WorldWideScience

Sample records for underlying gene sequences

  1. De novo transcriptome sequencing and comparative analysis of differentially expressed genes in dryoperis fragrans under temperature stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.Z.; Tong, W.S.; Gao, R.

    2016-01-01

    Dryopteris fragrans is a species of fern and contains flavonoids compounds with medicinal value. This study explain the temperature stress impact flavonoids synthesis in D. fragrans tissue culture seedlings under the low temperature at 4 degree C, high temperature at 35 degree C and moderate temperature at 25 degree C. By using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing, 80.9 million raw sequence reads were de novo assembled into 66,716 non-redundant unigenes. 38,486 unigenes (57.7%) were annotated for their function. 13,973 unigenes and 29,598 unigenes were allocated to gene ontology (GO) and clusters of orthologous group (COG), respectively. 18,989 sequences mapped to 118 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG), 204 genes were involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, regulation and transport. 25,292 and 16,817 unigenes exhibited marked differential expression in response to temperature shifts of 25 degree C to 4 degree C and 25 degree C to 35 degree C, respectively. 4CL and CHS genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis were tested and suggested that they were responsible for biosynthesis of flavonoids. This study provides the first published data to describe the D. fragrans transcriptome and should accelerate understanding of flavonoids biosynthesis, regulation and transport mechanisms. Since most unigenes described here were successfully annotated, these results should facilitate future functional genomic understanding and research of D. fragrans. (author)

  2. Post-transcriptional mending of gene sequences: looking under the hood of mitochondrial gene expression in diplonemids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valach, M.; Moreira, S.; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Lukeš, Julius; Burger, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 12 (2016), s. 1204-1211 ISSN 1547-6286 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21974S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptic genes * gene fragmentation * trans-splicing * RNA editing * multipartite mtDNA * diplonemids Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.900, year: 2016

  3. On the Sequence-Directed Nature of Human Gene Mutation: The Role of Genomic Architecture and the Local DNA Sequence Environment in Mediating Gene Mutations Underlying Human Inherited Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David N.; Bacolla, Albino; Férec, Claude; Vasquez, Karen M.; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Chen, Jian-Min

    2011-01-01

    Different types of human gene mutation may vary in size, from structural variants (SVs) to single base-pair substitutions, but what they all have in common is that their nature, size and location are often determined either by specific characteristics of the local DNA sequence environment or by higher-order features of the genomic architecture. The human genome is now recognized to contain ‘pervasive architectural flaws’ in that certain DNA sequences are inherently mutation-prone by virtue of their base composition, sequence repetitivity and/or epigenetic modification. Here we explore how the nature, location and frequency of different types of mutation causing inherited disease are shaped in large part, and often in remarkably predictable ways, by the local DNA sequence environment. The mutability of a given gene or genomic region may also be influenced indirectly by a variety of non-canonical (non-B) secondary structures whose formation is facilitated by the underlying DNA sequence. Since these non-B DNA structures can interfere with subsequent DNA replication and repair, and may serve to increase mutation frequencies in generalized fashion (i.e. both in the context of subtle mutations and SVs), they have the potential to serve as a unifying concept in studies of mutational mechanisms underlying human inherited disease. PMID:21853507

  4. Identification of differentially expressed genes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) leaves and roots under drought stress by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chunbo; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Jing; Ma, Jun; Li, Cen; Zhou, Fei; Zhang, Shuquan; Yu, Ying; Zhang, Liguo; Li, Weizhong; Huang, Xutang

    2017-10-25

    Sunflower is recognized as one of the most important oil plants with strong tolerance to drought in the world. In order to study the response mechanisms of sunflower plants to drought stress, gene expression profiling using high throughput sequencing was performed for seedling leaves and roots (sunflower inbred line R5) after 24 h of drought stress (15% PEG 6000). The transcriptome assembled using sequences of 12 samples was used as a reference. 805 and 198 genes were identified that were differentially expressed in leaves and roots, respectively. Another 71 genes were differentially expressed in both organs, in which more genes were up-regulated than down-regulated. In agreement with results obtained for other crops or from previous sunflower studies, we also observed that nine genes may be associated with the response of sunflower to drought. The results of this study may provide new information regarding the sunflower drought response, as well as add to the number of known genes associated with drought tolerance.

  5. Generation of expressed sequence tags under cadmium stress for gene discovery and development of molecular markers in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Rashmi; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Gupta, Meetu

    2014-07-01

    Chickpea is the world's third most important legume crop and belongs to Fabaceae family but suffered from severe yield loss due to various biotic and abiotic stresses. Development of modern genomic tools such as molecular markers and identification of resistant genes associated with these stresses facilitate improvement in chickpea breeding towards abiotic stress tolerance. In this study, 1597 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from a cDNA library of variety Pusa 1105 root tissue after cadmium (Cd) treatment. Assembly of ESTs resulted in a total of 914 unigenes of which putative homology was obtained for 38.8 % of unigenes after BLASTX search. In terms of species distribution, majority of sequences found similarity with Medicago truncatula followed by Glycine max, Vitis vinifera and Populus trichocarpa and Pisum sativum sequences. Functional annotation was assigned using Blast2Go, and the Gene Ontology (GO) terms were categorized into biological process, molecular function and cellular component. Approximately 10.83 % of unigenes were assigned at least one GO term. Moreover, in the distribution of transcripts into various biological pathways, 20 of the annotated transcripts were assigned to ten pathways in KEGG database. A majority of the genes were found to be involved in sulphur and nitrogen metabolism. In the quantitative real-time PCR analysis, five of the transcription factors and three of the transporter genes were found to be highly expressed after Cd treatment. Besides, the utility of ESTs was demonstrated by exploiting them for the development of 83 genic molecular markers including EST-simple sequence repeats and intron targeted polymorphism that would assist in tagging of genes related to metal stress for future prospects.

  6. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  7. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanavichit, Apichart

    2002-01-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  8. Vision from next generation sequencing: multi-dimensional genome-wide analysis for producing gene regulatory networks underlying retinal development, aging and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyun-Jin; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Cogliati, Tiziana; Kim, Jung-Woong; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-05-01

    Genomics and genetics have invaded all aspects of biology and medicine, opening uncharted territory for scientific exploration. The definition of "gene" itself has become ambiguous, and the central dogma is continuously being revised and expanded. Computational biology and computational medicine are no longer intellectual domains of the chosen few. Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, together with novel methods of pattern recognition and network analyses, has revolutionized the way we think about fundamental biological mechanisms and cellular pathways. In this review, we discuss NGS-based genome-wide approaches that can provide deeper insights into retinal development, aging and disease pathogenesis. We first focus on gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that govern the differentiation of retinal photoreceptors and modulate adaptive response during aging. Then, we discuss NGS technology in the context of retinal disease and develop a vision for therapies based on network biology. We should emphasize that basic strategies for network construction and analyses can be transported to any tissue or cell type. We believe that specific and uniform guidelines are required for generation of genome, transcriptome and epigenome data to facilitate comparative analysis and integration of multi-dimensional data sets, and for constructing networks underlying complex biological processes. As cellular homeostasis and organismal survival are dependent on gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, we believe that network-based biology will provide the foundation for deciphering disease mechanisms and discovering novel drug targets for retinal neurodegenerative diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Development and application of a next-generation-sequencing (NGS approach to detect known and novel gene defects underlying retinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audo Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inherited retinal disorders are clinically and genetically heterogeneous with more than 150 gene defects accounting for the diversity of disease phenotypes. So far, mutation detection was mainly performed by APEX technology and direct Sanger sequencing of known genes. However, these methods are time consuming, expensive and unable to provide a result if the patient carries a new gene mutation. In addition, multiplicity of phenotypes associated with the same gene defect may be overlooked. Methods To overcome these challenges, we designed an exon sequencing array to target 254 known and candidate genes using Agilent capture. Subsequently, 20 DNA samples from 17 different families, including four patients with known mutations were sequenced using Illumina Genome Analyzer IIx next-generation-sequencing (NGS platform. Different filtering approaches were applied to identify the genetic defect. The most likely disease causing variants were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Co-segregation and sequencing analysis of control samples validated the pathogenicity of the observed variants. Results The phenotype of the patients included retinitis pigmentosa, congenital stationary night blindness, Best disease, early-onset cone dystrophy and Stargardt disease. In three of four control samples with known genotypes NGS detected the expected mutations. Three known and five novel mutations were identified in NR2E3, PRPF3, EYS, PRPF8, CRB1, TRPM1 and CACNA1F. One of the control samples with a known genotype belongs to a family with two clinical phenotypes (Best and CSNB, where a novel mutation was identified for CSNB. In six families the disease associated mutations were not found, indicating that novel gene defects remain to be identified. Conclusions In summary, this unbiased and time-efficient NGS approach allowed mutation detection in 75% of control cases and in 57% of test cases. Furthermore, it has the possibility of associating known gene

  10. Repetitive sequence environment distinguishes housekeeping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, C Daniel; Regelson, Moira; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stan; Horvath, Steve; Marahrens, York

    2007-04-01

    Housekeeping genes are expressed across a wide variety of tissues. Since repetitive sequences have been reported to influence the expression of individual genes, we employed a novel approach to determine whether housekeeping genes can be distinguished from tissue-specific genes by their repetitive sequence context. We show that Alu elements are more highly concentrated around housekeeping genes while various longer (>400-bp) repetitive sequences ("repeats"), including Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1) elements, are excluded from these regions. We further show that isochore membership does not distinguish housekeeping genes from tissue-specific genes and that repetitive sequence environment distinguishes housekeeping genes from tissue-specific genes in every isochore. The distinct repetitive sequence environment, in combination with other previously published sequence properties of housekeeping genes, was used to develop a method of predicting housekeeping genes on the basis of DNA sequence alone. Using expression across tissue types as a measure of success, we demonstrate that repetitive sequence environment is by far the most important sequence feature identified to date for distinguishing housekeeping genes.

  11. Sequence analysis of diamine oxidase gene from fava bean and its expression related to γ-aminobutyric acid accumulation in seeds germinating under hypoxia-NaCl stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Runqiang; Yin, Yongqi; Guo, Liping; Han, Yongbin; Gu, Zhenxin

    2014-06-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is synthesized via the polyamine degradation pathway in plants, with diamine oxidase (DAO) being the key enzyme. In this study the cDNA of DAO in fava bean was cloned and its expression in seeds germinating under hypoxia-NaCl stress was investigated. Fava bean DAO cDNA is 2199 bp long and contains 2025 bp of open reading frame that encodes 675 amino acid peptides with a calculated molecular weight of 76.31 kDa and a pI of 5.41. Hypoxia and hypoxia-NaCl stress enhanced DAO activity and resulted in GABA accumulation in germinating fava bean. However, DAO gene expression was down-regulated under hypoxia compared with non-stress condition, while its expression in the cotyledon and shoot was up-regulated under hypoxia-NaCl. In addition, DAO expression could be promoted to enhance GABA accumulation after increasing the stress intensity using NaCl. DAO gene expression was significantly inhibited by aminoguanidine treatment under hypoxia but increased under hypoxia-NaCl. Under hypoxia, GABA accumulation due to NaCl was mainly concentrated in the cotyledon. The GABA content increase under hypoxia did not result from DAO gene expression, but DAO existing in seeds was activated under hypoxia. DAO gene expression was up-regulated to enhance GABA accumulation after increasing the stress intensity. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Sequencing genes in silico using single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xinyi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of high throughput sequencing technology has enabled the 1000 Genomes Project Pilot 3 to generate complete sequence data for more than 906 genes and 8,140 exons representing 697 subjects. The 1000 Genomes database provides a critical opportunity for further interpreting disease associations with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs discovered from genetic association studies. Currently, direct sequencing of candidate genes or regions on a large number of subjects remains both cost- and time-prohibitive. Results To accelerate the translation from discovery to functional studies, we propose an in silico gene sequencing method (ISS, which predicts phased sequences of intragenic regions, using SNPs. The key underlying idea of our method is to infer diploid sequences (a pair of phased sequences/alleles at every functional locus utilizing the deep sequencing data from the 1000 Genomes Project and SNP data from the HapMap Project, and to build prediction models using flanking SNPs. Using this method, we have developed a database of prediction models for 611 known genes. Sequence prediction accuracy for these genes is 96.26% on average (ranges 79%-100%. This database of prediction models can be enhanced and scaled up to include new genes as the 1000 Genomes Project sequences additional genes on additional individuals. Applying our predictive model for the KCNJ11 gene to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC Type 2 diabetes cohort, we demonstrate how the prediction of phased sequences inferred from GWAS SNP genotype data can be used to facilitate interpretation and identify a probable functional mechanism such as protein changes. Conclusions Prior to the general availability of routine sequencing of all subjects, the ISS method proposed here provides a time- and cost-effective approach to broadening the characterization of disease associated SNPs and regions, and facilitating the prioritization of candidate

  13. Water buffalo kappa-casein gene sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mancusi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to determine the nucleotide sequence of the water buffalo CSN3 gene (κ-casein. Two overlapping clones from a genomic water buffalo library were sequenced. The sequence comprises the five exons, the relative introns, 1057 nt at the 5’ end of the gene and 476 nt downstream the polyadenylation site. In order to identify polymorphisms responsible for amino acid differences, all the five exons from 10 genetically unrelated water buffaloes were sequenced. The comparison of the obtained sequences confirmed the two single nucleotide polymorphisms already reported in literature at the fourth exon: T versus C at codon 135 (IleATC versus ThrACC and the silent mutation T versus C at codon 136. The comparison of the promoter sequences of two animals homozygous for 135Thr and 135Ile respectively, evidenced 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms that could alter the expression of the gene.

  14. A Probabilistic Genome-Wide Gene Reading Frame Sequence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Christian Theil; Mørk, Søren

    as output. The model can be used to obtain the most probable genome annotation based on a combination of i: a gene finder score of each gene candidate and ii: the sequence of the reading frames of gene candidates through a genome. The model --- as well as a higher order variant --- is developed and tested......We introduce a new type of probabilistic sequence model, that model the sequential composition of reading frames of genes in a genome. Our approach extends gene finders with a model of the sequential composition of genes at the genome-level -- effectively producing a sequential genome annotation...... using the probabilistic logic programming language and machine learning system PRISM - a fast and efficient model prototyping environment, using bacterial gene finding performance as a benchmark of signal strength. The model is used to prune a set of gene predictions from an underlying gene finder...

  15. Targeted Gene Sequencing and Whole-Exome Sequencing in Autopsied Fetuses with Prenatally Diagnosed Kidney Anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M; Sunde, L; Nielsen, M L

    2018-01-01

    Identification of fetal kidney anomalies invites questions about underlying causes and recurrence risk in future pregnancies. We therefore investigated the diagnostic yield of next-generation sequencing in fetuses with bilateral kidney anomalies and the correlation between disrupted genes and fetal...... phenotypes. Fetuses with bilateral kidney anomalies were screened using an in-house-designed kidney-gene panel. In families where candidate variants were not identified, whole-exome sequencing was performed. Genes uncovered by this analysis were added to our kidney-panel. We identified likely deleterious...... of nephronophthisis. Exome sequencing identified ROBO1 variants in one family and a GREB1L variant in another family. GREB1L and ROBO1 were added to our kidney-gene panel and additional variants were identified. Next-generation sequencing substantially contributes to identifying causes of fetal kidney anomalies...

  16. Ancestral sequence alignment under optimal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Daniel G

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple genome alignment is an important problem in bioinformatics. An important subproblem used by many multiple alignment approaches is that of aligning two multiple alignments. Many popular alignment algorithms for DNA use the sum-of-pairs heuristic, where the score of a multiple alignment is the sum of its induced pairwise alignment scores. However, the biological meaning of the sum-of-pairs of pairs heuristic is not obvious. Additionally, many algorithms based on the sum-of-pairs heuristic are complicated and slow, compared to pairwise alignment algorithms. An alternative approach to aligning alignments is to first infer ancestral sequences for each alignment, and then align the two ancestral sequences. In addition to being fast, this method has a clear biological basis that takes into account the evolution implied by an underlying phylogenetic tree. In this study we explore the accuracy of aligning alignments by ancestral sequence alignment. We examine the use of both maximum likelihood and parsimony to infer ancestral sequences. Additionally, we investigate the effect on accuracy of allowing ambiguity in our ancestral sequences. Results We use synthetic sequence data that we generate by simulating evolution on a phylogenetic tree. We use two different types of phylogenetic trees: trees with a period of rapid growth followed by a period of slow growth, and trees with a period of slow growth followed by a period of rapid growth. We examine the alignment accuracy of four ancestral sequence reconstruction and alignment methods: parsimony, maximum likelihood, ambiguous parsimony, and ambiguous maximum likelihood. Additionally, we compare against the alignment accuracy of two sum-of-pairs algorithms: ClustalW and the heuristic of Ma, Zhang, and Wang. Conclusion We find that allowing ambiguity in ancestral sequences does not lead to better multiple alignments. Regardless of whether we use parsimony or maximum likelihood, the

  17. Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Leishmania tropica LACK Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudeh, Nour; Kweider, Mahmoud; Abbady, Abdul-Qader; Soukkarieh, Chadi

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania Homologue of receptors for Activated C Kinase (LACK) antigen is a 36-kDa protein, which provokes a very early immune response against Leishmania infection. There are several reports on the expression of LACK through different life-cycle stages of genus Leishmania, but only a few of them have focused on L.tropica. The present study provides details of the cloning, DNA sequencing and gene expression of LACK in this parasite species. First, several local isolates of Leishmania parasites were typed in our laboratory using PCR technique to verify of Leishmania parasite species. After that, LACK gene was amplified and cloned into a vector for sequencing. Finally, the expression of this molecule in logarithmic and stationary growth phase promastigotes, as well as in amastigotes, was evaluated by Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) technique. The typing result confirmed that all our local isolates belong to L.tropica. LACK gene sequence was determined and high similarity was observed with the sequences of other Leishmania species. Furthermore, the expression of LACK gene in both promastigotes and amastigotes forms was confirmed. Overall, the data set the stage for future studies of the properties and immune role of LACK gene products.

  18. The nucleotide sequences of two leghemoglobin genes from soybean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, O; Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Jensen, E O

    1982-01-01

    We present the complete nucleotide sequences of two leghemoglobin genes isolated from soybean DNA. Both genes contain three intervening sequences in identical positions. Comparison of the coding sequences with known amino-acid sequences of soybean leghemoglobins suggest that the two genes...

  19. Predicting gene expression from sequence: a reexamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yuan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Although much of the information regarding genes' expressions is encoded in the genome, deciphering such information has been very challenging. We reexamined Beer and Tavazoie's (BT approach to predict mRNA expression patterns of 2,587 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae from the information in their respective promoter sequences. Instead of fitting complex Bayesian network models, we trained naïve Bayes classifiers using only the sequence-motif matching scores provided by BT. Our simple models correctly predict expression patterns for 79% of the genes, based on the same criterion and the same cross-validation (CV procedure as BT, which compares favorably to the 73% accuracy of BT. The fact that our approach did not use position and orientation information of the predicted binding sites but achieved a higher prediction accuracy, motivated us to investigate a few biological predictions made by BT. We found that some of their predictions, especially those related to motif orientations and positions, are at best circumstantial. For example, the combinatorial rules suggested by BT for the PAC and RRPE motifs are not unique to the cluster of genes from which the predictive model was inferred, and there are simpler rules that are statistically more significant than BT's ones. We also show that CV procedure used by BT to estimate their method's prediction accuracy is inappropriate and may have overestimated the prediction accuracy by about 10%.

  20. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation with gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuqiang; Shen, Yanyan; Hu, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative models of gene regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this work, we have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence. The proposed model relies on a continuous time, differential equation description of transcriptional dynamics. The sequence features of the promoter are exploited to derive the binding affinity which is derived based on statistical molecular thermodynamics. Experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively identify the activity levels of transcription factors and the regulatory parameters. Comparing with the previous models, the proposed model can reveal more biological sense.

  1. Vision from next generation sequencing: Multi-dimensional genome-wide analysis for producing gene regulatory networks underlying retinal development, aging and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hyun-Jin; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Cogliati, Tiziana; Kim, Jung-Woong; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Genomics and genetics have invaded all aspects of biology and medicine, opening uncharted territory for scientific exploration. The definition of “gene” itself has become ambiguous, and the central dogma is continuously being revised and expanded. Computational biology and computational medicine are no longer intellectual domains of the chosen few. Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, together with novel methods of pattern recognition and network analyses, has revolutionized the way w...

  2. Sequence analysis of cereal sucrose synthase genes and isolation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-18

    Oct 18, 2007 ... sequencing of sucrose synthase gene fragment from sor- ghum using primers designed at their conserved exons. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Multiple sequence alignment. Sucrose synthase gene sequences of various cereals like rice, maize, and barley were accessed from NCBI Genbank database.

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of Gene and microRNA Expression in Diploid and Autotetraploid Paulownia fortunei (Seem Hemsl. under Drought Stress by Transcriptome, microRNA, and Degradome Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenli Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Drought is a common and recurring climatic condition in many parts of the world, and it can have disastrous impacts on plant growth and development. Many genes involved in the drought response of plants have been identified. Transcriptome, microRNA (miRNA, and degradome analyses are rapid ways of identifying drought-responsive genes. The reference genome sequence of Paulownia fortunei (Seem Hemsl. is now available, which makes it easier to explore gene expression, transcriptional regulation, and post-transcriptional in this species. In this study, four transcriptome, small RNA, and degradome libraries were sequenced by Illumina sequencing, respectively. A total of 258 genes and 11 miRNAs were identified for drought-responsive genes and miRNAs in P. fortunei. Degradome sequencing detected 28 miRNA target genes that were cleaved by members of nine conserved miRNA families and 12 novel miRNAs. The results here will contribute toward enriching our understanding of the response of Paulownia fortunei trees to drought stress and may provide new direction for further experimental studies related the development of molecular markers, the genetic map construction, and other genomic research projects in Paulownia.

  4. Use of massively parallel signature sequencing to study genes expressed during the plant defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Blake C; Haudenschild, Christian D; Vemaraju, Kalyan

    2007-01-01

    Massively parallel signature sequencing is a sequencing-based method that provides quantitative gene expression data for nearly all transcripts in a particular ribonucleic acid sample. Although the sequencing technology is practiced as a service by a California-based company, we have developed methods for the handling and analysis of these data. This chapter describes the steps involved in obtaining data from massively parallel signature sequencing, aligning the signatures to genomic sequence, identifying novel transcripts, and performing quantitative analyses of genes expressed under conditions such as disease treatments.

  5. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of core gene of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Pakistan, more than 10 million people are living with hepatitis C virus (HCV) with high morbidity and mortality. The aims of the present study are to report HCV core gene sequences from Pakistani population and perform their sequence comparison/phylogenetic analysis. The core gene of HCV has been cloned from six ...

  6. Sequence Evolution Under Constraints: Lessons Learned from Sudoku.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yucheng; Yang, Gongrong

    2016-10-01

    The complex structures of all proteins in nature are outcomes of a random walk driven by mutation and selection. Reconstructing the fitness landscape staging this process based on first-principle physical rules or experimental measurements is difficult. In this article we turn the popular Sudoku game into an artificial fitness landscape and use it as a model system to study sequence evolution under constraints. The Sudoku rules, which are human-mind friendly, intertwine a rugged landscape for sequences composed of digits, mimicking the functional constraints felt by a tightly folded protein. Simulated evolution reveals interesting properties of the valley-crossing dynamics on this complex landscape. It is found that (i) the mutation accumulation rate during valley-crossing is constant among different evolutionary pathways and depends on the ruggedness of the landscape; (ii) genetic drift and neutral networks play constructive roles during the process of searching for novel functions; and (iii) under strong selection, gene duplication can speed up the evolution by relaxing, but not completely liberating, the redundant copy from selective pressure. Insights gained from this prototype model may help us understand the evolution of real proteins.

  7. Nucleotide sequence of the triosephosphate isomerase gene from Macaca mulatta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Old, S.E.; Mohrenweiser, H.W. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1988-09-26

    The triosephosphate isomerase gene from a rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta, charon 34 library was sequenced. The human and chimpanzee enzymes differ from the rhesus enzyme at ASN 20 and GLU 198. The nucleotide sequence identity between rhesus and human is 97% in the coding region and >94% in the flanking regions. Comparison of the rhesus and chimp genes, including the intron and flanking sequences, does not suggest a mechanism for generating the two TPI peptides of proliferating cells from hominoids and a single peptide from the rhesus gene.

  8. Sequence biases in large scale gene expression profiling data

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Asim S.; Delaney, Allen D.; Schnerch, Angelique; Griffith, Obi L.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Marra, Marco A.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of a simple, statistical assay that measures the G+C content sensitivity bias of gene expression experiments without the requirement of a duplicate experiment. We analyse five gene expression profiling methods: Affymetrix GeneChip, Long Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (LongSAGE), LongSAGELite, ‘Classic’ Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) and ‘Signature’ MPSS. We demonstrate the methods have systematic and random errors leading to a different G+C content s...

  9. Identification and sequence analysis of Tapasin gene in guinea fowl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varuna P. Panicker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An attempt has been made to identify and study the nucleotide sequence variability in exon 5 - exon 6 regions of guinea fowl Tapasin gene. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from randomly selected birds (12 guinea fowl birds and Tapasin gene amplified using chicken specific primers designed from GenBank submitted sequences. Polymerase chain reaction conditions were standardized so as get only single amplicons. Obtained products were then cloned and sequenced; sequences were then analyzed using suitable software. Results: Amplicon size of the Tapasin gene in guinea fowl was same as reported in chicken with areas of transitions and transversions. The sequence variations reported in these coding sequences might have influence in the protein structure, which may be correlated with the increased immune status of the bird when compared with chicken breeds. Conclusion: Since Tapasin gene is an immunologically important gene, which plays an important role in the immune status of the bird. Sequence variations in the gene can be correlated with the altered immune status of the bird.

  10. Comparison of methods for genomic localization of gene trap sequences

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    Ferrin Thomas E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene knockouts in a model organism such as mouse provide a valuable resource for the study of basic biology and human disease. Determining which gene has been inactivated by an untargeted gene trapping event poses a challenging annotation problem because gene trap sequence tags, which represent sequence near the vector insertion site of a trapped gene, are typically short and often contain unresolved residues. To understand better the localization of these sequences on the mouse genome, we compared stand-alone versions of the alignment programs BLAT, SSAHA, and MegaBLAST. A set of 3,369 sequence tags was aligned to build 34 of the mouse genome using default parameters for each algorithm. Known genome coordinates for the cognate set of full-length genes (1,659 sequences were used to evaluate localization results. Results In general, all three programs performed well in terms of localizing sequences to a general region of the genome, with only relatively subtle errors identified for a small proportion of the sequence tags. However, large differences in performance were noted with regard to correctly identifying exon boundaries. BLAT correctly identified the vast majority of exon boundaries, while SSAHA and MegaBLAST missed the majority of exon boundaries. SSAHA consistently reported the fewest false positives and is the fastest algorithm. MegaBLAST was comparable to BLAT in speed, but was the most susceptible to localizing sequence tags incorrectly to pseudogenes. Conclusion The differences in performance for sequence tags and full-length reference sequences were surprisingly small. Characteristic variations in localization results for each program were noted that affect the localization of sequence at exon boundaries, in particular.

  11. Sequence analysis and overexpression of a pectin lyase gene (pel1) from Aspergillus oryzae KBN616.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamoto, N; Yoshino-Yasuda, S; Ohmiya, K; Tsukagoshi, N

    2001-01-01

    A gene (pel1) encoding pectin lyase (Pel1) was isolated from a shoyu koji mold, Aspergillus oryzae KBN616, and characterized. The structural gene comprised 1,196 bp with a single intron. The ORF encoded 381 amino acids with a signal peptide of 20 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to those of Aspergillus niger pectin lyases and Glomerella cingulata PnlA. The pel1 gene was successfully overexpressed under the promoter of the A. oryzae TEF1 gene. The molecular mass of the recombinant pectin lyase substantially coincided with that calculated based on nucleotide sequence.

  12. Sequencing results of pncA gene at JALMA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Sequencing results of pncA gene at JALMA. Red colour indicates novel mutations, Blue colour indicates the novel mutations reported at the same codon earlier also.

  13. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Bertalan Quintanilha; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2010-01-01

    To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence......, from faecal samples of 124 European individuals. The gene set, ,150 times larger than the human gene complement, contains an overwhelming majority of the prevalent (more frequent) microbial genes of the cohort and probably includes a large proportion of the prevalent human intestinal microbial genes....... The genes are largely shared among individuals of the cohort. Over 99% of the genes are bacterial, indicating that the entire cohort harbours between 1,000 and 1,150 prevalent bacterial species and each individual at least 160 such species, which are also largely shared. We define and describe the minimal...

  14. Regulatory sequence of cupin family gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Elizabeth; Teoh, Thomas

    2017-07-25

    This invention is in the field of plant biology and agriculture and relates to novel seed specific promoter regions. The present invention further provide methods of producing proteins and other products of interest and methods of controlling expression of nucleic acid sequences of interest using the seed specific promoter regions.

  15. Nucleotide sequence of a human tRNA gene heterocluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.N.; Pirtle, I.L.; Pirtle, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Leucine tRNA from bovine liver was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human gene library harbored in Charon-4A of bacteriophage lambda. The human DNA inserts from plaque-pure clones were characterized by restriction endonuclease mapping and Southern hybridization techniques, using both [3'- 32 P]-labeled bovine liver leucine tRNA and total tRNA as hybridization probes. An 8-kb Hind III fragment of one of these γ-clones was subcloned into the Hind III site of pBR322. Subsequent fine restriction mapping and DNA sequence analysis of this plasmid DNA indicated the presence of four tRNA genes within the 8-kb DNA fragment. A leucine tRNA gene with an anticodon of AAG and a proline tRNA gene with an anticodon of AGG are in a 1.6-kb subfragment. A threonine tRNA gene with an anticodon of UGU and an as yet unidentified tRNA gene are located in a 1.1-kb subfragment. These two different subfragments are separated by 2.8 kb. The coding regions of the three sequenced genes contain characteristic internal split promoter sequences and do not have intervening sequences. The 3'-flanking region of these three genes have typical RNA polymerase III termination sites of at least four consecutive T residues

  16. PCR-Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) genes sequencing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: DNA extraction, purification, amplification and sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) genes were per- formed using ... Keywords: Internal transcribed spacer genes, phylogenetic, genetic relationship, clinical and environmental fungi, HIV-TB. ... Nigeria. An Ethical clearance was obtained from the Eth-.

  17. Haplotype combination of the caprine PC1 gene sequence variants ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mutations in PC1 gene are related to obesity-related traits which may influence the performance of animals, and therefore it has been the focus of this study. In this study, polymorphisms of the caprine PC1 gene were detected in. 407 individuals from three breeds by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing methods. The results ...

  18. Characterization of genomic sequence of a drought-resistant gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Characterization of genomic sequence of a drought-resistant gene. TaSnRK2.7 in wheat species. HONG YING ZHANG1,2, WEI LI3, XIN GUO MAO1 and RUI LIAN JING1∗. 1The National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Institute of Crop Science,. Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, ...

  19. [Sequencing technology in gene diagnosis and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yibin, Guo

    2014-11-01

    The study of gene mutation is one of the hot topics in the field of life science nowadays, and the related detection methods and diagnostic technology have been developed rapidly. Sequencing technology plays an indispensable role in the definite diagnosis and classification of genetic diseases. In this review, we summarize the research progress in sequencing technology, evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of 1(st) ~3(rd) generation of sequencing technology, and describe its application in gene diagnosis. Also we made forecasts and prospects on its development trend.

  20. Targeted sequencing of cancer-related genes in colorectal cancer using next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Won Han

    Full Text Available Recent advance in sequencing technology has enabled comprehensive profiling of genetic alterations in cancer. We have established a targeted sequencing platform using next-generation sequencing (NGS technology for clinical use, which can provide mutation and copy number variation data. NGS was performed with paired-end library enriched with exons of 183 cancer-related genes. Normal and tumor tissue pairs of 60 colorectal adenocarcinomas were used to test feasibility. Somatic mutation and copy number alteration were analyzed. A total of 526 somatic non-synonymous sequence variations were found in 113 genes. Among these, 278 single nucleotide variations were 232 different somatic point mutations. 216 SNV were 79 known single nucleotide polymorphisms in the dbSNP. 32 indels were 28 different indel mutations. Median number of mutated gene per tumor was 4 (range 0-23. Copy number gain (>X2 fold was found in 65 genes in 40 patients, whereas copy number loss (genes in 39 patients. The most frequently altered genes (mutation and/or copy number alteration were APC in 35 patients (58%, TP53 in 34 (57%, and KRAS in 24 (40%. Altered gene list revealed ErbB signaling pathway as the most commonly involved pathway (25 patients, 42%. Targeted sequencing platform using NGS technology is feasible for clinical use and provides comprehensive genetic alteration data.

  1. Nucleotide Sequence of the Protective Antigen Gene of Bacillus Anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-02

    the bands excised, and the DNA extracted with phenol for cloning in M13. 6 Nuclotida sequence analysis. The two fragments were each cloned into phages ...E.c. ToxA a £scherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin A gene (45) V.c. CTxA - Vibrio ctolerae cholera toxin alfa subunlt gene (28) atotal nurber of specific amino acid residues deduced from p’otective antigen gene.

  2. Microsatellite Instability Use in Mismatch Repair Gene Sequence Variant Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony A. Thompson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Inherited mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes (MMR can cause MMR deficiency and increased susceptibility to colorectal and endometrial cancer. Microsatellite instability (MSI is the defining molecular signature of MMR deficiency. The clinical classification of identified MMR gene sequence variants has a direct impact on the management of patients and their families. For a significant proportion of cases sequence variants of uncertain clinical significance (also known as unclassified variants are identified, constituting a challenge for genetic counselling and clinical management of families. The effect on protein function of these variants is difficult to interpret. The presence or absence of MSI in tumours can aid in determining the pathogenicity of associated unclassified MMR gene variants. However, there are some considerations that need to be taken into account when using MSI for variant interpretation. The use of MSI and other tumour characteristics in MMR gene sequence variant classification will be explored in this review.

  3. Sequence Variability in Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Genes seb, sec, and sed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Johler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ingestion of staphylococcal enterotoxins preformed by Staphylococcus aureus in food leads to staphylococcal food poisoning, the most prevalent foodborne intoxication worldwide. There are five major staphylococcal enterotoxins: SEA, SEB, SEC, SED, and SEE. While variants of these toxins have been described and were linked to specific hosts or levels or enterotoxin production, data on sequence variation is still limited. In this study, we aim to extend the knowledge on promoter and gene variants of the major enterotoxins SEB, SEC, and SED. To this end, we determined seb, sec, and sed promoter and gene sequences of a well-characterized set of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains originating from foodborne outbreaks, human infections, human nasal colonization, rabbits, and cattle. New nucleotide sequence variants were detected for all three enterotoxins and a novel amino acid sequence variant of SED was detected in a strain associated with human nasal colonization. While the seb promoter and gene sequences exhibited a high degree of variability, the sec and sed promoter and gene were more conserved. Interestingly, a truncated variant of sed was detected in all tested sed harboring rabbit strains. The generated data represents a further step towards improved understanding of strain-specific differences in enterotoxin expression and host-specific variation in enterotoxin sequences.

  4. Fusion genes and their discovery using high throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annala, M J; Parker, B C; Zhang, W; Nykter, M

    2013-11-01

    Fusion genes are hybrid genes that combine parts of two or more original genes. They can form as a result of chromosomal rearrangements or abnormal transcription, and have been shown to act as drivers of malignant transformation and progression in many human cancers. The biological significance of fusion genes together with their specificity to cancer cells has made them into excellent targets for molecular therapy. Fusion genes are also used as diagnostic and prognostic markers to confirm cancer diagnosis and monitor response to molecular therapies. High-throughput sequencing has enabled the systematic discovery of fusion genes in a wide variety of cancer types. In this review, we describe the history of fusion genes in cancer and the ways in which fusion genes form and affect cellular function. We also describe computational methodologies for detecting fusion genes from high-throughput sequencing experiments, and the most common sources of error that lead to false discovery of fusion genes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Combinatorial pooling enables selective sequencing of the barley gene space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lonardi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available For the vast majority of species - including many economically or ecologically important organisms, progress in biological research is hampered due to the lack of a reference genome sequence. Despite recent advances in sequencing technologies, several factors still limit the availability of such a critical resource. At the same time, many research groups and international consortia have already produced BAC libraries and physical maps and now are in a position to proceed with the development of whole-genome sequences organized around a physical map anchored to a genetic map. We propose a BAC-by-BAC sequencing protocol that combines combinatorial pooling design and second-generation sequencing technology to efficiently approach denovo selective genome sequencing. We show that combinatorial pooling is a cost-effective and practical alternative to exhaustive DNA barcoding when preparing sequencing libraries for hundreds or thousands of DNA samples, such as in this case gene-bearing minimum-tiling-path BAC clones. The novelty of the protocol hinges on the computational ability to efficiently compare hundred millions of short reads and assign them to the correct BAC clones (deconvolution so that the assembly can be carried out clone-by-clone. Experimental results on simulated data for the rice genome show that the deconvolution is very accurate, and the resulting BAC assemblies have high quality. Results on real data for a gene-rich subset of the barley genome confirm that the deconvolution is accurate and the BAC assemblies have good quality. While our method cannot provide the level of completeness that one would achieve with a comprehensive whole-genome sequencing project, we show that it is quite successful in reconstructing the gene sequences within BACs. In the case of plants such as barley, this level of sequence knowledge is sufficient to support critical end-point objectives such as map-based cloning and marker-assisted breeding.

  6. High throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Larsen, Poul; Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup

    S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing has been developed over the past few years and is now ready to use for more comprehensive studies related to plant operation and optimization thanks to short analysis time, low cost, high throughput, and high taxonomic resolution. In this study we show how 16S r......RNA gene amplicon sequencing can be used to reveal factors of importance for the operation of full-scale nutrient removal plants related to settling problems and floc properties. Using optimized DNA extraction protocols, indexed primers and our in-house Illumina platform, we prepared multiple samples...... be correlated to the presence of the species that are regarded as “strong” and “weak” floc formers. In conclusion, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing provides a high throughput approach for a rapid and cheap community profiling of activated sludge that in combination with multivariate statistics can be used...

  7. Automated cleaning and pre-processing of immunoglobulin gene sequences from high-throughput sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri eMichaeli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing (HTS yields tens of thousands to millions of sequences that require a large amount of pre-processing work to clean various artifacts. Such cleaning cannot be performed manually. Existing programs are not suitable for immunoglobulin (Ig genes, which are variable and often highly mutated. This paper describes Ig-HTS-Cleaner (Ig High Throughput Sequencing Cleaner, a program containing a simple cleaning procedure that successfully deals with pre-processing of Ig sequences derived from HTS, and Ig-Indel-Identifier (Ig Insertion – Deletion Identifier, a program for identifying legitimate and artifact insertions and/or deletions (indels. Our programs were designed for analyzing Ig gene sequences obtained by 454 sequencing, but they are applicable to all types of sequences and sequencing platforms. Ig-HTS-Cleaner and Ig-Indel-Identifier have been implemented in Java and saved as executable JAR files, supported on Linux and MS Windows. No special requirements are needed in order to run the programs, except for correctly constructing the input files as explained in the text. The programs' performance has been tested and validated on real and simulated data sets.

  8. Sequence variants of the LCORL gene and its association with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y. J. HAN

    [Han Y. J., Chen Y., Liu Y. and Liu X. L. 2017 Sequence variants of the LCORL gene and its association with growth and carcass traits in. Qinchuan cattle in China. J. Genet. 96, xx–xx]. Introduction. Genetically selecting is a better way to satisfy the growing customer requirement with the development of beef cattle industry ...

  9. Inferring gene expression from ribosomal promoter sequences, a crowdsourcing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Pablo; Siwo, Geoffrey; Zeevi, Danny; Sharon, Eilon; Norel, Raquel; Segal, Eran; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2013-11-01

    The Gene Promoter Expression Prediction challenge consisted of predicting gene expression from promoter sequences in a previously unknown experimentally generated data set. The challenge was presented to the community in the framework of the sixth Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods (DREAM6), a community effort to evaluate the status of systems biology modeling methodologies. Nucleotide-specific promoter activity was obtained by measuring fluorescence from promoter sequences fused upstream of a gene for yellow fluorescence protein and inserted in the same genomic site of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Twenty-one teams submitted results predicting the expression levels of 53 different promoters from yeast ribosomal protein genes. Analysis of participant predictions shows that accurate values for low-expressed and mutated promoters were difficult to obtain, although in the latter case, only when the mutation induced a large change in promoter activity compared to the wild-type sequence. As in previous DREAM challenges, we found that aggregation of participant predictions provided robust results, but did not fare better than the three best algorithms. Finally, this study not only provides a benchmark for the assessment of methods predicting activity of a specific set of promoters from their sequence, but it also shows that the top performing algorithm, which used machine-learning approaches, can be improved by the addition of biological features such as transcription factor binding sites.

  10. What DNA sequence tells us about gene regulation - The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Siddharthan

    2007-11-03

    Nov 3, 2007 ... Predicting cis-regulatory modules: eve enhancers. Performance, even without prior WMs, comparable to dedicated CRM prediction programs like Stubb. Rahul Siddharthan. (The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600 113. What DNA sequence tells us about gene regulation. 03/11/2007. 27 / 34 ...

  11. Haplotype combination of the bovine PCSK1 gene sequence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haplotype combination of the bovine PCSK1 gene sequence variants and association with growth traits in Jiaxian cattle. JIAJIE SUN1,2, LIMIN SHAN2, CHUNLEI ZHANG2 and HONG CHEN1∗. 1College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology.

  12. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Sequence analysis of mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene fragment from seven mosquito species. YOGESH S SHOUCHE* and MILIND S PATOLE. National Center for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Pune 411 007, India. *Corresponding author (Fax, 91-20-5672259; Email, yogesh@nccs.res.in). Mosquitoes are ...

  13. Sequence variants of the LCORL gene and its association with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sequence variants of the LCORL gene and its association with growth and carcass traits in Qinchuan cattle in China. Y. J. HAN, Y. CHEN, Y. LIU and X. L. LIU. ∗. College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, No. 22, Xinong Road, Yangling,. Shaanxi 712100, People's Republic of China. Abstract.

  14. RESEARCH ARTICLE Sequence variants of the LCORL gene and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    1. RESEARCH ARTICLE. Sequence variants of the LCORL gene and its association with growth and carcass traits in Qinchuan cattle in China. Y.J. HAN, Y. CHEN, Y. LIU AND X.L. LIU*. College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, No. 22 Xinong. Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, P. R. China.

  15. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the cat myostatin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-07

    Sep 7, 2011 ... TEAF. TEA/ATTS DNA binding domain factors. TEAD.01. TEA domain-containing factors, transcriptional enhancer factors 1, 3,. 4, 5. -1129/-1117(-) transcription factor binding sites located in the cat myostatin gene upstream sequence. According to previous works, we focused on analyzing and discussing.

  16. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 93; Issue 3. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome of Occidozyga martensii. En Li Xiaoqiang Li Xiaobing Wu Ge Feng Man Zhang Haitao Shi Lijun Wang Jianping Jiang. Research Article Volume 93 Issue 3 December 2014 pp 631-641 ...

  17. Sequence biases in large scale gene expression profiling data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Asim S; Delaney, Allen D; Schnerch, Angelique; Griffith, Obi L; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A

    2006-07-13

    We present the results of a simple, statistical assay that measures the G+C content sensitivity bias of gene expression experiments without the requirement of a duplicate experiment. We analyse five gene expression profiling methods: Affymetrix GeneChip, Long Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (LongSAGE), LongSAGELite, 'Classic' Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) and 'Signature' MPSS. We demonstrate the methods have systematic and random errors leading to a different G+C content sensitivity. The relationship between this experimental error and the G+C content of the probe set or tag that identifies each gene influences whether the gene is detected and, if detected, the level of gene expression measured. LongSAGE has the least bias, while Signature MPSS shows a strong bias to G+C rich tags and Affymetrix data show different bias depending on the data processing method (MAS 5.0, RMA or GC-RMA). The bias in the Affymetrix data primarily impacts genes expressed at lower levels. Despite the larger sampling of the MPSS library, SAGE identifies significantly more genes (60% more RefSeq genes in a single comparison).

  18. Nucleotide sequence of the human N-myc gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanton, L.W.; Schwab, M.; Bishop, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Human neuroblastomas frequently display amplification and augmented expression of a gene known as N-myc because of its similarity to the protooncogene c-myc. It has therefore been proposed that N-myc is itself a protooncogene, and subsequent tests have shown that N-myc and c-myc have similar biological activities in cell culture. The authors have now detailed the kinship between N-myc and c-myc by determining the nucleotide sequence of human N-myc and deducing the amino acid sequence of the protein encoded by the gene. The topography of N-myc is strikingly similar to that of c-myc: both genes contain three exons of similar lengths; the coding elements of both genes are located in the second and third exons; and both genes have unusually long 5' untranslated regions in their mRNAs, with features that raise the possibility that expression of the genes may be subject to similar controls of translation. The resemblance between the proteins encoded by N-myc and c-myc sustains previous suspicions that the genes encode related functions

  19. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome......, including cell surface proteins such as beta barrel porins, presumably because of the involvement of these genes in evolutionary arms races with other bacteria, phages, and/or the host immune system. Structural mapping of positively selected sites on trans-membrane beta barrel porins reveals...... that the residues under positive selection occur almost exclusively in the extracellular region of the proteins that are enriched with sites known to be targets of phages, colicins, or the host immune system. More surprisingly, we also find a number of other categories of genes that show very strong evidence...

  20. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  1. Genes Underlying Positive Influence Of Prenatal Environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We aimed to investigate and find out key genes underlying the positive-negative effects derived from prenatal interventions. Materials and Methods: Pregnant rats were randomized into EE group (EEG), earthquake simulation group (ESG), herbal group (HG) received herbal supplements in feed after earthquake simulation, ...

  2. Identification of rat genes by TWINSCAN gene prediction, RT-PCR, and direct sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jia Qian; Shteynberg, David; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan

    2004-01-01

    an alternative approach: reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and direct sequencing based on dual-genome de novo predictions from TWINSCAN. We tested 444 TWINSCAN-predicted rat genes that showed significant homology to known human genes implicated in disease but that were partially...... in the single-intron experiment. Spliced sequences were amplified in 46 cases (34%). We conclude that this procedure for elucidating gene structures with native cDNA sequences is cost-effective and will become even more so as it is further optimized.......The publication of a draft sequence of a third mammalian genome--that of the rat--suggests a need to rethink genome annotation. New mammalian sequences will not receive the kind of labor-intensive annotation efforts that are currently being devoted to human. In this paper, we demonstrate...

  3. Finding candidate genes under positive selection in Non-model species: examples of genes involved in host specialization in pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguileta, G; Lengelle, J; Marthey, S; Chiapello, H; Rodolphe, F; Gendrault, A; Yockteng, R; Vercken, E; Devier, B; Fontaine, M C; Wincker, P; Dossat, C; Cruaud, C; Couloux, A; Giraud, T

    2010-01-01

    Numerous genes in diverse organisms have been shown to be under positive selection, especially genes involved in reproduction, adaptation to contrasting environments, hybrid inviability, and host-pathogen interactions. Looking for genes under positive selection in pathogens has been a priority in efforts to investigate coevolution dynamics and to develop vaccines or drugs. To elucidate the functions involved in host specialization, here we aimed at identifying candidate sequences that could have evolved under positive selection among closely related pathogens specialized on different hosts. For this goal, we sequenced c. 17,000-32,000 ESTs from each of four Microbotryum species, which are fungal pathogens responsible for anther smut disease on host plants in the Caryophyllaceae. Forty-two of the 372 predicted orthologous genes showed significant signal of positive selection, which represents a good number of candidate genes for further investigation. Sequencing 16 of these genes in 9 additional Microbotryum species confirmed that they have indeed been rapidly evolving in the pathogen species specialized on different hosts. The genes showing significant signals of positive selection were putatively involved in nutrient uptake from the host, secondary metabolite synthesis and secretion, respiration under stressful conditions and stress response, hyphal growth and differentiation, and regulation of expression by other genes. Many of these genes had transmembrane domains and may therefore also be involved in pathogen recognition by the host. Our approach thus revealed fruitful and should be feasible for many non-model organisms for which candidate genes for diversifying selection are needed.

  4. Identification of fusion genes in breast cancer by paired-end RNA-sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgren, Henrik; Murumagi, Astrid; Kangaspeska, Sara; Nicorici, Daniel; Hongisto, Vesa; Kleivi, Kristine; Rye, Inga H; Nyberg, Sandra; Wolf, Maija; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, chromosomal translocations and fusion genes have been an underappreciated class of mutations in solid tumors. Next-generation sequencing technologies provide an opportunity for systematic characterization of cancer cell transcriptomes, including the discovery of expressed fusion genes resulting from underlying genomic rearrangements. We applied paired-end RNA-seq to identify 24 novel and 3 previously known fusion genes in breast cancer cells. Supported by an improved bioinformatic approach, we had a 95% success rate of validating gene fusions initially detected by RNA-seq. Fusion partner genes were found to contribute promoters (5' UTR), coding sequences and 3' UTRs. Most fusion genes were associated with copy number transitions and were particularly common in high-level DNA amplifications. This suggests that fusion events may contribute to the selective advantage provided by DNA amplifications and deletions. Some of the fusion partner genes, such as GSDMB in the TATDN1-GSDMB fusion and IKZF3 in the VAPB-IKZF3 fusion, were only detected as a fusion transcript, indicating activation of a dormant gene by the fusion event. A number of fusion gene partners have either been previously observed in oncogenic gene fusions, mostly in leukemias, or otherwise reported to be oncogenic. RNA interference-mediated knock-down of the VAPB-IKZF3 fusion gene indicated that it may be necessary for cancer cell growth and survival. In summary, using RNA-sequencing and improved bioinformatic stratification, we have discovered a number of novel fusion genes in breast cancer, and identified VAPB-IKZF3 as a potential fusion gene with importance for the growth and survival of breast cancer cells.

  5. Genes and (common pathways underlying drug addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a serious worldwide problem with strong genetic and environmental influences. Different technologies have revealed a variety of genes and pathways underlying addiction; however, each individual technology can be biased and incomplete. We integrated 2,343 items of evidence from peer-reviewed publications between 1976 and 2006 linking genes and chromosome regions to addiction by single-gene strategies, microrray, proteomics, or genetic studies. We identified 1,500 human addiction-related genes and developed KARG (http://karg.cbi.pku.edu.cn, the first molecular database for addiction-related genes with extensive annotations and a friendly Web interface. We then performed a meta-analysis of 396 genes that were supported by two or more independent items of evidence to identify 18 molecular pathways that were statistically significantly enriched, covering both upstream signaling events and downstream effects. Five molecular pathways significantly enriched for all four different types of addictive drugs were identified as common pathways which may underlie shared rewarding and addictive actions, including two new ones, GnRH signaling pathway and gap junction. We connected the common pathways into a hypothetical common molecular network for addiction. We observed that fast and slow positive feedback loops were interlinked through CAMKII, which may provide clues to explain some of the irreversible features of addiction.

