Generalmente, su descripción y revisión se incluyen en las del sistema de órganos afectados específicamente, y la literatura que los aborda está muy fragmentada en las diferentes especialidades médicas. Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica sobre la etiología y síntomas de la mayor parte de los diferentes tipos de sarcomas. Es objetivo de esta revisión, lograr unir la información más actual disponible acerca de la etiología y síntomas de los sarcomas. Se han identificado diferentes factores de riesgo y factores etiológicos, tanto genéticos, infecciosos, como ambientales. Los grandes descubrimientos en relación con los mecanismos genéticos involucrados en los diferentes tipos de sarcoma, han abierto un camino de inestimable valor para introducir nuevos tratamientos, que incluyen ensayos con anticuerpos monoclonales y nuevos fármacos de terapia génica.

    Due to the wide diversity of sarcomas, almost no texts include all varieties of this type of cancer. Generally, their description and review is included in those of the specifically affected organ system, and the literature containing that information is very fragmented in different medical specialties. We performed a literature review on the etiology and symptoms of most types of sarcomas. It is aimed at achieving a recompilation of most current information available on the causes and symptoms of sarcomas. Different risks and etiologic factors have been identified regarding genetics, infections, and environment. The great discoveries regarding genetic mechanisms involved in different types of sarcomas, have opened an invaluable way to introduce new treatments, including monoclonal antibodies and new drugs of gene therapy.

  4. Controversies about a common etiology for eating and mood disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Rossetti, Clara; Halfon, Olivier; Boutrel, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and depression represent a growing health concern worldwide. For many years, basic science and medicine have considered obesity as a metabolic illness, while depression was classified a psychiatric disorder. Despite accumulating evidence suggesting that obesity and depression may share commonalities though, the causal link between eating and mood disorders remains to be fully understood. This etiology is highly complex, consisting of multiple environmental and genetic risk factors tha...

  5. Intrathoracic neoplasia: Epidemiology and etiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1992-05-01

    Neoplasms of the thorax encompass those derived from the thoracic wall, trachea, mediastinum, lungs and pleura. They represent a wide variety of lesions including benign and malignant tumors arising from many tissues. The large surface area, 60 to 90 m{sup 2} in man, represented by the respiratory epithelium and associated thoracic structures are ideal targets for carcinogens carried by inspired air. The topic of discussion in this report is the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in animals and man. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms.

  6. Intrathoracic neoplasia: Epidemiology and etiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, R.E.

    1992-05-01

    Neoplasms of the thorax encompass those derived from the thoracic wall, trachea, mediastinum, lungs and pleura. They represent a wide variety of lesions including benign and malignant tumors arising from many tissues. The large surface area, 60 to 90 m 2 in man, represented by the respiratory epithelium and associated thoracic structures are ideal targets for carcinogens carried by inspired air. The topic of discussion in this report is the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in animals and man. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms

  7. Genetic disorders as collective phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.

    1987-05-01

    Genetic disorders due to human chromosome aberrations in number are discussed from the point of view of Molecular Genetics. The etiology of trisomy is discussed in the light of the collective variables recently introduced and an age-dependent metabolic disorder is suggested as a possible etiological factor. (author). 11 refs

  8. Massively parallel sequencing and targeted exomes in familial kidney disease can diagnose underlying genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Andrew J; McCarthy, Hugh J; Ho, Gladys; Holman, Katherine; Farnsworth, Elizabeth; Patel, Chirag; Fletcher, Jeffery T; Mallawaarachchi, Amali; Quinlan, Catherine; Bennetts, Bruce; Alexander, Stephen I

    2017-12-01

    Inherited kidney disease encompasses a broad range of disorders, with both multiple genes contributing to specific phenotypes and single gene defects having multiple clinical presentations. Advances in sequencing capacity may allow a genetic diagnosis for familial renal disease, by testing the increasing number of known causative genes. However, there has been limited translation of research findings of causative genes into clinical settings. Here, we report the results of a national accredited diagnostic genetic service for familial renal disease. An expert multidisciplinary team developed a targeted exomic sequencing approach with ten curated multigene panels (207 genes) and variant assessment individualized to the patient's phenotype. A genetic diagnosis (pathogenic genetic variant[s]) was identified in 58 of 135 families referred in two years. The genetic diagnosis rate was similar between families with a pediatric versus adult proband (46% vs 40%), although significant differences were found in certain panels such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (88% vs 17%). High diagnostic rates were found for Alport syndrome (22 of 27) and tubular disorders (8 of 10), whereas the monogenic diagnostic rate for congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract was one of 13. Quality reporting was aided by a strong clinical renal and genetic multidisciplinary committee review. Importantly, for a diagnostic service, few variants of uncertain significance were found with this targeted, phenotype-based approach. Thus, use of targeted massively parallel sequencing approaches in inherited kidney disease has a significant capacity to diagnose the underlying genetic disorder across most renal phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Shared Genetic Propensity Underlies Experiences of Bullying Victimization in Late Childhood and Self-Rated Paranoid Thinking in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Sania; McGuire, Phillip; Cardno, Alastair G.; Freeman, Daniel; Plomin, Robert; Ronald, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying is a risk factor for developing psychotic experiences (PEs). Whether bullying is associated with particular PEs, and the extent to which genes and environments influence the association, are unknown. This study investigated which specific PEs in adolescence are associated with earlier bullying victimization and the genetic and environmental contributions underlying their association. Method: Participants were 4826 twin pairs from a longitudinal community-based twin study in England and Wales who reported on their bullying victimization at the age of 12 years. Measures of specific PEs (self-rated Paranoia, Hallucinations, Cognitive disorganization, Grandiosity, Anhedonia, and parent-rated Negative Symptoms) were recorded at age of 16 years. Results: Childhood bullying victimization was most strongly associated with Paranoia in adolescence (r = .26; P bullying victimization and Paranoia were both heritable (35% and 52%, respectively) with unique environmental influences (39% and 48%, respectively), and bullying victimization showed common environmental influences (26%). The association between bullying victimization and Paranoia operated almost entirely via genetic influences (bivariate heritability = 93%), with considerable genetic overlap (genetic correlation = .55). Conclusion: In contrast to the assumed role of bullying victimization as an environmental trigger, these data suggest that bullying victimization in late childhood is particularly linked to self-rated Paranoia in adolescence via a shared genetic propensity. Clinically, individuals with a history of bullying victimization are predicted to be particularly susceptible to paranoid symptoms. PMID:25323579

  10. A shared genetic propensity underlies experiences of bullying victimization in late childhood and self-rated paranoid thinking in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Sania; McGuire, Phillip; Cardno, Alastair G; Freeman, Daniel; Plomin, Robert; Ronald, Angelica

    2015-05-01

    Bullying is a risk factor for developing psychotic experiences (PEs). Whether bullying is associated with particular PEs, and the extent to which genes and environments influence the association, are unknown. This study investigated which specific PEs in adolescence are associated with earlier bullying victimization and the genetic and environmental contributions underlying their association. Participants were 4826 twin pairs from a longitudinal community-based twin study in England and Wales who reported on their bullying victimization at the age of 12 years. Measures of specific PEs (self-rated Paranoia, Hallucinations, Cognitive disorganization, Grandiosity, Anhedonia, and parent-rated Negative Symptoms) were recorded at age of 16 years. Childhood bullying victimization was most strongly associated with Paranoia in adolescence (r = .26; P bullying victimization and Paranoia were both heritable (35% and 52%, respectively) with unique environmental influences (39% and 48%, respectively), and bullying victimization showed common environmental influences (26%). The association between bullying victimization and Paranoia operated almost entirely via genetic influences (bivariate heritability = 93%), with considerable genetic overlap (genetic correlation = .55). In contrast to the assumed role of bullying victimization as an environmental trigger, these data suggest that bullying victimization in late childhood is particularly linked to self-rated Paranoia in adolescence via a shared genetic propensity. Clinically, individuals with a history of bullying victimization are predicted to be particularly susceptible to paranoid symptoms. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  11. Persistency of Prediction Accuracy and Genetic Gain in Synthetic Populations Under Recurrent Genomic Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Dominik; Schopp, Pascal; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2017-03-10

    Recurrent selection (RS) has been used in plant breeding to successively improve synthetic and other multiparental populations. Synthetics are generated from a limited number of parents [Formula: see text] but little is known about how [Formula: see text] affects genomic selection (GS) in RS, especially the persistency of prediction accuracy ([Formula: see text]) and genetic gain. Synthetics were simulated by intermating [Formula: see text]= 2-32 parent lines from an ancestral population with short- or long-range linkage disequilibrium ([Formula: see text]) and subjected to multiple cycles of GS. We determined [Formula: see text] and genetic gain across 30 cycles for different training set ( TS ) sizes, marker densities, and generations of recombination before model training. Contributions to [Formula: see text] and genetic gain from pedigree relationships, as well as from cosegregation and [Formula: see text] between QTL and markers, were analyzed via four scenarios differing in (i) the relatedness between TS and selection candidates and (ii) whether selection was based on markers or pedigree records. Persistency of [Formula: see text] was high for small [Formula: see text] where predominantly cosegregation contributed to [Formula: see text], but also for large [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] replaced cosegregation as the dominant information source. Together with increasing genetic variance, this compensation resulted in relatively constant long- and short-term genetic gain for increasing [Formula: see text] > 4, given long-range LD A in the ancestral population. Although our scenarios suggest that information from pedigree relationships contributed to [Formula: see text] for only very few generations in GS, we expect a longer contribution than in pedigree BLUP, because capturing Mendelian sampling by markers reduces selective pressure on pedigree relationships. Larger TS size ([Formula: see text]) and higher marker density improved persistency of

  12. Persistency of Prediction Accuracy and Genetic Gain in Synthetic Populations Under Recurrent Genomic Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Müller

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent selection (RS has been used in plant breeding to successively improve synthetic and other multiparental populations. Synthetics are generated from a limited number of parents ( Np , but little is known about how Np affects genomic selection (GS in RS, especially the persistency of prediction accuracy (rg , g ^ and genetic gain. Synthetics were simulated by intermating Np= 2–32 parent lines from an ancestral population with short- or long-range linkage disequilibrium (LDA and subjected to multiple cycles of GS. We determined rg , g ^ and genetic gain across 30 cycles for different training set (TS sizes, marker densities, and generations of recombination before model training. Contributions to rg , g ^ and genetic gain from pedigree relationships, as well as from cosegregation and LDA between QTL and markers, were analyzed via four scenarios differing in (i the relatedness between TS and selection candidates and (ii whether selection was based on markers or pedigree records. Persistency of rg , g ^ was high for small Np , where predominantly cosegregation contributed to rg , g ^ , but also for large Np , where LDA replaced cosegregation as the dominant information source. Together with increasing genetic variance, this compensation resulted in relatively constant long- and short-term genetic gain for increasing Np > 4, given long-range LDA in the ancestral population. Although our scenarios suggest that information from pedigree relationships contributed to rg , g ^ for only very few generations in GS, we expect a longer contribution than in pedigree BLUP, because capturing Mendelian sampling by markers reduces selective pressure on pedigree relationships. Larger TS size (NTS and higher marker density improved persistency of rg , g ^ and hence genetic gain, but additional recombinations could not increase genetic gain.

  13. Mapping QTL for Seed Germinability under Low Temperature Using a New High-Density Genetic Map of Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningfei Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mapping major quantitative trait loci (QTL responsible for rice seed germinability under low temperature (GULT can provide valuable genetic source for improving cold tolerance in rice breeding. In this study, 124 rice backcross recombinant inbred lines (BRILs derived from a cross indica cv. Changhui 891 and japonica cv. 02428 were genotyped through re-sequencing technology. A bin map was generated which includes 3057 bins covering distance of 1266.5 cM with an average of 0.41 cM between markers. On the basis of newly constructed high-density genetic map, six QTL were detected ranging from 40 to 140 kb on Nipponbare genome. Among these, two QTL qCGR8 and qGRR11 alleles shared by 02428 could increase GULT and seed germination recovery rate after cold stress, respectively. However, qNGR1 and qNGR4 may be two major QTL affecting indica Changhui 891germination under normal condition. QTL qGRR1 and qGRR8 affected the seed germination recovery rate after cold stress and the alleles with increasing effects were shared by the Changhui 891 could improve seed germination rate after cold stress dramatically. These QTL could be a highly valuable genetic factors for cold tolerance improvement in rice lines. Moreover, the BRILs developed in this study will serve as an appropriate choice for mapping and studying genetic basis of rice complex traits.

  14. Evolutionary divergence of the genetic architecture underlying photoperiodism in the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lair, K P; Bradshaw, W E; Holzapfel, C M

    1997-12-01

    We determine the contribution of composite additive, dominance, and epistatic effects to the genetic divergence of photoperiodic response along latitudinal, altitudinal, and longitudinal gradients in the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii. Joint scaling tests of crosses between populations showed widespread epistasis as well as additive and dominance differences among populations. There were differences due to epistasis between an alpine population in North Carolina and populations in Florida, lowland North Carolina, and Maine. Longitudinal displacement resulted in differences due to epistasis between Florida and Alabama populations separated by 300 km but not between Maine and Wisconsin populations separated by 2000 km. Genetic differences between New Jersey and Ontario did not involve either dominance or epistasis and we estimated the minimum number of effective factors contributing to a difference in mean critical photoperiod of 5 SD between them as nE = 5. We propose that the genetic similarity of populations within a broad northern region is due to their more recent origin since recession of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and that the unique genetic architecture of each population is the result of both mutation and repeated migration-founder-flush episodes during the dispersal of W. smithii in North America. Our results suggest that differences in composite additive and dominance effects arise early in the genetic divergence of populations while differences due to epistasis accumulate after more prolonged isolation.

  15. Genetic predisposition for beta cell fragility underlies type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James; Tian, Lei; Schonefeldt, Susann; Delghingaro-Augusto, Viviane; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E; Pasciuto, Emanuela; Di Marino, Daniele; Carr, Edward J; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Franckaert, Dean; Lagou, Vasiliki; Overbergh, Lut; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Allemeersch, Joke; Chabot-Roy, Genevieve; Dahlstrom, Jane E; Laybutt, D Ross; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Socha, Luis; Gevaert, Kris; Jetten, Anton M; Lambrechts, Diether; Linterman, Michelle A; Goodnow, Chris C; Nolan, Christopher J; Lesage, Sylvie; Schlenner, Susan M; Liston, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes share pathophysiological characteristics, yet mechanistic links have remained elusive. T1D results from autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells, whereas beta cell failure in T2D is delayed and progressive. Here we find a new genetic component of diabetes susceptibility in T1D non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, identifying immune-independent beta cell fragility. Genetic variation in Xrcc4 and Glis3 alters the response of NOD beta cells to unfolded protein stress, enhancing the apoptotic and senescent fates. The same transcriptional relationships were observed in human islets, demonstrating the role of beta cell fragility in genetic predisposition to diabetes.

  16. Genetic variation underlying resistance to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieuc, Marine S. O.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Palmer, Alexander D.; Naish, Kerry A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of host resistance to pathogens will allow insights into the response of wild populations to the emergence of new pathogens. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is endemic to the Pacific Northwest and infectious to Pacific salmon and trout (Oncorhynchus spp.). Emergence of the M genogroup of IHNV in steelhead trout O. mykiss in the coastal streams of Washington State, between 2007 and 2011, was geographically heterogeneous. Differences in host resistance due to genetic change were hypothesized to be a factor influencing the IHNV emergence patterns. For example, juvenile steelhead trout losses at the Quinault National Fish Hatchery (QNFH) were much lower than those at a nearby facility that cultures a stock originally derived from the same source population. Using a classical quantitative genetic approach, we determined the potential for the QNFH steelhead trout population to respond to selection caused by the pathogen, by estimating the heritability for 2 traits indicative of IHNV resistance, mortality (h2 = 0.377 (0.226 - 0.550)) and days to death (h2 = 0.093 (0.018 - 0.203)). These results confirm that there is a genetic basis for resistance and that this population has the potential to adapt to IHNV. Additionally, genetic correlation between days to death and fish length suggests a correlated response in these traits to selection. Reduction of genetic variation, as well as the presence or absence of resistant alleles, could affect the ability of populations to adapt to the pathogen. Identification of the genetic basis for IHNV resistance could allow the assessment of the susceptibility of other steelhead populations.

  17. Voice Disorders: Etiology and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Regina Helena Garcia; do Amaral, Henrique Abrantes; Tavares, Elaine Lara Mendes; Martins, Maira Garcia; Gonçalves, Tatiana Maria; Dias, Norimar Hernandes

    2016-11-01

    Voice disorders affect adults and children and have different causes in different age groups. The aim of the study is to present the etiology and diagnosis dysphonia in a large population of patients with this voice disorder.for dysphonia of a large population of dysphonic patients. We evaluated 2019 patients with dysphonia who attended the Voice Disease ambulatories of a university hospital. Parameters assessed were age, gender, profession, associated symptoms, smoking, and videolaryngoscopy diagnoses. Of the 2019 patients with dysphonia who were included in this study, 786 were male (38.93%) and 1233 were female (61.07). The age groups were as follows: 1-6 years (n = 100); 7-12 years (n = 187); 13-18 years (n = 92); 19-39 years (n = 494); 41-60 years (n = 811); and >60 years (n = 335). Symptoms associated with dysphonia were vocal overuse (n = 677), gastroesophageal symptoms (n = 535), and nasosinusal symptoms (n = 497). The predominant professions of the patients were domestic workers, students, and teachers. Smoking was reported by 13.6% patients. With regard to the etiology of dysphonia, in children (1-18 years old), nodules (n = 225; 59.3%), cysts (n = 39; 10.3%), and acute laryngitis (n = 26; 6.8%) prevailed. In adults (19-60 years old), functional dysphonia (n = 268; 20.5%), acid laryngitis (n = 164; 12.5%), and vocal polyps (n = 156; 12%) predominated. In patients older than 60 years, presbyphonia (n = 89; 26.5%), functional dysphonia (n = 59; 17.6%), and Reinke's edema (n = 48; 14%) predominated. In this population of 2019 patients with dysphonia, adults and women were predominant. Dysphonia had different etiologies in the age groups studied. Nodules and cysts were predominant in children, functional dysphonia and reflux in adults, and presbyphonia and Reinke's edema in the elderly. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Brief Communication: Quantitative- and molecular-genetic differentiation in humans and chimpanzees: implications for the evolutionary processes underlying cranial diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Timothy D

    2014-08-01

    Estimates of the amount of genetic differentiation in humans among major geographic regions (e.g., Eastern Asia vs. Europe) from quantitative-genetic analyses of cranial measurements closely match those from classical- and molecular-genetic markers. Typically, among-region differences account for ∼10% of the total variation. This correspondence is generally interpreted as evidence for the importance of neutral evolutionary processes (e.g., genetic drift) in generating among-region differences in human cranial form, but it was initially surprising because human cranial diversity was frequently assumed to show a strong signature of natural selection. Is the human degree of similarity of cranial and DNA-sequence estimates of among-region genetic differentiation unusual? How do comparisons with other taxa illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying cranial diversification? Chimpanzees provide a useful starting point for placing the human results in a broader comparative context, because common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) are the extant species most closely related to humans. To address these questions, I used 27 cranial measurements collected on a sample of 861 humans and 263 chimpanzees to estimate the amount of genetic differentiation between pairs of groups (between regions for humans and between species or subspecies for chimpanzees). Consistent with previous results, the human cranial estimates are quite similar to published DNA-sequence estimates. In contrast, the chimpanzee cranial estimates are much smaller than published DNA-sequence estimates. It appears that cranial differentiation has been limited in chimpanzees relative to humans. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Efficacy of Rosuvastatin in Children With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Association With Underlying Genetic Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Evan A.; Dann, Eldad J.; Wiegman, Albert; Skovby, Flemming; Gaudet, Daniel; Sokal, Etienne; Charng, Min-Ji; Mohamed, Mafauzy; Luirink, Ilse; Raichlen, Joel S.; Sundén, Mattias; Carlsson, Stefan C.; Raal, Frederick J.; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), a rare genetic disorder, is characterized by extremely elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Statin treatment starts at diagnosis, but no statin has been

  20. Genetic Factors Underlying the Risk of Thalidomide-Related Neuropathy in Patients With Multiple Myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, David C.; Corthals, Sophie L.; Walker, Brian A.; Ross, Fiona M.; Gregory, Walter M.; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Davies, Faith E.; Durie, Brian G. M.; Van Ness, Brian; Child, J. Anthony; Sonneveld, Pieter; Morgan, Gareth J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To indentify genetic variation that can modulate and predict the risk of developing thalidomide-related peripheral neuropathy (TrPN). Patients and Methods We analyzed DNA from 1,495 patients with multiple myeloma. Using a custom-built single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, we tested the

  1. Genetic and environmental contributions underlying stability in Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grootheest, D.S.; Bartels, M.; Cath, D.C.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Hudziak, J.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the stability of obsessive-compulsive (OC) behavior during childhood. The objective of this study is to determine the developmental stability of pediatric OC behavior and the genetic and environmental influences on stability in a large population-based twin sample.

  2. Virus-host co-evolution under a modified nuclear genetic code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. Taylor

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Among eukaryotes with modified nuclear genetic codes, viruses are unknown. However, here we provide evidence of an RNA virus that infects a fungal host (Scheffersomyces segobiensis with a derived nuclear genetic code where CUG codes for serine. The genomic architecture and phylogeny are consistent with infection by a double-stranded RNA virus of the genus Totivirus. We provide evidence of past or present infection with totiviruses in five species of yeasts with modified genetic codes. All but one of the CUG codons in the viral genome have been eliminated, suggesting that avoidance of the modified codon was important to viral adaptation. Our mass spectroscopy analysis indicates that a congener of the host species has co-opted and expresses a capsid gene from totiviruses as a cellular protein. Viral avoidance of the host’s modified codon and host co-option of a protein from totiviruses suggest that RNA viruses co-evolved with yeasts that underwent a major evolutionary transition from the standard genetic code.

  3. [Chronic diarrhea: etiologies and diagnostic evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepfer, A

    2008-04-30

    Chronic diarrhea is defined as a decrease in fecal consistency lasting for four or more weeks. A myriad of disorders are associated with chronic diarrhea. In developed countries, chronic diarrhea is mostly caused by non-infectious diseases. There are four pathogenic mechanisms leading to chronic diarrhea: osmotic diarrhea, secretory diarrhea, inflammatory diarrhea, and dysmotility. Overlaps between these mechanisms are possible. A 72-hour fecal collection as well as the fasting test are important diagnostic tools to identify the underlying pathomechanism. The identification of the pathomechanism narrows down the possible etiologies of chronic diarrhea and allows therefore a cost-saving diagnostic workup. The endoscopy is well established in the workup of chronic diarrhea. This article gives an overview about the main causes and mechanisms leading to chronic diarrhea and proposes an algorithm for the diagnostic evalution.

  4. Etiological diagnosis of pericardial effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Pierre-Yves; Habib, Gilbert; Collart, Fréderic; Lepidi, Hubert; Raoult, Didier

    2006-08-01

    Detection and treatment of pericarditis remains a challenging problem and the etiology is unknown in 40-85% of cases. As a result, a large proportion of cases are labeled idiopathic pericarditis. The advent of echocardiography, an accurate noninvasive method for the detection of effusion, has clarified the definition from pericarditis to pericardial effusion, which is a standardized and clear entity. A systematic approach to diagnostic testing based on standardized practice guidelines has been proposed. This strategy has led to a decrease in the number of cases classified as idiopathic and to the identification of treatable conditions. Percutaneous pericardiocentesis, guided by fluoroscopy or echocardiography, can now be carried out safely and rapidly and has also allowed the intrapericardial instillation of drugs, representing a new treatment strategy. The inclusion of flexible pericardioscopy, immunohistochemistry and contemporary molecular biology tools has improved the diagnostic value of the biopsy.

  5. Shared activity patterns arising at genetic susceptibility loci reveal underlying genomic and cellular architecture of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, J Kenneth; Bretherick, Andrew; Haley, Christopher S; Clohisey, Sara; Gray, Alan; Neyton, Lucile P A; Barrett, Jeffrey; Stahl, Eli A; Tenesa, Albert; Andersson, Robin; Brown, J Ben; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Lizio, Marina; Schaefer, Ulf; Daub, Carsten; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kondo, Naoto; Lassmann, Timo; Kawai, Jun; Mole, Damian; Bajic, Vladimir B; Heutink, Peter; Rehli, Michael; Kawaji, Hideya; Sandelin, Albin; Suzuki, Harukazu; Satsangi, Jack; Wells, Christine A; Hacohen, Nir; Freeman, Thomas C; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Hume, David A

    2018-03-01

    Genetic variants underlying complex traits, including disease susceptibility, are enriched within the transcriptional regulatory elements, promoters and enhancers. There is emerging evidence that regulatory elements associated with particular traits or diseases share similar patterns of transcriptional activity. Accordingly, shared transcriptional activity (coexpression) may help prioritise loci associated with a given trait, and help to identify underlying biological processes. Using cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) profiles of promoter- and enhancer-derived RNAs across 1824 human samples, we have analysed coexpression of RNAs originating from trait-associated regulatory regions using a novel quantitative method (network density analysis; NDA). For most traits studied, phenotype-associated variants in regulatory regions were linked to tightly-coexpressed networks that are likely to share important functional characteristics. Coexpression provides a new signal, independent of phenotype association, to enable fine mapping of causative variants. The NDA coexpression approach identifies new genetic variants associated with specific traits, including an association between the regulation of the OCT1 cation transporter and genetic variants underlying circulating cholesterol levels. NDA strongly implicates particular cell types and tissues in disease pathogenesis. For example, distinct groupings of disease-associated regulatory regions implicate two distinct biological processes in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis; a further two separate processes are implicated in Crohn's disease. Thus, our functional analysis of genetic predisposition to disease defines new distinct disease endotypes. We predict that patients with a preponderance of susceptibility variants in each group are likely to respond differently to pharmacological therapy. Together, these findings enable a deeper biological understanding of the causal basis of complex traits.

  6. Ichthyosis: etiology, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanna, John J; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie

    2003-01-01

    The ichthyoses are a heterogeneous group of disorders with both inherited and acquired forms. Clinical presentation, pattern of inheritance, and laboratory evaluation may establish a precise diagnosis, which can assist in prognosis and genetic counseling. Congenital autosomal recessive ichthyosis (CARI) usually presents at birth, often as a collodion baby. CARI can progress into any one of a spectrum of disorders. Lamellar ichthyosis is characterized by dark, plate (armor)-like scale. This disease is often caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme transglutaminase 1. Congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma is another phenotype within CARI, marked by generalized redness and fine white scale. Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hyperkeratosis and blistering, and at least six clinical phenotypes have been described. It may be due to mutations in the gene encoding the intermediate filament proteins keratin 1 and 10. Ichthyosis vulgaris is the most common ichthyosis, and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. Involvement is generally mild and may vary greatly with climate and humidity. X-linked ichthyosis, due to a defect in the enzyme steroid sulfatase, affects males with generalized scaling that usually begins soon after birth. There may be associated corneal opacities that do not affect vision. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is an autosomal recessive ichthyosis associated with progressive spastic paralysis and mental retardation. This condition is caused by mutations in the gene for fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase. Refsum's disease, due to accumulation of phytanic acid, results in ichthyosis and progressive neurologic dysfunction. The erythrokeratodermas are characterized by hyperkeratosis and localized erythema. Erythrokeratodermia variabilis is autosomal dominant and characterized by generalized or localized hyperkeratosis and migratory red patches. Mutations in the genes encoding the gap junction proteins

  7. Large-Scale Association Study Confirms Genetic Complexity Underlying Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso, Inês; Luan, Jian'an; Middelberg, Rita P. S; Harding, Anne-Helen; Franks, Paul W; Jakes, Rupert W; Clayton, David; Schafer, Alan J; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is an increasingly common, serious metabolic disorder with a substantial inherited component. It is characterised by defects in both insulin secretion and action. Progress in identification of specific genetic variants predisposing to the disease has been limited. To complement ongoing positional cloning efforts, we have undertaken a large-scale candidate gene association study. We examined 152 SNPs in 71 candidate genes for association with diabetes status and related phenoty...

  8. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Etiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Bellato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome is mainly characterized by pain, fatigue, and sleep disruption. The etiology of fibromyalgia is still unclear: if central sensitization is considered to be the main mechanism involved, then many other factors, genetic, immunological, and hormonal, may play an important role. The diagnosis is typically clinical (there are no laboratory abnormalities and the physician must concentrate on pain and on its features. Additional symptoms (e.g., Raynaud’s phenomenon, irritable bowel disease, and heat and cold intolerance can be associated with this condition. A careful differential diagnosis is mandatory: fibromyalgia is not a diagnosis of exclusion. Since 1990, diagnosis has been principally based on the two major diagnostic criteria defined by the ACR. Recently, new criteria have been proposed. The main goals of the treatment are to alleviate pain, increase restorative sleep, and improve physical function. A multidisciplinary approach is optimal. While most nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids have limited benefit, an important role is played by antidepressants and neuromodulating antiepileptics: currently duloxetine (NNT for a 30% pain reduction 7.2, milnacipran (NNT 19, and pregabalin (NNT 8.6 are the only drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. In addition, nonpharmacological treatments should be associated with drug therapy.

  9. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Etiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellato, Enrico; Marini, Eleonora; Castoldi, Filippo; Barbasetti, Nicola; Mattei, Lorenzo; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Blonna, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is mainly characterized by pain, fatigue, and sleep disruption. The etiology of fibromyalgia is still unclear: if central sensitization is considered to be the main mechanism involved, then many other factors, genetic, immunological, and hormonal, may play an important role. The diagnosis is typically clinical (there are no laboratory abnormalities) and the physician must concentrate on pain and on its features. Additional symptoms (e.g., Raynaud's phenomenon, irritable bowel disease, and heat and cold intolerance) can be associated with this condition. A careful differential diagnosis is mandatory: fibromyalgia is not a diagnosis of exclusion. Since 1990, diagnosis has been principally based on the two major diagnostic criteria defined by the ACR. Recently, new criteria have been proposed. The main goals of the treatment are to alleviate pain, increase restorative sleep, and improve physical function. A multidisciplinary approach is optimal. While most nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids have limited benefit, an important role is played by antidepressants and neuromodulating antiepileptics: currently duloxetine (NNT for a 30% pain reduction 7.2), milnacipran (NNT 19), and pregabalin (NNT 8.6) are the only drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. In addition, nonpharmacological treatments should be associated with drug therapy. PMID:23213512

  10. ETIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS AND MORPHOLOGY OF BILIARY ATRESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Iryshkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biliary atresia is an inflammatory fibrosing process, which invades both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts. There are two forms of biliary atresia: embryonic form, associated with another visceral malformations, and perinatal form, which is an isolated disease. Biliary atresia is a heterogeinc disease which may appear as a result of different etiological factors, the most important of them are genetics, viral infection, vascular factors, toxins and disregulation of immune system. The characteristic morphological features of biliaryatresia are: intracellular and ductular cholestasis, ductular proliferation, giant cell transformation, portal and perilobular oedema and/or fibrosis. As the patalogical process progresses, ductopenia appears, and fibrosis turns to cirrhosis. Embryonic form mophologically manifests with ductal plate malformation is, what is an important diagnostic criterion. Pro- gnosis of biliary atresia depends on form of disease, age of patient and type of surgical operation. Today surgical treatment includes two steps: palliative portoenterostomia, performed in neonatal period and further liver trans- plantation. However liver transplantation is more preferable as first and single-step treatment. 

  11. Interplay of host genetics and gut microbiota underlying the onset and clinical presentation of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhann, Floris; Vich Vila, Arnau; Bonder, Marc Jan; Fu, Jingyuan; Gevers, Dirk; Visschedijk, Marijn C; Spekhorst, Lieke M; Alberts, Rudi; Franke, Lude; van Dullemen, Hendrik M; Ter Steege, Rinze W F; Huttenhower, Curtis; Dijkstra, Gerard; Xavier, Ramnik J; Festen, Eleonora A M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Weersma, Rinse K

    2018-01-01

    Patients with IBD display substantial heterogeneity in clinical characteristics. We hypothesise that individual differences in the complex interaction of the host genome and the gut microbiota can explain the onset and the heterogeneous presentation of IBD. Therefore, we performed a case-control analysis of the gut microbiota, the host genome and the clinical phenotypes of IBD. Stool samples, peripheral blood and extensive phenotype data were collected from 313 patients with IBD and 582 truly healthy controls, selected from a population cohort. The gut microbiota composition was assessed by tag-sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. All participants were genotyped. We composed genetic risk scores from 11 functional genetic variants proven to be associated with IBD in genes that are directly involved in the bacterial handling in the gut: NOD2 , CARD9 , ATG16L1 , IRGM and FUT2 . Strikingly, we observed significant alterations of the gut microbiota of healthy individuals with a high genetic risk for IBD: the IBD genetic risk score was significantly associated with a decrease in the genus Roseburia in healthy controls (false discovery rate 0.017). Moreover, disease location was a major determinant of the gut microbiota: the gut microbiota of patients with colonic Crohn's disease (CD) is different from that of patients with ileal CD, with a decrease in alpha diversity associated to ileal disease (p=3.28×10 -13 ). We show for the first time that genetic risk variants associated with IBD influence the gut microbiota in healthy individuals. Roseburia spp are acetate-to-butyrate converters, and a decrease has already been observed in patients with IBD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Genetic Analysis for Some of Morphological Traits in Bread Wheat under Drought Stress Condition Using Generations Mean Analysis

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    Jamileh Abedi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Perception of genes action controlling of quantitative traits is very important in genetic breeding methods the plant populations. to study and estimate the parameters of genetic and appointment the best genetically model for justification the genetic changing some of traits the bread wheat under drought stress condition, parents (P1 & P2 and F3, F4, F5 generations together the four control cultivars (Kharchia, Gaspard, Moghan and Mahuti were evaluated by generation mean analysis using a agoment design including six blocks. Generation mean analysis was performed for all traits with Mather and Jinks model using joint scaling test. Three parameter model [m d h] provided the best fit for all traits expect harvest index, main spike grain weight, number of grain per plant, Total spike weight of plant with significant at 5% and 1% levels . Though additive and dominance effect both had interfered in controlling often the traits but with attention to difference effects and variety component was determined that dominance is more impressive than additive effect for traits of number of tiller, main spike weight, grain yield and grain number of main spike. Therefore will benefit using of these traits in the collection and to improve these traits hybridization would be much efficient than the selection strategies. In this study additive Ч additive epistasis effect only observed for traits of Total spike weight of plant, number of grain per plant, main spike grain weight and harvest index and other traits hadn’t any epistasis effect that it was demonstration lack of existence the genes reciprocal effect in the inheritance studied traits. Therefore we can suggest that the selection strategies perform in terminal generations and additive Ч additive epistasis effect would be confirmed in selection under self-pollination condition.

  13. The complex etiology of schizophrenia - general state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosák, Ladislav; Hosakova, Jirina

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of schizophrenia is complex. The aim of this article is to present a global view of the causes of schizophrenia and their interconnectivity. Recent genetic research into schizophrenia is based on genome-wide association studies, the assessment of DNA copy number variations, and the concept of endophenotypes. A lot of suspected genes have already been identified, mostly relating to neurodevelopment, neuroplasticity, immunology and neuroendocrinology. Gene-environment interactions (G×E) reflect genetic variation in susceptibility to the environment. Psychosocial stress and cannabis abuse seem to be the most important environmental factors in schizophrenia etiology. Epigenetic mechanisms, particularly DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNAs are the most important linking factor among the genetic and prenatal environmental variables in the etiology of schizophrenia. Postnatal risk factors (e.g., stress, urbanicity, cannabis use) may also affect the risk of schizophrenia via the potentiation of vulnerable brain pathways. Many questionable issues pertaining to G×E assessment of schizophrenia still persist and relate to the exact assessment of environmental agents as well as psychopathology. In future research concerning G×E in schizophrenia, the study samples should be adequately large, schizophrenia endophenotypes should be involved, prospective studies should be supported, environmental causative factors as well as psychopathology should be assessed in a quantitative way, the multiple interactions among the variety of environmental and genetic variables should be evaluated, and epigenetic factors should not be neglected. The EU-GEI project of the European Network of National Schizophrenia Networks Studying Gene-Environment Interactions (2010-2015) may become a milestone in the schizophrenia G×E research.

  14. Etiologic structure of bacterial intestinal infections in monkeys of Adler breeding center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardasheliya, S N; Kalashnikova, V A; Dzhikidze, E K

    2011-10-01

    We studied etiologic structure of bacterial intestinal infections in monkeys of Adler nursery. A total of 533 monkeys with diarrhea syndrome and monkeys dead from intestinal infections, as well as clinically healthy monkeys and animals dead from other pathologies were examined by bacteriological and molecular-genetic methods. Pathogenic enterobacteria Shigella and Salmonella and microaerophile Campylobacter were found in 5 and 19%, respectively. A high percentage (49%) of intestinal diseases of unknown etiology was revealed in monkeys. The fact that the number of detected opportunistic enterobacteria did not differ in healthy and diseased monkeys suggests that they are not involved into the etiology of intestinal disease.

  15. Controversies about a common etiology for eating and mood disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara eRossetti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and depression represent a growing health concern worldwide. For many years, basic science and medicine have considered obesity as a metabolic illness, while depression was classified a psychiatric disorder. Despite accumulating evidence suggesting that obesity and depression may share commonalities though, the causal link between eating and mood disorders remains to be fully understood. This etiology is highly complex, consisting of multiple environmental and genetic risk factors that interact with each other. In this review, we sought to summarize the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting a common etiology for eating and mood disorders, with a particular emphasis on signaling pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance and mood stability, among which orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides, metabolic factors, stress responsive hormones, cytokines and neurotrophic factors.