  6. Sequence variations in the FAD2 gene in seeded pumpkins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Y; Chang, Y; Xu, W L; Cui, C S; Qu, S P

    2015-12-21

    Seeded pumpkins are important economic crops; the seeds contain various unsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic acid and linoleic acid, which are crucial for human and animal nutrition. The fatty acid desaturase-2 (FAD2) gene encodes delta-12 desaturase, which converts oleic acid to linoleic acid. However, little is known about sequence variations in FAD2 in seeded pumpkins. Twenty-seven FAD2 clones from 27 accessions of Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita pepo, and Cucurbita ficifolia were obtained (totally 1152 bp; a single gene without introns). More than 90% nucleotide identities were detected among the 27 FAD2 clones. Nucleotide substitution, rather than nucleotide insertion and deletion, led to sequence polymorphism in the 27 FAD2 clones. Furthermore, the 27 FAD2 selected clones all encoded the FAD2 enzyme (delta-12 desaturase) with amino acid sequence identities from 91.7 to 100% for 384 amino acids. The same main-function domain between 47 and 329 amino acids was identified. The four species clustered separately based on differences in the sequences that were identified using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean. Geographic origin and species were found to be closely related to sequence variation in FAD2.

  7. Planarian homeobox genes: cloning, sequence analysis, and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Fernàndez, J; Baguñà, J; Saló, E

    1991-01-01

    Freshwater planarians (Platyhelminthes, Turbellaria, and Tricladida) are acoelomate, triploblastic, unsegmented, and bilaterally symmetrical organisms that are mainly known for their ample power to regenerate a complete organism from a small piece of their body. To identify potential pattern-control genes in planarian regeneration, we have isolated two homeobox-containing genes, Dth-1 and Dth-2 [Dugesia (Girardia) tigrina homeobox], by using degenerate oligonucleotides corresponding to the most conserved amino acid sequence from helix-3 of the homeodomain. Dth-1 and Dth-2 homeodomains are closely related (68% at the nucleotide level and 78% at the protein level) and show the conserved residues characteristic of the homeodomains identified to data. Similarity with most homeobox sequences is low (30-50%), except with Drosophila NK homeodomains (80-82% with NK-2) and the rodent TTF-1 homeodomain (77-87%). Some unusual amino acid residues specific to NK-2, TTF-1, Dth-1, and Dth-2 can be observed in the recognition helix (helix-3) and may define a family of homeodomains. The deduced amino acid sequences from the cDNAs contain, in addition to the homeodomain, other domains also present in various homeobox-containing genes. The expression of both genes, detected by Northern blot analysis, appear slightly higher in cephalic regions than in the rest of the intact organism, while a slight increase is detected in the central period (5 days) or regeneration. Images PMID:1714599

  8. Prospective identification of malaria parasite genes under balancing selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin K A Tetteh

    Full Text Available Endemic human pathogens are subject to strong immune selection, and interrogation of pathogen genome variation for signatures of balancing selection can identify important target antigens. Several major antigen genes in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have shown such signatures in polymorphism-versus-divergence indices (comparing with the chimpanzee parasite P. reichenowi, and in allele frequency based indices.To compare methods for prospective identification of genes under balancing selection, 26 additional genes known or predicted to encode surface-exposed proteins of the invasive blood stage merozoite were first sequenced from a panel of 14 independent P. falciparum cultured lines and P. reichenowi. Six genes at the positive extremes of one or both of the Hudson-Kreitman-Aguade (HKA and McDonald-Kreitman (MK indices were identified. Allele frequency based analysis was then performed on a Gambian P. falciparum population sample for these six genes and three others as controls. Tajima's D (TjD index was most highly positive for the msp3/6-like PF10_0348 (TjD = 1.96 as well as the positive control ama1 antigen gene (TjD = 1.22. Across the genes there was a strong correlation between population TjD values and the relative HKA indices (whether derived from the population or the panel of cultured laboratory isolates, but no correlation with the MK indices.Although few individual parasite genes show significant evidence of balancing selection, analysis of population genomic and comparative sequence data with the HKA and TjD indices should discriminate those that do, and thereby identify likely targets of immunity.

  9. Variations in CCL3L gene cluster sequence and non-specific gene copy numbers

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    Edberg Jeffrey C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variations (CNVs of the gene CC chemokine ligand 3-like1 (CCL3L1 have been implicated in HIV-1 susceptibility, but the association has been inconsistent. CCL3L1 shares homology with a cluster of genes localized to chromosome 17q12, namely CCL3, CCL3L2, and, CCL3L3. These genes are involved in host defense and inflammatory processes. Several CNV assays have been developed for the CCL3L1 gene. Findings Through pairwise and multiple alignments of these genes, we have shown that the homology between these genes ranges from 50% to 99% in complete gene sequences and from 70-100% in the exonic regions, with CCL3L1 and CCL3L3 being identical. By use of MEGA 4 and BioEdit, we aligned sense primers, anti-sense primers, and probes used in several previously described assays against pre-multiple alignments of all four chemokine genes. Each set of probes and primers aligned and matched with overlapping sequences in at least two of the four genes, indicating that previously utilized RT-PCR based CNV assays are not specific for only CCL3L1. The four available assays measured median copies of 2 and 3-4 in European and African American, respectively. The concordance between the assays ranged from 0.44-0.83 suggesting individual discordant calls and inconsistencies with the assays from the expected gene coverage from the known sequence. Conclusions This indicates that some of the inconsistencies in the association studies could be due to assays that provide heterogenous results. Sequence information to determine CNV of the three genes separately would allow to test whether their association with the pathogenesis of a human disease or phenotype is affected by an individual gene or by a combination of these genes.

  10. NEXT-GENERATION GENE SEQUENCING AND ITS APPLICATIONS IN ONCOHEMATOLOGY

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    I. M. Barkhatov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review bears on basic principles and technologies of next-generation sequencing (NGS, as well as its applications for detection of gene mutations in leukemic cells. We discuss some novel data concerning NGS approach to studies of genetic heterogeneity in myeloproliferative disorders, detection of high-risk genes, including drug resistance mutations, epigenomic changes associated with leukemias, as well as molecular aspects of clonal evolution. A special section concerns basic problems with bioinformatics and adequate analysis of large digital databases obtained with NGS approach. Optimal choice of appropriate software is of utmost importance for adequate retrieval and interpretation of the NGS data.

  11. High occurrence of functional new chimeric genes in survey of rice chromosome 3 short arm genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengjun; Wang, Jun; Marowsky, Nicholas C; Long, Manyuan; Wing, Rod A; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to identify newly evolved genes in rice, we searched the genomes of Asian-cultivated rice Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and its wild progenitors, looking for lineage-specific genes. Using genome pairwise comparison of approximately 20-Mb DNA sequences from the chromosome 3 short arm (Chr3s) in six rice species, O. sativa, O. nivara, O. rufipogon, O. glaberrima, O. barthii, and O. punctata, combined with synonymous substitution rate tests and other evidence, we were able to identify potential recently duplicated genes, which evolved within the last 1 Myr. We identified 28 functional O. sativa genes, which likely originated after O. sativa diverged from O. glaberrima. These genes account for around 1% (28/3,176) of all annotated genes on O. sativa's Chr3s. Among the 28 new genes, two recently duplicated segments contained eight genes. Fourteen of the 28 new genes consist of chimeric gene structure derived from one or multiple parental genes and flanking targeting sequences. Although the majority of these 28 new genes were formed by single or segmental DNA-based gene duplication and recombination, we found two genes that were likely originated partially through exon shuffling. Sequence divergence tests between new genes and their putative progenitors indicated that new genes were most likely evolving under natural selection. We showed all 28 new genes appeared to be functional, as suggested by Ka/Ks analysis and the presence of RNA-seq, cDNA, expressed sequence tag, massively parallel signature sequencing, and/or small RNA data. The high rate of new gene origination and of chimeric gene formation in rice may demonstrate rice's broad diversification, domestication, its environmental adaptation, and the role of new genes in rice speciation.

  12. Molecular Identification and Sequencing of Mannose Binding Protein (MBP Gene of Acanthamoeba palestinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaeian

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Acanthamoeba keratitis develops by pathogenic Acanthamoeba such as A. pal­es­tinen­sis. Indeed this species is one of the known causative agents of amoebic keratitis in Iran. Mannose Binding Protein (MBP is the main pathogenicity factors for developing this sight threatening disease. We aimed to characterize MBP gene in pathogenic Acanthamoeba isolates such as A. palestinensis."nMethods: This experimental research was performed in the School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran during 2007-2008.  A. palestinensis was grown on 2% non-nutrient agar overlaid with Escherichia coli. DNA extraction was performed using phenol-chloroform method. PCR reaction and amplification were done using specific primer pairs of MBP. The amplified fragment were purified and sequenced. Finally, the obtained fragment was deposited in the gene data bank."nResults: A 900 bp PCR-product was recovered after PCR reaction. Sequence analysis of the purified PCR product revealed a gene with 943 nucleotides. Homology analysis of the ob­tained sequence showed 81% similarity with the available MBP gene in the gene data bank. The fragment was deposited in the gene data bank under accession number EU678895"nConclusion: MBP is known as the most important factor in Acanthamoeba pathogenesis cas­cade. Therefore, characterization of this gene can aid in developing better therapeutic agents and even immunization of high-risk people.

  13. Differentiation of Xylella fastidiosa strains via multilocus sequence analysis of environmentally mediated genes (MLSA-E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Havird, Justin C; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2012-03-01

    Isolates of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa are genetically very similar, but studies on their biological traits have indicated differences in virulence and infection symptomatology. Taxonomic analyses have identified several subspecies, and phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes have shown broad host-based genetic differences; however, results are still inconclusive for genetic differentiation of isolates within subspecies. This study employs multilocus sequence analysis of environmentally mediated genes (MLSA-E; genes influenced by environmental factors) to investigate X. fastidiosa relationships and differentiate isolates with low genetic variability. Potential environmentally mediated genes, including host colonization and survival genes related to infection establishment, were identified a priori. The ratio of the rate of nonsynonymous substitutions to the rate of synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) was calculated to select genes that may be under increased positive selection compared to previously studied housekeeping genes. Nine genes were sequenced from 54 X. fastidiosa isolates infecting different host plants across the United States. Results of maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian phylogenetic (BP) analyses are in agreement with known X. fastidiosa subspecies clades but show novel within-subspecies differentiation, including geographic differentiation, and provide additional information regarding host-based isolate variation and specificity. dN/dS ratios of environmentally mediated genes, though fastidiosa isolates. Discovering the genetic relationships between X. fastidiosa isolates will provide new insights into the epidemiology of populations of X. fastidiosa, allowing improved disease management in economically important crops.

  14. Locating protein-coding sequences under selection for additional, overlapping functions in 29 mammalian genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Michael F; Kheradpour, Pouya; Washietl, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    synonymous constraint in these regions reflects selection on overlapping functional elements including splicing regulatory elements, dual-coding genes, RNA secondary structures, microRNA target sites, and developmental enhancers. Our results show that overlapping functional elements are common in mammalian......The degeneracy of the genetic code allows protein-coding DNA and RNA sequences to simultaneously encode additional, overlapping functional elements. A sequence in which both protein-coding and additional overlapping functions have evolved under purifying selection should show increased evolutionary...

  15. Transcriptional regulatory networks underlying gene expression changes in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Seth A; Pearl, Jocelynn R; Cantle, Jeffrey P; Bragg, Robert M; Skene, Peter J; Coffey, Sydney R; Bergey, Dani E; Wheeler, Vanessa C; MacDonald, Marcy E; Baliga, Nitin S; Rosinski, Jim; Hood, Leroy E; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Price, Nathan D

    2018-03-26

    Transcriptional changes occur presymptomatically and throughout Huntington's disease (HD), motivating the study of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) in HD We reconstructed a genome-scale model for the target genes of 718 transcription factors (TFs) in the mouse striatum by integrating a model of genomic binding sites with transcriptome profiling of striatal tissue from HD mouse models. We identified 48 differentially expressed TF-target gene modules associated with age- and CAG repeat length-dependent gene expression changes in Htt CAG knock-in mouse striatum and replicated many of these associations in independent transcriptomic and proteomic datasets. Thirteen of 48 of these predicted TF-target gene modules were also differentially expressed in striatal tissue from human disease. We experimentally validated a specific model prediction that SMAD3 regulates HD-related gene expression changes using chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) of mouse striatum. We found CAG repeat length-dependent changes in the genomic occupancy of SMAD3 and confirmed our model's prediction that many SMAD3 target genes are downregulated early in HD. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  16. Candidate genes revealed by a genome scan for mosquito resistance to a bacterial insecticide: sequence and gene expression variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jean-Philippe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome scans are becoming an increasingly popular approach to study the genetic basis of adaptation and speciation, but on their own, they are often helpless at identifying the specific gene(s or mutation(s targeted by selection. This shortcoming is hopefully bound to disappear in the near future, thanks to the wealth of new genomic resources that are currently being developed for many species. In this article, we provide a foretaste of this exciting new era by conducting a genome scan in the mosquito Aedes aegypti with the aim to look for candidate genes involved in resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti insecticidal toxins. Results The genome of a Bti-resistant and a Bti-susceptible strains was surveyed using about 500 MITE-based molecular markers, and the loci showing the highest inter-strain genetic differentiation were sequenced and mapped on the Aedes aegypti genome sequence. Several good candidate genes for Bti-resistance were identified in the vicinity of these highly differentiated markers. Two of them, coding for a cadherin and a leucine aminopeptidase, were further examined at the sequence and gene expression levels. In the resistant strain, the cadherin gene displayed patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms consistent with the action of positive selection (e.g. an excess of high compared to intermediate frequency mutations, as well as a significant under-expression compared to the susceptible strain. Conclusion Both sequence and gene expression analyses agree to suggest a role for positive selection in the evolution of this cadherin gene in the resistant strain. However, it is unlikely that resistance to Bti is conferred by this gene alone, and further investigation will be needed to characterize other genes significantly associated with Bti resistance in Ae. aegypti. Beyond these results, this article illustrates how genome scans can build on the body of new genomic information (here, full

  17. Genes under positives selection in deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sghaier, Haithem; Barkallah, Insaf; Ghedira, Kais; Benkahla, Alia

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionising radiation (IR) and desiccation. Deinococcus radiodurans is the current gold-medallist of ionising -radiation resistance and desiccation tolerance among organisms with a completely sequenced genome, can amend more than 100 DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) per chromosome, induced by 10 kGy, without loss of viability, and can survive for six years in a desiccator with 10% viability. To further unravel molecular targets involved in ionizing radiation resistance and desiccation tolerance in D. radiodurans, we identified based on pertinent ortho logy relationships and positive selection analyses less than 700 s tellar genes . the present work leads to further reduction of the set of factors implicated as major contributors to the resistance phenotype in D. radiodurans, and outlines a computational approach that may be broadly applicable for studying ionizing radiation resistance, desiccation tolerance and strain-specific adaptation in other prokaryotes

  18. Complete MHC Haplotype Sequencing for Common Disease Gene Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C. Andrew; Horton, Roger; Allcock, Richard J.N.; Ashurst, Jennifer L.; Atrazhev, Alexey M.; Coggill, Penny; Dunham, Ian; Forbes, Simon; Halls, Karen; Howson, Joanna M.M.; Humphray, Sean J.; Hunt, Sarah; Mungall, Andrew J.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Palmer, Sophie; Roberts, Anne N.; Rogers, Jane; Sims, Sarah; Wang, Yu; Wilming, Laurens G.; Elliott, John F.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Sawcer, Stephen; Todd, John A.; Trowsdale, John; Beck, Stephan

    2004-01-01

    The future systematic mapping of variants that confer susceptibility to common diseases requires the construction of a fully informative polymorphism map. Ideally, every base pair of the genome would be sequenced in many individuals. Here, we report 4.75 Mb of contiguous sequence for each of two common haplotypes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), to which susceptibility to >100 diseases has been mapped. The autoimmune disease-associated-haplotypes HLA-A3-B7-Cw7-DR15 and HLA-A1-B8-Cw7-DR3 were sequenced in their entirety through a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cloning strategy using the consanguineous cell lines PGF and COX, respectively. The two sequences were annotated to encompass all described splice variants of expressed genes. We defined the complete variation content of the two haplotypes, revealing >18,000 variations between them. Average SNP densities ranged from less than one SNP per kilobase to >60. Acquisition of complete and accurate sequence data over polymorphic regions such as the MHC from large-insert cloned DNA provides a definitive resource for the construction of informative genetic maps, and avoids the limitation of chromosome regions that are refractory to PCR amplification. PMID:15140828

  19. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. SINA: accurate high-throughput multiple sequence alignment of ribosomal RNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruesse, Elmar; Peplies, Jörg; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2012-07-15

    In the analysis of homologous sequences, computation of multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) has become a bottleneck. This is especially troublesome for marker genes like the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) where already millions of sequences are publicly available and individual studies can easily produce hundreds of thousands of new sequences. Methods have been developed to cope with such numbers, but further improvements are needed to meet accuracy requirements. In this study, we present the SILVA Incremental Aligner (SINA) used to align the rRNA gene databases provided by the SILVA ribosomal RNA project. SINA uses a combination of k-mer searching and partial order alignment (POA) to maintain very high alignment accuracy while satisfying high throughput performance demands. SINA was evaluated in comparison with the commonly used high throughput MSA programs PyNAST and mothur. The three BRAliBase III benchmark MSAs could be reproduced with 99.3, 97.6 and 96.1 accuracy. A larger benchmark MSA comprising 38 772 sequences could be reproduced with 98.9 and 99.3% accuracy using reference MSAs comprising 1000 and 5000 sequences. SINA was able to achieve higher accuracy than PyNAST and mothur in all performed benchmarks. Alignment of up to 500 sequences using the latest SILVA SSU/LSU Ref datasets as reference MSA is offered at http://www.arb-silva.de/aligner. This page also links to Linux binaries, user manual and tutorial. SINA is made available under a personal use license.

  1. Sequence characterisation of deletion breakpoints in the dystrophin gene by PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbs, S.; Sandhu, S.; Bobrow, M. [Guy`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Partial deletions of the dystrophin gene account for 65% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A high proportion of these structural changes are generated by new mutational events, and lie predominantly within two `hotspot` regions, yet the underlying reasons for this are not known. We are characterizing and sequencing the regions surrounding deletion breakpoints in order to: (i) investigate the mechanisms of deletion mutation, and (ii) enable the design of PCR assays to specifically amplify mutant and normal sequences, allowing us to search for the presence of somatic mosaicism in appropriate family members. Using this approach we have been able to demonstrate the presence of somatic mosaicism in a maternal grandfather of a DMD-affected male, deleted for exons 49-50. Three deletions, namely of exons 48-49, 49-50, and 50, have been characterized using a PCR approach that avoids any cloning procedures. Breakpoints were initially localized to within regions of a few kilobases using Southern blot restriction analyses with exon-specific probes and PCR amplification of exonic and intronic loci. Sequencing was performed directly on PCR products: (i) mutant sequences were obtained from long-range or inverse-PCR across the deletion junction fragments, and (ii) normal sequences were obtained from the products of standard PCR, vectorette PCR, or inverse-PCR performed on YACs. Further characterization of intronic sequences will allow us to amplify and sequence across other deletion breakpoints and increase our knowledge of the mechanisms of mutation in the dystophin gene.

  2. Technology development for gene discovery and full-length sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcelo Bento Soares

    2004-07-19

    In previous years, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, we developed methods for construction of normalized and subtracted cDNA libraries, and constructed hundreds of high-quality libraries for production of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). Our clones were made widely available to the scientific community through the IMAGE Consortium, and millions of ESTs were produced from our libraries either by collaborators or by our own sequencing laboratory at the University of Iowa. During this grant period, we focused on (1) the development of a method for preferential cloning of tissue-specific and/or rare transcripts, (2) its utilization to expedite EST-based gene discovery for the NIH Mouse Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, (3) further development and optimization of a method for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, and (4) modification of a plasmid vector to maximize efficiency of full-length cDNA sequencing by the transposon-mediated approach. It is noteworthy that the technology developed for preferential cloning of rare mRNAs enabled identification of over 2,000 mouse transcripts differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In addition, the method that we optimized for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries was successfully utilized for the production of approximately fifty libraries from the developing mouse nervous system, from which over 2,500 full-ORF-containing cDNAs have been identified and accurately sequenced in their entirety either by our group or by the NIH-Mammalian Gene Collection Program Sequencing Team.

  3. Transcriptome sequencing and whole genome expression profiling of chrysanthemum under dehydration stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanjie; Gao, Shan; Yang, Yingjie; Huang, Mingyun; Cheng, Lina; Wei, Qian; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping; Hong, Bo

    2013-09-28

    Chrysanthemum is one of the most important ornamental crops in the world and drought stress seriously limits its production and distribution. In order to generate a functional genomics resource and obtain a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms regarding chrysanthemum responses to dehydration stress, we performed large-scale transcriptome sequencing of chrysanthemum plants under dehydration stress using the Illumina sequencing technology. Two cDNA libraries constructed from mRNAs of control and dehydration-treated seedlings were sequenced by Illumina technology. A total of more than 100 million reads were generated and de novo assembled into 98,180 unique transcripts which were further extensively annotated by comparing their sequencing to different protein databases. Biochemical pathways were predicted from these transcript sequences. Furthermore, we performed gene expression profiling analysis upon dehydration treatment in chrysanthemum and identified 8,558 dehydration-responsive unique transcripts, including 307 transcription factors and 229 protein kinases and many well-known stress responsive genes. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment and biochemical pathway analyses showed that dehydration stress caused changes in hormone response, secondary and amino acid metabolism, and light and photoperiod response. These findings suggest that drought tolerance of chrysanthemum plants may be related to the regulation of hormone biosynthesis and signaling, reduction of oxidative damage, stabilization of cell proteins and structures, and maintenance of energy and carbon supply. Our transcriptome sequences can provide a valuable resource for chrysanthemum breeding and research and novel insights into chrysanthemum responses to dehydration stress and offer candidate genes or markers that can be used to guide future studies attempting to breed drought tolerant chrysanthemum cultivars.

  4. Transcriptome sequencing and whole genome expression profiling of chrysanthemum under dehydration stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Chrysanthemum is one of the most important ornamental crops in the world and drought stress seriously limits its production and distribution. In order to generate a functional genomics resource and obtain a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms regarding chrysanthemum responses to dehydration stress, we performed large-scale transcriptome sequencing of chrysanthemum plants under dehydration stress using the Illumina sequencing technology. Results Two cDNA libraries constructed from mRNAs of control and dehydration-treated seedlings were sequenced by Illumina technology. A total of more than 100 million reads were generated and de novo assembled into 98,180 unique transcripts which were further extensively annotated by comparing their sequencing to different protein databases. Biochemical pathways were predicted from these transcript sequences. Furthermore, we performed gene expression profiling analysis upon dehydration treatment in chrysanthemum and identified 8,558 dehydration-responsive unique transcripts, including 307 transcription factors and 229 protein kinases and many well-known stress responsive genes. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment and biochemical pathway analyses showed that dehydration stress caused changes in hormone response, secondary and amino acid metabolism, and light and photoperiod response. These findings suggest that drought tolerance of chrysanthemum plants may be related to the regulation of hormone biosynthesis and signaling, reduction of oxidative damage, stabilization of cell proteins and structures, and maintenance of energy and carbon supply. Conclusions Our transcriptome sequences can provide a valuable resource for chrysanthemum breeding and research and novel insights into chrysanthemum responses to dehydration stress and offer candidate genes or markers that can be used to guide future studies attempting to breed drought tolerant chrysanthemum cultivars. PMID:24074255

  5. Sequencing and transcriptional analysis of the biosynthesis gene cluster of abscisic acid-producing Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Shu, Dan; Yang, Jie; Ding, Zhong-Tao; Tan, Hong

    2014-09-29

    Botrytis cinerea is a model species with great importance as a pathogen of plants and has become used for biotechnological production of ABA. The ABA cluster of B. cinerea is composed of an open reading frame without significant similarities (bcaba3), followed by the genes (bcaba1 and bcaba2) encoding P450 monooxygenases and a gene probably coding for a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (bcaba4). In B. cinerea ATCC58025, targeted inactivation of the genes in the cluster suggested at least three genes responsible for the hydroxylation at carbon atom C-1' and C-4' or oxidation at C-4' of ABA. Our group has identified an ABA-overproducing strain, B. cinerea TB-3-H8. To differentiate TB-3-H8 from other B. cinerea strains with the functional ABA cluster, the DNA sequence of the 12.11-kb region containing the cluster of B. cinerea TB-3-H8 was determined. Full-length cDNAs were also isolated for bcaba1, bcaba2, bcaba3 and bcaba4 from B. cinerea TB-3-H8. Sequence comparison of the four genes and their flanking regions respectively derived from B. cinerea TB-3-H8, B05.10 and T4 revealed that major variations were located in intergenic sequences. In B. cinerea TB-3-H8, the expression profiles of the four function genes under ABA high-yield conditions were also analyzed by real-time PCR.

  6. Detection and sequence analysis of accessory gene regulator genes of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ananda Chitra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP is the major pathogenic species of dogs involved in a wide variety of skin and soft tissue infections. The accessory gene regulator (agr locus of Staphylococcus aureus has been extensively studied, and it influences the expression of many virulence genes. It encodes a two-component signal transduction system that leads to down-regulation of surface proteins and up-regulation of secreted proteins during in vitro growth of S. aureus. The objective of this study was to detect and sequence analyzing the AgrA, B, and D of SP isolated from canine skin infections. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have isolated and identified SP from canine pyoderma and otitis cases by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and confirmed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Primers for SP agrA and agrBD genes were designed using online primer designing software and BLAST searched for its specificity. Amplification of the agr genes was carried out for 53 isolates of SP by PCR and sequencing of agrA, B, and D were carried out for five isolates and analyzed using DNAstar and Mega5.2 software. Results: A total of 53 (59% SP isolates were obtained from 90 samples. 15 isolates (28% were confirmed to be methicillinresistant SP (MRSP with the detection of the mecA gene. Accessory gene regulator A, B, and D genes were detected in all the SP isolates. Complete nucleotide sequences of the above three genes for five isolates were submitted to GenBank, and their accession numbers are from KJ133557 to KJ133571. AgrA amino acid sequence analysis showed that it is mainly made of alpha-helices and is hydrophilic in nature. AgrB is a transmembrane protein, and AgrD encodes the precursor of the autoinducing peptide (AIP. Sequencing of the agrD gene revealed that the 5 canine SP strains tested could be divided into three Agr specificity groups (RIPTSTGFF, KIPTSTGFF, and RIPISTGFF based on the putative AIP produced by each strain

  7. Gene discovery and transcript analyses in the corn smut pathogen Ustilago maydis: expressed sequence tag and genome sequence comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saville Barry J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ustilago maydis is the basidiomycete fungus responsible for common smut of corn and is a model organism for the study of fungal phytopathogenesis. To aid in the annotation of the genome sequence of this organism, several expressed sequence tag (EST libraries were generated from a variety of U. maydis cell types. In addition to utility in the context of gene identification and structure annotation, the ESTs were analyzed to identify differentially abundant transcripts and to detect evidence of alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription. Results Four cDNA libraries were constructed using RNA isolated from U. maydis diploid teliospores (U. maydis strains 518 × 521 and haploid cells of strain 521 grown under nutrient rich, carbon starved, and nitrogen starved conditions. Using the genome sequence as a scaffold, the 15,901 ESTs were assembled into 6,101 contiguous expressed sequences (contigs; among these, 5,482 corresponded to predicted genes in the MUMDB (MIPS Ustilago maydis database, while 619 aligned to regions of the genome not yet designated as genes in MUMDB. A comparison of EST abundance identified numerous genes that may be regulated in a cell type or starvation-specific manner. The transcriptional response to nitrogen starvation was assessed using RT-qPCR. The results of this suggest that there may be cross-talk between the nitrogen and carbon signalling pathways in U. maydis. Bioinformatic analysis identified numerous examples of alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription. While intron retention was the predominant form of alternative splicing in U. maydis, other varieties were also evident (e.g. exon skipping. Selected instances of both alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription were independently confirmed using RT-PCR. Conclusion Through this work: 1 substantial sequence information has been provided for U. maydis genome annotation; 2 new genes were identified through the discovery of 619

  8. Mining Association Rules in Dengue Gene Sequence with Latent Periodicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marimuthu Thangam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mining of periodic patterns in dengue database is an interesting research problem that can be used for predicting the future evolution of dengue viruses. In this paper, we propose an algorithm called Recurrence Finder (RECFIN that uses the suffix tree for detecting the periodic patterns of dengue gene sequence. Also, the RECFIN finds the presence of palindrome which indicates the possibilities of formation of proteins. Further, this paper computes the periodicity of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of any length. The periodicity based association rules are used to diagnose the type of dengue. The time complexity of the proposed algorithm is O(n2. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach by comparing the experimental results performed on dengue virus serotypes dataset with NCBI-BLAST algorithm.

  9. Candidate gene analysis and exome sequencing confirm LBX1 as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauers, Anna; Wang, Jingwen; Einarsdottir, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    , were Sanger sequenced in the 100 pooled samples. RESULTS: Of the four candidate genes, an intergenic variant, rs11190870, downstream of the LBX1 gene, showed a highly significant association to idiopathic scoliosis in 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls (p=7.0×10(-18)). We identified 20 novel variants...... that are significantly associated with idiopathic scoliosis in Asian and Caucasian populations, rs11190870 close to the LBX1 gene being the most replicated finding. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetics of idiopathic scoliosis in a Scandinavian cohort by performing a candidate gene study...... of four variants previously shown to be associated with idiopathic scoliosis and exome sequencing of idiopathic scoliosis patients with a severe phenotype to identify possible novel scoliosis risk variants. STUDY DESIGN: This was a case control study. PATIENT SAMPLE: A total of 1,739 patients...

  10. SEQUENCING AND SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF MYOSTATIN GENE IN THE EXON 1 OF THE CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. SHAH, A. S. QURESHI1, M. REISSMANN2 AND H. J. SCHWARTZ3

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin, also called growth differentiation factor-8 (GDF-8, is a member of the mammalian growth transforming family (TGF-beta superfamily, which is expressed specifically in developing an adult skeletal muscle. Muscular hypertrophy allele (mh allele in the double muscle breeds involved mutation within the myostatin gene. Genomic DNA was isolated from the camel hair using NucleoSpin Tissue kit. Two animals of each of the six breeds namely, Marecha, Dhatti, Larri, Kohi, Sakrai and Cambelpuri were used for sequencing. For PCR amplification of the gene, a primer pair was designed from homolog regions of already published sequences of farm animals from GenBank. Results showed that camel myostatin possessed more than 90% homology with that of cattle, sheep and pig. Camel formed separate cluster from the pig in spite of having high homology (98% and showed 94% homology with cattle and sheep as reported in literature. Sequence analysis of the PCR amplified part of exon 1 (256 bp of the camel myostatin was identical among six camel breeds.

  11. Evolutionary analysis of hepatitis C virus gene sequences from 1953

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Rebecca R.; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Takebe, Yutaka; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Buskell, Zelma; Seeff, Leonard; Alter, Harvey J.; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing the transmission history of infectious diseases in the absence of medical or epidemiological records often relies on the evolutionary analysis of pathogen genetic sequences. The precision of evolutionary estimates of epidemic history can be increased by the inclusion of sequences derived from ‘archived’ samples that are genetically distinct from contemporary strains. Historical sequences are especially valuable for viral pathogens that circulated for many years before being formally identified, including HIV and the hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, surprisingly few HCV isolates sampled before discovery of the virus in 1989 are currently available. Here, we report and analyse two HCV subgenomic sequences obtained from infected individuals in 1953, which represent the oldest genetic evidence of HCV infection. The pairwise genetic diversity between the two sequences indicates a substantial period of HCV transmission prior to the 1950s, and their inclusion in evolutionary analyses provides new estimates of the common ancestor of HCV in the USA. To explore and validate the evolutionary information provided by these sequences, we used a new phylogenetic molecular clock method to estimate the date of sampling of the archived strains, plus the dates of four more contemporary reference genomes. Despite the short fragments available, we conclude that the archived sequences are consistent with a proposed sampling date of 1953, although statistical uncertainty is large. Our cross-validation analyses suggest that the bias and low statistical power observed here likely arise from a combination of high evolutionary rate heterogeneity and an unstructured, star-like phylogeny. We expect that attempts to date other historical viruses under similar circumstances will meet similar problems. PMID:23938759

  12. Evaluation and validation of housekeeping genes as reference for gene expression studies in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) under drought stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Pallavi; Singh, Vikas K; Suryanarayana, V; Krishnamurthy, L; Saxena, Rachit K; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression analysis using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a very sensitive technique and its sensitivity depends on the stable performance of reference gene(s) used in the study. A number of housekeeping genes have been used in various expression studies in many crops however, their expression were found to be inconsistent under different stress conditions. As a result, species specific housekeeping genes have been recommended for different expression studies in several crop species. However, such specific housekeeping genes have not been reported in the case of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) despite the fact that genome sequence has become available for the crop. To identify the stable housekeeping genes in pigeonpea for expression analysis under drought stress conditions, the relative expression variations of 10 commonly used housekeeping genes (EF1α, UBQ10, GAPDH, 18SrRNA, 25SrRNA, TUB6, ACT1, IF4α, UBC and HSP90) were studied on root, stem and leaves tissues of Asha (ICPL 87119). Three statistical algorithms geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper were used to define the stability of candidate genes. geNorm analysis identified IF4α and TUB6 as the most stable housekeeping genes however, NormFinder analysis determined IF4α and HSP90 as the most stable housekeeping genes under drought stress conditions. Subsequently validation of the identified candidate genes was undertaken in qRT-PCR based gene expression analysis of uspA gene which plays an important role for drought stress conditions in pigeonpea. The relative quantification of the uspA gene varied according to the internal controls (stable and least stable genes), thus highlighting the importance of the choice of as well as validation of internal controls in such experiments. The identified stable and validated housekeeping genes will facilitate gene expression studies in pigeonpea especially under drought stress conditions.

  13. EXONSAMPLER: a computer program for genome-wide and candidate gene exon sampling for targeted next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosart, Ted; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Luikart, Gordon

    2014-11-01

    The computer program EXONSAMPLER automates the sampling of thousands of exon sequences from publicly available reference genome sequences and gene annotation databases. It was designed to provide exon sequences for the efficient, next-generation gene sequencing method called exon capture. The exon sequences can be sampled by a list of gene name abbreviations (e.g. IFNG, TLR1), or by sampling exons from genes spaced evenly across chromosomes. It provides a list of genomic coordinates (a bed file), as well as a set of sequences in fasta format. User-adjustable parameters for collecting exon sequences include a minimum and maximum acceptable exon length, maximum number of exonic base pairs (bp) to sample per gene, and maximum total bp for the entire collection. It allows for partial sampling of very large exons. It can preferentially sample upstream (5 prime) exons, downstream (3 prime) exons, both external exons, or all internal exons. It is written in the Python programming language using its free libraries. We describe the use of EXONSAMPLER to collect exon sequences from the domestic cow (Bos taurus) genome for the design of an exon-capture microarray to sequence exons from related species, including the zebu cow and wild bison. We collected ~10% of the exome (~3 million bp), including 155 candidate genes, and ~16,000 exons evenly spaced genomewide. We prioritized the collection of 5 prime exons to facilitate discovery and genotyping of SNPs near upstream gene regulatory DNA sequences, which control gene expression and are often under natural selection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Membrane gene ontology bias in sequencing and microarray obtained by housekeeping-gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yijuan; Akintola, Oluwafemi S; Liu, Ken J A; Sun, Bingyun

    2016-01-10

    Microarray (MA) and high-throughput sequencing are two commonly used detection systems for global gene expression profiling. Although these two systems are frequently used in parallel, the differences in their final results have not been examined thoroughly. Transcriptomic analysis of housekeeping (HK) genes provides a unique opportunity to reliably examine the technical difference between these two systems. We investigated here the structure, genome location, expression quantity, microarray probe coverage, as well as biological functions of differentially identified human HK genes by 9 MA and 6 sequencing studies. These in-depth analyses allowed us to discover, for the first time, a subset of transcripts encoding membrane, cell surface and nuclear proteins that were prone to differential identification by the two platforms. We hope that the discovery can aid the future development of these technologies for comprehensive transcriptomic studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sequencing rare marine actinomycete genomes reveals high density of unique natural product biosynthetic gene clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorn, Michelle A.; Alanjary, Mohammad M.; Aguinaldo, Kristen; Korobeynikov, Anton; Podell, Sheila; Patin, Nastassia; Lincecum, Tommie; Jensen, Paul R.; Ziemert, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Traditional natural product discovery methods have nearly exhausted the accessible diversity of microbial chemicals, making new sources and techniques paramount in the search for new molecules. Marine actinomycete bacteria have recently come into the spotlight as fruitful producers of structurally diverse secondary metabolites, and remain relatively untapped. In this study, we sequenced 21 marine-derived actinomycete strains, rarely studied for their secondary metabolite potential and under-represented in current genomic databases. We found that genome size and phylogeny were good predictors of biosynthetic gene cluster diversity, with larger genomes rivalling the well-known marine producers in the Streptomyces and Salinispora genera. Genomes in the Micrococcineae suborder, however, had consistently the lowest number of biosynthetic gene clusters. By networking individual gene clusters into gene cluster families, we were able to computationally estimate the degree of novelty each genus contributed to the current sequence databases. Based on the similarity measures between all actinobacteria in the Joint Genome Institute's Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters database, rare marine genera show a high degree of novelty and diversity, with Corynebacterium, Gordonia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora and Pseudonocardia genera representing the highest gene cluster diversity. This research validates that rare marine actinomycetes are important candidates for exploration, as they are relatively unstudied, and their relatives are historically rich in secondary metabolites. PMID:27902408

  16. Transcriptome sequencing and positive selected genes analysis of Bombyx mandarina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingcai Cheng

    Full Text Available The wild silkworm Bombyx mandarina is widely believed to be an ancestor of the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori. Silkworms are often used as a model for studying the mechanism of species domestication. Here, we performed transcriptome sequencing of the wild silkworm using an Illumina HiSeq2000 platform. We produced 100,004,078 high-quality reads and assembled them into 50,773 contigs with an N50 length of 1764 bp and a mean length of 941.62 bp. A total of 33,759 unigenes were identified, with 12,805 annotated in the Nr database, 8273 in the Pfam database, and 9093 in the Swiss-Prot database. Expression profile analysis found significant differential expression of 1308 unigenes between the middle silk gland (MSG and posterior silk gland (PSG. Three sericin genes (sericin 1, sericin 2, and sericin 3 were expressed specifically in the MSG and three fibroin genes (fibroin-H, fibroin-L, and fibroin/P25 were expressed specifically in the PSG. In addition, 32,297 Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 361 insertion-deletions (INDELs were detected. Comparison with the domesticated silkworm p50/Dazao identified 5,295 orthologous genes, among which 400 might have experienced or to be experiencing positive selection by Ka/Ks analysis. These data and analyses presented here provide insights into silkworm domestication and an invaluable resource for wild silkworm genomics research.

  17. Sequencing Infrastructure Investments under Deep Uncertainty Using Real Options Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishtha Manocha

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The adaptation tipping point and adaptation pathway approach developed to make decisions under deep uncertainty do not shed light on which among the multiple available pathways should be chosen as the preferred pathway. This creates the need to extend these approaches by means of suitable tools that can help sequence actions and subsequently enable the outlining of relevant policies. This paper presents two sequencing approaches, namely, the “Build to Target” and “Build Up” approach, to aid in sub-selecting a set of preferred pathways. Both approaches differ in the levels of flexibility they offer. They are exemplified by means of two case studies wherein the Net Present Valuation and the Real Options Analysis are employed as selection criterions. The results demonstrate the benefit of these two approaches when used in conjunction with the adaptation pathways and show how the pathways selected by means of a Build to Target approach generally have a value greater than, or at least the same as, the pathways selected by the Build Up approach. Further, this paper also demonstrates the capacity of Real Options to quantify and capture the economic value of flexibility, which cannot be done by traditional valuation approaches such as Net Present Valuation.

  18. Targeted sequencing of established and candidate colorectal cancer genes in the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Leon; Guo, Yan; Du, Liping; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Lindor, Noralane M; Gruber, Stephen B; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2017-11-07

    The underlying genetic cause of colorectal cancer (CRC) can be identified for 5-10% of all cases, while at least 20% of CRC cases are thought to be due to inherited genetic factors. Screening for highly penetrant mutations in genes associated with Mendelian cancer syndromes using next-generation sequencing (NGS) can be prohibitively expensive for studies requiring large samples sizes. The aim of the study was to identify rare single nucleotide variants and small indels in 40 established or candidate CRC susceptibility genes in 1,046 familial CRC cases (including both MSS and MSI-H tumor subtypes) and 1,006 unrelated controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort using a robust and cost-effective DNA pooling NGS strategy. We identified 264 variants in 38 genes that were observed only in cases, comprising either very rare (minor allele frequency cancer susceptibility genes BAP1, CDH1, CHEK2, ENG, and MSH3 . For the candidate CRC genes, we identified likely pathogenic variants in the helicase domain of POLQ and in the LRIG1 , SH2B3 , and NOS1 genes and present their clinicopathological characteristics. Using a DNA pooling NGS strategy, we identified novel germline mutations in established CRC susceptibility genes in familial CRC cases. Further studies are required to support the role of POLQ , LRIG1 , SH2B3 and NOS1 as CRC susceptibility genes.

  19. Gene conversion of two functional goat alpha-globin genes preserves only minimal flanking sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, E A; Wernke, S M; Lingrel, J B

    1982-06-25

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the nonallelic adult goat I alpha- and II alpha-globin genes and, as is the case with the duplicated human alpha-to each other. Such high homology (99%) has most likely been preserved via a gene conversion mechanism. The conversion unit in goats is only about 9000 base pairs in length, and contained within this short region are all the known signals required for accurate and efficient transcription, with the CCAAT box adjacent to the 5'-boundary of the conversion unit and the poly(A) addition site adjacent to the 3' end. This conversion unit is also flanked by a 23-base-pair direct repeat "boundary sequence," vestiges of which are also observable in the human and mouse alpha-globin genes and pseudogenes. These direct repeats imply that a transposition-like event may have been responsible for the insertion of an ancestral alpha-like sequence into a new chromosomal locus, and that this insertion event and subsequent gene duplication may have predated the mammalian radiation.

  20. Sequence analysis of the N-acetyltransferase 2 gene (NAT2) among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yazun Bashir Jarrar

    2017-11-26

    Nov 26, 2017 ... bp open reading DNA sequence encoding 290 amino acids [8-10]. ... Two DNA frag- ments of NAT2 gene that represent the complete sequence of exon 2 of NAT2 gene were amplified using specific DNA primers (Table 1). The PCR condi ..... sequence from different species: human, chimpanzee,. Sumatran ...

  1. Molecular Cloning and Sequencing of Hemoglobin-Beta Gene of Channel Catfish, Ictalurus Punctatus Rafinesque

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Hemoglobin-y gene of channel catfish , lctalurus punctatus, was cloned and sequenced . Total RNA from head kidneys was isolated, reverse transcribed and amplified . The sequence of the channel catfish hemoglobin-y gene consists of 600 nucleotides . Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals one o...

  2. Gene discovery in the threatened elkhorn coral: 454 sequencing of the Acropora palmata transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R Polato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cnidarians, including corals and anemones, offer unique insights into metazoan evolution because they harbor genetic similarities with vertebrates beyond that found in model invertebrates and retain genes known only from non-metazoans. Cataloging genes expressed in Acropora palmata, a foundation-species of reefs in the Caribbean and western Atlantic, will advance our understanding of the genetic basis of ecologically important traits in corals and comes at a time when sequencing efforts in other cnidarians allow for multi-species comparisons. RESULTS: A cDNA library from a sample enriched for symbiont free larval tissue was sequenced on the 454 GS-FLX platform. Over 960,000 reads were obtained and assembled into 42,630 contigs. Annotation data was acquired for 57% of the assembled sequences. Analysis of the assembled sequences indicated that 83-100% of all A. palmata transcripts were tagged, and provided a rough estimate of the total number genes expressed in our samples (~18,000-20,000. The coral annotation data contained many of the same molecular components as in the Bilateria, particularly in pathways associated with oxidative stress and DNA damage repair, and provided evidence that homologs of p53, a key player in DNA repair pathways, has experienced selection along the branch separating Cnidaria and Bilateria. Transcriptome wide screens of paralog groups and transition/transversion ratios highlighted genes including: green fluorescent proteins, carbonic anhydrase, and oxidative stress proteins; and functional groups involved in protein and nucleic acid metabolism, and the formation of structural molecules. These results provide a starting point for study of adaptive evolution in corals. CONCLUSIONS: Currently available transcriptome data now make comparative studies of the mechanisms underlying coral's evolutionary success possible. Here we identified candidate genes that enable corals to maintain genomic integrity despite

  3. Gene discovery in the threatened elkhorn coral: 454 sequencing of the Acropora palmata transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polato, Nicholas R; Vera, J Cristobal; Baums, Iliana B

    2011-01-01

    Cnidarians, including corals and anemones, offer unique insights into metazoan evolution because they harbor genetic similarities with vertebrates beyond that found in model invertebrates and retain genes known only from non-metazoans. Cataloging genes expressed in Acropora palmata, a foundation-species of reefs in the Caribbean and western Atlantic, will advance our understanding of the genetic basis of ecologically important traits in corals and comes at a time when sequencing efforts in other cnidarians allow for multi-species comparisons. A cDNA library from a sample enriched for symbiont free larval tissue was sequenced on the 454 GS-FLX platform. Over 960,000 reads were obtained and assembled into 42,630 contigs. Annotation data was acquired for 57% of the assembled sequences. Analysis of the assembled sequences indicated that 83-100% of all A. palmata transcripts were tagged, and provided a rough estimate of the total number genes expressed in our samples (~18,000-20,000). The coral annotation data contained many of the same molecular components as in the Bilateria, particularly in pathways associated with oxidative stress and DNA damage repair, and provided evidence that homologs of p53, a key player in DNA repair pathways, has experienced selection along the branch separating Cnidaria and Bilateria. Transcriptome wide screens of paralog groups and transition/transversion ratios highlighted genes including: green fluorescent proteins, carbonic anhydrase, and oxidative stress proteins; and functional groups involved in protein and nucleic acid metabolism, and the formation of structural molecules. These results provide a starting point for study of adaptive evolution in corals. Currently available transcriptome data now make comparative studies of the mechanisms underlying coral's evolutionary success possible. Here we identified candidate genes that enable corals to maintain genomic integrity despite considerable exposure to genotoxic stress over long life

  4. Primate ABO Gene is under Weak Positive Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Santos EVANOVICH

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABO locus presents three main alleles: A, B and O. A and B encode glycosyltransferases that catalyze the addiction of an N-GalNac and D-galactose to a precursor substance (H substance, producing A and B antigens, while the O allele does not produce a functional protein. The presence of A and B antigens have been associated to resistance against infectious agents which could use them as attachment factors increasing the virulence of some parasitic agents. As these antigens are not restrict to humans, analyses them in others species, for instance non-human primates, may be crucial to understand the relationship between pathogens and ABO phenotypes. Despite of the relevance of this issue, in the last decade few studies have addressed, mainly in New World Monkeys (NWM, natural reservoir of tropical diseases in Amazon Region. In order to understand the evolution of the ABO system in the primates, it has been obtained the partial sequence of the most important exon of ABO gene (exon 7, in platyrrhini families: Atelidae, Pithecidae and Cebidae. Then, it has been compared the sequences obtained those present in the literature, and measured the selective pressure. The present results shown that residues 266 and 268 are also crucial to distinguish A and B phenotypes in the platyrrhines, such as in catarrhines, and the 266 codon is under positive selection, although the most site codons are under action of purifying selection.

  5. Hypothalamic gene expression underlying pre-hibernation satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C; Hampton, M; Andrews, M T

    2015-03-01

    Prior to hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) enter a hypophagic period where food consumption drops by an average of 55% in 3 weeks. This occurs naturally, while the ground squirrels are in constant environmental conditions and have free access to food. Importantly, this transition occurs before exposure to hibernation conditions (5°C and constant darkness), so the ground squirrels are still maintaining a moderate level of activity. In this study, we used the Illumina HiSeq 2000 system to sequence the hypothalamic transcriptomes of ground squirrels before and after the autumn feeding transition to examine the genes underlying this extreme change in feeding behavior. The hypothalamus was chosen because it is known to play a role in the control and regulation of food intake and satiety. Overall, our analysis identified 143 genes that are significantly differentially expressed between the two groups. Specifically, we found five genes associated with feeding behavior and obesity (VGF, TRH, LEPR, ADIPOR2, IRS2) that are all upregulated during the hypophagic period, after the feeding transition has occurred. We also found that serum leptin significantly increases in the hypophagic group. Several of the genes associated with the natural autumnal feeding decline in 13-lined ground squirrels show parallels to signaling pathways known to be disrupted in human metabolic diseases, like obesity and diabetes. In addition, many other genes were identified that could be important for the control of food consumption in other animals, including humans. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  6. Poly purine.pyrimidine sequences upstream of the beta-galactosidase gene affect gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmachari Samir K

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poly purine.pyrimidine sequences have the potential to adopt intramolecular triplex structures and are overrepresented upstream of genes in eukaryotes. These sequences may regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction of transcription factors with DNA sequences upstream of genes. Results A poly purine.pyrimidine sequence with the potential to adopt an intramolecular triplex DNA structure was designed. The sequence was inserted within a nucleosome positioned upstream of the β-galactosidase gene in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, between the cycl promoter and gal 10Upstream Activating Sequences (UASg. Upon derepression with galactose, β-galactosidase gene expression is reduced 12-fold in cells carrying single copy poly purine.pyrimidine sequences. This reduction in expression is correlated with reduced transcription. Furthermore, we show that plasmids carrying a poly purine.pyrimidine sequence are not specifically lost from yeast cells. Conclusion We propose that a poly purine.pyrimidine sequence upstream of a gene affects transcription. Plasmids carrying this sequence are not specifically lost from cells and thus no additional effort is needed for the replication of these sequences in eukaryotic cells.

  7. Cloning, DNA sequence, and expression of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c/sub 2/ gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, T.J.; McEwan, A.G.; Kaplan, S.

    1986-11-01

    The Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c/sub 2/ functions as a mobile electron carrier in both aerobic and photosynthetic electron transport chains. Synthetic deoxyoligonucleotide probes, based on the known amino acid sequence of this protein (M/sub r/ 14,000), were used to identify and clone the cytochrome c/sub 2/ structural gene (cycA). DNA sequence analysis of the cycA gene indicated the presence of a typical procaryotic 21-residue signal sequence, suggesting that this periplasmic protein is synthesized in vivo as a precursor. Synthesis of an immunoreactive cytochrome c/sub 2/ precursor protein (M/sub r/ 15,500) was observed in vitro when plasmids containing the cycA gene were used as templates in an R. sphaeroides coupled transcription-translation system. Approximately 500 base pairs of DNA upstream of the cycA gene was sufficient to allow expression of this gene product in vitro. Northern blot analysis with an internal cycA-specific probe identified at least two possibly monocistronic transcripts present in both different cellular levels and relative stoichiometries in steady-state cells grown under different physiological conditions. The ratio of the small (740-mucleotide) and large (920-nucleotide) cycA-specific mRNA species was dependent on cultural conditions but was not affected by light intensity under photosynthetic conditions. These results suggest that the increase in the cellular level of the cytochrome c/sub 2/ protein found in photosynthetic cells was due, in part, to increased transcription of the single-copy cyc operon.

  8. Understanding gene sequence variation in the context of transcription regulation in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Gat-Viks

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence polymorphism in a regulatory protein can have a widespread transcriptional effect. Here we present a computational approach for analyzing modules of genes with a common regulation that are affected by specific DNA polymorphisms. We identify such regulatory-linkage modules by integrating genotypic and expression data for individuals in a segregating population with complementary expression data of strains mutated in a variety of regulatory proteins. Our procedure searches simultaneously for groups of co-expressed genes, for their common underlying linkage interval, and for their shared regulatory proteins. We applied the method to a cross between laboratory and wild strains of S. cerevisiae, demonstrating its ability to correctly suggest modules and to outperform extant approaches. Our results suggest that middle sporulation genes are under the control of polymorphism in the sporulation-specific tertiary complex Sum1p/Rfm1p/Hst1p. In another example, our analysis reveals novel inter-relations between Swi3 and two mitochondrial inner membrane proteins underlying variation in a module of aerobic cellular respiration genes. Overall, our findings demonstrate that this approach provides a useful framework for the systematic mapping of quantitative trait loci and their role in gene expression variation.

  9. The Clinical Significance of Unknown Sequence Variants in BRCA Genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calò, Valentina; Bruno, Loredana; Paglia, Laura La; Perez, Marco; Margarese, Naomi; Gaudio, Francesca Di; Russo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 genes are responsible for a large proportion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Many highly penetrant predisposition alleles have been identified and include frameshift or nonsense mutations that lead to the translation of a truncated protein. Other alleles contain missense mutations, which result in amino acid substitution and intronic variants with splicing effect. The discovery of variants of uncertain/unclassified significance (VUS) is a result that can complicate rather than improve the risk assessment process. VUSs are mainly missense mutations, but also include a number of intronic variants and in-frame deletions and insertions. Over 2,000 unique BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants have been identified, located throughout the whole gene (Breast Cancer Information Core Database (BIC database)). Up to 10–20% of the BRCA tests report the identification of a variant of uncertain significance. There are many methods to discriminate deleterious/high-risk from neutral/low-risk unclassified variants (i.e., analysis of the cosegregation in families of the VUS, measure of the influence of the VUSs on the wild-type protein activity, comparison of sequence conservation across multiple species), but only an integrated analysis of these methods can contribute to a real interpretation of the functional and clinical role of the discussed variants. The aim of our manuscript is to review the studies on BRCA VUS in order to clarify their clinical relevance

  10. The Clinical Significance of Unknown Sequence Variants in BRCA Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calò, Valentina; Bruno, Loredana; Paglia, Laura La; Perez, Marco; Margarese, Naomi [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Gaudio, Francesca Di [Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Legal Medicine, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Russo, Antonio, E-mail: lab-oncobiologia@usa.net [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)

    2010-09-10

    Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 genes are responsible for a large proportion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Many highly penetrant predisposition alleles have been identified and include frameshift or nonsense mutations that lead to the translation of a truncated protein. Other alleles contain missense mutations, which result in amino acid substitution and intronic variants with splicing effect. The discovery of variants of uncertain/unclassified significance (VUS) is a result that can complicate rather than improve the risk assessment process. VUSs are mainly missense mutations, but also include a number of intronic variants and in-frame deletions and insertions. Over 2,000 unique BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants have been identified, located throughout the whole gene (Breast Cancer Information Core Database (BIC database)). Up to 10–20% of the BRCA tests report the identification of a variant of uncertain significance. There are many methods to discriminate deleterious/high-risk from neutral/low-risk unclassified variants (i.e., analysis of the cosegregation in families of the VUS, measure of the influence of the VUSs on the wild-type protein activity, comparison of sequence conservation across multiple species), but only an integrated analysis of these methods can contribute to a real interpretation of the functional and clinical role of the discussed variants. The aim of our manuscript is to review the studies on BRCA VUS in order to clarify their clinical relevance.

  11. Isolation and characterization of strong gene regulatory sequences from apple, Malus x domestica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, J.G.; Tinnenbroek, I.E.M.; Krens, F.A.

    2011-01-01

    For the strong expression of genes in plant tissue, the availability of specific gene regulatory sequences is desired. We cloned promoter and terminator sequences of an apple (Malus x domestica) ribulose biphosphate carboxylase small subunit gene (MdRbcS), which is known for its high expression and

  12. Minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS) and minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS) specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, Pelin; Kottmann, Renzo; Field, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Here we present a standard developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) for reporting marker gene sequences--the minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS). We also introduce a system for describing the environment from which a biological sample originates. The 'environmental...... packages' apply to any genome sequence of known origin and can be used in combination with MIMARKS and other GSC checklists. Finally, to establish a unified standard for describing sequence data and to provide a single point of entry for the scientific community to access and learn about GSC checklists, we...... present the minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS). Adoption of MIxS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere....

  13. Comparisons between Arabidopsis thaliana and Drosophila melanogaster in relation to Coding and Noncoding Sequence Length and Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Caldwell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a continuing interest in the analysis of gene architecture and gene expression to determine the relationship that may exist. Advances in high-quality sequencing technologies and large-scale resource datasets have increased the understanding of relationships and cross-referencing of expression data to the large genome data. Although a negative correlation between expression level and gene (especially transcript length has been generally accepted, there have been some conflicting results arising from the literature concerning the impacts of different regions of genes, and the underlying reason is not well understood. The research aims to apply quantile regression techniques for statistical analysis of coding and noncoding sequence length and gene expression data in the plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to determine if a relationship exists and if there is any variation or similarities between these species. The quantile regression analysis found that the coding sequence length and gene expression correlations varied, and similarities emerged for the noncoding sequence length (5′ and 3′ UTRs between animal and plant species. In conclusion, the information described in this study provides the basis for further exploration into gene regulation with regard to coding and noncoding sequence length.

  14. Diagnostic Yield of Sequencing Familial Hypercholesterolemia Genes in Severe Hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Amit V.; Won, Hong-Hee; Peloso, Gina M.; Lawson, Kim S.; Bartz, Traci M.; Deng, Xuan; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Natarajan, Pradeep; Emdin, Connor A.; Bick, Alexander G.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Gupta, Namrata; Nomura, Akihiro; Kessler, Thorsten; Duga, Stefano; Bis, Joshua C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Psaty, Bruce; Rader, Daniel J.; Danesh, John; Schunkert, Heribert; McPherson, Ruth; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Lander, Eric; Wilson, James G.; Correa, Adolfo; Boerwinkle, Eric; Merlini, Piera Angelica; Ardissino, Diego; Saleheen, Danish; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2017-01-01

    Background About 7% of US adults have severe hypercholesterolemia (untreated LDL cholesterol ≥190 mg/dl). Such high LDL levels may be due to familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a condition caused by a single mutation in any of three genes. Lifelong elevations in LDL cholesterol in FH mutation carriers may confer CAD risk beyond that captured by a single LDL cholesterol measurement. Objectives Assess the prevalence of a FH mutation among those with severe hypercholesterolemia and determine whether CAD risk varies according to mutation status beyond the observed LDL cholesterol. Methods Three genes causative for FH (LDLR, APOB, PCSK9) were sequenced in 26,025 participants from 7 case-control studies (5,540 CAD cases, 8,577 CAD-free controls) and 5 prospective cohort studies (11,908 participants). FH mutations included loss-of-function variants in LDLR, missense mutations in LDLR predicted to be damaging, and variants linked to FH in ClinVar, a clinical genetics database. Results Among 8,577 CAD-free control participants, 430 had LDL cholesterol ≥190 mg/dl; of these, only eight (1.9%) carried a FH mutation. Similarly, among 11,908 participants from 5 prospective cohorts, 956 had LDL cholesterol ≥190 mg/dl and of these, only 16 (1.7%) carried a FH mutation. Within any stratum of observed LDL cholesterol, risk of CAD was higher among FH mutation carriers when compared with non-carriers. When compared to a reference group with LDL cholesterol <130 mg/dl and no mutation, participants with LDL cholesterol ≥190 mg/dl and no FH mutation had six-fold higher risk for CAD (OR 6.0; 95%CI 5.2–6.9) whereas those with LDL cholesterol ≥190 mg/dl as well as a FH mutation demonstrated twenty-two fold increased risk (OR 22.3; 95%CI 10.7–53.2). Conclusions Among individuals with LDL cholesterol ≥190 mg/dl, gene sequencing identified a FH mutation in <2%. However, for any given observed LDL cholesterol, FH mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for CAD

  15. Targeted Sequencing Reveals Large-Scale Sequence Polymorphism in Maize Candidate Genes for Biomass Production and Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses M Muraya

    Full Text Available A major goal of maize genomic research is to identify sequence polymorphisms responsible for phenotypic variation in traits of economic importance. Large-scale detection of sequence variation is critical for linking genes, or genomic regions, to phenotypes. However, due to its size and complexity, it remains expensive to generate whole genome sequences of sufficient coverage for divergent maize lines, even with access to next generation sequencing (NGS technology. Because methods involving reduction of genome complexity, such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS, assess only a limited fraction of sequence variation, targeted sequencing of selected genomic loci offers an attractive alternative. We therefore designed a sequence capture assay to target 29 Mb genomic regions and surveyed a total of 4,648 genes possibly affecting biomass production in 21 diverse inbred maize lines (7 flints, 14 dents. Captured and enriched genomic DNA was sequenced using the 454 NGS platform to 19.6-fold average depth coverage, and a broad evaluation of read alignment and variant calling methods was performed to select optimal procedures for variant discovery. Sequence alignment with the B73 reference and de novo assembly identified 383,145 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, of which 42,685 were non-synonymous alterations and 7,139 caused frameshifts. Presence/absence variation (PAV of genes was also detected. We found that substantial sequence variation exists among genomic regions targeted in this study, which was particularly evident within coding regions. This diversification has the potential to broaden functional diversity and generate phenotypic variation that may lead to new adaptations and the modification of important agronomic traits. Further, annotated SNPs identified here will serve as useful genetic tools and as candidates in searches for phenotype-altering DNA variation. In summary, we demonstrated that sequencing of captured DNA is a powerful

  16. Whole Blood Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Gene Expression Differences between Dapulian and Landrace Piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqing Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is little genomic information regarding gene expression differences at the whole blood transcriptome level of different pig breeds at the neonatal stage. To solve this, we characterized differentially expressed genes (DEGs in the whole blood of Dapulian (DPL and Landrace piglets using RNA-seq (RNA-sequencing technology. In this study, 83 DEGs were identified between the two breeds. Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analyses identified immune response and metabolism as the most commonly enriched terms and pathways in the DEGs. Genes related to immunity and lipid metabolism were more highly expressed in the DPL piglets, while genes related to body growth were more highly expressed in the Landrace piglets. Additionally, the DPL piglets had twofold more single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and alternative splicing (AS than the Landrace piglets. These results expand our knowledge of the genes transcribed in the piglet whole blood of two breeds and provide a basis for future research of the molecular mechanisms underlying the piglet differences.

  17. A unique DNA repair and recombination gene (recN) sequence for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-04-23

    Apr 23, 2013 ... A unique DNA repair and recombination gene (recN) sequence for identification and intraspecific molecular typing of bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and its comparative analysis with ribosomal DNA sequences. AUNDY KUMAR. 1,*, THEKKAN PUTHIYAVEEDU PRAMEELA.

  18. Structural organization of glycophorin A and B genes: Glycophorin B gene evolved by homologous recombination at Alu repeat sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Shinichi; Fukuda, Minoru

    1989-01-01

    Glycophorins A (GPA) and B (GPB) are two major sialoglycoproteins of the human erythrocyte membrane. Here the authors present a comparison of the genomic structures of GPA and GPB developed by analyzing DNA clones isolated from a K562 genomic library. Nucleotide sequences of exon-intron junctions and 5' and 3' flanking sequences revealed that the GPA and GPB genes consist of 7 and 5 exons, respectively, and both genes have >95% identical sequence from the 5' flanking region to the region ∼ 1 kilobase downstream from the exon encoding the transmembrane regions. In this homologous part of the genes, GPB lacks one exon due to a point mutation at the 5' splicing site of the third intron, which inactivates the 5' cleavage event of splicing and leads to ligation of the second to the fourth exon. Following these very homologous sequences, the genomic sequences for GPA and GPB diverge significantly and no homology can be detected in their 3' end sequences. The analysis of the Alu sequences and their flanking direct repeat sequences suggest that an ancestral genomic structure has been maintained in the GPA gene, whereas the GPB gene has arisen from the acquisition of 3' sequences different from those of the GPA gene by homologous recombination at the Alu repeats during or after gene duplication

  19. Role of transcription regulatory sequence in regulation of gene expression and replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengbao; Meng, Han; Gao, Yujin; Gao, Hui; Guo, Kangkang; Almazan, Fernando; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhang, Yanming; Abrahamyan, Levon

    2017-08-10

    In order to gain insight into the role of the transcription regulatory sequences (TRSs) in the regulation of gene expression and replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene, under the control of the different structural gene TRSs, was inserted between the N gene and 3'-UTR of the PRRSV genome and EGFP expression was analyzed for each TRS. TRSs of all the studied structural genes of PRRSV positively modulated EGFP expression at different levels. Among the TRSs analyzed, those of GP2, GP5, M, and N genes highly enhanced EGFP expression without altering replication of PRRSV. These data indicated that structural gene TRSs could be an extremely useful tool for foreign gene expression using PRRSV as a vector.

  20. Gene-based segregation method for identifying rare variants in family-based sequencing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Dandi; Lange, Christoph; Laird, Nan M; Won, Sungho; Hersh, Craig P; Morrow, Jarrett; Hobbs, Brian D; Lutz, Sharon M; Ruczinski, Ingo; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K; Cho, Michael H

    2017-05-01

    Whole-exome sequencing using family data has identified rare coding variants in Mendelian diseases or complex diseases with Mendelian subtypes, using filters based on variant novelty, functionality, and segregation with the phenotype within families. However, formal statistical approaches are limited. We propose a gene-based segregation test (GESE) that quantifies the uncertainty of the filtering approach. It is constructed using the probability of segregation events under the null hypothesis of Mendelian transmission. This test takes into account different degrees of relatedness in families, the number of functional rare variants in the gene, and their minor allele frequencies in the corresponding population. In addition, a weighted version of this test allows incorporating additional subject phenotypes to improve statistical power. We show via simulations that the GESE and weighted GESE tests maintain appropriate type I error rate, and have greater power than several commonly used region-based methods. We apply our method to whole-exome sequencing data from 49 extended pedigrees with severe, early-onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the Boston Early-Onset COPD study (BEOCOPD) and identify several promising candidate genes. Our proposed methods show great potential for identifying rare coding variants of large effect and high penetrance for family-based sequencing data. The proposed tests are implemented in an R package that is available on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/GESE/). © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  1. CLONING AND SEQUENCING OF THE GENE FOR A LACTOCOCCAL ENDOPEPTIDASE, AN ENZYME WITH SEQUENCE SIMILARITY TO MAMMALIAN ENKEPHALINASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierau, Igor; Tan, Paris S.T.; Haandrikman, Alfred J.; Kok, Jan; Leenhouts, Kees J.; Konings, Wil N.; Venema, Gerard

    The gene specifying an endopeptidase of Lactococcus lactis, named pepO, was cloned from a genomic library of L. lactis subsp. cremoris P8-247 in lambdaEMBL3 and was subsequently sequenced. pepO is probably the last gene of an operon encoding the binding-protein-dependent oligopeptide transport

  2. Sequence of the dog immunoglobulin alpha and epsilon constant region genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, M.; Selinger, D.; Mark, G.E.; Hollis, G.F.; Hickey, G.J. [Merck Research Labs., Rathway, NJ (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The immunoglobulin alpha (IGHAC) and epsilon (IGHEC) germline constant region genes were isolated from a dog liver genomic DNA library. Sequence analysis indicates that the dog IGHEC gene is encoded by four exons spread out over 1.7 kilobases (kb). The IGHAC sequence encompasses 1.5 kb and includes all three constant region coding exons. The complete exon/intron sequence of these genes is described. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Exome sequencing and network analysis identifies shared mechanisms underlying spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibbeling, Esther A R; Duarri, Anna; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, Corien C; Fokkens, Michiel R; Karjalainen, Juha M; Smeets, Cleo J L M; de Boer-Bergsma, Jelkje J; van der Vries, Gerben; Dooijes, Dennis; Bampi, Giovana B; van Diemen, Cleo; Brunt, Ewout; Ippel, Elly; Kremer, Berry; Vlak, Monique; Adir, Noam; Wijmenga, Cisca; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Franke, Lude; Sinke, Richard J; Verbeek, Dineke S

    2017-11-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias, referred to as spinocerebellar ataxias in genetic nomenclature, are a rare group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by loss of balance and coordination. Despite the identification of numerous disease genes, a substantial number of cases still remain without a genetic diagnosis. Here, we report five novel spinocerebellar ataxia genes, FAT2, PLD3, KIF26B, EP300, and FAT1, identified through a combination of exome sequencing in genetically undiagnosed families and targeted resequencing of exome candidates in a cohort of singletons. We validated almost all genes genetically, assessed damaging effects of the gene variants in cell models and further consolidated a role for several of these genes in the aetiology of spinocerebellar ataxia through network analysis. Our work links spinocerebellar ataxia to alterations in synaptic transmission and transcription regulation, and identifies these as the main shared mechanisms underlying the genetically diverse spinocerebellar ataxia types. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A next-generation sequencing gene panel (MiamiOtoGenes) for comprehensive analysis of deafness genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Demet; Yan, Denise; Bademci, Guney; Feng, Yong; Guo, Shengru; Foster, Joseph; Blanton, Susan; Tekin, Mustafa; Liu, Xuezhong

    2016-03-01

    Extreme genetic heterogeneity along with remarkable variation in the distribution of causative variants across in different ethnicities makes single gene testing inefficient for hearing loss. We developed a custom capture/next-generation sequencing gene panel of 146 known deafness genes with a total target size of approximately 1 MB. The genes were identified by searching databases including Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage, the Human Genome Mutation Database (HGMD), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and most recent peer-reviewed publications related to the genetics of deafness. The design covered all coding exons, UTRs and 25 bases of intronic flanking sequences for each exon. To validate our panel, we used 6 positive controls with variants in known deafness genes and 8 unsolved samples from individuals with hearing loss. Mean coverage of the targeted exons was 697X. On average, each sample had 99.8%, 96.2% and 92.7% of the targeted region coverage of 1X, 50X and 100X reads, respectively. Analysis detected all known variants in nuclear genes. These results prove the accuracy and reliability of the custom capture experiment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of core gene of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... sequences from Japan are grouped into same cluster in the phylogenetic tree. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic ..... Tree was generated by Neighbor joining algorithm. Boot strap values are shown ... Clustal W: improving the sensitivity of progressive multiple sequence alignment through sequence ...

  6. Divergent evolution and purifying selection of the flaA gene sequences in Aeromonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorén J Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial flagellum is the most important organelle of motility in bacteria and plays a key role in many bacterial lifestyles, including virulence. The flagellum also provides a paradigm of how hierarchical gene regulation, intricate protein-protein interactions and controlled protein secretion can result in the assembly of a complex multi-protein structure tightly orchestrated in time and space. As if to stress its importance, plants and animals produce receptors specifically dedicated to the recognition of flagella. Aside from motility, the flagellum also moonlights as an adhesion and has been adapted by humans as a tool for peptide display. Flagellar sequence variation constitutes a marker with widespread potential uses for studies of population genetics and phylogeny of bacterial species. Results We sequenced the complete flagellin gene (flaA in 18 different species and subspecies of Aeromonas. Sequences ranged in size from 870 (A. allosaccharophila to 921 nucleotides (A. popoffii. The multiple alignment displayed 924 sites, 66 of which presented alignment gaps. The phylogenetic tree revealed the existence of two groups of species exhibiting different FlaA flagellins (FlaA1 and FlaA2. Maximum likelihood models of codon substitution were used to analyze flaA sequences. Likelihood ratio tests suggested a low variation in selective pressure among lineages, with an ω ratio of less than 1 indicating the presence of purifying selection in almost all cases. Only one site under potential diversifying selection was identified (isoleucine in position 179. However, 17 amino acid positions were inferred as sites that are likely to be under positive selection using the branch-site model. Ancestral reconstruction revealed that these 17 amino acids were among the amino acid changes detected in the ancestral sequence. Conclusion The models applied to our set of sequences allowed us to determine the possible evolutionary pathway

  7. Whole-exome sequencing for the identification of susceptibility genes of Kashin-Beck disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxing Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify and investigate the susceptibility genes of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD in Chinese population. METHODS: Whole-exome capturing and sequencing technology was used for the detection of genetic variations in 19 individuals from six families with high incidence of KBD. A total of 44 polymorphisms from 41 genes were genotyped from a total of 144 cases and 144 controls by using MassARRAY under the standard protocol from Sequenom. Association was applied on the data by using PLINK1.07. RESULTS: In the sequencing stage, each sample showed approximately 70-fold coverage, thus covering more than 99% of the target regions. Among the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs used in the transmission disequilibrium test, 108 had a p-value of <0.01, whereas 1056 had a p-value of <0.05. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes(KEGG pathway analysis indicates that these SNPs focus on three major pathways: regulation of actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and metabolic pathways. In the validation stage, single locus effects revealed that two of these polymorphisms (rs7745040 and rs9275295 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DRB1 gene and one polymorphism (rs9473132 in CD2-associated protein (CD2AP gene have a significant statistical association with KBD. CONCLUSIONS: HLA-DRB1 and CD2AP gene were identified to be among the susceptibility genes of KBD, thus supporting the role of the autoimmune response in KBD and the possibility of shared etiology between osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and KBD.

  8. Purifying selection acts on coding and non-coding sequences of paralogous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Robert D; Palmgren, Michael

    2016-06-13

    Whole-genome duplications in the ancestors of many diverse species provided the genetic material for evolutionary novelty. Several models explain the retention of paralogous genes. However, how these models are reflected in the evolution of coding and non-coding sequences of paralogous genes is unknown. Here, we analyzed the coding and non-coding sequences of paralogous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and compared these sequences with those of orthologous genes in Arabidopsis lyrata. Paralogs with lower expression than their duplicate had more nonsynonymous substitutions, were more likely to fractionate, and exhibited less similar expression patterns with their orthologs in the other species. Also, lower-expressed genes had greater tissue specificity. Orthologous conserved non-coding sequences in the promoters, introns, and 3' untranslated regions were less abundant at lower-expressed genes compared to their higher-expressed paralogs. A gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analysis showed that paralogs with similar expression levels were enriched in GO terms related to ribosomes, whereas paralogs with different expression levels were enriched in terms associated with stress responses. Loss of conserved non-coding sequences in one gene of a paralogous gene pair correlates with reduced expression levels that are more tissue specific. Together with increased mutation rates in the coding sequences, this suggests that similar forces of purifying selection act on coding and non-coding sequences. We propose that coding and non-coding sequences evolve concurrently following gene duplication.

  9. Homozygous sequence variants in the WNT10B gene underlie split hand/foot malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmat Ullah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM, also known as ectrodactyly is a rare genetic disorder. It is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of limb malformations characterized by absence/hypoplasia and/or median cleft of hands and/or feet. To date, seven genes underlying SHFM have been identified. This study described four consanguineous families (A-D segregating SHFM in an autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 12p11.1–q13.13 harboring WNT10B gene. Sequence analysis identified a novel homozygous nonsense variant (p.Gln154* in exon 4 of the WNT10B gene in two families (A and B. In the other two families (C and D, a previously reported variant (c.300_306dupAGGGCGG; p.Leu103Argfs*53 was detected. This study further expands the spectrum of the sequence variants reported in the WNT10B gene, which result in the split hand/foot malformation.

  10. RiceGeneThresher: a web-based application for mining genes underlying QTL in rice genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongjuea, Supat; Ruanjaichon, Vinitchan; Bruskiewich, Richard; Vanavichit, Apichart

    2009-01-01

    RiceGeneThresher is a public online resource for mining genes underlying genome regions of interest or quantitative trait loci (QTL) in rice genome. It is a compendium of rice genomic resources consisting of genetic markers, genome annotation, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), protein domains, gene ontology, plant stress-responsive genes, metabolic pathways and prediction of protein-protein interactions. RiceGeneThresher system integrates these diverse data sources and provides powerful web-based applications, and flexible tools for delivering customized set of biological data on rice. Its system supports whole-genome gene mining for QTL by querying using DNA marker intervals or genomic loci. RiceGeneThresher provides biologically supported evidences that are essential for targeting groups or networks of genes involved in controlling traits underlying QTL. Users can use it to discover and to assign the most promising candidate genes in preparation for the further gene function validation analysis. The web-based application is freely available at http://rice.kps.ku.ac.th.

  11. Defining reference sequences for Nocardia species by similarity and clustering analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Helal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intra- and inter-species genetic diversity of bacteria and the absence of 'reference', or the most representative, sequences of individual species present a significant challenge for sequence-based identification. The aims of this study were to determine the utility, and compare the performance of several clustering and classification algorithms to identify the species of 364 sequences of 16S rRNA gene with a defined species in GenBank, and 110 sequences of 16S rRNA gene with no defined species, all within the genus Nocardia. METHODS: A total of 364 16S rRNA gene sequences of Nocardia species were studied. In addition, 110 16S rRNA gene sequences assigned only to the Nocardia genus level at the time of submission to GenBank were used for machine learning classification experiments. Different clustering algorithms were compared with a novel algorithm or the linear mapping (LM of the distance matrix. Principal Components Analysis was used for the dimensionality reduction and visualization. RESULTS: The LM algorithm achieved the highest performance and classified the set of 364 16S rRNA sequences into 80 clusters, the majority of which (83.52% corresponded with the original species. The most representative 16S rRNA sequences for individual Nocardia species have been identified as 'centroids' in respective clusters from which the distances to all other sequences were minimized; 110 16S rRNA gene sequences with identifications recorded only at the genus level were classified using machine learning methods. Simple kNN machine learning demonstrated the highest performance and classified Nocardia species sequences with an accuracy of 92.7% and a mean frequency of 0.578. CONCLUSION: The identification of centroids of 16S rRNA gene sequence clusters using novel distance matrix clustering enables the identification of the most representative sequences for each individual species of Nocardia and allows the quantitation of inter- and intra

  12. Identification of HIV-1 genitourinary tract compartmentalization by analyzing the env gene sequences in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Maria; Carpenter, J Harris; Balakumaran, Bala; Cara, Andrea; Gao, Feng; Klotman, Mary E

    2015-08-24

    HIV-1 persists indefinitely in memory CD4 T cells and other long-lived cellular reservoirs despite antiretroviral therapy. Our group had previously demonstrated that HIV-1 can establish a productive infection in renal epithelial cells and that the kidney represents a separate compartment for HIV-1 replication. Here, to better understand the viruses in this unique site, we genetically characterized and compared the viruses in blood and urine specimens from 24 HIV-1 infected patients with detectable viremia. Blood and urine samples were obtained from 35 HIV-1 positive patients. Single-genome amplification was performed on HIV-1 env RNA and DNA isolated from urine supernatants and urine-derived cell pellets, respectively, as well as from plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell from the same individuals. Neighbor-joining trees were constructed under the Kimura 2-parameter model. We amplified and sequenced the full-length HIV-1 envelope (env) gene from 12 of the 24 individuals, indicating that 50% of the viremic HIV-1-positive patients had viral RNA in their urine. Phylogenetic analysis of the env sequences from four individuals with more than 15 urine-derived env sequences showed that the majority of the sequences from urine formed distinct cluster(s) independent of those peripheral blood mononuclear cell and plasma-derived sequences, consistent with viral compartmentalization in the urine. Our results suggest the presence of a distinct HIV compartment in the genitourinary tract.

  13. Identification of Brassinosteroid Target Genes by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Followed by High-Throughput Sequencing (ChIP-seq) and RNA-Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Trevor; Liu, Sanzhen; Guo, Hongqing; Li, Lei; Schnable, Patrick; Yin, Yanhai

    2017-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many growth and developmental processes. BRs signal to regulate BR-INSENSITIVE1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 (BES1) and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1) transcription factors (TFs), which, in turn, regulate several hundreds of transcription factors (termed BES1/BZR1-targeted TFs or BTFs) and thousands of genes to mediate various BR responses. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) with BES1/BZR1 and BTFs is an important approach to identify BR target genes. In combination with RNA-sequencing experiments, these genomic methods have become powerful tools to detect BR target genes and reveal transcriptional networks underlying BR-regulated processes.

  14. Isolation and characterization of gene sequences expressed in cotton fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taciana de Carvalho Coutinho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cotton fiber are tubular cells which develop from the differentiation of ovule epidermis. In addition to being one of the most important natural fiber of the textile group, cotton fiber afford an excellent experimental system for studying the cell wall. The aim of this work was to isolate and characterise the genes expressed in cotton fiber (Gossypium hirsutum L. to be used in future work in cotton breeding. Fiber of the cotton cultivar CNPA ITA 90 II were used to extract RNA for the subsequent generation of a cDNA library. Seventeen sequences were obtained, of which 14 were already described in the NCBI database (National Centre for Biotechnology Information, such as those encoding the lipid transfer proteins (LTPs and arabinogalactans (AGP. However, other cDNAs such as the B05 clone, which displays homology with the glycosyltransferases, have still not been described for this crop. Nevertheless, results showed that several clones obtained in this study are associated with cell wall proteins, wall-modifying enzymes and lipid transfer proteins directly involved in fiber development.

  15. Targeted Exome Sequencing of Deafness Genes After Failure of Auditory Phenotype-Driven Candidate Gene Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Jik; Kim, Ah Reum; Park, Gibeom; Park, Woong Yang; Chang, Sun O; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-07-01

    To demonstrate the efficacy and advantages of targeted exome sequencing (TES) of known deafness genes in cases with failed or misleading auditory phenotype-driven candidate gene screening. Prospective cohort survey. Otolaryngology department of a tertiary referral hospital. Six hearing-impaired probands with seemingly non-syndromic features from six deaf families were enrolled in this study after failure of genetic diagnosis using auditory phenotype-driven candidate gene screening. TES of known deafness genes was performed in the six probands, and a final causative variant was pursued using subsequent filtering steps. Potential causative variants determined using TES were confirmed by previously introduced filtering steps. We detected causative variants in three (50%) of six families, and these variants were in the COCH, PAX3, and GJB2 genes. Additionally, we also recapitulated the recent finding from other report arguing for the non-pathogenic potential of MYO1A variant. TES of a deafness panel provides a comprehensive genetic screening tool that can be implemented without being misled by the audiogram configuration information and can complement incomplete clinical physical examinations. In addition, the secondary incidental finding obtained by TES contributes useful information regarding the deafness field.

  16. Expression of Nudix hydrolase genes in barley under UV irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sayuri; Sugimoto, Manabu; Kihara, Makoto

    Seed storage and cultivation should be necessary to self-supply foods when astronauts would stay and investigate during long-term space travel and habitation in the bases on the Moon and Mars. Thought the sunlight is the most importance to plants, both as the ultimate energy source and as an environmental signal regulating growth and development, UV presenting the sunlight can damage many aspects of plant processes at the physiological and DNA level. Especially UV-C, which is eliminated by the stratospheric ozone layer, is suspected to be extremely harmful and give a deadly injury to plants in space. However, the defense mechanism against UV-C irradiation damage in plant cells has not been clear. In this study, we investigated the expression of Nudix hydrolases, which defense plants from biotic / abiotic stress, in barley under UV irradiation. The genes encoding the amino acid sequences, which show homology to those of 28 kinds of Nudix hydrolases in Arabidopsis thaliana, were identified in the barley full-length cDNA library. BLAST analysis showed 14 kinds of barley genes (HvNUDX1-14), which encode the Nudix motif sequence. A phylogenetic tree showed that HvNUDX1, HvNUDX7, HvNUDX9 and HvNUDX11 belonged to the ADP-ribose pyrophosphohydrolase, ADP-sugar pyrophosphohydrolase, NAD(P)H pyrophosphohydrolase and FAD pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, respectively, HvNUDX3, HvNUDX6, and HvNUDX8 belonged to the Ap _{n}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX5 and HvNUDX14 belonged to the coenzyme A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX12 and HvNUDX13 belonged to the Ap _{4}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies. Induction of HvNUDX genes by UV-A (340nm), UV-B (312nm), and UV-C (260nm) were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that HvNUDX4 was induced by UV-A and UV-B, HvNUDX6 was induced by UV-B and UV-C, and HvNUDX7 and HvNUDX14 were induced by UV-C, significantly. Our results suggest that the response of HvNUDXs to UV irradiation is different by UV

  17. Transcriptional profiling of protein expression related genes of Pichia pastoris under simulated microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qi

    Full Text Available The physiological responses and transcription profiling of Pichia pastoris GS115 to simulated microgravity (SMG were substantially changed compared with normal gravity (NG control. We previously reported that the recombinant P. pastoris grew faster under SMG than NG during methanol induction phase and the efficiencies of recombinant enzyme production and secretion were enhanced under SMG, which was considered as the consequence of changed transcriptional levels of some key genes. In this work, transcriptiome profiling of P. pastoris cultured under SMG and NG conditions at exponential and stationary phases were determined using next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies. Four categories of 141 genes function as methanol utilization, protein chaperone, RNA polymerase and protein transportation or secretion classified according to Gene Ontology (GO were chosen to be analyzed on the basis of NGS results. And 80 significantly changed genes were weighted and estimated by Cluster 3.0. It was found that most genes of methanol metabolism (85% of 20 genes and protein transportation or secretion (82.2% of 45 genes were significantly up-regulated under SMG. Furthermore the quantity and fold change of up-regulated genes in exponential phase of each category were higher than those of stationary phase. The results indicate that the up-regulated genes of methanol metabolism and protein transportation or secretion mainly contribute to enhanced production and secretion of the recombinant protein under SMG.

  18. Reconstruction of ancestral RNA sequences under multiple structural constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Tremblay-Savard, Olivier; Reinharz, Vladimir; Waldisp?hl, J?r?me

    2016-01-01

    Background Secondary structures form the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) families. An accurate reconstruction of ancestral ncRNAs must use this structural signal. However, the inference of ancestors of a single ncRNA family with a single consensus structure may bias the results towards sequences with high affinity to this structure, which are far from the true ancestors. Methods In this paper, we introduce achARNement, a maximum parsimony approach that, given...

  19. Cloning and sequencing of the bovine gastrin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, T; Rehfeld, J F; Olsen, Jørgen

    1989-01-01

    In order to deduce the primary structure of bovine preprogastrin we therefore sequenced a gastrin DNA clone isolated from a bovine liver cosmid library. Bovine preprogastrin comprises 104 amino acids and consists of a signal peptide, a 37 amino acid spacer-sequence, the gastrin-34 sequence followed...

  20. Cloning, sequence and expression of the pel gene from an Amycolata sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brühlmann, F; Keen, N T

    1997-11-20

    The pel gene from an Amycolata sp. encoding a pectate lyase (EC 4.2.2.2) was isolated by activity screening a genomic DNA library in Streptomyces lividans TK24. Subsequent subcloning and sequencing of a 2.3 kb BamHI BglII fragment revealed an open reading frame of 930 nt corresponding to a protein of 29,660 Da. The overall G + C content for the coding region was 65%, with a strong G + C preference in the third (wobble) codon position (93%). A putative ribosome-binding site 5'-GGGAG-3' preceded the translational start codon by 7 base pairs. The Amycolata pectate lyase contains a signal peptide of 26 amino acids, that is cleaved after the sequence Ala-Thr-Ala. The size of the deduced protein as well as its N-terminal amino-acid sequence match the wild-type pectate lyase from the Amycolata sp. Expression of the pel gene in S. lividans TK24 resulted in high pectate lyase activity in the culture supernatant, concomitant with the appearance of a dominant protein band on a sodium dodecyl polyacrylamide gel at 30 kDa. No pectate lyase activity was detected in E. coli BL21 with the pel gene under the strong T7 promotor. The deduced amino-acid sequence showed 40% identity with PelE from Erwinia chrysanthemi and the pectate lyase from Glomerella cingulata. The Amycolata pectate lyase clearly belongs to the pectate lyase superfamily, sharing all functional amino acids and likely has a similar structural topology as Pels from Erwinia chrysanthemi and Bacillus subtilis.

  1. Effect of long-term exposure to mobile phone radiation on alpha-Int1 gene sequence of Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin-jafari, Ariyo; Bayat, Mansour; Shahhosseiny, Mohammad Hassan; Tajik, Parviz; Roudbar-mohammadi, Shahla

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, communication industries have witnessed a tremendous expansion, while, the biological effects of electromagnetic waves have not been fully elucidated. Current study aimed at evaluating the mutagenic effect of long-term exposure to 900-MHz radiation on alpha-Int1 gene sequences of Candida albicans. A standard 900 MHz radiation generator was used for radiation. 10 ml volumes from a stock suspension of C. albicans were transferred into 10 polystyrene tubes. Five tubes were exposed at 4 °C to a fixed magnitude of radiation with different time periods of 10, 70, 210, 350 and 490 h. The other 5 tubes were kept far enough from radiation. The samples underwent genomic DNA extraction. PCR amplification of alpha-Int1 gene sequence was done using one set of primers. PCR products were resolved using agarose gel electrophoresis and the nucleotide sequences were determined. All samples showed a clear electrophoretic band around 441 bp and further sequencing revealed the amplified DNA segments are related to alpha-Int1 gene of the yeast. No mutations in the gene were seen in radiation exposed samples. Long-term exposure of the yeast to mobile phone radiation under the above mentioned conditions had no mutagenic effect on alpha-Int1 gene sequence. PMID:27081370

  2. Gene length and detection bias in single cell RNA sequencing protocols [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Phipson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq has rapidly gained popularity for profiling transcriptomes of hundreds to thousands of single cells. This technology has led to the discovery of novel cell types and revealed insights into the development of complex tissues. However, many technical challenges need to be overcome during data generation. Due to minute amounts of starting material, samples undergo extensive amplification, increasing technical variability. A solution for mitigating amplification biases is to include unique molecular identifiers (UMIs, which tag individual molecules. Transcript abundances are then estimated from the number of unique UMIs aligning to a specific gene, with PCR duplicates resulting in copies of the UMI not included in expression estimates. Methods: Here we investigate the effect of gene length bias in scRNA-Seq across a variety of datasets that differ in terms of capture technology, library preparation, cell types and species. Results: We find that scRNA-seq datasets that have been sequenced using a full-length transcript protocol exhibit gene length bias akin to bulk RNA-seq data. Specifically, shorter genes tend to have lower counts and a higher rate of dropout. In contrast, protocols that include UMIs do not exhibit gene length bias, with a mostly uniform rate of dropout across genes of varying length. Across four different scRNA-Seq datasets profiling mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs, we found the subset of genes that are only detected in the UMI datasets tended to be shorter, while the subset of genes detected only in the full-length datasets tended to be longer. Conclusions: We find that the choice of scRNA-seq protocol influences the detection rate of genes, and that full-length datasets exhibit gene-length bias. In addition, despite clear differences between UMI and full-length transcript data, we illustrate that full-length and UMI data can be combined to reveal the underlying biology

  3. Cloning and sequencing of phenol oxidase 1 (pox1) gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gene (pox1) encoding a phenol oxidase 1 from Pleurotus ostreatus was sequenced and the corresponding pox1-cDNA was also synthesized, cloned and sequenced. The isolated gene is flanked by an upstream region called the promoter (399 bp) prior to the start codon (ATG). The putative metalresponsive elements ...

  4. Characterization of sulphonamide-resistant Escherichia coli using comparison of sul2 gene sequences and multilocus sequence typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trobos, Margarita; Christensen, Henrik; Sunde, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The sul2 gene encodes sulphonamide resistance (Sul(R)) and is commonly found in Escherichia coli from different hosts. We typed E coli isolates by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and compared the results to sequence variation of sul2, in order to investigate the relation to host origin...... was performed in a subset of isolates. All isolates were divided into 45 different sequence types (STs), with clonal complexes CC10, CC23, CC168, CC350 and CC69 being the most frequent. The sul2 gene from the majority of E coli strains had only two point mutations, at positions 159 and 197, leading...... of pathogenic and commensal E coli strains and to investigate whether transfer of sul2 into different genomic lineages has happened multiple times. Sixty-eight E coli isolated in Denmark and Norway from different hosts and years were MLST typed and sul2 PCR products were sequenced and compared. PFGE...

  5. Human glucagon gene promoter sequences regulating tissue-specific versus nutrient-regulated gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Min; Gu, Jun; Irwin, David M; Drucker, Daniel J

    2002-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptides (GLPs) are synthesized and secreted in a nutrient-dependent manner in rodents; however, the factors regulating human GLP-1 and GLP-2 biosynthesis remain unclear. To understand how nutrients regulate human proglucagon gene expression, we studied the expression of a human proglucagon promoter-growth hormone (GH) transgene in 1.6 human glucagon-GH transgenic mice. Fasting-refeeding significantly decreased and increased the levels of circulating mouse insulin and transgene-derived hGH (P fasting vs. refeeding) and decreased and upregulated, respectively, the levels of endogenous mouse proglucagon RNA in the ileum but not in the jejunum or colon. High-fiber feeding significantly increased the levels of glucose-stimulated circulating hGH and upregulated levels of mouse intestinal proglucagon gene expression in the jejunum, ileum, and colon (P fasting-refeeding nor a high-fiber diet upregulated the expression of the human proglucagon promoter-hGH transgene. These findings demonstrate that human proglucagon gene regulatory sequences specifying tissue-specific expression in gut endocrine cells are not sufficient for recognition of energy-derived signals regulating murine glucagon gene expression in enteroendocrine cells in vivo.

  6. The nucleotide sequence of the Desulfovibrio gigas desulforedoxin gene indicates that the Desulfovibrio vulgaris rbo gene originated from a gene fusion event.

    OpenAIRE

    Brumlik, M J; Leroy, G; Bruschi, M; Voordouw, G

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the rbo gene from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough in Escherichia coli minicells and Western blotting (immunoblotting) of Desulfovibrio cell extracts with antibodies raised against a synthetic peptide indicated the presence of a 14-kDa polypeptide product, as expected from the gene sequence. Cloning and sequencing of the gene (dsr) for desulforedoxin, a 4-kDa redox protein from Desulfovibrio gigas, showed that it is formed by expression of an autonomous gene of 111 bp, not b...

  7. Characterization and Amplification of Gene-Based Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers in Date Palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongli; Keremane, Manjunath; Prakash, Channapatna S; He, Guohao

    2017-01-01

    The paucity of molecular markers limits the application of genetic and genomic research in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.). Availability of expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences in date palm may provide a good resource for developing gene-based markers. This study characterizes a substantial fraction of transcriptome sequences containing simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from the EST sequences in date palm. The EST sequences studied are mainly homologous to those of Elaeis guineensis and Musa acuminata. A total of 911 gene-based SSR markers, characterized with functional annotations, have provided a useful basis not only for discovering candidate genes and understanding genetic basis of traits of interest but also for developing genetic and genomic tools for molecular research in date palm, such as diversity study, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, and molecular breeding. The procedures of DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of these gene-based SSR markers, and gel electrophoresis of PCR products are described in this chapter.

  8. Structural analysis of DNA sequence: evidence for lateral gene transfer in Thermotoga maritima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worning, Peder; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nelson, K. E.

    2000-01-01

    The recently published complete DNA sequence of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima provides evidence, based on protein sequence conservation, for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and Bacteria. We introduce a new method of periodicity analysis of DNA sequences, based on structural parameters......, which brings independent evidence for the lateral gene transfer in the genome of T.maritima, The structural analysis relates the Archaea-like DNA sequences to the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Analysis of 24 complete genomic DNA sequences shows different periodicity patterns for organisms...

  9. Confirmation and Sequence analysis of N gene of PPRV in South Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YongHong Liu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In China, Peste des petits ruminants (PPR was officially first reported in 2007. From 2010 until the outbreak of 2013, PPRV infection was not reported. In November 2013, PPRV re-emerged in Xinjiang and rapidly spread to 22 P/A/M (provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities of China. In the study, suspected PPRV-infected sheep in a breeding farm of South Xinjiang in 2014 were diagnosed and the characteristics of complete sequence of N protein gene of PPRV was analyzed. The sheep showed PPRV-infected signs, such as fever, orinasal secretions increase, dyspnea and diarrhea, with 60% of morbidity and 21.1% of fatality rate. The macroscopic lesions after autopsy and histopathological changes were observed under light microscope including stomatitis, broncho-interstitial pneumonia, catarrhal hemorrhagic enteritis and intracytoplasmic eosinophilic inclusions in multinucleated giantcell in lung. The formalin-fixed mixed tissues samples were positive by nucleic acid extraction and RT-PCR detection. The nucleotide of N protein gene of China/XJNJ/2014 strain was extremely high homology with the China/XJYL/2013 strain, and the highest with PRADESH_95 strain from India in exotic strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on complete sequence of N protein gene of PPRV showed that the China/XJNJ/2014 strain, other strain of 2013-2014 in this study and Tibetan strains all belonged to lineage Ⅳ, but the PPRV strains of 2013-2014 in this study and Tibetan strains were in different sub-branches.

  10. Insert sequence length determines transfection efficiency and gene expression levels in bicistronic mammalian expression vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Andrew J; Gerdes, Bryan C; Kaja, Simon; Koulen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Bicistronic expression vectors have been widely used for co-expression studies since the initial discovery of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) about 25 years ago. IRES sequences allow the 5’ cap-independent initiation of translation of multiple genes on a single messenger RNA strand. Using a commercially available mammalian expression vector containing an IRES sequence with a 3’ green fluorescent protein fluorescent marker, we found that sequence length of the gene of interest expresse...

  11. Three Replicons of Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 Harbor Symbiotic Gene Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Margarita; Mavingui, Patrick; Girard, Lourdes; Perret, Xavier; Broughton, William J.; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Dávila, Guillermo; Palacios, Rafael

    1998-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 contains three replicons: the symbiotic plasmid or pNGR234a, a megaplasmid (pNGR234b), and the chromosome. Symbiotic gene sequences not present in pNGR234a were analyzed by hybridization. DNA sequences homologous to the genes fixLJKNOPQGHIS were found on the chromosome, while sequences homologous to nodPQ and exoBDFLK were found on pNGR234b. PMID:9811668

  12. A second pectin lyase gene (pel2) from Aspergillus oryzae KBN616: its sequence analysis and overexpression, and characterization of the gene products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamoto, N; Yoshino-Yasuda, S; Ohmiya, K; Tsukagoshi, N

    2001-01-01

    A second pectin lyase gene, designated pel2, was isolated from a shoyu koji mold Aspergillus oryzae KBN616 and characterized. The structural gene comprised 1306 bp with three introns. The ORF encoded 375 amino acids with a signal peptide of 19 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to those of A. oryzae Pel1, Aspergillus niger pectin lyases and Glomerella cingulata Pn1A. The pel2 gene was overexpressed under the control of the promoter of the A. oryzae TEF1 gene for purification and enzymatic characterization of its gene product. The gene product exhibited two molecular masses of 48 and 44 kDa due to different degrees of glycosylation. Both proteins had the same pH optimum of 6.0 and temperature optimum of 50 degrees C.

  13. Reconstruction of ancestral RNA sequences under multiple structural constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Tremblay-Savard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary structures form the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of non-coding RNA (ncRNA families. An accurate reconstruction of ancestral ncRNAs must use this structural signal. However, the inference of ancestors of a single ncRNA family with a single consensus structure may bias the results towards sequences with high affinity to this structure, which are far from the true ancestors. Methods In this paper, we introduce achARNement, a maximum parsimony approach that, given two alignments of homologous ncRNA families with consensus secondary structures and a phylogenetic tree, simultaneously calculates ancestral RNA sequences for these two families. Results We test our methodology on simulated data sets, and show that achARNement outperforms classical maximum parsimony approaches in terms of accuracy, but also reduces by several orders of magnitude the number of candidate sequences. To conclude this study, we apply our algorithms on the Glm clan and the FinP-traJ clan from the Rfam database. Conclusions Our results show that our methods reconstruct small sets of high-quality candidate ancestors with better agreement to the two target structures than with classical approaches. Our program is freely available at: http://csb.cs.mcgill.ca/acharnement .

  14. Reconstruction of ancestral RNA sequences under multiple structural constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-Savard, Olivier; Reinharz, Vladimir; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2016-11-11

    Secondary structures form the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) families. An accurate reconstruction of ancestral ncRNAs must use this structural signal. However, the inference of ancestors of a single ncRNA family with a single consensus structure may bias the results towards sequences with high affinity to this structure, which are far from the true ancestors. In this paper, we introduce achARNement, a maximum parsimony approach that, given two alignments of homologous ncRNA families with consensus secondary structures and a phylogenetic tree, simultaneously calculates ancestral RNA sequences for these two families. We test our methodology on simulated data sets, and show that achARNement outperforms classical maximum parsimony approaches in terms of accuracy, but also reduces by several orders of magnitude the number of candidate sequences. To conclude this study, we apply our algorithms on the Glm clan and the FinP-traJ clan from the Rfam database. Our results show that our methods reconstruct small sets of high-quality candidate ancestors with better agreement to the two target structures than with classical approaches. Our program is freely available at: http://csb.cs.mcgill.ca/acharnement .

  15. Cloning and sequencing of the bovine gastrin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, T; Rehfeld, J F; Olsen, Jørgen

    1989-01-01

    In order to deduce the primary structure of bovine preprogastrin we therefore sequenced a gastrin DNA clone isolated from a bovine liver cosmid library. Bovine preprogastrin comprises 104 amino acids and consists of a signal peptide, a 37 amino acid spacer-sequence, the gastrin-34 sequence followed...... by an amidation-site (Gly-Arg-Arg), and a C-terminal nonapeptide. Comparison with human, porcine, and rat cDNA sequences revealed extensive homology in the coding region as well as in short noncoding structures....