  16. Controversies about a common etiology for eating and mood disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Clara; Halfon, Olivier; Boutrel, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and depression represent a growing health concern worldwide. For many years, basic science and medicine have considered obesity as a metabolic illness, while depression was classified a psychiatric disorder. Despite accumulating evidence suggesting that obesity and depression may share commonalities, the causal link between eating and mood disorders remains to be fully understood. This etiology is highly complex, consisting of multiple environmental and genetic risk factors that interact with each other. In this review, we sought to summarize the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting a common etiology for eating and mood disorders, with a particular emphasis on signaling pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance and mood stability, among which orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides, metabolic factors, stress responsive hormones, cytokines, and neurotrophic factors. PMID:25386150

  17. Toward an Etiologic Classification of Pediatric Social Illness: A Descriptive Epidemiology of Child Abuse and Neglect, Failure to Thrive, Accidents and Poisonings in Children Under Four Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberger, Eli H.; And Others

    This study examined the underlying common origins of pediatric social illnesses (i.e., child abuse and neglect, failure to thrive, accidents, and poisonings) in children under age 4. Subjects were 560 children admitted to the Children's Hospital Medical Center in Boston. Children admitted with pediatric social diagnoses were matched on the basis…

  18. Genetic variation underlying renal uric acid excretion in Hispanic children: the Viva La Familia Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittoor, Geetha; Haack, Karin; Mehta, Nitesh R; Laston, Sandra; Cole, Shelley A; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Butte, Nancy F; Voruganti, V Saroja

    2017-01-17

    Reduced renal excretion of uric acid plays a significant role in the development of hyperuricemia and gout in adults. Hyperuricemia has been associated with chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in children and adults. There are limited genome-wide association studies associating genetic polymorphisms with renal urate excretion measures. Therefore, we investigated the genetic factors that influence the excretion of uric acid and related indices in 768 Hispanic children of the Viva La Familia Study. We performed a genome-wide association analysis for 24-h urinary excretion measures such as urinary uric acid/urinary creatinine ratio, uric acid clearance, fractional excretion of uric acid, and glomerular load of uric acid in SOLAR, while accounting for non-independence among family members. All renal urate excretion measures were significantly heritable (p uric acid clearance with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in zinc finger protein 446 (ZNF446) (rs2033711 (A/G), MAF: 0.30). The minor allele (G) was associated with increased uric acid clearance. Also, we found suggestive associations of uric acid clearance with SNPs in ZNF324, ZNF584, and ZNF132 (in a 72 kb region of 19q13; p <1 × 10 -6 , MAFs: 0.28-0.31). For the first time, we showed the importance of 19q13 region in the regulation of renal urate excretion in Hispanic children. Our findings indicate differences in inherent genetic architecture and shared environmental risk factors between our cohort and other pediatric and adult populations.

  19. Exploring the genetics and non-cell autonomous mechanisms underlying ALS/FTLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongbo; Kankel, Mark W; Su, Susan C; Han, Steve W S; Ofengeim, Dimitry

    2018-03-01

    Although amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, was first described in 1874, a flurry of genetic discoveries in the last 10 years has markedly increased our understanding of this disease. These findings have not only enhanced our knowledge of mechanisms leading to ALS, but also have revealed that ALS shares many genetic causes with another neurodegenerative disease, frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD). In this review, we survey how recent genetic studies have bridged our mechanistic understanding of these two related diseases and how the genetics behind ALS and FTLD point to complex disorders, implicating non-neuronal cell types in disease pathophysiology. The involvement of non-neuronal cell types is consistent with a non-cell autonomous component in these diseases. This is further supported by studies that identified a critical role of immune-associated genes within ALS/FTLD and other neurodegenerative disorders. The molecular functions of these genes support an emerging concept that various non-autonomous functions are involved in neurodegeneration. Further insights into such a mechanism(s) will ultimately lead to a better understanding of potential routes of therapeutic intervention. Facts ALS and FTLD are severe neurodegenerative disorders on the same disease spectrum. Multiple cellular processes including dysregulation of RNA homeostasis, imbalance of proteostasis, contribute to ALS/FTLD pathogenesis. Aberrant function in non-neuronal cell types, including microglia, contributes to ALS/FTLD. Strong neuroimmune and neuroinflammatory components are associated with ALS/FTLD patients. Open Questions Why can patients with similar mutations have different disease manifestations, i.e., why do C9ORF72 mutations lead to motor neuron loss in some patients while others exhibit loss of neurons in the frontotemporal lobe? Do ALS causal mutations result in microglial dysfunction and contribute to ALS/FTLD pathology? How do microglia

  20. Angioedema: Clinical and Etiological Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanokvalai Kulthanan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioedema is an abrupt swelling of the skin, mucous membrane, or both including respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. This study aimed to report an experience of angioedema in a university hospital with respect to etiologies, clinical features, treatment, and outcome. One hundred and five patients were enrolled. About half had angioedema without urticaria. The common sites of involvement were periorbital area and lips. Forty five patients (49% had systemic symptoms. The most common cause of angioedema was allergic angioedema. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced angioedema and idiopathic angioedema were detected in 20% and 18%, respectively. Among patients with allergic angioedema, 41.7% were caused by food, 39.6% by drugs. Thirty seven patients (39% had recurrent attacks of angioedema. Mean standard deviation (SD number of attacks in patients with recurrent angioedema was 3.9 (2.7 (ranging from 2 to 10 times. Patients who had older age and multiple sites of skin involvement had tendency to have systemic symptoms.

  1. [Etiology of mental retardation in children: experience in two third level centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarcas, Lissete; Espinosa, Eugenia; Velasco, Harvy

    2013-01-01

    One to three per cent of the world population has mental retardation. This is a frequently consulted and diagnosed disorder in neuropediatric services. Causes are heterogeneous and only a proportion of these patients achieve an accurate etiologic diagnosis. To determine the etiology of patients with mental retardation who go to the neuropediatric services in two third level hospitals. We included pediatric patients diagnosed with mental retardation, and used the diagnostic algorithm proposed by the committee of medical genetics and the Academy of Pediatrics for the evaluation of these patients. The data were entered into an Excel database and subsequently analyzed in SPSS 1.5. The etiology of cognitive impairment was classified into five categories. We included 239 patients: 60.3% were male; according to the severity, 39% of the patients had mild mental retardation, 37.7% had moderate mental retardation, 13.4% had severe mental retardation, and 9.6% had profound mental retardation. In the clinical findings, we found the presence of minor anomalies in 70.3% of patients; these findings in more than two patients suggested a genetic etiology. Definitive etiology of mental retardation was determined in 64.4% of the patients. Environmental causes accounted for 36.4% of this disability in which perinatal hypoxia is the most frequent cause. Genetic causes accounted for 23.8% of the etiology. Finally, 23.8% continued to have no specific diagnosis. Perinatal hypoxia is the most common cause of cognitive impairment in our population. Early treatment of comorbidities of premature infants can impact the bottom line by decreasing motor and cognitive impairment in these patients. Patients with genetic etiology are the second cause. The proportion of undiagnosed patients could decrease if patient access to genetic studies were better and if these studies were covered by the social security regime in our country, regardless of affiliation.

  2. On the Etiology of Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Kup, Elaine

    Molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a condition that is defined based on its peculiar clinical presentation. Reports on the etiology of the condition and possible risk factors are inconclusive and the original suggestion that MIH is an idiopathic condition is often cited. Our group was the first to suggest MIH has a genetic component that involves genetic variation in genes expressed during dental enamel formation. In this report, we provide a rationale to explain the preferential affection of molars and incisors. We suggest that MIH is a genetic condition based on its prevalence, which varies depending on the geographic location, and the evidence that on occasion second primary molars, permanent canines, and premolars can show signs of hypomineralization of enamel when molars and incisors are affected. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Distinct genetic architecture underlies the emergence of sleep loss and prey-seeking behavior in the Mexican cavefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Masato; Robinson, Beatriz G; Duboué, Erik R; Masek, Pavel; Jaggard, James B; O'Quin, Kelly E; Borowsky, Richard L; Jeffery, William R; Keene, Alex C

    2015-02-20

    Sleep is characterized by extended periods of quiescence and reduced responsiveness to sensory stimuli. Animals ranging from insects to mammals adapt to environments with limited food by suppressing sleep and enhancing their response to food cues, yet little is known about the genetic and evolutionary relationship between these processes. The blind Mexican cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus is a powerful model for elucidating the genetic mechanisms underlying behavioral evolution. A. mexicanus comprises an extant ancestral-type surface dwelling morph and at least five independently evolved cave populations. Evolutionary convergence on sleep loss and vibration attraction behavior, which is involved in prey seeking, have been documented in cavefish raising the possibility that enhanced sensory responsiveness underlies changes in sleep. We established a system to study sleep and vibration attraction behavior in adult A. mexicanus and used high coverage quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping to investigate the functional and evolutionary relationship between these traits. Analysis of surface-cave F2 hybrid fish and an outbred cave population indicates that independent genetic factors underlie changes in sleep/locomotor activity and vibration attraction behavior. High-coverage QTL mapping with genotyping-by-sequencing technology identify two novel QTL intervals that associate with locomotor activity and include the narcolepsy-associated tp53 regulating kinase. These QTLs represent the first genomic localization of locomotor activity in cavefish and are distinct from two QTLs previously identified as associating with vibration attraction behavior. Taken together, these results localize genomic regions underlying sleep/locomotor and sensory changes in cavefish populations and provide evidence that sleep loss evolved independently from enhanced sensory responsiveness.

  4. DGAT1 underlies large genetic variation in milk-fat composition of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schennink, A; Stoop, W M; Visker, M H P W; Heck, J M L; Bovenhuis, H; van der Poel, J J; van Valenberg, H J F; van Arendonk, J A M

    2007-10-01

    Dietary fat may play a role in the aetiology of many chronic diseases. Milk and milk-derived foods contribute substantially to dietary fat, but have a fat composition that is not optimal for human health. We measured the fat composition of milk samples in 1918 Dutch Holstein Friesian cows in their first lactation and estimated genetic parameters for fatty acids. Substantial genetic variation in milk-fat composition was found: heritabilities were high for short- and medium-chain fatty acids (C4:0-C16:0) and moderate for long-chain fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated C18). We genotyped 1762 cows for the DGAT1 K232A polymorphism, which is known to affect milk-fat percentage, to study the effect of the polymorphism on milk-fat composition. We found that the DGAT1 K232A polymorphism has a clear influence on milk-fat composition. The DGAT1 allele that encodes lysine (K) at position 232 (232K) is associated with more saturated fat; a larger fraction of C16:0; and smaller fractions of C14:0, unsaturated C18 and conjugated linoleic acid (P < 0.001). We conclude that selective breeding can make a significant contribution to change the fat composition of cow's milk.

  5. BAYESIAN PREDICTION OF GENETIC PARAMETERS IN Eucalyptus globulus CLONES UNDER WATER SUPPLY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy Mora

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/198050989297A Bayesian analysis of genetic parameters for growth traits at twelve months after planting was carried out in twenty nine Eucalyptus globulus clones in southern Chile. Two different environmental conditions were considered: 1 Non-irrigation and; 2 Plants were irrigated with a localized irrigation system. The Bayesian approach was performed using Gibbs sampling algorithm in a clone-environment interaction model. Inheritability values ​​were high in the water supply condition (posterior mode: H2=0.41, 0.36 and 0.39 for height, diameter and sectional area, respectively, while in the environment without irrigation, the inheritabilities were significantly lower, which was confirmed by the Bayesian credible intervals (95% probability. The posterior mode of the genetic correlation between sites was positive and high for all traits (r=0.7, 0.65 and 0.8, for height, diameter and sectional area, respectively and according to the credible interval, it was statistically different from zero, indicating a non-significant interaction.

  6. Assessment of Genetics Understanding. Under What Conditions Do Situational Features Have an Impact on Measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiemann, Philipp; Nehm, Ross H.; Tornabene, Robyn E.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding how situational features of assessment tasks impact reasoning is important for many educational pursuits, notably the selection of curricular examples to illustrate phenomena, the design of formative and summative assessment items, and determination of whether instruction has fostered the development of abstract schemas divorced from particular instances. The goal of our study was to employ an experimental research design to quantify the degree to which situational features impact inferences about participants' understanding of Mendelian genetics. Two participant samples from different educational levels and cultural backgrounds (high school, n = 480; university, n = 444; Germany and USA) were used to test for context effects. A multi-matrix test design was employed, and item packets differing in situational features (e.g., plant, animal, human, fictitious) were randomly distributed to participants in the two samples. Rasch analyses of participant scores from both samples produced good item fit, person reliability, and item reliability and indicated that the university sample displayed stronger performance on the items compared to the high school sample. We found, surprisingly, that in both samples, no significant differences in performance occurred among the animal, plant, and human item contexts, or between the fictitious and "real" item contexts. In the university sample, we were also able to test for differences in performance between genders, among ethnic groups, and by prior biology coursework. None of these factors had a meaningful impact upon performance or context effects. Thus some, but not all, types of genetics problem solving or item formats are impacted by situational features.

  7. Epidemiology and etiology of wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, churg-strauss syndrome and goodpasture syndrome: vasculitides with frequent lung involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibelin, Aude; Maldini, Carla; Mahr, Alfred

    2011-06-01

    This review focuses on the epidemiological characteristics and etiologies of four primary systemic vasculitides with frequent lung involvement, namely Wegener granulomatosis (WG), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS), and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS). Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these vasculitides with frequent lung involvement is complicated by their rarity, which hampers the undertaking of large-scale studies; difficulties in classification; and their multifaceted clinical presentations, which infer the existence of several etiologic pathways. Notwithstanding, epidemiological research showed some evidence for international, interethnic, and temporal variations of the frequencies of these four vasculitides; led to the identification of several genetic and environmental risk factors; and provided insight on the extent to which genes and environment might contribute to their development. Available data support the concept that WG, MPA, CSS, and GPS have unique and shared risk determinants. Although the precise causes of these vasculitides are not yet fully understood and the development of prevention strategies is out of our reach at present, current knowledge enables the formulation of etiologic hypotheses to provide caregivers and their patients with valuable information on the nature of these rare entities. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  8. Pediatric Obesity: Etiology and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Crocker, Melissa K.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews factors that contribute to excessive weight gain in children and outlines current knowledge regarding approaches for treating pediatric obesity. Virtually all of the known genetic causes of obesity primarily increase energy intake. Genes regulating the leptin signaling pathway are particularly important for human energy homeostasis. Obesity is a chronic disorder that requires long-term strategies for management. The foundation for all treatments for pediatric obesity remain...

  9. Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Symbiotic Specificity in Legume-Rhizobium Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Legumes are able to form a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria called rhizobia. The result of this symbiosis is to form nodules on the plant root, within which the bacteria can convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia that can be used by the plant. Establishment of a successful symbiosis requires the two symbiotic partners to be compatible with each other throughout the process of symbiotic development. However, incompatibility frequently occurs, such that a bacterial strain is unable to nodulate a particular host plant or forms nodules that are incapable of fixing nitrogen. Genetic and molecular mechanisms that regulate symbiotic specificity are diverse, involving a wide range of host and bacterial genes/signals with various modes of action. In this review, we will provide an update on our current knowledge of how the recognition specificity has evolved in the context of symbiosis signaling and plant immunity.

  10. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying arsenic-associated diabetes mellitus: a perspective of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth M; Stýblo, Miroslav; Fry, Rebecca C

    2017-05-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been associated with the development of diabetes mellitus (DM), a disease characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from dysregulation of glucose homeostasis. This review summarizes four major mechanisms by which arsenic induces diabetes, namely inhibition of insulin-dependent glucose uptake, pancreatic β-cell damage, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and stimulation of liver gluconeogenesis that are supported by both in vivo and in vitro studies. Additionally, the role of polymorphic variants associated with arsenic toxicity and disease susceptibility, as well as epigenetic modifications associated with arsenic exposure, are considered in the context of arsenic-associated DM. Taken together, in vitro, in vivo and human genetic/epigenetic studies support that arsenic has the potential to induce DM phenotypes and impair key pathways involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  11. Genetic subdivision and candidate genes under selection in North American grey wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Rena M; vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Harrigan, Ryan; Knowles, James C; Musiani, Marco; Coltman, David; Novembre, John; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    Previous genetic studies of the highly mobile grey wolf (Canis lupus) found population structure that coincides with habitat and phenotype differences. We hypothesized that these ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes) should exhibit signatures of selection in genes related to morphology, coat colour and metabolism. To test these predictions, we quantified population structure related to habitat using a genotyping array to assess variation in 42 036 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 111 North American grey wolves. Using these SNP data and individual-level measurements of 12 environmental variables, we identified six ecotypes: West Forest, Boreal Forest, Arctic, High Arctic, British Columbia and Atlantic Forest. Next, we explored signals of selection across these wolf ecotypes through the use of three complementary methods to detect selection: FST /haplotype homozygosity bivariate percentilae, bayescan, and environmentally correlated directional selection with bayenv. Across all methods, we found consistent signals of selection on genes related to morphology, coat coloration, metabolism, as predicted, as well as vision and hearing. In several high-ranking candidate genes, including LEPR, TYR and SLC14A2, we found variation in allele frequencies that follow environmental changes in temperature and precipitation, a result that is consistent with local adaptation rather than genetic drift. Our findings show that local adaptation can occur despite gene flow in a highly mobile species and can be detected through a moderately dense genomic scan. These patterns of local adaptation revealed by SNP genotyping likely reflect high fidelity to natal habitats of dispersing wolves, strong ecological divergence among habitats, and moderate levels of linkage in the wolf genome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Exome sequencing in Jewish and Arab patients with rhabdomyolysis reveals single-gene etiology in 43% of cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivante, Asaf; Ityel, Hadas; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Chen, Jing; Shril, Shirlee; van der Ven, Amelie T; Mann, Nina; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Segel, Reeval; Aran, Adi; Zeharia, Avraham; Staretz-Chacham, Orna; Bar-Yosef, Omer; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Landau, Yuval E; Lifton, Richard P; Anikster, Yair; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2017-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical emergency that may cause acute kidney injury (AKI). It can be acquired or due to monogenic mutations. Around 60 different rare monogenic forms of rhabdomyolysis have been reported to date. In the clinical setting, identifying the underlying molecular diagnosis is challenging due to nonspecific presentation, the high number of causative genes, and current lack of data on the prevalence of monogenic forms. We employed whole exome sequencing (WES) to reveal the percentage of rhabdomyolysis cases explained by single-gene (monogenic) mutations in one of 58 candidate genes. We investigated a cohort of 21 unrelated families with rhabdomyolysis, in whom no underlying etiology had been previously established. Using WES, we identified causative mutations in candidate genes in nine of the 21 families (43%). We detected disease-causing mutations in eight of 58 candidate genes, grouped into the following categories: (1) disorders of fatty acid metabolism (CPT2), (2) disorders of glycogen metabolism (PFKM and PGAM2), (3) disorders of abnormal skeletal muscle relaxation and contraction (CACNA1S, MYH3, RYR1 and SCN4A), and (4) disorders of purine metabolism (AHCY). Our findings demonstrate a very high detection rate for monogenic etiologies using WES and reveal broad genetic heterogeneity for rhabdomyolysis. These results highlight the importance of molecular genetic diagnostics for establishing an etiologic diagnosis. Because these patients are at risk for recurrent episodes of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent risk for AKI, WES allows adequate prophylaxis and treatment for these patients and their family members and enables a personalized medicine approach.

  13. Romantic Relationship Satisfaction Moderates the Etiology of Adult Personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Susan C; Krueger, Robert F; Elkins, Irene J; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The heritability of major normative domains of personality is well-established, with approximately half the proportion of variance attributed to genetic differences. In the current study, we examine the possibility of gene × environment interaction (G×E) for adult personality using the environmental context of intimate romantic relationship functioning. Personality and relationship satisfaction are significantly correlated phenotypically, but to date no research has examined how the genetic and environmental components of variance for personality differ as a function of romantic relationship satisfaction. Given the importance of personality for myriad outcomes from work productivity to psychopathology, it is vital to identify variables present in adulthood that may affect the etiology of personality. In the current study, quantitative models of G×E were used to determine whether the genetic and environmental influences on personality differ as a function of relationship satisfaction. We drew from a sample of now-adult twins followed longitudinally from adolescence through age 29. All participants completed the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ) and an abbreviated version of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale. Biometric moderation was found for eight of the eleven MPQ scales examined: well-being, social potency, negative emotionality, alienation, aggression, constraint, traditionalism, and absorption. The pattern of findings differed, suggesting that the ways in which relationship quality moderates the etiology of personality may depend on the personality trait.

  14. Romantic Relationship Satisfaction Moderates the Etiology of Adult Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Susan C.; Krueger, Robert F.; Elkins, Irene; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The heritability of major normative domains of personality is well-established, with approximately half the proportion of variance attributed to genetic differences. In the current study, we examine the possibility of gene x environment interaction (GxE) for adult personality using the environmental context of intimate romantic relationship functioning. Personality and relationship satisfaction are significantly correlated phenotypically, but to date no research has examined how the genetic and environmental components of variance for personality differ as a function of romantic relationship satisfaction. Given the importance of personality for myriad outcomes from work productivity to psychopathology, it is vital to identify variables present in adulthood that may affect the etiology of personality. In the current study, quantitative models of GxE were used to determine whether the genetic and environmental influences on personality differ as a function of relationship satisfaction. We drew from a sample of now-adult twins followed longitudinally from adolescence through age 29. All participants completed the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ) and an abbreviated version of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS). Biometric moderation was found for eight of the eleven MPQ scales examined: Well-Being, Social Potency, Negative Emotionality, Alienation, Aggression, Constraint, Traditionalism, and Absorption. The pattern of findings differed, suggesting that the ways in which relationship quality moderates the etiology of personality may depend on the personality trait. PMID:26581694

  15. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  16. Genetic Architecture of Natural Variation Underlying Adult Foraging Behavior That Is Essential for Survival of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuh Chwen G; Yang, Qian; Chi, Wanhao; Turkson, Susie A; Du, Wei A; Kemkemer, Claus; Zeng, Zhao-Bang; Long, Manyuan; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2017-05-01

    Foraging behavior is critical for the fitness of individuals. However, the genetic basis of variation in foraging behavior and the evolutionary forces underlying such natural variation have rarely been investigated. We developed a systematic approach to assay the variation in survival rate in a foraging environment for adult flies derived from a wild Drosophila melanogaster population. Despite being such an essential trait, there is substantial variation of foraging behavior among D. melanogaster strains. Importantly, we provided the first evaluation of the potential caveats of using inbred Drosophila strains to perform genome-wide association studies on life-history traits, and concluded that inbreeding depression is unlikely a major contributor for the observed large variation in adult foraging behavior. We found that adult foraging behavior has a strong genetic component and, unlike larval foraging behavior, depends on multiple loci. Identified candidate genes are enriched in those with high expression in adult heads and, demonstrated by expression knock down assay, are involved in maintaining normal functions of the nervous system. Our study not only identified candidate genes for foraging behavior that is relevant to individual fitness, but also shed light on the initial stage underlying the evolution of the behavior. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  17. RAD-QTL Mapping Reveals Both Genome-Level Parallelism and Different Genetic Architecture Underlying the Evolution of Body Shape in Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Species Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, Martin; Rogers, Sean M; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie; Normandeau, Eric; Gagnaire, Pierre-Alexandre; Dalziel, Anne C; Chebib, Jobran; Bernatchez, Louis

    2015-05-21

    Parallel changes in body shape may evolve in response to similar environmental conditions, but whether such parallel phenotypic changes share a common genetic basis is still debated. The goal of this study was to assess whether parallel phenotypic changes could be explained by genetic parallelism, multiple genetic routes, or both. We first provide evidence for parallelism in fish shape by using geometric morphometrics among 300 fish representing five species pairs of Lake Whitefish. Using a genetic map comprising 3438 restriction site-associated DNA sequencing single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we then identified quantitative trait loci underlying body shape traits in a backcross family reared in the laboratory. A total of 138 body shape quantitative trait loci were identified in this cross, thus revealing a highly polygenic architecture of body shape in Lake Whitefish. Third, we tested for evidence of genetic parallelism among independent wild populations using both a single-locus method (outlier analysis) and a polygenic approach (analysis of covariation among markers). The single-locus approach provided limited evidence for genetic parallelism. However, the polygenic analysis revealed genetic parallelism for three of the five lakes, which differed from the two other lakes. These results provide evidence for both genetic parallelism and multiple genetic routes underlying parallel phenotypic evolution in fish shape among populations occupying similar ecological niches. Copyright © 2015 Laporte et al.

  18. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hieab H H; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Rentería, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivières, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Bis, Joshua C; Blanken, Laura M E; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Braber, Anouk Den; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Filippi, Irina; Ge, Tian; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Greven, Corina U; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hilal, Saima; Hofer, Edith; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liao, Jiemin; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mazoyer, Bernard; McKay, David R; McWhirter, Rebekah; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin; Muetzel, Ryan L; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pappa, Irene; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pudas, Sara; Pütz, Benno; Rajan, Kumar B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Thomson, Russell; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo G M; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Xu, Bing; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chen, Christopher; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Geus, Eco J C; De Jager, Philip L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita L; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Evans, Denis A; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald H H; Grabe, Hans J; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Pol, Hilleke E Hulshoff; Ikeda, Masashi; Ikram, M Kamran; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Longstreth, W T; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Katie L; McMahon, Francis J; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schofield, Peter R; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Srikanth, Velandai; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Tiemeier, Henning; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; Van der Lugt, Aad; Van der Wee, Nic J A; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Van T Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Veltman, Dick J; Vernooij, Meike W; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, H Ronald; Zonderman, Alan B; Deary, Ian J; DeCarli, Charles; Schmidt, Helena; Martin, Nicholas G; De Craen, Anton J M; Wright, Margaret J; Launer, Lenore J; Schumann, Gunter; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Barbara; Debette, Stéphanie; Medland, Sarah E; Ikram, M Arfan; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously

  19. Genetic control of protein, oil and fatty acids content under partial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the present study was to map quantitative trait locus (QTLs) associated with percentage of seed protein, oil and fatty acids content under different conditions in a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of sunflower. Three independent field experiments were conducted with well-, partial-irrigated and ...

  20. Prostate cancer - epidemiology, etiology, diagnostics, clinical symptoms, screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrus, D.

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer presents a real important medical and social problem at present. It is one of the most common malignancy in males. In global point of view it means permanent incidence increase of this disease. Despite improvement of prostate cancer diagnosis and complex treatment mortality does not decreased significantly. Knowledge of etiological factors are relatively limited. Important factors are: genetic disposition, age, life style, race, positive familial history, circulated androgens. Diagnostics is well known, based on routine clinical methods: digital rectal examination, measurement of PSA a transrectal ultrasound. Benefit of prostate cancer screening is until now unclear, controversial. (author)

  1. An assessment of yield gains under climate change due to genetic modification of pearl millet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Piara; Boote, K J; Kadiyala, M D M; Nedumaran, S; Gupta, S K; Srinivas, K; Bantilan, M C S

    2017-12-01

    Developing cultivars with traits that can enhance and sustain productivity under climate change will be an important climate smart adaptation option. The modified CSM-CERES-Pearl millet model was used to assess yield gains by modifying plant traits determining crop maturity duration, potential yield and tolerance to drought and heat in pearl millet cultivars grown at six locations in arid (Hisar, Jodhpur, Bikaner) and semi-arid (Jaipur, Aurangabad and Bijapur) tropical India and two locations in semi-arid tropical West Africa (Sadore in Niamey and Cinzana in Mali). In all the study locations the yields decreased when crop maturity duration was decreased by 10% both in current and future climate conditions; however, 10% increase in crop maturity significantly (pclimate situations in India and West Africa. Drought tolerance imparted the lowest yield gain at Aurangabad (6%), the highest at Sadore (30%) and intermediate at the other locations under current climate. Under climate change the contribution of drought tolerance to the yield of cultivars either increased or decreased depending upon changes in rainfall of the locations. Yield benefits of heat tolerance substantially increased under climate change at most locations, having the greatest effects at Bikaner (17%) in India and Sadore (13%) in West Africa. Aurangabad and Bijapur locations had no yield advantage from heat tolerance due to their low temperature regimes. Thus drought and heat tolerance in pearl millet increased yields under climate change in both the arid and semi-arid tropical climates with greater benefit in relatively hotter environments. This study will assists the plant breeders in evaluating new promising plant traits of pearl millet for adapting to climate change at the selected locations and other similar environments. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Definition, etiology, classification and presentation forms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas Garriga, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is defined as a degenerative process affecting the joints as a result of mechanical and biological disorders that destabilize the balance between the synthesis and degradation of joint cartilage, stimulating the growth of subchondral bone; chronic synovitis is also present. Currently, the joint is considered as a functional unit that includes distinct tissues, mainly cartilage, the synovial membrane, and subchondral bone, all of which are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Distinct risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis have been described: general, unmodifiable risk factors (age, sex, and genetic makeup), general, modifiable risk factors (obesity and hormonal factors) and local risk factors (prior joint anomalies and joint overload). Notable among the main factors related to disease progression are joint alignment defects and generalized osteoarthritis. Several classifications of osteoarthritis have been proposed but none is particularly important for the primary care management of the disease. These classifications include etiological (primary or idiopathic forms and secondary forms) and topographical (typical and atypical localizations) classifications, the Kellgren and Lawrence classification (radiological repercussions) and that of the American College of Rheumatology for osteoarthritis of the hand, hip and knee. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis is 10.2% in Spain and shows a marked discrepancy between clinical and radiological findings. Hand osteoarthritis, with a prevalence of symptomatic involvement of around 6.2%, has several forms of presentation (nodal osteoarthritis, generalized osteoarthritis, rhizarthrosis, and erosive osteoarthritis). Symptomatic osteoarthritis of the hip affects between 3.5% and 5.6% of persons older than 50 years and has different radiological patterns depending on femoral head migration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Tuning to the significant: neural and genetic processes underlying affective enhancement of visual perception and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Jelena; Anderson, Adam K; Todd, Rebecca M

    2014-02-01

    Emotionally arousing events reach awareness more easily and evoke greater visual cortex activation than more mundane events. Recent studies have shown that they are also perceived more vividly and that emotionally enhanced perceptual vividness predicts memory vividness. We propose that affect-biased attention (ABA) - selective attention to emotionally salient events - is an endogenous attentional system tuned by an individual's history of reward and punishment. We present the Biased Attention via Norepinephrine (BANE) model, which unifies genetic, neuromodulatory, neural and behavioural evidence to account for ABA. We review evidence supporting BANE's proposal that a key mechanism of ABA is locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) activity, which interacts with activity in hubs of affective salience networks to modulate visual cortex activation and heighten the subjective vividness of emotionally salient stimuli. We further review literature on biased competition and look at initial evidence for its potential as a neural mechanism behind ABA. We also review evidence supporting the role of the LC-NE system as a driving force of ABA. Finally, we review individual differences in ABA and memory including differences in sensitivity to stimulus category and valence. We focus on differences arising from a variant of the ADRA2b gene, which codes for the alpha2b adrenoreceptor as a way of investigating influences of NE availability on ABA in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Climate change underlies global demographic, genetic, and cultural transitions in pre-Columbian southern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehren-Schmitz, Lars; Haak, Wolfgang; Mächtle, Bertil; Masch, Florian; Llamas, Bastien; Cagigao, Elsa Tomasto; Sossna, Volker; Schittek, Karsten; Isla Cuadrado, Johny; Eitel, Bernhard; Reindel, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Several archaeological studies in the Central Andes have pointed at the temporal coincidence of climatic fluctuations (both long- and short-term) and episodes of cultural transition and changes of socioeconomic structures throughout the pre-Columbian period. Although most scholars explain the connection between environmental and cultural changes by the impact of climatic alterations on the capacities of the ecosystems inhabited by pre-Columbian cultures, direct evidence for assumed demographic consequences is missing so far. In this study, we address directly the impact of climatic changes on the spatial population dynamics of the Central Andes. We use a large dataset of pre-Columbian mitochondrial DNA sequences from the northern Rio Grande de Nasca drainage (RGND) in southern Peru, dating from ∼840 BC to 1450 AD. Alternative demographic scenarios are tested using Bayesian serial coalescent simulations in an approximate Bayesian computational framework. Our results indicate migrations from the lower coastal valleys of southern Peru into the Andean highlands coincident with increasing climate variability at the end of the Nasca culture at ∼640 AD. We also find support for a back-migration from the highlands to the coast coincident with droughts in the southeastern Andean highlands and improvement of climatic conditions on the coast after the decline of the Wari and Tiwanaku empires (∼1200 AD), leading to a genetic homogenization in the RGND and probably southern Peru as a whole.

  5. An overview of posttraumatic stress disorder genetic studies by analyzing and integrating genetic data into genetic database PTSDgene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Kunlin; Qu, Susu; Chang, Suhua; Li, Gen; Cao, Chengqi; Fang, Kechi; Olff, Miranda; Wang, Li; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating psychiatric syndrome with complex etiology. Studies aiming to explore genetic susceptibility and environmental triggers of PTSD have been increasing. However, the results are limited and highly heterogeneous. To understand the genetic study

  6. Genome-wide characterization of genetic variants and putative regions under selection in meat and egg-type chicken lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschiero, Clarissa; Moreira, Gabriel Costa Monteiro; Gheyas, Almas Ara; Godoy, Thaís Fernanda; Gasparin, Gustavo; Mariani, Pilar Drummond Sampaio Corrêa; Paduan, Marcela; Cesar, Aline Silva Mello; Ledur, Mônica Corrêa; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann

    2018-01-25

    Meat and egg-type chickens have been selected for several generations for different traits. Artificial and natural selection for different phenotypes can change frequency of genetic variants, leaving particular genomic footprints throghtout the genome. Thus, the aims of this study were to sequence 28 chickens from two Brazilian lines (meat and white egg-type) and use this information to characterize genome-wide genetic variations, identify putative regions under selection using Fst method, and find putative pathways under selection. A total of 13.93 million SNPs and 1.36 million INDELs were identified, with more variants detected from the broiler (meat-type) line. Although most were located in non-coding regions, we identified 7255 intolerant non-synonymous SNPs, 512 stopgain/loss SNPs, 1381 frameshift and 1094 non-frameshift INDELs that may alter protein functions. Genes harboring intolerant non-synonymous SNPs affected metabolic pathways related mainly to reproduction and endocrine systems in the white-egg layer line, and lipid metabolism and metabolic diseases in the broiler line. Fst analysis in sliding windows, using SNPs and INDELs separately, identified over 300 putative regions of selection overlapping with more than 250 genes. For the first time in chicken, INDEL variants were considered for selection signature analysis, showing high level of correlation in results between SNP and INDEL data. The putative regions of selection signatures revealed interesting candidate genes and pathways related to important phenotypic traits in chicken, such as lipid metabolism, growth, reproduction, and cardiac development. In this study, Fst method was applied to identify high confidence putative regions under selection, providing novel insights into selection footprints that can help elucidate the functional mechanisms underlying different phenotypic traits relevant to meat and egg-type chicken lines. In addition, we generated a large catalog of line-specific and common

  7. Genetic parameters of rumination time and feed efficiency traits in primiparous Holstein cows under research and commercial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byskov, M V; Fogh, A; Løvendahl, P

    2017-12-01

    Feed efficiency has the potential to be improved both through feeding, management, and breeding. Including feed efficiency in a selection index is limited by the fact that dry matter intake (DMI) recording is only feasible under research facilities, resulting in small data sets and, consequently, uncertain genetic parameter estimates. As a result, the need to record DMI indicator traits on a larger scale exists. Rumination time (RT), which is already recorded in commercial dairy herds by a sensor-based system, has been suggested as a potential DMI indicator. However, RT can only be a DMI indicator if it is heritable, correlates with DMI, and if the genetic parameters of RT in commercial herd settings are similar to those in research facilities. Therefore, the objective of our study was to estimate genetic parameters for RT and the related traits of DMI in primiparous Holstein cows, and to compare genetic parameters of rumination data between a research herd and 72 commercial herds. The estimated heritability values were all moderate for DMI (0.32-0.49), residual feed intake (0.23-0.36), energy-corrected milk (ECM) yield (0.49-0.70), and RT (0.14-0.44) found in the research herd. The estimated heritability values for ECM were lower for the commercial herds (0.08-0.35) than that for the research herd. The estimated heritability values for RT were similar for the 2 herd types (0.28-0.32). For the research herd, we found negative individual level correlations between RT and DMI (-0.24 to -0.09) and between RT and RFI (-0.34 to -0.03), and we found both positive and negative correlations between RT and ECM (-0.08 to 0.09). For the commercial herds, genetic correlations between RT and ECM were both positive and negative (-0.27 to 0.10). In conclusion, RT was not found to be a suitable indicator trait for feed intake and only a weak indicator of feed efficiency. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Hieab HH; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Renter��a, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivi��res, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjus...

  9. Rapid Genetic Adaptation during the First Four Months of Survival under Resource Exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrani, Sarit; Bolotin, Evgeni; Katz, Sophia; Hershberg, Ruth

    2017-07-01

    Many bacteria, including the model bacterium Escherichia coli can survive for years within spent media, following resource exhaustion. We carried out evolutionary experiments, followed by whole genome sequencing of hundreds of evolved clones to study the dynamics by which E. coli adapts during the first 4 months of survival under resource exhaustion. Our results reveal that bacteria evolving under resource exhaustion are subject to intense selection, manifesting in rapid mutation accumulation, enrichment in functional mutation categories and extremely convergent adaptation. In the most striking example of convergent adaptation, we found that across five independent populations adaptation to conditions of resource exhaustion occurs through mutations to the three same specific positions of the RNA polymerase core enzyme. Mutations to these three sites are strongly antagonistically pleiotropic, in that they sharply reduce exponential growth rates in fresh media. Such antagonistically pleiotropic mutations, combined with the accumulation of additional mutations, severely reduce the ability of bacteria surviving under resource exhaustion to grow exponentially in fresh media. We further demonstrate that the three positions at which these resource exhaustion mutations occur are conserved for the ancestral E. coli allele, across bacterial phyla, with the exception of nonculturable bacteria that carry the resource exhaustion allele at one of these positions, at very high frequencies. Finally, our results demonstrate that adaptation to resource exhaustion is not limited by mutational input and that bacteria are able to rapidly adapt under resource exhaustion in a temporally precise manner through allele frequency fluctuations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. The genetics of keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Han-Ying Peggy; Chodosh, James

    2013-01-01

    Keratoconus is a bilateral, non-inflammatory corneal ectasia characterized by progressive conical thinning and protrusion of the cornea. Its etiology has long been believed to be multifactorial, with environmental, behavioral, and genetic factors all contributing to the disease process. This review focuses specifically on examining the evidence that supports a genetic basis for keratoconus.

  11. Role of genetics in adapting forests under climate change: lessons learned from common garden experiments in central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debojyoti; Schueler, Silvio

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive management aiming at reducing vulnerability and enhancing the resilience of forested ecosystems is a key to preserving the potential of forests to provide multiple ecosystem services under climate change. Planting alternative or non native tree species adapted to future conditions and also utilizing the genetic variation within tree species has also been suggested as an important adaptive management strategy under climate change. Therefore, knowledge on suitable provenances/populations is a key issue. Provenance trial experiments, where several populations of a species are planted in a particular climate or throughout an appropriate climatic gradient offers a great opportunity to understand adaptive genetic variation within a tree species. These trials were primarily established, for identifying populations with desired growth and fitness characteristics. Due to the increasing interest in climate change, such trials were revisited to understand the relation between growth performance and climate and to recommend suitable populations for future conditions. Here we present the lessons learned from provenance trials of Norway spruce and Douglas -fir in central Europe. With data from provenance trials planted across a wide range of environmental conditions in central Europe we developed multivariate models, Universal Response Functions (URFs). The URFs predict growth performance as a function of climate of planting locations (i.e. environmental factors) and provenance/ population origin (i.e. genetic factors). The flexibility of the URFs as a decision making tool is remarkable. The model can be used as to identify suitable planting material for a give site, and vice versa and also as a species distribution model (SDM) with integrated genetic variation. Under current and climate change scenarios, the URFs were applied to predict populations with higher growth performance in central Europe and also as species distribution models for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga

  12. Optimization of wear behavior of electroless Ni-P-W coating under dry and lubricated conditions using genetic algorithm (GA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadeb Mukhopadhyay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the tribological behavior of Ni-P-W coating under dry and lubricated condition. The coating is deposited onto mild steel (AISI 1040 specimens by the electroless method using a sodium hypophosphite based alkaline bath. Coating characterization is done to investigate the effect of microstructure on its performance. The change in microhardness is observed to be quite significant after annealing the deposits at 400°C for 1h. A pin–on–disc type tribo-tester is used to investigate the tribological behavior of the coating under dry and lubricated conditions. The experimental design formulation is based on Taguchi’s orthogonal array. The design parameters considered are the applied normal load, sliding speed and sliding duration while the response parameter is wear depth. Multiple regression analysis is employed to obtain a quadratic model of the response variables with the main design parameters under considerations. A high value of coefficient of determination of 95.3% and 87.5% of wear depth is obtained under dry and lubricated conditions, respectively which indicate good correlation between experimental results and the multiple regression models. Analysis of variance at a confidence level of 95% shows that the models are statistically significant. Finally, the quadratic equations are used as objective functions to obtain the optimal combination of tribo testing parameters for minimum wear depth using genetic algorithm (GA.

  13. Cellular, Molecular, and Genetic Substrates Underlying the Impact of Nicotine on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Thomas J.; Leach, Prescott T.

    2013-01-01

    deficits in learning, and 4) the role of genetics and developmental stage (i.e., adolescence) in these effects. PMID:23973448

  14. On the underlying assumptions of threshold Boolean networks as a model for genetic regulatory network behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Van; McCall, Matthew N; McMurray, Helene R; Almudevar, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Boolean networks (BoN) are relatively simple and interpretable models of gene regulatory networks. Specifying these models with fewer parameters while retaining their ability to describe complex regulatory relationships is an ongoing methodological challenge. Additionally, extending these models to incorporate variable gene decay rates, asynchronous gene response, and synergistic regulation while maintaining their Markovian nature increases the applicability of these models to genetic regulatory networks (GRN). We explore a previously-proposed class of BoNs characterized by linear threshold functions, which we refer to as threshold Boolean networks (TBN). Compared to traditional BoNs with unconstrained transition functions, these models require far fewer parameters and offer a more direct interpretation. However, the functional form of a TBN does result in a reduction in the regulatory relationships which can be modeled. We show that TBNs can be readily extended to permit self-degradation, with explicitly modeled degradation rates. We note that the introduction of variable degradation compromises the Markovian property fundamental to BoN models but show that a simple state augmentation procedure restores their Markovian nature. Next, we study the effect of assumptions regarding self-degradation on the set of possible steady states. Our findings are captured in two theorems relating self-degradation and regulatory feedback to the steady state behavior of a TBN. Finally, we explore assumptions of synchronous gene response and asynergistic regulation and show that TBNs can be easily extended to relax these assumptions. Applying our methods to the budding yeast cell-cycle network revealed that although the network is complex, its steady state is simplified by the presence of self-degradation and lack of purely positive regulatory cycles.

  15. Population size drives industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcoholic fermentation and is under genetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertin, Warren; Marullo, Philippe; Aigle, Michel; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Bely, Marina; Sicard, Delphine

    2011-04-01

    Alcoholic fermentation (AF) conducted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been exploited for millennia in three important human food processes: beer and wine production and bread leavening. Most of the efforts to understand and improve AF have been made separately for each process, with strains that are supposedly well adapted. In this work, we propose a first comparison of yeast AFs in three synthetic media mimicking the dough/wort/grape must found in baking, brewing, and wine making. The fermentative behaviors of nine food-processing strains were evaluated in these media, at the cellular, populational, and biotechnological levels. A large variation in the measured traits was observed, with medium effects usually being greater than the strain effects. The results suggest that human selection targeted the ability to complete fermentation for wine strains and trehalose content for beer strains. Apart from these features, the food origin of the strains did not significantly affect AF, suggesting that an improvement program for a specific food processing industry could exploit the variability of strains used in other industries. Glucose utilization was analyzed, revealing plastic but also genetic variation in fermentation products and indicating that artificial selection could be used to modify the production of glycerol, acetate, etc. The major result was that the overall maximum CO(2) production rate (V(max)) was not related to the maximum CO(2) production rate per cell. Instead, a highly significant correlation between V(max) and the maximum population size was observed in all three media, indicating that human selection targeted the efficiency of cellular reproduction rather than metabolic efficiency. This result opens the way to new strategies for yeast improvement.

  16. Population Size Drives Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Alcoholic Fermentation and Is under Genetic Control▿†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertin, Warren; Marullo, Philippe; Aigle, Michel; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Bely, Marina; Sicard, Delphine

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentation (AF) conducted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been exploited for millennia in three important human food processes: beer and wine production and bread leavening. Most of the efforts to understand and improve AF have been made separately for each process, with strains that are supposedly well adapted. In this work, we propose a first comparison of yeast AFs in three synthetic media mimicking the dough/wort/grape must found in baking, brewing, and wine making. The fermentative behaviors of nine food-processing strains were evaluated in these media, at the cellular, populational, and biotechnological levels. A large variation in the measured traits was observed, with medium effects usually being greater than the strain effects. The results suggest that human selection targeted the ability to complete fermentation for wine strains and trehalose content for beer strains. Apart from these features, the food origin of the strains did not significantly affect AF, suggesting that an improvement program for a specific food processing industry could exploit the variability of strains used in other industries. Glucose utilization was analyzed, revealing plastic but also genetic variation in fermentation products and indicating that artificial selection could be used to modify the production of glycerol, acetate, etc. The major result was that the overall maximum CO2 production rate (Vmax) was not related to the maximum CO2 production rate per cell. Instead, a highly significant correlation between Vmax and the maximum population size was observed in all three media, indicating that human selection targeted the efficiency of cellular reproduction rather than metabolic efficiency. This result opens the way to new strategies for yeast improvement. PMID:21357433

  17. Microbial and genetic ecology of tropical Vertisols under intensive chemical farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Jaya; Aparna, K; Dua, Ankita; Sangwan, Naseer; Trimurtulu, N; Rao, D L N; Lal, Rup

    2015-01-01

    There are continued concerns on unscientific usage of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, particularly in many developing countries leading to adverse consequences for soil biological quality and agricultural sustainability. In farmers' fields in tropical Vertisols of peninsular India, "high" fertilizer and pesticide usage at about 2.3 times the recommended rates in black gram (Vigna mungo) did not have a deleterious effect on the abundance of culturable microorganisms, associative nitrogen fixers, nitrifiers, and 16S rRNA gene diversity compared to normal rates. However, "very high" application at about five times the fertilizers and 1.5 times pesticides in chilies (Capsicum annuum) adversely affected the populations of fungi, actinomycetes, and ammonifiers, along with a drastic change in the eubacterial community profile and diversity over normal rates. Actinobacteria were dominant in black gram normal (BG1) (47%), black gram high (BG2) (36%), and chili normal (CH1) (30%) and were least in chili very high (CH2) (14%). Geodermatophilus formed 20% of Actinobacteria in BG1 but disappeared in BG2, CH1, and CH2. Asticcacaulis dominated at "very high" input site (CH2). Diversity of nitrogen fixers was completely altered; Dechloromonas and Anaeromyxobacter were absent in BG1 but proliferated well in BG2. There was reduction in rhizobial nifH sequences in BG2 by 46%. Phylogenetic differences characterized by UniFrac and principal coordinate analysis showed that BG2 and CH2 clustered together depicting a common pattern of genetic shift, while BG1 and CH1 fell at different axis. Overall, there were adverse consequences of "very high" fertilizer and pesticide usage on soil microbial diversity and function in tropical Vertisols.

  18. [Etiology and pathophysiology of fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, C; Häuser, W; Burgmer, M; Engelhardt, R; Gerhold, K; Petzke, F; Schmidt-Wilcke, T; Späth, M; Tölle, T; Uçeyler, N; Wang, H; Winkelmann, A; Thieme, K

    2012-06-01

    The scheduled update to the German S3 guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies ("Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften", AWMF; registration number 041/004) was planned starting in March 2011. The development of the guidelines was coordinated by the German Interdisciplinary Association for Pain Therapy ("Deutsche Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Schmerztherapie", DIVS), 9 scientific medical societies and 2 patient self-help organizations. Eight working groups with a total of 50 members were evenly balanced in terms of gender, medical field, potential conflicts of interest and hierarchical position in the medical and scientific fields. Literature searches were performed using the Medline, PsycInfo, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases (until December 2010). The grading of the strength of the evidence followed the scheme of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Current data do not identify distinct etiologic or pathophysiological factors mediating development of FMS. The development of FMS is associated with inflammatory rheumatic diseases (EL2b), with gene polymorphisms of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)(2) receptor (EL3a), lifestyle factors (smoking, obesity, lack of physical activity; EL2b), physical and sexual abuse in childhood and adulthood (EL3a). FMS is most likely the result of various pathogenetic factors and pathophysiological mechanisms. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under "Supplemental").

  19. Papilledema: epidemiology, etiology, and clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigi M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Rigi,1 Sumayya J Almarzouqi,2 Michael L Morgan,2 Andrew G Lee2–4 1Robert Cizik Eye Clinic, University of Texas, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Houston Methodist Hospital, Blanton Eye Institute, 3Baylor College of Medicine, 4Departments of Ophthalmology, Neurology, and Neurosurgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, UTMB Galveston, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA Abstract: Papilledema is optic disc swelling due to high intracranial pressure. Possible conditions causing high intracranial pressure and papilledema include intracerebral mass lesions, cerebral hemorrhage, head trauma, meningitis, hydrocephalus, spinal cord lesions, impairment of cerebral sinus drainage, anomalies of the cranium, and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH. Irrespective of the cause, visual loss is the feared morbidity of papilledema, and the main mechanism of optic nerve damage is intraneuronal ischemia secondary to axoplasmic flow stasis. Treatment is directed at correcting the underlying cause. In cases where there is no other identifiable cause for intracranial hypertension (ie, IIH the available options include both medical and surgical modalities. Weight loss and diuretics remain the mainstays for treatment of IIH, and surgery is typically reserved for patients who fail, are intolerant to, or non-compliant with maximum medical therapy. Keywords: papilledema, intracranial hypertension, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, epidemiology, papilledema management, papilledema etiology, acetazolamide, optic nerve sheath fenestration, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, lumboperitoneal shunt, venous sinus stenting

  20. Association mapping of loci controlling genetic and environmental interaction of soybean flowering time under various photo-thermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Tingting; Li, Jinyu; Wen, Zixiang; Wu, Tingting; Wu, Cunxiang; Sun, Shi; Jiang, Bingjun; Hou, Wensheng; Li, Wenbin; Song, Qijian; Wang, Dechun; Han, Tianfu

    2017-05-26

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is a short day plant. Its flowering and maturity time are controlled by genetic and environmental factors, as well the interaction between the two factors. Previous studies have shown that both genetic and environmental factors, mainly photoperiod and temperature, control flowering time of soybean. Additionally, these studies have reported gene × gene and gene × environment interactions on flowering time. However, the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in response to photoperiod and temperature have not been well evaluated. The objectives of the current study were to identify the effects of loci associated with flowering time under different photo-thermal conditions and to understand the effects of interaction between loci and environment on soybean flowering. Different photoperiod and temperature combinations were obtained by adjusting sowing dates (spring sowing and summer sowing) or day-length (12 h, 16 h). Association mapping was performed on 91 soybean cultivars from different maturity groups (MG000-VIII) using 172 SSR markers and 5107 SNPs from the Illumina SoySNP6K iSelectBeadChip. The effects of the interaction between QTL and environments on flowering time were also analysed using the QTXNetwork. Large-effect loci were detected on Gm 11, Gm 16 and Gm 20 as in previous reports. Most loci associated with flowering time are sensitive to photo-thermal conditions. Number of loci associated with flowering time was more under the long day (LD) than under the short day (SD) condition. The variation of flowering time among the soybean cultivars mostly resulted from the epistasis × environment and additive × environment interactions. Among the three candidate loci, i.e. Gm04_4497001 (near GmCOL3a), Gm16_30766209 (near GmFT2a and GmFT2b) and Gm19_47514601 (E3 or GmPhyA3), the Gm04_4497001 may be the key locus interacting with other loci for controlling soybean flowering time. The effects of loci associated

  1. Genetic drift evolution under vaccination pressure among H5N1 Egyptian isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afifi Manal A

    2011-06-01

    Egypt. Egyptian H5N1-AIVs are constantly undergoing genetic changes and reveal a complex pattern of drifts. These findings raise the concerns about the value of using influenza vaccines in correlation with the development of antigenic drift in influenza epidemics.

  2. Incidence, Prevalence, Etiology, and Prognosis of First-Time Chronic Pancreatitis in Young Patients: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Maiken Thyregod; Brusgaard, Klaus; Crüger, Dorthe Gylling

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Publications on etiology of chronic pancreatitis (CP) are infrequent. Etiologies today encompass genetic disorders. We wanted to describe etiologies of today and identify patients with genetic disorders like hereditary pancreatitis (HP), mutations in Serine Protease Inhibitor Kazal...... type1 (SPINK1), and the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator gene (CFTR) among patients formerly considered to have idiopathic CP. METHODS: Data on patients diagnosed with first-time CP ... with idiopathic pancreatitis accepted genetic reevaluation; 28 patients had a genetic mutation that totally or partly could explain their pancreatitis, nine of these had two, and 11 patients had HP. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of CP, especially in women, increased over time. Genetic causes that partly or totally...

  3. Genetically modified corn on fall armyworm and earwig populations under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Regina Frizzas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of corn MON810 on the Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith and the earwig Doru luteipes (Scudder were tested under field conditions in Brazil. Results from MON810 corn fields were compared with those fields of conventional corn with and without the application of insecticides in four harvests in the region of Barretos, SP. It was assessed the damage to S. frugiperda via direct counts of the number of fall armyworms and adults and nymphs of the predator D. luteipes on corn plants. The rate of S. frugiperda damage and the average numbers of larvae (large and small were lower in the MON810 corn field relative to the control plot. There were no differences (P>0.05 between treatments regarding the predator abundance in corn plants. The second crop season ("safrinha" showed the greatest extent of S. frugiperda damage and the lowest average abundance of earwigs. MON810 was effective in controlling S. frugiperda and abundance of predator D. luteipes was similar in the three treatments under field conditions.

  4. Genetic Factors in the Etiology of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Klaassens (Merel)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCongenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is a relatively common birth defect in which a defect in diaphragm formation is associated with lung hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. CDH has a significant mortality of 50-80%, depending on the presence of associated anomalies and on the

  5. Genetic Etiology and Clinical Consequences of Cone Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.H.J. Thiadens (Alberta)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHereditary retinal disorders constitute a large heterogeneous group of diseases in which the photoreceptors are primarily aff ected. When cone cells are aff ected, one cannot see details or perceive color. In this thesis, we focused on the three most important diseases in which the

  6. Etiology of Shock in the Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Jensen, Helene Kildegaard; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard

    2018-01-01

    were included. Discharge diagnoses defined the etiology and were grouped as; distributive septic shock (SS), distributive non-septic shock (NS)), cardiogenic shock (CS), hypovolemic shock (HS), obstructive shock (OS) and other conditions (OC). Outcomes were etiology-based characteristics, annual IR per......INTRODUCTION: The knowledge of the etiology and associated mortality of undifferentiated shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. We aimed to describe the etiology based proportions and incidence rates (IR) of shock, as well as the associated mortality in the ED. METHODS: Population......-based cohort study at an University Hospital ED in Denmark from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. Patients aged ≥18 years living in the ED-catchment area (N = 225,000) with a first time ED presentation with shock (n = 1,646) defined as hypotension (systolic blood pressure ≤100 mmHg)) and ≥1 organ failures...

  7. Etiology and Outcome of Neonatal Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The prognostic value of seizure etiology, neurologic examination, EEG, and neuroimaging in the neurodevelopmental outcome of 89 term infants with neonatal seizures was determined at the Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

  8. Etiology of homosexuality and attitudes toward same-sex parenting: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias-Navarro, Dolores; Monterde-I-Bort, Hector; Pascual-Soler, Marcos; Badenes-Ribera, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Attribution theory suggests the hypothesis that heterosexuals' attitudes toward homosexual sexual orientation will be more negative when homosexuality is attributed to controllable causes. Our randomized study analyzed (a) whether beliefs about the genetic or environmental etiology of the homosexual sexual orientation can be immediately modified by reading a text and (b) the causal effect of attributions about the controllability (environmental etiology) or noncontrollability (genetic etiology) of homosexual sexual orientation on the rejection of same-sex parenting and their social rights. The sample was composed of 190 Spanish university students with a mean age of 22.07 years (SD = 8.46). The results show that beliefs about the etiology of the sexual orientation could be modified by means of a written text. Furthermore, participants who believed that sexual orientation had a genetic etiology showed greater support for social rights and less rejection of same-sex parenting. However, the effects were detected only when there was a traditional opposition to the family with same-sex parenting. When the opposition was normative, the effect was not statistically significant. Our results can be useful in planning variables for intervention programs designed to foster tolerance toward and normality of sexual diversity.

  9. Virulence Differences among Melissococcus plutonius Strains with Different Genetic Backgrounds in Apis mellifera Larvae under an Improved Experimental Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keiko; Yamazaki, Yuko; Shiraishi, Akiyo; Kobayashi, Sota; Harada, Mariko; Yoshiyama, Mikio; Osaki, Makoto; Okura, Masatoshi; Takamatsu, Daisuke

    2016-09-14

    European foulbrood (EFB) caused by Melissococcus plutonius is an important bacterial disease of honeybee larvae. M. plutonius strains can be grouped into three genetically distinct groups (CC3, CC12 and CC13). Because EFB could not be reproduced in artificially reared honeybee larvae by fastidious strains of CC3 and CC13 previously, we investigated a method to improve experimental conditions using a CC3 strain and found that infection with a potassium-rich diet enhanced proliferation of the fastidious strain in larvae at the early stage of infection, leading to the appearance of clear clinical symptoms. Further comparison of M. plutonius virulence under the conditions revealed that the representative strain of CC12 was extremely virulent and killed all tested bees before pupation, whereas the CC3 strain was less virulent than the CC12 strain, and a part of the infected larvae pupated. In contrast, the tested CC13 strain was avirulent, and as with the non-infected control group, most of the infected brood became adult bees, suggesting differences in the insect-level virulence among M. plutonius strains with different genetic backgrounds. These strains and the improved experimental infection method to evaluate their virulence will be useful tools for further elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms of EFB.

  10. Interspecific Hybridization in Pilot Whales and Asymmetric Genetic Introgression in Northern Globicephala melas under the Scenario of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Laura; Oremus, Marc; Silva, Mónica A; Planes, Serge; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Pilot whales are two cetacean species (Globicephala melas and G. macrorhynchus) whose distributions are correlated with water temperature and partially overlap in some areas like the North Atlantic Ocean. In the context of global warming, distribution range shifts are expected to occur in species affected by temperature. Consequently, a northward displacement of the tropical pilot whale G. macrorynchus is expected, eventually leading to increased secondary contact areas and opportunities for interspecific hybridization. Here, we describe genetic evidences of recurrent hybridization between pilot whales in northeast Atlantic Ocean. Based on mitochondrial DNA sequences and microsatellite loci, asymmetric introgression of G. macrorhynchus genes into G. melas was observed. For the latter species, a significant correlation was found between historical population growth rate estimates and paleotemperature oscillations. Introgressive hybridization, current temperature increases and lower genetic variation in G. melas suggest that this species could be at risk in its northern range. Under increasing environmental and human-mediated stressors in the North Atlantic Ocean, it seems recommendable to develop a conservation program for G. melas.

  11. Relationships between Parental Negativity and Childhood Antisocial Behavior over Time: A Bidirectional Effects Model in a Longitudinal Genetically Informative Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Henrik; Viding, Essi; Rijsdijk, Fruhling V.; Plomin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the direction and etiology underlying the relationships between parental negativity and early childhood antisocial behavior using a bidirectional effects model in a longitudinal genetically informative design. We analyzed parent reports of parental negativity and early childhood antisocial behavior in 6,230 pairs of twins at 4…

  12. Etiology of diverticular disease with classic illustrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D. W.; Bumpers, H. L.; Hoover, E. L.

    1996-01-01

    Diverticulosis is a common colonic disorder and often is found incidentally on colonic endoscopy and contrast enema radiographs. Theories relating to the etiology of the pathologic processes are commonly quoted, although the actual anatomic features are rarely seen during colonoscopic examinations. Here we show classic illustrations that support the widely held theories regarding the etiologies of diverticular diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8691502

  13. Hormonal and genetic influences underlying arousal as it drives sex and aggression in animal and human brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mong, Jessica A; Pfaff, Donald W

    2003-01-01

    Estrogen treatment induces transcription and increases excitability and reproductive behavior. Estrogens provide the structural basis for increased synaptic activity and greater behavior-facilitating output. Administration of progesterone amplifies the effect of estrogens on mating behavior. The role of GnRH is to synchronize reproductive behavior with the ovulatory surge of LH. A causal connection can be charted from one individual gene to human social behavior, but only via six causal links. Glia, meninges and neurons may participate, under the influence of sex hormones, in the direction of sex behavior. Neural and genetic mechanisms for motivation may lead to biological understanding of functions that apply to the most primitive aspects of human mental functioning. With respect to aggression, besides testosterone and its metabolites, serotonergic projections to the forebrain play an important role.

  14. The ultrastructure and genetic traits of plants under the condition of hypobaric and hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuangsheng; Tang, Yongkang; Wang, Shulei; Cheng, Quanyong; Zhao, Qi

    This study analyzed the cellular, sub-cellular and molecular levels, particle composition and volume changes of Indian lettuce under the conditions of hypobaric and hypoxia. Firstly, in the hypobaric and hypoxia conditions, two kinds of sample showed a decrease in the num-ber of cells, the increase in volume and the deflation in nuclear size. Secondly, Significant changes of the chloroplast ultrastructure have taken place in the two conditions. Thirdly, in the hypoxia condition, the chloroplast grana lamellae fractured and aggregated, which caused the chloroplasts to enlarge, their lamellae to reduce,become vaguer and finally to disintegrate. Fourthly, the volume change and aggregation of the chloroplasts induced mitochondria to ap-proach the chloroplasts. Fifthly, cytoskeleton immunofluorescence positioning results showed that the microtubules had decreased in number, shortened in length and gathered in the vicinity of the nucleus. In addition, total leaf DNA-sequence alignment found no rbcl gene mutation in the extreme conditions. Keywords: Chloroplast Ultrastructure Cytoskeleton rbcl gene Indian lettuce

  15. A Behavioral Genetic Model of the Mechanisms Underlying the Link Between Obesity and Symptoms of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patte, Karen A; Davis, Caroline A; Levitan, Robert D; Kaplan, Allan S; Carter-Major, Jacqueline; Kennedy, James L

    2016-01-21

    The ADHD-obesity link has been suggested to result from a shared underlying basis of suboptimal dopamine (DA); however, this theory conflicts evidence that an amplified DA signal increases the risk for overeating and weight gain. A model was tested in which ADHD symptoms, predicted by hypodopaminergic functioning in the prefrontal cortex, in combination with an enhanced appetitive drive, predict hedonic eating and, in turn, higher body mass index (BMI). DRD2 and DRD4 markers were genotyped. The model was tested using structural equation modeling in a nonclinical sample (N = 421 adults). The model was a good fit to the data. Controlling for education, all parameter estimates were significant, except for the DRD4-ADHD symptom pathway. The significant indirect effect indicates that overeating mediated the ADHD symptoms-BMI association. Results support the hypothesis that overeating and elevated DA in the ventral striatum-representative of a greater reward response-contribute to the ADHD symptom-obesity relationship. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Application of multi-objective optimization based on genetic algorithm for sustainable strategic supplier selection under fuzzy environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hashim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:  The incorporation of environmental objective into the conventional supplier selection practices is crucial for corporations seeking to promote green supply chain management (GSCM. Challenges and risks associated with green supplier selection have been broadly recognized by procurement and supplier management professionals. This paper aims to solve a Tetra “S” (SSSS problem based on a fuzzy multi-objective optimization with genetic algorithm in a holistic supply chain environment. In this empirical study, a mathematical model with fuzzy coefficients is considered for sustainable strategic supplier selection (SSSS problem and a corresponding model is developed to tackle this problem. Design/methodology/approach: Sustainable strategic supplier selection (SSSS decisions are typically multi-objectives in nature and it is an important part of green production and supply chain management for many firms. The proposed uncertain model is transferred into deterministic model by applying the expected value mesurement (EVM and genetic algorithm with weighted sum approach for solving the multi-objective problem. This research focus on a multi-objective optimization model for minimizing lean cost, maximizing sustainable service and greener product quality level. Finally, a mathematical case of textile sector is presented to exemplify the effectiveness of the proposed model with a sensitivity analysis. Findings: This study makes a certain contribution by introducing the Tetra ‘S’ concept in both the theoretical and practical research related to multi-objective optimization as well as in the study of sustainable strategic supplier selection (SSSS under uncertain environment. Our results suggest that decision makers tend to select strategic supplier first then enhance the sustainability. Research limitations/implications: Although the fuzzy expected value model (EVM with fuzzy coefficients constructed in present research should be helpful for

  17. Application of multi-objective optimization based on genetic algorithm for sustainable strategic supplier selection under fuzzy environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashim, M.; Nazam, M.; Yao, L.; Baig, S.A.; Abrar, M.; Zia-ur-Rehman, M.

    2017-07-01

    The incorporation of environmental objective into the conventional supplier selection practices is crucial for corporations seeking to promote green supply chain management (GSCM). Challenges and risks associated with green supplier selection have been broadly recognized by procurement and supplier management professionals. This paper aims to solve a Tetra “S” (SSSS) problem based on a fuzzy multi-objective optimization with genetic algorithm in a holistic supply chain environment. In this empirical study, a mathematical model with fuzzy coefficients is considered for sustainable strategic supplier selection (SSSS) problem and a corresponding model is developed to tackle this problem. Design/methodology/approach: Sustainable strategic supplier selection (SSSS) decisions are typically multi-objectives in nature and it is an important part of green production and supply chain management for many firms. The proposed uncertain model is transferred into deterministic model by applying the expected value mesurement (EVM) and genetic algorithm with weighted sum approach for solving the multi-objective problem. This research focus on a multi-objective optimization model for minimizing lean cost, maximizing sustainable service and greener product quality level. Finally, a mathematical case of textile sector is presented to exemplify the effectiveness of the proposed model with a sensitivity analysis. Findings: This study makes a certain contribution by introducing the Tetra ‘S’ concept in both the theoretical and practical research related to multi-objective optimization as well as in the study of sustainable strategic supplier selection (SSSS) under uncertain environment. Our results suggest that decision makers tend to select strategic supplier first then enhance the sustainability. Research limitations/implications: Although the fuzzy expected value model (EVM) with fuzzy coefficients constructed in present research should be helpful for solving real world

  18. Application of multi-objective optimization based on genetic algorithm for sustainable strategic supplier selection under fuzzy environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, M.; Nazam, M.; Yao, L.; Baig, S.A.; Abrar, M.; Zia-ur-Rehman, M.

    2017-01-01

    The incorporation of environmental objective into the conventional supplier selection practices is crucial for corporations seeking to promote green supply chain management (GSCM). Challenges and risks associated with green supplier selection have been broadly recognized by procurement and supplier management professionals. This paper aims to solve a Tetra “S” (SSSS) problem based on a fuzzy multi-objective optimization with genetic algorithm in a holistic supply chain environment. In this empirical study, a mathematical model with fuzzy coefficients is considered for sustainable strategic supplier selection (SSSS) problem and a corresponding model is developed to tackle this problem. Design/methodology/approach: Sustainable strategic supplier selection (SSSS) decisions are typically multi-objectives in nature and it is an important part of green production and supply chain management for many firms. The proposed uncertain model is transferred into deterministic model by applying the expected value mesurement (EVM) and genetic algorithm with weighted sum approach for solving the multi-objective problem. This research focus on a multi-objective optimization model for minimizing lean cost, maximizing sustainable service and greener product quality level. Finally, a mathematical case of textile sector is presented to exemplify the effectiveness of the proposed model with a sensitivity analysis. Findings: This study makes a certain contribution by introducing the Tetra ‘S’ concept in both the theoretical and practical research related to multi-objective optimization as well as in the study of sustainable strategic supplier selection (SSSS) under uncertain environment. Our results suggest that decision makers tend to select strategic supplier first then enhance the sustainability. Research limitations/implications: Although the fuzzy expected value model (EVM) with fuzzy coefficients constructed in present research should be helpful for solving real world

  19. Contribution of nonprimate animal models in understanding the etiology of schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Noah L.; Neufeld, Richard W.J.; Cain, Donald P.

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder that is characterized by positive and negative symptoms and cognitive impairments. The etiology of the disorder is complex, and it is thought to follow a multifactorial threshold model of inheritance with genetic and neurodevelopmental contributions to risk. Human studies are particularly useful in capturing the richness of the phenotype, but they are often limited to the use of correlational approaches. By assessing behavioural abnormalities in both humans and rodents, nonprimate animal models of schizophrenia provide unique insight into the etiology and mechanisms of the disorder. This review discusses the phenomenology and etiology of schizophrenia and the contribution of current nonprimate animal models with an emphasis on how research with models of neurotransmitter dysregulation, environmental risk factors, neurodevelopmental disruption and genetic risk factors can complement the literature on schizophrenia in humans. PMID:21247514

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Graves disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tomer Y. Cutting edge: the etiology of autoimmune thyroid diseases. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2011 Oct;41(2): ... The search for the genetic contribution to autoimmune thyroid disease: the never ending story? Brief Funct Genomics. 2011 ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Hashimoto thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Page Dong YH, Fu DG. Autoimmune thyroid disease: mechanism, genetics and current knowledge. Eur Rev Med ... Tomer Y. Cutting edge: the etiology of autoimmune thyroid diseases. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2011 Oct;41(2): ...

  2. Etiology of Pervasive versus Situational Antisocial Behaviors: A Multi-informant Longitudinal Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Jasmin; Zavos, Helena M. S.; Matthews, Timothy; Gray, Rebecca; Best-Lane, Janis; Pariante, Carmine M.; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to disentangle pervasive from situational antisocial behaviors using multiple informants, and to investigate their genetic and environmental etiologies in preadolescence and across time. Antisocial behaviors were assessed in 2,232 twins from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study at ages 5 and 12.…

  3. Etiology and management of primary amenorrhoea: A study of 102 cases at tertiary centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Kriplani

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: The present study has currently been the largest case series of primary amenorrhea from North India. Mullerian anomaly is the most prevalent etiological factor leading to amenorrhoea followed by gonadal dysgenesis in our study. Racial, genetic and environmental factors could play role in the cause of primary amenorrhea.

  4. Development of methodical approach to the identification of the features of the genetic polymorphisms and gene expression in children under influence of chemical environmental factors on the example of strontium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Dolgikh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Methodological approaches evaluating the features of genetic polymorphism associated with exposure to chemical etiology factors for the identification of genetic susceptibility markers were developed. The technologies, methodological aspects of the use of polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing fragments, studies of spontaneous and induced strontium expression of candidate genes that help identify changes in the genome and transcriptome in order to identify early disorders of adaptation processes in chronic environmental burden to prove the injury and assessment of individual exposure risk chemical factors were suggested.

  5. Intraabdominal abscessus of unknown etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Radoje

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intraabdominal abscesses are in 98-99% cases the result of secondary and only in 1-2% of primary peritonitis. They are easy and successfully diagnosed. Abdominal abscesses of unknown cause are extremely rare. Case Outline. The authors present a 68-year-old man, without significant data in past history, who suddenly developed epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting and leukocytosis which was treated with antibiotics resulting in the alleviation of complaints and reduction of white blood cells count. After five days ultrasonography showed incapsulated collection of dense fluid in the epigastrium confirmed by CT scan two days later. Upper endoscopy excluded ulcer and/or perforation of the stomach and duodenum. Under local anesthesia, through the upper part of the left rectal muscle, puncture followed by incision was done, and about 50 ml of dense pus was removed. Finger exploration of the cavity showed no foreign body within the cavity. Using drainage, the recovery was quick and uneventful. By preoperative and postoperative abdominal investigations no cause of the abscess was found. Two and a half years after surgery the patient remained symptom-free with normal clinical, laboratory and ultrasonographic findings. Conclusion. The authors presented an intraabdominal abscess of unknown cause that was successfully treated with antibiotics, percutaneous puncture and drainage under local anaesthesia. In spite of all diagnostic methods the cause of the abscess could not be found. Thus, such a possibility, although being rare, should be taken into account.

  6. Mechanisms and genetic factors underlying co-use of nicotine and alcohol or other drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sarah J; Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Leslie, Frances M

    2017-03-01

    Concurrent use of tobacco and alcohol or psychostimulants represents a major public health concern, with use of one substance influencing consumption of the other. Co-abuse of these drugs leads to substantial negative health outcomes, reduced cessation, and high economic costs, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Epidemiological data suggest that tobacco use during adolescence plays a particularly significant role. Adolescence is a sensitive period of development marked by major neurobiological maturation of brain regions critical for reward processing, learning and memory, and executive function. Nicotine exposure during this time produces a unique and long-lasting vulnerability to subsequent substance use, likely via actions at cholinergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic systems. In this review, we discuss recent clinical and preclinical data examining the genetic factors and mechanisms underlying co-use of nicotine and alcohol or cocaine and amphetamines. We evaluate the critical role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors throughout, and emphasize the dearth of preclinical studies assessing concurrent drug exposure. We stress important age and sex differences in drug responses, and highlight a brief, low-dose nicotine exposure paradigm that may better model early use of tobacco products. The escalating use of e-cigarettes among youth necessitates a closer look at the consequences of early adolescent nicotine exposure on subsequent alcohol and drug abuse.

  7. Lactic Acid Bacteria Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Toxicity of Graphene Oxide by Maintaining Normal Intestinal Permeability under different Genetic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Xiaoming; Jia, Ruhan; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is safe and useful for food and feed fermentation. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible beneficial effect of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus) pretreatment against toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and the underlying mechanisms. LAB prevented GO toxicity on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in wild-type nematodes. LAB blocked translocation of GO into secondary targeted organs through intestinal barrier by maintaining normal intestinal permeability in wild-type nematodes. Moreover, LAB prevented GO damage on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in exposed nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes (sod-2, sod-3, gas-1, and aak-2) to GO toxicity by sustaining normal intestinal permeability. LAB also sustained the normal defecation behavior in both wild-type nematodes and nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes. Therefore, the beneficial role of LAB against GO toxicity under different genetic backgrounds may be due to the combinational effects on intestinal permeability and defecation behavior. Moreover, the beneficial effects of LAB against GO toxicity was dependent on the function of ACS-22, homologous to mammalian FATP4 to mammalian FATP4. Our study provides highlight on establishment of pharmacological strategy to protect intestinal barrier from toxicity of GO.

  8. Prediction of composite fatigue life under variable amplitude loading using artificial neural network trained by genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohman, Muhamad Nur; Hidayat, Mas Irfan P.; Purniawan, Agung

    2018-04-01

    Neural networks (NN) have been widely used in application of fatigue life prediction. In the use of fatigue life prediction for polymeric-base composite, development of NN model is necessary with respect to the limited fatigue data and applicable to be used to predict the fatigue life under varying stress amplitudes in the different stress ratios. In the present paper, Multilayer-Perceptrons (MLP) model of neural network is developed, and Genetic Algorithm was employed to optimize the respective weights of NN for prediction of polymeric-base composite materials under variable amplitude loading. From the simulation result obtained with two different composite systems, named E-glass fabrics/epoxy (layups [(±45)/(0)2]S), and E-glass/polyester (layups [90/0/±45/0]S), NN model were trained with fatigue data from two different stress ratios, which represent limited fatigue data, can be used to predict another four and seven stress ratios respectively, with high accuracy of fatigue life prediction. The accuracy of NN prediction were quantified with the small value of mean square error (MSE). When using 33% from the total fatigue data for training, the NN model able to produce high accuracy for all stress ratios. When using less fatigue data during training (22% from the total fatigue data), the NN model still able to produce high coefficient of determination between the prediction result compared with obtained by experiment.

  9. Identification of new susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes and shared etiological pathways with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Wei; Rasheed, Asif; Tikkanen, Emmi

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the shared genetic etiology of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and coronary heart disease (CHD), we conducted a genome-wide, multi-ancestry study of genetic variation for both diseases in up to 265,678 subjects for T2D and 260,365 subjects for CHD. We identify 16 previously unreported loci for ...

  10. Quantitative trait loci in hop (Humulus lupulus L.) reveal complex genetic architecture underlying variation in sex, yield and cone chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, Erin L; Freeman, Jules S; Whittock, Simon P; Buck, Emily J; Jakse, Jernej; Cerenak, Andreja; Javornik, Branka; Kilian, Andrzej; Wang, Cai-Hong; Andersen, Dave; Vaillancourt, René E; Carling, Jason; Beatson, Ron; Graham, Lawrence; Graham, Donna; Darby, Peter; Koutoulis, Anthony

    2013-05-30

    genetic control of traits of current economic and breeding significance in hop and demonstrate the complex genetic architecture underlying variation in these traits. The linkage information obtained in this study, based on transferable markers, can be used to facilitate the validation of QTL, crucial to the success of MAS.

  11. Etiología del colesteatoma ótico Etiology of otic cholesteatoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianis Loraine Quintero Noa

    2011-12-01

    very clear and controversial. Different theories are reported to explain the congenital cholesteatoma, the transition of a retraction pocket until the appearance of primary acquired cholesteatoma and other on the genesis of the secondary acquired cholesteatoma. Presence of some cytokines in cholesteatoma is described inducing to hyperproliferation and not coordinated of keratinocytes of the external auditory meatus and the pars flaccida more aggressive in the pediatric acquired cholesteatoma playing a fundamental role in the proliferation and in apoptosis of keratinocyte. In a sample of choleastomatous tissue in vitro culture has been recently identified that the a-TNF stimulates the production of IL-8. It is interesting to offer present review on the etiology of cholesteatoma that still is under research and a challenge for otologists due to its high relapses incidence and potential complications.