  16. Fast and simple protein-alignment-guided assembly of orthologous gene families from microbiome sequencing reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huson, Daniel H; Tappu, Rewati; Bazinet, Adam L; Xie, Chao; Cummings, Michael P; Nieselt, Kay; Williams, Rohan

    2017-01-25

    Microbiome sequencing projects typically collect tens of millions of short reads per sample. Depending on the goals of the project, the short reads can either be subjected to direct sequence analysis or be assembled into longer contigs. The assembly of whole genomes from metagenomic sequencing reads is a very difficult problem. However, for some questions, only specific genes of interest need to be assembled. This is then a gene-centric assembly where the goal is to assemble reads into contigs for a family of orthologous genes. We present a new method for performing gene-centric assembly, called protein-alignment-guided assembly, and provide an implementation in our metagenome analysis tool MEGAN. Genes are assembled on the fly, based on the alignment of all reads against a protein reference database such as NCBI-nr. Specifically, the user selects a gene family based on a classification such as KEGG and all reads binned to that gene family are assembled. Using published synthetic community metagenome sequencing reads and a set of 41 gene families, we show that the performance of this approach compares favorably with that of full-featured assemblers and that of a recently published HMM-based gene-centric assembler, both in terms of the number of reference genes detected and of the percentage of reference sequence covered. Protein-alignment-guided assembly of orthologous gene families complements whole-metagenome assembly in a new and very useful way.

  17. Molecular characterization, sequence analysis and tissue expression of a porcine gene – MOSPD2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The full-length cDNA sequence of a porcine gene, MOSPD2, was amplified using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method based on a pig expressed sequence tag sequence which was highly homologous to the coding sequence of the human MOSPD2 gene. Sequence prediction analysis revealed that the open reading frame of this gene encodes a protein of 491 amino acids that has high homology with the motile sperm domain-containing protein 2 (MOSPD2 of five species: horse (89%, human (90%, chimpanzee (89%, rhesus monkey (89% and mouse (85%; thus, it could be defined as a porcine MOSPD2 gene. This novel porcine gene was assigned GeneID: 100153601. This gene is structured in 15 exons and 14 introns as revealed by computer-assisted analysis. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the porcine MOSPD2 gene has a closer genetic relationship with the MOSPD2 gene of horse. Tissue expression analysis indicated that the porcine MOSPD2 gene is generally and differentially expressed in the spleen, muscle, skin, kidney, lung, liver, fat and heart. Our experiment is the first to establish the primary foundation for further research on the porcine MOSPD2 gene.

  18. De novo assembly, gene annotation, and marker discovery in stored-product pest Liposcelis entomophila (Enderlein using transcriptome sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As a major stored-product pest insect, Liposcelis entomophila has developed high levels of resistance to various insecticides in grain storage systems. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance and environmental stress have not been characterized. To date, there is a lack of genomic information for this species. Therefore, studies aimed at profiling the L. entomophila transcriptome would provide a better understanding of the biological functions at the molecular levels. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied Illumina sequencing technology to sequence the transcriptome of L. entomophila. A total of 54,406,328 clean reads were obtained and that de novo assembled into 54,220 unigenes, with an average length of 571 bp. Through a similarity search, 33,404 (61.61% unigenes were matched to known proteins in the NCBI non-redundant (Nr protein database. These unigenes were further functionally annotated with gene ontology (GO, cluster of orthologous groups of proteins (COG, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG databases. A large number of genes potentially involved in insecticide resistance were manually curated, including 68 putative cytochrome P450 genes, 37 putative glutathione S-transferase (GST genes, 19 putative carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE genes, and other 126 transcripts to contain target site sequences or encoding detoxification genes representing eight types of resistance enzymes. Furthermore, to gain insight into the molecular basis of the L. entomophila toward thermal stresses, 25 heat shock protein (Hsp genes were identified. In addition, 1,100 SSRs and 57,757 SNPs were detected and 231 pairs of SSR primes were designed for investigating the genetic diversity in future. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We developed a comprehensive transcriptomic database for L. entomophila. These sequences and putative molecular markers would further promote our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying

  19. Biased distribution of DNA uptake sequences towards genome maintenance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, T.; Rodland, E.A.; Lagesen, K.

    2004-01-01

    Repeated sequence signatures are characteristic features of all genomic DNA. We have made a rigorous search for repeat genomic sequences in the human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae and found that by far the most frequent 9-10mers residing within...

  20. Cloning and sequencing of the allophycocyanin genes from Spirulina maxima (Cyanophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Song; Hiroyuki, Kojima; Yoshikazu, Kawata; Shin-Ichi, Yano; Zeng, Cheng-Kui

    1998-03-01

    The genes coding for the α-and β-subunit of allophycocyanin ( apcA and apcB) from the cyanophyte Spirulina maxima were cloned and sequenced. The results revealed 44.4% of nucleotide sequence similarity and 30.4% of similarity of deduced amino acid sequence between them. The amino acid sequence identities between S. maxima and S. platensis are 99.4% for α subunit and 100% for β subunit.

  1. Sequencing analysis reveals a unique gene organization in the gyrB region of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    The homolog of the gyrB gene, which has been reported to be present in the vicinity of the initiation site of replication in bacteria, was mapped on the Mycoplasma hominis genome, and the region was subsequently sequenced. Five open reading frames were identified flanking the gyrB gene, one...... of which showed similarity to that which encodes the LicA protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The organization of the genes in the region showed no resemblance to that in the corresponding regions of other bacteria sequenced so far. The gyrA gene was mapped 35 kb downstream from the gyrB gene....

  2. Sequencing analysis reveals a unique gene organization in the gyrB region of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    of which showed similarity to that which encodes the LicA protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The organization of the genes in the region showed no resemblance to that in the corresponding regions of other bacteria sequenced so far. The gyrA gene was mapped 35 kb downstream from the gyrB gene....

  3. Cloning, sequence analysis, and characterization of the genes involved in isoprimeverose metabolism in Lactobacillus pentosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Lokman, B.C.; Leer, R.J.; Posthuma, C.; Postma, P.W.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Two genes, xylP and xylQ, from the xylose regulon of Lactobacillus pentosus were cloned and sequenced. Together with the repressor gene of the regulon, xylR, the xylPQ genes form an operon which is inducible by xylose and which is transcribed from a promoter located 145 bp upstream of xylP. A

  4. Analysis of common SHOX gene sequence variants and ∼4.9-kb ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Solc R., Hirschfeldova K., Kebrdlova V. and Baxova A. 2014 Analysis of common SHOX gene sequence variants and ∼4.9-kb PAR1 deletion in ISS patients. J. Genet. 93, 505–508]. Introduction. Defects of the SHOX gene (short stature homeobox- containing gene), localized in the pseudoautosomal region 1. (PAR1) have ...

  5. Characterization of promoter sequence of toll-like receptor genes in Vechur cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lakshmi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the promoter sequence of toll-like receptor (TLR genes in Vechur cattle, an indigenous breed of Kerala with the sequence of Bos taurus and access the differences that could be attributed to innate immune responses against bovine mastitis. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from Jugular vein of Vechur cattle, maintained at Vechur cattle conservation center of Kerala Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, using an acid-citrate-dextrose anticoagulant. The genomic DNA was extracted, and polymerase chain reaction was carried out to amplify the promoter region of TLRs. The amplified product of TLR2, 4, and 9 promoter regions was sequenced by Sanger enzymatic DNA sequencing technique. Results: The sequence of promoter region of TLR2 of Vechur cattle with the B. taurus sequence present in GenBank showed 98% similarity and revealed variants for four sequence motifs. The sequence of the promoter region of TLR4 of Vechur cattle revealed 99% similarity with that of B. taurus sequence but not reveals significant variant in motifregions. However, two heterozygous loci were observed from the chromatogram. Promoter sequence of TLR9 gene also showed 99% similarity to B. taurus sequence and revealed variants for four sequence motifs. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that significant variation in the promoter of TLR2 and 9 genes in Vechur cattle breed and may potentially link the influence the innate immunity response against mastitis diseases.

  6. Dissection of two soybean QTL conferring partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae through sequence and gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hehe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora sojae is the primary pathogen of soybeans that are grown on poorly drained soils. Race-specific resistance to P. sojae in soybean is gene-for-gene, although in many areas of the US and worldwide there are populations that have adapted to the most commonly deployed resistance to P. sojae ( Rps genes. Hence, this system has received increased attention towards identifying mechanisms and molecular markers associated with partial resistance to this pathogen. Several quantitative trait loci (QTL have been identified in the soybean cultivar ‘Conrad’ that contributes to the expression of partial resistance to multiple P. sojae isolates. Results In this study, two of the Conrad QTL on chromosome 19 were dissected through sequence and expression analysis of genes in both resistant (Conrad and susceptible (‘Sloan’ genotypes. There were 1025 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 87 of 153 genes sequenced from Conrad and Sloan. There were 304 SNPs in 54 genes sequenced from Conrad compared to those from both Sloan and Williams 82, of which 11 genes had SNPs unique to Conrad. Eleven of 19 genes in these regions analyzed with qRT-PCR had significant differences in fold change of transcript abundance in response to infection with P. sojae in lines with QTL haplotype from the resistant parent compared to those with the susceptible parent haplotype. From these, 8 of the 11 genes had SNPs in the upstream, untranslated region, exon, intron, and/or downstream region. These 11 candidate genes encode proteins potentially involved in signal transduction, hormone-mediated pathways, plant cell structural modification, ubiquitination, and basal resistance. Conclusions These findings may indicate a complex defense network with multiple mechanisms underlying these two soybean QTL conferring resistance to P. sojae. SNP markers derived from these candidate genes can contribute to fine mapping of QTL and marker assisted breeding for

  7. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like gene sequences are present in lung patient specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Padilla Cristina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have reported on the presence of Murine Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-like gene sequences in human cancer tissue specimens. Here, we search for MMTV-like gene sequences in lung diseases including carcinomas specimens from a Mexican population. This study was based on our previous study reporting that the INER51 lung cancer cell line, from a pleural effusion of a Mexican patient, contains MMTV-like env gene sequences. Results The MMTV-like env gene sequences have been detected in three out of 18 specimens studied, by PCR using a specific set of MMTV-like primers. The three identified MMTV-like gene sequences, which were assigned as INER6, HZ101, and HZ14, were 99%, 98%, and 97% homologous, respectively, as compared to GenBank sequence accession number AY161347. The INER6 and HZ-101 samples were isolated from lung cancer specimens, and the HZ-14 was isolated from an acute inflammatory lung infiltrate sample. Two of the env sequences exhibited disruption of the reading frame due to mutations. Conclusion In summary, we identified the presence of MMTV-like gene sequences in 2 out of 11 (18% of the lung carcinomas and 1 out of 7 (14% of acute inflamatory lung infiltrate specimens studied of a Mexican Population.

  8. Identification of gene fusion transcripts by transcriptome sequencing in BRCA1-mutated breast cancers and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kevin C H; Lalonde, Emilie; Li, Lili; Cavallone, Luca; Natrajan, Rachael; Lambros, Maryou B; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Hakas, Jarle; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Fenwick, Kerry; Lord, Chris J; Ashworth, Alan; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Basik, Mark; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Majewski, Jacek; Foulkes, William D

    2011-10-27

    Gene fusions arising from chromosomal translocations have been implicated in cancer. However, the role of gene fusions in BRCA1-related breast cancers is not well understood. Mutations in BRCA1 are associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (up to 80% lifetime risk) and ovarian cancer (up to 50%). We sought to identify putative gene fusions in the transcriptomes of these cancers using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We used Illumina sequencing technology to sequence the transcriptomes of five BRCA1-mutated breast cancer cell lines, three BRCA1-mutated primary tumors, two secretory breast cancer primary tumors and one non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cell line. Using a bioinformatics approach, our initial attempt at discovering putative gene fusions relied on analyzing single-end reads and identifying reads that aligned across exons of two different genes. Subsequently, latter samples were sequenced with paired-end reads and at longer cycles (producing longer reads). We then refined our approach by identifying misaligned paired reads, which may flank a putative gene fusion junction. As a proof of concept, we were able to identify two previously characterized gene fusions in our samples using both single-end and paired-end approaches. In addition, we identified three novel in-frame fusions, but none were recurrent. Two of the candidates, WWC1-ADRBK2 in HCC3153 cell line and ADNP-C20orf132 in a primary tumor, were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and RT-PCR. RNA-Seq expression profiling of these two fusions showed a distinct overexpression of the 3' partner genes, suggesting that its expression may be under the control of the 5' partner gene's regulatory elements. In this study, we used both single-end and paired-end sequencing strategies to discover gene fusions in breast cancer transcriptomes with BRCA1 mutations. We found that the use of paired-end reads is an effective tool for transcriptome profiling of gene fusions. Our findings suggest that

  9. Identification of gene fusion transcripts by transcriptome sequencing in BRCA1-mutated breast cancers and cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Kevin CH

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene fusions arising from chromosomal translocations have been implicated in cancer. However, the role of gene fusions in BRCA1-related breast cancers is not well understood. Mutations in BRCA1 are associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (up to 80% lifetime risk and ovarian cancer (up to 50%. We sought to identify putative gene fusions in the transcriptomes of these cancers using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq. Methods We used Illumina sequencing technology to sequence the transcriptomes of five BRCA1-mutated breast cancer cell lines, three BRCA1-mutated primary tumors, two secretory breast cancer primary tumors and one non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cell line. Using a bioinformatics approach, our initial attempt at discovering putative gene fusions relied on analyzing single-end reads and identifying reads that aligned across exons of two different genes. Subsequently, latter samples were sequenced with paired-end reads and at longer cycles (producing longer reads. We then refined our approach by identifying misaligned paired reads, which may flank a putative gene fusion junction. Results As a proof of concept, we were able to identify two previously characterized gene fusions in our samples using both single-end and paired-end approaches. In addition, we identified three novel in-frame fusions, but none were recurrent. Two of the candidates, WWC1-ADRBK2 in HCC3153 cell line and ADNP-C20orf132 in a primary tumor, were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and RT-PCR. RNA-Seq expression profiling of these two fusions showed a distinct overexpression of the 3' partner genes, suggesting that its expression may be under the control of the 5' partner gene's regulatory elements. Conclusions In this study, we used both single-end and paired-end sequencing strategies to discover gene fusions in breast cancer transcriptomes with BRCA1 mutations. We found that the use of paired-end reads is an effective tool for

  10. Comparative genome sequencing of Drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene, and cis-element evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    years (Myr) since the pseudoobscura/melanogaster divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome-wide average, consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than random and nearby sequences......We have sequenced the genome of a second Drosophila species, Drosophila pseudoobscura, and compared this to the genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster, a primary model organism. Throughout evolution the vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same chromosome arm, but within each...... between the species-but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a pattern of repeat-mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high coadaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence...

  11. Cloning and sequence analysis of hyaluronoglucosaminidase (nagH gene of Clostridium chauvoei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K. Dangi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Blackleg disease is caused by Clostridium chauvoei in ruminants. Although virulence factors such as C. chauvoei toxin A, sialidase, and flagellin are well characterized, hyaluronidases of C. chauvoei are not characterized. The present study was aimed at cloning and sequence analysis of hyaluronoglucosaminidase (nagH gene of C. chauvoei. Materials and Methods: C. chauvoei strain ATCC 10092 was grown in ATCC 2107 media and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using the primers specific for 16-23S rDNA spacer region. nagH gene of C. chauvoei was amplified and cloned into pRham-SUMO vector and transformed into Escherichia cloni 10G cells. The construct was then transformed into E. cloni cells. Colony PCR was carried out to screen the colonies followed by sequencing of nagH gene in the construct. Results: PCR amplification yielded nagH gene of 1143 bp product, which was cloned in prokaryotic expression system. Colony PCR, as well as sequencing of nagH gene, confirmed the presence of insert. Sequence was then subjected to BLAST analysis of NCBI, which confirmed that the sequence was indeed of nagH gene of C. chauvoei. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequence showed that it is closely related to Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium paraputrificum. Conclusion: The gene for virulence factor nagH was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector and confirmed by sequencing.

  12. Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Housekeeping Genes and Antigenic Determinant Genes in Bordetella pertussis Strains Isolated in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang-Oun; Moon, Yu Mi; Kim, So-Hyeon; Sung, Hwa Young; Kwon, Seung-Jik; Kang, Yeon Ho; Yu, Jae Yon

    2011-09-01

    To confirm genotype diversities of clinical isolates of Bordetella pertussis and to evaluate the risk of pertussis outbreak in Korea. Seven housekeeping genes and 10 antigenic determinant genes from clinical B. pertussis isolates were analyzed by Multilocus sequence typing (MLST). More variant pattern was observed in antigenic determinant genes. Especially, PtxS1 gene was the most variant gene; five genotypes were observed from eight global genotypes. In the bacterial type, the number of observed sequence types in the isolates was seven and the most frequent form was type 1 (79.6%). This major sequence type also showed a time-dependent transition pattern. Older isolates (1968 and 1975) showed type 1 and 6 in housekeeping genes and antigenic determinant genes, respectively. However, these were changed to type 2 and 1 in isolates 1999-2008. This transition was mainly attributed to genotype change of PtxS1 and Fim3 gene; the tendency of genotype change was to avoid vaccine-derived genotype. In addition, there was second transition in 2009. In this period, only the sequence type of antigenic determinant genes was changed to type 2. Based Upon Related Sequence Types (BURST) analysis confirmed that there were two clonal complexes (ACCI and ACCII) in the Korean isolates. Moreover, the recently increased sequence type was revealed as AST2 derived from AST 3 in ACCI. Genotype changes in Korean distributing strains are still progressing and there was a specific driving force in antigenic determinant genes. Therefore continuous surveillance of genotype change of the distributing strains should be performed to confirm interrelationship of genotype change with vaccine immunity.

  13. Expressed sequence tags of differential genes in the radioresistant mice and their parental mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Yue Jingyin; Li Jin; Song Li; Liu Qiang; Mu Chuanjie; Wu Hongying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore radioresistance correlative genes in IRM-2 inbred mouse. Methods: The total RNA was extracted from spleen cells of IRM-2 and their parent 615 and ICR/JCL mouse. The mRNA differential display technique was used to analyze gene expression differences. Each differential bands were amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced. Results: There were 75 differential expression bands appearing in IRM-2 mouse but not in 615 and ICR/JCL mouse. Fifty-two pieces of cDNA sequences were got by sequencing. Twenty-one expressed sequence tags (EST) that were not the same as known mice genes were found and registered by comparing with GenBank database. Conclusion: Twenty-one EST denote that radioresistance correlative genes may be in IRM-2 mouse, which have laid a foundation for isolating and identifying radioresistance correlative genes in further study. (authors)

  14. Use of H19 Gene Regulatory Sequences in DNA-Based Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

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    V. Scaiewicz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the eighth most common cause of death from cancer in the world, for which palliative treatments are not effective and frequently accompanied by severe side effects. We propose a DNA-based therapy for pancreatic cancer using a nonviral vector, expressing the diphtheria toxin A chain under the control of the H19 gene regulatory sequences. The H19 gene is an oncofetal RNA expressed during embryo development and in several types of cancer. We tested the expression of H19 gene in patients, and found that 65% of human pancreatic tumors analyzed showed moderated to strong expression of the gene. In vitro experiments showed that the vector was effective in reducing Luciferase protein activity on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. In vivo experiment results revealed tumor growth arrest in different animal models for pancreatic cancer. Differences in tumor size between control and treated groups reached a 75% in the heterotopic model (P=.037 and 50% in the orthotopic model (P=.007. In addition, no visible metastases were found in the treated group of the orthotopic model. These results indicate that the treatment with the vector DTA-H19 might be a viable new therapeutic option for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  15. Cloning, sequencing and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms of partial sequence on the porcine CACNA1S gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, XiaoMin; Xu, NingYing; Ren, ShouWen

    2008-04-01

    CACNA1S gene encodes the alpha1 subunit of the calcium channel. The mutation of CACNA1S gene can cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoKPP) and maliglant hyperthermia synarome (MHS) in human beings. Current research on CACNA1S was mainly in human being and model animal, but rarely in livestock and poultry. In this study, Yorkshire pigs (23), Pietrain pigs (30), Jinhua pigs (115) and the second generation (126) of crossbred of Jinhua and Pietrain were used. Primers were designed according to the sequence of human CACNA1S gene and PCR was carried out using pig genome DNA. PCR products were sequenced and compared with that of human, and then single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were investigated by PCR-SSCP, while PCR-RFLP tests were performed to validate the mutations. Results indicated: (1) the 5211 bp DNA fragments of porcine CACNA1S gene were acquired (GenBank accession number: DQ767693 ) and the identity of the exon region was 82.6% between human and pig; (2) fifty-seven mutations were found within the cloned sequences, among which 24 were in exon region; (3) the results of PCR-RFLP were in accordance with that of PCR-SSCP. According to the EST of porcine CACNA1S gene published in GenBank (Bx914582, Bx666997), 8 of the 11 SNPs identified in the present study were consistent with the base difference between two EST fragments.

  16. The Arabidopsis Root Transcriptome by Serial Analysis of Gene Expression. Gene Identification Using the Genome Sequence1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizames, Cécile; Muños, Stéphane; Cazettes, Céline; Nacry, Philippe; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Piquemal, David; Delorme, Valérie; Commes, Thérèse; Doumas, Patrick; Cooke, Richard; Marti, Jacques; Sentenac, Hervé; Gojon, Alain

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale identification of genes expressed in roots of the model plant Arabidopsis was performed by serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), on a total of 144,083 sequenced tags, representing at least 15,964 different mRNAs. For tag to gene assignment, we developed a computational approach based on 26,620 genes annotated from the complete sequence of the genome. The procedure selected warrants the identification of the genes corresponding to the majority of the tags found experimentally, with a high level of reliability, and provides a reference database for SAGE studies in Arabidopsis. This new resource allowed us to characterize the expression of more than 3,000 genes, for which there is no expressed sequence tag (EST) or cDNA in the databases. Moreover, 85% of the tags were specific for one gene. To illustrate this advantage of SAGE for functional genomics, we show that our data allow an unambiguous analysis of most of the individual genes belonging to 12 different ion transporter multigene families. These results indicate that, compared with EST-based tag to gene assignment, the use of the annotated genome sequence greatly improves gene identification in SAGE studies. However, more than 6,000 different tags remained with no gene match, suggesting that a significant proportion of transcripts present in the roots originate from yet unknown or wrongly annotated genes. The root transcriptome characterized in this study markedly differs from those obtained in other organs, and provides a unique resource for investigating the functional specificities of the root system. As an example of the use of SAGE for transcript profiling in Arabidopsis, we report here the identification of 270 genes differentially expressed between roots of plants grown either with NO3- or NH4NO3 as N source. PMID:14730065

  17. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Species classification and sequence accession numbers of amphibian mt genomes used in phylogenetic analyses. Taxon. Species. Family. GenBank no. Archaeobatrachia. Bombina fortinuptialis. Bombinatoridae. AY458591. B. orientalis. Bombinatoridae. AY585338. B. variegata. Bombinatoridae. AY971143. B. maxima.

  18. Transcriptome sequencing of the naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber and identification of hypoxia tolerance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Xiao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The naked mole rat (NMR; Heterocephalus glaber is a small rodent species found in regions of Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia. It has a high tolerance for hypoxia and is thus considered one of the most important natural models for studying hypoxia tolerance mechanisms. The various mechanisms underlying the NMR's hypoxia tolerance are beginning to be understood at different levels of organization, and next-generation sequencing methods promise to expand this understanding to the level of gene expression. In this study, we examined the sequence and transcript abundance data of the muscle transcriptome of NMRs exposed to hypoxia using the Illumina HiSeq 2500 system to clarify the possible genomic adaptive responses to the hypoxic underground surroundings. The RNA-seq raw FastQ data were mapped against the NMR genome. We identified 2337 differentially expressed genes (DEGs by comparison of the hypoxic and control groups. Functional annotation of the DEGs by gene ontology (GO analysis revealed enrichment of hypoxia stress-related GO categories, including ‘biological regulation’, ‘cellular process’, ‘ion transport’ and ‘cell-cell signaling’. Enrichment of DEGs in signaling pathways was analyzed against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG database to identify possible interactions between DEGs. The results revealed significant enrichment of DEGs in focal adhesion, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway and the glycine, serine and threonine metabolism pathway. Furthermore, inhibition of DEGs (STMN1, MAPK8IP1 and MAPK10 expression induced apoptosis and arrested cell growth in NMR fibroblasts following hypoxia. Thus, this global transcriptome analysis of NMRs can provide an important genetic resource for the study of hypoxia tolerance in mammals. Furthermore, the identified DEGs may provide important molecular targets for biomedical research into therapeutic strategies for stroke and cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Genomic sequence and organization of two members of a human lectin gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitt, M.A.; Barondes, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced the genomic DNA encoding a human dimeric soluble lactose-binding lectin. The gene has four exons, and its upstream region contains sequences that suggest control by glucocorticoids, heat (environmental) shock, metals, and other factors. They have also isolated and sequenced three exons of the gene encoding another human putative lectin, the existence of which was first indicated by isolation of its cDNA. Comparisons suggest a general pattern of genomic organization of members of this lectin gene family

  20. Cyanobacteria gene and protein sequences in diurnal oscillation metabolic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremberger, George, Jr.; Holden, T.; Cheung, E.; Dehipawala, S.; Gadura, N.; Golebiewska, U.; Valentin, K.; Smulczeski, M.; Satizabal, W.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2010-09-01

    Daytime photosynthesis and nighttime nitrogen fixation metabolic processes have been reported in the bacterium, Cyanothece 51142. The organism's auto-fluorescence with 532 nm excitation would place cyanobacteria at the forefront in the remote sensing of microbial activity in astrobiology. The sensitivity of nitrogenase to oxygen was studied in terms of sequence nucleotide fluctuation. A nucleotide sequence fractal dimension can be calculated from a numerical series consisting of the atomic numbers of each nucleotide. The fractal dimension and Shannon entropy form a two-dimensional measure that is useful in assessing evolutionary pressures. The studied sequences include nitrogenase iron protein NifH, nitrogenase molybdenum-iron protein alpha chain NifD and beta chain NifK. The photosynthesis-lacking UCYN-A cyanobacterium as reported recently in the journal, Nature, was observed to have the lowest entropy with relatively high fractal dimension values in the studied NifH, NifD and NifH sequences. The fractal dimension of NifH sequences correlates with the NifD sequence values with an R-square of 0.91 (N = 8). The Shannon mononucleotide entropy of NifD sequences correlates with the NifK sequence values with an R-square value of 0.92 (N = 8). The observed strong correlation suggests the presence of gradual evolutionary pressure among the studied cyanobacteria, and throws light on the reported paradox in evolution for the case of UCYN-A. The results show that diurnal oscillation metabolic processes in cyanobacteria (including the photosynthesis-deficient case) are not associated with extraordinary evolutionary pressures and thus are processes consistent with putative astrobiological organisms.

  1. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes' encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired "safe" harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in plant

  2. De novo transcriptome sequencing of Isaria cateniannulata and comparative analysis of gene expression in response to heat and cold stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingfeng Wang

    Full Text Available Isaria cateniannulata is a very important and virulent entomopathogenic fungus that infects many insect pest species. Although I. cateniannulata is commonly exposed to extreme environmental temperature conditions, little is known about its molecular response mechanism to temperature stress. Here, we sequenced and de novo assembled the transcriptome of I. cateniannulata in response to high and low temperature stresses using Illumina RNA-Seq technology. Our assembly encompassed 17,514 unigenes (mean length = 1,197 bp, in which 11,445 unigenes (65.34% showed significant similarities to known sequences in NCBI non-redundant protein sequences (Nr database. Using digital gene expression analysis, 4,483 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified after heat treatment, including 2,905 up-regulated genes and 1,578 down-regulated genes. Under cold stress, 1,927 DEGs were identified, including 1,245 up-regulated genes and 682 down-regulated genes. The expression patterns of 18 randomly selected candidate DEGs resulting from quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR were consistent with their transcriptome analysis results. Although DEGs were involved in many pathways, we focused on the genes that were involved in endocytosis: In heat stress, the pathway of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE was active; however at low temperature stresses, the pathway of clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE was active. Besides, four categories of DEGs acting as temperature sensors were observed, including cell-wall-major-components-metabolism-related (CWMCMR genes, heat shock protein (Hsp genes, intracellular-compatible-solutes-metabolism-related (ICSMR genes and glutathione S-transferase (GST. These results enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of I. cateniannulata in response to temperature stresses and provide a valuable resource for the future investigations.

  3. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of the human and mouse cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Jamison, D. Curtis; Touchman, Jeffrey W.; Chissoe, Stephanie L.; Braden Maduro, Valerie V.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Dietrich, Nicole L.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Iyer, Leslie M.; Weintraub, Lauren A.; Cotton, Marc; Courtney, Laura; Edwards, Jennifer; Maupin, Rachel; Ozersky, Philip; Rohlfing, Theresa; Wohldmann, Patricia; Miner, Tracie; Kemp, Kimberley; Kramer, Jason; Korf, Ian; Pepin, Kimberlie; Antonacci-Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert S.; Minx, Patrick; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Wilson, Richard K.; Waterston, Robert H.; Miller, Webb; Green, Eric D.

    2000-01-01

    The identification of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) in 1989 represents a landmark accomplishment in human genetics. Since that time, there have been numerous advances in elucidating the function of the encoded protein and the physiological basis of cystic fibrosis. However, numerous areas of cystic fibrosis biology require additional investigation, some of which would be facilitated by information about the long-range sequence context of the CFTR gene. For example, the latter might provide clues about the sequence elements responsible for the temporal and spatial regulation of CFTR expression. We thus sought to establish the sequence of the chromosomal segments encompassing the human CFTR and mouse Cftr genes, with the hope of identifying conserved regions of biologic interest by sequence comparison. Bacterial clone-based physical maps of the relevant human and mouse genomic regions were constructed, and minimally overlapping sets of clones were selected and sequenced, eventually yielding ≈1.6 Mb and ≈358 kb of contiguous human and mouse sequence, respectively. These efforts have produced the complete sequence of the ≈189-kb and ≈152-kb segments containing the human CFTR and mouse Cftr genes, respectively, as well as significant amounts of flanking DNA. Analyses of the resulting data provide insights about the organization of the CFTR/Cftr genes and potential sequence elements regulating their expression. Furthermore, the generated sequence reveals the precise architecture of genes residing near CFTR/Cftr, including one known gene (WNT2/Wnt2) and two previously unknown genes that immediately flank CFTR/Cftr. PMID:10655503

  4. Sequence Variation in Toxoplasma gondii rop17 Gene among Strains from Different Hosts and Geographical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian-Zhang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity of T. gondii is a concern of many studies, due to the biological and epidemiological diversity of this parasite. The present study examined sequence variation in rhoptry protein 17 (ROP17 gene among T. gondii isolates from different hosts and geographical regions. The rop17 gene was amplified and sequenced from 10 T. gondii strains, and phylogenetic relationship among these T. gondii strains was reconstructed using maximum parsimony (MP, neighbor-joining (NJ, and maximum likelihood (ML analyses. The partial rop17 gene sequences were 1375 bp in length and A+T contents varied from 49.45% to 50.11% among all examined T. gondii strains. Sequence analysis identified 33 variable nucleotide positions (2.1%, 16 of which were identified as transitions. Phylogeny reconstruction based on rop17 gene data revealed two major clusters which could readily distinguish Type I and Type II strains. Analyses of sequence variations in nucleotides and amino acids among these strains revealed high ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous polymorphisms (>1, indicating that rop17 shows signs of positive selection. This study demonstrated the existence of slightly high sequence variability in the rop17 gene sequences among T. gondii strains from different hosts and geographical regions, suggesting that rop17 gene may represent a new genetic marker for population genetic studies of T. gondii isolates.

  5. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  6. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of partial CXCR2 gene of Murrah buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Wani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Present study was carried out to sequence and phylogenetic analysis of CXCR2 gene of Murrah buffalo. Materials and Methods: For the present investigation, from a group of forty eight Murrah buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis, blood samples were collected randomly from eight animals, out of which four were healthy and four were mastitic. Results: The amplification of Interleukin-8B (IL-8B receptor gene target sequence was carried out using the primer pair in an optimized polymerase chain reaction. Partial sequencing of IL-8B receptor gene of Bubalus bubalis (Murrah has been done successfully. The sequences of IL-8B receptor gene showed 99% homology to that of Bos indicus × Bos taurus, 98% to that of Bos taurus, 97% to that of Ovis aries, 93% to that of Sus scrofa, 92% to that of Equus caballus and 90% to that of Felis catus. Conclusion: From the present study it can be concluded that the PCR amplification procedure for target region of IL-8B receptor gene yielding 459 bp products has been standardized, which yielded consistent and specific amplification. Amplification of partial IL-8B receptor gene (exon 2- 459 bp using self designed primers specific for cattle ortholog sequence signifies that the locus is conserved in cattle and buffaloes. In phylogenetic tree, the target sequence of IL-8B receptor gene of Bubalus bubalis were found to be more closely related to Bos indicus × Bos Taurus and Bos taurus than to Ovis aries and Sus scrofa.

  7. Evolution of the RH gene family in vertebrates revealed by brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami) genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akinori; Komata, Hidero; Iwashita, Shogo; Seto, Shotaro; Ikeya, Hironobu; Tabata, Mitsutoshi; Kitano, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    In vertebrates, there are four major genes in the RH (Rhesus) gene family, RH, RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG. These genes are thought to have been formed by the two rounds of whole-genome duplication (2R-WGD) in the common ancestor of all vertebrates. In our previous work, where we analyzed details of the gene duplications process of this gene family, three nucleotide sequences belonging to this family were identified in Far Eastern brook lamprey (Lethenteron reissneri), and the phylogenetic positions of the genes were determined. Lampreys, along with hagfishes, are cyclostomata (jawless fishes), which is a sister group of gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates). Although those results suggested that one gene was orthologous to the gnathostome RHCG genes, we did not identify clear orthologues for other genes. In this study, therefore, we identified three novel cDNA sequences that belong to the RH gene family using de novo transcriptome analysis of another cyclostome: the brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami). We also determined the nucleotide sequences for the RHBG and RHCG genes in a red stingray (Dasyatis akajei), which belongs to the cartilaginous fishes. The phylogenetic tree showed that two brown hagfish genes, which were probably duplicated in the cyclostome lineage, formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHAG genes, whereas another brown hagfish gene formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHCG genes. We estimated that the RH genes had a higher evolutionary rate than the RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG genes. Interestingly, in the RHBG genes, only the bird lineage showed a higher rate of nonsynonymous substitutions. It is likely that this higher rate was caused by a state of relaxed functional constraints rather than positive selection nor by pseudogenization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of MALDI-TOF MS, housekeeping gene sequencing, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing for identification of Aeromonas clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Bong; Yoon, Jihoon; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Myung Sook; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-03-01

    The genus Aeromonas is a pathogen that is well known to cause severe clinical illnesses, ranging from gastroenteritis to sepsis. Accurate identification of A. hydrophila, A. caviae, and A. veronii is important for the care of patients. However, species identification remains difficult using conventional methods. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different methods of identifying Aeromonas at the species level: a biochemical method, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S rRNA sequencing, and housekeeping gene sequencing (gyrB, rpoB). We analyzed 65 Aeromonas isolates recovered from patients at a university hospital in Korea between 1996 and 2012. The isolates were recovered from frozen states and tested using the following four methods: a conventional biochemical method, 16S rRNA sequencing, housekeeping gene sequencing with phylogenetic analysis, and MALDI-TOF MS. The conventional biochemical method and 16S rRNA sequencing identified Aeromonas at the genus level very accurately, although species level identification was unsatisfactory. MALDI-TOF MS system correctly identified 60 (92.3%) isolates at the species level and an additional four (6.2%) at the genus level. Overall, housekeeping gene sequencing with phylogenetic analysis was found to be the most accurate in identifying Aeromonas at the species level. The most accurate method of identification of Aeromonas to species level is by housekeeping gene sequencing, although high cost and technical difficulty hinder its usage in clinical settings. An easy-to-use identification method is needed for clinical laboratories, for which MALDI-TOF MS could be a strong candidate.

  9. Identification of salt-induced genes from Salicornia brachiata, an extreme halophyte through expressed sequence tags analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Bhavanath; Agarwal, Pradeep K; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Lal, Sanjay; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2009-04-01

    Salinity severely affects plant growth and development causing crop loss worldwide. We have isolated a large number of salt-induced genes as well as unknown and hypothetical genes from Salicornia brachiata Roxb. (Amaranthaceae). This is the first description of identification of genes in response to salinity stress in this extreme halophyte plant. Salicornia accumulates salt in its pith and survives even at 2 M NaCl under field conditions. For isolating salt responsive genes, cDNA subtractive hybridization was performed between control and 500 mM NaCl treated plants. Out of the 1200 recombinant clones, 930 sequences were submitted to the NCBI database (GenBank accession: EB484528 to EB485289 and EC906125 to EC906292). 789 ESTs showed matching with different genes in NCBI database. 4.8% ESTs belonged to stress-tolerant gene category and approximately 29% ESTs showed no homology with known functional gene sequences, thus classified as unknown or hypothetical. The detection of a large number of ESTs with unknown putative function in this species makes it an interesting contribution. The 90 unknown and hypothetical genes were selected to study their differential regulation by reverse Northern analysis for identifying their role in salinity tolerance. Interestingly, both up and down regulation at 500 mM NaCl were observed (21 and 10 genes, respectively). Northern analysis of two important salt tolerant genes, ASR1 (Abscisic acid stress ripening gene) and plasma membrane H+ATPase, showed the basal level of transcripts in control condition and an increase with NaCl treatment. ASR1 gene is made full length using 5' RACE and its potential role in imparting salt tolerance is being studied.

  10. Third-Generation Sequencing and Analysis of Four Complete Pig Liver Esterase Gene Sequences in Clones Identified by Screening BAC Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiongqiong; Sun, Wenjuan; Liu, Xiyan; Wang, Xiliang; Xiao, Yuncai; Bi, Dingren; Yin, Jingdong; Shi, Deshi

    2016-01-01

    Pig liver carboxylesterase (PLE) gene sequences in GenBank are incomplete, which has led to difficulties in studying the genetic structure and regulation mechanisms of gene expression of PLE family genes. The aim of this study was to obtain and analysis of complete gene sequences of PLE family by screening from a Rongchang pig BAC library and third-generation PacBio gene sequencing. After a number of existing incomplete PLE isoform gene sequences were analysed, primers were designed based on conserved regions in PLE exons, and the whole pig genome used as a template for Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Specific primers were then selected based on the PCR amplification results. A three-step PCR screening method was used to identify PLE-positive clones by screening a Rongchang pig BAC library and PacBio third-generation sequencing was performed. BLAST comparisons and other bioinformatics methods were applied for sequence analysis. Five PLE-positive BAC clones, designated BAC-10, BAC-70, BAC-75, BAC-119 and BAC-206, were identified. Sequence analysis yielded the complete sequences of four PLE genes, PLE1, PLE-B9, PLE-C4, and PLE-G2. Complete PLE gene sequences were defined as those containing regulatory sequences, exons, and introns. It was found that, not only did the PLE exon sequences of the four genes show a high degree of homology, but also that the intron sequences were highly similar. Additionally, the regulatory region of the genes contained two 720bps reverse complement sequences that may have an important function in the regulation of PLE gene expression. This is the first report to confirm the complete sequences of four PLE genes. In addition, the study demonstrates that each PLE isoform is encoded by a single gene and that the various genes exhibit a high degree of sequence homology, suggesting that the PLE family evolved from a single ancestral gene. Obtaining the complete sequences of these PLE genes provides the necessary foundation for

  11. Tsukamurella pulmonis Bloodstream Infection Identified by secA1 Gene Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada C.; Cano, María E.; García de la Fuente, Celia; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; López, Mónica; Fernández-Mazarrasa, Carlos; Agüero, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent bloodstream infections caused by a Gram-positive bacterium affected an immunocompromised child. Tsukamurella pulmonis was the microorganism identified by secA1 gene sequencing. Antibiotic treatment in combination with removal of the subcutaneous port healed the patient.

  12. Isolation and sequencing of the cryIC-like delta endotoxin gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and sequencing of the cryIC-like delta endotoxin gene from Egyptian strains of Bacillus thuringiensis toxic against Lepidoptera. ME Elkashef, AM Heikal, MEDM Solliman, MI Kobeasy, HA El-Shemy ...

  13. Species-specific genes under selection characterize the co-evolution of slavemaker and host lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmeyer, B; Elsner, D; Alleman, A; Foitzik, S

    2017-12-04

    The transition to a parasitic lifestyle entails comprehensive changes to the selective regime. In parasites, genes encoding for traits that facilitate host detection, exploitation and transmission should be under selection. Slavemaking ants are social parasites that exploit the altruistic behaviour of their hosts by stealing heterospecific host brood during raids, which afterwards serve as slaves in slavemaker nests. Here we search for evidence of selection in the transcriptomes of three slavemaker species and three closely related hosts. We expected selection on genes underlying recognition and raiding or defense behaviour. Analyses of selective forces in species with a slavemaker or host lifestyle allowed investigation into whether or not repeated instances of slavemaker evolution share the same genetic basis. To investigate the genetic basis of host-slavemaker co-evolution, we created orthologous clusters from transcriptome sequences of six Temnothorax ant species - three slavemakers and three hosts - to identify genes with signatures of selection. We further tested for functional enrichment in selected genes from slavemakers and hosts respectively and investigated which pathways the according genes belong to. Our phylogenetic analysis, based on more than 5000 ortholog sequences, revealed sister species status for two slavemakers as well as two hosts, contradicting a previous phylogeny based on mtDNA. We identified 309 genes with signs of positive selection on branches leading to slavemakers and 161 leading to hosts. Among these were genes potentially involved in cuticular hydrocarbon synthesis, thus species recognition, and circadian clock functionality possibly explaining the different activity patterns of slavemakers and hosts. There was little overlap of genes with signatures of positive selection among species, which are involved in numerous different functions and different pathways. We identified different genes, functions and pathways under positive

  14. De Novo Sequencing-Based Transcriptome and Digital Gene Expression Analysis Reveals Insecticide Resistance-Relevant Genes in Propylaea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptea: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Feng-Liang; Qiu, Bao-Li; Wu, Jian-Hui; Ren, Shun-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The ladybird Propylaea japonica (Thunberg) is one of most important natural enemies of aphids in China. This species is threatened by the extensive use of insecticides but genomics-based information on the molecular mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance is limited. Hence, we analyzed the transcriptome and expression profile data of P. japonica in order to gain a deeper understanding of insecticide resistance in ladybirds. We performed de novo assembly of a transcriptome using Illumina's Solexa sequencing technology and short reads. A total of 27,243,552 reads were generated. These were assembled into 81,458 contigs and 33,647 unigenes (6,862 clusters and 26,785 singletons). Of the unigenes, 23,965 (71.22%) have putative homologues in the non-redundant (nr) protein database from NCBI, using BLASTX, with a cut-off E-value of 10−5. We examined COG, GO and KEGG annotations to better understand the functions of these unigenes. Digital gene expression (DGE) libraries showed differences in gene expression profiles between two insecticide resistant strains. When compared with an insecticide susceptible profile, a total of 4,692 genes were significantly up- or down- regulated in a moderately resistant strain. Among these genes, 125 putative insecticide resistance genes were identified. To confirm the DGE results, 16 selected genes were validated using quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). This study is the first to report genetic information on P. japonica and has greatly enriched the sequence data for ladybirds. The large number of gene sequences produced from the transcriptome and DGE sequencing will greatly improve our understanding of this important insect, at the molecular level, and could contribute to the in-depth research into insecticide resistance mechanisms. PMID:24959827

  15. De novo sequencing-based transcriptome and digital gene expression analysis reveals insecticide resistance-relevant genes in Propylaea japonica (Thunberg (Coleoptea: Coccinellidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-De Tang

    Full Text Available The ladybird Propylaea japonica (Thunberg is one of most important natural enemies of aphids in China. This species is threatened by the extensive use of insecticides but genomics-based information on the molecular mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance is limited. Hence, we analyzed the transcriptome and expression profile data of P. japonica in order to gain a deeper understanding of insecticide resistance in ladybirds. We performed de novo assembly of a transcriptome using Illumina's Solexa sequencing technology and short reads. A total of 27,243,552 reads were generated. These were assembled into 81,458 contigs and 33,647 unigenes (6,862 clusters and 26,785 singletons. Of the unigenes, 23,965 (71.22% have putative homologues in the non-redundant (nr protein database from NCBI, using BLASTX, with a cut-off E-value of 10(-5. We examined COG, GO and KEGG annotations to better understand the functions of these unigenes. Digital gene expression (DGE libraries showed differences in gene expression profiles between two insecticide resistant strains. When compared with an insecticide susceptible profile, a total of 4,692 genes were significantly up- or down- regulated in a moderately resistant strain. Among these genes, 125 putative insecticide resistance genes were identified. To confirm the DGE results, 16 selected genes were validated using quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR. This study is the first to report genetic information on P. japonica and has greatly enriched the sequence data for ladybirds. The large number of gene sequences produced from the transcriptome and DGE sequencing will greatly improve our understanding of this important insect, at the molecular level, and could contribute to the in-depth research into insecticide resistance mechanisms.

  16. Transcriptome analysis of Emiliania huxleyi cells grown under different conditions using high-throughput sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreson, R.; Anlauf, H.; Mackinder, L.; Iglesias-Rodriguez, D.; LaRoche, J.; Lenhard, B.

    2012-04-01

    Coccolithophores are ideal for studying genes responsible for biomineralization processes due to relatively small genome sizes, ability to grow in culture, and as a natural model system for measuring expression of calcification-related genes in two life stages. As the Emiliania huxleyi has several annotated calcification-related proteins, we have concentrated on analyzing its genes and promoter areas. Many recent studies have focused primarily on transcriptome analysis of E. huxleyi using nutrient-limited conditions to get more information about up-regulated genes involved in biomineralization and calcification processes. Although there are more than 100,000 EST sequences for E. huxleyi available from these projects in public databases, that data is often insufficient to identify the exact position of transcription start site (TSS) to perform precise analysis (nucleotide content, motif search) of core promoters and regulatory mechanisms in immediate flanking areas. ESTs are not ideal for these kinds of analyses because the standard technologies of producing 5' EST libraries do not guarantee that the exact 5' end of the transcript will be captured. To determine the extent and accurate positions of 5' ends of transcripts and therefore the positions of core promoters, Cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) sequencing method was used for sequencing RNA of E. huxleyi in both stages, calcifying and non-calcifying. As an additional info, gene expression levels of RNA for 21 samples were retrieved with whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-Seq). The collections of reads these methods produced were used to map and annotate genes on several samples and measure the RNA expression levels in different conditions. Although there are not much data available for close organisms, it is possible to compare these results with other species to find conserved regulatory mechanisms between genes related to calcification. Visualization tools allowing browsing of annotated genes

  17. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Kojun; Pflug, James M; Sproul, John S; Dasenko, Mark A; Maddison, David R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  18. Detection bias in microarray and sequencing transcriptomic analysis identified by housekeeping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yijuan; Akintola, Oluwafemi S; Liu, Ken J A; Sun, Bingyun

    2016-03-01

    This work includes the original data used to discover the gene ontology bias in transcriptomic analysis conducted by microarray and high throughput sequencing (Zhang et al., 2015) [1]. In the analysis, housekeeping genes were used to examine the differential detection ability by microarray and sequencing because these genes are probably the most reliably detected. The genes included here were compiled from 15 human housekeeping gene studies. The provided tables here comprise of detailed chromosomal location, detection breadth, normalized expression level, exon count, total exon length, and total intron length of each concerned gene and their related transcripts. We hope this information can help researchers better understand the differences in gene ontology-bias we discussed (Zhang et al., 2015) [1] and can encourage further improvement on these two technology platforms.

  19. Estimating variation within the genes and inferring the phylogeny of 186 sequenced diverse Escherichia coli genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Rundsten, Carsten Friis; Ussery, David

    2012-01-01

    for creating better phylogenies, for determination of molecular clocks and for improved typing techniques. Results We find 3,051 gene clusters/families present in at least 95% of the genomes and 1,702 gene clusters present in 100% of the genomes. The former 'soft core' of about 3,000 gene families is perhaps...... more biologically relevant, especially considering that many of these genome sequences are draft quality. The E. coli pan-genome for this set of isolates contains 16,373 gene clusters. A core-gene tree, based on alignment and a pan-genome tree based on gene presence/absence, maps the relatedness...... of the 186 sequenced E. coli genomes. The core-gene tree displays high confidence and divides the E. coli strains into the observed MLST type clades and also separates defined phylotypes. Conclusion The results of comparing a large and diverse E. coli dataset support the theory that reliable and good...

  20. Profiling dehydrin gene sequence and physiological parameters in drought tolerant and susceptible spring wheat cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, M.J.; Jatoi, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Physiological and yield traits such as stomatal conductance (mmol m-/sup 2/s/sup -1/), Leaf relative water content (RWC %) and grain yield per plant were studied in a separate experiment. Results revealed that five out of sixteen cultivars viz. Anmol, Moomal, Sarsabz, Bhitai and Pavan, appeared to be relatively more drought tolerant. Based on morphophysiological results, studies were continued to look at these cultivars for drought tolerance at molecular level. Initially, four well recognized primers for dehydrin genes (DHNs) responsible for drought induction in T. durum L., T. aestivum L. and O. sativa L. were used for profiling gene sequence of sixteen wheat cultivars. The primers amplified the DHN genes variably like Primer WDHN13 (T. aestivum L.) amplified the DHN gene in only seven cultivars whereas primer TdDHN15 ( T. durum L.) amplified all the sixteen cultivars with even different DNA banding patterns some showing second weaker DNA bands. Third primer TdDHN16 (T. durum L.) has shown entirely different PCR amplification prototype, specially showing two strong DNA bands while fourth primer RAB16C (O. sativa L.) failed to amplify DHN gene in any of the cultivars. Examination of DNA sequences revealed several interesting features. First, it identified the two exon/one intron structure of this gene (complete sequences were not shown), a feature not previously described in the two database cDNA sequences available from T. aestivum L. (gi|21850). Secondly, the analysis identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), positions in gene sequence. Although complete gene sequence was not obtained for all the cultivars, yet there were a total of 38 variable positions in exonic (coding region) sequence, from a total gene length of 453 nucleotides. Matrix of SNP shows these 37 positions with individual sequence at positions given for each of the 14 cultivars (sequence of two cultivars was not obtained) included in this analysis. It demonstrated a considerab le

  1. Identification of cancer/testis-antigen genes by massively parallel signature sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yao-Tseng; Scanlan, Matthew J.; Venditti, Charis A.; Chua, Ramon; Theiler, Gregory; Stevenson, Brian J.; Iseli, Christian; Gure, Ali O.; Vasicek, Tom; Strausberg, Robert L.; Jongeneel, C. Victor; Old, Lloyd J.; Simpson, Andrew J. G.

    2005-01-01

    Massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) generates millions of short sequence tags corresponding to transcripts from a single RNA preparation. Most MPSS tags can be unambiguously assigned to genes, thereby generating a comprehensive expression profile of the tissue of origin. From the comparison of MPSS data from 32 normal human tissues, we identified 1,056 genes that are predominantly expressed in the testis. Further evaluation by using MPSS tags from cancer cell lines and EST data fro...