  12. ETIOLOGICAL FACTORS FOR VOCAL FOLD POLYP FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAŠA GLUVAJIĆ

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vocal fold polyp is one of the most common causes for hoarseness. Many different etiological factors contribute to vocal fold polyp formation. The aim of the study was to find out whether the etiological factors for polyp formation have changed in the last 30 years.Methods: Eighty-one patients with unilateral vocal fold polyp were included in the study. A control group was composed of 50 volunteers without voice problems who matched the patients by age and gender. The data about etiological factors and the findings of phoniatric examination were obtained from the patients' medical documentation and from the questionnaires for the control group. The incidence of etiological factors was compared between the two groups. The program SPSS, Version 18 was used for statistical analysis.Results: The most frequent etiological factors were occupational voice load, GER, allergy and smoking. In 79% of patients 2 – 6 contemporary acting risk factors were found. Occupational voice load (p=0,018 and GER (p=0,004 were significantly more frequent in the patients than in the controls. The other factors did not significantly influence the polyp formation.Conclusions: There are several factors involved simultaneously in the formation of vocal fold polyps both nowadays and 30 years ago. Some of the most common factors remain the same (voice load, smoking, others are new (GER, allergy, which is probably due to the different lifestyle and working conditions than 30 years ago. Occupational voice load and GER were significantly more frequently present in the patients with polyp than in the control group. Regarding the given results it is important to instruct workers with professional vocal load about etiological factors for vocal fold polyp formation.

  13. Incidence, etiology and mortality of cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Fialla, Annette; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B; Touborg Lassen, Annmarie

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge on the prognosis among patients with cirrhosis is mainly based on clinical trials with selected patient groups as well as population-based register studies with suboptimal diagnostic reliability. The aim of the study was to describe incidence, etiology, and mortality of well-validated c......Knowledge on the prognosis among patients with cirrhosis is mainly based on clinical trials with selected patient groups as well as population-based register studies with suboptimal diagnostic reliability. The aim of the study was to describe incidence, etiology, and mortality of well...

  14. Temporal stability in the genetic structure of Sarcoptes scabiei under the host-taxon law: empirical evidences from wildlife-derived Sarcoptes mite in Asturias, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Implicitly, parasite molecular studies assume temporal genetic stability. In this study we tested, for the first time to our knowledge, the extent of changes in genetic diversity and structure of Sarcoptes mite populations from Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) in Asturias (Spain), using one multiplex of 9 microsatellite markers and Sarcoptes samples from sympatric Pyrenean chamois, red deer (Cervus elaphus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes). Results The analysis of an 11-years interval period found little change in the genetic diversity (allelic diversity, and observed and expected heterozygosity). The temporal stability in the genetic diversity was confirmed by population structure analysis, which was not significantly variable over time. Population structure analysis revealed temporal stability in the genetic diversity of Sarcoptes mite under the host-taxon law (herbivore derived- and carnivore derived-Sarcoptes mite) among the sympatric wild animals from Asturias. Conclusions The confirmation of parasite temporal genetic stability is of vital interest to allow generalizations to be made, which have further implications regarding the genetic structure, epidemiology and monitoring protocols of the ubiquitous Sarcoptes mite. This could eventually be applied to other parasite species. PMID:21794141

  15. Temporal stability in the genetic structure of Sarcoptes scabiei under the host-taxon law: empirical evidences from wildlife-derived Sarcoptes mite in Asturias, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Luca

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implicitly, parasite molecular studies assume temporal genetic stability. In this study we tested, for the first time to our knowledge, the extent of changes in genetic diversity and structure of Sarcoptes mite populations from Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica in Asturias (Spain, using one multiplex of 9 microsatellite markers and Sarcoptes samples from sympatric Pyrenean chamois, red deer (Cervus elaphus, roe deer (Capreolus capreolus and red fox (Vulpes vulpes. Results The analysis of an 11-years interval period found little change in the genetic diversity (allelic diversity, and observed and expected heterozygosity. The temporal stability in the genetic diversity was confirmed by population structure analysis, which was not significantly variable over time. Population structure analysis revealed temporal stability in the genetic diversity of Sarcoptes mite under the host-taxon law (herbivore derived- and carnivore derived-Sarcoptes mite among the sympatric wild animals from Asturias. Conclusions The confirmation of parasite temporal genetic stability is of vital interest to allow generalizations to be made, which have further implications regarding the genetic structure, epidemiology and monitoring protocols of the ubiquitous Sarcoptes mite. This could eventually be applied to other parasite species.

  16. Temporal stability in the genetic structure of Sarcoptes scabiei under the host-taxon law: empirical evidences from wildlife-derived Sarcoptes mite in Asturias, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasaad, Samer; Oleaga, Álvaro; Casais, Rosa; Rossi, Luca; Min, Annarita Molinar; Soriguer, Ramón C; Gortázar, Christian

    2011-07-27

    Implicitly, parasite molecular studies assume temporal genetic stability. In this study we tested, for the first time to our knowledge, the extent of changes in genetic diversity and structure of Sarcoptes mite populations from Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) in Asturias (Spain), using one multiplex of 9 microsatellite markers and Sarcoptes samples from sympatric Pyrenean chamois, red deer (Cervus elaphus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes). The analysis of an 11-years interval period found little change in the genetic diversity (allelic diversity, and observed and expected heterozygosity). The temporal stability in the genetic diversity was confirmed by population structure analysis, which was not significantly variable over time. Population structure analysis revealed temporal stability in the genetic diversity of Sarcoptes mite under the host-taxon law (herbivore derived- and carnivore derived-Sarcoptes mite) among the sympatric wild animals from Asturias. The confirmation of parasite temporal genetic stability is of vital interest to allow generalizations to be made, which have further implications regarding the genetic structure, epidemiology and monitoring protocols of the ubiquitous Sarcoptes mite. This could eventually be applied to other parasite species. © 2011 Alasaad et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  17. Biochemical, radiological, and genetic characterization of congenital hypothyroidism in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Asma; Elkadry, Ihab; Attia, Salima; Al Suwaidi, Hana; Obaid, Laila; Schoenmakers, Nadia A

    2016-07-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is caused by thyroid gland (TG) dysgenesis or inadequate thyroid hormone biosynthesis in a structurally normal gland. Different etiologies are known to be associated with various clinical, biochemical and imaging markers and a subset of cases have an underlying genetic basis. Despite the presence of neonatal screening programs in the UAE, there is a lack of data on the disease etiology in the area. We aim to study the etiology of CH in our center and examine its relationship with the clinical, biochemical, genetic and radiological features. Patients with CH who were followed in our center between 2011 and 2014 are enrolled in the study. Data collected included gender, gestational age, history of CH in a first-degree relative, initial thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T4) levels, imaging findings, associated disease/malformation and treatment details. Selected patients with associated systemic disease or familial CH underwent genetic testing. Sixty-five patients were enrolled. Ten patients underwent genetic study: seven patients with associated congenital disease/malformation, one with a sibling and two with cousins with CH. Forty-nine subjects had technetium99 and/or ultrasound scans. Dyshormonogenesis was diagnosed in two-thirds of the patients. Three patients of 10 tested had likely causative genetic mutations; two homozygous thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and one heterozygous thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) missense mutations. Dyshormonogenesis is the commonest etiology in CH in the studied group. It is expected that genetic mutations are more prevalent in our region due to the nature of the CH etiology and the rate of high consanguinity rate.

  18. The genetic and environmental factors for keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon-Shaag, Ariela; Millodot, Michel; Shneor, Einat; Liu, Yutao

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is the most common cornea ectatic disorder. It is characterized by a cone-shaped thin cornea leading to myopia, irregular astigmatism, and vision impairment. It affects all ethnic groups and both genders. Both environmental and genetic factors may contribute to its pathogenesis. This review is to summarize the current research development in KC epidemiology and genetic etiology. Environmental factors include but are not limited to eye rubbing, atopy, sun exposure, and geography. Genetic discoveries have been reviewed with evidence from family-based linkage analysis and fine mapping in linkage region, genome-wide association studies, and candidate genes analyses. A number of genes have been discovered at a relatively rapid pace. The detailed molecular mechanism underlying KC pathogenesis will significantly advance our understanding of KC and promote the development of potential therapies.

  19. The Genetics Underlying Natural Variation in the Biotic Interactions of Arabidopsis thaliana: The Challenges of Linking Evolutionary Genetics and Community Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, F; Bergelson, J

    2016-01-01

    In the context of global change, predicting the responses of plant communities in an ever-changing biotic environment calls for a multipronged approach at the interface of evolutionary genetics and community ecology. However, our understanding of the genetic basis of natural variation involved in mediating biotic interactions, and associated adaptive dynamics of focal plants in their natural communities, is still in its infancy. Here, we review the genetic and molecular bases of natural variation in the response to biotic interactions (viruses, bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, herbivores, and plants) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana as well as the adaptive value of these bases. Among the 60 identified genes are a number that encode nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-type proteins, consistent with early examples of plant defense genes. However, recent studies have revealed an extensive diversity in the molecular mechanisms of defense. Many types of genetic variants associate with phenotypic variation in biotic interactions, even among the genes of large effect that tend to be identified. In general, we found that (i) balancing selection rather than directional selection explains the observed patterns of genetic diversity within A. thaliana and (ii) the cost/benefit tradeoffs of adaptive alleles can be strongly dependent on both genomic and environmental contexts. Finally, because A. thaliana rarely interacts with only one biotic partner in nature, we highlight the benefit of exploring diffuse biotic interactions rather than tightly associated host-enemy pairs. This challenge would help to improve our understanding of coevolutionary quantitative genetics within the context of realistic community complexity. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Progression of Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Remodelling under Optimal Medical Therapy in CHF Patients: Role of Individual Genetic Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Rigolli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurohormonal systems play an important role in chronic heart failure (CHF. Due to interindividual heterogeneity in the benefits of therapy, it may be hypothesized that polymorphisms of neurohormonal systems may affect left ventricular (LV remodelling and systolic function. We aimed to assess whether genetic background of maximally treated CHF patients predicts variations in LV systolic function and volumes. Methods and Results. We prospectively studied 131 CHF outpatients on optimal treatment for at least six months. Echocardiographic evaluations were performed at baseline and after 12 months. Genotype analysis for ACE I/D, β1adrenergic receptor (AR Arg389Gly, β2AR Arg16Gly, and β2AR Gln27Glu polymorphisms was performed. No differences in baseline characteristics were detected among subgroups. ACE II was a significant predictor of improvement of LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volume (=.003 and =.002, respectively but not of LV ejection fraction (LVEF; β1AR389 GlyGly was related to improvement of LVEF (=.02 and LV end-systolic volume (=.01. The predictive value of polymorphisms remained after adjustment for other clinically significant predictors (<.05 for all. Conclusions. ACE I/D and β1AR Arg389Gly polymorphisms are independent predictors of reverse remodeling and systolic function recovery in CHF patients under optimal treatment.

  1. Genetic evidence for a role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mph1 in recombinational DNA repair under replicative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Evandro Rocco; Ede, Christopher; Schildmann, Michael; Schürer, Kirsten Anke; Kramer, Wilfried

    2010-01-01

    In yeast as in human, DNA helicases play critical roles in assisting replication fork progression. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPH1 gene, homologue of human FANCM, has been involved in homologous recombination and DNA repair. We describe a synthetic growth defect of an mph1 deletion if combined with an srs2 deletion that can result-depending on the genetic background-in synthetic lethality. The lethality is suppressed by mutations in homologous recombination (rad51, rad52, rad55, rad57) and in the DNA damage checkpoint (rad9, rad24, rad17). Importantly, rad54 and mph1, epistatic for damage sensitivity, are subadditive for spontaneous mutator phenotype. Therefore, Mph1 could be placed at the Rad51-mediated strand invasion process, with a function distinct from Rad54. Moreover, siz1 mutation is viable with mph1 and additive for DNA damage sensitivity. mph1 srs2 double mutants, isolated in a background where they are viable, are synergistically sensitive to DNA damage. Moderate overexpression of SGS1 partially suppresses this sensitivity. Finally, we observe an epistatic relationship in terms of sensitivity to camptothecin of mms4 or mus81 to mph1. Overall, our results support a role of Mph1 in assisting replication progression. We propose two models for the resumption of DNA synthesis under replicative stress where Mph1 is placed at the sister chromatid interaction step.

  2. Expression profiling of a genetic animal model of depression reveals novel molecular pathways underlying depressive-like behaviours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterini Blaveri

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Flinders model is a validated genetic rat model of depression that exhibits a number of behavioural, neurochemical and pharmacological features consistent with those observed in human depression.In this study we have used genome-wide microarray expression profiling of the hippocampus and prefrontal/frontal cortex of Flinders Depression Sensitive (FSL and control Flinders Depression Resistant (FRL lines to understand molecular basis for the differences between the two lines. We profiled two independent cohorts of Flinders animals derived from the same colony six months apart, each cohort statistically powered to allow independent as well as combined analysis. Using this approach, we were able to validate using real-time-PCR a core set of gene expression differences that showed statistical significance in each of the temporally distinct cohorts, representing consistently maintained features of the model. Small but statistically significant increases were confirmed for cholinergic (chrm2, chrna7 and serotonergic receptors (Htr1a, Htr2a in FSL rats consistent with known neurochemical changes in the model. Much larger gene changes were validated in a number of novel genes as exemplified by TMEM176A, which showed 35-fold enrichment in the cortex and 30-fold enrichment in hippocampus of FRL animals relative to FSL.These data provide significant insights into the molecular differences underlying the Flinders model, and have potential relevance to broader depression research.

  3. Distribution network design under demand uncertainty using genetic algorithm and Monte Carlo simulation approach: a case study in pharmaceutical industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Arman; Kimiagari, Ali Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Distribution network design as a strategic decision has long-term effect on tactical and operational supply chain management. In this research, the location-allocation problem is studied under demand uncertainty. The purposes of this study were to specify the optimal number and location of distribution centers and to determine the allocation of customer demands to distribution centers. The main feature of this research is solving the model with unknown demand function which is suitable with the real-world problems. To consider the uncertainty, a set of possible scenarios for customer demands is created based on the Monte Carlo simulation. The coefficient of variation of costs is mentioned as a measure of risk and the most stable structure for firm's distribution network is defined based on the concept of robust optimization. The best structure is identified using genetic algorithms and 14 % reduction in total supply chain costs is the outcome. Moreover, it imposes the least cost variation created by fluctuation in customer demands (such as epidemic diseases outbreak in some areas of the country) to the logistical system. It is noteworthy that this research is done in one of the largest pharmaceutical distribution firms in Iran.

  4. Finding Risk Groups by Optimizing Artificial Neural Networks on the Area under the Survival Curve Using Genetic Algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Kalderstam

    Full Text Available We investigate a new method to place patients into risk groups in censored survival data. Properties such as median survival time, and end survival rate, are implicitly improved by optimizing the area under the survival curve. Artificial neural networks (ANN are trained to either maximize or minimize this area using a genetic algorithm, and combined into an ensemble to predict one of low, intermediate, or high risk groups. Estimated patient risk can influence treatment choices, and is important for study stratification. A common approach is to sort the patients according to a prognostic index and then group them along the quartile limits. The Cox proportional hazards model (Cox is one example of this approach. Another method of doing risk grouping is recursive partitioning (Rpart, which constructs a decision tree where each branch point maximizes the statistical separation between the groups. ANN, Cox, and Rpart are compared on five publicly available data sets with varying properties. Cross-validation, as well as separate test sets, are used to validate the models. Results on the test sets show comparable performance, except for the smallest data set where Rpart's predicted risk groups turn out to be inverted, an example of crossing survival curves. Cross-validation shows that all three models exhibit crossing of some survival curves on this small data set but that the ANN model manages the best separation of groups in terms of median survival time before such crossings. The conclusion is that optimizing the area under the survival curve is a viable approach to identify risk groups. Training ANNs to optimize this area combines two key strengths from both prognostic indices and Rpart. First, a desired minimum group size can be specified, as for a prognostic index. Second, the ability to utilize non-linear effects among the covariates, which Rpart is also able to do.

  5. pathogenesis of cysts of diverse etiologies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    usual causes of cystic lung lesions in childhood [1]. All these may present early in life, often with cystic air-filled lesions in the periphery of the lung, and usually require surgical treatment. Cysts occur because of other disparate acquired etiologies as well. Infections in patients with cystic fibrosis and staphylococcal ...

  6. On the Etiology of Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbaum, Bernard

    1977-01-01

    Lack of consideration of the sexually functional population has led to misconceptions about causes of sexual dysfunction functioning. Automatic functioning can mask effects of pathogenic influences on sexuality, making these effects appear random, confounding etiological issues and creating the belief that causes of sexual dysfunction and disorder…

  7. MODEL-ASSISTED ESTIMATION OF THE GENETIC VARIABILITY IN PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS RELATED TO TOMATO FRUIT GROWTH UNDER CONTRASTED WATER CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Constantinescu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress is a major abiotic stres threatening plant and crop productivity. In case of fleshy fruits, understanding Drought stress is a major abiotic stress threatening plant and crop productivity. In case of fleshy fruits, understanding mechanisms governing water and carbon accumulations and identifying genes, QTLs and phenotypes, that will enable trade-offs between fruit growth and quality under Water Deficit (WD condition is a crucial challenge for breeders and growers. In the present work, 117 recombinant inbred lines of a population of Solanum lycopersicum were phenotyped under control and WD conditions. Plant water status, fruit growth and composition were measured and data were used to calibrate a process-based model describing water and carbon fluxes in a growing fruit as a function of plant and environment. Eight genotype-dependent model parameters were estimated using a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm in order to minimize the prediction errors of fruit dry and fresh mass throughout fruit development. WD increased the fruit dry matter content (up to 85 % and decreased its fresh weight (up to 60 %, big fruit size genotypes being the most sensitive. The mean normalized root mean squared errors of the predictions ranged between 16-18 % in the population. Variability in model genotypic parameters allowed us to explore diverse genetic strategies in response to WD. An interesting group of genotypes could be discriminated in which i the low loss of fresh mass under WD was associated with high active uptake of sugars and low value of the maximum cell wall extensibility, and ii the high dry matter content in control treatment (C was associated with a slow decrease of mass flow. Using 501 SNP markers genotyped across the genome, a QTL analysis of model parameters allowed to detect three main QTLs related to xylem and phloem conductivities, on chromosomes 2, 4 and 8. The model was then applied to design ideotypes with high dry matter

  8. Etiology of syncope in hospitalized patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravi, Mehrdad; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan; Hojati, Mohammad Masood; Valinejad, Ebrahim; Senaat, Ahmad; Sohrabnejad, Reza; Khosoosi Niaki, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Syncope is a common clinical problem which can be remarkably debilitating and associated with high health care costs. Syncope is a clinical syndrome with many potential causes. The aim of the study was to determine the etiologies of patients with syncope in the emergency department (ED) of a referral and general university hospital. Methods: One hundred sixty-five consecutive patients aged more than 18 years old with syncope were admitted to the emergency department of Ayatollah Rouhani Hospital. Initially organized, systematic approach included detailed medical history and structured questionnaires for history taking, physical examination, ECG and cardiac monitoring, cardiology and neurology were done. Advanced diagnostic tests were carried out if the etiology of syncope remained unexplained. Results: Out of the 165 patients who presented to the ED between February 2012 and February 2013, 124 had definition of syncope. The mean age of male patients was 59.5±19.8, 58. The etiology of syncope was diagnosed in 104 (83%) patients. Neurocardiogenic syncope was found in 36 (29.03%) patients, cardiac arrhythmias in 40 (32.25%) patients, and acute coronary syndrome in 8 (6.45%) patients. There are some infrequent etiologies like intracranial hemorrhage in 5 patients, aortic stenosis in 4 patients, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and aortic dissection in 3 patients, Brugada and pulmonary embolism in 2 patients and carotid hypersensitivity in one patient. Conclusion: We found that cardiac arrhythmias and neurocardiogenic type are the frequent causes of syncope. In about one-sixth of the patients, no etiology was found. Approximately one-third of patients had traumatic syncope. PMID:26644899

  9. Etiology of syncope in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravi, Mehrdad; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan; Hojati, Mohammad Masood; Valinejad, Ebrahim; Senaat, Ahmad; Sohrabnejad, Reza; Khosoosi Niaki, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Syncope is a common clinical problem which can be remarkably debilitating and associated with high health care costs. Syncope is a clinical syndrome with many potential causes. The aim of the study was to determine the etiologies of patients with syncope in the emergency department (ED) of a referral and general university hospital. One hundred sixty-five consecutive patients aged more than 18 years old with syncope were admitted to the emergency department of Ayatollah Rouhani Hospital. Initially organized, systematic approach included detailed medical history and structured questionnaires for history taking, physical examination, ECG and cardiac monitoring, cardiology and neurology were done. Advanced diagnostic tests were carried out if the etiology of syncope remained unexplained. Out of the 165 patients who presented to the ED between February 2012 and February 2013, 124 had definition of syncope. The mean age of male patients was 59.5±19.8, 58. The etiology of syncope was diagnosed in 104 (83%) patients. Neurocardiogenic syncope was found in 36 (29.03%) patients, cardiac arrhythmias in 40 (32.25%) patients, and acute coronary syndrome in 8 (6.45%) patients. There are some infrequent etiologies like intracranial hemorrhage in 5 patients, aortic stenosis in 4 patients, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and aortic dissection in 3 patients, Brugada and pulmonary embolism in 2 patients and carotid hypersensitivity in one patient. We found that cardiac arrhythmias and neurocardiogenic type are the frequent causes of syncope. In about one-sixth of the patients, no etiology was found. Approximately one-third of patients had traumatic syncope.

  10. Environmental impacts of genetic improvement in growth rate and feed conversion in fish farming under density and nitrogen limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besson, M.; Aubin, J.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Komen, H.; Poelman, M.; Quillet, E.; Vandeputte, M.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Many environmental impacts can be attributed to fish farming and there is a need to explore new ways of reducing environmental impacts, such as fish genetic improvement. The environmental consequences of genetic improvement in thermal growth coefficient (TGC) and in feed conversion ratio (FCR) were

  11. An aid to the diagnosis of genetic disorders underlying adult-onset renal failure : a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, H.; Strunk, A. L. M.; Meijer, S.; Boers, J. E.; Aries, M.J.H.; Abbes, A. P.; Engel, H.; Beukhof, J. R.

    Several genetic disorders can present in adult patients with renal insufficiency. Genetic renal disease other than ADPKD accounts for ESRD in 3% of the adult Dutch population. Because of this low prevalence and their clinical heterogeneity most adult nephrologists are less familiar with these

  12. Genetic Gains in Yield and Yield Related Traits under Drought Stress and Favorable Environments in a Maize Population Improved Using Marker Assisted Recurrent Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folusho Bankole

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of marker assisted recurrent selection (MARS is to increase the frequency of favorable marker alleles in a population before inbred line extraction. This approach was used to improve drought tolerance and grain yield (GY in a biparental cross of two elite drought tolerant lines. The testcrosses of randomly selected 50 S1 lines from each of the three selection cycles (C0, C1, C2 of the MARS population, parental testcrosses and the cross between the two parents (F1 were evaluated under drought stress (DS and well watered (WW well as under rainfed conditions to determine genetic gains in GY and other agronomic traits. Also, the S1 lines derived from each selection types were genotyped with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers. Testcrosses derived from C2 produced significantly higher grain field under DS than those derived from C0 with a relative genetic gain of 7% per cycle. Also, the testcrosses of S1 lines from C2 showed an average genetic gain of 1% per cycle under WW condition and 3% per cycle under rainfed condition. Molecular analysis revealed that the frequency of favorable marker alleles increased from 0.510 at C0 to 0.515 at C2, while the effective number of alleles (Ne per locus decreased from C0 (1.93 to C2 (1.87. Our results underscore the effectiveness of MARS for improvement of GY under DS condition.

  13. ?Suspects? in Etiology of Endemic Nephropathy: Aristolochic Acid versus Mycotoxins

    OpenAIRE

    Pepeljnjak, Stjepan; Klari?, Maja ?egvi?

    2010-01-01

    Despite many hypotheses that have been challenged, the etiology of endemic nephropathy (EN) is still unknown. At present, the implications of aristolochic acid (AA) and mycotoxins (ochratoxin A—OTA and citrinin—CIT) are under debate. AA-theory is based on renal pathohistological similarities between Chinese herbs nephropathy (CHN) and EN, findings of AA-DNA adducts in EN and in patients with urinary tract tumors (UTT), as well as the domination of A:T→T:A transversions in the p53 mutational s...

  14. Oral Anaerobic Bacteria in the Etiology of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Öğrendik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is associated with periodontitis. Anti– Porphyromonas gingivalis and anti– Prevotella intermedia antibody titers were higher in patients with spondyloarthritis than in healthy people. Sulfasalazine is an effective antibiotic treatment for AS. Moxifloxacin and rifamycin were also found to be significantly effective. The etiology hypothesis suggests that oral anaerobic bacteria such as Porphyromonas spp and Prevotella spp contribute to the disease. These bacteria have been identified in AS, and we will discuss their pathogenic properties with respect to our knowledge of the disease. Periodontal pathogens are likely to be responsible for the development of AS in genetically susceptible individuals. This finding should guide the development of more comprehensive and efficacious treatment strategies for AS.

  15. [Neuropediatrics: epidemiological features and etiologies at the Dakar neurology service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, M; Sene-Diouf, F; Diop, A G; Ndao, A K; Ndiaye, M M; Ndiaye, I P

    1999-01-01

    Child neurology is a relatively young speciality of neurosciences which is at the frontier of Neurology and Paediatrics. Its development has been impulsed by the diagnosis techniques such as Neurobiology, Genetics, Neuroimaging and pedo-psychology. We conducted a retrospective survey among the in-patients from January 1980 to December 1997 in the service of Neurology of the University Hospital. Have been included children ranged from 0 to 15 years old without any racial, sexual or origin distinctive. In Neurology Department, children of 0 to 15 years old represent 10.06% of the in-patients received from 1980 to 1997. The mortality rate was 9.23%. The diseases are dominated by epilepsy and infantile encephalopathies with 31.02%, infectious diseases with 19.36% represented by tuberculosis, other bacterial, viral and parasitical etiologies, tumors with 10.36%, vascular pathology and degenerative disorders.

  16. Genetic structure of coexisting wild and managed agave populations: implications for the evolution of plants under domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, Carmen Julia; Casas, Alejandro; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Nassar, Jafet M; Colunga-GarcíaMarín, Patricia; Rocha-Ramírez, Víctor

    2015-10-03

    Domestication is a continuous evolutionary process guided by humans. This process leads to divergence in characteristics such as behaviour, morphology or genetics, between wild and managed populations. Agaves have been important resources for Mesoamerican peoples since prehistory. Some species are domesticated and others vary in degree of domestication. Agave inaequidens Koch is used in central Mexico to produce mescal, and a management gradient from gathered wild and silvicultural populations, as well as cultivated plantations, has been documented. Significant morphological differences were reported among wild and managed populations, and a high phenotypic variation in cultivated populations composed of plants from different populations. We evaluated levels of genetic diversity and structure associated with management, hypothesizing that high morphological variation would be accompanied by high genetic diversity in populations with high gene flow and low genetic structure among managed and unmanaged populations. Wild, silvicultural and cultivated populations were studied, collecting tissue of 19-30 plants per population. Through 10 nuclear microsatellite loci, we compared population genetic parameters. We analysed partition of variation associated with management categories to estimate gene flow among populations. Agave inaequidens exhibits high levels of genetic diversity (He = 0.707) and moderate genetic structure (FST = 0.112). No differences were found in levels of genetic diversity among wild (He = 0.704), silviculturally managed (He = 0.733) and cultivated (He = 0.698) populations. Bayesian analysis indicated that five genetic clusters best fit the data, with genetic groups corresponding to habitats where populations grow rather than to management. Migration rates ranged from zero between two populations to markedly high among others (M = 0.73-35.25). Natural mechanisms of gene flow and the dynamic management of agave propagules among populations favour gene

  17. Molecular Etiology of Hereditary Single-Side Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Ah Reum; Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Young; Chun, Eun Hi; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL)/single-side deafness (SSD) is a frequently encountered disability in children. The etiology of a substantial portion of USNHL/SSD still remains unknown, and genetic causes have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the authors evaluated the heritability of USNHL/SSD. The authors sequentially recruited 50 unrelated children with SSD. For an etiologic diagnosis, we performed a rigorous review on the phenotypes of family members of all children and conducted, if necessary, molecular genetic tests including targeted exome sequencing of 129 deafness genes. Among the 50 SSD children cohort, the authors identify 4 (8%) unrelated SSD probands from 4 families (SH136, SB173, SB177, and SB199) with another hearing impaired family members. Notably, all 4 probands in our cohort with a familial history of SSD also have pigmentary abnormalities such as brown freckles or premature gray hair within first degree relatives, which may indicate that genes whose products are involved with pigmentary disorder could be candidates for heritable SSD. Indeed, SH136 and SB199 turned out to segregate a mutation in MITF and PAX3, respectively, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (WS). We report, for the first time in the literature, a significant heritability of pediatric SSD. There is a strong association between the heritability of USNHL/SSD and the pigmentary abnormality, shedding a new light on the understanding of the molecular basis of heritable USNHL/SSD. In case of children with congenital SSD, it would be mandatory to rigorously screen pigmentary abnormalities. WS should also be included in the differential diagnosis of children with USNHL/SSD, especially in a familial form. PMID:26512583

  18. Transcriptome analysis deciphers evolutionary mechanisms underlying genetic differentiation between coastal and offshore anchovy populations in the Bay of Biscay

    KAUST Repository

    Montes, Iratxe

    2016-09-13

    Morphometry and otolith microchemistry point to the existence of two populations of the European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) in the Bay of Biscay: one in open seawaters, and a yet unidentified population in coastal waters. To test this hypothesis, we assembled a large number of samples from the region, including 587 juveniles and spawning adults from offshore and coastal waters, and 264 fish from other locations covering most of the species’ European range. These samples were genotyped for 456 exonic SNPs that provide a robust way to decipher adaptive processes in these populations. Two genetically differentiated populations of anchovy inhabit the Bay of Biscay with different population dynamics: (1) a large offshore population associated with marine waters included in the wide-shelf group, and (2) a coastal metapopulation adapted to estuarine environments in the Bay of Biscay and North Sea included in the narrow-shelf group. Transcriptome analysis identified neutral and adaptive evolutionary processes underlying differentiation between these populations. Reduced gene flow between offshore and coastal populations in the Bay of Biscay appears to result from divergence between two previously isolated gene pools adapted to contrasting habitats and now in secondary contact. Eleven molecular markers appear to mark divergent selection between the ecotypes, and a majority of these markers are associated with salinity variability. Ecotype differences at two outlier genes, TSSK6 and basigin, may hinder gamete compatibility between the ecotypes and reinforce reproductive isolation. Additionally, possible convergent evolution between offshore and coastal populations in the Bay of Biscay has been detected for the syntaxin1B-otoferlin gene system, which is involved in the control of larval buoyancy. Further study of exonic markers opens the possibility of understanding the mechanisms of adaptive divergence between European anchovy populations. © 2016, Springer

  19. An iterative genetic and dynamical modelling approach identifies novel features of the gene regulatory network underlying melanocyte development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhill, Emma R; Rocco, Andrea; Vibert, Laura; Nikaido, Masataka; Kelsh, Robert N

    2011-09-01

    The mechanisms generating stably differentiated cell-types from multipotent precursors are key to understanding normal development and have implications for treatment of cancer and the therapeutic use of stem cells. Pigment cells are a major derivative of neural crest stem cells and a key model cell-type for our understanding of the genetics of cell differentiation. Several factors driving melanocyte fate specification have been identified, including the transcription factor and master regulator of melanocyte development, Mitf, and Wnt signalling and the multipotency and fate specification factor, Sox10, which drive mitf expression. While these factors together drive multipotent neural crest cells to become specified melanoblasts, the mechanisms stabilising melanocyte differentiation remain unclear. Furthermore, there is controversy over whether Sox10 has an ongoing role in melanocyte differentiation. Here we use zebrafish to explore in vivo the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying melanocyte specification and differentiation. We use an iterative process of mathematical modelling and experimental observation to explore methodically the core melanocyte GRN we have defined. We show that Sox10 is not required for ongoing differentiation and expression is downregulated in differentiating cells, in response to Mitfa and Hdac1. Unexpectedly, we find that Sox10 represses Mitf-dependent expression of melanocyte differentiation genes. Our systems biology approach allowed us to predict two novel features of the melanocyte GRN, which we then validate experimentally. Specifically, we show that maintenance of mitfa expression is Mitfa-dependent, and identify Sox9b as providing an Mitfa-independent input to melanocyte differentiation. Our data supports our previous suggestion that Sox10 only functions transiently in regulation of mitfa and cannot be responsible for long-term maintenance of mitfa expression; indeed, Sox10 is likely to slow melanocyte differentiation in the

  20. Etiologic yield of autistic spectrum disorders: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Agatino; Carey, John C

    2006-02-15

    group of patients with PDD was informative in 10.5% (9/85). HRB karyotype was diagnostic in one, and molecular fragile X studies in one child. Brain MRI was informative in two children (2.3%) with relative macrocrania but no neurological features; and EEG was helpful in one child, identifying a Landau-Kleffner disorder. Audiometry and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) showed a bilateral sensorineural loss in another child. Metabolic evaluation gave normal results in all subjects. The results suggest an evaluation paradigm with reference to etiologic determination for individuals with PDDs that does not presently justify metabolic or neuroimaging on a screening basis. Recurrence risk, treatment implications, and significant and long-lasting emotional relief for the parents suggest that serious consideration be given to clinical genetic examination, genetic testing, EEG study (during wakefulness and sleep), and audiometry, despite a relatively low yield. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Etiology of Pericarditis in a Prospective Cohort of 1162 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouriet, Frédérique; Levy, Pierre-Yves; Casalta, Jean-Paul; Zandotti, Christine; Collart, Frédéric; Lepidi, Hubert; Cautela, Jennifer; Bonnet, Jean Louis; Thuny, Franck; Habib, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier

    2015-07-01

    Pericarditis is a common disorder that is present in various pathologies and may be the first manifestation of an underlying systemic disease. The aims of this study were to describe the different causes of infectious and noninfectious pericarditis and compare them with those in the literature. Between May 2007 and September 2012, we prospectively evaluated a strategy using a systematic prescription of tests for the different etiological causes of pericarditis in patients with acute pericarditis who were hospitalized in the Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery Department or admitted to the Emergency Department (University Hospital of Marseille). A total of 1162 patients with suspected pericarditis were included. A standardized diagnosis procedure was performed for 800 patients, and 362 had pericardiocentesis. Acute pericarditis was diagnosed in 933 patients. No diagnosis was established in 516 patients (55%), 197 patients suffered from postinjury syndromes, and 156 had previously known diseases that were associated with pericarditis. Our survey allowed us to relate the probable cause of pericarditis in 64 cases. An infectious etiological diagnosis was established in 53 cases. In our study, postinjury syndrome was the leading cause of pericarditis, a new diagnosis was made in 6.7% of cases, and 16% of the diagnoses were linked to a secondary, underlying disease. Using this strategy, we were able to reduce the number of idiopathic cases. In many cases, the etiologies were still identified. Long-term follow-up in the management of idiopathic pericarditis should remain of great interest for the future diagnosis of other disorders that remain hidden. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms of antioxidant enzymes CAT and SOD affect the outcome of clinical, biochemical, and anthropometric variables in people with obesity under a dietary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Guerrero, César; Parra-Carriedo, Alicia; Ruiz-de-Santiago, Diana; Galicia-Castillo, Oscar; Buenrostro-Jáuregui, Mario; Díaz-Gutiérrez, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of antioxidant enzymes CAT, GPX, and SOD are involved in the etiology of obesity and its principal comorbidities. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of aforementioned SNPs over the output of several variables in people with obesity after a nutritional intervention. The study included 92 Mexican women, which received a dietary intervention by 3 months. Participants were genotyped and stratified into two groups: (1) carriers; mutated homozygous plus heterozygous (CR) and (2) homozygous wild type (WT). A comparison between CR and WT was done in clinical (CV), biochemical (BV), and anthropometric variables (AV), at the beginning and at the end of the intervention. Participants ( n  = 92) showed statistically significant differences ( p  T GPX1 (rs1050450), - 251A>G SOD1 (rs2070424), and - 262C>T CAT (rs1001179). (B) Only CR showed statistically changes ( p  T CAT (rs7943316) and 47C>T SOD2 (rs4880). The dietary intervention effect was statistically significantly between the polymorphisms of 47C>T SOD2 and BMI, SBP, TBARS, total cholesterol, and C-LCL ( p  T CAT (rs7943316) and SBP, DBP, total cholesterol, and atherogenic index ( p  CAT enzymes.

  3. Are there sex differences in the etiology of youth antisocial behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, S Alexandra; Slawinski, Brooke L; Klump, Kelly L

    2018-01-01

    Sex differences in the etiology of youth antisocial behavior are an intuitively appealing hypothesis given the consistently higher prevalence of antisocial behavior in boys versus girls. Although a few early studies supported this possibility, reporting stronger genetic influences in females and stronger environmental influences in males, subsequent meta-analyses found that antisocial behavior was equally heritable in males and females. Critically however, none of the meta-analyses evaluated whether sex differences in etiology might be enhanced in particular subpopulations or contexts. The current study sought to do just this. We examined 1,030 child twin pairs from the Michigan State University Twin Registry, half of whom were oversampled for neighborhood disadvantage, thereby allowing us to meaningfully evaluate whether sex differences in etiology were enhanced in disadvantaged contexts. We also directly evaluated the possibility of sex differences in the etiology of teacher- versus maternal-informant reports of antisocial behavior, evaluating each informant-report for possible sex differences. Results were not consistent with differential effects of sex on etiology in disadvantaged versus advantaged contexts, but did suggest moderation by informant-report. Namely, genetic influences were stronger in girls, and environmental influences were stronger in boys, when antisocial behavior was assessed using teacher informant-reports, but not when assessed using maternal informant-reports. Critically, these findings were confirmed when we reanalyzed meta-analytic data from Burt (2009a) separately by informant. Such findings suggest that, at least in school contexts, the etiology of antisocial behavior does indeed vary across sex. Implications are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. [The etiology and pathogenesis of Sprengel's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopichenko, D N

    1999-01-01

    Basing on the analysis of clinico-radiological and functional signs, electromyographic and histological changes in the shoulder girdle (SG) upper extremities muscles, macro- and microscopic investigations of omovertebral formations in the patients with Sprengel disease, and the literature data there was formulated the scheme of etiology and pathogenesis of the inborn high position of shoulder blade. The leading role in the Sprengel disease etiology plays teratogenic exo- or endogenous harmful agent, affecting mesenchymal tissue in the moment of the vertebral column and SG inlay on the 4-5th week of embryogenesis. Underdevelopment and degeneration of the SG muscles, creation of fibrous, fibrous-cartilaginous and osteal tissues due to the embryogenesis disorder occurrence, are playing essential role in pathogenesis of anatomic-functional disorders, causing occurrence of the inborn high position of shoulder blade.

  5. The genetics of rheumatoid arthritis and the need for animal models to find and understand the underlying genes

    OpenAIRE

    Jirholt, Johan; Lindqvist, Anna-Karin B; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2000-01-01

    The causes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are largely unknown. However, RA is most probably a multifactorial disease with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Searches for genes that influence RA have been conducted in both human and experimental model materials. Both types of study have confirmed the polygenic inheritance of the disease. It has become clear that the features of RA complicate the human genetic studies. Animal models are therefore valuable tools for identifying ...

  6. Studies on the Etiology of a Leaf Spot Disease of Rough Lemon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... similar foliar lesions when artificially inoculated on healthy citrus leaves. The fungus was also re-isolated. A. niger did not elicite any disease under the conditions of this study. Rhizoctonia sp. is therefore, the causal organism of the disease under study. Keywords: Etiology, Leaf spot disease, Rough lemon, Citrus jambhiri, ...

  7. Rare etiological causes of iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis: Reports of 2 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Ereren

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Deep venous thrombosis is frequently seen in lower extremities. However, when seen in the iliac level, mass effect of an underlying pathology must be considered. In this report, we present two cases with upper region deep venous thrombosis, which had underlying pathologies of appendicitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Keywords: Deep venous thrombosis, Etiology, Emergency department

  8. Noncarious Cervical Lessions: From Etiology to Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Krolo; Aleksandra Kovačević

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to briefly summarize the most important characteristics of non-carious cervical lesions, as well as the etiological factors that lead to their formation. Cervical area represents one of the most sensitive parts of the tooth due to the specific position, as well as the structure and thickness of hard tissue. It is less resistant to various chemical and mechanical stimuli, and as a result the lesions in this area are frequently encountered in everyday practice.

  9. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization, Prevalence, and Etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Allazzam, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alaki, Sumer Madani; El Meligy, Omar Abdel Sadek

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the prevalence and possible etiological factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) among a group of children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A group of 8-12-year-old children were recruited (n = 267) from the Pediatric Dental Clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Children had at least one first permanent molar (FPM), erupted or partially erupted. Demographic information, children's medical history, and pregnancy-related data wer...

  10. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guo-Jun; Gao, Chun-Fang; Wei, Dong; Wang, Cun; Ding, Si-Qin

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hype...

  11. Etiology of syncope in hospitalized patients

    OpenAIRE

    Saravi, Mehrdad; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan; Hojati, Mohammad Masood; Valinejad, Ebrahim; Senaat, Ahmad; Sohrabnejad, Reza; Khosoosi Niaki, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Syncope is a common clinical problem which can be remarkably debilitating and associated with high health care costs. Syncope is a clinical syndrome with many potential causes. The aim of the study was to determine the etiologies of patients with syncope in the emergency department (ED) of a referral and general university hospital. Methods: One hundred sixty-five consecutive patients aged more than 18 years old with syncope were admitted to the emergency department of Ayatollah R...

  12. Etiology of short stature in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultan, M.; Afzal, M.; Ali, S.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the causes of short stature in children with special emphasis on growth hormone deficiency. Two hundred and fourteen children (140 boys and 74 girls), ranging from 02 to 15 years presenting with short stature were studied. Height and weight were plotted on appropriate growth charts and centiles determined. Relevant hematological and biochemical investigations including thyroid profile were done. Bone age was determined in all cases. Growth hormone axis was investigated after excluding other causes. Karyotyping was done in selected cases. Data was analyzed by SPSS 10.0 by descriptive statistics. Mean values were compared using t-test. In this study, the five most common etiological factors in order of frequency were Constitutional Growth Delay (CGD), Familial Short Stature (FSS), malnutrition, coeliac disease and Growth Hormone Deficiency (GHD). In 37.4% of patients, the study revealed normal variants of growth - CGD, FSS or combination of both, 46.7% cases had nonendocrinological and 15.9% had endocrinological etiology. CGD (22.1%) in males and FSS (27%) in females were the most common etiology. GHD was found in 6.1% children and it comprised 38.2% of all endocrinological causes. Children with height falling below 0.4th centile were more likely to have a pathological short stature (79.2%) compared to 39.3% whose height was below 3rd centile but above 0.4th centile (p<0.05). CGD and FSS are most common causes of short stature in boys and girls respectively, whereas, GHD is a relatively uncommon etiology. (author)

  13. Etiology, diagnosis, and clinical management of vulvodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadownik LA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Leslie A Sadownik University of British Columbia, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vancouver, BC, Canada Abstract: Chronic vulvar pain or discomfort for which no obvious etiology can be found, ie, vulvodynia, can affect up to 16% of women. It may affect girls and women across all age groups and ethnicities. Vulvodynia is a significant burden to society, the health care system, the affected woman, and her intimate partner. The etiology is multifactorial and may involve local injury or inflammation, and peripheral and or central sensitization of the nervous system. An approach to the diagnosis and management of a woman presenting with chronic vulvar pain should address the biological, psychological, and social/interpersonal factors that contribute to her illness. The gynecologist has a key role in excluding other causes for vulvar pain, screening for psychosexual and pelvic floor dysfunction, and collaborating with other health care providers to manage a woman's pain. An important component of treatment is patient education regarding the pathogenesis of the pain and the negative impact of experiencing pain on a woman's overall quality of life. An individualized, holistic, and often multidisciplinary approach is needed to effectively manage the woman's pain and pain-related distress. Keywords: vulvodynia, diagnosis, treatment, etiology, sexual pain disorder, dyspareunia, vestibulodynia, assessment, treatment, multidisciplinary

  14. Etiology, Localization and Prognosis in Cerebellar Infarctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Yücel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovasculer disease are the most frequent disease of the brain. Cerebellar infarct remains % 1.5-4.2 of these diseases. Etiological factors, lesion localization, symptoms and findings and relationship with prognosis of our patients with cerebellar infarct were investigated in our study. For this purpose, 32 patients were evaluated who were admitted to the Dicle University Medical School Department of Neurology in 1995-2001 hospitalized with the diagnosis of clinically and radiological confirmed cerebellar infarction.All of patients in the study group, 21 (%65.6 were male and 11 (%34.3 female. Age of overall patients ranged between 40 and 75 years with a mean of 57.8±10.2 years. Atherothrombotic infarct was the most frequent reason at the etiologic clinical classification. The most frequently found localization was the posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct (%50. The leading two risk factors were hypertension (%78.1 and cigarette smoking (%50. The most common sign and symptoms were vertigo (%93.7, vomiting (%75, headache (%68.7 and cerebellar dysfunction findings (%50. The mean duration of hospitalization was 16.3±7.6 days. Overall mortality rate was found to be % 6.2. Finally, the most remarkable risk factors at cerebellar infarct patients are hypertension and atherosclerosis at etiology. We are considering that, controlling of these factors will reduce the appearance frequency of cerebellar infarcts.

  15. An atlas of genetic correlations across human diseases and traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Finucane, Hilary K; Anttila, Verneri

    2015-01-01

    Identifying genetic correlations between complex traits and diseases can provide useful etiological insights and help prioritize likely causal relationships. The major challenges preventing estimation of genetic correlation from genome-wide association study (GWAS) data with current methods are t...

  16. Etiology of end stage renal disease in dialysis patient in Gilan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khosravi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD in every community differ according to genetic, nutrition, and public health status. ESRD,the terminal stage of chronic renal failure,needs replacement therapy otherwise could lead to death. The aim of the study is to determine the relative frequency of ESRD etiology in hemodialysis patients of Gilan province. Methods:This descriptive study was performed on 407 patients who were being hemodialysis in all hemodialysis centers of the Gilan province from September 2002 to September 2003. The original data was collected from the medical records of patients. Results: The most prevalent causes were: hypertension 35.4% ; unknown etiology 16.2% ; diabetes melitus 13.8% , glomerulopathies 9.6% , urologic causes 9.1%, cystic kidney diseases 7.6 % ; other causes 5.9 % ; congenital 2.5%. Conclusion: In our study hypertension was the first etiology of ESRD, followed by unknown causes, however nephrology textbooks indicate diabetes melitus as the primary and hypertension as the secondary etiology of ESRD,.

  17. Epidemiology, Etiology and Treatment of Isolated Cleft Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine L Burg

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Isolated cleft palate (CPO is the rarest form of oral clefting. The incidence of CPO varies substantially by geography from 1.3 to 25.3 per 10,000 live births, with the highest rates in British Columbia, Canada and the lowest rates in Nigeria, Africa. Stratified by ethnicity/race, the highest rates of CPO are observed in non-Hispanic Whites and the lowest in Africans; nevertheless, rates of CPO are consistently higher in females compared to males. Approximately fifty percent of children born with cleft palate occur as part of a known genetic syndrome or with another malformation (e.g., congenital heart defects and the other half occur as solitary defects, referred to often as non-syndromic clefts. The etiology of CPO is multifactorial involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. Several animal models have yielded insight into the molecular pathways responsible for proper closure of the palate, including the BMP, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways. In terms of environmental exposures, only maternal tobacco smoke exposure has been found to have a strong association with CPO. Some studies have suggested that maternal glucocorticoid exposure may also be important. Clearly, there is a need for larger epidemiologic studies to further investigate both genetic and environmental risk factors and potential gene-environment interactions. In terms of treatment, there is a need for long-term comprehensive care including surgical, dental and speech pathology. Overall, five main themes emerge as critical in advancing research: (1 monitoring of the occurrence of CPO (capacity building; (2 detailed phenotyping of the severity (biology; (3 understanding of the genetic and environmental risk factors (primary prevention; (4 access to early detection and multidisciplinary treatment (clinical services; and (5 understanding predictors of recurrence and possible interventions among families with a child with CPO (secondary prevention.

  18. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment of Isolated Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Madeleine L.; Chai, Yang; Yao, Caroline A.; Magee, William; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cleft palate (CPO) is the rarest form of oral clefting. The incidence of CPO varies substantially by geography from 1.3 to 25.3 per 10,000 live births, with the highest rates in British Columbia, Canada and the lowest rates in Nigeria, Africa. Stratified by ethnicity/race, the highest rates of CPO are observed in non-Hispanic Whites and the lowest in Africans; nevertheless, rates of CPO are consistently higher in females compared to males. Approximately fifty percent of cases born with cleft palate occur as part of a known genetic syndrome or with another malformation (e.g., congenital heart defects) and the other half occur as solitary defects, referred to often as non-syndromic clefts. The etiology of CPO is multifactorial involving genetic and environmental risk factors. Several animal models have yielded insight into the molecular pathways responsible for proper closure of the palate, including the BMP, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways. In terms of environmental exposures, only maternal tobacco smoke has been found to be strongly associated with CPO. Some studies have suggested that maternal glucocorticoid exposure may also be important. Clearly, there is a need for larger epidemiologic studies to further investigate both genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions. In terms of treatment, there is a need for long-term comprehensive care including surgical, dental and speech pathology. Overall, five main themes emerge as critical in advancing research: (1) monitoring of the occurrence of CPO (capacity building); (2) detailed phenotyping of the severity (biology); (3) understanding of the genetic and environmental risk factors (primary prevention); (4) access to early detection and multidisciplinary treatment (clinical services); and (5) understanding predictors of recurrence and possible interventions among families with a child with CPO (secondary prevention). PMID:26973535

  19. Clinical presentation and pharmacotherapy response in social anxiety disorder: The effect of etiological beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonah N; Potter, Carrie M; Drabick, Deborah A G; Blanco, Carlos; Schneier, Franklin R; Liebowitz, Michael R; Heimberg, Richard G

    2015-07-30

    Therapies for social anxiety disorder (SAD) leave many patients symptomatic at the end of treatment and little is known about predictors of treatment response. This study investigated the predictive relationship of patients' etiological attributions to initial clinical features and response to pharmacotherapy. One hundred thirty-seven individuals seeking treatment for SAD received 12 weeks of open treatment with paroxetine. Participants completed the Attributions for the Etiology of Social Anxiety Scale at baseline in addition to measures of social anxiety and depression at baseline and over the course of treatment. A latent class analysis suggested four profiles of etiological beliefs about one's SAD that may be characterized as: Familial Factors, Need to be Liked, Bad Social Experiences, and Diffuse Beliefs. Patients in the more psychosocially-driven classes, Need to be Liked and Bad Social Experiences, had the most severe social anxiety and depression at baseline. Patients in the Familial Factors class, who attributed their SAD to genetic, biological, and early life experiences, had the most rapid response to paroxetine.These results highlight the effect of biological and genetically-oriented etiological beliefs on pharmacological intervention, have implications for person-specific treatment selection, and identify potential points of intervention to augment treatment response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Etiology and neuropsychology of comorbidity between RD and ADHD: the case for multiple-deficit models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcutt, Erik G; Betjemann, Rebecca S; McGrath, Lauren M; Chhabildas, Nomita A; Olson, Richard K; DeFries, John C; Pennington, Bruce F

    2010-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and reading disability (RD) are complex childhood disorders that frequently co-occur, but the etiology of this comorbidity remains unknown. Participants were 457 twin pairs from the Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center (CLDRC) twin study, an ongoing study of the etiology of RD, ADHD, and related disorders. Phenotypic analyses compared groups with and without RD and ADHD on composite measures of six cognitive domains. Twin analyses were then used to test the etiology of the relations between the disorders and any cognitive weaknesses. Phenotypic analyses supported the hypothesis that both RD and ADHD arise from multiple cognitive deficits rather than a single primary cognitive deficit. RD was associated independently with weaknesses on measures of phoneme awareness, verbal reasoning, and working memory, whereas ADHD was independently associated with a heritable weakness in inhibitory control. RD and ADHD share a common cognitive deficit in processing speed, and twin analyses indicated that this shared weakness is primarily due to common genetic influences that increase susceptibility to both disorders. Individual differences in processing speed are influenced by genes that also increase risk for RD, ADHD, and their comorbidity. These results suggest that processing speed measures may be useful for future molecular genetic studies of the etiology of comorbidity between RD and ADHD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  1. An Underlying Common Factor, Influenced by Genetics and Unique Environment, Explains the Covariation Between Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Burnout: A Swedish Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Lisa; Blom, Victoria; Bergström, Gunnar; Svedberg, Pia

    2016-12-01

    Depression and anxiety are highly comorbid due to shared genetic risk factors, but less is known about whether burnout shares these risk factors. We aimed to examine whether the covariation between major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and burnout is explained by common genetic and/or environmental factors. This cross-sectional study included 25,378 Swedish twins responding to a survey in 2005-2006. Structural equation models were used to analyze whether the trait variances and covariances were due to additive genetics, non-additive genetics, shared environment, and unique environment. Univariate analyses tested sex limitation models and multivariate analysis tested Cholesky, independent pathway, and common pathway models. The phenotypic correlations were 0.71 (0.69-0.74) between MDD and GAD, 0.58 (0.56-0.60) between MDD and burnout, and 0.53 (0.50-0.56) between GAD and burnout. Heritabilities were 45% for MDD, 49% for GAD, and 38% for burnout; no statistically significant sex differences were found. A common pathway model was chosen as the final model. The common factor was influenced by genetics (58%) and unique environment (42%), and explained 77% of the variation in MDD, 69% in GAD, and 44% in burnout. GAD and burnout had additive genetic factors unique to the phenotypes (11% each), while MDD did not. Unique environment explained 23% of the variability in MDD, 20% in GAD, and 45% in burnout. In conclusion, the covariation was explained by an underlying common factor, largely influenced by genetics. Burnout was to a large degree influenced by unique environmental factors not shared with MDD and GAD.

  2. Intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis in patients with symptomatic epilepsy and epilepsy of unknown etiology ('cryptogenic').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, S; Soellner, C; Bien, C G; Tumani, H

    2017-09-01

    To compare the frequency of intrathecal immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis in patients with symptomatic epilepsy and epilepsy of unknown etiology ('cryptogenic'). Patients with epileptic (n = 301) and non-epileptic (n = 10) seizures were retrospectively screened for autochthonous intrathecal Ig synthesis and oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid. Intrathecal IgG/OCBs were detected in 8% of patients with epilepsies of unknown etiology, 5% of patients with first seizures of unknown cause and 0-4% of patients with epilepsy due to brain tumors, cerebrovascular disease or other etiologies. Intrathecal IgG/OCBs were not seen in patients with psychogenic seizures. Identical OCBs in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were more common in all patient groups (10-40% depending on underlying etiology). Intrathecal IgG synthesis/OCBs were observed slightly more frequently in patients with 'cryptogenic' epilepsy and with first seizures of unknown etiology than in other patient groups. However, this remained an infrequent finding and thus we could not confirm humoral immunity as a leading disease mechanism in patients with epilepsy in general or with unknown etiology in particular. © 2017 EAN.

  3. Classifying Hydroceles of the Pelvis and Groin: An Overview of Etiology, Secondary Complications, Evaluation, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagur, Gautam; Gandhi, Jason; Suh, Yiji; Weissbart, Steven; Sheynkin, Yefim R.; Smith, Noel L.; Joshi, Gargi; Khan, Sardar Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A hydrocele is defined as the pathological buildup of serous fluid in the pelvis and groin due to various etiologies such as diseases or trauma. It has distinct clinical manifestations, particularly discomfort and psychosocial distress. Understanding the anatomy, embryology, and physiology associated with hydrocele formation is crucial to understand its onset and progression. Materials and Methods A MEDLINE® search was conducted using keywords for the relevant classification of hydrocele and its etiology, complications, sexual barriers, evaluation, and management. Results Appropriately classifying the hydrocele as primary, secondary communicating, secondary noncommunicating, microbe-induced, inflammatory, iatrogenic, trauma-induced, tumor-induced, canal of Nuck, congenital, and giant is important for identifying the underlying etiology. Often this process is overlooked when the classification or etiology is too rare. A focused evaluation is important for this, so that timely management can be provided. We comprehensively review the classifications, etiology, and secondary complications of hydrocele. Pitfalls of current diagnostic techniques are explored along with recommended methods for accurate diagnosis and current treatment options. Conclusion Due to the range of classifications and etiologies of hydrocele in the pelvis and groin, a deliberate differential diagnosis is essential to avoiding imminent life-threatening complications as well as providing the appropriate treatment. PMID:28559772

  4. Developmental genetic analysis of fruit shape traits under different environmental conditions in sponge gourd (Luffa cylindrical (L Roem. Violales, Cucurbitaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of genetic main effects and genotype × environment (GE interaction effects for the fruit shape traits fruit length and fruit circumference in the sponge gourd (Luffa cylindrical (L Roem. Violales, Cucurbitaceae was conducted for diallel cross data from two planting seasons. A genetic model including fruit direct effects and maternal effects and unconditional and conditional variances analysis was used to evaluate the development of the fruit at four maturation stages. The variance analysis results indicated that fruit length and circumference were simultaneously affected by fruit direct genetic effects and maternal effects as well as GE interaction effects. Fruit direct genetic effects were relatively more important for both fruit shape traits during the whole developmental period. Gene activation was mostly due to additive effects at the first maturation stage and dominance effects were mainly active during the other three stages. The fruit shape trait correlation coefficients due to different genetic effects and the phenotypic correlation coefficients varied significantly for the various maturation stages. The results indicate that it is relatively easy to improve the two fruit shape traits for market purposes by carefully selecting the parents at the first maturation stage 3 days after flowering instead of at fruit economic maturation.

  5. Childhood hydrocephalus – is radiological morphology associated with etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss-Skiftesvik, Jon; Andresen, Morten; Juhler, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians use a non-standardized, intuitive approach when correlating radiological morphology and etiology of hydrocephalus.......Clinicians use a non-standardized, intuitive approach when correlating radiological morphology and etiology of hydrocephalus....

  6. Neurodevelopmental Hypothesis about the Etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Inui

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous models or hypotheses of autism spectral disorder (ASD failed to take into full consideration the chronological and causal developmental trajectory, leading to the emergence of diverse phenotypes through a complex interaction between individual etiologies and environmental factors. Those phenotypes include persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction (criteria A in DSM-5, and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities (criteria B in DSM-5. In this article, we proposed a domain-general model that can explain criteria in DSM-5 based on the assumption that the same etiological mechanism would trigger the various phenotypes observed in different individuals with ASD. In the model, we assumed the following joint causes as the etiology of autism: (1 Hypoplasia of the pons in the brainstem, occurring immediately following neural tube closure; and (2 Deficiency in the GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid developmental switch during the perinatal period. Microstructural abnormalities of the pons directly affect both the structural and functional development of the brain areas strongly connected to it, especially amygdala. The impairment of GABA switch could not only lead to the deterioration of inhibitory processing in the neural network, but could also cause abnormal cytoarchitecture. We introduced a perspective that atypical development in both brain structure and function can give full explanation of diverse phenotypes and pathogenetic mechanism of ASD. Finally, we discussed about neural mechanisms underlying the phenotypic characteristics of ASD that are not described in DSM-5 but should be considered as important foundation: sleep, global precedence, categorical perception, intelligence, interoception and motor control.

  7. Genetic Dissection of Bioenergy-Related Traits in Sweet Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) under Danish Agro-Climatic Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocoeur, Anne Raymonde Joelle

    plant for sequencing in 2009 promoting it as a C4 model plant. Among the very diverse genetic resources available for sorghum, sweet sorghum plants; amassing large quantities of juice-rich and sugar-rich stem, grain and vegetative biomass; have been enlightened as bioenergy crop as it can produced from...... a single plant food, feed and fuel. Sweet sorghum has gained interest in Europe to replace maize, for biogas and bioenergy productions, but this versatile crop is sensitive to chilling temperatures and little breeding efforts have been done toward its cold acclimation. The state-of-art of using...... in Denmark using a panel of genetic and genomic tools. A large bi-parental QTL mapping study was carried out by using several mapping populations progenies, derived from a cross between a sweet and grain sorghum and they were grown and phenotyped in China and Denmark. The genetic map used for this bi...

  8. The genetics of rheumatoid arthritis and the need for animal models to find and understand the underlying genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirholt, J; Lindqvist, A B; Holmdahl, R

    2001-01-01

    The causes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are largely unknown. However, RA is most probably a multifactorial disease with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Searches for genes that influence RA have been conducted in both human and experimental model materials. Both types of study have confirmed the polygenic inheritance of the disease. It has become clear that the features of RA complicate the human genetic studies. Animal models are therefore valuable tools for identifying genes and determining their pathogenic role in the disease. This is probably the fastest route towards unravelling the pathogenesisis of RA and developing new therapies.

  9. 76 FR 63891 - Foreign Quarantine; Etiological Agents, Hosts, and Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... Foreign Quarantine; Etiological Agents, Hosts, and Vectors AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and... cover the importation of etiological agents and the hosts and vectors of human disease. The changes are... for importation of etiological agents, hosts, and vectors (42 CFR 71.54), requiring persons to obtain...

  10. The Interaction between the Immune System and Epigenetics in the Etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Nardone, Stefano; Elliott, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have firmly established that the etiology of autism includes both genetic and environmental components. However, we are only just beginning to elucidate the environmental factors that might be involved in the development of autism, as well as the molecular mechanisms through which they function. Mounting epidemiological and biological evidence suggest that prenatal factors that induce a more activated immune state in the mother are involved in the development of autism. In para...

  11. Etiological study of microcytic hypochromic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kafle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microcytic hypochromic anemia is a distinct morphologic subtype of anemia with well- de ned etiology and treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the etiology and frequency of microcytic hypochromic anemia. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital. One hundred cases of microcytic hypochromic anemia were included. Relevant clinical history, hemogram, reticulocyte count, iron pro les were documented in a proforma. Bone marrow aspiration and hemoglobin electrophoresis was conducted when required. Data was analysed by Microsoft SPSS 16 windows. Result: Iron de ciency was the commonest etiology (49%. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (20.8% was the commonest cause of iron de ciency, malignancy (24.3% was the commonest cause of anemia of chronic disease. Mean value of Mean Corpuscular Volume was lowest in hemolytic anemia (71.0 . Mean Red cell Distribution Width was normal (14.0% in hemolytic anemia but was raised in other types. Mean serum iron was reduced in iron de ciency anemia (32.2μg/dl and chronic disease (34.8μg/dl, normal in hemolytic anemia (83μg/dl and raised in sideroblastic anemia (295μg/dl. Mean serum ferritin was reduced in iron de ciency anemia (7.6ng/ml, raised in chronic disease (158.6ng/ml and normal in hemolytic anemia (99.2ng/ml. Serum ferritin was normal in sideroblastic anemia (93ng/ml. Mean Total Iron Binding Capacity was raised in iron de ciency anemia (458μg/dl and normal in other microcytic hypochromic anemias. Conclusion: Diagnosis of microcytic hypochromic anemia requires a standardized approach which includes clinical details, hemogram, peripheral blood smear, reticulocyte count, iron pro le, hemoglobin electrophoresis and bone marrow examination. 

  12. Genetic Variation of Morphological Traits and Transpiration in an Apple Core Collection under Well-Watered Conditions: Towards the Identification of Morphotypes with High Water Use Efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Lopez

    Full Text Available Water use efficiency (WUE is a quantitative measurement which improvement is a major issue in the context of global warming and restrictions in water availability for agriculture. In this study, we aimed at studying the variation and genetic control of WUE and the respective role of its components (plant biomass and transpiration in a perennial fruit crop. We explored an INRA apple core collection grown in a phenotyping platform to screen one-year-old scions for their accumulated biomass, transpiration and WUE under optimal growing conditions. Plant biomass was decompose into morphological components related to either growth or organ expansion. For each trait, nine mixed models were evaluated to account for the genetic effect and spatial heterogeneity inside the platform. The Best Linear Unbiased Predictors of genetic values were estimated after model selection. Mean broad-sense heritabilities were calculated from variance estimates. Heritability values indicated that biomass (0.76 and WUE (0.73 were under genetic control. This genetic control was lower in plant transpiration with an heritability of 0.54. Across the collection, biomass accounted for 70% of the WUE variability. A Hierarchical Ascendant Classification of the core collection indicated the existence of six groups of genotypes with contrasting morphology and WUE. Differences between morphotypes were interpreted as resulting from differences in the main processes responsible for plant growth: cell division leading to the generation of new organs and cell elongation leading to organ dimension. Although further studies will be necessary on mature trees with more complex architecture and multiple sinks such as fruits, this study is a first step for improving apple plant material for the use of water.

  13. Genetic Background and Environment Influence the Effects of Mutations in pykF and Help Reveal Mechanisms Underlying Their Benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    environment interactions characterize the evolution of drug resistance in yeast. Genetics 192:241–252. Gompel, N., and B. Prud’homme. 2009. The causes...3314–3323. 84 Walk, S. T., E. W. Alm, D. M. Gordon, J. L. Ram, G. A. Toranzos, J. M. Tiedje, and T. S. Whittam. 2009. Cryptic lineages of the genus

  14. Indirect Genetic Effects and the Spread of Infectious Disease: Are We Capturing the Full Heritable Variation Underlying Disease Prevalence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipschutz-Powell, D.; Woolliams, J.A.; Bijma, P.; Doeschl-Wilson, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    Reducing disease prevalence through selection for host resistance offers a desirable alternative to chemical treatment. Selection for host resistance has proven difficult, however, due to low heritability estimates. These low estimates may be caused by a failure to capture all the relevant genetic

  15. [Infrequent etiology inguinal tumor: Nuck channel cyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabistany-Esqué, A C; Martinez-Medel, J; Royo-Arilla, B; Sanz-Asín, O; Aísa-Rivera, G

    2016-04-01

    Cyst of Nuck is an infrequent disease originated in the inadequate obliteration of the processus vaginalis during the embrionary life of the woman. Clinically usually appears as a slowly growth inguinal tumor, painless, smooth, soft, fluctuant and irreducible. Differential diagnosis must include inguinal hernia and other etiologies of inguinal tumor, for which echography is the main diagnostic test. Treatment consists on surgical extirpation and local reparation. It is exposed a case of a patient with cyst of Nuck clinically typical. It is made a review of clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approach of this disease.

  16. Testicular cancer - epidemiology, etiology and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrusova, M.; Ondrus, D.

    2012-01-01

    Testicular cancer is a rare malignancy, that affects 1-2 % of male population. Trends of testicular cancer mortality are stable for a long period of time, even that incidence shows a rapid growth. This paper deals with national trends in testicular cancer incidence and mortality in Slovakia from 1968 to 2007 by using the join-point regression analysis to propose potential changes in health care. The authors noted a statistically significant increase in the values of incidence and improvement in mortality after 1975. Paper also deals with the etiology and risk factors of this malignancy. (author)

  17. Treacher Collins syndrome: etiology, pathogenesis and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Paul A; Dixon, Jill; Dixon, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare congenital disorder of craniofacial development that arises as the result of mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes a nucleolar phosphoprotein known as Treacle. Individuals diagnosed with TCS frequently undergo multiple reconstructive surgeries, which are rarely fully corrective. Identifying potential avenues for rescue and/or repair of TCS depends on a profound appreciation of the etiology and pathogenesis of the syndrome. Recent research using animal models has not only determined the cellular basis of TCS but also, more importantly, unveiled a successful avenue for therapeutic intervention and prevention of the craniofacial anomalies observed in TCS. PMID:19107148

  18. Etiology of pediatric acute liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Jing

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric acute liver failure (PALF is a complex syndrome with rapid progression, and the cause of PALF is age-dependent. This article analyzes the common causes of PALF in clinical practice, including infection factors, inherited metabolic factors, poisoning and drugs, abnormal perfusion, and autoimmune diseases, among which infection factors are the most common cause. With the improvement in diagnosis and treatment techniques, the diagnostic rate of PALF caused by inherited metabolic diseases and autoimmune diseases keeps increasing. Due to the small number of PALF patients, there lacks experience in etiological diagnosis. This article summarizes related reports, in order to provide a reference for screening the causes of PALF.

  19. Etiological Diagnosis of Undervirilized Male / XY Disorder of Sex Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atta, I.; Ibrahim, M.; Parkash, A.; Lone, S. W.; Khan, Y. N.; Raza, J.

    2014-01-01

    .7%). Genitogram was carried out in 86 (45.98%) patients. Presumptive etiological diagnosis of androgen sensitivity syndrome/ 5-alpha reductase deficiency, testicular biosynthetic defect/ leydig cell hypoplasia, partial gonadal dysgenesis, ovotesticular DSD, XX testicular DSD, mixed gonadal dysgenesis, testicular vanishing syndrome, klinefelter syndrome, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, isolated hypospadias and isolated micropenis was made. Conclusion: Clinical, chromosomal and hormonal assessment may help in making the presumptive etiological diagnosis. Further molecular genetics analysis are needed in differentiating these abnormalities and to make a final diagnosis. (author)

  20. Genetic variability in elite barley genotypes based on the agro-morphological characteristics evaluated under irrigated system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Fernando Amabile

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Recently, researches have shown that the Brazilian savannah has a great potential to supply the demand for barley grains. The purpose of this study was to assess the genetic variability in 39 elite barley (Hordeum vulgare L. genotypes based on the agro-morphological traits of a crop irrigated in the savannah system. An irrigation experiment in the design of complete randomized block with four replicates was conducted at Federal District - Brazil. The evaluated traits were: distance from the last knot to the rachis, distance from the flag leaf to rachis, spike length, number of grains by ear, flag leaf area, plant height, silking, lodging, grain yield, thousand-seed weight, protein content and grain commercial classification. After using analysis of variance the means were used to estimate the genetic dissimilarity among all genotypes pairs based on the Mahalanobis’ generalized distance. Cluster analysis using genetic distance matrix was performed having Unweighted Pair Group Method using Arithmetic Means method (UPGMA as the criteria. Highly significant differences were found among the genotypes for all traits evaluated. The high coefficient of genetic variation indicates the possibility of having genetic gains for all traits. The traits that most contributed to the variability were the flag leaf area and silking, while the protein content and lodging were the traits that contributed the least. Based on the cluster analysis, at least three major groups of similarity were found. There was a clustering trend of two and six-rowed materials. The most divergent genotypes were PFC 2005123, Antártica-1, Nandi and FM 404.

  1. An unusual etiology in cold injury: Liquefied petroleum gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapı, Emin; Bozkurt, Mehmet; Taylan Filinte, Gaye; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Alioğlu, Celal

    2017-05-01

    Cold injury is a condition that causes reversible and irreversible damage when tissues are exposed to cold. This injury occurs due to various etiologies, and the most commonly observed ones include contact with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) used in households, vehicles, and industry. LPG is a type of gas stored in liquid state under high pressure within cylinders. LPG contains a mixture of propane and butane gases. Direct contact of these gases with the tissues has the potential to cause metabolic, toxic, and respiratory damage. In this study, we present the cases of four patients with cold injury in the face and upper extremity caused by a pressurized jet stream of liquid gas that escaped out of the valves of the LPG cylinders. The patients had bullous lesions in the upper extremities and the face and second- and third-degree cold injuries with fibrotic and necrotic areas. The superficial defects secondarily healed with minimal scarring, while the necrotic finger had to be amputated. Cold injury on the skin caused by high-pressure jet streams of liquid gas as in our study is a rare occurrence. Our patients are important cases due to the rare etiology of cold injury.

  2. An Etiologic Profile of Anemia in 405 Geriatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabea Geisel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anemia is a common condition in the elderly and a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality, reducing not only functional capacity and mobility but also quality of life. Currently, few data are available regarding anemia in hospitalized geriatric patients. Our retrospective study investigated epidemiology and causes of anemia in 405 hospitalized geriatric patients. Methods. Data analysis was performed using laboratory parameters determined during routine hospital admission procedures (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin saturation, C-reactive protein, vitamin B12, folic acid, and creatinine in addition to medical history and demographics. Results. Anemia affected approximately two-thirds of subjects. Of 386 patients with recorded hemoglobin values, 66.3% were anemic according to WHO criteria, mostly (85.1% in a mild form. Anemia was primarily due to iron deficiency (65%, frequently due to underlying chronic infection (62.1%, or of mixed etiology involving a combination of chronic disease and iron deficiency, with absolute iron deficiency playing a comparatively minor role. Conclusion. Greater awareness of anemia in the elderly is warranted due to its high prevalence and negative effect on outcomes, hospitalization duration, and mortality. Geriatric patients should be routinely screened for anemia and etiological causes of anemia individually assessed to allow timely initiation of appropriate therapy.

  3. Acute symptomatic neonatal seizures in preterm neonates: etiologies and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Francesco; Spagnoli, Carlotta

    2017-12-15

    Acute symptomatic neonatal seizures in preterm newborns are a relevant clinical challenge due to the presence of many knowledge gaps. Etiology-wise, acute symptomatic seizures have an age-specific epidemiology, with intraventricular hemorrhage and its complications representing the first cause in extremely and very preterm neonates, whereas other etiologies have similar occurrence rates as in full-term infants. Specific treatment strategies for the premature neonates are not yet available. Studies suggest a similarly low response rate with even more unfavorable prognosis than in full-term infants. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic changes are likely under way during the preterm period, with the potential to affect both effectiveness and safety of antiepileptic drugs in these patients. However, due to the lack of clear evidence to guide prioritization of second-line drugs, off-label medications are frequently indicated by review papers and flow-charts, and are prescribed in clinical practice. We therefore conclude by exploring potential future lines of research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic improvement of under-utilized and neglected crops in low income food deficit countries through irradiation and related techniques. Proceedings of a final research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    The majority of the world's food is produced from only a few crops, and yet many neglected and under-utilized crops are extremely important for food production in low income food deficit countries (LIFDCs). As the human population grows at an alarming rate in LIFDCs, food availability has declined and is also affected due to environmental factors, lack of improvement of local crop species, erosion of genetic diversity and dependence on a few crop species for food supply. Neglected crops are traditionally grown by farmers in their centres of origin or centres of diversity, where they are still important for the subsistence of local communities, and maintained by socio-cultural preferences and traditional uses. These crops remain inadequately characterised and, until very recently, have been largely ignored by research and conservation. Farmers are losing these crops because they are less competitive with improved major crop species. Radiation-induced mutation techniques have successfully been used that benefited the most genetic improvement of 'major crops' and their know-how have a great potential for enhancing the use of under-utilized and neglected species and speeding up their domestication and crop improvement. The FAO/IAEA efforts on genetic improvement of under-utilized and neglected species play a strategic role in complementing the work that is being carried out worldwide in their promotion. This CRP entitled Genetic Improvement of Under-utilized and Neglected Crops in LIFDCs through Irradiation and Related Techniques was initiated in 1998 with an overall objective to improve food security, enhance nutritional balance, and promote sustainable agriculture in LIFDCs. Specific objectives addressed major constraints to productivity of neglected and under-utilized crops by genetic improvement with radiation-induced mutations and biotechnology in order to enhance economic viability and sustain crop species diversity, and in future to benefit small farmers. This

  5. Genetics in Keratoconus ? What is New?

    OpenAIRE

    Moussa, Sarah; Grabner, G?nther; Ruckhofer, Josef; Dietrich, Marie; Reitsamer, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    Background: Keratoconus is characterized as a bilateral, progressive, non-inflammatory thinning of the cornea resulting in blurred vision due to irregular astigmatism. Keratoconus has a multifactorial etiology, with multiple genetic and environmental components contributing to the disease pathophysiology. Several genomic loci and genes have been identified that highlight the complex molecular etiology of this disease. Conclusion: The review focuses on current knowledge of these genetic risk f...

  6. Etiology of liver cirrhosis in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum; Aguilar-Ramírez, Juan R; Reyes, Angel; Dehesa, Margarita; Juórez, Alberto; Castñeda, Beatriz; Sánchez-Avila, Francisco; Poo, Jorge L; Guevara González, Luis; Lizardi, Javier; Valdovinos, Miguel A; Uribe, Misael; Contreras, Ana M; Tirado, Patricia; Aguirre, Jesús; Rivera-Benítez, Cesar; Santiago-Santiago, Ramón; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco; Muñoz, Linda; Guerroro, Arnoldo; Ramos, Mayra; Rodríguez-Hernández, Heriberto; Jacobo-Karam, Jannett

    2004-01-01

    In the last decades it has been suggested that the main cause of liver cirrhosis in Mexico is alcohol. Currently in Western countries hepatitis C virus stage liver disease and liver transplantation. In Mexico, we have no data relative to the etiology of liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the main causes of liver cirrhosis in Mexico. Eight hospitals located in different areas of the country were invited to participate in this study. Those hospitals provide health care to different social classes of the country. The inclusion criteria were the presence of either an histological or a clinical and biochemical diagnosis of liver cirrhosis. A total 1,486 cases were included in this study. The etiology of liver cirrhosis was alcohol in 587 (39.5%), HCV 544 (36.6%), cryptogenic 154 (10.4%), PBC 84 (5.7%), HBV 75 (5.0%) and other 42 (2.8%). There was no statistical difference between alcohol and HCV. We conclude that the main causes of liver cirrhosis in Mexico are alcohol and HCV.