  2. A complex array of Hpr consensus DNA recognition sequences proximal to the enterotoxin gene in Clostridium perfringens type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynestad, S; Iwanejko, L A; Stewart, G S; Granum, P E

    1994-01-01

    Enterotoxin production in Clostridium perfringens is both strain dependent and sporulation associated. Underlying these phenotypic observations must lie a genetic and molecular explanation and the principal keys will be held within the DNA sequence both upstream and downstream of the structural gene cpe. In accordance with the above we have sequenced 4.1 kbp of DNA upstream of cpe in the type strain NCTC 8239. A region of DNA extending up to 1.5 kb 5' to cpe is conserved in all enterotoxin-positive strains. This region contains a putative ORF with substantial homology to an ORF in the Salmonella typhimurium IS200 insertion element and, in addition, contains multiple perfect consensus DNA-binding sequences for the Bacillus subtilis transition state regulator Hpr. The detailed structural elements revealed by the sequence analysis are presented and used to develop a new perspective on the molecular basis of enterotoxin production in this important food-poisoning bacterium.

  3. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the cat myostatin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... MEF3, MTBF, PAX3, SMAD, HBOX, HOMF and TEAF motifs. Comparative analysis for some motifs showed both conservations and differences among cat, horse, porcine and human. Key words: Cat, myostatin 5'-regulatory region, molecular cloning, sequence analysis and comparison, transcription factor binding sites.

  4. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mosquitoes are vectors for the transmission of many human pathogens that include viruses, nematodes and protozoa. For the understanding of their vectorial capacity, identification of disease carrying and refractory strains is essential. Recently, molecular taxonomic techniques have been utilized for this purpose. Sequence ...

  5. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mosquitoes are vectors for the transmission of many human pathogens that include viruses, nematodes and protozoa. For the understanding of their vectorial capacity, identification of disease carrying and refractory strains is essential. Recently, molecular taxonomic techniques have been utilized for this purpose. Sequence ...

  6. Haplotype combination of the bovine PCSK1 gene sequence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physiology of obesity (Ramachandrappa and Farooqi 2011). Recently, the associations of the nonsynonymous ... (1997, 2003) and Farooqi et al. (2007) have also characterized the genomic sequence of the human ... ingly, in contrast to human PCSK1 deficiency, PCSK1. −/− mice exhibit smaller birth weight and stunted ...

  7. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired “safe” harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in

  8. Precise genome modification via sequence-specific nucleases-mediated gene targeting for crop improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwei Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ or homology-directed repair (HDR. While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired ‘safe’ harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential

  9. Sequence and evolution of HLA-DR7- and -DRw53-associated. beta. -chain genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.A.T.; Wilkinson, D.; Bodmer, W.F.; Trowsdale, J.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones representing products of the DR7 and DRw53 ..beta..-chain genes were isolated from the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line MANN (DR7, DRw53, DQw2, DPw2). The DRw53..beta.. sequence was identical to a DRw53..beta.. sequence derived from cells with a DR4 haplotype. In contrast, the DR7..beta.. sequence was as unrelated to DR4..beta.. sequence as it was to other DR..beta..-related genes, except at the 3'-untranslated region. These results suggest that the DR7 and DR4 haplotypes may have been derived relatively recently from a common ancestral haplotype and that the DR4 and DR7 ..beta..-chain genes have undergone more rapid diversification in the ..beta..1 domains, most probably as a result of natural selection, than have the DRw53..beta..-chain genes. Short tracts of sequence within the DR7 and DRw53 ..beta..1 domains were shared with other DR..beta.. sequences, indicating that exchanges of genetic information between ..beta..1 domains of DR..beta..-related genes have played a part in their evolution. Serological analysis of mouse L-cell transfectants expressing surface HLA-DR7 molecules, confirmed by antibody binding and allelic sequence comparison, identified amino acid residues that may be critical to the binding of a monomorphic DR- and CP-specific monoclonal antibody.

  10. Cloning, sequencing and expression of a xylanase gene from the maize pathogen Helminthosporium turcicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degefu, Y.; Paulin, L.; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen

    2001-01-01

    A gene encoding an endoxylanase from the phytopathogenic fungus Helminthosporium turcicum Pass. was cloned and sequenced. The entire nucleotide sequence of a 1991 bp genomic fragment containing an endoxylanase gene was determined. The xylanase gene of 795 bp, interrupted by two introns of 52 and 62...... bp, encoded a protein of 227 amino acids showing up to 95% amino acid homology with other fungal xylanases. The precise splicing site of the introns was identified by sequencing the corresponding cDNA. A northern blot showed that the gene is expressed when the fungus is grown in a medium containing...... xylan as a sole carbon source. The cloned xylanase gene was expressed in maize plants during infection....

  11. [Comparative analysis of sequence alignment of SH3GL1 gene as a disease candidate gene of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Xu, Jian-zhong; Jia, Quan-zhang; Guo, Hong; Luo, Fei; Ye, Qing; Bai, Yun

    2010-03-15

    To identify whether SH3GL1 gene serves as a disease associated gene of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Positioning candidate cloning: "case-sibling or case-family control design" research scheme based on family constellation was designed. Fifty-six AIS patients (15 male and 41 female, mean age 15 years old, ranged from 8 to 22 years old, Cobb angle from 25 degrees to 110 degrees , average Cobb angle of 67.5 degrees ) from November 2007 to December 2008 were recruited. In all patients, blood preparation was collected, and genome DNA was extracted. According to nucleotide sequence of gene SH3GL1, primer pair for PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing with 10 exons as emphasis was designed. Sequence comparative analysis for exon sequencing result between sib pairs or family pairs, and that between sib pair or family pairs and NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) were conducted through Vector NTI Advance 10.3 software to judge whether basic group mutation occurred or not. Amino acid sequence comparative analysis for prediction was made. Ten exons of the candidate gene SH3GL1 were successfully amplified and cloned in genome DNA of an AIS sib pair and family pairs, and the sequencing obtained positive results. Twelve basic group mutations were found in 10 exons of the candidate gene SH3GL1 of patients with AIS. These mutations were located in the second exon (3 mutations), the fourth exon (1 mutations), the fifth exon (4 mutations), the sixth exon (1 mutations), the eighth exon (1 mutations), and the tenth exon (2 mutations, noncoding region). If basic group in 515 of mRNA was mutated to T, termination codon(TAG) came into being and open reading frame was altered. The sequence of protein showed brachytmema protein was encoded, which could cause changes of primary structure. SH3GL1 is possibly one of the disease associated genes of AIS.

  12. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of Bovine Leukosis Virus Tax gene in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Momtaz

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Leukosis Virus (BLV belongs to the genus Deltaretrovirus ,subfamily Orthoretrovirinae of the family Retroviridae comprising 3 main genes of gag, pol and env and a number of replication regulatory genes such as Tax, Rex, R III, C IV. For determination of genetic relationship of Tax gene of BLV in Iran with those in other countries fragments 927bp corresponding to Tax from four infected samples were amplified in PCR system and sequenced for determining nucleotide sequence and compared with identified nucleotide sequence of this gene in other countries.A comparison made on Tax gene in Iran with other countries demonstrated 3.4 to 7.7% variability in Tax gene, of which the greatest sequence similarity exists between sequences of Tax in Iran with USA (AY700378.1with 96.6% similarity and the least relationship exists between sequences of this virus in Iran with Australia (AY700379.1 and Japan (AY700381.1 with 92.3% similarity

  13. Exome sequencing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies risk genes and pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirulli, Elizabeth T.; Lasseigne, Brittany N.; Petrovski, Slavé; Sapp, Peter C.; Dion, Patrick A.; Leblond, Claire S.; Couthouis, Julien; Lu, Yi-Fan; Wang, Quanli; Krueger, Brian J.; Ren, Zhong; Keebler, Jonathan; Han, Yujun; Levy, Shawn E.; Boone, Braden E.; Wimbish, Jack R.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Jones, Angela L.; Carulli, John P.; Day-Williams, Aaron G.; Staropoli, John F.; Xin, Winnie W.; Chesi, Alessandra; Raphael, Alya R.; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Cady, Janet; de Jong, J. M. B. Vianney; Kenna, Kevin P.; Smith, Bradley N.; Topp, Simon; Miller, Jack; Gkazi, Athina; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Veldink, Jan; Silani, Vincenzo; Ticozzi, Nicola; Shaw, Christopher E.; Baloh, Robert H.; Appel, Stanley; Simpson, Ericka; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Pulst, Stefan M.; Gibson, Summer; Trojanowski, John Q.; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Grossman, Murray; Shneider, Neil A.; Chung, Wendy K.; Ravits, John M.; Glass, Jonathan D.; Sims, Katherine B.; van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Maniatis, Tom; Hayes, Sebastian D.; Ordureau, Alban; Swarup, Sharan; Landers, John; Baas, Frank; Allen, Andrew S.; Bedlack, Richard S.; Harper, J. Wade; Gitler, Aaron D.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Brown, Robert; Harms, Matthew B.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Harris, Tim; Myers, Richard M.; Goldstein, David B.; Hardiman, Orla; McLaughlin, Russell L.; Mazzini, Letizia; Blair, Ian P.; Williams, Kelly L.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Al-Sarraj, Safa; King, Andrew; Scotter, Emma L.; Troakes, Claire; Vance, Caroline; D'alfonso, Sandra; Duga, Stefano; Corrado, Lucia; ten Asbroek, Anneloor L. M. A.; Calini, Daniela; Colombrita, Claudia; Ratti, Antonia; Tiloca, Cinzia; Wu, Zheyang; Asress, Seneshaw; Polak, Meraida; Diekstra, Frank; van Rheenen, Wouter; Danielson, Eric W.; Fallini, Claudia; Keagle, Pamela; Lewis, Elizabeth A.; Kost, Jason; Sorarù, Gianni; Bertolin, Cinzia; Querin, Giorgia; Castellotti, Barbara; Gellera, Cinzia; Pensato, Viviana; Taroni, Franco; Cereda, Cristina; Gagliardi, Stella; Ceroni, Mauro; Lauria, Giuseppe; de Belleroche, Jacqueline; Comi, Giacomo P.; Corti, Stefania; del Bo, Roberto; Turner, Martin R.; Talbot, Kevin; Pall, Hardev; Morrison, Karen E.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; García-Redondo, Alberto; Muñoz-Blanco, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disease with no effective treatment. We report the results of a moderate-scale sequencing study aimed at increasing the number of genes known to contribute to predisposition for ALS. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 2869 ALS

  14. [Cloning and sequencing of the papA gene from uropathogenic Escherichia coli 4030 strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinggang; Zhang, Jingping; Zhao, Chuncheng; Zhu, Jianguo

    2008-09-01

    Cloning and sequencing of the papA gene from uropathogenic Escherichia coli 4030 strain to investigate the differences of the sequences of the papA of UPEC4030 strain and the ones of related genes, in order to make whether or not it was a new genotype. Cloning and sequencing methods were used to analyze the sequence of the papA of UPEC4030 strain in comparison with related sequences. The sequence analysis of papA revealed a 722 bp gene and encode 192 amino acid polypeptide. The overall homology of the papA genes between UPEC4030 and the standard strains of ten F types were 36.11%-77.95% and 22.20%-78.34% at nucleotide and deduced amino acid levels. The homology between the sequence of the reverse primers and the corresponding sequence of UPEC4030 papA was 10%-66.67%. The results confirmed that UPEC4030 strain contained a novel papA variant. UPEC4030 strain could contain an unknown papA variant or the novel genotype. The pathogenic mechanism and epidemiology related need to be further studied.

  15. GxGrare: gene-gene interaction analysis method for rare variants from high-throughput sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Minseok; Leem, Sangseob; Yoon, Joon; Park, Taesung

    2018-03-19

    With the rapid advancement of array-based genotyping techniques, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified common genetic variants associated with common complex diseases. However, it has been shown that only a small proportion of the genetic etiology of complex diseases could be explained by the genetic factors identified from GWAS. This missing heritability could possibly be explained by gene-gene interaction (epistasis) and rare variants. There has been an exponential growth of gene-gene interaction analysis for common variants in terms of methodological developments and practical applications. Also, the recent advancement of high-throughput sequencing technologies makes it possible to conduct rare variant analysis. However, little progress has been made in gene-gene interaction analysis for rare variants. Here, we propose GxGrare which is a new gene-gene interaction method for the rare variants in the framework of the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis. The proposed method consists of three steps; 1) collapsing the rare variants, 2) MDR analysis for the collapsed rare variants, and 3) detect top candidate interaction pairs. GxGrare can be used for the detection of not only gene-gene interactions, but also interactions within a single gene. The proposed method is illustrated with 1080 whole exome sequencing data of the Korean population in order to identify causal gene-gene interaction for rare variants for type 2 diabetes. The proposed GxGrare performs well for gene-gene interaction detection with collapsing of rare variants. GxGrare is available at http://bibs.snu.ac.kr/software/gxgrare which contains simulation data and documentation. Supported operating systems include Linux and OS X.

  16. Occurrence and Evolutionary Analysis of Coat Protein Gene Sequences of Iranian Isolates of Sugarcane mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Moradi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV is one of the most damaging viruses infecting sugarcane, maize and some other graminaceous species around the world. To investigate the genetic diversity of SCMV in Iran, the coat protein (CP gene sequences of 23 SCMV isolates from different hosts were determined. The nucleotide sequence identity among Iranian isolates was more than 96%. They shared nucleotide identities of 75.5–99.9% with those of other SCMV isolates available in GenBank, the highest with the Egyptian isolate EGY7-1 (97.5–99.9%. The results of phylogenetic analysis suggested five divergent evolutionary lineages that did not completely reflect the geographical origin or host plant of the isolates. Population genetic analysis revealed greater between-group than within-group evolutionary divergence values, further supporting the results of the phylogenetic analysis. Our results indicated that natural selection might have contributed to the evolution of isolates belonging to the five identified SCMV groups, with infrequent genetic exchanges occurring between them. Phylogenetic analyses and the estimation of genetic distance indicated that Iranian isolates have low genetic diversity. No recombination was found in the CP cistron of Iranian isolates and the CP gene was under negative selection. These findings provide a comprehensive analysis of the population structure and driving forces for the evolution of SCMV with implications for global exchange of sugarcane germplasm. Gene flow, selection and somehow homologous recombination were found to be the important evolutionary factors shaping the genetic structure of SCMV populations.

  17. [Recent progress in gene mapping through high-throughput sequencing technology and forward genetic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cai-rui; Zou, Chang-song; Song, Guo-li

    2015-08-01

    Traditional gene mapping using forward genetic approaches is conducted primarily through construction of a genetic linkage map, the process of which is tedious and time-consuming, and often results in low accuracy of mapping and large mapping intervals. With the rapid development of high-throughput sequencing technology and decreasing cost of sequencing, a variety of simple and quick methods of gene mapping through sequencing have been developed, including direct sequencing of the mutant genome, sequencing of selective mutant DNA pooling, genetic map construction through sequencing of individuals in population, as well as sequencing of transcriptome and partial genome. These methods can be used to identify mutations at the nucleotide level and has been applied in complex genetic background. Recent reports have shown that sequencing mapping could be even done without the reference of genome sequence, hybridization, and genetic linkage information, which made it possible to perform forward genetic study in many non-model species. In this review, we summarized these new technologies and their application in gene mapping.

  18. Identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences. Annual performance report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.A.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this project is the development of practical software to automate the identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences from the human, and other higher eukaryotic genomes. A software system for automated sequence analysis, gm (gene modeler) has been designed, implemented, tested, and distributed to several dozen laboratories worldwide. A significantly faster, more robust, and more flexible version of this software, gm 2.0 has now been completed, and is being tested by operational use to analyze human cosmid sequence data. A range of efforts to further understand the features of eukaryoyic gene sequences are also underway. This progress report also contains papers coming out of the project including the following: gm: a Tool for Exploratory Analysis of DNA Sequence Data; The Human THE-LTR(O) and MstII Interspersed Repeats are subfamilies of a single widely distruted highly variable repeat family; Information contents and dinucleotide compostions of plant intron sequences vary with evolutionary origin; Splicing signals in Drosophila: intron size, information content, and consensus sequences; Integration of automated sequence analysis into mapping and sequencing projects; Software for the C. elegans genome project.

  19. Targeted sequencing of 351 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in a large cohort of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Kovel, Carolien G F; Brilstra, Eva H; van Kempen, Marjan J A

    2016-01-01

    genes, we sequenced 26 known and 351 candidate genes for EE in 360 patients. Variants in 25 genes known to be involved in EE or related phenotypes were followed up in 41 patients. We prioritized the candidate genes, and followed up 31 variants in this prioritized subset of candidate genes. RESULTS......BACKGROUND: Many genes are candidates for involvement in epileptic encephalopathy (EE) because one or a few possibly pathogenic variants have been found in patients, but insufficient genetic or functional evidence exists for a definite annotation. METHODS: To increase the number of validated EE......: Twenty-nine genotypes in known genes for EE (19) or related diseases (10), dominant as well as recessive or X-linked, were classified as likely pathogenic variants. Among those, likely pathogenic de novo variants were found in EE genes that act dominantly, including the recently identified genes EEF1A2...

  20. Haplotype combination of the caprine PC1 gene sequence variants ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proprotein convertase 1 (PC1) is an endopeptidase involved in proteolytic processing of peptide hormone precursors in granules of the regulated secretory pathway of endocrine cells. Mutations in PC1 gene are related to obesity-related traits which may influence the performance of animals, and therefore it has been the ...

  1. Sequence analysis of the N -acetyltransferase 2 gene (NAT2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study aimed to identify the NAT2 haplotypes, linkage disequilibrium, and novel NAT2 genetic variants among Jordanian population. We isolated the genomic DNA from 68 healthy, Arab, unrelated Jordanian volunteers to amplify the protein-coding region of NAT2 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Then ...

  2. Gene mining a marama bean expressed sequence tags (ESTs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tylosema esculentum (marama bean) is one of the underutilized legumes that have potential to provide protein and fatty acids to ensure food security in dry parts of Southern Africa. In order to establish rapid domestication programs for the plant, it is important to explore the plant's genome and identify functional genes ...

  3. Characterization of genomic sequence of a drought-resistant gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, People's Republic of China; College of Tobacco Science, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou 450002, People's Republic of China; Institute of Cotton ...

  4. Disparate sequence characteristics of the Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, S.K.; Justesen, A.F.; Giese, H.

    1997-01-01

    , Egh falls into the group of Ascomycetes located at a basal position. The regulatory region of the Egh gpd gene has no homology to corresponding sequences in other filamentous Ascomycetes. Codon usage was determined for the four characterized Egh genes (tub2, Egh7, Egh16 and gpd) and found...

  5. Targeted sequencing of venom genes from cone snail genomes improves understanding of conotoxin molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Mark A; Mahardika, Gusti N

    2018-03-05

    To expand our capacity to discover venom sequences from the genomes of venomous organisms, we applied targeted sequencing techniques to selectively recover venom gene superfamilies and non-toxin loci from the genomes of 32 cone snail species (family, Conidae), a diverse group of marine gastropods that capture their prey using a cocktail of neurotoxic peptides (conotoxins). We were able to successfully recover conotoxin gene superfamilies across all species with high confidence (> 100X coverage) and used these data to provide new insights into conotoxin evolution. First, we found that conotoxin gene superfamilies are composed of 1-6 exons and are typically short in length (mean = ∼85bp). Second, we expanded our understanding of the following genetic features of conotoxin evolution: (a) positive selection, where exons coding the mature toxin region were often three times more divergent than their adjacent noncoding regions, (b) expression regulation, with comparisons to transcriptome data showing that cone snails only express a fraction of the genes available in their genome (24%-63%), and (c) extensive gene turnover, where Conidae species varied from 120-859 conotoxin gene copies. Finally, using comparative phylogenetic methods, we found that while diet specificity did not predict patterns of conotoxin evolution, dietary breadth was positively correlated with total conotoxin gene diversity. Overall, the targeted sequencing technique demonstrated here has the potential to radically increase the pace at which venom gene families are sequenced and studied, reshaping our ability to understand the impact of genetic changes on ecologically relevant phenotypes and subsequent diversification.

  6. Nucleotide sequence of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens octopine Ti plasmid-encoded tmr gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidekamp, F.; Dirkse, W.G.; Hille, J.; Ormondt, H. van

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the tmr gene, encoded by the octopine Ti plasmid from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (pTiAch5), was determined. The T-DNA, which encompasses this gene, is involved in tumor formation and maintenance, and probably mediates the cytokinin-independent growth of transformed plant

  7. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of VP6 gene of giant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... G), and the major structural protein of inner capsid particles (ICP), and also specific antigen of mucosa immunization that mediate specific immunological reaction. In this report, sequence analysis of VP6 gene of giant panda rotavirus was carried out. Full-length VP6 gene encoding for ICP of giant panda.

  8. Neural network predicts sequence of TP53 gene based on DNA chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicker, J.S.; Wikman, F.; Lu, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    We have trained an artificial neural network to predict the sequence of the human TP53 tumor suppressor gene based on a p53 GeneChip. The trained neural network uses as input the fluorescence intensities of DNA hybridized to oligonucleotides on the surface of the chip and makes between zero...

  9. Characterization and Sequencing of MT-Cox1 Gene in Khorasan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nucleotide sequence of COX1 gene in mitochondrial genome of Khorasan native chicken and detect the possible mutations in the genome. For this purpose, after sampling and extracting DNA from the whole blood samples, the COX1 gene was amplified using specific primers and ...

  10. Cloning and sequencing of the peroxisomal amine oxidase gene from Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinenberg, P. G.; Evers, M.; Waterham, H. R.; Kuipers, J.; Arnberg, A. C.; AB, G.

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned the AMO gene, encoding the microbody matrix enzyme amine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6) from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha. The gene was isolated by differential screening of a cDNA library, immunoselection, and subsequent screening of a H. polymorpha genomic library. The nucleotide sequence

  11. Clinical utility of a 377 gene custom next-generation sequencing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JEN BEVILACQUA

    2017-07-26

    Jul 26, 2017 ... condition as diverse as epilepsy at a low cost compared to traditional Sanger sequencing (Lemke et al. 2012; Németh et al. 2013). Our 377 gene epilepsy NGS test was developed to include genes known to cause or have published association with epilepsy and seizure-related disorders. Given the scale of ...

  12. Investigation of genome sequence and gene expression regulation in T4 related bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Kalinienė, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of bacteriophage VR7 has been determined. The genome sequence is 169,285 nt, with an overall G+C content of 40,3%, compared with 35.3 % of T4. VR7 encodes 293 putative protein-encoding open reading frames (ORFs) and tRNAMet. In total, 211 of the 293 VR7 open reading frames encode putative proteins that share 30% ‒ 97% amino acid sequence identity with those found in T4; 46 ORFs resemble genes from other T4-like phages, 9 show similarities to genes of non T4 type p...

  13. Analyzing Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 gene expression by a next generation sequencing based method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jakob S.; Petersen, Bent; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine

    2013-01-01

    at identifying PfEMP1 features associated with high virulence. Here we present the first effective method for sequence analysis of var genes expressed in field samples: a sequential PCR and next generation sequencing based technique applied on expressed var sequence tags and subsequently on long range PCR......, encoded by ~60 highly variable 'var' genes per haploid genome. PfEMP1 is exported to the surface of infected erythrocytes and is thought to be fundamental to immune evasion by adhesion to host and parasite factors. The highly variable nature has constituted a roadblock in var expression studies aimed...

  14. Homozygosity mapping and targeted sanger sequencing reveal genetic defects underlying inherited retinal disease in families from pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleeha Maria

    Full Text Available Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD.We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, retinitis pigmentosa (RP, congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB, or cone dystrophy (CD. We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families.Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1.Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future.

  15. [Characterization of Black and Dichothrix Cyanobacteria Based on the 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Maya

    2010-01-01

    My project focuses on characterizing different cyanobacteria in thrombolitic mats found on the island of Highborn Cay, Bahamas. Thrombolites are interesting ecosystems because of the ability of bacteria in these mats to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and mineralize it as calcium carbonate. In the future they may be used as models to develop carbon sequestration technologies, which could be used as part of regenerative life systems in space. These thrombolitic communities are also significant because of their similarities to early communities of life on Earth. I targeted two cyanobacteria in my research, Dichothrix spp. and whatever black is, since they are believed to be important to carbon sequestration in these thrombolitic mats. The goal of my summer research project was to molecularly identify these two cyanobacteria. DNA was isolated from each organism through mat dissections and DNA extractions. I ran Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR) to amplify the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene in each cyanobacteria. This specific gene is found in almost all bacteria and is highly conserved, meaning any changes in the sequence are most likely due to evolution. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene can be used for bacterial identification of different species based on the sequence of their 16S rRNA gene. Since the exact sequence of the Dichothrix gene was unknown, I designed different primers that flanked the gene based on the known sequences from other taxonomically similar cyanobacteria. Once the 16S rRNA gene was amplified, I cloned the gene into specialized Escherichia coli cells and sent the gene products for sequencing. Once the sequence is obtained, it will be added to a genetic database for future reference to and classification of other Dichothrix sp.

  16. Cloning, sequencing and variability analysis of the gap gene from Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Tina; Jacobsen, Iben Søgaard; Melkova, Renata

    2000-01-01

    The gap gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The gene was cloned and sequenced from the Mycoplasma hominis type strain PG21(T). The intraspecies variability was investigated by inspection of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns...... after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the gap gene from 15 strains and furthermore by sequencing of part of the gene in eight strains. The M. hominis gap gene was found to vary more than the Escherichia coli counterpart, but the variation at nucleotide level gave rise to only a few...... amino acid substitutions. To verify that the gene was expressed in M. hominis, a polyclonal antibody was produced and tested against whole cell protein from 15 strains. The enzyme was expressed in all strains investigated as a 36-kDa protein. All strains except type strain PG21(T) showed reaction...

  17. Transcriptome sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies fusion genes associated with distinct DNA methylation profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincevic-Zuniga, Yanara; Dahlberg, Johan; Nilsson, Sara; Raine, Amanda; Nystedt, Sara; Lindqvist, Carl Mårten; Berglund, Eva C; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Cavelier, Lucia; Forestier, Erik; Heyman, Mats; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Nordlund, Jessica; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2017-08-14

    Structural chromosomal rearrangements that lead to expressed fusion genes are a hallmark of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of 134 primary ALL patient samples to comprehensively detect fusion transcripts. We combined fusion gene detection with genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, gene expression profiling, and targeted sequencing to determine molecular signatures of emerging ALL subtypes. We identified 64 unique fusion events distributed among 80 individual patients, of which over 50% have not previously been reported in ALL. Although the majority of the fusion genes were found only in a single patient, we identified several recurrent fusion gene families defined by promiscuous fusion gene partners, such as ETV6, RUNX1, PAX5, and ZNF384, or recurrent fusion genes, such as DUX4-IGH. Our data show that patients harboring these fusion genes displayed characteristic genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression signatures in addition to distinct patterns in single nucleotide variants and recurrent copy number alterations. Our study delineates the fusion gene landscape in pediatric ALL, including both known and novel fusion genes, and highlights fusion gene families with shared molecular etiologies, which may provide additional information for prognosis and therapeutic options in the future.

  18. Transcriptome sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies fusion genes associated with distinct DNA methylation profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanara Marincevic-Zuniga

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural chromosomal rearrangements that lead to expressed fusion genes are a hallmark of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of 134 primary ALL patient samples to comprehensively detect fusion transcripts. Methods We combined fusion gene detection with genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, gene expression profiling, and targeted sequencing to determine molecular signatures of emerging ALL subtypes. Results We identified 64 unique fusion events distributed among 80 individual patients, of which over 50% have not previously been reported in ALL. Although the majority of the fusion genes were found only in a single patient, we identified several recurrent fusion gene families defined by promiscuous fusion gene partners, such as ETV6, RUNX1, PAX5, and ZNF384, or recurrent fusion genes, such as DUX4-IGH. Our data show that patients harboring these fusion genes displayed characteristic genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression signatures in addition to distinct patterns in single nucleotide variants and recurrent copy number alterations. Conclusion Our study delineates the fusion gene landscape in pediatric ALL, including both known and novel fusion genes, and highlights fusion gene families with shared molecular etiologies, which may provide additional information for prognosis and therapeutic options in the future.

  19. Transcriptome characterization and sequencing-based identification of salt-responsive genes in Millettia pinnata, a semi-mangrove plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianzi; Lu, Xiang; Yan, Hao; Chen, Shouyi; Zhang, Wanke; Huang, Rongfeng; Zheng, Yizhi

    2012-04-01

    Semi-mangroves form a group of transitional species between glycophytes and halophytes, and hold unique potential for learning molecular mechanisms underlying plant salt tolerance. Millettia pinnata is a semi-mangrove plant that can survive a wide range of saline conditions in the absence of specialized morphological and physiological traits. By employing the Illumina sequencing platform, we generated ~192 million short reads from four cDNA libraries of M. pinnata and processed them into 108,598 unisequences with a high depth of coverage. The mean length and total length of these unisequences were 606 bp and 65.8 Mb, respectively. A total of 54,596 (50.3%) unisequences were assigned Nr annotations. Functional classification revealed the involvement of unisequences in various biological processes related to metabolism and environmental adaptation. We identified 23,815 candidate salt-responsive genes with significantly differential expression under seawater and freshwater treatments. Based on the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR analyses, we verified the changes in expression levels for a number of candidate genes. The functional enrichment analyses for the candidate genes showed tissue-specific patterns of transcriptome remodelling upon salt stress in the roots and the leaves. The transcriptome of M. pinnata will provide valuable gene resources for future application in crop improvement. In addition, this study sets a good example for large-scale identification of salt-responsive genes in non-model organisms using the sequencing-based approach.

  20. Identification of conserved potentially regulatory sequences of the SRY gene from 10 different species of mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarit, E; Guillén, A; Rebordosa, C; Vidal-Taboada, J; Sánchez, M; Ballesta, F; Oliva, R

    1998-04-17

    We have sequenced the 5' region of the SRY gene from human, chimpanzee, sheep, and mouse and from four additional mammalian species, not previously characterized (gorilla, gazelle, rat, and guinea pig). In order to identify conserved DNA elements potentially involved in the regulation of the SRY gene, the newly determined sequences were analyzed and compared to all mammalian SRY promoter sequences available at present. Ten highly conserved potential regulatory elements have been identified in all 10 species (AP1, Barbie, GATA, Gfi1, cMyb, vMyb, NF1, Oct1, Sp1, and SRY). The known function of several of these regulatory elements fits well with the known expression of the SRY gene. However, except for the highly conserved coding HMG motif, only a short region close to the initiation of transcription in the human SRY is conserved in the exact position along the gene in all the species analyzed. This lack of sequence identity at the orthologous positions is consistent with the suggested rapid evolution of the SRY gene. This relative lack of homology contrasts with a high sequence identity of the putative regulatory sequences found within each taxonomic group of species (primates, bovids, and rodents), which supports a common mechanism of SRY expression and possibly also a similar function.

  1. Cloning and sequencing of the gene for human β-casein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennerdal, B.; Bergstroem, S.; Andersson, Y.; Hialmarsson, K.; Sundgyist, A.; Hernell, O.

    1990-01-01

    Human β-casein is a major protein in human milk. This protein is part of the casein micelle and has been suggested to have several physiological functions in the newborn. Since there is limited information on βcasein and the factors that affect its concentration in human milk, the authors have isolated and sequenced the gene for this protein. A human mammary gland cDNA library (Clontech) in gt 11 was screened by plaque hy-hybridization using a 42-mer synthetic 32 p-labelled oligo-nucleotide. Positive clones were identified and isolated, DNA was prepared and the gene isolated by cleavage with EcoR1. Following subcloning (PUC18), restriction mapping and Southern blotting, DNA for sequencing was prepared. The gene was sequenced by the dideoxy method. Human β-casein has 212 amino acids and the amino acid sequence deducted from the nucleotide sequence is to 91% identical to the published sequence for human β-casein show a high degree of conservation at the leader peptide and the highly phosphorylated sequences, but also deletions and divergence at several positions. These results provide insight into the structure of the human β-casein gene and will facilitate studies on factors affecting its expression

  2. Strategies for exome and genome sequence data analysis in disease-gene discovery projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter N; Krawitz, P; Mundlos, S

    2011-08-01

    In whole-exome sequencing (WES), target capture methods are used to enrich the sequences of the coding regions of genes from fragmented total genomic DNA, followed by massively parallel, 'next-generation' sequencing of the captured fragments. Since its introduction in 2009, WES has been successfully used in several disease-gene discovery projects, but the analysis of whole-exome sequence data can be challenging. In this overview, we present a summary of the main computational strategies that have been applied to identify novel disease genes in whole-exome data, including intersect filters, the search for de novo mutations, and the application of linkage mapping or inference of identity-by-descent (IBD) in family studies. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. DNA Sequence of Cutinase Gene Isolated from Spilocaea oleagina as Determined by PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Yoshinori; Toyoda, Hideyoshi; Morii, Naho; Graniti, Antonio; Ouchi, Seiji

    1998-01-01

    [Synopsis] In this study, partial cutinase genes were cloned from Spilocaea oleagina and four different formae specials of Fusarium oxysporum (lycopersici, melonis, spinaciae and fragariae) by using PCR method. The reported amino acid sequences were aligned with DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ), and highly conserved amino acid regions were selected to construct specific primers of cutinase genes. Chromosomal DNA of S. oleagina was isolated and used for template of PCR to amplify cutinase genes. ...

  4. A novel method to discover fluoroquinolone antibiotic resistance (qnr genes in fragmented nucleotide sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulund Fredrik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotics are central in modern health care and are used to treat and prevent a wide range of bacterial infections. The recently discovered qnr genes provide a mechanism of resistance with the potential to rapidly spread between bacteria using horizontal gene transfer. As for many antibiotic resistance genes present in pathogens today, qnr genes are hypothesized to originate from environmental bacteria. The vast amount of data generated by shotgun metagenomics can therefore be used to explore the diversity of qnr genes in more detail. Results In this paper we describe a new method to identify qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. We show, using cross-validation, that the method has a high statistical power of correctly classifying sequences from novel classes of qnr genes, even for fragments as short as 100 nucleotides. Based on sequences from public repositories, the method was able to identify all previously reported plasmid-mediated qnr genes. In addition, several fragments from novel putative qnr genes were identified in metagenomes. The method was also able to annotate 39 chromosomal variants of which 11 have previously not been reported in literature. Conclusions The method described in this paper significantly improves the sensitivity and specificity of identification and annotation of qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. The predicted novel putative qnr genes in the metagenomic data support the hypothesis of a large and uncharacterized diversity within this family of resistance genes in environmental bacterial communities. An implementation of the method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.math.chalmers.se/qnr/.

  5. An atlas of human gene expression from massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS)

    OpenAIRE

    Jongeneel, C. Victor; Delorenzi, Mauro; Iseli, Christian; Zhou, Daixing; Haudenschild, Christian D.; Khrebtukova, Irina; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; Stevenson, Brian J.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Vasicek, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    We have used massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) to sample the transcriptomes of 32 normal human tissues to an unprecedented depth, thus documenting the patterns of expression of almost 20,000 genes with high sensitivity and specificity. The data confirm the widely held belief that differences in gene expression between cell and tissue types are largely determined by transcripts derived from a limited number of tissue-specific genes, rather than by combinations of more promiscuousl...

  6. Identification of metastasis driver genes by massive parallel sequencing of successive steps of breast cancer progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2018-01-01

    concordance between different steps of malignant progression we performed exome sequencing and validation with targeted deep sequencing of successive steps of malignant progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous distant metastases in six breast cancer patients. Using the ratio of non...... notable are the DCC, ABCA13, TIAM2, CREBBP, BCL6B and ZNF185 genes, mainly mutated exclusively in metastases and highly likely driver genes of metastatic progression. We find different genes and pathways to be affected at different steps of malignant progression. The Adherens junction pathway is affected...... in four of the six studied patients and this pathway most likely plays a vital role in the metastatic process....

  7. nef gene sequence variation among HIV-1-infected African children

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chakraborty, R.; Reiniš, Milan; Rostron, T.; Philpott, S.; Dong, T.; D'Agostino, A.; Musoke, R.; de Silva, E.; Stumpf, M.; Weiser, B.; Burger, H.; Rowland-Jones, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2006), s. 75-84 ISSN 1464-2662 Grant - others:Fogarty International Center, NIH(US) 3D43TW00915; NIH(US) RO1 AI 42555 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HIV-1 nef gene * non-clade B * Kenya Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.674, year: 2006

  8. Reanalysis of RNA-sequencing data reveals several additional fusion genes with multiple isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaspeska, Sara; Hultsch, Susanne; Edgren, Henrik; Nicorici, Daniel; Murumägi, Astrid; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2012-01-01

    RNA-sequencing and tailored bioinformatic methodologies have paved the way for identification of expressed fusion genes from the chaotic genomes of solid tumors. We have recently successfully exploited RNA-sequencing for the discovery of 24 novel fusion genes in breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate the importance of continuous optimization of the bioinformatic methodology for this purpose, and report the discovery and experimental validation of 13 additional fusion genes from the same samples. Integration of copy number profiling with the RNA-sequencing results revealed that the majority of the gene fusions were promoter-donating events that occurred at copy number transition points or involved high-level DNA-amplifications. Sequencing of genomic fusion break points confirmed that DNA-level rearrangements underlie selected fusion transcripts. Furthermore, a significant portion (>60%) of the fusion genes were alternatively spliced. This illustrates the importance of reanalyzing sequencing data as gene definitions change and bioinformatic methods improve, and highlights the previously unforeseen isoform diversity among fusion transcripts.

  9. Cloning and sequencing of adhesion protein gene of Trichomonas gallinae from pigeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, F; Li, G Q; Su, R Q; Liang, G; Chen, Z H; Hicham, W

    2010-02-26

    The adhesion protein (AP) gene of Trichomonas gallinae from pigeon was cloned and sequenced. The first-strand cDNA of the AP gene of T. gallinae from pigeon was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with total RNA extracting kit and cloned in the vector pMD18-T. The recombinant plasmid was identified by PCR and restriction endonuclease, and the positive clone was sequenced and analysed by comparing the sequence similarity with other sequences in the GenBank. The AP gene of T. gallinae had a length of 1032bp, which contained a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 930bp long, coding for 309 amino acids. The sequence analysis revealed that the homology with three AP genes of Trichomonas vaginalis (i.e., TVU87096, TVU87097 and TVU87098) was 94.2%, 92.6% and 92.0%, respectively. It is concluded that the successfully cloned AP gene from T. gallinae will provide the basis for the expression of the AP gene in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and the preparation of its recombinant protein.

  10. Bidirectional gene sequences with similar homology to functional proteins of alkane degrading bacterium pseudomonas fredriksbergensis DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megeed, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for two overlapping fragments of DNA from a clone of newly isolated alkanes degrading bacterium Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis encoding sequences with similar homology to two parts of functional proteins is described. One strand contains a sequence with high homology to alkanes monooxygenase (alkB), a member of the alkanes hydroxylase family, and the other strand contains a sequence with some homology to alcohol dehydrogenase gene (alkJ). Overlapping of the genes on opposite strands has been reported in eukaryotic species, and is now reported in a bacterial species. The sequence comparisons and ORFS results revealed that the regulation and the genes organization involved in alkane oxidation represented in Pseudomonas frederiksberghensis varies among the different known alkane degrading bacteria. The alk gene cluster containing homologues to the known alkane monooxygenase (alkB), and rubredoxin (alkG) are oriented in the same direction, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase (alkJ) is oriented in the opposite direction. Such genomes encode messages on both strands of the DNA, or in an overlapping but different reading frames, of the same strand of DNA. The possibility of creating novel genes from pre-existing sequences, known as overprinting, which is a widespread phenomenon in small viruses. Here, the origin and evolution of the gene overlap to bacteriophages belonging to the family Microviridae have been investigated. Such a phenomenon is most widely described in extremely small genomes such as those of viruses or small plasmids, yet here is a unique phenomenon. (author)

  11. Reference genes for gene expression studies in wheat flag leaves grown under different farming conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordeiro Raposo Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internal control genes with highly uniform expression throughout the experimental conditions are required for accurate gene expression analysis as no universal reference genes exists. In this study, the expression stability of 24 candidate genes from Triticum aestivum cv. Cubus flag leaves grown under organic and conventional farming systems was evaluated in two locations in order to select suitable genes that can be used for normalization of real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR reactions. The genes were selected among the most common used reference genes as well as genes encoding proteins involved in several metabolic pathways. Findings Individual genes displayed different expression rates across all samples assayed. Applying geNorm, a set of three potential reference genes were suitable for normalization of RT-qPCR reactions in winter wheat flag leaves cv. Cubus: TaFNRII (ferredoxin-NADP(H oxidoreductase; AJ457980.1, ACT2 (actin 2; TC234027, and rrn26 (a putative homologue to RNA 26S gene; AL827977.1. In addition of these three genes that were also top-ranked by NormFinder, two extra genes: CYP18-2 (Cyclophilin A, AY456122.1 and TaWIN1 (14-3-3 like protein, AB042193 were most consistently stably expressed. Furthermore, we showed that TaFNRII, ACT2, and CYP18-2 are suitable for gene expression normalization in other two winter wheat varieties (Tommi and Centenaire grown under three treatments (organic, conventional and no nitrogen and a different environment than the one tested with cv. Cubus. Conclusions This study provides a new set of reference genes which should improve the accuracy of gene expression analyses when using wheat flag leaves as those related to the improvement of nitrogen use efficiency for cereal production.

  12. Haplotypes and Sequence Variation in the Ovine Adiponectin Gene (ADIPOQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Ming An

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In this study five separate regions (regions 1 to 5 of ovine ADIPOQ were analysed using PCR-SSCP. Four different PCR-SSCP patterns (A1-D1, A2-D2 were detected in region-1 and region-2, respectively, with seven and six SNPs being revealed. In region-3, three different patterns (A3-C3 and three SNPs were observed. Two patterns (A4-B4, A5-B5 and two and one SNPs were observed in region-4 and region-5, respectively. In total, nineteen SNPs were detected, with five of them in the coding region and two (c.46T/C and c.515G/A putatively resulting in amino acid changes (p.Tyr16His and p.Lys172Arg. In region-1, -2 and -3 of 316 sheep from eight New Zealand breeds, variants A1, A2 and A3 were the most common, although variant frequencies differed in the eight breeds. Across region-1 and region-3, nine haplotypes were identified and haplotypes A1-A3, A1-C3, B1-A3 and B1-C3 were most common. These results indicate that the ADIPOQ gene is polymorphic and suggest that further analysis is required to see if the variation in the gene is associated with animal production traits.

  13. Generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of Camelina sativa to mine drought stress-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanth, Bashistha Kumar; Kumari, Shipra; Choi, Seo Hee; Ha, Hye-Jeong; Lee, Geung-Joo

    2015-11-06

    Camelina sativa is an oil-producing crop belonging to the family of Brassicaceae. Due to exceptionally high content of omega fatty acid, it is commercially grown around the world as edible oil, biofuel, and animal feed. A commonly referred 'false flax' or gold-of-pleasure Camelina sativa has been interested as one of biofuel feedstocks. The species can grow on marginal land due to its superior drought tolerance with low requirement of agricultural inputs. This crop has been unexploited due to very limited transcriptomic and genomic data. Use of gene-specific molecular markers is an important strategy for new cultivar development in breeding program. In this study, Illumina paired-end sequencing technology and bioinformatics tools were used to obtain expression profiling of genes responding to drought stress in Camelina sativa BN14. A total of more than 60,000 loci were assembled, corresponding to approximately 275 K transcripts. When the species was exposed to 10 kPa drought stress, 100 kPa drought stress, and rehydrated conditions, a total of 107, 2,989, and 982 genes, respectively, were up-regulated, while 146, 3,659, and 1189 genes, respectively, were down-regulated compared to control condition. Some unknown genes were found to be highly expressed under drought conditions, together with some already reported gene families such as senescence-associated genes, CAP160, and LEA under 100 kPa soil water condition, cysteine protease, 2OG, Fe(II)-dependent oxygenase, and RAD-like 1 under rehydrated condition. These genes will be further validated and mapped to determine their function and loci. This EST library will be favorably applied to develop gene-specific molecular markers and discover genes responsible for drought tolerance in Camelina species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of lack gene sequences for 22 Chinese Leishmania isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Ying; Zhou, Juan; Ding, Bin; Lu, Xiao-Jun; Xiao, Yu-Ling; Hu, Xiao-Su; Ma, Ying

    2013-07-01

    The phylogenetic relationships between Chinese Leishmania strains were investigated using lack (Leishmania homolog of receptors for activated protein kinase C) gene sequences, and the power of this gene was assessed for understanding the epidemiology and population genetics of Leishmania. The lack gene sequences from Leishmania isolates were sequenced after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Sequence alignment was performed and a phylogenetic tree was created using the MEGA 5.0 software program. Sequences of 850 bp were analyzed for each of the Leishmania strains collected from different locations in China, and minor differences in sequences were noted between the strains. Four distinct groups formed according to differences in the sequences of the lack gene. Group I consisted of 12 isolates from Shandong, Xinjiang, Gansu and Sichuan. These strains are part of the Leishmania donovani complex and are pathogenic to humans and canines. Group II included six isolates from Xinjiang and a reference strain, Leishmania turanica. Group III contained two isolates (one from a sand fly in Xinjiang and one from a rodent in Inner Mongolia) and they were identified as Leishmania gerbilli. Finally, group IV contained a strain from a sand fly in Xinjiang and a strain from a lizard in Inner Mongolia, and these strains were found to be Sauroleishmania. The Chinese Leishmania isolates formed four groups based on differences in the sequences of the lack gene, and this result is consistent with previous studies. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the Leishmania isolates from China are more complicated than previously thought. There is consensus between genetic clustering and identification using classical methods, which means that the lack gene yields polymorphic information that could be used for genotyping Leishmania isolates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genomic sequence around butterfly wing development genes: annotation and comparative analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês C Conceição

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of genomic sequence allows characterization of genome content and organization, and access beyond gene-coding regions for identification of functional elements. BAC libraries, where relatively large genomic regions are made readily available, are especially useful for species without a fully sequenced genome and can increase genomic coverage of phylogenetic and biological diversity. For example, no butterfly genome is yet available despite the unique genetic and biological properties of this group, such as diversified wing color patterns. The evolution and development of these patterns is being studied in a few target species, including Bicyclus anynana, where a whole-genome BAC library allows targeted access to large genomic regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterize ∼1.3 Mb of genomic sequence around 11 selected genes expressed in B. anynana developing wings. Extensive manual curation of in silico predictions, also making use of a large dataset of expressed genes for this species, identified repetitive elements and protein coding sequence, and highlighted an expansion of Alcohol dehydrogenase genes. Comparative analysis with orthologous regions of the lepidopteran reference genome allowed assessment of conservation of fine-scale synteny (with detection of new inversions and translocations and of DNA sequence (with detection of high levels of conservation of non-coding regions around some, but not all, developmental genes. CONCLUSIONS: The general properties and organization of the available B. anynana genomic sequence are similar to the lepidopteran reference, despite the more than 140 MY divergence. Our results lay the groundwork for further studies of new interesting findings in relation to both coding and non-coding sequence: 1 the Alcohol dehydrogenase expansion with higher similarity between the five tandemly-repeated B. anynana paralogs than with the corresponding B. mori orthologs, and 2 the high

  16. Characterization of fusion genes and the significantly expressed fusion isoforms in breast cancer by hybrid sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirather, Jason L; Afshar, Pegah Tootoonchi; Clark, Tyson A; Tseng, Elizabeth; Powers, Linda S; Underwood, Jason G; Zabner, Joseph; Korlach, Jonas; Wong, Wing Hung; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-10-15

    We developed an innovative hybrid sequencing approach, IDP-fusion, to detect fusion genes, determine fusion sites and identify and quantify fusion isoforms. IDP-fusion is the first method to study gene fusion events by integrating Third Generation Sequencing long reads and Second Generation Sequencing short reads. We applied IDP-fusion to PacBio data and Illumina data from the MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Compared with the existing tools, IDP-fusion detects fusion genes at higher precision and a very low false positive rate. The results show that IDP-fusion will be useful for unraveling the complexity of multiple fusion splices and fusion isoforms within tumorigenesis-relevant fusion genes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Annotation and Re-Sequencing of Genes from De Novo Transcriptome Assembly of Abies alba (Pinaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Roschanski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: We present a protocol for the annotation of transcriptome sequence data and the identification of candidate genes therein using the example of the nonmodel conifer Abies alba. Methods and Results: A normalized cDNA library was built from an A. alba seedling. The sequencing on a 454 platform yielded more than 1.5 million reads that were de novo assembled into 25 149 contigs. Two complementary approaches were applied to annotate gene fragments that code for (1 well-known proteins and (2 proteins that are potentially adaptively relevant. Primer development and testing yielded 88 amplicons that could successfully be resequenced from genomic DNA. Conclusions: The annotation workflow offers an efficient way to identify potential adaptively relevant genes from the large quantity of transcriptome sequence data. The primer set presented should be prioritized for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection in adaptively relevant genes in A. alba.

  18. Annotation and re-sequencing of genes from de novo transcriptome assembly of Abies alba (Pinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschanski, Anna M; Fady, Bruno; Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Liepelt, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    We present a protocol for the annotation of transcriptome sequence data and the identification of candidate genes therein using the example of the nonmodel conifer Abies alba. • A normalized cDNA library was built from an A. alba seedling. The sequencing on a 454 platform yielded more than 1.5 million reads that were de novo assembled into 25149 contigs. Two complementary approaches were applied to annotate gene fragments that code for (1) well-known proteins and (2) proteins that are potentially adaptively relevant. Primer development and testing yielded 88 amplicons that could successfully be resequenced from genomic DNA. • The annotation workflow offers an efficient way to identify potential adaptively relevant genes from the large quantity of transcriptome sequence data. The primer set presented should be prioritized for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection in adaptively relevant genes in A. alba.