  7. Rhabdomyolysis with different etiologies in childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaygut, Demet; Torun Bayram, Meral; Kasap, Belde; Soylu, Alper; Türkmen, Mehmet; Kavukcu, Salih

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate different etiologies and management of the rhabdomyolysis in children. METHODS Eight pediatric rhabdomyolysis cases who applied to the Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine Department of Pediatric Nephrology with different etiologies between January 2004 and January 2012 were evaluated in terms of age, gender, admission symptoms, physical examination findings, factors provoking rhabdomyolysis, number of rhabdomyolysis attacks, laboratory results, family history and the final diagnosis received after the treatment. RESULTS Average diagnosis ages of eight cases were 129 (24-192) ± 75.5 mo and five of them were girls. All of them had applied with the complaint of muscle pain, calf pain, and dark color urination. Infection (pneumonia) and excessive physical activity were the most important provocative factors and excessive licorice consumption was observed in one case. In 5 cases, acute kidney injury was determined and two cases needed hemodialysis. As a result of the further examinations; the cases had received diagnoses of rhabdomyolysis associated with mycoplasma pneumoniae, sepsis associated rhabdomyolysis, licorice-induced hypokalemic rhabdomyolysis, carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, congenital muscular dystrophy and idiopathic paroxysmal rhabdomyolysis (Meyer-Betz syndrome). CONCLUSION It is important to distinguish the sporadic and recurrent rhabdomyolysis cases from each other. Recurrent rhabdomyolysis cases should follow up more regardful and attentive. PMID:29184760

  8. Genetic Insights into Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Anne S; Chow, Eva WC; Waterworth, Dawn M; Brzustowicz, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Objective To outline new insights into the genetic etiology of schizophrenia. Methods We discuss several commonly held beliefs about the genetic issues in schizophrenia. Results The complex genetic nature of the illness poses a challenge for investigators seeking causative genetic mutations. Multiple independent research findings are, however converging to identify a relatively small number of chromosomal locations that appear to contain schizophrenia susceptibility genes. Also, a clinically relevant genetic subtype of schizophrenia (22qDS) has been identified. We are developing a better understanding of how schizophrenia relates to other psychiatric disorders. While investigations into the possible roles of dopaminergic and serotonergic systems continue, other approaches that do not require theories of the mechanism of illness are also being used to identify candidate susceptibility genes. Conclusions Research to date suggests that our understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia will soon be fundamentally altered by genetic approaches to this complex disease. PMID:11280081

  9. Genetic control and combining ability of flag leaf area and relative water content traits of bread wheat cultivars under drought stress condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golparvar Ahmad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to compare mode of inheritance, combining ability, heterosis and gene action in genetic control of traits flag leaf area, relative water content and grain filling rate of bread wheat under drought stress, a study was conducted on 8 cultivars using of Griffing’s method2 in fixed model. Mean square of general combining ability was significant also for all traits and mean square of specific combining ability was significant also for all traits except relative water content of leaf which show importance of both additive and dominant effects of genes in heredity of these traits under stress. GCA to SCA mean square ratio was significant for none of traits. Results of this study showed that non additive effects of genes were more important than additive effect for all traits. According to results we can understand that genetic improvement of mentioned traits will have low genetic efficiency by selection from the best crosses of early generations. Then it is better to delay selection until advanced generations and increase in heritability of these traits.

  10. Genetic architecture and functional characterization of genes underlying the rapid diversification of male external genitalia between Drosophila simulans and Drosophila mauritiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kentaro M; Hopfen, Corinna; Herbert, Matthew R; Schlötterer, Christian; Stern, David L; Masly, John P; McGregor, Alistair P; Nunes, Maria D S

    2015-05-01

    Male sexual characters are often among the first traits to diverge between closely related species and identifying the genetic basis of such changes can contribute to our understanding of their evolutionary history. However, little is known about the genetic architecture or the specific genes underlying the evolution of male genitalia. The morphology of the claspers, posterior lobes, and anal plates exhibit striking differences between Drosophila mauritiana and D. simulans. Using QTL and introgression-based high-resolution mapping, we identified several small regions on chromosome arms 3L and 3R that contribute to differences in these traits. However, we found that the loci underlying the evolution of clasper differences between these two species are independent from those that contribute to posterior lobe and anal plate divergence. Furthermore, while most of the loci affect each trait in the same direction and act additively, we also found evidence for epistasis between loci for clasper bristle number. In addition, we conducted an RNAi screen in D. melanogaster to investigate if positional and expression candidate genes located on chromosome 3L, are also involved in genital development. We found that six of these genes, including components of Wnt signaling and male-specific lethal 3 (msl3), regulate the development of genital traits consistent with the effects of the introgressed regions where they are located and that thus represent promising candidate genes for the evolution these traits. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Joint genetic and network analyses identify loci associated with root growth under NaCl stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuriko; Sadhukhan, Ayan; Tazib, Tanveer; Nakano, Yuki; Kusunoki, Kazutaka; Kamara, Mohamed; Chaffai, Radhouane; Iuchi, Satoshi; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Hoekenga, Owen A; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Plants have evolved a series of tolerance mechanisms to saline stress, which perturbs physiological processes throughout the plant. To identify genetic mechanisms associated with salinity tolerance, we performed linkage analysis and genome-wide association study (GWAS) on maintenance of root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana in hydroponic culture with weak and severe NaCl toxicity. The top 200 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) determined by GWAS could cumulatively explain approximately 70% of the variation observed at each stress level. The most significant SNPs were linked to the genes of ATP-binding cassette B10 and vacuolar proton ATPase A2. Several known salinity tolerance genes such as potassium channel KAT1 and calcium sensor SOS3 were also linked to SNPs in the top 200. In parallel, we constructed a gene co-expression network to independently verify that particular groups of genes work together to a common purpose. We identify molecular mechanisms to confer salt tolerance from both predictable and novel physiological sources and validate the utility of combined genetic and network analysis. Additionally, our study indicates that the genetic architecture of salt tolerance is responsive to the severity of stress. These gene datasets are a significant information resource for a following exploration of gene function. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The co-occurrence of autistic and ADHD dimensions in adults: an etiological study in 17,770 twins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, T.J.C.; Hoekstra, R.A.; Posthuma, D.; Larsson, H.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often occur together. To obtain more insight in potential causes for the co-occurrence, this study examined the genetic and environmental etiology of the association between specific ASD and ADHD disorder dimensions.

  13. Incidence, etiology and prognosis of first-time acute pancreatitis in young patients: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken; Brusgaard, Klaus; Crüger, Dorthe Gylling

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) seems to have changed during the last two decades, and since detection of mutations in the gene for cationic trypsinogen(PRSS1) causing hereditary pancreatitis some patients formerly diagnosed with idiopathic AP (IAP) turn out to have a genetic cause....

  14. Fungal Genetics and Functional Diversity of Microbial Communities in the Soil under Long-Term Monoculture of Maize Using Different Cultivation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gałązka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal diversity in the soil may be limited under natural conditions by inappropriate environmental factors such as: nutrient resources, biotic and abiotic factors, tillage system and microbial interactions that prevent the occurrence or survival of the species in the environment. The aim of this paper was to determine fungal genetic diversity and community level physiological profiling of microbial communities in the soil under long-term maize monoculture. The experimental scheme involved four cultivation techniques: direct sowing (DS, reduced tillage (RT, full tillage (FT, and crop rotation (CR. Soil samples were taken in two stages: before sowing of maize (DSBS-direct sowing, RTBS-reduced tillage, FTBS-full tillage, CRBS-crop rotation and the flowering stage of maize growth (DSF-direct sowing, RTF-reduced tillage, FTF-full tillage, CRF-crop rotation. The following plants were used in the crop rotation: spring barley, winter wheat and maize. The study included fungal genetic diversity assessment by ITS-1 next generation sequencing (NGS analyses as well as the characterization of the catabolic potential of microbial communities (Biolog EcoPlates in the soil under long-term monoculture of maize using different cultivation techniques. The results obtained from the ITS-1 NGS technique enabled to classify and correlate the fungi species or genus to the soil metabolome. The research methods used in this paper have contributed to a better understanding of genetic diversity and composition of the population of fungi in the soil under the influence of the changes that have occurred in the soil under long-term maize cultivation. In all cultivation techniques, the season had a great influence on the fungal genetic structure in the soil. Significant differences were found on the family level (P = 0.032, F = 3.895, genus level (P = 0.026, F = 3.313 and on the species level (P = 0.033, F = 2.718. This study has shown that: (1 fungal diversity was changed

  15. Transcriptional profiling of human breast cancer cells cultured under microgravity conditions revealed the key role of genetic gravity sensors previously detected in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Lavan, David; Diego Orihuela-Tacuri, M.; Sanabria, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Currently, studies in Drosophila melanogaster has shown emerging evidence that microgravity stimuli can be detected at the genetic level. Analysis of the transcriptome in the pupal stage of the fruit flies under microgravity conditions versus ground controls has suggested the presence of a few candidate genes as "gravity sensors" which are experimentally validated. Additionally, several studies have shown that microgravity causes inhibitory effects in different types of cancer cells, although the genes involved and responsible for these effects are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the genes suggested as the sensors of gravitational waves in Drosophila melanogaster and their human counterpart (orthologous genes) are highly involved in carcinogenesis, proliferation, anti-apoptotic signals, invasiveness, and metastatic potential of breast cancer cell tumors. The transcriptome analyses suggested that the observed inhibitory effect in cancer cells could be due to changes in the genetic expression of these candidates. These results encourage the possibility of new therapeutic targets managed together and not in isolation.

  16. Genetic Basis of Positive and Negative Symptom Domains in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Rose Mary; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2017-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder, the genetic etiology of which has been well established. Yet despite significant advances in genetics research, the pathophysiological mechanisms of this disorder largely remain unknown. This gap has been attributed to the complexity of the polygenic disorder, which has a heterogeneous clinical profile. Examining the genetic basis of schizophrenia subphenotypes, such as those based on particular symptoms, is thus a useful strategy for decoding the underlying mechanisms. This review of literature examines the recent advances (from 2011) in genetic exploration of positive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. We searched electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature using key words schizophrenia, symptoms, positive symptoms, negative symptoms, cognition, genetics, genes, genetic predisposition, and genotype in various combinations. We identified 115 articles, which are included in the review. Evidence from these studies, most of which are genetic association studies, identifies shared and unique gene associations for the symptom domains. Genes associated with neurotransmitter systems and neuronal development/maintenance primarily constitute the shared associations. Needed are studies that examine the genetic basis of specific symptoms within the broader domains in addition to functional mechanisms. Such investigations are critical to developing precision treatment and care for individuals afflicted with schizophrenia.

  17. Physiological basis of genetic variation in leaf photosynthesis among rice (Oryza sativa L.) introgression lines under drought and well-watered conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xinyou

    2012-01-01

    To understand the physiological basis of genetic variation and resulting quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for photosynthesis in a rice (Oryza sativa L.) introgression line population, 13 lines were studied under drought and well-watered conditions, at flowering and grain filling. Simultaneous gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements were conducted at various levels of incident irradiance and ambient CO2 to estimate parameters of a model that dissects photosynthesis into stomatal conductance (g s), mesophyll conductance (g m), electron transport capacity (J max), and Rubisco carboxylation capacity (V cmax). Significant genetic variation in these parameters was found, although drought and leaf age accounted for larger proportions of the total variation. Genetic variation in light-saturated photosynthesis and transpiration efficiency (TE) were mainly associated with variation in g s and g m. One previously mapped major QTL of photosynthesis was associated with variation in g s and g m, but also in J max and V cmax at flowering. Thus, g s and g m, which were demonstrated in the literature to be responsible for environmental variation in photosynthesis, were found also to be associated with genetic variation in photosynthesis. Furthermore, relationships between these parameters and leaf nitrogen or dry matter per unit area, which were previously found across environmental treatments, were shown to be valid for variation across genotypes. Finally, the extent to which photosynthesis rate and TE can be improved was evaluated. Virtual ideotypes were estimated to have 17.0% higher photosynthesis and 25.1% higher TE compared with the best genotype investigated. This analysis using introgression lines highlights possibilities of improving both photosynthesis and TE within the same genetic background. PMID:22888131

  18. Genetic diversity and positive selection analysis of classical swine fever virus envelope protein gene E2 in east China under C-strain vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfang eHu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Classical swine fever virus (CSFV causes an economically important and highly contagious disease of pigs worldwide. C-strain vaccination is one of the most effective ways to contain this disease. Since 2014, sporadic CSF outbreaks have been occurring in some C-strain vaccinated provinces of China. To decipher the disease etiology, 25 CSFV E2 genes from 169 clinical samples were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all 25 isolates belonged to subgenotype 2.1. Twenty-three of the 25 isolates were clustered in a newly defined subgenotype, 2.1d, and shared some consistent molecular characteristics. To determine whether the complete E2 gene was under positive selection pressure, we used a site-by-site analysis to identify specific codons that underwent evolutionary selection, and seven positively selected codons were found. Three positively selected sites (amino acids 17, 34, and 72 were identified in antigenicity-relevant domains B/C of the amino-terminal half of the E2 protein. In addition, another positively selected site (amino acid 200 exhibited a polarity change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, which may change the antigenicity and virulence of CSFV. The results indicate that the circulating CSFV strains in Shandong province were mostly clustered in subgenotype 2.1d. Moreover, the identification of these positively selected sites could help to reveal molecular determinants of virulence or pathogenesis, and to clarify the driving force of CSFV evolution in East China.

  19. Etiology and Therapeutic Approach to Elevated Lactate Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuff Andersen, Lars; Mackenhauer, Julie; Roberts, Jonathan C

    2013-01-01

    Lactate levels are commonly evaluated in acutely ill patients. Although most often used in the context of evaluating shock, lactate levels can be elevated for many reasons. While tissue hypoperfusion may be the most common cause of elevation, many other etiologies or contributing factors exist....... Clinicians need to be aware of the many potential causes of lactate level elevation as the clinical and prognostic importance of an elevated lactate level varies widely by disease state. Moreover, specific therapy may need to be tailored to the underlying cause of elevation. The present review is based...... on a comprehensive PubMed search between the dates of January 1, 1960, to April 30, 2013, using the search term lactate or lactic acidosis combined with known associations, such as shock, sepsis, cardiac arrest, trauma, seizure, ischemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, thiamine, malignancy, liver, toxins, overdose...

  20. Acute Pancreatitis: Etiology, Pathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Shirin; Golembioski, Adam; Wilson, Stephen L; Thompson, Errington C

    2017-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a fascinating disease. In the United States, the two most common etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and excessive alcohol consumption. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is made with a combination of history, physical examination, computed tomography scan, and laboratory evaluation. Differentiating patients who will have a benign course of their pancreatitis from patients who will have severe pancreatitis is challenging to the clinician. C-reactive protein, pro-calcitonin, and the Bedside Index for Severity of Acute Pancreatitis appeared to be the best tools for the early and accurate diagnosis of severe pancreatitis. Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is indicated for patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis. For patients who are going to have a prolonged hospitalization, enteral nutrition is preferred. Total parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated for patients with pancreatic necrosis. Surgical intervention for infected pancreatic necrosis should be delayed as long as possible to improve patient outcomes.

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries: etiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Robert H; Silvers, Holly J; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2010-03-01

    The relatively high risk of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture among female athletes has been a major impetus for investigation into the etiology of this injury. A number of risk factors have been identified, both internal and external to the athlete, including neuromuscular, anatomical, hormonal, shoe-surface interaction, and environmental, such as weather. The anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors, often gender related, are the focus of most ACL injury prevention programs. Although studies have shown that biomechanic- centered prevention programs can reduce the risk of ACL injury, many questions remain unanswered. More research is needed to increase our understanding of the risk factors for ACL injury; how injury prevention programs work and can the clinical application of such programs be optimized.

  2. [Etiology and pathogenesis of overactive bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bschleipfer, T; Wagenlehner, F; Weidner, W

    2011-04-01

    The symptom complex"overactive bladder" (OAB) affects more than 10% of adult individuals. The etiopathology is complex and multifactorial. Foremost, urinary tract infection, bladder cancer, foreign bodies, and history of radiation or intravesical instillation of chemotherapeutics must be excluded. In many cases, OAB is caused by neurogenic disorders that activate involuntary detrusor contractions (detrusor overactivity, DO). Also, non-neurogenic disorders such as bladder outlet obstruction or dysfunctions of the female pelvic floor/slack ligaments that affect the urothelium, suburothelium, detrusor and bladder afferents are substantially involved in the pathogenesis of OAB. Until now, circulatory disorders have not been adequately taken into consideration but seem to be another etiological factor that causes OAB. Henceforth, molecular changes of bladder afferents and circulatory disorders in patients suffering from OAB have to be investigated in more detail.

  3. Bilateral Breast Masses with a Rare Etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Thieringer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast masses have a variety of benign and malignant etiologies. We present the case of a 28-year-old woman with bilateral large painful breast masses that developed rapidly in the three weeks before first presentation. Further investigation revealed bilateral ovarian masses. Biopsies of both ovarian masses were taken, and the pathology reported Burkitt’s lymphoma. Additional staging with a PET scan was suggestive of bone marrow involvement, but bone marrow biopsy was negative. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid did not identify malignant cells. The patient underwent CODOX-M/IVAC chemotherapy, and a complete response was demonstrated after one cycle of treatment. Six months after finishing chemotherapy the patient remained in complete remission. To our knowledge this is the first case reporting simultaneous involvement of breast, ovaries, and bones in Burkitt’s lymphoma. Gynecologists and oncologists should be aware of this pattern. Polychemotherapy treatment must be initiated rapidly with curative intent.

  4. Congenital malformations according to etiology in newborns from the floricultural zone of Mexico state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Cadena, Julieta; Mejia-Sanchez, Fernando; López-Arriaga, Jerónimo Amado

    2017-03-01

    Birth defects are the number one cause of child mortality worldwide and in 2010 it was the second cause in Mexico. Congenital malformations are a public health issue, because they cause infant mortality, chronic disease and disability. The origin can be genetic, environmental or unknown causes. Among environmental contaminants, pesticides stand out. In this study, we determine the frequency and etiology of congenital malformations in newborns (NBs) of a floricultural community and we compare it with that in the urban community. For 18 months, the NBs were monitored at the Tenancingo General Hospital and the Mother and Child Gynecology and Obstetrics Hospital (IMIEM) in Toluca. The identification of these malformations was carried out in accordance with the WHO. In Tenancingo, 1149 NBs were viewed, where 20% had some kind of congenital malformations. While in the IMIEM, 5069 were reviewed and 6% had some malformation. According to the etiology, in Tenancingo, 69% were multifactorial, 28% were monogenetic and 2% were chromosomal. In the IMIEM, 47% were multifactorial, then 18.3% were monogenetic and 2.8% were chromosomal. There was a significant difference between the global frequency of malformations and the multifactorial etiology of both institutions. Our results show that congenital malformations in the NBs occurred more frequently in the floricultural zone and that because the percentage of multifactorial etiology is higher, it is likely there is an association with exposure to pesticides.

  5. Etiology and Pharmacology of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alles, Sascha R A; Smith, Peter A

    2018-04-01

    Injury to or disease of the nervous system can invoke chronic and sometimes intractable neuropathic pain. Many parallel, interdependent, and time-dependent processes, including neuroimmune interactions at the peripheral, supraspinal, and spinal levels, contribute to the etiology of this "disease of pain." Recent work emphasizes the roles of colony-stimulating factor 1, ATP, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Excitatory processes are enhanced, and inhibitory processes are attenuated in the spinal dorsal horn and throughout the somatosensory system. This leads to central sensitization and aberrant processing such that tactile and innocuous thermal information is perceived as pain (allodynia). Processes involved in the onset of neuropathic pain differ from those involved in its long-term maintenance. Opioids display limited effectiveness, and less than 35% of patients derive meaningful benefit from other therapeutic approaches. We thus review promising therapeutic targets that have emerged over the last 20 years, including Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, transient receptor potential channel type V1 channels, and adenosine A3 receptors. Despite this progress, the gabapentinoids retain their status as first-line treatments, yet their mechanism of action is poorly understood. We outline recent progress in understanding the etiology of neuropathic pain and show how this has provided insights into the cellular actions of pregabalin and gabapentin. Interactions of gabapentinoids with the α 2 δ -1 subunit of voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels produce multiple and neuron type-specific actions in spinal cord and higher centers. We suggest that drugs that affect multiple processes, rather than a single specific target, show the greatest promise for future therapeutic development. Copyright © 2018 by The Author(s).

  6. The etiology and prevalence of gingival recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Moawia M; Cohen, Robert E

    2003-02-01

    Gingival recession in its localized or generalized form is an undesirable condition resulting in root exposure. The result often is not esthetic and may lead to sensitivity and root caries. Exposed root surfaces also are prone to abrasion. The purpose of this article is to describe the prevalence, etiology and factors associated with gingival recession. The authors reviewed cross-sectional epidemiologic studies of gingival recession and found that they correlated the prevalence of recession to trauma, sex, malpositioned teeth, inflammation and tobacco consumption. The recent surveys they reviewed revealed that 88 percent of people 65 years of age and older and 50 percent of people 18 to 64 years of age have one or more sites with recession. The presence and extent of gingival recession also increased with age. More than 50 percent of the population has one or more sites with gingival recession of 1 mm or more. The prevalence of gingival recession was found in patients with both good and poor oral hygiene. It has been proposed that recession is multifactorial, with one type being associated with anatomical factors and another type with physiological or pathological factors. Recession has been found more frequently on buccal surfaces than on other aspects of the teeth. Dentists should be knowledgeable about the etiology, prevalence and associating factors of gingival recession, as well as treatment options, so that appropriate treatment modalities can be offered to patients. Treatments for gingival recession include gingival grafting, guided tissue regeneration and orthodontic therapy. Such treatments typically result in esthetic improvement, elimination of sensitivity and a decreased risk of developing root caries.

  7. Etiology of severe pneumonia in Ecuadorian children.

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    Sivani Jonnalagadda

    Full Text Available In Latin America, community-acquired pneumonia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children. Few studies have examined the etiology of pneumonia in Ecuador.This observational study was part of a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted among children aged 2-59 months with severe pneumonia in Quito, Ecuador. Nasopharyngeal and blood samples were tested for bacterial and viral etiology by polymerase chain reaction. Risk factors for specific respiratory pathogens were also evaluated.Among 406 children tested, 159 (39.2% had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, 71 (17.5% had human metapneumovirus (hMPV, and 62 (15.3% had adenovirus. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified in 37 (9.2% samples and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in three (0.74% samples. The yearly circulation pattern of RSV (P = 0.0003 overlapped with S. pneumoniae, (P = 0.03 with most cases occurring in the rainy season. In multivariable analysis, risk factors for RSV included younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.9, P = 0.01 and being underweight (aOR = 1.8, P = 0.04. Maternal education (aOR = 0.82, P = 0.003, pulse oximetry (aOR = 0.93, P = 0.005, and rales (aOR = 0.25, P = 0.007 were associated with influenza A. Younger age (aOR = 3.5, P = 0.007 and elevated baseline respiratory rate were associated with HPIV-3 infection (aOR = 0.94, P = 0.03.These results indicate the importance of RSV and influenza, and potentially modifiable risk factors including undernutrition and future use of a RSV vaccine, when an effective vaccine becomes available.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00513929.

  8. VIRAL ETIOLOGY OF RECURRENT URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

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    H. S. Ibishev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recurrent urinary tract infection is an actual problem of modern urology.Objective. Complex investigation of urinary tract infections including viral etiology for chronic recurrent cystitis in womenMaterials and methods. The study included 31 women with recurrent infection of urinary tract. Inclusion criteria were the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms caused by infection, severe recurrent course, the lack of anatomical and functional disorders of the urinary tract, the absence of bacterial pathogens during the study, taking into account the culture of aerobic and anaerobic culturing techniques.Results. The analysis of the clinical manifestations, the dominant in the study group were pain and urgency to urinate at 100% and 90% of women surveyed, respectively, and less frequent urination were recorded in 16.1% of patients. In general clinical examination of urine in all cases identified leukocyturia and 90% of the hematuria. By using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR in midstream urine of all examined was verified 10 types of human papilloma virus (HPV with the predominance of 16 and 18 types . Considering the presence of recurrent infectious and inflammatory processes of the urinary tract, cystoscopy with bladder biopsy was performed for all patients. When histomorphological biopsies of all patients surveyed noted the presence of the specific characteristics of HPV: papillary hyperplasia with squamous koilocytosis, pale cytoplasm and shrunken kernels. When analyzing the results of PCR biopsy data corresponded with the results of PCR in midstream urine in all biopsies was detected HPV.Conclusions. Human papillomavirus infection may be involved in the development of viral cystitis. In the etiological structure of viral cystitis, both highly oncogenic and low oncogenic HPV types can act.

  9. Metabolic Syndrome: Genetic Insights into Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziki, Maen D. Abou; Mani, Arya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of inter-related and heritable metabolic traits, which collectively impart unsurpassed risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Considerable work has been done to understand the underlying disease mechanisms by elucidating its genetic etiology. Recent findings Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been widely utilized albeit with modest success in identifying variants that are associated with more than two metabolic traits. Another limitation of this approach is the inherent small effect of the common variants, a major barrier for dissecting their cognate pathways. Modest advances in this venue have been also made by genetic studies of kindreds at the extreme ends of quantitative distributions. These efforts have led to the discovery of a number of disease genes with large effects that underlie the association of diverse traits of this syndrome. Summary Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in identification of genetic risk factors associated with the various traits of MetS. The heterogeneity and multifactorial heritability of MetS, however, has been a challenge towards understanding the factors underlying the association of these traits. Genetic investigations of outlier kindreds or homogenous populations with high prevalence for the disease can potentially improve our knowledge of the disease pathophysiology. PMID:26825138

  10. Headache as a crucial symptom in the etiology of convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, María; Benavente, Lorena; Para, Marta; Santamarta, Elena; Pascual, Julio; Calleja, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been associated with different diseases, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and cerebral amyloid angiopathy being the 2 main causes. To investigate whether headache at onset is determinant in identifying the underlying etiology for convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage. After searching in the database of our hospital, 24 patients were found with convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the last 10 years. The mean age of the sample was 69.5 years. We recorded data referring to demographics, symptoms and neuroimaging. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients accounted for 46% of the sample, 13% were diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, 16% with several other etiologies, and in 25%, the cause remained unknown. Mild headache was present only in 1 (9%) of the 11 cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients, while severe headache was the dominant feature in 86% of cases of the remaining etiologies. Headache is a key symptom allowing a presumptive etiological diagnosis of convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage. While the absence of headache suggests cerebral amyloid angiopathy as the more probable cause, severe headache obliges us to rule out other etiologies, such as reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  11. Intrauterine and genetic factors in early childhood sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    predictive value of elevated cord blood IgE found in recent studies. Future studies should control for materno-fetal transfer of IgE or preferably use other markers of atopy. Variation in the gene coding for the skin barrier protein filaggrin (FLG) is the strongest known genetic risk factor for eczema. FLG......The allergy-associated (atopic) diseases; asthma, eczema and rhinoconjunctivitis, are the most common chronic diseases in childhood. A large number of environmental and genetic risk factors have been suggested, but still our understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms and etiologies...... of opportunity” for prevention. The aim of this thesis was to increase the understanding of sensitization in early life. We studied indicators of sensitization in the newborn, and early development of sensitization and disease associated with a newly discovered genetic risk factor. Such insight may increase our...

  12. A Population Genomics Approach to Assessing the Genetic Basis of Within-Host Microevolution Underlying Recurrent Cryptococcal Meningitis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Rhodes

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Recurrence of meningitis due to Cryptococcus neoformans after treatment causes substantial mortality in HIV/AIDS patients across sub-Saharan Africa. In order to determine whether recurrence occurred due to relapse of the original infecting isolate or reinfection with a different isolate weeks or months after initial treatment, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS to assess the genetic basis of infection in 17 HIV-infected individuals with recurrent cryptococcal meningitis (CM. Comparisons revealed a clonal relationship for 15 pairs of isolates recovered before and after recurrence showing relapse of the original infection. The two remaining pairs showed high levels of genetic heterogeneity; in one pair we found this to be a result of infection by mixed genotypes, while the second was a result of nonsense mutations in the gene encoding the DNA mismatch repair proteins MSH2, MSH5, and RAD5. These nonsense mutations led to a hypermutator state, leading to dramatically elevated rates of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions. Hypermutator phenotypes owing to nonsense mutations in these genes have not previously been reported in C. neoformans, and represent a novel pathway for rapid within-host adaptation and evolution of resistance to first-line antifungal drugs.

  13. A Population Genomics Approach to Assessing the Genetic Basis of Within-Host Microevolution Underlying Recurrent Cryptococcal Meningitis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Johanna; Beale, Mathew A; Vanhove, Mathieu; Jarvis, Joseph N; Kannambath, Shichina; Simpson, John A; Ryan, Anthea; Meintjes, Graeme; Harrison, Thomas S; Fisher, Matthew C; Bicanic, Tihana

    2017-04-03

    Recurrence of meningitis due to Cryptococcus neoformans after treatment causes substantial mortality in HIV/AIDS patients across sub-Saharan Africa. In order to determine whether recurrence occurred due to relapse of the original infecting isolate or reinfection with a different isolate weeks or months after initial treatment, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to assess the genetic basis of infection in 17 HIV-infected individuals with recurrent cryptococcal meningitis (CM). Comparisons revealed a clonal relationship for 15 pairs of isolates recovered before and after recurrence showing relapse of the original infection. The two remaining pairs showed high levels of genetic heterogeneity; in one pair we found this to be a result of infection by mixed genotypes, while the second was a result of nonsense mutations in the gene encoding the DNA mismatch repair proteins MSH2 , MSH5 , and RAD5 These nonsense mutations led to a hypermutator state, leading to dramatically elevated rates of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions. Hypermutator phenotypes owing to nonsense mutations in these genes have not previously been reported in C. neoformans , and represent a novel pathway for rapid within-host adaptation and evolution of resistance to first-line antifungal drugs. Copyright © 2017 Rhodes et al.

  14. Genetic Diversity Underlying the Envelope Glycoproteins of Hepatitis C Virus: Structural and Functional Consequences and the Implications for Vaccine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W. Tarr

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the 26 years since the discovery of Hepatitis C virus (HCV a major global research effort has illuminated many aspects of the viral life cycle, facilitating the development of targeted antivirals. Recently, effective direct-acting antiviral (DAA regimens with >90% cure rates have become available for treatment of chronic HCV infection in developed nations, representing a significant advance towards global eradication. However, the high cost of these treatments results in highly restricted access in developing nations, where the disease burden is greatest. Additionally, the largely asymptomatic nature of infection facilitates continued transmission in at risk groups and resource constrained settings due to limited surveillance. Consequently a prophylactic vaccine is much needed. The HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are located on the surface of viral lipid envelope, facilitate viral entry and are the targets for host immunity, in addition to other functions. Unfortunately, the extreme global genetic and antigenic diversity exhibited by the HCV glycoproteins represents a significant obstacle to vaccine development. Here we review current knowledge of HCV envelope protein structure, integrating knowledge of genetic, antigenic and functional diversity to inform rational immunogen design.

  15. Genetic progress in the UNB-2U population of popcorn under recurrent selection in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, R M; do Amaral Júnior, A T; Gonçalves, L S A; Candido, L S; Silva, T R C; Pena, G F

    2012-05-15

    As part of the Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense recurrent selection program of popcorn, we evaluated full-sib families of the sixth cycle of recurrent selection and estimated genetic progress for grain yield and expansion capacity. We assessed 200 full-sib families for 10 agronomic traits, in a randomized block design, with two replications within sets in two environments: Campos dos Goytacazes and Itaocara, in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. There were significant differences for families/"sets" for all traits, indicating genetic variability that could be exploited in future cycles. In the selection of superior progenies, the Mulamba and Mock index gave the best gains for popping expansion (PE) and grain yield (GY), with values of 10.97 and 15.30%, respectively, using random economic weights. By comparing the evolution of the means obtained for PE and GY in the cycles C(0), C(1), C(2), C(3), C(4), C(5), and predicted for C(6), a steady increase was observed for both PE and GY, with the addition of 1.71 mL/g (R(2) = 0.93) and 192.87 kg/ha (R(2) = 0.88), respectively, in each cycle. Given the good performance of this popcorn population in successive cycles of intrapopulation recurrent selection, we expect that a productive variety with high expansion capacity will soon be available for producers in the north and northwest regions of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

  16. Application of the distributed genetic algorithm for in-core fuel optimization problems under parallel computational environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Hashimoto, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    The distributed genetic algorithm (DGA) is applied for loading pattern optimization problems of the pressurized water reactors. A basic concept of DGA follows that of the conventional genetic algorithm (GA). However, DGA equally distributes candidates of solutions (i.e. loading patterns) to several independent ''islands'' and evolves them in each island. Communications between islands, i.e. migrations of some candidates between islands are performed with a certain period. Since candidates of solutions independently evolve in each island while accepting different genes of migrants, premature convergence in the conventional GA can be prevented. Because many candidate loading patterns should be evaluated in GA or DGA, the parallelization is efficient to reduce turn around time. Parallel efficiency of DGA was measured using our optimization code and good efficiency was attained even in a heterogeneous cluster environment due to dynamic distribution of the calculation load. The optimization code is based on the client/server architecture with the TCP/IP native socket and a client (optimization) module and calculation server modules communicate the objects of loading patterns each other. Throughout the sensitivity study on optimization parameters of DGA, a suitable set of the parameters for a test problem was identified. Finally, optimization capability of DGA and the conventional GA was compared in the test problem and DGA provided better optimization results than the conventional GA. (author)

  17. Most important etiologic factors in the development of genital prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović-Segedi Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The incidence of genital prolapse depends on numerous factors. The contribution of race, gender and genetic factors is significant. However, additional factors of initiation, promotion and decomposition are necessary if a person with the genetic predisposition to genital prolapse begins to suffer from it. At least 50% of parous women are believed to suffer from genital prolapse of various degrees. Moreover, the prevalence of genital prolapse increases with age. The prevalence of genital prolapse is expected to be even higher in the future due to the extension of the lifespan of women worldwide. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the most common etiologic factors in the development of genital prolapse in the population of Serbia. Methods The study was conducted as prospective and included 50 women who underwent surgical treatment due to the problems caused by genital prolapse. Results Mean age of the women was 58.74 years. Twenty percent of the women had the menstrual cycle, while 80% were in menopause. Mean menopause period was 8.88 years. None of the women used hormone replacement therapy. Mean BMI was 27.395 kg/m2. Twenty-eight percent of the women were of normal weight, while 72% of the women were obese (42% were obese and 30% were severely obese. Ninety-eight percent of the women were parous, and mean parity was 2.08. Mean birth weight of neonates was 3682.77 g. Sixty-four percent of the women did physical labour and lifted heavy objects. Conclusion Vaginal childbirth is one of the most important initiating factors. The most significant promoting factor is obesity and heavy labour. Ageing and entering menopause are the most important factors of decomposition as well as the occurrence of clinical manifestations of the pelvic floor dysfunction. .

  18. The Role of Fungi in the Etiology of Multiple Sclerosis

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    Julián Benito-León

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. Infectious triggers of MS are being actively investigated. Substantial evidence supports the involvement of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, though other viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi are also being considered. Many links between fungi and diseases involving chronic inflammation have been found recently. Evidence linking MS and fungi is reviewed here. The HLA-DRB1*15 allele group is the most important genetic risk factor of MS, and is a risk factor in several other conditions linked to fungal infections. Many biomarkers of MS are consistent with fungal infections, such as IL-17, chitotriosidase, and antibodies against fungi. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF, first used as an industrial fungicide, was recently repurposed to reduce MS symptoms. Its mechanisms of action in MS have not been firmly established. The low risk of MS during childhood and its moderate association with herpes simplex virus type 2 suggest genital exposure to microbes (including fungi should be investigated as a possible trigger. Molecular and epidemiological evidence support a role for infections such as EBV in MS. Though fungal infections have not been widely studied in MS, many lines of evidence are consistent with a fungal etiology. Future microbiome and serological studies should consider fungi as a possible risk factor for MS, and future clinical studies should consider the effect of fungicides other than DMF on MS symptoms.

  19. Endometriosis: etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, modern aspects of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Avramenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze the data of the current scientific literature on the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinic and modern therapy of genital endometriosis, which is one of the most urgent problems of modern gynecological practice. Methods and results. The main role in the process of growth and development of endometriosis is currently attributed to changes in the function of the immune system, possibly genetically determined. Currently, it is proved that endometriosis develops immune processes against endometrial tissue. There is every reason to believe that endometrium in its unusual places can acquire antigenic properties that stimulates the body's immune system reaction. Hyperandrogenism, early menarche, heavy and prolonged menstruation, disorders of the outflow of menstrual blood, adverse environment, obesity, smoking, stress are considered as the risk factors for the development of endometriosis. Revised diagnosis is possible with laparoscopic visualization (ideally with confirming histological research. A presumptive diagnosis is based on typical clinical symptoms and signs. Laboratory methods of diagnosis: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The main methods of treatment of endometriosis are surgical, medication, combined. Conclusion. Endometriosis remains unresolved scientific and clinical problem characterized by the paradoxical aspects of the pathogenesis and clinical contrasts of course without found explanation yet.

  20. MSX1 gene in the etiology orofacial deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Paradowska-Stolarz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The muscle segment homeobox (MSX1 gene plays a crucial role in epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions in craniofacial development. It plays a regulative role in cellular proliferation, differentiation and cell death. The human MSX1 domain was also found in cow (Bt 302906, mouse (Mm 123311, rat (Rn13592001, chicken (Gg 170873 and clawed toad (XI 547690. Cleft lip and palate is the most common anomaly of the facial part of the skull. The etiology is not fully understood, but it is believed that the key role is played by the genetic factor activated by environmental factors. Among the candidate genes whose mutations could lead to formation of the cleft, the MSX1 homeobox gene is mentioned. Mutations in the gene MSX1 can lead to isolated cleft deformities, but also cause other dismorphic changes. Among the most frequently mentioned is loss of permanent tooth buds (mostly of less than 4 teeth – hypodontia, including second premolars. Mutations of MSX1 are observed in the Pierre- Robin sequence, which may be one of the features of congenital defects or is observed as an isolated defect. Mutation of the gene can lead to the occurrence of a rare congenital defect Wiktop (dental-nail syndrome. Deletion of a fragment MSX1 (4p16.3 located in the WHS critical region, may be a cause of some symptoms of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

  1. Selection for long and short sleep duration in Drosophila melanogaster reveals the complex genetic network underlying natural variation in sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbison, Susan T; Serrano Negron, Yazmin L; Hansen, Nancy F; Lobell, Amanda S

    2017-12-01

    Why do some individuals need more sleep than others? Forward mutagenesis screens in flies using engineered mutations have established a clear genetic component to sleep duration, revealing mutants that convey very long or short sleep. Whether such extreme long or short sleep could exist in natural populations was unknown. We applied artificial selection for high and low night sleep duration to an outbred population of Drosophila melanogaster for 13 generations. At the end of the selection procedure, night sleep duration diverged by 9.97 hours in the long and short sleeper populations, and 24-hour sleep was reduced to 3.3 hours in the short sleepers. Neither long nor short sleeper lifespan differed appreciably from controls, suggesting little physiological consequences to being an extreme long or short sleeper. Whole genome sequence data from seven generations of selection revealed several hundred thousand changes in allele frequencies at polymorphic loci across the genome. Combining the data from long and short sleeper populations across generations in a logistic regression implicated 126 polymorphisms in 80 candidate genes, and we confirmed three of these genes and a larger genomic region with mutant and chromosomal deficiency tests, respectively. Many of these genes could be connected in a single network based on previously known physical and genetic interactions. Candidate genes have known roles in several classic, highly conserved developmental and signaling pathways-EGFR, Wnt, Hippo, and MAPK. The involvement of highly pleiotropic pathway genes suggests that sleep duration in natural populations can be influenced by a wide variety of biological processes, which may be why the purpose of sleep has been so elusive.

  2. Dissection of Genetic Factors underlying Wheat Kernel Shape and Size in an Elite × Nonadapted Cross using a High Density SNP Linkage Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wheat kernel shape and size has been under selection since early domestication. Kernel morphology is a major consideration in wheat breeding, as it impacts grain yield and quality. A population of 160 recombinant inbred lines (RIL, developed using an elite (ND 705 and a nonadapted genotype (PI 414566, was extensively phenotyped in replicated field trials and genotyped using Infinium iSelect 90K assay to gain insight into the genetic architecture of kernel shape and size. A high density genetic map consisting of 10,172 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers, with an average marker density of 0.39 cM/marker, identified a total of 29 genomic regions associated with six grain shape and size traits; ∼80% of these regions were associated with multiple traits. The analyses showed that kernel length (KL and width (KW are genetically independent, while a large number (∼59% of the quantitative trait loci (QTL for kernel shape traits were in common with genomic regions associated with kernel size traits. The most significant QTL was identified on chromosome 4B, and could be an ortholog of major rice grain size and shape gene or . Major and stable loci also were identified on the homeologous regions of Group 5 chromosomes, and in the regions of (6A and (7A genes. Both parental genotypes contributed equivalent positive QTL alleles, suggesting that the nonadapted germplasm has a great potential for enhancing the gene pool for grain shape and size. This study provides new knowledge on the genetic dissection of kernel morphology, with a much higher resolution, which may aid further improvement in wheat yield and quality using genomic tools.

  3. The Genetics of Keratoconus: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Joshua; Hauser, Michael A.; Afshari, Natalie A.; Allingham, R. Rand; Liu, Yutao

    2012-01-01

    Keratoconus is the most common ectatic disorder of the corneal. Genetic and environmental factors may contribute to its pathogenesis. The focus of this article is to summarize current research into the complex genetics of keratoconus. We discuss the evidence of genetic etiology including family-based linkage studies, twin studies, genetic mutations, and genome-wide association studies. The genes implicated potentially include VSX1, miR-184, DOCK9, SOD1, RAB3GAP1, and HGF. Besides the coding m...

  4. Using Mouse and Zebrafish Models to Understand the Etiology of Developmental Defects in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; MUTO, AKIHIKO; LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SCHILLING, THOMAS F.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.; CALOF, ANNE L.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem birth defects disorder that affects every tissue and organ system in the body. Understanding the factors that contribute to the origins, prevalence, and severity of these developmental defects provides the most direct approach for developing screens and potential treatments for individuals with CdLS. Since the majority of cases of CdLS are caused by haploinsufficiency for NIPBL (Nipped-B-like, which encodes a cohesin-associated protein), we have developed mouse and zebrafish models of CdLS by using molecular genetic tools to create Nipbl-deficient mice and zebrafish (Nipbl+/− mice, zebrafish nipbl morphants). Studies of these vertebrate animal models have yielded novel insights into the developmental etiology and genes/gene pathways that contribute to CdLS-associated birth defects, particularly defects of the gut, heart, craniofacial structures, nervous system, and limbs. Studies of these mouse and zebrafish CdLS models have helped clarify how deficiency for NIPBL, a protein that associates with cohesin and other transcriptional regulators in the nucleus, affects processes important to the emergence of the structural and physiological birth defects observed in CdLS: NIPBL exerts chromosome position-specific effects on gene expression; it influences long-range interactions between different regulatory elements of genes; and it regulates combinatorial and synergistic actions of genes in developing tissues. Our current understanding is that CdLS should be considered as not only a cohesinopathy, but also a “transcriptomopathy,” that is, a disease whose underlying etiology is the global dysregulation of gene expression throughout the organism. PMID:27120001

  5. Hepatitis B virus is still the most common etiologic factor of liver cirrhosis: Results from a single center in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebahat Başyigit

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is important to examine the epidemiology of liver cirrhosis (LC because of it is a preventable disease. In this single-center study, we aimed to determine the epidemiological characteristics and etiology of LC in Central Anatolian region of Turkey. Methods: We reviewed data of patients with liver cirrhosis who presented to outpatient and inpatient clinics of our medical center between January 1, 2011 and September 31, 2014 Results: Overall, 135 patients were included to the study: 91 men (67.4% and 44 women (33% with a mean age of 63±14,3 years (range: 15–87years. The primary causes of cirrhosis were chronic hepatitis B (CHB (n: 52, 38.5% and cryptogenic cirrhosis (n: 33, 24.4%. CHB was the main etiology of cirrhosis in men (49.5% and cryptogenic LC was predominant in women (40.9%. Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis were solely male. Percentage of patients with autoimmune hepatitis was significantly higher among women (70%. The percentage of patients with HBV was similar between patients aged50 years (31.6% and 39.7%, respectively, but percentage of patients with hepatitis C virus was lower (5.3% in patients aged50 years (14.7%. There was no cirrhotic patients under 50 years of age due to a genetic disorder Conclusion: Despite national vaccination program, effective treatment regimens and intensive screening methods against hepatitis B virus, it remains to be the most common cause of LC in our country.

  6. Etiology and pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Ransohoff, R M

    1998-01-01

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unknown despite decades of intense research. The major research disciplines that have been brought to bear on this question include genetics, epidemiology, neuropathology, immunology, and virology. Recent advances in the understanding of the inflammato...

  7. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss in children: Etiology, management, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitaro, Jacob; Bechor-Fellner, Avital; Gavriel, Haim; Marom, Tal; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is uncommon, and the current guidelines for its management refer to adults. Our objective was to review cases of SSNHL in children and examine their etiologies, management, and outcome. We performed a retrospective chart review of all children under the age of 18 years treated for SSNHL between January 2003 and September 2014. Data recorded included age, gender, symptoms, onset of hearing loss, audiometric results, diagnostic studies, treatment, and outcome. Nineteen children were included. Mean age was 14 years (range 7-18 years). Male: female ratio was 9:10. Degree of hearing loss varied from mild to profound across the tested frequencies. Most common accompanying symptom was tinnitus. Serologic tests demonstrated recent Epstein-Barr virus infection in one patient and previous cytomegalovirus infection in six patients. Imaging studies included computed tomography scan (n=3) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (n=12). All imaging studies did not demonstrate any pathology. Treatment included systemic steroids in 19 (100%) children and intratympanic steroids in eight (42%). Hearing completely improved in three (16%) children, partially improved in nine (47%), and there was no improvement in six (32%). One child was lost to follow-up. Viral infection was a common finding in children with SSNHL and no pathological changes were demonstrated on imaging studies. In most patients (63%), hearing improvement was observed. Intratympanic steroid injection can benefit these children. Further studies are required to investigate the etiologies and establish guidelines for the management of SSNHL in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetics of Schizophrenia: Historical Insights and Prevailing Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Leemput, J; Hess, J L; Glatt, S J; Tsuang, M T

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia's (SZ's) heritability and familial transmission have been known for several decades; however, despite the clear evidence for a genetic component, it has been very difficult to pinpoint specific causative genes. Even so genetic studies have taught us a lot, even in the pregenomic era, about the molecular underpinnings and disease-relevant pathways. Recurring themes emerged revealing the involvement of neurodevelopmental processes, glutamate regulation, and immune system differential activation in SZ etiology. The recent emergence of epigenetic studies aimed at shedding light on the biological mechanisms underlying SZ has provided another layer of information in the investigation of gene and environment interactions. However, this epigenetic insight also brings forth another layer of complexity to the (epi)genomic landscape such as interactions between genetic variants, epigenetic marks-including cross-talk between DNA methylation and histone modification processes-, gene expression regulation, and environmental influences. In this review, we seek to synthesize perspectives, including limitations and obstacles yet to overcome, from genetic and epigenetic literature on SZ through a qualitative review of risk factors and prevailing hypotheses. Encouraged by the findings of both genetic and epigenetic studies to date, as well as the continued development of new technologies to collect and interpret large-scale studies, we are left with a positive outlook for the future of elucidating the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying SZ and other complex neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clues to the Etiology of Bile Duct Injury in Biliary Atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Cara L.; Feldman, Amy G.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is an infantile obstructive cholangiopathy of unknown etiology with suboptimal therapy, which is responsible for 40 to 50% of all pediatric liver transplants. Although the etiology of bile duct injury in BA in unknown, it is postulated that a pre- or perinatal viral infection initiates cholangiocyte apoptosis and release of antigens that trigger a Th1 immune response that leads to further bile duct injury, inflammation, and obstructive fibrosis. Humoral immunity and activation of the innate immune system may also play key roles in this process. Moreover, recent investigations from the murine BA model and human data suggest that regulatory T cells and genetic susceptibility factors may orchestrate autoimmune mechanisms. What controls the coordination of these events, why the disease only occurs in the first few months of life, and why a minority of infants with perinatal viral infections develop BA are remaining questions to be answered. PMID:23397531

  10. Infecção urinária em menores de 15 anos: etiologia e perfil de sensibilidade antimicrobiana em hospital geral de pediatria Urinary tract infection in children under 15 years: etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility in a children's hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Swei Lo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a prevalência dos principais agentes etiológicos de infecção urinária comunitária em crianças menores de 15 anos e analisar o perfil de sensibilidade antimicrobiana do principal agente, Escherichia coli. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo conduzido a partir de uroculturas com crescimento de agente único, com unidades formadoras de colônia maior ou igual a 10(5/mL. A população selecionada foi atendida no Pronto Atendimento de Pediatria do Hospital Universitário da Universidade de São Paulo entre janeiro de 2006 e dezembro de 2007. Para analisar o perfil de sensibilidade de E. coli, foram excluídos casos com infecção urinária de repetição e/ou portadores de uropatias. RESULTADOS: Dos 176 casos de infecção urinária, 133 (76% ocorreram no sexo feminino e 43 (24% no masculino. A faixa etária de maior prevalência das infecções urinárias foi a de menores de dois anos, com 84 casos (48%. Escherichia coli foi o principal agente isolado (122 culturas - 69% do total. Foram encontrados altos índices de sensibilidade antimicrobiana de E. coli às cefalosporinas de segunda e terceira geração (cefuroxima e ceftriaxona, 100%, aos aminoglicosídeos (amicacina, 100%; gentamicina, 96,4%, ao ácido nalidíxico (97,3%, à nitrofurantoina (98,2% e às quinolonas (ciprofloxacina e norfloxacina, 98,2%; sensibilidade moderada à cefalosporina de primeira geração (cefalotina, 78,4%; baixa sensibilidade à ampicilina (38,7% e ao sufametoxazol-trimetoprim (55%. CONCLUSÕES: E. coli continua sendo a bactéria mais prevalente das infecções urinárias comunitárias. Conhecendo a baixa sensibilidade in vitro dessa bactéria à sulfametoxazol-trimetoprim e à ampicilina, recomenda-se que tais drogas não sejam eleitas para a terapêutica inicial.OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of the most frequent etiological agents of community acquired urinary tract infection in children under the age of 15 years, as well as to analyse

  11. Arlequin suite ver 3.5: a new series of programs to perform population genetics analyses under Linux and Windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excoffier, Laurent; Lischer, Heidi E L

    2010-05-01

    We present here a new version of the Arlequin program available under three different forms: a Windows graphical version (Winarl35), a console version of Arlequin (arlecore), and a specific console version to compute summary statistics (arlsumstat). The command-line versions run under both Linux and Windows. The main innovations of the new version include enhanced outputs in XML format, the possibility to embed graphics displaying computation results directly into output files, and the implementation of a new method to detect loci under selection from genome scans. Command-line versions are designed to handle large series of files, and arlsumstat can be used to generate summary statistics from simulated data sets within an Approximate Bayesian Computation framework. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Influence of genetic diversity on cause and effect relationships in lens culinaris germplasm under rain-fed eco-agricultural system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, M.; Arshad, M.; Ghafoor, A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to emerging demands of organic foods, lentil, one of the most primitive legumes was investigated for genetic diversity including cause and effect relationships among various clusters under eco-agricultural system. The 73 lentil genotypes were investigated for qualitative and quantitative traits to identify the potential lines under rain-fed conditions for organic farming using no chemical fertilizers for crop production. Variation existed for all the qualitative traits including orange cotyledon colour in 27 genotypes which is a preferred trait by Asian consumers including Pakistan. Five clusters revealed that average intra-clusters distances were more or less similar, whereas inter-cluster distance indicated higher level of genetic diversity. First three PCs contributed more than 3/4 of the variability and the results were in coordination with clustering pattern amongst 73 genotypes. The populations contributing the first PC were late in maturity possessed higher number of branches, pods, better biomass and grain yield. The PC/sub 2/ was more contributed by seeds pod-1 and seed diameter, whereas pod length and harvest index contributed 13% variability. The cause and effect relationships indicated differential response for selection of lentil genotypes suitable for eco-agricultural system within each cluster. (author)

  13. Etiology and audiological outcomes at 3 years for 364 children in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Henrik M Dahl

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is an etiologically heterogeneous trait with differences in the age of onset, severity and site of lesion. It is caused by a combination of genetic and/or environmental factors. A longitudinal study to examine the efficacy of early intervention for improving child outcomes is ongoing in Australia. To determine the cause of hearing loss in these children we undertook molecular testing of perinatal "Guthrie" blood spots of children whose hearing loss was either detected via newborn hearing screening or detected later in infancy. We analyzed the GJB2 and SLC26A4 genes for the presence of mutations, screened for the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA A1555G mutation, and screened for congenital CMV infection in DNA isolated from dried newborn blood spots. Results were obtained from 364 children. We established etiology for 60% of children. One or two known GJB2 mutations were present in 82 children. Twenty-four children had one or two known SLC26A4 mutations. GJB2 or SLC26A4 changes with unknown consequences on hearing were found in 32 children. The A1555G mutation was found in one child, and CMV infection was detected in 28 children. Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder was confirmed in 26 children whose DNA evaluations were negative. A secondary objective was to investigate the relationship between etiology and audiological outcomes over the first 3 years of life. Regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between hearing levels and etiology. Data analysis does not support the existence of differential effects of etiology on degree of hearing loss or on progressiveness of hearing loss.

  14. Cannabis Controversies: How genetics can inform the study of comorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To review three key and controversial comorbidities of cannabis use – other illicit drug use, psychosis and depression as well as suicide, from a genetically informed perspective. Design Selective review. Results Genetic factors play a critical role in the association between cannabis use, particularly early-onset use and use of other illicit drugs, psychosis and depression as well as suicide, albeit via differing mechanisms. For other illicit drugs, while there is strong evidence for shared genetic influences, residual association that is attributable to causal or person-specific environmental factors cannot be ruled out. For depression, common genetic influences are solely responsible for the association with cannabis use but for suicidal attempt, evidence for person-specific factors persists. Finally, even though rates of cannabis use are inordinately high in those with psychotic disorders, there is no evidence of shared genetic etiologies underlying this comorbidity. Instead, there is limited evidence that adolescent cannabis use might moderate the extent to which diathesis influences psychosis. Conclusions Overlapping genetic influences underlie the association between early-onset cannabis use and other illicit drug use as well as depression and suicide. For psychosis, mechanisms other than shared genetic influences might be at play. PMID:24438181

  15. Cannabis controversies: how genetics can inform the study of comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T

    2014-03-01

    To review three key and controversial comorbidities of cannabis use-other illicit drug use, psychosis and depression, as well as suicide, from a genetically informed perspective. Selective review. Genetic factors play a critical role in the association between cannabis use, particularly early-onset use and use of other illicit drugs, psychosis and depression, as well as suicide, albeit via differing mechanisms. For other illicit drugs, while there is strong evidence for shared genetic influences, residual association that is attributable to causal or person-specific environmental factors cannot be ruled out. For depression, common genetic influences are solely responsible for the association with cannabis use but for suicidal attempt, evidence for person-specific factors persists. Finally, even though rates of cannabis use are inordinately high in those with psychotic disorders, there is no evidence of shared genetic etiologies underlying this comorbidity. Instead, there is limited evidence that adolescent cannabis use might moderate the extent to which diathesis influences psychosis. Overlapping genetic influences underlie the association between early-onset cannabis use and other illicit drug use as well as depression and suicide. For psychosis, mechanisms other than shared genetic influences might be at play. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. Angioedema: etiology, pathophysiology, current and emerging therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lawrence M

    2013-11-01

    Angioedema (AE) is characterized by nonpitting edema of the dermis and subcutaneous layers. The most common sites of involvement are the tongue, lips, face, and throat; however, swelling can also occur in the extremities, genitalia, and viscera. Life-threatening airway swelling can also occur. AE may be allergic or nonallergic. The overall lifetime incidence of AE is reported to be as high as 15%. This article summarizes the etiology, pathophysiology, and current treatment of several forms of nonallergic AE (including hereditary, acquired, and idiopathic AE) and focuses on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema (ACEi-AE), which is responsible for 30%-40% of all AE seen in United States emergency departments. Although the triggers, which are primary biologic mechanisms, and treatments for ACEi-AE may differ from those of the hereditary and acquired forms of AE, the clinical effects of ACEi-AE are mediated through a shared pathway, the kallikrein-kinin system. Thus, although current therapeutic options for ACEi-AE are limited, recent advances in the treatment of hereditary AE (HAE) appear promising for improving the outcomes of patients with ACEi-AE. New HAE medications that correct imbalances in the kallikrein-kinin system may prove safe and efficacious in the treatment of ACEi-AE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Etiological Aspects of Human Trafficking in Kosovo

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    Emine Abdyli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human trafficking is considered one of the most serious criminal offences, which is presented as a contemporary form of slavery and which implies the most brutal violation of basic human rights, which are guaranteed by international and law and national law. The phenomenon of human trafficking is present in many countries in transition (such as Kosovo, namely in those countries which were affected by internal political, economic, social, educational, etc. changes, and in such situations the perpetrators of this offense are in a very favorable position to victimize society. Therefore, this paper will focus on external criminogenic factors that influence the growth of this negative phenomenon, including the difficult economic situation, poverty and unemployment, poor housing, migration of people, domestic violence, the impact of mass media in society, lack of border control and insufficient effectiveness of institutions to deal with law enforcement. The paper is based on literature review, statistical data and interviews by treating the subject theoretically, legislatively and practically. To successfully fight against human trafficking, relevant authorities should more closely approach the etiological treatment of this negative phenomenon.

  18. A etiological factors in mechanical intestinal obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asad, S.; Khan, H.; Khan, I.A.; Ghaffar, S.; Rehman, Z.U.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Intestinal obstruction occurs when the normal flow of intestinal contents is interrupted. The most frequent causes of intestinal obstruction are postoperative adhesions and hernias, which cause extrinsic compression of the intestine. Less frequently, tumours or strictures of the bowel can cause intrinsic blockage. Objective of the study was to find out the various a etiological factors of mechanical intestinal obstruction and to evaluate the morbidity and mortality in adult patients presenting to Surgical 'A' unit of Ayub teaching hospital with mechanical intestinal obstruction. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from March 2009 to September, 2009. All patients presenting with intestinal obstruction and were above the age of 12 years were included in the study. Patients with non-mechanical obstruction were excluded from the study and those who responded to conservative measures were also excluded. Results: A total of 36 patients with age ranging from 12 to 80 years (Mean age 37.72+-19.74 years) and male to female ratio of 1.77:1, were treated for mechanical intestinal obstruction. The most common cause for mechanical intestinal obstruction was adhesions (36.1%). Intestinal tuberculosis was the second most common cause (19.4%), while hernias and sigmoid volvulus affected 13.9% patients each. Malignancies were found in 5.6% cases. Conclusion: Adhesions and Tuberculosis are the leading causes of mechanical intestinal obstruction in Pakistan. Although some patients can be treated conservatively, a substantial portion requires immediate surgical intervention. (author)

  19. Disordered gambling: etiology, trajectory, and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Howard J; Martin, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Gambling-related research has advanced rapidly during the past 20 years. As a result of expanding interest in pathological gambling (PG), stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, regulators, and policy makers) have a better understanding of excessive gambling, including its etiology (e.g., neurobiological/neurogenetic, psychological, and sociological factors) and trajectory (e.g., initiation, course, and adaptation to gambling exposure). In this article, we examine these advances in PG-related research and then consider some of the clinical implications of these advances. We consider criteria changes for PG recently proposed by the DSM-V Impulse Control Work Group for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V). We also review how clinicians can more accurately and efficiently diagnose clients seeking help for gambling-related problems by utilizing brief screens. Finally, we consider the importance of future research that can identify behavioral markers for PG. We suggest that identifying these markers will allow clinicians to make earlier diagnoses, recommend targeted treatments, and advance secondary prevention efforts. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved

  20. Cervicogenic vertigo: etiology, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Tavanai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Cervicogenic dizziness is induced by a specific neck position and the earth’s gravity has no effect on provoking of it. The precise incidence of cervicogenic dizziness is not certain but, 20-58% of patients following sudden head injuries experience its symptoms . In this article, the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of cervicogenic vertigo is discussed. Methods: At first, articles of cervicogenic dizziness from electronic databases of Google scholar , PubMed, Scopus, Ovid and CINAHL were searched from 1987 up to 2012. Then, the articles in them vertigo, disequilibrium or nystagmus were consistent with neck disorders were searched. Conclusion: Articles with title of cervicogenic vertigo (cervical vertigo were limited. Clinical researches about cervicogenic vertigo up to now implicate on several points; all signify that we cannot diagnose it certainly and there is not any specific single test for that. Recently, smooth pursuit neck torsion test (SPNTT has introduced for diagnosis of cervicogenic vertigo that is not valid yet. There is no protocol for diagnosis of cervicogenic vertigo and diagnosis is often based on limited clinical experiences of clinicians. Physiotherapy, medication and manual therapies are options for treatment but there is no distinct and effective treatment for it and in just one article, a combination of treatments for cervicogenic vertigo as a protocol has recommended.

  1. Molar incisor hypomineralization, prevalence, and etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allazzam, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alaki, Sumer Madani; El Meligy, Omar Abdel Sadek

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the prevalence and possible etiological factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) among a group of children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A group of 8-12-year-old children were recruited (n = 267) from the Pediatric Dental Clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Children had at least one first permanent molar (FPM), erupted or partially erupted. Demographic information, children's medical history, and pregnancy-related data were obtained. The crowns of the FPM and permanent incisors were examined for demarcated opacities, posteruptive breakdown (PEB), atypical restorations, and extracted FPMs. Children were considered to have MIH if one or more FPM with or without involvement of incisors met the diagnostic criteria. Results. MIH showed a prevalence of 8.6%. Demarcated opacities were the most common form. Maxillary central incisors were more affected than mandibular (P = 0.01). The condition was more prevalent in children with history of illnesses during the first four years of life including tonsillitis (P = 0.001), adenoiditis (P = 0.001), asthma (P = 0.001), fever (P = 0.014), and antibiotics intake (P = 0.001). Conclusions. The prevalence of MIH is significantly associated with childhood illnesses during the first four years of life including asthma, adenoid infections, tonsillitis, fever, and antibiotics intake.

  2. Maternal sepsis: epidemiology, etiology and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillen, Jeroen; Zwart, Joost; Schutte, Joke; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2010-06-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of maternal death worldwide. Little is known on the incidence of severe maternal morbidity related to sepsis. In this review, we focus on new findings concerning epidemiology, etiology and outcome of maternal sepsis in low-income as well as high-income countries. It is estimated that puerperal sepsis causes at least 75,000 maternal deaths every year, mostly in low-income countries. Studies from high-income countries report incidence of maternal morbidity due to sepsis of 0.1-0.6 per 1000 deliveries. The causative microorganisms are generally polymicrobial with beta-haemolytic streptococci group A (GAS) often being the cause of severe cases of puerperal fever. The single most important risk factor for postpartum infection seems to be caesarean section, and prophylactic antibiotics during the procedure substantially reduce the infection risk. Improvements in service provision as promoted through the Surviving Sepsis Campaign can reduce the overall risk of mortality and morbidity from maternal sepsis in high-income as well as in low-income countries. Maternal sepsis is an infrequent, but important complication of pregnancy, childbirth and puerperium, resulting in significant maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Improved outcome is possible through improved service provision.

  3. Etiology and perinatal outcome of polyhydramnios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, M; Voetsch, J; Koidl, C; Schest, E; Haeusler, M; Lang, U; Klaritsch, P

    2014-08-01

    To determine causes of polyhydramnios and the respective perinatal outcome. We retrospectively analyzed cases with polyhydramnios at the Medical University Graz, Austria from 2003 - 2011. Inclusion criteria were single deepest pocket ≥ 8  cm, amniotic fluid index ≥ 25  cm, each of the latter parameters > 95th percentile or subjective impression. Etiologies, including TORCH infection, diabetes and congenital malformations, as well as perinatal outcome were evaluated. Out of 860 singleton pregnancies with polyhydramnios, 2.9 % had positive TORCH serology, 8.5 % had congenital anomalies, 19.8 % had maternal diabetes, and 68.8 % were idiopathic. The most common fetal anomalies were cardiac defects (32.9 %). Elective caesarean sections were more common in the groups with malformations and maternal diabetes. Low birth weight combined with severe polyhydramnios or maternal diabetes was associated with malformations. Diagnosis of polyhydramnios should prompt glucose-tolerance testing, detailed sonography including fetal echocardiography, and TORCH serology. Especially pregnancies with polyhydramnios and small fetuses as well as those with maternal diabetes should be carefully evaluated for malformations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization, Prevalence, and Etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Mohammed Allazzam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the prevalence and possible etiological factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH among a group of children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A group of 8-12-year-old children were recruited (n=267  from the Pediatric Dental Clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Children had at least one first permanent molar (FPM, erupted or partially erupted. Demographic information, children’s medical history, and pregnancy-related data were obtained. The crowns of the FPM and permanent incisors were examined for demarcated opacities, posteruptive breakdown (PEB, atypical restorations, and extracted FPMs. Children were considered to have MIH if one or more FPM with or without involvement of incisors met the diagnostic criteria. Results. MIH showed a prevalence of 8.6%. Demarcated opacities were the most common form. Maxillary central incisors were more affected than mandibular (P=0.01. The condition was more prevalent in children with history of illnesses during the first four years of life including tonsillitis (P=0.001, adenoiditis (P=0.001, asthma (P=0.001, fever (P=0.014, and antibiotics intake (P=0.001. Conclusions. The prevalence of MIH is significantly associated with childhood illnesses during the first four years of life including asthma, adenoid infections, tonsillitis, fever, and antibiotics intake.

  5. The Pathophysiology and Etiology of Vaginismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherng-Jye Jeng

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaginismus is defined as an involuntary spasm of the pelvic muscles surrounding the outer third of the vagina, especially the perineal muscles and the levator ani muscles. Its severe form usually makes penetration virtually impossible and causes a severe, burning pain, and leads to unconsummated marriage. There appears to be basic agreement that vaginismus is a psychosociologic disorder with phobic elements resulting from actual or imagined negative experiences with penetration attempts. Fear and anxiety concerning penetration is expressed physiologically via the involuntary vaginal muscle spasm that characterizes vaginismus. Since 1547, when vaginismus was first described, thousands of research papers have been published on this female sexual disorder. However, the etiology of vaginismus remains controversial. Women with vaginismus generally experience shame, disgust and dislike toward their genitals. They frequently have or have had other phobias. They are usually overprotected by their fathers and have been “good girls” since childhood. Their sexual partners are usually kind, gentle, considerate and passive “nice guys”. The male partner's lack of aggressiveness actually leads to unconsummation of the marriage. The sexually secure husband can usually overcome mild degrees of vaginismus by persistent but firm penile insertion. For moderate to severe degrees of vaginismus, medical intervention is usually necessary to lead to consummation of the marriage.

  6. Etiology and immunology of infectious bronchitis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LF Caron

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV of chickens is currently one of the main diseases associated with respiratory syndrome in domestic poultry, as well as with losses related to egg production. The etiological agent is a coronavirus, which presents structural differences in the field, mainly in the S1 spike protein. The immune response against this virus is complicated by the few similarities among serotypes. Environmental and management factors, as well as the high mutation rate of the virus, render it difficult to control the disease and compromise the efficacy of the available vaccines. Bird immune system capacity to respond to challenges depend on the integrity of the mucosae, as an innate compartment, and on the generation of humoral and cell-mediated adaptive responses, and may affect the health status of breeding stocks in the medium run. Vaccination of day-old chicks in the hatchery on aims at eliciting immune responses, particularly cell-mediated responses that are essential when birds are first challenged. Humoral response (IgY and IgA are also important for virus clearance in subsequent challenges. The presence of antibodies against the S1 spike protein in 3- to 4-week-old birds is important both in broilers and for immunological memory in layers and breeders.

  7. The Shared Etiology of Attentional Control and Anxiety: An Adolescent Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Jeffrey R.; O’Sullivan, Deirdre L.; Schmidt, Nicole L.; Spann, Catherine A.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the etiology of attentional control (AC) and four different anxiety symptom types (generalized, obsessive-compulsive, separation, and social) in an adolescent sample of over 400 twin pairs. Genetic factors contributed to 55% of the variance in AC and between 43 and 58% of the variance in anxiety. Negative phenotypic associations between AC and anxiety indicated that lower attentional ability is related to increased risk for all 4 anxiety categories. Genetic correlations between AC and anxiety phenotypes ranged from −.36 to −.47, with evidence of nonshared environmental covariance between AC and generalized and separation anxiety. Results suggest that AC is a phenotypic and genetic risk factor for anxiety in early adolescence, with somewhat differing levels of risk depending on symptomatology. PMID:28498525

  8. The Broader Autism Phenotype and Its Implications on the Etiology and Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Gerdts

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of autism-related traits has been well documented in undiagnosed family members of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. The most common finding is mild impairments in social and communication skills that are similar to those shown by individuals with autism, but exhibited to a lesser degree. Termed the broader autism phenotype (BAP, these traits suggest a genetic liability for autism-related traits in families. Genetic influence in autism is strong, with identical twins showing high concordance for the diagnosis and related traits and approximately 20% of all ASD cases having an identified genetic mechanism. This paper highlights the studies conducted to date regarding the BAP and considers the implications of these findings for the etiology and treatment of ASD.

  9. Genetics for the ophthalmologist

    OpenAIRE

    Sadagopan, Karthikeyan A.; Capasso, Jenina; Levin, Alex V.

    2012-01-01

    The eye has played a major role in human genomics including gene therapy. It is the fourth most common organ system after integument (skin, hair and nails), nervous system, and musculoskeletal system to be involved in genetic disorders. The eye is involved in single gene disorders and those caused by multifactorial etiology. Retinoblastoma was the first human cancer gene to be cloned. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy was the first mitochondrial disorder described. X-Linked red-green color de...

  10. Modeling of constructed wetland performance in BOD5removal for domestic wastewater under changes in relative humidity using genetic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankararajan, Vanitha; Neelakandhan, Nampoothiri; Chandrasekaran, Sivapragasam

    2017-04-01

    Despite the extensive use of constructed wetland (CW) as an effective method for domestic wastewater treatment, there is lack of clarity in arriving at well-defined design guidelines. This is particularly due to the fact that the design of CW is dependent on many inter-connected parameters which interact in a complex manner. Consequently, different researchers in the past have tried to address different aspects of this complexity. In this study, an attempt is made to model the influence of relative humidity (RH) in the effectiveness of BOD 5 removal. Since it is an accepted fact that plants respond to change in humidity, it is necessary to take this parameter into consideration particularly when the CW is to be designed involving changes in relative humidity over a shorter time horizon (say a couple of months). This study reveals that BOD 5out depends on the ratio of BOD 5in and relative humidity. An attempt is also made to model the outlet BOD 5 using genetic programming with inlet BOD 5 and relative humidity as input parameters.

  11. Estimating genetic potential of biofuel forest hardwoods to withstand metal toxicity in industrial effluent under dry tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, S A; Mirza, S N; Zubair, M; Nouman, W; Hussain, S B; Mehmood, S; Irshad, A; Sarwar, N; Ammar, A; Iqbal, M F; Asim, A; Chattha, M U; Chattha, M B; Zafar, A; Abid, R

    2015-08-14

    Biofuel tree species are recognized as a promising alternative source of fuel to conventional forms. Additionally, these tree species are also effective in accumulating toxic heavy metals present in some industrial effluents. In developing countries such as Pakistan, the use of biofuel tree species is gaining popularity not only for harvesting economical and environmentally friendly biofuel, but also to sequester poisonous heavy metals from industrial wastewater. This study was aimed at evaluating the genetic potential of two biofuel species, namely, Jatropha curcas and Pongamia pinnata, to grow when irrigated with industrial effluent from the Pak-Arab Fertilizer Factory Multan, Southern Punjab, Pakistan. The growth performances of one-year-old seedlings of both species were compared in soil with adverse physiochemical properties. It was found that J. curcas was better able to withstand the toxicity of the heavy metals present in the fertilizer factory effluent. J. curcas showed maximum gain in height, diameter, and biomass production in soil irrigated with 75% concentrated industrial effluent. In contrast, P. pinnata showed a significant reduction in growth in soil irrigated with more than 50% concentrated industrial effluent, indicating that this species is less tolerant to higher toxicity levels of industrial effluent. This study identifies J. curcas as a promising biofuel tree species that can be grown using industrial wastewater.

  12. The genetic basis underlying variation in production of the flavour compound diacetyl by Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Raquel; Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Bansal, Nidhi; Turner, Mark S

    2018-01-16

    Diacetyl and the closely related compound acetoin impart desirable buttery flavour and odour to many foods including cheese and are generated through the metabolism of citrate by lactic acid bacteria (LAB). To increase the levels of these compounds, adjunct cultures capable of producing them can be added to cheese fermentations. In this study, we compared the diacetyl and acetoin producing abilities of 13 Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains from cheese sources. Diacetyl and acetoin production was found to be a common feature of Lb. rhamnosus grown in milk, with 12 strains producing these compounds. Whole genome sequencing of four strains revealed that genes encoding the citrate metabolising pathway present in other LAB are conserved in Lb. rhamnosus. One strain was, however, totally defective in diacetyl and acetoin production. This was likely due to an inability to produce the diacetyl/acetoin precursor compound acetolactate resulting from a frameshift mutation in the acetolactate synthase (als) gene. Complementation of this defective strain with a complete als gene from a diacetyl producing strain restored production of diacetyl and acetoin to levels equivalent to naturally high producing strains. Introduction of the same als-containing plasmid into the probiotic Lb. rhamnosus strain GG also increased diacetyl and acetoin levels. In model cheesemaking experiments, the als-complemented strain produced very high levels of diacetyl and acetoin over 35days of ripening. These findings identify the genetic basis for natural variation in production of a key cheese flavour compound in Lb. rhamnosus strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic variants associated with the root system architecture of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) under contrasting phosphate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Chen, Yanling; Thomas, Catherine L; Ding, Guangda; Xu, Ping; Shi, Dexu; Grandke, Fabian; Jin, Kemo; Cai, Hongmei; Xu, Fangsen; Yi, Bin; Broadley, Martin R; Shi, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Breeding crops with ideal root system architecture for efficient absorption of phosphorus is an important strategy to reduce the use of phosphate fertilizers. To investigate genetic variants leading to changes in root system architecture, 405 oilseed rape cultivars were genotyped with a 60K Brassica Infinium SNP array in low and high P environments. A total of 285 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with root system architecture traits at varying phosphorus levels. Nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms corroborate a previous linkage analysis of root system architecture quantitative trait loci in the BnaTNDH population. One peak single-nucleotide polymorphism region on A3 was associated with all root system architecture traits and co-localized with a quantitative trait locus for primary root length at low phosphorus. Two more single-nucleotide polymorphism peaks on A5 for root dry weight at low phosphorus were detected in both growth systems and co-localized with a quantitative trait locus for the same trait. The candidate genes identified on A3 form a haplotype 'BnA3Hap', that will be important for understanding the phosphorus/root system interaction and for the incorporation into Brassica napus breeding programs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  14. Etiologic Subtypes, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Acute Ischemic Stroke in Young Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnci Şule Özer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stroke in people aged less than 45 years is less frequent than in older patients, but has major impacts on both the individual and society. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic subtypes of acute ischemic stroke in the young. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the hospital records of 619 patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke between January 2011 and November 2014. Acute ischemic stroke in the young was defined as patients aged 45 years and under. Demographic data, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores at admission and detailed investigations aimed at determining etiologic cause were recorded. Etiologic stroke subtypes were determined using the automated Causative Classification System. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS scores were recorded in the follow-up. Results: There were 32 (5.2% young patients with acute ischemic stroke. The rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and coronary artery disease were significantly lower in young patients compared with patients aged more than 45 years (p<0.05. The mean NIHSS score at admission and hospital mortality was significantly lower in patients aged 45 years and under compared with those older than 45 years (p=0.006, p=0.043. Cardioaortic embolism was the most common etiologic stroke subtype in both groups. Other causes were significantly more frequent in the young acute ischemic stroke group compared with the older patients. The median follow-up mRS was significantly lower in patients aged 45 years and under compared with those older than 45 years (p<0.001. Conclusion: Young patients with ischemic stroke have different risk factors, stroke etiology, stroke severity and prognosis compared with patients older than 45 years with the same condition

  15. Etiology of thyroid cancer: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narkar, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    Thyroid cancer, although a relatively rare tumor, is the most common cancer of the endocrine glands. The identification of genetic factors important in the pathogesis of thyroid cancer could provide molecular tools for a better differential diagnosis between the different histotypes. Characterisation of mechanisms by which mutated proteins transduce mitogenic and de-differentiating signals might suggest novel therapeutic approaches for controlling cell growth and restoring thyroid differentiated functions

  16. Keloid Scarring: Understanding the Genetic Basis, Advances, and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Sukari Halim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Keloid disease is a fibroproliferative dermal tumor with an unknown etiology that occurs aftera skin injury in genetically susceptible individuals. Increased familial aggregation, a higherprevalence in certain races, parallelism in identical twins, and alteration in gene expression allfavor a remarkable genetic contribution to keloid pathology. It seems that the environmenttriggers the disease in genetically susceptible individuals. Several genes have been implicatedin the etiology of keloid disease, but no single gene mutation has thus far been found to beresponsible. Therefore, a combination of methods such as association, gene-gene interaction,epigenetics, linkage, gene expression, and protein analysis should be applied to determinekeloid etiology.