  19. Sequence diversities of serine-aspartate repeat genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from different hosts presumably by horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huping Xue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is recognized as one of the major forces for bacterial genome evolution. Many clinically important bacteria may acquire virulence factors and antibiotic resistance through HGT. The comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT in emerging pathogens. In this study, the Serine-Aspartate Repeat (Sdr family has been compared among different sources of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus to discover sequence diversities within their genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four sdr genes were analyzed for 21 different S. aureus strains and 218 mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates from Canada. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis (RF122 and mastitis isolates in this study, ovine mastitis (ED133, pig (ST398, chicken (ED98, and human methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (TCH130, MRSA252, Mu3, Mu50, N315, 04-02981, JH1 and JH9 were highly associated with one another, presumably due to HGT. In addition, several types of insertion and deletion were found in sdr genes of many isolates. A new insertion sequence was found in mastitis isolates, which was presumably responsible for the HGT of sdrC gene among different strains. Moreover, the sdr genes could be used to type S. aureus. Regional difference of sdr genes distribution was also indicated among the tested S. aureus isolates. Finally, certain associations were found between sdr genes and subclinical or clinical mastitis isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Certain sdr gene sequences were shared in S. aureus strains and isolates from different species presumably due to HGT. Our results also suggest that the distributional assay of virulence factors should detect the full sequences or full functional regions of these factors. The traditional assay using short conserved regions may not be accurate or credible. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that may

  20. Myelin protein zero gene sequencing diagnoses Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1B disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Y.; Zhang, H.; Madrid, R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common genetic neuropathy, affects about 1 in 2600 people in Norway and is found worldwide. CMT Type 1 (CMT1) has slow nerve conduction with demyelinated Schwann cells. Autosomal dominant CMT Type 1B (CMT1B) results from mutations in the myelin protein zero gene which directs the synthesis of more than half of all Schwann cell protein. This gene was mapped to the chromosome 1q22-1q23.1 borderline by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The first 7 of 7 reported CMT1B mutations are unique. Thus the most effective means to identify CMT1B mutations in at-risk family members and fetuses is to sequence the entire coding sequence in dominant or sporadic CMT patients without the CMT1A duplication. Of the 19 primers used in 16 pars to uniquely amplify the entire MPZ coding sequence, 6 primer pairs were used to amplify and sequence the 6 exons. The DyeDeoxy Terminator cycle sequencing method used with four different color fluorescent lables was superior to manual sequencing because it sequences more bases unambiguously from extracted genomic DNA samples within 24 hours. This protocol was used to test 28 CMT and Dejerine-Sottas patients without CMT1A gene duplication. Sequencing MPZ gene-specific amplified fragments identified 9 polymorphic sites within the 6 exons that encode the 248 amino acid MPZ protein. The large number of major CMT1B mutations identified by single strand sequencing are being verified by reverse strand sequencing and when possible, by restriction enzyme analysis. This protocol can be used to distringuish CMT1B patients from othre CMT phenotypes and to determine the CMT1B status of relatives both presymptomatically and prenatally.

  1. IS21-558 Insertion Sequences Are Involved in the Mobility of the Multiresistance Gene cfr▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrenberg, Corinna; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Schwarz, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    During a study of florfenicol-resistant porcine staphylococci from Denmark, the genes cfr and fexA were detected in the chromosomal DNA or on plasmids of Staphylococcus hyicus, Staphylococcus warneri, and Staphylococcus simulans. A novel variant of the phenicol resistance transposon Tn558 was detected on the ca. 43-kb plasmid pSCFS6 in S. warneri and S. simulans isolates. Sequence analysis of a 22,010-bp segment revealed that the new Tn558 variant harbored an additional resistance gene region integrated into the tnpC reading frame. This resistance gene region consisted of the clindamycin exporter gene lsa(B) and the gene cfr for combined resistance to phenicols, lincosamides, oxazolidinones, pleuromutilins, and streptogramin A antibiotics bracketed by IS21-558 insertion sequences orientated in the same direction. A 6-bp target site duplication was detected at the integration site within tnpC. Transpositionally active forms of the IS21-558 element, known as minicircles, were detected by PCR and suggest that this insertion sequence is involved in the mobility of the multiresistance gene cfr. Based on the knowledge of the transposition pathways of IS21-like insertion sequences and the sequence features detected, the resistance gene region of plasmid pSCFS6 is believed to have developed via IS21-558-mediated cointegrate formation. The data obtained in this study identified the multiresistance gene cfr not only in three novel host species but also in a novel genetic context whose further analysis suggested that insertion sequences of the type IS21-558 are likely to be involved in the dissemination of cfr. PMID:17145796

  2. Sequence diversity within the capsular genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae serogroup 6 and 19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Elberse

    Full Text Available The main virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae is the capsule. The polysaccharides comprising this capsule are encoded by approximately 15 genes and differences in these genes result in different serotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the sequence diversity of the capsular genes of serotypes 6A, 6B, 6C, 19A and 19F and to explore a possible effect of vaccination on variation and distribution of these serotypes in the Netherlands. The complete capsular gene locus was sequenced for 25 serogroup 6 and for 20 serogroup 19 isolates. If one or more genes varied in 10 or more base pairs from the reference sequence, it was designated as a capsular subtype. Allele-specific PCRs and specific gene sequencing of highly variable capsular genes were performed on 184 serogroup 6 and 195 serogroup 19 isolates to identify capsular subtypes. This revealed the presence of 6, 3 and a single capsular subtype within serotypes 6A, 6B and 6C, respectively. The serotype 19A and 19F isolates comprised 3 and 4 capsular subtypes, respectively. For serogroup 6, the genetic background, as determined by multi locus sequence typing (MLST and multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA, seemed to be closely related to the capsular subtypes, but this was less pronounced for serogroup 19 isolates. The data also suggest shifts in the occurrence of capsular subtypes within serotype 6A and 19A after introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine. The shifts within these non-vaccine serotypes might indicate that these capsular subtypes are filling the niche of the vaccine serotypes. In conclusion, there is considerable DNA sequence variation of the capsular genes within pneumococcal serogroup 6 and 19. Such changes may result in altered polysaccharides or in strains that produce more capsular polysaccharides. Consequently, these altered capsules may be less sensitive for vaccine induced immunity.

  3. EXPRESSION OF CALCIUM-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE (CDPK GENES IN VITIS AMURENSIS UNDER ABIOTIC STRESS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubrovina A.S.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses, such as extreme temperatures, soil salinity, or water deficit, are one of the major limiting factors of crop productivity worldwide. Examination of molecular and genetic mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance in plants is of great interest to plant biologists. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs, which are the most important Ca2+ sensors in plants, are known to play one of the key roles in plant adaptation to abiotic stress. CDPK is a multigene family of enzymes. Analysis of CDPK gene expression under various abiotic stress conditions would help identify those CDPKs that might play important roles in plant adaptation to abiotic stress. We focused on studying CDPK gene expression under osmotic, water deficit, and temperature stress conditions in a wild-growing grapevine Vitis amurensis Rurp., which is native to the Russian Far East and is known to possess high adaptive potential and high level of resistance against adverse environmental conditions. Healthy V. amurensis cuttings (excised young stems with one healthy leaf were used for the treatments. For the non-stress treatment, we placed the cuttings in distilled water for 12 h at room temperature. For the water-deficit stress, detached cuttings were laid on a paper towel for 12 h at room temperature. For osmotic stress treatments, the cuttings were placed in 0.4 М NaCl and 0.4 М mannitol solutions for 12 h at room temperature. To examine temperature stress tolerance, the V. amurensis cuttings were placed in a growth chamber at +10oC and +37oC for 12 h. The total expression of VaCDPK genes was examined by semiquantitative RT-PCR with degenerate primers designed to the CDPK kinase domain. The total level of CDPK gene expression increased under salt and decreased under low temperature stress conditions. We sequenced 300 clones of the amplified part of different CDPK transcripts obtained from the analyzed cDNA probes. Analysis of the cDNA sequences identified 8 different

  4. Occurrence and Diversity of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Lagoons and Groundwater Underlying Two Swine Production Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Aminov, R.I.; Krapac, I.J.; Garrigues-Jeanjean, N.; Mackie, R.I.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we used PCR typing methods to assess the presence of tetracycline resistance determinants conferring ribosomal protection in waste lagoons and in groundwater underlying two swine farms. All eight classes of genes encoding this mechanism of resistance [tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(M), tetB(P), tet(S), tet(T), and otrA] were found in total DNA extracted from water of two lagoons. These determinants were found to be seeping into the underlying groundwater and could be detected as far as 250 m downstream from the lagoons. The identities and origin of these genes in groundwater were confirmed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses. Tetracycline-resistant bacterial isolates from groundwater harbored the tet(M) gene, which was not predominant in the environmental samples and was identical to tet(M) from the lagoons. The presence of this gene in some typical soil inhabitants suggests that the vector of antibiotic resistance gene dissemination is not limited to strains of gastrointestinal origin carrying the gene but can be mobilized into the indigenous soil microbiota. This study demonstrated that tet genes occur in the environment as a direct result of agriculture and suggested that groundwater may be a potential source of antibiotic resistance in the food chain.

  5. Automated DNA mutation detection using universal conditions direct sequencing: application to ten muscular dystrophy genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Bai-Lin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most common and efficient methods for detecting mutations in genes is PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. Until recently, the process of designing PCR assays has been to focus on individual assay parameters rather than concentrating on matching conditions for a set of assays. Primers for each individual assay were selected based on location and sequence concerns. The two primer sequences were then iteratively adjusted to make the individual assays work properly. This generally resulted in groups of assays with different annealing temperatures that required the use of multiple thermal cyclers or multiple passes in a single thermal cycler making diagnostic testing time-consuming, laborious and expensive. These factors have severely hampered diagnostic testing services, leaving many families without an answer for the exact cause of a familial genetic disease. A search of GeneTests for sequencing analysis of the entire coding sequence for genes that are known to cause muscular dystrophies returns only a small list of laboratories that perform comprehensive gene panels. The hypothesis for the study was that a complete set of universal assays can be designed to amplify and sequence any gene or family of genes using computer aided design tools. If true, this would allow automation and optimization of the mutation detection process resulting in reduced cost and increased throughput. Results An automated process has been developed for the detection of deletions, duplications/insertions and point mutations in any gene or family of genes and has been applied to ten genes known to bear mutations that cause muscular dystrophy: DMD; CAV3; CAPN3; FKRP; TRIM32; LMNA; SGCA; SGCB; SGCG; SGCD. Using this process, mutations have been found in five DMD patients and four LGMD patients (one in the FKRP gene, one in the CAV3 gene, and two likely causative heterozygous pairs of variations in the CAPN3 gene of two other

  6. Automated DNA mutation detection using universal conditions direct sequencing: application to ten muscular dystrophy genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard R; Schneider, Hal E; Estrella, Elicia; Burgess, Stephanie; Cheng, Andrew S; Barrett, Caitlin; Lip, Va; Lai, Poh San; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai-Lin; Darras, Basil T; Beggs, Alan H; Kunkel, Louis M

    2009-10-18

    One of the most common and efficient methods for detecting mutations in genes is PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. Until recently, the process of designing PCR assays has been to focus on individual assay parameters rather than concentrating on matching conditions for a set of assays. Primers for each individual assay were selected based on location and sequence concerns. The two primer sequences were then iteratively adjusted to make the individual assays work properly. This generally resulted in groups of assays with different annealing temperatures that required the use of multiple thermal cyclers or multiple passes in a single thermal cycler making diagnostic testing time-consuming, laborious and expensive.These factors have severely hampered diagnostic testing services, leaving many families without an answer for the exact cause of a familial genetic disease. A search of GeneTests for sequencing analysis of the entire coding sequence for genes that are known to cause muscular dystrophies returns only a small list of laboratories that perform comprehensive gene panels.The hypothesis for the study was that a complete set of universal assays can be designed to amplify and sequence any gene or family of genes using computer aided design tools. If true, this would allow automation and optimization of the mutation detection process resulting in reduced cost and increased throughput. An automated process has been developed for the detection of deletions, duplications/insertions and point mutations in any gene or family of genes and has been applied to ten genes known to bear mutations that cause muscular dystrophy: DMD; CAV3; CAPN3; FKRP; TRIM32; LMNA; SGCA; SGCB; SGCG; SGCD. Using this process, mutations have been found in five DMD patients and four LGMD patients (one in the FKRP gene, one in the CAV3 gene, and two likely causative heterozygous pairs of variations in the CAPN3 gene of two other patients). Methods and assay sequences are reported in

  7. Housekeeping and tissue-specific genes differ in simple sequence repeats in the 5'-UTR region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Mark J; Zhang, Liqing

    2008-01-15

    SSRs (simple sequence repeats) have been shown to have a variety of effects on an organism. In this study, we compared SSRs in housekeeping and tissue-specific genes in human and mouse, in terms of SSR types and distributions in different regions including 5'-UTRs, introns, coding exons, 3'-UTRs, and upstream regions. Among all these regions, SSRs in the 5'-UTR show the most distinction between housekeeping genes and tissue-specific genes in both densities and repeat types. Specifically, SSR densities in 5'-UTRs in housekeeping genes are about 1.7 times higher than those in tissue-specific genes, in contrast to the 0.8-1.2 times differences between the two classes of genes in other regions. Tri-SSRs in 5'-UTRs of housekeeping genes are more GC rich than those of tissue-specific genes and CGG, the dominant type of tri-SSR in 5'-UTR, accounts for 74-79% of the tri-SSRs in housekeeping genes, as compared to 42-57% in tissue-specific genes. 75% of the tri-SSRs in the 5'-UTR of housekeeping genes have 4-5 repeat units, versus the 86-90% in tissue-specific genes. Taken together, our results suggest that SSRs may have an effect on gene expression and may play an important role in contributing to the different expression profiles between housekeeping and tissue-specific genes.

  8. De novo 454 sequencing of barcoded BAC pools for comprehensive gene survey and genome analysis in the complex genome of barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Uwe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background De novo sequencing the entire genome of a large complex plant genome like the one of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. is a major challenge both in terms of experimental feasibility and costs. The emergence and breathtaking progress of next generation sequencing technologies has put this goal into focus and a clone based strategy combined with the 454/Roche technology is conceivable. Results To test the feasibility, we sequenced 91 barcoded, pooled, gene containing barley BACs using the GS FLX platform and assembled the sequences under iterative change of parameters. The BAC assemblies were characterized by N50 of ~50 kb (N80 ~31 kb, N90 ~21 kb and a Q40 of 94%. For ~80% of the clones, the best assemblies consisted of less than 10 contigs at 24-fold mean sequence coverage. Moreover we show that gene containing regions seem to assemble completely and uninterrupted thus making the approach suitable for detecting complete and positionally anchored genes. By comparing the assemblies of four clones to their complete reference sequences generated by the Sanger method, we evaluated the distribution, quality and representativeness of the 454 sequences as well as the consistency and reliability of the assemblies. Conclusion The described multiplex 454 sequencing of barcoded BACs leads to sequence consensi highly representative for the clones. Assemblies are correct for the majority of contigs. Though the resolution of complex repetitive structures requires additional experimental efforts, our approach paves the way for a clone based strategy of sequencing the barley genome.

  9. Detection of viral sequences by internally calibrated gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, R K; Hui, M F; Dosch, H M; Ewart, T E

    1993-05-01

    Inherent pitfalls of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can become serious difficulties when transferring research applications to high-volume routine procedures such as biofermentation process control and clinical diagnostics. Difficulties include 1) the danger of accidental sample contamination with positive control templates; 2) variable amplification due to positional effects in thermocycler blocks and unequal primer efficiency for sense/anti-sense strands; and 3) the need for reliable controls, which provide confidence for reporting negative reactions. Using the PCR detection system for Epstein-Barr virus as a model, we have developed a quick process to generate mutant internal co-amplification templates. These can be used for titration of amplification sensitivity. More importantly, single tube co-amplification without titrations allows determination of the minimum sensitivity achieved in each individual reaction; critical information when reporting negative diagnostic results. Mutant and native fragments are easy to distinguish by size, and sample cross contamination can be readily identified. The system should be easily adaptable to gene amplification procedures, which aim to routinely detect the presence of a given gene fragment in a controlled fashion.

  10. In-depth cDNA library sequencing provides quantitative gene expression profiling in cancer biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanling; Ying, Dingge; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative gene expression analysis plays an important role in identifying differentially expressed genes in various pathological states, gene expression regulation and co-regulation, shedding light on gene functions. Although microarray is widely used as a powerful tool in this regard, it is suboptimal quantitatively and unable to detect unknown gene variants. Here we demonstrated effective detection of differential expression and co-regulation of certain genes by expressed sequence tag analysis using a selected subset of cDNA libraries. We discussed the issues of sequencing depth and library preparation, and propose that increased sequencing depth and improved preparation procedures may allow detection of many expression features for less abundant gene variants. With the reduction of sequencing cost and the emerging of new generation sequencing technology, in-depth sequencing of cDNA pools or libraries may represent a better and powerful tool in gene expression profiling and cancer biomarker detection. We also propose using sequence-specific subtraction to remove hundreds of the most abundant housekeeping genes to increase sequencing depth without affecting relative expression ratio of other genes, as transcripts from as few as 300 most abundantly expressed genes constitute about 20% of the total transcriptome. In-depth sequencing also represents a unique advantage of detecting unknown forms of transcripts, such as alternative splicing variants, fusion genes, and regulatory RNAs, as well as detecting mutations and polymorphisms that may play important roles in disease pathogenesis.

  11. A score system for quality evaluation of RNA sequence tags: an improvement for gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Daniel G; Galante, Pedro A F; de Souza, Sandro J; Zago, Marco A; Silva, Wilson A

    2009-06-06

    High-throughput molecular approaches for gene expression profiling, such as Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) or Sequencing-by-Synthesis (SBS) represent powerful techniques that provide global transcription profiles of different cell types through sequencing of short fragments of transcripts, denominated sequence tags. These techniques have improved our understanding about the relationships between these expression profiles and cellular phenotypes. Despite this, more reliable datasets are still necessary. In this work, we present a web-based tool named S3T: Score System for Sequence Tags, to index sequenced tags in accordance with their reliability. This is made through a series of evaluations based on a defined rule set. S3T allows the identification/selection of tags, considered more reliable for further gene expression analysis. This methodology was applied to a public SAGE dataset. In order to compare data before and after filtering, a hierarchical clustering analysis was performed in samples from the same type of tissue, in distinct biological conditions, using these two datasets. Our results provide evidences suggesting that it is possible to find more congruous clusters after using S3T scoring system. These results substantiate the proposed application to generate more reliable data. This is a significant contribution for determination of global gene expression profiles. The library analysis with S3T is freely available at http://gdm.fmrp.usp.br/s3t/. S3T source code and datasets can also be downloaded from the aforementioned website.

  12. Non-coding sequence retrieval system for comparative genomic analysis of gene regulatory elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temple Matthew H

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Completion of the human genome sequence along with other species allows for greater understanding of the biochemical mechanisms and processes that govern healthy as well as diseased states. The large size of the genome sequences has made them difficult to study using traditional methods. There are many studies focusing on the protein coding sequences, however, not much is known about the function of non-coding regions of the genome. It has been demonstrated that parts of the non-coding region play a critical role as gene regulatory elements. Enhancers that regulate transcription processes have been found in intergenic regions. Furthermore, it is observed that regulatory elements found in non-coding regions are highly conserved across different species. However, the analysis of these regulatory elements is not as straightforward as it may first seem. The development of a centralized resource that allows for the quick and easy retrieval of non-coding sequences from multiple species and is capable of handing multi-gene queries is critical for the analysis of non-coding sequences. Here we describe the development of a web-based non-coding sequence retrieval system. Results This paper presents a Non-Coding Sequences Retrieval System (NCSRS. The NCSRS is a web-based bioinformatics tool that performs fast and convenient retrieval of non-coding and coding sequences from multiple species related to a specific gene or set of genes. This tool has compiled resources from multiple sources into one easy to use and convenient web based interface. With no software installation necessary, the user needs only internet access to use this tool. Conclusion The unique features of this tool will be very helpful for those studying gene regulatory elements that exist in non-coding regions. The web based application can be accessed on the internet at: http://cell.rutgers.edu/ncsrs/.

  13. Enriching Genomic Resources and Transcriptional Profile Analysis of Miscanthus sinensis under Drought Stress Based on RNA Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Nie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Miscanthus × giganteus is wildly cultivated as a potential biofuel feedstock around the world; however, the narrow genetic basis and sterile characteristics have become a limitation for its utilization. As a progenitor of M. × giganteus, M. sinensis is widely distributed around East Asia providing well abiotic stress tolerance. To enrich the M. sinensis genomic databases and resources, we sequenced and annotated the transcriptome of M. sinensis by using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Approximately 316 million high-quality trimmed reads were generated from 349 million raw reads, and a total of 114,747 unigenes were obtained after de novo assembly. Furthermore, 95,897 (83.57% unigenes were annotated to at least one database including NR, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, GO, and NT, supporting that the sequences obtained were annotated properly. Differentially expressed gene analysis indicates that drought stress 15 days could be a critical period for M. sinensis response to drought stress. The high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of M. sinensis under drought stress has greatly enriched the current genomic available resources. The comparison of DEGs under different periods of drought stress identified a wealth of candidate genes involved in drought tolerance regulatory networks, which will facilitate further genetic improvement and molecular studies of the M. sinensis.

  14. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Engineering, Yokohama, Japan). The complete mtDNA se- quence of O. martensii reported in this paper was deposited in GenBank under the accession number GU177877. Molecular phylogenetic analyses. In an attempt to further confirm the phylogenetic rela- tions within Neobatrachia and the phylogenetic position of.

  15. Identification and nucleotide sequence of the thymidine kinase gene of Shope fibroma virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, C.; McFadden, G.

    1986-01-01

    The thymidine kinase (TK) gene of Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic leporipoxvirus, was localized within the viral genome with degenerate oligonucleotide probes. These probes were constructed to two regions of high sequence conservation between the vaccinia virus TK gene and those of several known eucaryotic cellular TK genes, including human, mouse, hamster, and chicken TK genes. The oligonucleotide probes initially localized the SFV TK gene 50 kilobases (kb) from the right terminus of the 160-kb SFV genome within the 9.5-kb BamHI-HindIII fragment E. Fine-mapping analysis indicated that the TK Gene was within a 1.2-kb AvaI-HaeIII fragment, and DNA sequencing of this region revealed an open reading frame capable of encoding a polypeptide of 187 amino acids possessing considerable homology to the TK genes of the vaccinia, variola, and monkeypox orthopoxviruses and also to a variety of cellular TK genes. Homology matrix analysis and homology scores suggest that the SFV TK gene has diverged significantly from its counterpart members in the orthopoxvirus genus. Nevertheless, the presence of conserved upstream open reading frames on the 5' side of all of the poxvirus TK genes indicates a similarity of functional organization between the orthopoxviruses and leporipoxviruses. These data suggest a common ancestral origin for at least some of the unique internal regions of the leporipoxviruses and orthopoxviruses as exemplified by SFV and vaccinia virus, respectively

  16. Identification of cancer/testis-antigen genes by massively parallel signature sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Tseng; Scanlan, Matthew J; Venditti, Charis A; Chua, Ramon; Theiler, Gregory; Stevenson, Brian J; Iseli, Christian; Gure, Ali O; Vasicek, Tom; Strausberg, Robert L; Jongeneel, C Victor; Old, Lloyd J; Simpson, Andrew J G

    2005-05-31

    Massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) generates millions of short sequence tags corresponding to transcripts from a single RNA preparation. Most MPSS tags can be unambiguously assigned to genes, thereby generating a comprehensive expression profile of the tissue of origin. From the comparison of MPSS data from 32 normal human tissues, we identified 1,056 genes that are predominantly expressed in the testis. Further evaluation by using MPSS tags from cancer cell lines and EST data from a wide variety of tumors identified 202 of these genes as candidates for encoding cancer/testis (CT) antigens. Of these genes, the expression in normal tissues was assessed by RT-PCR in a subset of 166 intron-containing genes, and those with confirmed testis-predominant expression were further evaluated for their expression in 21 cancer cell lines. Thus, 20 CT or CT-like genes were identified, with several exhibiting expression in five or more of the cancer cell lines examined. One of these genes is a member of a CT gene family that we designated as CT45. The CT45 family comprises six highly similar (>98% cDNA identity) genes that are clustered in tandem within a 125-kb region on Xq26.3. CT45 was found to be frequently expressed in both cancer cell lines and lung cancer specimens. Thus, MPSS analysis has resulted in a significant extension of our knowledge of CT antigens, leading to the discovery of a distinctive X-linked CT-antigen gene family.

  17. Sequencing of 15622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Munoz-Amatriain, M.; Lonardi, S.; Luo, M.C.; Madishetty, K.; Svensson, J.T.; Moscou, M. J.; Wanamaker, S.; Kudrna, D.; Zheng, J.; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, J.; Mammadov, J.; Close, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 1 (2015), s. 216-227 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Barley * Hordeum vulgare L * BAC sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.468, year: 2015

  18. Comprehensive sampling of gene expression in human cell lines with massively parallel signature sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongeneel, C Victor; Iseli, Christian; Stevenson, Brian J; Riggins, Gregory J; Lal, Anita; Mackay, Alan; Harris, Robert A; O'Hare, Michael J; Neville, A Munro; Simpson, Andrew J G; Strausberg, Robert L

    2003-04-15

    Whereas information is rapidly accumulating about the structure and position of genes encoded in the human genome, less is known about the complexity and relative abundance of their expression in individual human cells and tissues. Here, we describe the characteristics of the transcriptomes of two cultured cell lines, HB4a (normal breast epithelium) and HCT-116 (colon adenocarcinoma), using massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS). We generated in excess of 10(7) short signature sequences per cell line, thus providing a comprehensive snapshot of gene expression, within the technical limitations of the method. The number of genes expressed at one copy per cell or more in either of the lines was estimated to be between 10,000 and 15,000. The vast majority of the transcripts found in these cells can be mapped to known genes and their polyadenylation variants. Among the genes that could be identified from their signature sequences, approximately 8,500 were expressed by both cell lines, whereas 6,000 showed cellular specificity. Taking into account sequence tags that map uniquely to the genome but not to known transcripts, overall the data are consistent with an upper limit of 17,000 for the total number of genes expressed at more than one copy per cell in one or both of the two cell lines examined.

  19. Citrus plastid-related gene profiling based on expressed sequence tag analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tercilio Calsa Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastid-related sequences, derived from putative nuclear or plastome genes, were searched in a large collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs and genomic sequences from the Citrus Biotechnology initiative in Brazil. The identified putative Citrus chloroplast gene sequences were compared to those from Arabidopsis, Eucalyptus and Pinus. Differential expression profiling for plastid-directed nuclear-encoded proteins and photosynthesis-related gene expression variation between Citrus sinensis and Citrus reticulata, when inoculated or not with Xylella fastidiosa, were also analyzed. Presumed Citrus plastome regions were more similar to Eucalyptus. Some putative genes appeared to be preferentially expressed in vegetative tissues (leaves and bark or in reproductive organs (flowers and fruits. Genes preferentially expressed in fruit and flower may be associated with hypothetical physiological functions. Expression pattern clustering analysis suggested that photosynthesis- and carbon fixation-related genes appeared to be up- or down-regulated in a resistant or susceptible Citrus species after Xylella inoculation in comparison to non-infected controls, generating novel information which may be helpful to develop novel genetic manipulation strategies to control Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC.

  20. Dual redundant sequencing strategy: Full-length gene characterisation of 1056 novel and confirmatory HLA alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, V; Zweiniger, C; Surendranath, V; Lang, K; Schöfl, G; Dahl, A; Winkler, S; Lange, V; Böhme, I; Schmidt, A H

    2017-08-01

    The high-throughput department of DKMS Life Science Lab encounters novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles on a daily basis. To characterise these alleles, we have developed a system to sequence the whole gene from 5'- to 3'-UTR for the HLA loci A, B, C, DQB1 and DPB1 for submission to the European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Nucleotide Archive (EMBL-ENA) and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database. Our workflow is based on a dual redundant sequencing strategy. Using shotgun sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq instrument and single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing on a PacBio RS II instrument, we are able to achieve highly accurate HLA full-length consensus sequences. Remaining conflicts are resolved using the R package DR2S (Dual Redundant Reference Sequencing). Given the relatively high throughput of this strategy, we have developed the semi-automated web service TypeLoader, to aid in the submission of sequences to the EMBL-ENA and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database. In the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database release 3.24.0 (April 2016; prior to the submission of the sequences described here), only 5.2% of all known HLA alleles have been fully characterised together with intronic and UTR sequences. So far, we have applied our strategy to characterise and submit 1056 HLA alleles, thereby more than doubling the number of fully characterised alleles. Given the increasing application of next generation sequencing (NGS) for full gene characterisation in clinical practice, extending the HLA database concomitantly is highly desirable. Therefore, we propose this dual redundant sequencing strategy as a workflow for submission of novel full-length alleles and characterisation of sequences that are as yet incomplete. This would help to mitigate the predominance of partially known alleles in the database. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence and gene organization of the rainbow runner (Elagatis bipinnulata) (Perciformes: Carangidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunyan; Ma, Hongyu; Zhang, Heng; Feng, Chunlei; Wei, Hongqing; Wang, Wei; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fengying; Ma, Lingbo

    2017-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome information can play an important role in species identification, phylogeny, evolution research, genetic differentiation, and diversity. Here we determined the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Elagatis bipinnulata (Perciformes: Carangidae). This circular genome was 16 542 bp in length, and included all 37 typical mitochondrial genes, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes, and a putative control region. The gene order of E. bipinnulata was identical to that observed in most other vertebrates. Of 37 genes, 28 were encoded by heavy strand, while the other ones were encoded by light strand. According to the phylogenetic analysis based on 13 concatenated protein-coding genes, E. bipinnulata was genetically closer to the species of genus Seriola compared with any other species within Perciformes. This work can provide helpful data for further studies on population genetic diversity and molecular evolution.

  2. Rubisco activity and gene expression of tropical tree species under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Young

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... Light intensity is associated with the photosynthetic rate and genetic response to moderate ... light intensity. Thus, this study reviews the relationship between the physiological and Rubisco activity changes and gene expression under different light ... being the most dominant family and Rubiaceae and.

  3. Whole exome sequencing reveals concomitant mutations of multiple FA genes in individual Fanconi anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lixian; Yuan, Weiping; Zeng, Huimin; Zhou, Quanquan; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Jianfeng; Li, Miaomiao; Wang, Xiaomin; Xu, Mingjiang; Yang, Fengchun; Yang, Yungui; Cheng, Tao; Zhu, Xiaofan

    2014-05-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited genetic syndrome with highly variable clinical manifestations. Fifteen genetic subtypes of FA have been identified. Traditional complementation tests for grouping studies have been used generally in FA patients and in stepwise methods to identify the FA type, which can result in incomplete genetic information from FA patients. We diagnosed five pediatric patients with FA based on clinical manifestations, and we performed exome sequencing of peripheral blood specimens from these patients and their family members. The related sequencing data were then analyzed by bioinformatics, and the FANC gene mutations identified by exome sequencing were confirmed by PCR re-sequencing. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations of FANC genes were identified in all of the patients. The FA subtypes of the patients included FANCA, FANCM and FANCD2. Interestingly, four FA patients harbored multiple mutations in at least two FA genes, and some of these mutations have not been previously reported. These patients' clinical manifestations were vastly different from each other, as were their treatment responses to androstanazol and prednisone. This finding suggests that heterozygous mutation(s) in FA genes could also have diverse biological and/or pathophysiological effects on FA patients or FA gene carriers. Interestingly, we were not able to identify de novo mutations in the genes implicated in DNA repair pathways when the sequencing data of patients were compared with those of their parents. Our results indicate that Chinese FA patients and carriers might have higher and more complex mutation rates in FANC genes than have been conventionally recognized. Testing of the fifteen FANC genes in FA patients and their family members should be a regular clinical practice to determine the optimal care for the individual patient, to counsel the family and to obtain a better understanding of FA pathophysiology.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Fer-de-Lance Virus reveals a novel gene in reptilian Paramyxoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, G.; Batts, W.N.; Ahne, W.; Winton, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The complete RNA genome sequence of the archetype reptilian paramyxovirus, Fer-de-Lance virus (FDLV), has been determined. The genome is 15,378 nucleotides in length and consists of seven nonoverlapping genes in the order 3??? N-U-P-M-F-HN-L 5???, coding for the nucleocapsid, unknown, phospho-, matrix, fusion, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase, and large polymerase proteins, respectively. The gene junctions contain highly conserved transcription start and stop signal sequences and tri-nucleotide intergenic regions similar to those of other Paramyxoviridae. The FDLV P gene expression strategy is like that of rubulaviruses, which express the accessory V protein from the primary transcript and edit a portion of the mRNA to encode P and I proteins. There is also an overlapping open reading frame potentially encoding a small basic protein in the P gene. The gene designated U (unknown), encodes a deduced protein of 19.4 kDa that has no counterpart in other paramyxoviruses and has no similarity with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database. Active transcription of the U gene in infected cells was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis, and bicistronic N-U mRNA was also evident. The genomes of two other snake paramyxovirus genotypes were also found to have U genes, with 11 to 16% nucleotide divergence from the FDLV U gene. Pairwise comparisons of amino acid identities and phylogenetic analyses of all deduced FDLV protein sequences with homologous sequences from other Paramyxoviridae indicate that FDLV represents a new genus within the subfamily Paramyxovirinae. We suggest the name Ferlavirus for the new genus, with FDLV as the type species.

  5. Novel noncontiguous duplications identified with a comprehensive mutation analysis in the DMD gene by DMD gene-targeted sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Huanhuan; Xiao, Bing; Wei, Wei; Liu, Yu; Ye, Hui; Ying, Xiaomin; Chen, Yingwei; Liu, Xiaoqing; Ji, Xing; Sun, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Genomic rearrangements, such as intragenic deletions and duplications, are the most prevalent types of mutation in the DMD gene, and DMD mutations underlie Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Using multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and DMD gene-targeted sequencing, we performed a molecular characterization of two cases of complex noncontiguous duplication rearrangements that involved inverted duplications. The breakpoint sequences were analyzed to investigate the mechanisms of the rearrangement. The two cases shared the same duplication events (Dup-nml-Dup/inv), and both involved microhomology and small insertions at the breakpoints. Additionally, in case 1, SNP sequencing results indicated that the de novo duplication mutation arose in the allele that originated from the grandfather. This study has identified a novel type of DMD complex rearrangement and provides insight into the molecular basis of this genomic rearrangement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Chromosomal location and nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli dapA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richaud, F; Richaud, C; Ratet, P; Patte, J C

    1986-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the first enzyme of the diaminopimelate and lysine pathway is dihydrodipicolinate synthetase, which is feedback-inhibited by lysine and encoded by the dapA gene. The location of the dapA gene on the bacterial chromosome has been determined accurately with respect to the neighboring purC and dapE genes. The complete nucleotide sequence and the transcriptional start of the dapA gene were determined. The results show that dapA consists of a single cistron encoding a 292-amino acid polypeptide of 31,372 daltons. Images PMID:3514578

  7. Chromosomal location and nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli dapA gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Richaud, F; Richaud, C; Ratet, P; Patte, J C

    1986-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the first enzyme of the diaminopimelate and lysine pathway is dihydrodipicolinate synthetase, which is feedback-inhibited by lysine and encoded by the dapA gene. The location of the dapA gene on the bacterial chromosome has been determined accurately with respect to the neighboring purC and dapE genes. The complete nucleotide sequence and the transcriptional start of the dapA gene were determined. The results show that dapA consists of a single cistron encoding a 292-amin...

  8. Chromosomal location and nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli dapA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richaud, F; Richaud, C; Ratet, P; Patte, J C

    1986-04-01

    In Escherichia coli, the first enzyme of the diaminopimelate and lysine pathway is dihydrodipicolinate synthetase, which is feedback-inhibited by lysine and encoded by the dapA gene. The location of the dapA gene on the bacterial chromosome has been determined accurately with respect to the neighboring purC and dapE genes. The complete nucleotide sequence and the transcriptional start of the dapA gene were determined. The results show that dapA consists of a single cistron encoding a 292-amino acid polypeptide of 31,372 daltons.

  9. Massively parallel sequencing and targeted exomes in familial kidney disease can diagnose underlying genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Andrew J; McCarthy, Hugh J; Ho, Gladys; Holman, Katherine; Farnsworth, Elizabeth; Patel, Chirag; Fletcher, Jeffery T; Mallawaarachchi, Amali; Quinlan, Catherine; Bennetts, Bruce; Alexander, Stephen I

    2017-12-01

    Inherited kidney disease encompasses a broad range of disorders, with both multiple genes contributing to specific phenotypes and single gene defects having multiple clinical presentations. Advances in sequencing capacity may allow a genetic diagnosis for familial renal disease, by testing the increasing number of known causative genes. However, there has been limited translation of research findings of causative genes into clinical settings. Here, we report the results of a national accredited diagnostic genetic service for familial renal disease. An expert multidisciplinary team developed a targeted exomic sequencing approach with ten curated multigene panels (207 genes) and variant assessment individualized to the patient's phenotype. A genetic diagnosis (pathogenic genetic variant[s]) was identified in 58 of 135 families referred in two years. The genetic diagnosis rate was similar between families with a pediatric versus adult proband (46% vs 40%), although significant differences were found in certain panels such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (88% vs 17%). High diagnostic rates were found for Alport syndrome (22 of 27) and tubular disorders (8 of 10), whereas the monogenic diagnostic rate for congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract was one of 13. Quality reporting was aided by a strong clinical renal and genetic multidisciplinary committee review. Importantly, for a diagnostic service, few variants of uncertain significance were found with this targeted, phenotype-based approach. Thus, use of targeted massively parallel sequencing approaches in inherited kidney disease has a significant capacity to diagnose the underlying genetic disorder across most renal phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolation of laccase gene-specific sequences from white rot and brown rot fungi by PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Souza, T.M.; Boominathan, K.; Reddy, C.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Degenerate primers corresponding to the consensus sequences of the copper-binding regions in the N-terminal domains of known basidiomycete laccases were used to isolate laccase gene-specific sequences from strains representing nine genera of wood rot fungi. All except three gave the expected PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequences of each of the PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequence of each of the PCR products analyzed as a laccase gene sequence, suggesting the specificity of the primers. PCR products of the white rot fungi Ganoderma lucidum, Phlebia brevispora, and Trametes versicolor showed 65 to 74% nucleotide sequence similarity to each other; the similarity in deduced amino acid sequences was 83 to 91%. The PCR products of Lentinula edodes and Lentinus tigrinus, on the other hand, showed relatively low nucleotide and amino acid similarities (58 to 64 and 62 to 81%, respectively); however, these similarities were still much higher than when compared with the corresponding regions in the laccases of the ascomycete fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa. A few of the white rot fungi, as well as Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown rot fungus, gave a 144-bp PCR fragment which had a nucleotide sequence similarity of 60 to 71%. Demonstration of laccase activity in G. trabeum and several other brown rot fungi was of particular interest because these organisms were not previously shown to produce laccases. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Gene expression analysis by massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) on microbead arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, S; Johnson, M; Bridgham, J; Golda, G; Lloyd, D H; Johnson, D; Luo, S; McCurdy, S; Foy, M; Ewan, M; Roth, R; George, D; Eletr, S; Albrecht, G; Vermaas, E; Williams, S R; Moon, K; Burcham, T; Pallas, M; DuBridge, R B; Kirchner, J; Fearon, K; Mao, J; Corcoran, K

    2000-06-01

    We describe a novel sequencing approach that combines non-gel-based signature sequencing with in vitro cloning of millions of templates on separate 5 microm diameter microbeads. After constructing a microbead library of DNA templates by in vitro cloning, we assembled a planar array of a million template-containing microbeads in a flow cell at a density greater than 3x10(6) microbeads/cm2. Sequences of the free ends of the cloned templates on each microbead were then simultaneously analyzed using a fluorescence-based signature sequencing method that does not require DNA fragment separation. Signature sequences of 16-20 bases were obtained by repeated cycles of enzymatic cleavage with a type IIs restriction endonuclease, adaptor ligation, and sequence interrogation by encoded hybridization probes. The approach was validated by sequencing over 269,000 signatures from two cDNA libraries constructed from a fully sequenced strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and by measuring gene expression levels in the human cell line THP-1. The approach provides an unprecedented depth of analysis permitting application of powerful statistical techniques for discovery of functional relationships among genes, whether known or unknown beforehand, or whether expressed at high or very low levels.

  12. Natural variation in CBF gene sequence, gene expression and freezing tolerance in the Versailles core collection of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunel Dominique

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants from temperate regions are able to withstand freezing temperatures due to a process known as cold acclimation, which is a prior exposure to low, but non-freezing temperatures. During acclimation, a large number of genes are induced, bringing about biochemical changes in the plant, thought to be responsible for the subsequent increase in freezing tolerance. Key regulatory proteins in this process are the CBF1, 2 and 3 transcription factors which control the expression of a set of target genes referred to as the "CBF regulon". Results To assess the role of the CBF genes in cold acclimation and freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana, the CBF genes and their promoters were sequenced in the Versailles core collection, a set of 48 accessions that maximizes the naturally-occurring genetic diversity, as well as in the commonly used accessions Col-0 and WS. Extensive polymorphism was found in all three genes. Freezing tolerance was measured in all accessions to assess the variability in acclimated freezing tolerance. The effect of sequence polymorphism was investigated by evaluating the kinetics of CBF gene expression, as well as that of a subset of the target COR genes, in a set of eight accessions with contrasting freezing tolerance. Our data indicate that CBF genes as well as the selected COR genes are cold induced in all accessions, irrespective of their freezing tolerance. Although we observed different levels of expression in different accessions, CBF or COR gene expression was not closely correlated with freezing tolerance. Conclusion Our results indicate that the Versailles core collection contains significant natural variation with respect to freezing tolerance, polymorphism in the CBF genes and CBF and COR gene expression. Although there tends to be more CBF and COR gene expression in tolerant accessions, there are exceptions, reinforcing the idea that a complex network of genes is involved in freezing tolerance

  13. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Olea europaea L. to Identify Genes Involved in the Development of the Pollen Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Iaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In olive (Olea europaea L., the processes controlling self-incompatibility are still unclear and the molecular basis underlying this process are still not fully characterized. In order to determine compatibility relationships, using next-generation sequencing techniques and a de novo transcriptome assembly strategy, we show that pollen tubes from different olive plants, grown in vitro in a medium containing its own pistil and in combination pollen/pistil from self-sterile and self-fertile cultivars, have a distinct gene expression profile and many of the differentially expressed sequences between the samples fall within gene families involved in the development of the pollen tube, such as lipase, carboxylesterase, pectinesterase, pectin methylesterase, and callose synthase. Moreover, different genes involved in signal transduction, transcription, and growth are overrepresented. The analysis also allowed us to identify members in actin and actin depolymerization factor and fibrin gene family and member of the Ca2+ binding gene family related to the development and polarization of pollen apical tip. The whole transcriptomic analysis, through the identification of the differentially expressed transcripts set and an extended functional annotation analysis, will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of pollen germination and pollen tube growth in the olive.

  14. Preliminary study on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene sequences and phylogeny of flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Feng; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Peijun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2005-09-01

    A 605 bp section of mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene from Paralichthys olivaceus, Pseudorhombus cinnamomeus, Psetta maxima and Kareius bicoloratus, which represent 3 families of Order Pleuronectiformes was amplified by PCR and sequenced to show the molecular systematics of Pleuronectiformes for comparison with related gene sequences of other 6 flatfish downloaded from GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis based on genetic distance from related gene sequences of 10 flatfish showed that this method was ideal to explore the relationship between species, genera and families. Phylogenetic trees set-up is based on neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods that accords to the general rule of Pleuronectiformes evolution. But they also resulted in some confusion. Unlike data from morphological characters, P. olivaceus clustered with K. bicoloratus, but P. cinnamomeus did not cluster with P. olivaceus, which is worth further studying.

  15. Gene identification in the obligate fungal pathogen Blumeria graminis by expressed sequence tag analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S W; Rasmussen, S W; Glaring, M A; Rouster, J A; Christiansen, S K; Oliver, R P

    2001-08-01

    Powdery mildew of barley is caused by the obligate fungal pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Haploid conidia of B. graminis, landing on the barley leaf, germinate to form first a primary germ tube and then an appressorial germ tube. The appressorial germ tube differentiates into a mature appressorium from which direct penetration of host epidermis occurs. Here we present data on 4908 expressed sequence tags obtained from B. graminis conidia. The combined sequences represent 2676 clones describing 1669 individual genes. Comparison with sequences from other pathogenic and nonpathogenic fungi defines hypotheses on the genes required for pathogenicity and growth on the host. The putative roles of some of the identified genes are discussed. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  16. High prevalence of human polyomavirus JC VP1 gene sequences in pediatric malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiramizu, B; Hu, N; Frisque, R J; Nerurkar, V R

    2007-05-15

    The oncogenic potential of human polyomavirus JC (JCV), a ubiquitous virus that establishes infection during early childhood in approximately 70% of the human population, is unclear. As a neurotropic virus, JCV has been implicated in pediatric central nervous system tumors and has been suggested to be a pathogenic agent in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Recent studies have demonstrated JCV gene sequences in pediatric medulloblastomas and among patients with colorectal cancer. JCV early protein T-antigen (TAg) can form complexes with cellular regulatory proteins and thus may play a role in tumorigenesis. Since JCV is detected in B-lymphocytes, a retrospective analysis of pediatric B-cell and non-B-cell malignancies as well as other HIV-associated pediatric malignancies was conducted for the presence of JCV gene sequences. DNA was extracted from 49 pediatric malignancies, including Hodgkin disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, large cell lymphoma and sarcoma. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted using JCV specific nested primer sets for the transcriptional control region (TCR), TAg, and viral capsid protein 1 (VP1) genes. Southern blot analysis and DNA sequencing were used to confirm specificity of the amplicons. A 215-bp region of the JCV VP1 gene was amplified from 26 (53%) pediatric tumor tissues. The JCV TCR and two JCV gene regions were amplified from a leiomyosarcoma specimen from an HIV-infected patient. The leiomyosarcoma specimen from the cecum harbored the archetype strain of JCV. Including the leiomyosarcoma specimen, three of five specimens sequenced were typed as JCV genotype 2. The failure to amplify JCV TCR, and TAg gene sequences in the presence of JCV VP1 gene sequence is surprising. Even though JCV TAg gene, which is similar to the SV40 TAg gene, is oncogenic in animal models, the presence of JCV gene sequences in pediatric malignancies does not prove causality. In light of the available data on the presence of JCV in normal and cancerous

  17. A Primer for Disease Gene Prioritization Using Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuoguo Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS technology produces a tremendous amount of raw sequence data. The challenges for researchers are to process the raw data, to map the sequences to genome, to discover variants that are different from the reference genome, and to prioritize/rank the variants for the question of interest. The recent development of many computational algorithms and programs has vastly improved the ability to translate sequence data into valuable information for disease gene identification. However, the NGS data analysis is complex and could be overwhelming for researchers who are not familiar with the process. Here, we outline the analysis pipeline and describe some of the most commonly used principles and tools for analyzing NGS data for disease gene identification.

  18. Linking secondary metabolites to gene clusters through genome sequencing of six diverse Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbølling, Inge; Vesth, Tammi C.; Frisvad, Jens C.

    2018-01-01

    to determine phylogeny and genetic diversity, showing that each presented genome contains 15–27% genes not found in other sequenced Aspergilli. In particular, A. novofumigatus was compared with the pathogenic species A. fumigatus. This suggests that A. novofumigatus can produce most of the same allergens......, virulence, and pathogenicity factors as A. fumigatus, suggesting that A. novofumigatus could be as pathogenic as A. fumigatus. Furthermore, SMs were linked to gene clusters based on biological and chemical knowledge and analysis, genome sequences, and predictive algorithms. We thus identify putative SM....... campestris, A. novofumigatus, A. ochraceoroseus, and A. steynii) have been whole-genome PacBio sequenced to provide genetic references in three Aspergillus sections. A. taichungensis and A. candidus also were sequenced for SM elucidation. Thirteen Aspergillus genomes were analyzed with comparative genomics...

  19. Outbreak tracking of Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) using partial NS1 gene sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryt-Hansen, Pia; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Hagberg, E. E.

    2017-01-01

    . However, in 2015, several outbreaks of AMDV occurred at mink farms throughout Denmark, and the sources of these outbreaks were not known. Partial NS1 gene sequencing, phylogenetic analyses data were utilized along with epidemiological to determine the origin of the outbreaks. The phylogenetic analyses...... of partial NS1 gene sequences revealed that the outbreaks were caused by two different clusters of viruses that were clearly different from the strains found in Northern Jutland. These clusters had restricted geographical distribution, and the variation within the clusters was remarkably low. The outbreaks...... on Zealand were epidemiologically linked and a close sequence match was found to two virus sequences from Sweden. The other cluster of outbreaks restricted to Jutland and Funen were linked to three feed producers (FP) but secondary transmissions between farms in the same geographical area could...

  20. Comparative sequence analysis of cis elements present in Glycine max L. leghemoglobin lba and lbc3 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    She, Q; Sandal, N N; Stougaard, J

    1993-01-01

    The soybean leghemoglobin lba gene promoter sequence was determined and aligned with the promoter sequence of the soybean lbc3 gene from the same gene family. Five highly conserved regions were found. There are two large conserved regions, one of which overlaps the basic promoter while the other...

  1. Comparative sequence analysis of cis elements present in Glycine max L. leghemoglobin lba and lbc3 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    She, Q; Sandal, N N; Stougaard, J

    1993-01-01

    The soybean leghemoglobin lba gene promoter sequence was determined and aligned with the promoter sequence of the soybean lbc3 gene from the same gene family. Five highly conserved regions were found. There are two large conserved regions, one of which overlaps the basic promoter while the other ...

  2. Inducing gene expression by targeting promoter sequences using small activating RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vector-based systems comprised of exogenous nucleic acid sequences remain the standard for ectopic expression of a particular gene. Such systems offer robust overexpression, but have inherent drawbacks such the tedious process of construction, excluding sequences (e.g. introns and untranslated regions important for gene function and potential insertional mutagenesis of host genome associated with the use of viral vectors. We and others have recently reported that short double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs can induce endogenous gene expression by targeting promoter sequences in a phenomenon referred to as RNA activation (RNAa and such dsRNAs are termed small activating RNAs (saRNAs. To date, RNAa has been successfully utilized to induce the expression of different genes such as tumor suppressor genes. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for target selection and dsRNA design with associated experiments to facilitate RNAa in cultured cells. This technique may be applied to selectively activate endogenous gene expression for studying gene function, interrogating molecular pathways and reprogramming cell fate.

  3. Activation and clustering of a Plasmodium falciparum var gene are affected by subtelomeric sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Michael F; Tang, Jingyi; Sumardy, Fransisca; Nguyen, Hanh H T; Selvarajah, Shamista A; Josling, Gabrielle A; Day, Karen P; Petter, Michaela; Brown, Graham V

    2017-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum var multigene family encodes the cytoadhesive, variant antigen PfEMP1. P. falciparum antigenic variation and cytoadhesion specificity are controlled by epigenetic switching between the single, or few, simultaneously expressed var genes. Most var genes are maintained in perinuclear clusters of heterochromatic telomeres. The active var gene(s) occupy a single, perinuclear var expression site. It is unresolved whether the var expression site forms in situ at a telomeric cluster or whether it is an extant compartment to which single chromosomes travel, thus controlling var switching. Here we show that transcription of a var gene did not require decreased colocalisation with clusters of telomeres, supporting var expression site formation in situ. However following recombination within adjacent subtelomeric sequences, the same var gene was persistently activated and did colocalise less with telomeric clusters. Thus, participation in stable, heterochromatic, telomere clusters and var switching are independent but are both affected by subtelomeric sequences. The var expression site colocalised with the euchromatic mark H3K27ac to a greater extent than it did with heterochromatic H3K9me3. H3K27ac was enriched within the active var gene promoter even when the var gene was transiently repressed in mature parasites and thus H3K27ac may contribute to var gene epigenetic memory. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. cDNA sequence of human transforming gene hst and identification of the coding sequence required for transforming activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, M.; Yoshida, T.; Miyagawa, K.; Sakamoto, H.; Terada, M.; Sugimura, T.

    1987-01-01

    The hst gene was originally identified as a transforming gene in DNAs from human stomach cancers and from a noncancerous portion of stomach mucosa by DNA-mediated transfection assay using NIH3T3 cells. cDNA clones of hst were isolated from the cDNA library constructed from poly(A) + RNA of a secondary transformant induced by the DNA from a stomach cancer. The sequence analysis of the hst cDNA revealed the presence of two open reading frames. When this cDNA was inserted into an expression vector containing the simian virus 40 promoter, it efficiently induced the transformation of NIH3T3 cells upon transfection. It was found that one of the reading frames, which coded for 206 amino acids, was responsible for the transforming activity

  5. Genome sequence analysis of predicted polyprenol reductase gene from mangrove plant kandelia obovata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Sagami, H.; Baba, S.; Oku, H.

    2018-03-01

    It has been previously reported that dolichols but not polyprenols were predominated in mangrove leaves and roots. Therefore, the occurrence of larger amounts of dolichol in leaves of mangrove plants implies that polyprenol reductase is responsible for the conversion of polyprenol to dolichol may be active in mangrove leaves. Here we report the early assessment of probably polyprenol reductase gene from genome sequence of mangrove plant Kandelia obovata. The functional assignment of the gene was based on a homology search of the sequences against the non-redundant (nr) peptide database of NCBI using Blastx. The degree of sequence identity between DNA sequence and known polyprenol reductase was confirmed using the Blastx probability E-value, total score, and identity. The genome sequence data resulted in three partial sequences, termed c23157 (700 bp), c23901 (960 bp), and c24171 (531 bp). The c23157 gene showed the highest similarity (61%) to predicted polyprenol reductase 2- like from Gossypium raimondii with E-value 2e-100. The second gene was c23901 to exhibit high similarity (78%) to the steroid 5-alpha-reductase Det2 from J. curcas with E-value 2e-140. Furthermore, the c24171 gene depicted highest similarity (79%) to the polyprenol reductase 2 isoform X1 from Jatropha curcas with E- value 7e-21.The present study suggested that the c23157, c23901, and c24171, genes may encode predicted polyprenol reductase. The c23157, c23901, c24171 are therefore the new type of predicted polyprenol reductase from K. obovata.

  6. Comprehensive sampling of gene expression in human cell lines with massively parallel signature sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Jongeneel, C. Victor; Iseli, Christian; Stevenson, Brian J.; Riggins, Gregory J.; Lal, Anita; Mackay, Alan; Harris, Robert A.; O'Hare, Michael J.; Neville, A. Munro; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; Strausberg, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Whereas information is rapidly accumulating about the structure and position of genes encoded in the human genome, less is known about the complexity and relative abundance of their expression in individual human cells and tissues. Here, we describe the characteristics of the transcriptomes of two cultured cell lines, HB4a (normal breast epithelium) and HCT-116 (colon adenocarcinoma), using massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS). We generated in excess of 107 short signature sequences...

  7. Hunting down frame shifts: Ecological analysis of diverse functional gene sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eStrejcek

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Functional gene ecological analyses using amplicon sequencing can be challenging as translated sequences are often burdened with shifted reading frames. The aim of this work was to evaluate several bioinformatics tools designed to correct errors which arise during sequencing in an effort to reduce the number of frame-shifts (FS. Genes encoding for alpha subunits of biphenyl (bphA and benzoate (benA dioxygenases were used as model sequences. FrameBot, a FS correction tool, was able to reduce the number of detected FS to zero. However, up to 43.1% of sequences were discarded by FrameBot as non-specific targets. Therefore, we proposed a de novo mode of FrameBot for FS correction, which works on a similar basis as common chimera identifying platforms and is not dependent on reference sequences. By nature of FrameBot de novo design, it is crucial to provide it with data as error free as possible. We tested the ability of several publicly available correction tools to decrease the number of errors in the data sets. The combination of Maximum Expected Error (MEE filtering and single linkage pre-clustering (SLP proved the most efficient read procession. Applying FrameBot de novo on the processed data enabled analysis of BphA sequences with minimal losses of potentially functional sequences not homologous to those previously known. This experiment also demonstrated the extensive diversity of dioxygenases in soil. A script which performs FrameBot de novo is presented in the supplementary material to the study and the tool was implemented into FunGene Pipeline available at http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/FunGenePipeline/ and https://github.com/rdpstaff/Framebot.

  8. Nucleotide sequences of immunoglobulin eta genes of chimpanzee and orangutan: DNA molecular clock and hominoid evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakoyama, Y.; Hong, K.J.; Byun, S.M.; Hisajima, H.; Ueda, S.; Yaoita, Y.; Hayashida, H.; Miyata, T.; Honjo, T.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the phylogenetic relationships among hominoids and the dates of their divergence, the complete nucleotide sequences of the constant region of the immunoglobulin eta-chain (C/sub eta1/) genes from chimpanzee and orangutan have been determined. These sequences were compared with the human eta-chain constant-region sequence. A molecular clock (silent molecular clock), measured by the degree of sequence divergence at the synonymous (silent) positions of protein-encoding regions, was introduced for the present study. From the comparison of nucleotide sequences of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin and ..beta..- and delta-globulin genes between humans and Old World monkeys, the silent molecular clock was calibrated: the mean evolutionary rate of silent substitution was determined to be 1.56 x 10/sup -9/ substitutions per site per year. Using the silent molecular clock, the mean divergence dates of chimpanzee and orangutan from the human lineage were estimated as 6.4 +/- 2.6 million years and 17.3 +/- 4.5 million years, respectively. It was also shown that the evolutionary rate of primate genes is considerably slower than those of other mammalian genes.

  9. Phylogeny of ruminants secretory ribonuclease gene sequences of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beintema, Jaap J; Breukelman, Heleen J; Dubois, Jean-Yves F; Warmels, Hayo W

    2003-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses based on primary structures of mammalian ribonucleases, indicated that three homologous enzymes (pancreatic, seminal and brain ribonucleases) present in the bovine species are the results of gene duplication events, which occurred in the ancestor of the ruminants after divergence from other artiodactyls. In this paper sequences are presented of genes encoding pancreatic and brain-type ribonuclease genes of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana). The seminal-type ribonuclease gene could not be detected in this species, neither by PCR amplification nor by Southern blot analyses, indicating that it may be deleted completely in this species. Previously we demonstrated of a study of amino acid sequences of pancreatic ribonucleases of a large number of ruminants the monophyly of bovids and cervids, and that pronghorn groups with giraffe. Here we present phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences of ribonucleases and other molecules from ruminant species and compare these with published data. Chevrotain (Tragulus) always groups with the other ruminants as separate taxon from the pecora or true ruminants. Within the pecora the relationships between Bovidae, Cervidae, Giraffidae, and pronghorn (Antilocapra) cannot be decided with certainty, although in the majority of analyses Antilocapra diverges first, separately or joined with giraffe. Broad taxon sampling and investigation of specific sequence features may be as important for reliable conclusions in phylogeny as the lengths of analyzed sequences.

  10. Exome sequencing for gene discovery in lethal fetal disorders--harnessing the value of extreme phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Isabel; Friedman, Jan M

    2015-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of Mendelian disorders, and many novel genes have been discovered to cause disease phenotypes when mutant. At the same time, next-generation sequencing approaches have enabled non-invasive prenatal testing of free fetal DNA in maternal blood. However, little attention has been paid to using whole exome and genome sequencing strategies for gene identification in fetal disorders that are lethal in utero, because they can appear to be sporadic and Mendelian inheritance may be missed. We present challenges and advantages of applying next-generation sequencing approaches to gene discovery in fetal malformation phenotypes and review recent successful discovery approaches. We discuss the implication and significance of recessive inheritance and cross-species phenotyping in fetal lethal conditions. Whole exome sequencing can be used in individual families with undiagnosed lethal congenital anomaly syndromes to discover causal mutations, provided that prior to data analysis, the fetal phenotype can be correlated to a particular developmental pathway in embryogenesis. Cross-species phenotyping allows providing further evidence for causality of discovered variants in genes involved in those extremely rare phenotypes and will increase our knowledge about normal and abnormal human developmental processes. Ultimately, families will benefit from the option of early prenatal diagnosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Analysis and comparison of fragrant gene sequence in some rice cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karami Noushafarin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the fragrant trait in rice (Oryza sativa L. is largely controlled by fgr gene on chromosome 8 and it has been specified that the existence of an 8 bp deletion and three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in exon 7 is effective on this trait. In this study, sequence alignment analysis of fgr exon7 on chromosome 8 for 11 different fragrant and non-fragrant cultivars revealed that 5 aromatic rice cultivars carried 3 SNPs and 8 bp deletion in exon7 which terminates prematurely at a TAA stop codon. However, 5 of the non-aromatics showed a sequence identical to the published Nipponbare, being non-fragrant Japonica variety sequence. An exception among them was Bejar, which had 8 bp deletion and 3SNPs but it was non-aromatic. Sequencing can determine nucleotide alignment of a gene and give beneficial information about gene function. In silico prediction showed proteins sequences alignment of fgr gene for Khazar and Domsiah genotypes were different. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase complete enzyme belongs to Khazar non-fragrant genotype that has complete length and 503 amino acids while non-functional BADH2 enzyme for Domsiah fragrant genotype has 251 amino acids that result in accumulate 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (2AP and produces aroma in fragrant genotypes.

  12. Improved identification of Gordonia, Rhodococcus and Tsukamurella species by 5'-end 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Kong, Fanrong; Chen, Sharon; Xiao, Meng; Sorrell, Tania; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shuo; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2011-01-01

    The identification of fastidious aerobic Actinomycetes such as Gordonia, Rhodococcus, and Tsukamurella has remained a challenge leading to clinically significant misclassifications. This study is intended to examine the feasibility of partial 5'-end 16S rRNA gene sequencing for the identification of Gordonia, Rhodococcus, and Tsukamurella, and defined potential reference sequences for species from each of these genera. The 16S rRNA gene sequence based identification algorithm for species identification was used and enhanced by aligning test sequences with reference sequences from the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature. Conventional PCR based 16S rRNA gene sequencing and the alignment of the isolate 16S rRNA gene sequence with reference sequences accurately identified 100% of clinical strains of aerobic Actinomycetes. While partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of reference type strains matched with the 16S rRNA gene sequences of 19 isolates in our data set, another 13 strains demonstrated a degree of polymorphism with a 1-4 bp difference in the regions of difference. 5'-end 606 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing, coupled with the assignment of well defined reference sequences to clinically relevant species of bacteria, can be a useful strategy for improving the identification of clinically relevant aerobic Actinomycetes.

  13. Whole genome sequencing resource identifies 18 new candidate genes for autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuen, Ryan K C; Merico, Daniele; Bookman, Matt; Howe, Jennifer L.; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Patel, Rohan V.; Whitney, Joe; Deflaux, Nicole; Bingham, Jonathan; Wang, Zhuozhi; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Buchanan, Janet A.; Walker, Susan; Marshall, Christian R.; Uddin, Mohammed; Zarrei, Mehdi; Deneault, Eric; D'Abate, Lia; Chan, Ada J S; Koyanagi, Stephanie; Paton, Tara; Pereira, Sergio L.; Hoang, Ny; Engchuan, Worrawat; Higginbotham, Edward J.; Ho, Karen; Lamoureux, Sylvia; Li, Weili; MacDonald, Jeffrey R.; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Sung, Wilson W L; Tsoi, Fiona J.; Wei, John; Xu, Lizhen; Tasse, Anne Marie; Kirby, Emily; Van Etten, William; Twigger, Simon; Roberts, Wendy; Drmic, Irene; Jilderda, Sanne; Modi, Bonnie Mackinnon; Kellam, Barbara; Szego, Michael; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Weksberg, Rosanna; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Woodbury-Smith, Marc; Brian, Jessica; Senman, Lili; Iaboni, Alana; Doyle-Thomas, Krissy; Thompson, Ann; Chrysler, Christina; Leef, Jonathan; Savion-Lemieux, Tal; Smith, Isabel M.; Liu, Xudong; Nicolson, Rob; Seifer, Vicki; Fedele, Angie; Cook, Edwin H.; Dager, Stephen; Estes, Annette; Gallagher, Louise; Malow, Beth A.; Parr, Jeremy R.; Spence, Sarah J.; Vorstman, Jacob; Frey, Brendan J.; Robinson, James T.; Strug, Lisa J.; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Carter, Melissa T.; Hallmayer, Joachim; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Szatmari, Peter; Ring, Robert H.; Glazer, David; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2017-01-01

    We are performing whole-genome sequencing of families with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to build a resource (MSSNG) for subcategorizing the phenotypes and underlying genetic factors involved. Here we report sequencing of 5,205 samples from families with ASD, accompanied by clinical information,

  14. Metazoan Remaining Genes for Essential Amino Acid Biosynthesis: Sequence Conservation and Evolutionary Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor R. Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential amino acids (EAA consist of a group of nine amino acids that animals are unable to synthesize via de novo pathways. Recently, it has been found that most metazoans lack the same set of enzymes responsible for the de novo EAA biosynthesis. Here we investigate the sequence conservation and evolution of all the metazoan remaining genes for EAA pathways. Initially, the set of all 49 enzymes responsible for the EAA de novo biosynthesis in yeast was retrieved. These enzymes were used as BLAST queries to search for similar sequences in a database containing 10 complete metazoan genomes. Eight enzymes typically attributed to EAA pathways were found to be ubiquitous in metazoan genomes, suggesting a conserved functional role. In this study, we address the question of how these genes evolved after losing their pathway partners. To do this, we compared metazoan genes with their fungal and plant orthologs. Using phylogenetic analysis with maximum likelihood, we found that acetolactate synthase (ALS and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT diverged from the expected Tree of Life (ToL relationships. High sequence conservation in the paraphyletic group Plant-Fungi was identified for these two genes using a newly developed Python algorithm. Selective pressure analysis of ALS and BHMT protein sequences showed higher non-synonymous mutation ratios in comparisons between metazoans/fungi and metazoans/plants, supporting the hypothesis that these two genes have undergone non-ToL evolution in animals.

  15. cDNA sequences reveal considerable gene prediction inaccuracy in the Plasmodium falciparum genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenzuela Jesus G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completion of the Plasmodium falciparum genome represents a milestone in malaria research. The genome sequence allows for the development of genome-wide approaches such as microarray and proteomics that will greatly facilitate our understanding of the parasite biology and accelerate new drug and vaccine development. Designing and application of these genome-wide assays, however, requires accurate information on gene prediction and genome annotation. Unfortunately, the genes in the parasite genome databases were mostly identified using computer software that could make some erroneous predictions. Results We aimed to obtain cDNA sequences to examine the accuracy of gene prediction in silico. We constructed cDNA libraries from mixed blood stages of P. falciparum parasite using the SMART cDNA library construction technique and generated 17332 high-quality expressed sequence tags (EST, including 2198 from primer-walking experiments. Assembly of our sequence tags produced 2548 contigs and 2671 singletons versus 5220 contigs and 5910 singletons when our EST were assembled with EST in public databases. Comparison of all the assembled EST/contigs with predicted CDS and genomic sequences in the PlasmoDB database identified 356 genes with predicted coding sequences fully covered by EST, including 85 genes (23.6% with introns incorrectly predicted. Careful automatic software and manual alignments found an additional 308 genes that have introns different from those predicted, with 152 new introns discovered and 182 introns with sizes or locations different from those predicted. Alternative spliced and antisense transcripts were also detected. Matching cDNA to predicted genes also revealed silent chromosomal regions, mostly at subtelomere regions. Conclusion Our data indicated that approximately 24% of the genes in the current databases were predicted incorrectly, although some of these inaccuracies could represent alternatively

  16. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene of Corynebacterium glutamicum: molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikmanns, B J; Follettie, M T; Griot, M U; Sinskey, A J

    1989-08-01

    The ppc gene of Corynebacterium glutamicum encoding phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase was isolated by complementation of a ppc mutant of Escherichia coli using a cosmid gene bank of chromosomal C. glutamicum DNA. By subsequent subcloning into the plasmid pUC8 and deletion analysis, the ppc gene could be located on a 3.3 kb SalI fragment. This fragment was able to complement the E. coli ppc mutant and conferred PEP carboxylase activity to the mutant. The complete nucleotide sequence of the ppc gene including 5' and 3' flanking regions has been determined and the primary structure of PEP carboxylase was deduced. The sequence predicts a 919 residue protein product (molecular weight of 103 154) which shows 34% similarity with the respective E. coli enzyme.

  17. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of the Cellobiohydrolase I Genes from Some Basidiomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharachchikumbura, Sajeewa S. N.; Wongkham, Shannaphimon; Sysouphanthong, Phongeun; Phookamsak, Rungtiwa; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Genes encoding the cellobiohydrolase enzyme (CBHI), designated as cbhI, were isolated from the basidiomycetes Auricularia fuscosuccinea, Pleurotus giganteus, P. eryngii, P. ostreatus, and P. sajor-caju. Initially, the fungal genomic DNA was extracted using a modified cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) protocol and used as a DNA template. The cbhI genes were then amplified and cloned using the pGEM-T Easy Vector Systems. The sizes of these PCR amplicons were between 700~800 bp. The DNA sequences obtained were similar showing high identity to the cbhI gene family. These cbhI genes were partial consisting of three coding regions and two introns. The deduced amino acid sequences exhibited significant similarity to those of fungal CBHI enzymes belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 7. PMID:22870052

  18. Molecular cloning, sequence characterization and expression pattern of Rab18 gene from watermelon (Citrullus lanatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinli, Xiao; Lei, Peng

    2015-03-04

    The complete mRNA sequence of watermelon Rab18 gene was amplified through the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The full-length mRNA was 1010 bp containing a 645 bp open reading frame, which encodes a protein of 214 amino acids. Sequence analysis revealed that watermelon Rab18 protein shares high homology with the Rab18 of cucumber (99%), muskmelon (98%), Morus notabilis (90%), tomato (89%), wine grape (89%) and potato (88%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that watermelon Rab18 gene has a closer genetic relationship with Rab18 gene of cucumber and muskmelon. Tissue expression profile analysis indicated that watermelon Rab18 gene was highly expressed in root, stem and leaf, moderately expressed in flower and weakly expressed in fruit.

  19. Abnormal gene expression and gene fusion in lung adenocarcinoma with high-throughput RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z-H; Zheng, R; Gao, Y; Zhang, Q; Zhang, H

    2014-02-01

    To explore the universal law of the abnormal gene expression and the structural variation of genes related to lung adenocarcinoma, the gene expression profile of GSE37765 were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were analyzed with t-test and NOISeq tool, and the core DEGs were screened out by combining with another RNA-seq data containing totally 77 pairs of samples in 77 patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Moreover, the functional annotation of the core DEGs was performed by using the Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery following selection of oncogene and tumor suppressor by combining with tumor suppressor genes and Cancer Genes database, and motif-finding of core DEGs was performed with motif-finding algorithm Seqpos. We also used Tophat-fusion tool to further explore the fusion genes. In total, 850 downregulated DEGs and 206 upregulated DEGs were screened out in lung adenocarcinoma tissues. Next, we selected 543 core DEGs, including 401 downregulated and 142 upregulated genes, and vasculature development (P=1.89E-06) was significantly enriched among downregulated core genes, as well as mitosis (P=6.26E-04) enriched among upregulated core genes. On the basis of the cellular localization analysis of core genes, wnt-1-induced secreted protein 1 (WISP1) and receptor (G protein-coupled) activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) identified mainly located in extracellular region and extracellular space. We also screened one oncogene, v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog-like 2 (MYBL2). Moreover, transcription factor GATA2 was mined by motif-finding analysis. Finally, four fusion genes belonged to the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) family. WISP1, RAMP1, MYBL2 and GATA2 could be potential targets of treatment for lung adenocarcinoma and the fusion of HLA family genes might have important roles in lung adenocarcinoma.

  20. Complete nucleotide sequence of a functional HLA-DP beta gene and the region between the DP beta 1 and DP alpha 1 genes: comparison of the 5' ends of HLA class II genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, A; Trowsdale, J

    1985-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an HLA-DP beta 1 gene and part of the adjacent DP alpha 1 gene, up to and including the signal sequence exon, were determined. The sequence of the DP beta 1 gene identified it as the DPw4 allele. The six exons of the DP beta 1 gene spanned over 11,000 bp of sequence. The arrangement of the gene was broadly analogous to genes of other class II beta chains. The beta 1 exon was flanked by introns of over 4 kb. Comparisons with published sequences of cDNA clone...

  1. Influences on gene expression in vivo by a Shine-Dalgarno sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Haining; Zhao, Qing; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I

    2006-01-01

    The Shine-Dalgarno (SD+: 5'-AAGGAGG-3') sequence anchors the mRNA by base pairing to the 16S rRNA in the small ribosomal subunit during translation initiation. We have here compared how an SD+ sequence influences gene expression, if located upstream or downstream of an initiation codon...... sites compete for ribosomes that bind to an SD+ located between them. A minor positive contribution to upstream initiation resulting from 3' to 5' ribosomal diffusion along the mRNA is suggested. Analysis of the E. coli K12 genome suggests that the SD+ or SD-like sequences are systematically avoided...

  2. Eliminating HIV-1 Packaging Sequences from Lentiviral Vector Proviruses Enhances Safety and Expedites Gene Transfer for Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Conrad A; Counsell, John R; Perocheau, Dany P; Karda, Rajvinder; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Brugman, Martijn H; Galla, Melanie; Schambach, Axel; McKay, Tristan R; Waddington, Simon N; Howe, Steven J

    2017-08-02

    Lentiviral vector genomic RNA requires sequences that partially overlap wild-type HIV-1 gag and env genes for packaging into vector particles. These HIV-1 packaging sequences constitute 19.6% of the wild-type HIV-1 genome and contain functional cis elements that potentially compromise clinical safety. Here, we describe the development of a novel lentiviral vector (LTR1) with a unique genomic structure designed to prevent transfer of HIV-1 packaging sequences to patient cells, thus reducing the total HIV-1 content to just 4.8% of the wild-type genome. This has been achieved by reconfiguring the vector to mediate reverse-transcription with a single strand transfer, instead of the usual two, and in which HIV-1 packaging sequences are not copied. We show that LTR1 vectors offer improved safety in their resistance to remobilization in HIV-1 particles and reduced frequency of splicing into human genes. Following intravenous luciferase vector administration to neonatal mice, LTR1 sustained a higher level of liver transgene expression than an equivalent dose of a standard lentivirus. LTR1 vectors produce reverse-transcription products earlier and start to express transgenes significantly quicker than standard lentiviruses after transduction. Finally, we show that LTR1 is an effective lentiviral gene therapy vector as demonstrated by correction of a mouse hemophilia B model. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inactivation of gene expression in plants as a consequence of specific sequence duplication.

    OpenAIRE

    Flavell, R B

    1994-01-01

    Numerous examples now exist in plants where the insertion of multiple copies of a transgene leads to loss of expression of some or all copies of the transgene. Where the transgene contains sequences homologous to an endogenous gene, expression of both transgene and endogenous gene is sometimes found to be impaired. Several examples of these phenomena displaying different features are reviewed. Possible explanations for the observed phenomena are outlined, drawing on known cellular processes i...

  4. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of the human and mouse cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genes

    OpenAIRE

    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Jamison, D. Curtis; Touchman, Jeffrey W.; Chissoe, Stephanie L.; Braden Maduro, Valerie V.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Dietrich, Nicole L.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Iyer, Leslie M.; Weintraub, Lauren A.; Cotton, Marc; Courtney, Laura; Edwards, Jennifer; Maupin, Rachel; Ozersky, Philip

    2000-01-01

    The identification of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) in 1989 represents a landmark accomplishment in human genetics. Since that time, there have been numerous advances in elucidating the function of the encoded protein and the physiological basis of cystic fibrosis. However, numerous areas of cystic fibrosis biology require additional investigation, some of which would be facilitated by information about the long-range sequence context of the CFTR gene. Fo...

  5. Sequences of the coat protein gene from brazilian isolates of Papaya ringspot virus

    OpenAIRE

    LIMA, ROBERTO C. A.; SOUZA JR., MANOEL T.; PIO-RIBEIRO, GILVAN; LIMA, J. ALBERSIO A.

    2002-01-01

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is the causal agent of the main papaya (Carica papaya) disease in the world. Brazil is currently the world's main papaya grower, responsible for about 40% of the worldwide production. Resistance to PRSV on transgenic plants expressing the PRSV coat protein (cp) gene was shown to be dependent on the sequence homology between the cp transgene expressed in the plant genome and the cp gene from the incoming virus, in an isolate-specific fashion. Therefore, knowledge o...

  6. X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, H.; Haas, S.A.; Chelly, J.; Van Esch, H.; Raynaud, M.; de Brouwer, A.P.M.; Weinert, S.; Froyen, G.; Frints, S.G.M.; Laumonnier, F.; Zemojtel, T.; Love, M.I.; Richard, H.; Emde, A.K.; Bienek, M.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of ...

  7. Overexpression of an EaZIP gene devoid of transit peptide sequence induced leaf variegation in tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayu Guan

    Full Text Available Leaf variegation is an ornamental trait that is not only biologically but also economically important. In our previous study, a Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase homologue, EaZIP (Epipremnum aureum leucine zipper was found to be associated with leaf variegation in Epipremnum aureum (Linden & Andre G.S. Bunting. The protein product of this nuclear-encoded gene is targeted back to chloroplast involving in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Based on a web-based homology analysis, the EaZIP was found to lack a chloroplast transit peptide (cTP sequence. In the present study, we tested if overexpression of the EaZIP cDNA with or without the cTP sequence could affect leaf variegation. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing EaZIP genes with (EaZIPwcTP and without (EaZIPwocTP cTP sequence were generated. Many plant lines harboring EaZIPwocTP showed variegated leaves, while none of the plant lines with EaZIPwcTP produced such a phenotype. Molecular analysis of T0 plants and selfed T1 progeny, as well as observations of tagged marker GFP (green fluorescent protein did not show any other difference in patterns of gene integrity and expression. Results from this study indicate that transgenic approach for expressing EaZIPwocTP could be a novel method of generating variegated plants even through the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated.

  8. Mutational analysis of the mycobacteriophage BPs promoter PR reveals context-dependent sequences for mycobacterial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Lauren M; Hatfull, Graham F

    2014-10-01

    The PR promoter of mycobacteriophage BPs directs early lytic gene expression and is under the control of the BPs repressor, gp33. Reporter gene fusions showed that PR has modest activity in an extrachromosomal context but has activity that is barely detectable in an integrated context, even in the absence of its repressor. Mutational dissection of PR showed that it uses a canonical -10 hexamer recognized by SigA, and mutants with mutations to the sequence 5'-TATAMT had the greatest activities. It does not contain a 5'-TGN-extended -10 sequence, although mutants with mutations creating an extended -10 sequence had substantially increased promoter activity. Mutations in the -35 hexamer also influenced promoter activity but were strongly context dependent, and similar substitutions in the -35 hexamer differentially affected promoter activity, depending on the -10 and extended -10 motifs. This warrants caution in the construction of synthetic promoters or the bioinformatic prediction of promoter activity. Combinations of mutations throughout PR generated a calibrated series of promoters for expression of stably integrated recombinant genes in both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis, with maximal promoter activity being more than 2-fold that of the strong hsp60 promoter. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. BBH-LS: an algorithm for computing positional homologs using sequence and gene context similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Melvin; Leong, Hon Wai

    2012-01-01

    Identifying corresponding genes (orthologs) in different species is an important step in genome-wide comparative analysis. In particular, one-to-one correspondences between genes in different species greatly simplify certain problems such as transfer of function annotation and genome rearrangement studies. Positional homologs are the direct descendants of a single ancestral gene in the most recent common ancestor and by definition form one-to-one correspondence. In this work, we present a simple yet effective method (BBH-LS) for the identification of positional homologs from the comparative analysis of two genomes. Our BBH-LS method integrates sequence similarity and gene context similarity in order to get more accurate ortholog assignments. Specifically, BBH-LS applies the bidirectional best hit heuristic to a combination of sequence similarity and gene context similarity scores. We applied our method to the human, mouse, and rat genomes and found that BBH-LS produced the best results when using both sequence and gene context information equally. Compared to the state-of-the-art algorithms, such as MSOAR2, BBH-LS is able to identify more positional homologs with fewer false positives.

  10. Cloning, DNA sequence, and expression of Aeromonas caviae WS7b chitinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Amarila; Wenuganen, S; Suwanto, Antonius; Tjahjono, Budi

    2003-01-01

    A chitinase-producing bacterium, designated WS7b, was isolated from a soil sample obtained from a black-pepper plantation on Bangka Island, Indonesia. Fatty-acid methyl-ester analysis indicated that the isolate was Aeromonas caviae. A chitinase gene from WS7b was cloned in a pUC19-based plasmid vector, but without its natural promoter. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene was determined, and the structural gene consisted of a 2748-bp region encoding 864 amino acids. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the gene had been cloned without its promoter, and this was confirmed by chitinase-plate assay of the truncated version of the gene in Escherichia coli. The chitinase gene product showed amino-acid sequence similarity to chiA from A. caviae. Chitinase enzyme activity was determined spectrophotometrically, using colloidal chitin azure as substrate for extracellular and intracellular fractions. The ability of the chitinase cloned in E. coli to hydrolyze chitin was less than that of the enzyme in its indigenous host.

  11. Candidate Gene Sequence Analyses toward Identifying Rsv3-Type Resistance to Soybean Mosaic Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Redekar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available is one of three genetic loci conferring strain-specific resistance to (SMV. The locus has been mapped to a 154-kb region on chromosome 14, containing a cluster of five nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR resistance genes. High sequence similarity between the candidate genes challenges fine mapping of the locus. Among the five, Glyma14g38533 showed the highest transcript abundance in 1 to 3 h of SMV-G7 inoculation. Comparative sequence analyses were conducted with the five candidate NB-LRR genes from susceptible (-type soybean [ (L. Merr.] cultivar Williams 82, resistant (-type cultivar Hwangkeum, and resistant lines L29 and RRR. Sequence comparisons revealed that Glyma14g38533 had far more polymorphisms than the other candidate genes. Interestingly, Glyma14g38533 gene from -type lines exhibited 150 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and six insertion–deletion (InDel markers relative to -type line, Furthermore, the polymorphisms identified in three -type lines were highly conserved. Several polymorphisms were validated in 18 -type resistant and six -type susceptible lines and were found associated with their disease response. The majority of the polymorphisms were located in LRR domain encoding region, which is involved in pathogen recognition via protein–protein interactions. These findings associating Glyma14g38533 with -type resistance to SMV suggest it is the most likely candidate gene for .

  12. Transcriptome sequencing and expression analysis of terpenoid biosynthesis genes in Litsea cubeba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jiao Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aromatic essential oils extracted from fresh fruits of Litsea cubeba (Lour. Pers., have diverse medical and economic values. The dominant components in these essential oils are monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of terpenoid biosynthesis is essential for improving the yield and quality of terpenes. However, the 40 available L. cubeba nucleotide sequences in the public databases are insufficient for studying the molecular mechanisms. Thus, high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of L. cubeba is necessary to generate large quantities of transcript sequences for the purpose of gene discovery, especially terpenoid biosynthesis related genes. RESULTS: Using Illumina paired-end sequencing, approximately 23.5 million high-quality reads were generated. De novo assembly yielded 68,648 unigenes with an average length of 834 bp. A total of 38,439 (56% unigenes were annotated for their functions, and 35,732 and 25,806 unigenes could be aligned to the GO and COG database, respectively. By searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG, 16,130 unigenes were assigned to 297 KEGG pathways, and 61 unigenes, which contained the mevalonate and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathways, could be related to terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. Of the 12,963 unigenes, 285 were annotated to the terpenoid pathways using the PlantCyc database. Additionally, 14 terpene synthase genes were identified from the transcriptome. The expression patterns of the 16 genes related to terpenoid biosynthesis were analyzed by RT-qPCR to explore their putative functions. CONCLUSION: RNA sequencing was effective in identifying a large quantity of sequence information. To our knowledge, this study is the first exploration of the L. cubeba transcriptome, and the substantial amount of transcripts obtained will accelerate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of essential oils biosynthesis. The

  13. Global sequence diversity of the lactate dehydrogenase gene in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpalipan, Phumin; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Harnyuttanakorn, Pongchai

    2018-01-09

    Antigen-detecting rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been recommended by the World Health Organization for use in remote areas to improve malaria case management. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of Plasmodium falciparum is one of the main parasite antigens employed by various commercial RDTs. It has been hypothesized that the poor detection of LDH-based RDTs is attributed in part to the sequence diversity of the gene. To test this, the present study aimed to investigate the genetic diversity of the P. falciparum ldh gene in Thailand and to construct the map of LDH sequence diversity in P. falciparum populations worldwide. The ldh gene was sequenced for 50 P. falciparum isolates in Thailand and compared with hundreds of sequences from P. falciparum populations worldwide. Several indices of molecular variation were calculated, including the proportion of polymorphic sites, the average nucleotide diversity index (π), and the haplotype diversity index (H). Tests of positive selection and neutrality tests were performed to determine signatures of natural selection on the gene. Mean genetic distance within and between species of Plasmodium ldh was analysed to infer evolutionary relationships. Nucleotide sequences of P. falciparum ldh could be classified into 9 alleles, encoding 5 isoforms of LDH. L1a was the most common allelic type and was distributed in P. falciparum populations worldwide. Plasmodium falciparum ldh sequences were highly conserved, with haplotype and nucleotide diversity values of 0.203 and 0.0004, respectively. The extremely low genetic diversity was maintained by purifying selection, likely due to functional constraints. Phylogenetic analysis inferred the close genetic relationship of P. falciparum to malaria parasites of great apes, rather than to other human malaria parasites. This study revealed the global genetic variation of the ldh gene in P. falciparum, providing knowledge for improving detection of LDH-based RDTs and supporting the candidacy of

  14. Comparative analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) between drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes of chickpea under terminal drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important grain-legume crop that is mainly grown in rainfed areas, where terminal drought is a major constraint to its productivity. We generated expressed sequence tags (ESTs) by suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) to identify differentially expressed genes in drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes in chickpea. Results EST libraries were generated by SSH from root and shoot tissues of IC4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought resistant) exposed to terminal drought conditions by the dry down method. SSH libraries were also constructed by using 2 sets of bulks prepared from the RNA of root tissues from selected recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (10 each) for the extreme high and low root biomass phenotype. A total of 3062 unigenes (638 contigs and 2424 singletons), 51.4% of which were novel in chickpea, were derived by cluster assembly and sequence alignment of 5949 ESTs. Only 2185 (71%) unigenes showed significant BLASTX similarity (<1E-06) in the NCBI non-redundant (nr) database. Gene ontology functional classification terms (BLASTX results and GO term), were retrieved for 2006 (92.0%) sequences, and 656 sequences were further annotated with 812 Enzyme Commission (EC) codes and were mapped to 108 different KEGG pathways. In addition, expression status of 830 unigenes in response to terminal drought stress was evaluated using macro-array (dot blots). The expression of few selected genes was validated by northern blotting and quantitative real-time PCR assay. Conclusion Our study compares not only genes that are up- and down-regulated in a drought-tolerant genotype under terminal drought stress and a drought susceptible genotype but also between the bulks of the selected RILs exhibiting extreme phenotypes. More than 50% of the genes identified have been shown to be associated with drought stress in chickpea for the first time. This study not only serves as resource for marker discovery, but can provide

  15. Inversion of Moraxella lacunata type 4 pilin gene sequences by a Neisseria gonorrhoeae site-specific recombinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsa, F W; Meyer, T F; Fussenegger, M

    1997-01-01

    A plasmid library of Neisseria gonorrhoeae sequences was screened for the ability to mediate recombinations on a sequence containing the Moraxella lacunata type 4 pilin gene invertible region in Escherichia coli. A plasmid containing the N. gonorrhoeae sequence encoding the putative recombinase (gcr) was identified and sequenced. Plasmids containing gcr were able to mediate site-specific recombinations despite a weak amino acid homology to Piv, the native M. lacunata pilin gene invertase. The gcr gene is present only in pathogenic strains of Neisseria tested; however, in our assays gene knockouts of gcr did not alter the variation of surface features that play a role in the pathogenesis of N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:9079926

  16. DNMT3A GENE POINT MUTATIONS DETECTION IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA PATIENTS USING SEQUENCING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vinogradov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to estimate the frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients (pts using target automatic sequencing technique.Material and Methods. Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples were obtained from 34 AML pts aged 21 to 64, who were treated in Sverdlovsk Regional Hematological Centre (Ekaterinburg during the period 2012–2014. Distribution of the pts according to FAB-classification was as follows: AML M0 – 3, M1 – 1, M2 – 12, M3 – 3, M4 – 10, M5 – 2, M6 – 1, M7 – 1, blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm – 1. Total RNA was extracted from leukemic cells and subjected to reverse transcription. DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 were amplified by PCR. Detection of mutations in DNMT3A gene was performed by direct sequencing. Sequencing was realized using an automatic genetic analyzer ABI Prism 310.Results. The average frequency of functionally significant point mutations in DNMT3A gene exons 18– 26 among the treated AML pts was 5.9%. They were detected in morphological subgroups M2 and M4(according to WHO classification. The average frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations among the AML M2 and M4 pts without chromosomal aberrations and TP53 gene point mutations was 14.3%. In both cases there were samples in which DNMT3A gene mutations were accompanied by molecular lesions of NPM1, KRAS and WT1 genes. AML pts with DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations characterized by poor response to standard chemotherapeutic regimens and unfavorable prognosis.

  17. Inferring the gene network underlying the branching of tomato inflorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Astola

    Full Text Available The architecture of tomato inflorescence strongly affects flower production and subsequent crop yield. To understand the genetic activities involved, insight into the underlying network of genes that initiate and control the sympodial growth in the tomato is essential. In this paper, we show how the structure of this network can be derived from available data of the expressions of the involved genes. Our approach starts from employing biological expert knowledge to select the most probable gene candidates behind branching behavior. To find how these genes interact, we develop a stepwise procedure for computational inference of the network structure. Our data consists of expression levels from primary shoot meristems, measured at different developmental stages on three different genotypes of tomato. With the network inferred by our algorithm, we can explain the dynamics corresponding to all three genotypes simultaneously, despite their apparent dissimilarities. We also correctly predict the chronological order of expression peaks for the main hubs in the network. Based on the inferred network, using optimal experimental design criteria, we are able to suggest an informative set of experiments for further investigation of the mechanisms underlying branching behavior.

  18. Deep sequencing of ESTs from nacreous and prismatic layer producing tissues and a screen for novel shell formation-related genes in the pearl oyster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeharu Kinoshita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite its economic importance, we have a limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying shell formation in pearl oysters, wherein the calcium carbonate crystals, nacre and prism, are formed in a highly controlled manner. We constructed comprehensive expressed gene profiles in the shell-forming tissues of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata and identified novel shell formation-related genes candidates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed the GS FLX 454 system and constructed transcriptome data sets from pallial mantle and pearl sac, which form the nacreous layer, and from the mantle edge, which forms the prismatic layer in P. fucata. We sequenced 260477 reads and obtained 29682 unique sequences. We also screened novel nacreous and prismatic gene candidates by a combined analysis of sequence and expression data sets, and identified various genes encoding lectin, protease, protease inhibitors, lysine-rich matrix protein, and secreting calcium-binding proteins. We also examined the expression of known nacreous and prismatic genes in our EST library and identified novel isoforms with tissue-specific expressions. CONCLUSIONS: We constructed EST data sets from the nacre- and prism-producing tissues in P. fucata and found 29682 unique sequences containing novel gene candidates for nacreous and prismatic layer formation. This is the first report of deep sequencing of ESTs in the shell-forming tissues of P. fucata and our data provide a powerful tool for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms of molluscan biomineralization.

  19. Expression profiles of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) genes under ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    protein homologue, xyloglucanendo-1,4-β-D-gucanase precursor, PR10, and the putative non-specific lipid transfer protein StnsLTP. [Hwang E-W, Kim K-A, Park S-C, Jeong M-J, Byun M-O and Kwon H-B 2005 Expression profiles of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) genes under cold stress conditions; J. Biosci. 30 657–667].

  20. IS21-558 insertion sequences are involved in the mobility of the multiresistance gene cfr

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehrenberg, Corinna; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Schwarz, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    During a study of florfenicol-resistant porcine staphylococci from Denmark, the genes cfr and fexA were detected in the chromosomal DNA or on plasmids of Staphylococcus hyicus, Staphylococcus warneri, and Staphylococcus simulans. A novel variant of the phenicol resistance transposon Tn558...... exporter gene lsa(B) and the gene cfr for combined resistance to phenicols, lincosamides, oxazolidinones, pleuromutilins, and streptogramin A antibiotics bracketed by IS21-558 insertion sequences orientated in the same direction. A 6-bp target site duplication was detected at the integration site within...

  1. Flavonoid Biosynthesis Genes Putatively Identified in the Aromatic Plant Polygonum minus via Expressed Sequences Tag (EST Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamri Zainal

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available P. minus is an aromatic plant, the leaf of which is widely used as a food additive and in the perfume industry. The leaf also accumulates secondary metabolites that act as active ingredients such as flavonoid. Due to limited genomic and transcriptomic data, the biosynthetic pathway of flavonoids is currently unclear. Identification of candidate genes involved in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway will significantly contribute to understanding the biosynthesis of active compounds. We have constructed a standard cDNA library from P. minus leaves, and two normalized full-length enriched cDNA libraries were constructed from stem and root organs in order to create a gene resource for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, especially flavonoid biosynthesis. Thus, large‑scale sequencing of P. minus cDNA libraries identified 4196 expressed sequences tags (ESTs which were deposited in dbEST in the National Center of Biotechnology Information (NCBI. From the three constructed cDNA libraries, 11 ESTs encoding seven genes were mapped to the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. Finally, three flavonoid biosynthetic pathway-related ESTs chalcone synthase, CHS (JG745304, flavonol synthase, FLS (JG705819 and leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase, LDOX (JG745247 were selected for further examination by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR in different P. minus organs. Expression was detected in leaf, stem and root. Gene expression studies have been initiated in order to better understand the underlying physiological processes.

  2. Cloning and sequencing of an alkaline protease gene from Bacillus lentus and amplification of the gene on the B. lentus chromosome by an improved technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, P L; Tangney, M; Pedersen, P E; Hastrup, S; Diderichsen, B; Jørgensen, S T

    2000-02-01

    A gene encoding an alkaline protease was cloned from an alkalophilic bacillus, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The cloned gene was used to increase the copy number of the protease gene on the chromosome by an improved gene amplification technique.

  3. Identification of the conserved coding sequences of three chitin synthase genes in Fonsecaea pedrosoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppayil, S M; Peng, M; Mendoza, L; Levins, T A; Szaniszlo, P J

    1996-01-01

    Primers having designs based on highly conserved stretches in the deduced amino acid sequences of chitin synthase (CHS) genes were used in PCR reactions to amplify 600 bp and 366 bp products from the genomic DNA of three major causal agents of chromoblastomycosis. Cloning and sequencing of the PCR products of one of these fungi, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, identified three CHS sequences designated as FpCHS1, FpCHS2 and FpCHS3. FpCHS1 and FpCHS2 were homologous to regions of CHS1 and CHS2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and their derived amino acid sequences fell into chitin synthase classes I and II, respectively. FpCHS3 was homologous to a region of the CAL1/CSD2 gene of S. cerevisiae, which codes for the chitin synthase three (Chs3) enzyme in that fungus. Phylogenetic trees constructed using the deduced amino acid sequences of PCR-amplified CHS products from many fungi clustered F. pedrosoi with other dematiaceous fungi, providing new molecular evidence for the genetic relatedness of these organisms. The identification of these CHS genes in F. pedrosoi will facilitate future studies of the functional roles of chitin synthases in the unique in vivo dimorphism exhibited by chromoblastomycotic fungi.

  4. Distribution of Genes and Repetitive Elements in the Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Genome Estimated Using BAC Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad S. Coates

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Feeding damage caused by the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is destructive to corn plants in North America and Europe where control remains challenging due to evolution of resistance to chemical and transgenic toxins. A BAC library, DvvBAC1, containing 109,486 clones with 104±34.5 kb inserts was created, which has an ~4.56X genome coverage based upon a 2.58 Gb (2.80 pg flow cytometry-estimated haploid genome size. Paired end sequencing of 1037 BAC inserts produced 1.17 Mb of data (~0.05% genome coverage and indicated ~9.4 and 16.0% of reads encode, respectively, endogenous genes and transposable elements (TEs. Sequencing genes within BAC full inserts demonstrated that TE densities are high within intergenic and intron regions and contribute to the increased gene size. Comparison of homologous genome regions cloned within different BAC clones indicated that TE movement may cause haplotype variation within the inbred strain. The data presented here indicate that the D. virgifera virgifera genome is large in size and contains a high proportion of repetitive sequence. These BAC sequencing methods that are applicable for characterization of genomes prior to sequencing may likely be valuable resources for genome annotation as well as scaffolding.

  5. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  6. CLONING AND SEQUENCING OF PSEUDOMONAS GENES DETERMINING SODIUM DODECYL-SULFATE BIODEGRADATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAVISON, J; BRUNEL, F; PHANOPOULOS, A; PROZZI, D; TERPSTRA, P

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of two genes involved in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) degradation, by Pseudomonas, have been determined. One of these, sdsA, codes for an alkyl sulfatase (58 957 Da) and has similarity (31.8% identity over a 201-amino acid stretch) to the N terminus of a predicted protein of

  7. Intraspecific sequence variation in 16S rRNA gene of Ureaplasma diversum isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, L M; Buzinhani, M; Guimaraes, A M S; Marques, R C P; Farias, S T; Neto, R L; Yamaguti, M; Oliveira, R C; Timenetsky, J

    2011-08-26

    Ureaplasma diversum infection in bulls may result in seminal vesiculitis, balanoposthitis and alterations in spermatozoids. In cows, it can cause placentitis, fetal alveolitis, abortion and the birth of weak calves. U. diversum ATCC 49782 (serogroups A), ATCC 49783 (serogroup C) and 34 field isolates were used for this study. These microorganisms were submitted to Polymerase Chain Reaction for 16S gene sequence determination using Taq High Fidelity and the products were purified and bi-directionally sequenced. Using the sequence obtained, a fragment containing four hypervariable regions was selected and nucleotide polymorphisms were identified based on their position within the 16S rRNA gene. Forty-four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were detected. The genotypic variability of the 16S rRNA gene of U. diversum isolates shows that the taxonomy classification of these organisms is likely much more complex than previously described and that 16S rRNA gene sequencing may be used to suggest an epidemiologic pattern of different origin strains. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sequence variation in TgROP7 gene among Toxoplasma gondii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxoplasma gondii can infect a wide range of hosts including mammals and birds, causing toxoplasmosis which is one of the most common parasitic zoonoses worldwide. The present study examined sequence variation in rhoptry 7 (ROP7) gene among different T. gondii isolates from different hosts and geographical ...

  9. Cloning, nucleotide sequence and transcriptional analysis of the uvrA gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, C.G.; Fyfe, J.A.M.; Davies, J.K.

    1997-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid capable of restoring UV resistance to an Escherichia coli uvrA mutant was isolated from a genomic library of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame whose deduced amino acid sequence displayed significant similarity to those of the UvrA proteins of other bacterial species. A second open reading frame (ORF259) was identified upstream from, and in the opposite orientation to the gonococcal uvrA gene. Transcriptional fusions between portions of the gonococcal uvrA upstream region and a reporter gene were used to localise promoter activity in both E. coli and N. gonorrhoeae. The transcriptional starting points of uvrA and ORF259 were mapped in E. coli by primer extension analysis, and corresponding σ 70 promoters were identified. The arrangement of the uvrA-ORF259 intergenic region is similar to that of the gonococcal recA-aroD intergenic region. Both contain inverted copies of the 10 bp neisserial DNA uptake sequence situated between divergently transcribed genes. However, there is no evidence that either the uptake sequence or the proximity of the promoters influences expression of these genes. (author)

  10. Sequence variants in the CLDN14 gene associate with kidney stones and bone mineral density.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorleifsson, G.; Holm, H.; Edvardsson, V.; Walters, G.B.; Styrkarsdottir, U.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Sulem, P.; Halldorsson, B.V.; Vegt, F. de; D'Ancona, F.C.H.; Heijer, M. den; Franzson, L.; Christiansen, C.; Alexandersen, P.; Rafnar, T.; Kristjansson, K.; Sigurdsson, G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Bodvarsson, M.; Indridason, O.S.; Palsson, R.; Kong, A.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.

    2009-01-01

    Kidney stone disease is a common condition. To search for sequence variants conferring risk of kidney stones, we conducted a genome-wide association study in 3,773 cases and 42,510 controls from Iceland and The Netherlands. We discovered common, synonymous variants in the CLDN14 gene that associate

  11. Phylogeny and identification of Pantoea species and typing of Pantoea agglomerans strains by multilocus gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delétoile, Alexis; Decré, Dominique; Courant, Stéphanie; Passet, Virginie; Audo, Jennifer; Grimont, Patrick; Arlet, Guillaume; Brisse, Sylvain

    2009-02-01

    Pantoea agglomerans and other Pantoea species cause infections in humans and are also pathogenic to plants, but the diversity of Pantoea strains and their possible association with hosts and disease remain poorly known, and identification of Pantoea species is difficult. We characterized 36 Pantoea strains, including 28 strains of diverse origins initially identified as P. agglomerans, by multilocus gene sequencing based on six protein-coding genes, by biochemical tests, and by antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Phylogenetic analysis and comparison with other species of Enterobacteriaceae revealed that the genus Pantoea is highly diverse. Most strains initially identified as P. agglomerans by use of API 20E strips belonged to a compact sequence cluster together with the type strain, but other strains belonged to diverse phylogenetic branches corresponding to other species of Pantoea or Enterobacteriaceae and to probable novel species. Biochemical characteristics such as fosfomycin resistance and utilization of d-tartrate could differentiate P. agglomerans from other Pantoea species. All 20 strains of P. agglomerans could be distinguished by multilocus sequence typing, revealing the very high discrimination power of this method for strain typing and population structure in this species, which is subdivided into two phylogenetic groups. PCR detection of the repA gene, associated with pathogenicity in plants, was positive in all clinical strains of P. agglomerans, suggesting that clinical and plant-associated strains do not form distinct populations. We provide a multilocus gene sequencing method that is a powerful tool for Pantoea species delineation and identification and for strain tracking.