  17. Keloid Scarring: Understanding the Genetic Basis, Advances, and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Sukari Halim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Keloid disease is a fibroproliferative dermal tumor with an unknown etiology that occurs after a skin injury in genetically susceptible individuals. Increased familial aggregation, a higher prevalence in certain races, parallelism in identical twins, and alteration in gene expression all favor a remarkable genetic contribution to keloid pathology. It seems that the environment triggers the disease in genetically susceptible individuals. Several genes have been implicated in the etiology of keloid disease, but no single gene mutation has thus far been found to be responsible. Therefore, a combination of methods such as association, gene-gene interaction, epigenetics, linkage, gene expression, and protein analysis should be applied to determine keloid etiology.

  18. 42 CFR 71.54 - Etiological agents, hosts, and vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Etiological agents, hosts, and vectors. 71.54..., INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.54 Etiological agents, hosts, and vectors. (a) A... any arthropod or other animal host or vector of human disease, or any exotic living arthropod or other...

  19. Etiology and pathogenesis of anterior open bite: A review | Wanjau ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review the etiology and pathogenesis of anterior open bite malocclusion. Data source: Review of literature was affected through Pubmed, Google scholar and Science direct. References identified from articles found from the primary search were also reviewed. Study selection: Published data on etiology and ...

  20. Etiology and incidence of chronic ulcers in Blantyre, Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegelaar, Jim E.; Stroïnk, Aimee C.; Steketee, Willemyn H.; Faber, William R.; van der Wal, Allard C.; Komolafe, Isaac O. O.; Dzamalala, Charles; Chibwana, Cecilia; Wendte, Johannes F.; Zijlstra, Eduard E.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little information is available on the incidence and etiology of chronic ulcers in the tropics. Therefore, the incidence and etiology of chronic skin ulcers were assessed in out-patients at the Department of Dermatology and in in-patients at the Departments of Dermatology, Surgery,

  1. Heart failure etiology impacts survival of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecini, Redi; Møller, Daniel Vega; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of heart failure (HF) etiology on prognosis of HF is not well known. METHODS: 3078 patients (median age 75years, 61% male) hospitalized with HF were studied. Patients were classified into six etiology groups: hypertension (HTN, 13.9%), ischemic heart disease (IHD, 42...

  2. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic manifestations...

  3. Epidemiologie et etiologies des epistaxis dans notre pratique: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: A frequent ailment in ENT, the epistaxis is an emergency that can put the vital prognosis at stake. An adequate follow up care deserves some knowledge of etiology. Objectives: Study the epidemiological and etiological aspects of the epistaxis. Methodology: A retrospective and descriptive study conducted on ...

  4. The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato is genetically monomorphic and under strong selection to evade tomato immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongman Cai

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, genome sequencing of many isolates of genetically monomorphic bacterial human pathogens has given new insights into pathogen microevolution and phylogeography. Here, we report a genome-based micro-evolutionary study of a bacterial plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Only 267 mutations were identified between five sequenced isolates in 3,543,009 nt of analyzed genome sequence, which suggests a recent evolutionary origin of this pathogen. Further analysis with genome-derived markers of 89 world-wide isolates showed that several genotypes exist in North America and in Europe indicating frequent pathogen movement between these world regions. Genome-derived markers and molecular analyses of key pathogen loci important for virulence and motility both suggest ongoing adaptation to the tomato host. A mutational hotspot was found in the type III-secreted effector gene hopM1. These mutations abolish the cell death triggering activity of the full-length protein indicating strong selection for loss of function of this effector, which was previously considered a virulence factor. Two non-synonymous mutations in the flagellin-encoding gene fliC allowed identifying a new microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP in a region distinct from the known MAMP flg22. Interestingly, the ancestral allele of this MAMP induces a stronger tomato immune response than the derived alleles. The ancestral allele has largely disappeared from today's Pto populations suggesting that flagellin-triggered immunity limits pathogen fitness even in highly virulent pathogens. An additional non-synonymous mutation was identified in flg22 in South American isolates. Therefore, MAMPs are more variable than expected differing even between otherwise almost identical isolates of the same pathogen strain.

  5. COE loss-of-function analysis reveals a genetic program underlying maintenance and regeneration of the nervous system in planarians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martis W Cowles

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Members of the COE family of transcription factors are required for central nervous system (CNS development. However, the function of COE in the post-embryonic CNS remains largely unknown. An excellent model for investigating gene function in the adult CNS is the freshwater planarian. This animal is capable of regenerating neurons from an adult pluripotent stem cell population and regaining normal function. We previously showed that planarian coe is expressed in differentiating and mature neurons and that its function is required for proper CNS regeneration. Here, we show that coe is essential to maintain nervous system architecture and patterning in intact (uninjured planarians. We took advantage of the robust phenotype in intact animals to investigate the genetic programs coe regulates in the CNS. We compared the transcriptional profiles of control and coe RNAi planarians using RNA sequencing and identified approximately 900 differentially expressed genes in coe knockdown animals, including 397 downregulated genes that were enriched for nervous system functional annotations. Next, we validated a subset of the downregulated transcripts by analyzing their expression in coe-deficient planarians and testing if the mRNAs could be detected in coe+ cells. These experiments revealed novel candidate targets of coe in the CNS such as ion channel, neuropeptide, and neurotransmitter genes. Finally, to determine if loss of any of the validated transcripts underscores the coe knockdown phenotype, we knocked down their expression by RNAi and uncovered a set of coe-regulated genes implicated in CNS regeneration and patterning, including orthologs of sodium channel alpha-subunit and pou4. Our study broadens the knowledge of gene expression programs regulated by COE that are required for maintenance of neural subtypes and nervous system architecture in adult animals.

  6. COE loss-of-function analysis reveals a genetic program underlying maintenance and regeneration of the nervous system in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Martis W; Omuro, Kerilyn C; Stanley, Brianna N; Quintanilla, Carlo G; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2014-10-01

    Members of the COE family of transcription factors are required for central nervous system (CNS) development. However, the function of COE in the post-embryonic CNS remains largely unknown. An excellent model for investigating gene function in the adult CNS is the freshwater planarian. This animal is capable of regenerating neurons from an adult pluripotent stem cell population and regaining normal function. We previously showed that planarian coe is expressed in differentiating and mature neurons and that its function is required for proper CNS regeneration. Here, we show that coe is essential to maintain nervous system architecture and patterning in intact (uninjured) planarians. We took advantage of the robust phenotype in intact animals to investigate the genetic programs coe regulates in the CNS. We compared the transcriptional profiles of control and coe RNAi planarians using RNA sequencing and identified approximately 900 differentially expressed genes in coe knockdown animals, including 397 downregulated genes that were enriched for nervous system functional annotations. Next, we validated a subset of the downregulated transcripts by analyzing their expression in coe-deficient planarians and testing if the mRNAs could be detected in coe+ cells. These experiments revealed novel candidate targets of coe in the CNS such as ion channel, neuropeptide, and neurotransmitter genes. Finally, to determine if loss of any of the validated transcripts underscores the coe knockdown phenotype, we knocked down their expression by RNAi and uncovered a set of coe-regulated genes implicated in CNS regeneration and patterning, including orthologs of sodium channel alpha-subunit and pou4. Our study broadens the knowledge of gene expression programs regulated by COE that are required for maintenance of neural subtypes and nervous system architecture in adult animals.

  7. [Causes of emergency dizziness stratified by etiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Wenying; Liu, Jianguo; Zeng, Hong; Liu, Yugeng; Jia, Weihua; Wang, Honghong; Liu, Bo; Tan, Jing; Li, Changqing

    2014-06-03

    To explore the causes of emergency dizziness stratified to improve the diagnostic efficiency. A total of 1 857 cases of dizziness at our emergency department were collected and their etiologies stratified by age and gender. The top three diagnoses were benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, 31.7%), hypertension (24.0%) and posterior circulation ischemia (PCI, 20.5%). Stratified by age, the main causes of dizziness included BPPV (n = 6), migraine-associated vertigo (n = 2), unknown cause (n = 1) for the group of vertigo (14.5%) and neurosis (7.3%) for 18-44 years; BPPV (36.8%), hypertension (22.4%) and migraine-associated vertigo (11.2%) for 45-59 years; hypertension (30.8%), PCI (29.8%) and BPPV (22.9%) for 60-74 years; PCI (30.7%), hypertension (28.6%) and BPPV (25.5%) for 75-92 years. BPPV, migraine and neurosis were more common in females while hypertension and PCI predominated in males (all P hypertension, neurosis and migraine showed the following significant demographic features: BPPV, PCI, hypertension, neurosis and migraine may be the main causes of dizziness. BPPV should be considered initially when vertigo was triggered repeatedly by positional change, especially for young and middle-aged women. And the other common causes of dizziness were migraine-associated vertigo, neurosis and Meniere's disease.Hypertension should be screened firstly in middle-aged and elderly patients presenting mainly with head heaviness and stretching. In elders with dizziness, BPPV is second in constituent ratio to PCI and hypertension.In middle-aged and elderly patients with dizziness, psychological factors should be considered and diagnosis and treatment should be offered timely.

  8. Genetic research in autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Elise B.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Hyman, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The recent explosion of genetic findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research has improved knowledge of the disorder's underlying biology and etiologic architecture. This review introduces concepts and results from recent genetic studies and discusses the manner in which those findings can influence the trajectory of ASD research. Recent findings Large consortium studies have associated ASDs with many types of genetic risk factors, including common polygenic risk, de novo single nucleotide variants, copy number variants, and rare inherited variants. In aggregate, these results confirm the heterogeneity and complexity of ASDs. The rare variant findings in particular point to genes and pathways that begin to bridge the gap between behavior and biology. Summary Genetic studies have the potential to identify the biological underpinnings of ASDs and other neuropsychiatric disorders. The data they generate are already being used to examine disease pathways and pathogenesis. The results also speak to ASD heterogeneity and, in the future, may be used to stratify research studies and treatment trials. PMID:26371945

  9. Genetics and caries: prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Rezende Vieira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Caries remains the most prevalent non-contagious infectious disease in humans. It is clear that the current approaches to decrease the prevalence of caries in human populations, including water fluoridation and school-based programs, are not enough to protect everyone. The scientific community has suggested the need for innovative work in a number of areas in cariology, encompassing disease etiology, epidemiology, definition, prevention, and treatment. We have pioneered the work on genetic studies to identify genes and genetic markers of diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic value. This paper summarizes a presentation that elaborated on these initial findings.

  10. The Genetics of Pediatric Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Chesi, Alessandra; Grant, Struan F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity among children and adults has notably escalated over recent decades and represents a global major health problem. We now know that both genetics and environmental factors contribute to its complex etiology. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed compelling genetic signals influencing obesity risk in adults. Recent reports for childhood obesity revealed that many adult loci also play a role in the pediatric setting. Childhood GWAS have uncovered novel loci below the detec...

  11. The Etiology of Vaginal Discharge Syndrome in Zimbabwe Results from the Zimbabwe STI Etiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirenje, Z Mike; Dhibi, Nicholas; Handsfield, H Hunter; Gonese, Elizabeth; Barr, Beth Tippett; Gwanzura, Lovemore; Latif, Ahmed S; Maseko, Dumisili Venessa; Kularatne, Ranmini S; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Kilmarx, Peter H; Machiha, Anna; Mugurungi, Owen; Rietmeijer, Cornelis A

    2017-11-29

    Symptomatic vaginal discharge is a common gynecological condition managed syndromically in most developing countries. In Zimbabwe, women presenting with symptomatic vaginal discharge are treated with empirical regimens that commonly cover both sexually transmitted infections (STI) and reproductive tract infections, typically including a combination of an intramuscular injection of kanamycin, and oral doxycycline and metronidazole regimens. This study was conducted to determine the current etiology of symptomatic vaginal discharge and assess adequacy of current syndromic management guidelines. We enrolled 200 women with symptomatic vaginal discharge presenting at 6 STI clinics in Zimbabwe. Microscopy was used to detect bacterial vaginosis and yeast infection. Nucleic acid amplifications tests were used to detect Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis and Mycoplasma genitalium. In addition, serologic testing was performed to detect HIV infection. Of the 200 women, 146 (73%) had an etiology detected, including bacterial vaginosis (24.7%); N. gonorrhoeae (24.0%); yeast infection (20.7%); T. vaginalis (19.0%); C. trachomatis (14.0%) and M. genitalium (7.0%). Among women with STIs (N=90), 62 (68.9%) had a single infection, 18 (20.0%) had a dual infection and 10 (11.1%) had three infections.Of 158 women who consented to HIV testing, 64 (40.5%) were HIV infected.The syndromic management regimen covered 115 (57.5%) of the women in the sample who had gonorrhea, chlamydia, M. genitalium, or bacterial vaginosis, while 85 (42.5%) of women were treated without such diagnosis. Among women presenting with symptomatic vaginal discharge, bacterial vaginosis was the most common etiology and gonorrhea was the most frequently detected STI. The current syndromic management algorithm is suboptimal for coverage of women presenting with symptomatic vaginal discharge; addition of point of care testing could compliment the effectiveness of the syndromic approach.

  12. The role of the neuro-astro-vascular unit in the etiology of Ataxia Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leenoy eMeshulam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing recognition that brain pathologies do not affect neurons only but rather are, to a large extent, pathologies of glial cells as well as of the vasculature opens to new perspectives in our understanding of genetic disorders of the CNS. To validate the role of the neuron-glial-vascular unit in the etiology of genome instability disorders, we report about cell death and morphological aspects of neuro-glia networks and the associated vasculature in a mouse model of Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T, a human genetic disorder that induces severe motor impairment. We found that AT-mutated protein deficiency was consistent with aberrant astrocytic morphology and alterations of the vasculature, often accompanied by reactive gliosis. Interestingly similar findings could also be reported in the case of other genetic disorders. These observations bolster the notion that astrocyte-specific pathologies, hampered vascularization and astrocyte-endothelium interactions in the CNS could play a crucial role in the etiology of genome instability brain disorders and could underlie neurodegeneration.

  13. Epidemiology and etiology of Parkinson's disease: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirdefeldt, Karin; Adami, Hans-Olov; Cole, Philip; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Mandel, Jack

    2011-06-01

    The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) is not well understood but likely to involve both genetic and environmental factors. Incidence and prevalence estimates vary to a large extent-at least partly due to methodological differences between studies-but are consistently higher in men than in women. Several genes that cause familial as well as sporadic PD have been identified and familial aggregation studies support a genetic component. Despite a vast literature on lifestyle and environmental possible risk or protection factors, consistent findings are few. There is compelling evidence for protective effects of smoking and coffee, but the biologic mechanisms for these possibly causal relations are poorly understood. Uric acid also seems to be associated with lower PD risk. Evidence that one or several pesticides increase PD risk is suggestive but further research is needed to identify specific compounds that may play a causal role. Evidence is limited on the role of metals, other chemicals and magnetic fields. Important methodological limitations include crude classification of exposure, low frequency and intensity of exposure, inadequate sample size, potential for confounding, retrospective study designs and lack of consistent diagnostic criteria for PD. Studies that assessed possible shared etiological components between PD and other diseases show that REM sleep behavior disorder and mental illness increase PD risk and that PD patients have lower cancer risk, but methodological concerns exist. Future epidemiologic studies of PD should be large, include detailed quantifications of exposure, and collect information on environmental exposures as well as genetic polymorphisms.

  14. On the use of genetic algorithm to optimize industrial assets lifecycle management under safety and budget constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonchampt, J.; Fessart, K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the method and tool dedicated to optimize investments planning for industrial assets. These investments may either be preventive maintenance tasks, asset enhancements or logistic investments such as spare parts purchases. The two methodological points to investigate in such an issue are: 1. The measure of the profitability of a portfolio of investments 2. The selection and planning of an optimal set of investments 3. The measure of the risk of a portfolio of investments The measure of the profitability of a set of investments in the IPOP tool is synthesised in the Net Present Value indicator. The NPV is the sum of the differences of discounted cash flows (direct costs, forced outages...) between the situations with and without a given investment. These cash flows are calculated through a pseudo-Markov reliability model representing independently the components of the industrial asset and the spare parts inventories. The component model has been widely discussed over the years but the spare part model is a new one based on some approximations that will be discussed. This model, referred as the NPV function, takes for input an investments portfolio and gives its NPV. The second issue is to optimize the NPV. If all investments were independent, this optimization would be an easy calculation, unfortunately there are two sources of dependency. The first one is introduced by the spare part model, as if components are indeed independent in their reliability model, the fact that several components use the same inventory induces a dependency. The second dependency comes from economic, technical or logistic constraints, such as a global maintenance budget limit or a safety requirement limiting the residual risk of failure of a component or group of component, making the aggregation of individual optimum not necessary feasible. The algorithm used to solve such a difficult optimization problem is a genetic algorithm. After a description

  15. Genetic evidence that induction of root Fe(III) chelate reductase activity is necessary for iron uptake under iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Y; Guerinot, M L

    1996-11-01

    Reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) by Fe(III) chelate reductase is thought to be an obligatory step in iron uptake as well as the primary factor in making iron available for absorption by all plants except grasses. Fe(III) chelate reductase has also been suggested to play a more general role in the regulation of cation absorption. In order to experimentally address the importance of Fe(III) chelate reductase activity in the mineral nutrition of plants, three Arabidopsis thaliana mutans (frd1-1, frd1-2 and frd1-3), that do not show induction of Fe(III) chelate reductase activity under iron-deficient growth conditions, have been isolated and characterized. These mutants are still capable of acidifying the rhizosphere under iron-deficiency and accumulate more Zn and Mn in their shoots relative to wild-type plants regardless of iron status. frd1 mutants do not translocate radiolabeled iron to the shoots when roots are presented with a tightly chelated form of Fe(III). These results: (1) confirm that iron must be reduced before it can be transported, (2) show that Fe(III) reduction can be uncoupled from proton release, the other major iron-deficiency response, and (3) demonstrate that Fe(III) chelate reductase activity per se is not necessarily responsible for accumulation of cations previously observed in pea and tomato mutants with constitutively high levels of Fe(III) chelate reductase activity.

  16. [Application of systematic etiological analysis in final and differential diagnosis of hereditary hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J Y; Gu, H H; Zheng, S J; Zha, Z S; Hua, M X; Jiang, J J; Cai, B; Zhou, L; Jia, Y; Fang, C P; Qian, B H

    2016-06-14

    Study on the application of the systematic analysis strategies of etiology in final and differential diagnosis of hereditary hemolytic anemia (HHA). Analysis of 1 506 patients with suspected hemolytic anemia (HA) in systematic hemolytic etiological analysis. ①1 413(94%) of the total 1 506 patients [male 799, female 707, median age 22-year-old (4 days to 86-year-old) ]were caused by membranopathy, hemoglobinopathy and enzymopathy, documented the three major causes of HHA. 369 cases (26%) of the 1 413 patients showed complex type of HA, which had the coexistence of two or more hereditary defects concerning HA in red cells, the other 1 044 cases (74%) were HA with single hemolytic cause. ②In 1 044 cases of single HA, hemoglobinopathy, membranopathy and enzymopathy was 22%, 63% and 15%, respectively. When single HA plused complex HA, the hemoglobinopathy, membranopathy and enzymopathy was 29%, 57% and 14% respectively. The difference was not statistically significant (P >0.05). ③ The most common double heterozygosis with different genetic defects was hemoglobinopathy complicated with membranopathy (50%, 184/369). The complex HA was also found in patients with the enzymopathy complicated with membranopathy (18%, 66/369) and with hemoglobinopathy (4%, 13/369). Some of complex HA patients had the same kinds of genetic defects which means double hemoglobinopathies (29 cases, 8% ), membranopathies (57 cases, 15% ) and enzymopathies (9 cases, 2%). Other kinds (11 cases, 3%) of complex HA, anemia and jaundice were seen in HAA patients accompanied with acquired and secondary defects or other system abnormalities. The parallel etiologic examination of three major genetic hemolytic diseases can be 94% of patients for classification. The results showed that the first cause of HAA was membranopathy, second hemoglobinopathy and then enzymopathy. Complex hemolysis is not uncommon and single factor analysis alone is not enough to provide scientific basis for diagnosis.

  17. Mutations and modeling of the chromatin remodeler CHD8 define an emerging autism etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Barnard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with a strong but complex genetic component. Recent family based exome-sequencing strategies have identified recurrent de novo mutations at specific genes, providing strong evidence for ASD risk, but also highlighting the extreme genetic heterogeneity of the disorder. However, disruptions in these genes converge on key molecular pathways early in development. In particular, functional enrichment analyses have found that there is a bias towards genes involved in transcriptional regulation, such as chromatin regulators. Here we review recent genetic, animal model, co-expression network, and functional genomics studies relating to the high confidence ASD risk gene, CHD8. CHD8 a chromatin remodeling factor, may serve as a master regulator of a common ASD etiology. Individuals with a CHD8 mutation show an ASD subtype that includes similar physical characteristics, such as macrocephaly and prolonged GI problems including recurrent constipation. Similarly, animal models of CHD8 disruption exhibit enlarged head circumference and reduced gut motility phenotypes. Systems biology approaches suggest CHD8 and other candidate ASD risk genes are enriched during mid-fetal development, which may represent a critical time window in ASD etiology. Transcription profiles from cell and primary tissue models of early development indicate that CHD8 may also positively regulate other candidate ASD risk genes through both direct and indirect means. However continued study is needed to elucidate the mechanism of regulation as well as identify which CHD8 targets are most relevant to ASD risk. Overall, these initial studies suggest the potential for common ASD etiologies and the development of personalized treatments in the future.

  18. The role of schizotypy in the study of the etiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrantes-Vidal, Neus; Grant, Phillip; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2015-03-01

    Schizotypy provides a useful construct for understanding the development of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. As research on the epidemiology of psychotic symptoms and clinical risk for psychosis has expanded, conceptual challenges have emerged to comprehend the nature and borders of the space comprised between personality variation and psychosis. Schizotypy is considered in light of these more recent constructs. It is suggested that rather than being superseded by them due to their higher specificity and predictive power for transition to psychosis, schizotypy integrates them as it constitutes a dynamic continuum ranging from personality to psychosis. The advantages of schizotypy for studying schizophrenia etiology are discussed (eg, it facilitates a developmental approach and the identification of causal, resilience, and compensating factors and offers a multidimensional structure that captures etiological heterogeneity). An overview of putative genetic, biological, and psychosocial risk factors is presented, focusing on communalities and differences between schizotypy and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The found notable overlap supports etiological continuity, and, simultaneously, differential findings appear that are critical to understanding resilience to schizophrenia. For example, discrepant findings in genetic studies might be interpreted as suggestive of sets of independent genetic factors playing a differential role in schizotypy and schizophrenia: some would influence variation specifically on schizotypy dimensions (ie, high vs low schizotypy, thereby increasing proneness to psychosis), some would confer unspecific liability to disease by impacting neural properties and susceptibility to environmental factors (ie, high vs low resilience to disorder) and some might contribute to disease-specific characteristics. Finally, schizotypy's promise for studying gene-environment interactions is considered. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University

  19. [Genetics of bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, M; Forstner, A J; Adorjan, K; Schaupp, S K; Nöthen, M M; Schulze, T G

    2017-07-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) has a multifactorial etiology. Its development is influenced by genetic as well as environmental factors. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS), in which genetic risk allelic variants for the disorder could be replicated for the first time, marked the breakthrough in the identification of the responsible risk genes. In addition to these common genetic variants with moderate effects identified by GWAS, rare variants with a higher penetrance are expected to play a role in disease development. The results of recent studies suggest that copy number variants might contribute to BD development, although to a lesser extent than in other psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia or autism. Results from the initial next generation sequencing studies indicate an enrichment of rare variants in pathways and genes that were previously found to be associated with BD. In the field of pharmacogenetics, a risk gene that influences the individual variance in the response to lithium treatment was identified for the first time in a recent large international GWAS. Currently the reported risk alleles do not sufficiently explain the phenotypic variance to be used for individual prediction of disease risk, disease course or response to medication. Future genetic research will provide important insights into the biological basis of BD by the identification of additional genes associated with BD. This knowledge of genetics will help identify potential etiological subgroups as well as cross-diagnostic disease mechanisms.

  20. Referring patients for a medical genetics consultation and genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Reid

    2011-01-01

    Clinical geneticists and genetic counselors provide diagnosis and counseling for genetic disorders affecting every organ system and every age group. Genetic counselors are more focused on informing patients and families about the inheritance of a genetic disorder and providing recurrence risk counseling, support and information about a diagnosis and reproductive options. Medical geneticists may also share some of these roles in addition to establishing a diagnosis and providing medical management. Medical Geneticists receive training in ACGME-accredited residency programs and are certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics. Genetic counseling is a masters degree program and certification is granted by the American Board of Genetic Counseling. When a patient/family is referred to a Clinical Geneticist, they may expect a thorough evaluation in an effort to establish a diagnosis that may provide information about etiology, prognosis, therapy and recurrence risk. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Genetic-Phenotypic Variability and Correlation between Morphology-Anatomy-Physiology Characteristics and Dry Matter Yield of Polyploidized Forage Grasses under Aluminum Stressed Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Anwar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted with the aim to know the genetic-phenotypic variability (heritability value, and correlation between morphology-anatomy-physiology characters and dry matter yield (DMY of polyploidized forage grasses under aluminum (Al stressed condition. A total of 16 forage grass genotypes (polyploid and diploid Brachiaria brizantha, Brachiaria decumbens, Setaria sphacelata, Setaria splendida, Panicum muticum, Panicum maximum, Pennisetum purpureum, and Pennisetum purpupoides were subjected to Al-stressed (16 mM Al2(SO43. The treatments were allotted to a Randomized Completely Block Design with monofactorial pattern (genotypes and 5 blocks in each treatment. The morphology-anatomy-physiology characteristics evaluated were plant height, leaf number, tiller number, leaf color, chlorophyll content, stomata number, chloroplast number, leaf nitrate reductase activity, dry matter, wet matter yield, dry matter yield, stress tolerance index and pH media. Results showed the polyploidization increased stress tolerance index of grasses. The genetic-phenotypic variability (heritability value estimates for all morphology-anatomy-physiology characteristics were high. Most morphology-anatomy-physiology characteristics, except leaf number, chlorophyll content and chloroplast number, had significant correlation to dry matter yield. In conclusion, evaluation on selection progress of dry matter yield of forage grasses can be effectively done by selection for yield of wet matter, plant height, leaf color, branch number, stomata number, leaf nitrate reductase activity, pH media, and dry matter simultaneously. (Animal Production 9(1: 23-29 (2007

  2. Prediction of crack growth direction by Strain Energy Sih's Theory on specimens SEN under tension-compression biaxial loading employing Genetic Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-MartInez R; Lugo-Gonzalez E; Urriolagoitia-Calderon G; Urriolagoitia-Sosa G; Hernandez-Gomez L H; Romero-Angeles B; Torres-San Miguel Ch

    2011-01-01

    Crack growth direction has been studied in many ways. Particularly Sih's strain energy theory predicts that a fracture under a three-dimensional state of stress spreads in direction of the minimum strain energy density. In this work a study for angle of fracture growth was made, considering a biaxial stress state at the crack tip on SEN specimens. The stress state applied on a tension-compression SEN specimen is biaxial one on crack tip, as it can observed in figure 1. A solution method proposed to obtain a mathematical model considering genetic algorithms, which have demonstrated great capacity for the solution of many engineering problems. From the model given by Sih one can deduce the density of strain energy stored for unit of volume at the crack tip as dW = [1/2E(σ 2 x + σ 2 y ) - ν/E(σ x σy)]dV (1). From equation (1) a mathematical deduction to solve in terms of θ of this case was developed employing Genetic Algorithms, where θ is a crack propagation direction in plane x-y. Steel and aluminium mechanical properties to modelled specimens were employed, because they are two of materials but used in engineering design. Obtained results show stable zones of fracture propagation but only in a range of applied loading.

  3. ENDOCRINE OPHTHALMOPATHY: ETIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS, CLINICAL PICTURE, DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikonova L. V.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the study of endocrine ophthalmopathy is due to the high prevalence of this disease and a high risk of developing impaired vision that leads to disability of patients. This lecture presents the main genetic, immunological, clinical manifestations of endocrine ophthalmopathy in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this pathology. The clinical picture of endocrine ophthalmopathy is various, unique for every patient and depends on the activity and severity of the process, which requires combined etiopathogenetic therapy. The importance of timely diagnosis for endocrine ophthalmopathy with an assessment of the activity of the process for choosing the right tactics for managing patients is very high.

  4. Genetic Dissection of Root Morphological Traits Related to Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Brassica napus L. under Two Contrasting Nitrogen Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As the major determinant for nutrient uptake, root system architecture (RSA has a massive impact on nitrogen use efficiency (NUE. However, little is known the molecular control of RSA as related to NUE in rapeseed. Here, a rapeseed recombinant inbred line population (BnaZNRIL was used to investigate root morphology (RM, an important component for RSA and NUE-related traits under high-nitrogen (HN and low-nitrogen (LN conditions by hydroponics. Data analysis suggested that RM-related traits, particularly root size had significantly phenotypic correlations with plant dry biomass and N uptake irrespective of N levels, but no or little correlation with N utilization efficiency (NUtE, providing the potential to identify QTLs with pleiotropy or specificity for RM- and NUE-related traits. A total of 129 QTLs (including 23 stable QTLs, which were repeatedly detected at least two environments or different N levels were identified and 83 of them were integrated into 22 pleiotropic QTL clusters. Five RM-NUE, ten RM-specific and three NUE-specific QTL clusters with same directions of additive-effect implied two NUE-improving approaches (RM-based and N utilization-based directly and provided valuable genomic regions for NUE improvement in rapeseed. Importantly, all of four major QTLs and most of stable QTLs (20 out of 23 detected here were related to RM traits under HN and/or LN levels, suggested that regulating RM to improve NUE would be more feasible than regulating N efficiency directly. These results provided the promising genomic regions for marker-assisted selection on RM-based NUE improvement in rapeseed.

  5. Fitting Analysis using Differential evolution Optimization (FADO):. Spectral population synthesis through genetic optimization under self-consistency boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.

    2017-07-01

    The goal of population spectral synthesis (pss; also referred to as inverse, semi-empirical evolutionary- or fossil record approach) is to decipher from the spectrum of a galaxy the mass, age and metallicity of its constituent stellar populations. This technique, which is the reverse of but complementary to evolutionary synthesis, has been established as fundamental tool in extragalactic research. It has been extensively applied to large spectroscopic data sets, notably the SDSS, leading to important insights into the galaxy assembly history. However, despite significant improvements over the past decade, all current pss codes suffer from two major deficiencies that inhibit us from gaining sharp insights into the star-formation history (SFH) of galaxies and potentially introduce substantial biases in studies of their physical properties (e.g., stellar mass, mass-weighted stellar age and specific star formation rate). These are I) the neglect of nebular emission in spectral fits, consequently; II) the lack of a mechanism that ensures consistency between the best-fitting SFH and the observed nebular emission characteristics of a star-forming (SF) galaxy (e.g., hydrogen Balmer-line luminosities and equivalent widths-EWs, shape of the continuum in the region around the Balmer and Paschen jump). In this article, we present fado (Fitting Analysis using Differential evolution Optimization) - a conceptually novel, publicly available pss tool with the distinctive capability of permitting identification of the SFH that reproduces the observed nebular characteristics of a SF galaxy. This so-far unique self-consistency concept allows us to significantly alleviate degeneracies in current spectral synthesis, thereby opening a new avenue to the exploration of the assembly history of galaxies. The innovative character of fado is further augmented by its mathematical foundation: fado is the first pss code employing genetic differential evolution optimization. This, in conjunction

  6. Genetics for the ophthalmologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadagopan, Karthikeyan A; Capasso, Jenina; Levin, Alex V

    2012-09-01

    The eye has played a major role in human genomics including gene therapy. It is the fourth most common organ system after integument (skin, hair and nails), nervous system, and musculoskeletal system to be involved in genetic disorders. The eye is involved in single gene disorders and those caused by multifactorial etiology. Retinoblastoma was the first human cancer gene to be cloned. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy was the first mitochondrial disorder described. X-Linked red-green color deficiency was the first X-linked disorder described. The eye, unlike any other body organ, allows directly visualization of genetic phenomena such as skewed X-inactivation in the fundus of a female carrier of ocular albinism. Basic concepts of genetics and their application to clinical ophthalmological practice are important not only in making a precise diagnosis and appropriate referral, but also in management and genetic counseling.

  7. Genetics for the ophthalmologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan A Sadagopan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The eye has played a major role in human genomics including gene therapy. It is the fourth most common organ system after integument (skin, hair and nails, nervous system, and musculoskeletal system to be involved in genetic disorders. The eye is involved in single gene disorders and those caused by multifactorial etiology. Retinoblastoma was the first human cancer gene to be cloned. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy was the first mitochondrial disorder described. X-Linked red-green color deficiency was the first X-linked disorder described. The eye, unlike any other body organ, allows directly visualization of genetic phenomena such as skewed X-inactivation in the fundus of a female carrier of ocular albinism. Basic concepts of genetics and their application to clinical ophthalmological practice are important not only in making a precise diagnosis and appropriate referral, but also in management and genetic counseling.

  8. A hybrid genetic-simulated annealing algorithm for the location-inventory-routing problem considering returns under e-supply chain environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhui; Guo, Hao; Wang, Lin; Fu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Facility location, inventory control, and vehicle routes scheduling are critical and highly related problems in the design of logistics system for e-business. Meanwhile, the return ratio in Internet sales was significantly higher than in the traditional business. Many of returned merchandise have no quality defects, which can reenter sales channels just after a simple repackaging process. Focusing on the existing problem in e-commerce logistics system, we formulate a location-inventory-routing problem model with no quality defects returns. To solve this NP-hard problem, an effective hybrid genetic simulated annealing algorithm (HGSAA) is proposed. Results of numerical examples show that HGSAA outperforms GA on computing time, optimal solution, and computing stability. The proposed model is very useful to help managers make the right decisions under e-supply chain environment.

  9. A Hybrid Genetic-Simulated Annealing Algorithm for the Location-Inventory-Routing Problem Considering Returns under E-Supply Chain Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Facility location, inventory control, and vehicle routes scheduling are critical and highly related problems in the design of logistics system for e-business. Meanwhile, the return ratio in Internet sales was significantly higher than in the traditional business. Many of returned merchandise have no quality defects, which can reenter sales channels just after a simple repackaging process. Focusing on the existing problem in e-commerce logistics system, we formulate a location-inventory-routing problem model with no quality defects returns. To solve this NP-hard problem, an effective hybrid genetic simulated annealing algorithm (HGSAA is proposed. Results of numerical examples show that HGSAA outperforms GA on computing time, optimal solution, and computing stability. The proposed model is very useful to help managers make the right decisions under e-supply chain environment.

  10. A Hybrid Genetic-Simulated Annealing Algorithm for the Location-Inventory-Routing Problem Considering Returns under E-Supply Chain Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hao; Fu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Facility location, inventory control, and vehicle routes scheduling are critical and highly related problems in the design of logistics system for e-business. Meanwhile, the return ratio in Internet sales was significantly higher than in the traditional business. Many of returned merchandise have no quality defects, which can reenter sales channels just after a simple repackaging process. Focusing on the existing problem in e-commerce logistics system, we formulate a location-inventory-routing problem model with no quality defects returns. To solve this NP-hard problem, an effective hybrid genetic simulated annealing algorithm (HGSAA) is proposed. Results of numerical examples show that HGSAA outperforms GA on computing time, optimal solution, and computing stability. The proposed model is very useful to help managers make the right decisions under e-supply chain environment. PMID:24489489

  11. Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR): epidemiology and etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Agustín; Carceller, Raquel; Tobajas, Javier

    2009-02-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is mainly due to a pathologic slow-down in the fetal growth pace, resulting in a fetus that is unable to reach its growth potential. IUGR frequency will vary depending on the discrimination criteria adopted. It is extremely important to use local or national fetal growth graphs in order to avoid some confounding factors. IUGR incidence in newborns would be between 3% and 7% of the total population. In our experience it is 5.13% a figure similar to the one obtained by other authors but with a progressively higher incidence during the last decade. There are multiple maternal factors that can generally be grouped into constitutional and general factors given that they affect age, weight, race, maternal cardiac volume, etc, socioeconomic factors with key incidence in the mother's nutrition level, where a poor maternal nutrition level would be the key factor in this group. We have evaluated multiple factors as possible contributors to the IUGR risk: race, parents' age, mother's height (cm), mother's birth weight and before pregnancy (kg), ponderal gain and blood pressure during pregnancy, and previous SGA newborns. Socioeconomic factors like social class, parents' profession, habitual residence, salary, immigration, and diet were also evaluated. We also included variables such as total daily working time and time mothers spent standing up, daily sleeping time (hrs), stress self-perception test at work and primiparity age. Toxic factors during pregnancy: tobacco (active and passive), alcohol, drugs and coffee consumption. Fetal or utero-placental factors were considered. In our study, the most significant etiologic factors were: Active and passive tobacco consuming, mother's stress level, increase of total months worked during pregnancy, total daily working hours and time mothers spent standing up and finally, the parent's height. Our data support the main objective of reducing the incidence of SGA newborns after IUGR by fighting

  12. Overview of Epidemiology, Genetics, Birth Defects, and Chromosome Abnormalities Associated With CDH

    OpenAIRE

    Pober, Barbara R.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common and well-studied birth defect. The etiology of most cases remains unknown but increasing evidence points to genetic causation. The data supporting genetic etiologies which are detailed below include the association of CDH with recurring chromosome abnormalities, the existence of CDH-multiplex families, and the co-occurrence of CDH with additional congenital malformations.

  13. Cross-study differences in the etiology of reading comprehension: A meta-analytical review of twin studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Callie W; Haughbrook, Rasheda; Hart, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    Numerous twin studies have been published examining the genetic and environmental etiology of reading comprehension, though the etiological estimates may be influenced currently unidentified sample conditions (e.g., Tucker-Drob & Bates, 2015). The purpose of the current meta-analysis was to average the etiological influences of reading comprehension and to explore the potential moderators that may be influencing these estimates. Results revealed an average heritability estimate of h2 = .59, with significant variation in estimates across studies, suggesting potential moderation. Heritability was moderated by publication year, grade level, project, zygosity determination method, and response type. The average shared environmental estimate was c2 = .16, with publication year, grade and zygosity determination method acting as significant moderators. These findings support the large role of genetic influences on reading comprehension, and a small but significant role of shared environmental influences. The significant moderators of etiological influences within the current synthesis suggest our interpretation of how genes and environment influence reading comprehension should reflect aspects of study and sample. PMID:27630039

  14. Emerging new tools to study and treat muscle pathologies: genetics and molecular mechanisms