  12. Prosthetic joint infection due to Lysobacter thermophilus diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    B Dhawan; S Sebastian; R Malhotra; A Kapil; D Gautam

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of prosthetic joint infection caused by Lysobacter thermophilus which was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Removal of prosthesis followed by antibiotic treatment resulted in good clinical outcome. This case illustrates the use of molecular diagnostics to detect uncommon organisms in suspected prosthetic infections.

  13. Prosthetic joint infection due to Lysobacter thermophilus diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Dhawan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first case of prosthetic joint infection caused by Lysobacter thermophilus which was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Removal of prosthesis followed by antibiotic treatment resulted in good clinical outcome. This case illustrates the use of molecular diagnostics to detect uncommon organisms in suspected prosthetic infections.

  14. Tsukamurella pulmonis bloodstream infection identified by secA1 gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada C; Cano, María E; García de la Fuente, Celia; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; López, Mónica; Fernández-Mazarrasa, Carlos; Agüero, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Recurrent bloodstream infections caused by a Gram-positive bacterium affected an immunocompromised child. Tsukamurella pulmonis was the microorganism identified by secA1 gene sequencing. Antibiotic treatment in combination with removal of the subcutaneous port healed the patient. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. The S-layer gene of Lactobacillus helveticus CNRZ 892 : cloning, sequence and heterologous expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callegari, M.L.; Riboli, B.; Sanders, J.W; Cocconcelli, P.S.; Kok, J.; Venema, G; Morelli, L.

    1998-01-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus CNRZ 892 contains a surface layer (S-layer) composed of protein monomers of 43 kDa organized in regular arrays. The gene encoding this protein (slpH) has been cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. slpH consists of 440 codons and is preceded by a ribosome-binding site

  16. Molecular cloning, sequence characteristics, and tissue expression analysis of ECE1 gene in Tibetan pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Dong; Zhang, Jian; Li, Chuan-Hao; Xu, Hai-Peng; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Yong-Qing; Wang, Hui

    2015-10-25

    Low air pressure and low oxygen partial pressure at high altitude seriously affect the survival and development of human beings and animals. ECE1 is a recently discovered gene that is involved in anti-hypoxia, but the full-length cDNA sequence has not been obtained. For a better understanding of the structure and function of the ECE1 gene and to study its effect in Tibetan pig, the cDNA of the ECE1 gene from the muscle of Tibetan pig was cloned, sequenced and characterized. The ECE1 full-length cDNA sequence consists of 2262 bp coding sequence (CDS) that encodes 753 amino acids with a molecular mass of 85,449 kD, 2 bp 5'UTR and 1507 bp 3'UTR. In addition, the phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that the Tibetan pig ECE1 has a closer genetic relationship and evolution distance with the land mammals ECE1. Furthermore, analysis by qPCR showed that the ECE1 transcript is constitutively expressed in the 10 tissues tested: the liver, subcutaneous fat, kidney, muscle, stomach, heart, brain, spleen, pancreas, and lung. These results serve as a foundation for further insight into the Tibetan pig ECE1 gene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sequence analysis of putative swrW gene required for surfactant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2012-07-17

    Jul 17, 2012 ... Sequence analysis of putative swrW gene required for surfactant serrawettin W1 production from Serratia marcescens. Monabel May N. Apao*, Franco G. Teves and Ma. Reina Suzette B. Madamba. Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Mathematics, MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology, ...

  18. Haplotypes of bovine FoxO1 gene sequence variants and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haplotypes of bovine FoxO1 gene sequence variants and association with growth traits in Qinchuan cattle. YUJIA SUN1, JING XUE1, WENJIAO GUO1, MINGXUN LI1, YONGZHEN HUANG1, XIANYONG LAN1,. CHUZHAO LEI1, CHUNLEI ZHANG2 and HONG CHEN1∗. 1College of Animal Science and Technology, ...

  19. 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic tree of lactobacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactobacilli are ubiquitous in nature and in humans they play a very significant role in the general health maintenance of the host. Identification of lactobacilli has previously been based on culturedependent methods and recently molecular techniques involving gene sequencing are now the 'gold standard'. Scarce ...

  20. Sequence analysis of the N-acetyltransferase 2 gene (NAT2) among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yazun Bashir Jarrar

    2017-11-26

    Nov 26, 2017 ... Sequence analysis of the N-acetyltransferase 2 gene (NAT2) among Jordanian volunteers. Yazun Bashir Jarrar, Ayat Ahmed Balasmeh and Wassan Jarrar. Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, AlZaytoonah University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan. ABSTRACT. The present study aimed to identify ...

  1. Sequence variation in TgROP7 gene among Toxoplasma gondii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-27

    Mar 27, 2012 ... Toxoplasma gondii can infect a wide range of hosts including mammals and birds, causing toxoplasmosis which is one of the most common parasitic zoonoses worldwide. The present study examined sequence variation in rhoptry 7 (ROP7) gene among different T. gondii isolates from different hosts and ...

  2. Patterns of nucleotide sequence variation in ICAM1 and TNF genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have studied DNA sequence variation in and around the genes ICAM1 and TNF, which play functional and correlated roles in inflammatory processes and immune cell responses, in 12 diverse ethnic groups of India, with a view to investigating the relative roles of demographic history and natural selection in shaping the ...

  3. Rapid identification of rice blast resistance gene by specific length amplified fragment sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Excavation of resistance genes is one of the most effective and environment-friendly measures to control the devastating rice disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae. Many resistance genes have been mapped and characterized in the last century. Nevertheless, only a few of the total resistance genes could be really applied in the rice breeding program. Huazhan (HZ is a new native rice restorer line developed in China and widely used in hybrid rice in recent years. HZ and its crossed combinations usually show a broad spectrum of resistance against rice blast in different rice ecosystems in China. Dissection of the genetic background of HZ is very useful for its further application. In this study, a combined method based on bulked segregation analysis (BSA and specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq was used to identify blast resistance gene(s in HZ. A total of 56,187 SLAFs labels were captured and 9051 polymorphic SLAFs markers were analysed and procured in this study. One trait associated with candidate resistance genes region on chromosome 12 overlapping 10.2–17.6 Mb has been identified, in which 10 NBS-LRR (nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat coding genes were used as resistance gene candidates. Our result indicated that SLAF-seq with BSA is a rapid and effective method for initial identification of blast resistance genes. The identification of resistance gene in HZ will improve its molecular breeding and resistance variety application.

  4. Sequence diversity and differential expression of major phenylpropanoid-flavonoid biosynthetic genes among three mango varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van L T; Innes, David J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Monteith, Gregory R; Gidley, Michael J; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2015-07-30

    Mango fruits contain a broad spectrum of phenolic compounds which impart potential health benefits; their biosynthesis is catalysed by enzymes in the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid (PF) pathway. The aim of this study was to reveal the variability in genes involved in the PF pathway in three different mango varieties Mangifera indica L., a member of the family Anacardiaceae: Kensington Pride (KP), Irwin (IW) and Nam Doc Mai (NDM) and to determine associations with gene expression and mango flavonoid profiles. A close evolutionary relationship between mango genes and those from the woody species poplar of the Salicaceae family (Populus trichocarpa) and grape of the Vitaceae family (Vitis vinifera), was revealed through phylogenetic analysis of PF pathway genes. We discovered 145 SNPs in total within coding sequences with an average frequency of one SNP every 316 bp. Variety IW had the highest SNP frequency (one SNP every 258 bp) while KP and NDM had similar frequencies (one SNP every 369 bp and 360 bp, respectively). The position in the PF pathway appeared to influence the extent of genetic diversity of the encoded enzymes. The entry point enzymes phenylalanine lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-mono-oxygenase (C4H) and chalcone synthase (CHS) had low levels of SNP diversity in their coding sequences, whereas anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) showed the highest SNP frequency followed by flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H). Quantitative PCR revealed characteristic patterns of gene expression that differed between mango peel and flesh, and between varieties. The combination of mango expressed sequence tags and availability of well-established reference PF biosynthetic genes from other plant species allowed the identification of coding sequences of genes that may lead to the formation of important flavonoid compounds in mango fruits and facilitated characterisation of single nucleotide polymorphisms between varieties. We discovered an association between the extent of sequence variation and

  5. Perspective on sequence evolution of microsatellite locus (CCGn in Rv0050 gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ruiliang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mycobacterial genome is inclined to polymerase slippage and a high mutation rate in microsatellite regions due to high GC content and absence of a mismatch repair system. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying microsatellite variation have not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated mutation events in the hyper-variable trinucleotide microsatellite locus MML0050 located in the Rv0050 gene of W-Beijing and non-W-Beijing Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in order to gain insight into the genomic structure and activity of repeated regions. Results Size analysis indicated the presence of five alleles that differed in length by three base pairs. Moreover, nucleotide gains occurred more frequently than loses in this trinucleotide microsatellite. Mutation frequency was not completely related with the total length, though the relative frequency in the longest allele was remarkably higher than that in the shortest. Sequence analysis was able to detect seven alleles and revealed that point mutations enhanced the level of locus variation. Introduction of an interruptive motif correlated with the total allele length and genetic lineage, rather than the length of the longest stretch of perfect repeats. Finally, the level of locus variation was drastically different between the two genetic lineages. Conclusion The Rv0050 locus encodes the bifunctional penicillin-binding protein ponA1 and is essential to mycobacterial survival. Our investigations of this particularly dynamic genomic region provide insights into the overall mode of microsatellite evolution. Specifically, replication slippage was implicated in the mutational process of this microsatellite and a sequence-based genetic analysis was necessary to determine that point mutation events acted to maintain microsatellite size integrity while providing genomic diversity.

  6. Sequence comparison of six human microRNAs genes between tuberculosis patients and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amila, A; Acosta, A; Sarmiento, M E; Suraiya, Siti; Zafarina, Z; Panneerchelvam, S; Norazmi, M N

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in diseases development. Therefore, human miRNAs may be able to inhibit the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in the human host by targeting critical genes of the pathogen. Mutations within miRNAs can alter their target selection, thereby preventing them from inhibiting Mtb genes, thus increasing host susceptibility to the disease. This study was undertaken to investigate the genetic association of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) with six human miRNAs genes, namely, hsa-miR-370, hsa-miR-520d, hsa-miR-154, hsa-miR-497, hsa-miR-758, and hsa-miR-593, which have been predicted to interact with Mtb genes. The objective of the study was to determine the possible sequence variation of selected miRNA genes that are potentially associated with the inhibition of critical Mtb genes in TB patients. The study did not show differences in the sequences compared with healthy individuals without antecedents of TB. This result could have been influenced by the sample size and the selection of miRNA genes, which need to be addressed in future studies. Copyright © 2015 Asian African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Defining the Sequence Elements and Candidate Genes for the Coloboma Mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Robb

    Full Text Available The chicken coloboma mutation exhibits features similar to human congenital developmental malformations such as ocular coloboma, cleft-palate, dwarfism, and polydactyly. The coloboma-associated region and encoded genes were investigated using advanced genomic, genetic, and gene expression technologies. Initially, the mutation was linked to a 990 kb region encoding 11 genes; the application of the genetic and genomic tools led to a reduction of the linked region to 176 kb and the elimination of 7 genes. Furthermore, bioinformatics analyses of capture array-next generation sequence data identified genetic elements including SNPs, insertions, deletions, gaps, chromosomal rearrangements, and miRNA binding sites within the introgressed causative region relative to the reference genome sequence. Coloboma-specific variants within exons, UTRs, and splice sites were studied for their contribution to the mutant phenotype. Our compiled results suggest three genes for future studies. The three candidate genes, SLC30A5 (a zinc transporter, CENPH (a centromere protein, and CDK7 (a cyclin-dependent kinase, are differentially expressed (compared to normal embryos at stages and in tissues affected by the coloboma mutation. Of these genes, two (SLC30A5 and CENPH are considered high-priority candidate based upon studies in other vertebrate model systems.

  8. [Characterization of 5S rRNA gene sequence and secondary structure in gymnosperms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan-Lin; Zhang, Da-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2003-01-01

    In higher plants the primary and the secondary structures of 5S ribosomal RNA gene are considered highly conservative. Little is known about the 5S rRNA gene structure, organization and variation in gyimnosperms. In this study we analyzed sequence and structure variation of 5S rRNA gene in Pinus through cloning and sequencing multiple copies of 5S rDNA repeats from individual trees of five pines, P. bungeana, P. tabulaeformis, P. yunnanensis, P. massoniana and P. densata. Pinus bungeana is from the subgenus Strobus while the other four are from the subgenus Pinus (diploxylon pines). Our results revealed variations in both primary and secondary structure among copies of 5S rDNA within individual genomes and between species. 5S rRNA gene in Pinus is 120 bp long in most of the 122 clones we sequenced except for one or two deletions in three clones. Among these clones 50 unique sequences were identified and they were shared by different pine species. Our sequences were compared to 13 sequences each representing a different gymnosperm species, and to six sequences representing both angiosperm monocots and dicots. Average sequence similarity was 97.1% among Pinus species and 94.3% between Pinus and other gymnosperms. Between gymnosperms and angiosperms the sequence similarity decreased to 88.1%. Similar to other molecular data, significant sequence divergence was found between the two Pinus subgenera. The 5S gene tree (neighbor-joining tree) grouped the four diploxylon pines together and separated them distinctly from P. bungeana. Comparison of sequence divergence within individuals and between species suggested that concerted evolution has been very weak especially after the divergence of the four diploxylon pines. The phylogenetic information contained in the 5S rRNA gene is limited due to its shorter length and the difficulties in identifying orthologous and paralogous copies of rDNA multigene family further complicate its phylogenetic application. Pinus densata is a

  9. Resolution of the African hominoid trichotomy by use of a mitochondrial gene sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruvolo, M.; Disotell, T.R.; Allard, M.W. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Brown, W.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)); Honeycutt, R.L. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

    1991-02-15

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences encoding the cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene have been determined for five primate species, siamang (Hylobates syndactylus), lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), pygmy chimpanzee (Pan paniscus), crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis), and green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops), and compared with published sequences of other primate and nonprimate species. Comparisons of cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene sequences provide clear-cut evidence from the mitochondrial genome for the separation of the African ape trichotomy into two evolutionary lineages, one leading to gorillas and the other to humans and chimpanzees. Several different tree-building methods support this same phylogenetic tree topology. The comparisons also yield trees in which a substantial length separates the divergence point of gorillas from that of humans and chimpanzees, suggesting that the lineage most immediately ancestral to humans and chimpanzees may have been in existence for a relatively long time.

  10. Resolution of the African hominoid trichotomy by use of a mitochondrial gene sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruvolo, M.; Disotell, T.R.; Allard, M.W.; Brown, W.M.; Honeycutt, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences encoding the cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene have been determined for five primate species, siamang (Hylobates syndactylus), lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), pygmy chimpanzee (Pan paniscus), crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis), and green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops), and compared with published sequences of other primate and nonprimate species. Comparisons of cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene sequences provide clear-cut evidence from the mitochondrial genome for the separation of the African ape trichotomy into two evolutionary lineages, one leading to gorillas and the other to humans and chimpanzees. Several different tree-building methods support this same phylogenetic tree topology. The comparisons also yield trees in which a substantial length separates the divergence point of gorillas from that of humans and chimpanzees, suggesting that the lineage most immediately ancestral to humans and chimpanzees may have been in existence for a relatively long time

  11. Bardet-Biedl syndrome in Denmark-report of 13 novel sequence variations in six genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, Tina Duelund; Grønskov, Karen; Philp, Alisdair R

    2010-01-01

    . Triallelic inheritance has been suggested in about 5% of cases. Forty-nine unrelated BBS patients were screened for mutations by DHPLC analysis in BBS1, BBS2, BBS4, BBS6/MKKS, BBS10, and BBS12. The selected genes either account for more than 5% of the mutational load or are commonly reported in triallelic...... inheritance. Eight patients with only one or no BBS mutation were further investigated by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. In total, mutations were detected in 44 patients. Twenty percent had two mutations in BBS1, 18% in BBS2, 4% in BBS9, 43% in BBS10, and 2% in BBS12. Five patients were...... heterozygous for a sequence variation in BBS6/MKKS. We found eight patients with three sequence variations in two genes, which could be explained by triallelic inheritance, by the prevalence of heterozygous carriers or the third sequence variations representing rare polymorphisms. All changes found in a second...

  12. Gorilla MHC class I gene and sequence variation in a comparative context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Jörg B; Bergl, Richard A; Vigilant, Linda

    2017-05-01

    Comparisons of MHC gene content and diversity among closely related species can provide insights into the evolutionary mechanisms shaping immune system variation. After chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas are humans' closest living relatives; but in contrast, relatively little is known about the structure and variation of gorilla MHC class I genes (Gogo). Here, we combined long-range amplifications and long-read sequencing technology to analyze full-length MHC class I genes in 35 gorillas. We obtained 50 full-length genomic sequences corresponding to 15 Gogo-A alleles, 4 Gogo-Oko alleles, 21 Gogo-B alleles, and 10 Gogo-C alleles including 19 novel coding region sequences. We identified two previously undetected MHC class I genes related to Gogo-A and Gogo-B, respectively, thereby illustrating the potential of this approach for efficient and highly accurate MHC genotyping. Consistent with their phylogenetic position within the hominid family, individual gorilla MHC haplotypes share characteristics with humans and chimpanzees as well as orangutans suggesting a complex history of the MHC class I genes in humans and the great apes. However, the overall MHC class I diversity appears to be low further supporting the hypothesis that gorillas might have experienced a reduction of their MHC repertoire.

  13. Expressed sequences tags of the anther smut fungus, Microbotryum violaceum, identify mating and pathogenicity genes

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    Devier Benjamin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The basidiomycete fungus Microbotryum violaceum is responsible for the anther-smut disease in many plants of the Caryophyllaceae family and is a model in genetics and evolutionary biology. Infection is initiated by dikaryotic hyphae produced after the conjugation of two haploid sporidia of opposite mating type. This study describes M. violaceum ESTs corresponding to nuclear genes expressed during conjugation and early hyphal production. Results A normalized cDNA library generated 24,128 sequences, which were assembled into 7,765 unique genes; 25.2% of them displayed significant similarity to annotated proteins from other organisms, 74.3% a weak similarity to the same set of known proteins, and 0.5% were orphans. We identified putative pheromone receptors and genes that in other fungi are involved in the mating process. We also identified many sequences similar to genes known to be involved in pathogenicity in other fungi. The M. violaceum EST database, MICROBASE, is available on the Web and provides access to the sequences, assembled contigs, annotations and programs to compare similarities against MICROBASE. Conclusion This study provides a basis for cloning the mating type locus, for further investigation of pathogenicity genes in the anther smut fungi, and for comparative genomics.

  14. Method of Selection of Bacteria Antibiotic Resistance Genes Based on Clustering of Similar Nucleotide Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, I S; Naumov, V A; Borovikov, P I; Gordeev, A B; Dubodelov, D V; Lyubasovskaya, L A; Rodchenko, Yu V; Bystritskii, A A; Aleksandrova, N V; Trofimov, D Yu; Priputnevich, T V

    2017-10-01

    A new method for selection of bacterium antibiotic resistance genes is proposed and tested for solving the problems related to selection of primers for PCR assay. The method implies clustering of similar nucleotide sequences and selection of group primers for all genes of each cluster. Clustering of resistance genes for six groups of antibiotics (aminoglycosides, β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, glycopeptides, macrolides and lincosamides, and fusidic acid) was performed. The method was tested for 81 strains of bacteria of different genera isolated from patients (K. pneumoniae, Staphylococcus spp., S. agalactiae, E. faecalis, E. coli, and G. vaginalis). The results obtained by us are comparable to those in the selection of individual genes; this allows reducing the number of primers necessary for maximum coverage of the known antibiotic resistance genes during PCR analysis.

  15. A score system for quality evaluation of RNA sequence tags: an improvement for gene expression profiling

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    Pinheiro Daniel G

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput molecular approaches for gene expression profiling, such as Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS or Sequencing-by-Synthesis (SBS represent powerful techniques that provide global transcription profiles of different cell types through sequencing of short fragments of transcripts, denominated sequence tags. These techniques have improved our understanding about the relationships between these expression profiles and cellular phenotypes. Despite this, more reliable datasets are still necessary. In this work, we present a web-based tool named S3T: Score System for Sequence Tags, to index sequenced tags in accordance with their reliability. This is made through a series of evaluations based on a defined rule set. S3T allows the identification/selection of tags, considered more reliable for further gene expression analysis. Results This methodology was applied to a public SAGE dataset. In order to compare data before and after filtering, a hierarchical clustering analysis was performed in samples from the same type of tissue, in distinct biological conditions, using these two datasets. Our results provide evidences suggesting that it is possible to find more congruous clusters after using S3T scoring system. Conclusion These results substantiate the proposed application to generate more reliable data. This is a significant contribution for determination of global gene expression profiles. The library analysis with S3T is freely available at http://gdm.fmrp.usp.br/s3t/. S3T source code and datasets can also be downloaded from the aforementioned website.

  16. X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H; Haas, S A; Chelly, J; Van Esch, H; Raynaud, M; de Brouwer, A P M; Weinert, S; Froyen, G; Frints, S G M; Laumonnier, F; Zemojtel, T; Love, M I; Richard, H; Emde, A-K; Bienek, M; Jensen, C; Hambrock, M; Fischer, U; Langnick, C; Feldkamp, M; Wissink-Lindhout, W; Lebrun, N; Castelnau, L; Rucci, J; Montjean, R; Dorseuil, O; Billuart, P; Stuhlmann, T; Shaw, M; Corbett, M A; Gardner, A; Willis-Owen, S; Tan, C; Friend, K L; Belet, S; van Roozendaal, K E P; Jimenez-Pocquet, M; Moizard, M-P; Ronce, N; Sun, R; O'Keeffe, S; Chenna, R; van Bömmel, A; Göke, J; Hackett, A; Field, M; Christie, L; Boyle, J; Haan, E; Nelson, J; Turner, G; Baynam, G; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Müller, U; Steinberger, D; Budny, B; Badura-Stronka, M; Latos-Bieleńska, A; Ousager, L B; Wieacker, P; Rodríguez Criado, G; Bondeson, M-L; Annerén, G; Dufke, A; Cohen, M; Van Maldergem, L; Vincent-Delorme, C; Echenne, B; Simon-Bouy, B; Kleefstra, T; Willemsen, M; Fryns, J-P; Devriendt, K; Ullmann, R; Vingron, M; Wrogemann, K; Wienker, T F; Tzschach, A; van Bokhoven, H; Gecz, J; Jentsch, T J; Chen, W; Ropers, H-H; Kalscheuer, V M

    2016-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.

  17. Riboprinting and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Identification of Brewery Pediococcus Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Michael; Volgyi, Antonia; Navarro, Alfonso; Ryder, David

    2001-01-01

    A total of 46 brewery and 15 ATCC Pediococcus isolates were ribotyped using a Qualicon RiboPrinter. Of these, 41 isolates were identified as Pediococcus damnosus using EcoRI digestion. Three ATCC reference strains had patterns similar to each other and matched 17 of the brewery isolates. Six other brewing isolates were similar to ATCC 25249. The other 18 P. damnosus brewery isolates had unique patterns. Of the remaining brewing isolates, one was identified as P. parvulus, two were identified as P. acidilactici, and two were identified as unique Pediococcus species. The use of alternate restriction endonucleases indicated that PstI and PvuII could further differentiate some strains having identical EcoRI profiles. An acid-resistant P. damnosus isolate could be distinguished from non-acid-resistant varieties of the same species using PstI instead of EcoRI. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was compared to riboprinting for identifying pediococci. The complete 16S rRNA gene was PCR amplified and sequenced from seven brewery isolates and three ATCC references with distinctive riboprint patterns. The 16S rRNA gene sequences from six different brewery P. damnosus isolates were homologous with a high degree of similarity to the GenBank reference strain but were identical to each other and one ATCC strain with the exception of 1 bp in one strain. A slime-producing, beer spoilage isolate had 16S rRNA gene sequence homology to the P. acidilactici reference strain, in agreement with the riboprint data. Although 16S rRNA gene sequencing correctly identified the genus and species of the test Pediococcus isolates, riboprinting proved to be a better method for subspecies differentiation. PMID:11157216

  18. Expression and nucleotide sequence of the Lactobacillus bulgaricus beta-galactosidase gene cloned in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, B F; Adams, R M; Requadt, C; Power, S; Mainzer, S E

    1989-01-01

    The Lactobacillus bulgaricus beta-galactosidase gene was cloned on a ca. 7-kilobase-pair HindIII fragment in the vector pKK223-3 and expressed in Escherichia coli by using its own promoter. The nucleotide sequence of the gene and approximately 400 bases of 3'- and 5'-flanking sequences was determined. The amino acid sequence of the beta-galactosidase, deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the gene, yielded a monomeric molecular mass of ca. 114 kilodaltons, slightly smaller than the E. coli lacZ and Klebsiella pneumoniae lacZ enzymes but larger than the E. coli evolved (ebgA) beta-galactosidase. The cloned beta-galactosidase was found to be indistinguishable from the native enzyme by several criteria. From amino acid sequence alignments, the L. bulgaricus beta-galactosidase has a 30 to 34% similarity to the E. coli lacZ, E. coli ebgA, and K. pneumoniae lacZ enzymes. There are seven regions of high similarity common to all four of these beta-galactosidases. Also, the putative active-site residues (Glu-461 and Tyr-503 in the E. coli lacZ beta-galactosidase) are conserved in the L. bulgaricus enzyme as well as in the other two beta-galactosidases mentioned above. The conservation of active-site amino acids and the large regions of similarity suggest that all four of these beta-galactosidases evolved from a common ancestral gene. However, these enzymes are quite different from the thermophilic beta-galactosidase encoded by the Bacillus stearothermophilus bgaB gene. PMID:2492511

  19. Genetic variability of Myzus persicae nicotianae densovirus based on partial NS and VP gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X R; Tang, S H; Tang, Z Q; Yang, X M; Wang, X W; Wang, X F; Xu, P J; Ren, G W

    2016-11-21

    We previously described a novel densovirus [Myzus persicae nicotianae densovirus (MpnDV)] infecting M. persicae nicotianae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) with 34% prevalence. This single-stranded DNA virus has a 5480-nucleotide ambisense genome and belongs to the Densovirinae subfamily within the family Parvoviridae. In the present study, we estimated the genetic diversity of MpnDV using partial nonstructural protein (NS) and capsid protein (VP) gene sequences from 10 locations in China. First, we identified MpnDV-positive samples by amplifying a 445-bp fragment with primers MpDVF/MpDVR. Subsequently, we amplified and sequenced COI genes with primers MpCOIF/ MpCOIR, and partial NS and VP sequences with primers MpnDVF1/MpnDVR1. The respective 655-, 1461-, and 423-bp COI, NS, and VP fragments were used to analyze the genetic diversity of MpnDV using MEGA 6.0 and DnaSP 5.0. The high level of identity shared by all COI sequences (>99%) suggested that the aphids sampled were of the same species, and indicated population homogeneity across the 10 locations investigated. The nucleotide diversity of MpnDV sequences (0.0020 ± 0.0025) was significantly higher than that of the COI genes (0.0002 ± 0.0005). The pairwise fixation index for MpnDV was 0.832, and the total gene flow was 0.05. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MpnDV haplotypes clustered according to geographical location, except for those from the Liaoning and Shanxi provinces. In conclusion, MpnDV demonstrated a low level of gene flow and high genetic diversity, suggesting that it is vertically transmitted, and implying that endosymbiotic viruses could be used as markers in studies of insect population genetics.

  20. Repeated adaptive introgression at a gene under multiallelic balancing selection.

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    Vincent Castric

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently diverged species typically have incomplete reproductive barriers, allowing introgression of genetic material from one species into the genomic background of the other. The role of natural selection in preventing or promoting introgression remains contentious. Because of genomic co-adaptation, some chromosomal fragments are expected to be selected against in the new background and resist introgression. In contrast, natural selection should favor introgression for alleles at genes evolving under multi-allelic balancing selection, such as the MHC in vertebrates, disease resistance, or self-incompatibility genes in plants. Here, we test the prediction that negative, frequency-dependent selection on alleles at the multi-allelic gene controlling pistil self-incompatibility specificity in two closely related species, Arabidopsis halleri and A. lyrata, caused introgression at this locus at a higher rate than the genomic background. Polymorphism at this gene is largely shared, and we have identified 18 pairs of S-alleles that are only slightly divergent between the two species. For these pairs of S-alleles, divergence at four-fold degenerate sites (K = 0.0193 is about four times lower than the genomic background (K = 0.0743. We demonstrate that this difference cannot be explained by differences in effective population size between the two types of loci. Rather, our data are most consistent with a five-fold increase of introgression rates for S-alleles as compared to the genomic background, making this study the first documented example of adaptive introgression facilitated by balancing selection. We suggest that this process plays an important role in the maintenance of high allelic diversity and divergence at the S-locus in flowering plant families. Because genes under balancing selection are expected to be among the last to stop introgressing, their comparison in closely related species provides a lower-bound estimate of the time since the

  1. Whole-exome sequencing and homozygosity analysis implicate depolarization-regulated neuronal genes in autism.

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    Maria H Chahrour

    Full Text Available Although autism has a clear genetic component, the high genetic heterogeneity of the disorder has been a challenge for the identification of causative genes. We used homozygosity analysis to identify probands from nonconsanguineous families that showed evidence of distant shared ancestry, suggesting potentially recessive mutations. Whole-exome sequencing of 16 probands revealed validated homozygous, potentially pathogenic recessive mutations that segregated perfectly with disease in 4/16 families. The candidate genes (UBE3B, CLTCL1, NCKAP5L, ZNF18 encode proteins involved in proteolysis, GTPase-mediated signaling, cytoskeletal organization, and other pathways. Furthermore, neuronal depolarization regulated the transcription of these genes, suggesting potential activity-dependent roles in neurons. We present a multidimensional strategy for filtering whole-exome sequence data to find candidate recessive mutations in autism, which may have broader applicability to other complex, heterogeneous disorders.

  2. Sequencing and analysis of the gene-rich space of cowpea

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    Cheung Foo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp., is one of the most important food and forage legumes in the semi-arid tropics because of its drought tolerance and ability to grow on poor quality soils. Approximately 80% of cowpea production takes place in the dry savannahs of tropical West and Central Africa, mostly by poor subsistence farmers. Despite its economic and social importance in the developing world, cowpea remains to a large extent an underexploited crop. Among the major goals of cowpea breeding and improvement programs is the stacking of desirable agronomic traits, such as disease and pest resistance and response to abiotic stresses. Implementation of marker-assisted selection and breeding programs is severely limited by a paucity of trait-linked markers and a general lack of information on gene structure and organization. With a nuclear genome size estimated at ~620 Mb, the cowpea genome is an ideal target for reduced representation sequencing. Results We report here the sequencing and analysis of the gene-rich, hypomethylated portion of the cowpea genome selectively cloned by methylation filtration (MF technology. Over 250,000 gene-space sequence reads (GSRs with an average length of 610 bp were generated, yielding ~160 Mb of sequence information. The GSRs were assembled, annotated by BLAST homology searches of four public protein annotation databases and four plant proteomes (A. thaliana, M. truncatula, O. sativa, and P. trichocarpa, and analyzed using various domain and gene modeling tools. A total of 41,260 GSR assemblies and singletons were annotated, of which 19,786 have unique GenBank accession numbers. Within the GSR dataset, 29% of the sequences were annotated using the Arabidopsis Gene Ontology (GO with the largest categories of assigned function being catalytic activity and metabolic processes, groups that include the majority of cellular enzymes and components of amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. A

  3. Sequence homology and expression profile of genes associated with DNA repair pathways in Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukul; Vedithi, Sundeep Chaitanya; Das, Madhusmita; Roy, Anindya; Ebenezer, Mannam

    2017-01-01

    Survival of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative bacteria for leprosy, in the human host is dependent to an extent on the ways in which its genome integrity is retained. DNA repair mechanisms protect bacterial DNA from damage induced by various stress factors. The current study is aimed at understanding the sequence and functional annotation of DNA repair genes in M. leprae. T he genome of M. leprae was annotated using sequence alignment tools to identify DNA repair genes that have homologs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. A set of 96 genes known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in E. coli and Mycobacteriaceae were chosen as a reference. Among these, 61 were identified in M. leprae based on sequence similarity and domain architecture. The 61 were classified into 36 characterized gene products (59%), 11 hypothetical proteins (18%), and 14 pseudogenes (23%). All these genes have homologs in M. tuberculosis and 49 (80.32%) in E. coli. A set of 12 genes which are absent in E. coli were present in M. leprae and in Mycobacteriaceae. These 61 genes were further investigated for their expression profiles in the whole transcriptome microarray data of M. leprae which was obtained from the signal intensities of 60bp probes, tiling the entire genome with 10bp overlaps. It was noted that transcripts corresponding to all the 61 genes were identified in the transcriptome data with varying expression levels ranging from 0.18 to 2.47 fold (normalized with 16SrRNA). The mRNA expression levels of a representative set of seven genes ( four annotated and three hypothetical protein coding genes) were analyzed using quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) assays with RNA extracted from skin biopsies of 10 newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy cases. It was noted that RNA expression levels were higher for genes involved in homologous recombination whereas the genes with a low level of expression are involved in the direct repair pathway. This study provided

  4. Sequence homology and expression profile of genes associated with dna repair pathways in Mycobacterium leprae

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    Mukul Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survival of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative bacteria for leprosy, in the human host is dependent to an extent on the ways in which its genome integrity is retained. DNA repair mechanisms protect bacterial DNA from damage induced by various stress factors. The current study is aimed at understanding the sequence and functional annotation of DNA repair genes in M. leprae. Methods: T he genome of M. leprae was annotated using sequence alignment tools to identify DNA repair genes that have homologs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. A set of 96 genes known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in E. coli and Mycobacteriaceae were chosen as a reference. Among these, 61 were identified in M. leprae based on sequence similarity and domain architecture. The 61 were classified into 36 characterized gene products (59%, 11 hypothetical proteins (18%, and 14 pseudogenes (23%. All these genes have homologs in M. tuberculosis and 49 (80.32% in E. coli. A set of 12 genes which are absent in E. coli were present in M. leprae and in Mycobacteriaceae. These 61 genes were further investigated for their expression profiles in the whole transcriptome microarray data of M. leprae which was obtained from the signal intensities of 60bp probes, tiling the entire genome with 10bp overlaps. Results: It was noted that transcripts corresponding to all the 61 genes were identified in the transcriptome data with varying expression levels ranging from 0.18 to 2.47 fold (normalized with 16SrRNA. The mRNA expression levels of a representative set of seven genes ( four annotated and three hypothetical protein coding genes were analyzed using quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR assays with RNA extracted from skin biopsies of 10 newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy cases. It was noted that RNA expression levels were higher for genes involved in homologous recombination whereas the genes with a low level of expression are involved in the

  5. Identification of cancer/testis-antigen genes by massively parallel signature sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Tseng; Scanlan, Matthew J.; Venditti, Charis A.; Chua, Ramon; Theiler, Gregory; Stevenson, Brian J.; Iseli, Christian; Gure, Ali O.; Vasicek, Tom; Strausberg, Robert L.; Jongeneel, C. Victor; Old, Lloyd J.; Simpson, Andrew J. G.

    2005-01-01

    Massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) generates millions of short sequence tags corresponding to transcripts from a single RNA preparation. Most MPSS tags can be unambiguously assigned to genes, thereby generating a comprehensive expression profile of the tissue of origin. From the comparison of MPSS data from 32 normal human tissues, we identified 1,056 genes that are predominantly expressed in the testis. Further evaluation by using MPSS tags from cancer cell lines and EST data from a wide variety of tumors identified 202 of these genes as candidates for encoding cancer/testis (CT) antigens. Of these genes, the expression in normal tissues was assessed by RT-PCR in a subset of 166 intron-containing genes, and those with confirmed testis-predominant expression were further evaluated for their expression in 21 cancer cell lines. Thus, 20 CT or CT-like genes were identified, with several exhibiting expression in five or more of the cancer cell lines examined. One of these genes is a member of a CT gene family that we designated as CT45. The CT45 family comprises six highly similar (>98% cDNA identity) genes that are clustered in tandem within a 125-kb region on Xq26.3. CT45 was found to be frequently expressed in both cancer cell lines and lung cancer specimens. Thus, MPSS analysis has resulted in a significant extension of our knowledge of CT antigens, leading to the discovery of a distinctive X-linked CT-antigen gene family. PMID:15905330

  6. Differential Gene Expression of Longan Under Simulated Acid Rain Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shan; Pan, Tengfei; Ma, Cuilan; Qiu, Dongliang

    2017-05-01

    Differential gene expression profile was studied in Dimocarpus longan Lour. in response to treatments of simulated acid rain with pH 2.5, 3.5, and a control (pH 5.6) using differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR). Results showed that mRNA differential display conditions were optimized to find an expressed sequence tag (EST) related with acid rain stress. The potential encoding products had 80% similarity with a transcription initiation factor IIF of Gossypium raimondii and 81% similarity with a protein product of Theobroma cacao. This fragment is the transcription factor activated by second messenger substances in longan leaves after signal perception of acid rain.

  7. Effects of loading sequence for notched specimens under high-low two-step fatigue loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of loading sequence on crack-initiation period were investigated for notched aluminum-alloy specimens under high-low two-step loading with special emphasis on local cyclic stresses and strains at the notch root. Local stress and strain were determined by a procedure based on an equation proposed by Neuber which relates elastoplastic stress and strain at a notch. Local stress and strain were also measured experimentally to verify the Neuber equation. The effects of initial high load on the crack-initiation periods were demonstrated with notched specimens and were simulated in unnotched specimens fatigue tested with local stress sequences. An analysis of the results indicated that sequence effects were not caused solely by local residual stresses, as is usually assumed; the existence of a damaging effect, resulting from the high local strain cycles, was demonstrated. The sequence effects observed with notched specimens were interpreted as the combined result of residual stresses and high local strain cycles.

  8. Sequence-Based Introgression Mapping Identifies Candidate White Mold Tolerance Genes in Common Bean

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    Sujan Mamidi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available White mold, caused by the necrotrophic fungus (Lib. de Bary, is a major disease of common bean ( L.. WM7.1 and WM8.3 are two quantitative trait loci (QTL with major effects on tolerance to the pathogen. Advanced backcross populations segregating individually for either of the two QTL, and a recombinant inbred (RI population segregating for both QTL were used to fine map and confirm the genetic location of the QTL. The QTL intervals were physically mapped using the reference common bean genome sequence, and the physical intervals for each QTL were further confirmed by sequence-based introgression mapping. Using whole-genome sequence data from susceptible and tolerant DNA pools, introgressed regions were identified as those with significantly higher numbers of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs relative to the whole genome. By combining the QTL and SNP data, WM7.1 was located to a 660-kb region that contained 41 gene models on the proximal end of chromosome Pv07, while the WM8.3 introgression was narrowed to a 1.36-Mb region containing 70 gene models. The most polymorphic candidate gene in the WM7.1 region encodes a BEACH-domain protein associated with apoptosis. Within the WM8.3 interval, a receptor-like protein with the potential to recognize pathogen effectors was the most polymorphic gene. The use of gene and sequence-based mapping identified two candidate genes whose putative functions are consistent with the current model of pathogenicity.

  9. Identification of miRNAs and their target genes in developing soybean seeds by deep sequencing

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    Chen Shou-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression by mediating gene silencing at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in higher plants. miRNAs and related target genes have been widely studied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and rice; however, the number of identified miRNAs in soybean (Glycine max is limited, and global identification of the related miRNA targets has not been reported in previous research. Results In our study, a small RNA library and a degradome library were constructed from developing soybean seeds for deep sequencing. We identified 26 new miRNAs in soybean by bioinformatic analysis and further confirmed their expression by stem-loop RT-PCR. The miRNA star sequences of 38 known miRNAs and 8 new miRNAs were also discovered, providing additional evidence for the existence of miRNAs. Through degradome sequencing, 145 and 25 genes were identified as targets of annotated miRNAs and new miRNAs, respectively. GO analysis indicated that many of the identified miRNA targets may function in soybean seed development. Additionally, a soybean homolog of Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SLIENCING 3 (AtSGS3 was detected as a target of the newly identified miRNA Soy_25, suggesting the presence of feedback control of miRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We have identified large numbers of miRNAs and their related target genes through deep sequencing of a small RNA library and a degradome library. Our study provides more information about the regulatory network of miRNAs in soybean and advances our understanding of miRNA functions during seed development.

  10. An atlas of human gene expression from massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongeneel, C Victor; Delorenzi, Mauro; Iseli, Christian; Zhou, Daixing; Haudenschild, Christian D; Khrebtukova, Irina; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; Stevenson, Brian J; Strausberg, Robert L; Simpson, Andrew J G; Vasicek, Thomas J

    2005-07-01

    We have used massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) to sample the transcriptomes of 32 normal human tissues to an unprecedented depth, thus documenting the patterns of expression of almost 20,000 genes with high sensitivity and specificity. The data confirm the widely held belief that differences in gene expression between cell and tissue types are largely determined by transcripts derived from a limited number of tissue-specific genes, rather than by combinations of more promiscuously expressed genes. Expression of a little more than half of all known human genes seems to account for both the common requirements and the specific functions of the tissues sampled. A classification of tissues based on patterns of gene expression largely reproduces classifications based on anatomical and biochemical properties. The unbiased sampling of the human transcriptome achieved by MPSS supports the idea that most human genes have been mapped, if not functionally characterized. This data set should prove useful for the identification of tissue-specific genes, for the study of global changes induced by pathological conditions, and for the definition of a minimal set of genes necessary for basic cell maintenance. The data are available on the Web at http://mpss.licr.org and http://sgb.lynxgen.com.

  11. A sweetpotato gene index established by de novo assembly of pyrosequencing and Sanger sequences and mining for gene-based microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.), a hexaploid outcrossing crop, is an important staple and food security crop in developing countries in Africa and Asia. The availability of genomic resources for sweetpotato is in striking contrast to its importance for human nutrition. Previously existing sequence data were restricted to around 22,000 expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences and ~ 1,500 GenBank sequences. We have used 454 pyrosequencing to augment the available gene sequence information to enhance functional genomics and marker design for this plant species. Results Two quarter 454 pyrosequencing runs used two normalized cDNA collections from stems and leaves from drought-stressed sweetpotato clone Tanzania and yielded 524,209 reads, which were assembled together with 22,094 publically available expressed sequence tags into 31,685 sets of overlapping DNA segments and 34,733 unassembled sequences. Blastx comparisons with the UniRef100 database allowed annotation of 23,957 contigs and 15,342 singletons resulting in 24,657 putatively unique genes. Further, 27,119 sequences had no match to protein sequences of UniRef100database. On the basis of this gene index, we have identified 1,661 gene-based microsatellite sequences, of which 223 were selected for testing and 195 were successfully amplified in a test panel of 6 hexaploid (I. batatas) and 2 diploid (I. trifida) accessions. Conclusions The sweetpotato gene index is a useful source for functionally annotated sweetpotato gene sequences that contains three times more gene sequence information for sweetpotato than previous EST assemblies. A searchable version of the gene index, including a blastn function, is available at http://www.cipotato.org/sweetpotato_gene_index. PMID:20977749

  12. Citrate synthase gene sequence: a new tool for phylogenetic analysis and identification of Ehrlichia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuma, H; Brouqui, P; Drancourt, M; Raoult, D

    2001-09-01

    The sequence of the citrate synthase gene (gltA) of 13 ehrlichial species (Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Ehrlichia canis, Ehrlichia muris, an Ehrlichia species recently detected from Ixodes ovatus, Cowdria ruminantium, Ehrlichia phagocytophila, Ehrlichia equi, the human granulocytic ehrlichiosis [HGE] agent, Anaplasma marginale, Anaplasma centrale, Ehrlichia sennetsu, Ehrlichia risticii, and Neorickettsia helminthoeca) have been determined by degenerate PCR and the Genome Walker method. The ehrlichial gltA genes are 1,197 bp (E. sennetsu and E. risticii) to 1,254 bp (A. marginale and A. centrale) long, and GC contents of the gene vary from 30.5% (Ehrlichia sp. detected from I. ovatus) to 51.0% (A. centrale). The percent identities of the gltA nucleotide sequences among ehrlichial species were 49.7% (E. risticii versus A. centrale) to 99.8% (HGE agent versus E. equi). The percent identities of deduced amino acid sequences were 44.4% (E. sennetsu versus E. muris) to 99.5% (HGE agent versus E. equi), whereas the homology range of 16S rRNA genes was 83.5% (E. risticii versus the Ehrlichia sp. detected from I. ovatus) to 99.9% (HGE agent, E. equi, and E. phagocytophila). The architecture of the phylogenetic trees constructed by gltA nucleotide sequences or amino acid sequences was similar to that derived from the 16S rRNA gene sequences but showed more-significant bootstrap values. Based upon the alignment analysis of the ehrlichial gltA sequences, two sets of primers were designed to amplify tick-borne Ehrlichia and Neorickettsia genogroup Ehrlichia (N. helminthoeca, E. sennetsu, and E. risticii), respectively. Tick-borne Ehrlichia species were specifically identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns of AcsI and XhoI with the exception of E. muris and the very closely related ehrlichia derived from I. ovatus for which sequence analysis of the PCR product is needed. Similarly, Neorickettsia genogroup Ehrlichia species were specifically identified by

  13. Molecular characterization of the L1 gene of papillomaviruses in epithelial lesions of cats and comparative analysis with corresponding gene sequences of human and feline papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Eman A; O'Neill, Sarah H; Newkirk, Kim M; Brahmbhatt, Rupal A; Abd-Eldaim, Mohamed; Frank, Linda A; Kania, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    To characterize the L1 gene of papillomaviruses detected in epithelial lesions of cats and to determine the relationship between those L1 gene nucleotide sequences and known L1 gene sequences of human and feline papillomaviruses. 10 tissue samples of epithelial lesions from 8 cats. DNA was extracted from tissue samples. Primers were designed to amplify the L1 gene of papillomaviruses. Amplicons of DNA were sequenced; nucleotide sequences were compared with known L1 gene nucleotide sequences of papillomaviruses and used for phylogenetic analysis. Tissue samples were obtained from lesions (diagnosed as dysplasia [n=1], squamous cell carcinoma in situ [3], or squamous cell carcinoma [6]) of the skin (9) and oral mucosa [1]. Two amplicons had 99% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of human papillomavirus type 38b subtype FA125. Another amplicon had 84% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of human papillomavirus type 80 and was considered to be a new type of papillomavirus. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that these 3 papillomaviruses were grouped into 2 clades that were not similar to the clades of Felis domesticus papillomavirus type 1 or F domesticus papillomavirus type 2 (FdPV2). The remaining 7 amplicons had 98% to 100% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of FdPV2. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that those 7 papillomaviruses were grouped nto a single clade with FdPV2. Results support the likelihood of transmission of papillomaviruses between humans and cats.

  14. A De Novo Whole GCK Gene Deletion Not Detected by Gene Sequencing, in a Boy with Phenotypic GCK Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Birkebæk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a boy with diabetes mellitus and a phenotype indicating glucokinase (GCK insufficiency, but a normal GCK gene examination applying direct gene sequencing. The boy was referred for diabetes mellitus at 7.5 years old. His father, grandfather and great grandfather suffered type 2 DM. Several blood glucose profiles showed (BG of 6.5–10 mmol/L L. After three years on neutral insulin Hagedorn (NPH in a dose of 0.3 IU/kg/day haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c was 6.8%. Treatment was changed to sulphonylurea 750 mg a day, and after 4 years HbA1c was 7%. At that time a multiplex ligation-dependent amplification gene dosage assay (MLPA was done, revealing a whole GCK gene deletion. Medical treatment was ceased, and after one year HbA1c was 6.8%. This case underscores the importance of a MLPA examination if the phenotype of a patient is strongly indicative of GCK insufficiency and no mutation is identified using direct sequencing.

  15. Gene Profiling of Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells under Elevated Pressure Conditions: Modulation of Inflammatory Gene Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Warnock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify mechanosensitive pathways and gene networks that are stimulated by elevated cyclic pressure in aortic valve interstitial cells (VICs and lead to detrimental tissue remodeling and/or pathogenesis. Porcine aortic valve leaflets were exposed to cyclic pressures of 80 or 120 mmHg, corresponding to diastolic transvalvular pressure in normal and hypertensive conditions, respectively. Linear, two-cycle amplification of total RNA, followed by microarray was performed for transcriptome analysis (with qRT-PCR validation. A combination of systems biology modeling and pathway analysis identified novel genes and molecular mechanisms underlying the biological response of VICs to elevated pressure. 56 gene transcripts related to inflammatory response mechanisms were differentially expressed. TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-1β were key cytokines identified from the gene network model. Also of interest was the discovery that pentraxin 3 (PTX3 was significantly upregulated under elevated pressure conditions (41-fold change. In conclusion, a gene network model showing differentially expressed inflammatory genes and their interactions in VICs exposed to elevated pressure has been developed. This system overview has detected key molecules that could be targeted for pharmacotherapy of aortic stenosis in hypertensive patients.

  16. Concept development of housekeeping genes in the high-throughput sequencing era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kai; Ma, Lei

    2017-02-20

    Housekeeping genes are typically constitutive genes that are required for the maintenance of basic cellular functions, and are stably expressed in all cells of an organism under all conditions and during all developmental stages. The definition and development of housekeeping genes reflect their essence and characteristics at different times. The present study reviews the concept development of housekeeping genes based on the technologies that quantify gene expression levels. We also analyze pig housekeeping genes by RNA-seq data, and discuss conceptual issues raised by the rapid progress of technologies and the growth of data. Our present study summarizes that housekeeping genes should be defined at different levels, and changing times will witness its conceptual development.

  17. Bayesian analysis of gene essentiality based on sequencing of transposon insertion libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, Michael A.; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Sassetti, Christopher M.; Rubin, Eric J.; Sacchettini, James C.; Ioerger, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Next-generation sequencing affords an efficient analysis of transposon insertion libraries, which can be used to identify essential genes in bacteria. To analyse this high-resolution data, we present a formal Bayesian framework for estimating the posterior probability of essentiality for each gene, using the extreme-value distribution to characterize the statistical significance of the longest region lacking insertions within a gene. We describe a sampling procedure based on the Metropolis–Hastings algorithm to calculate posterior probabilities of essentiality while simultaneously integrating over unknown internal parameters. Results: Using a sequence dataset from a transposon library for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we show that this Bayesian approach predicts essential genes that correspond well with genes shown to be essential in previous studies. Furthermore, we show that by using the extreme-value distribution to characterize genomic regions lacking transposon insertions, this method is capable of identifying essential domains within genes. This approach can be used for analysing transposon libraries in other organisms and augmenting essentiality predictions with statistical confidence scores. Availability: A python script implementing the method described is available for download from http://saclab.tamu.edu/essentiality/. Contact: michael.dejesus@tamu.edu or ioerger@cs.tamu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23361328

  18. DEK binding to class II MHC Y-box sequences is gene- and allele-specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Barbara S; Cha, Hyuk C; Cleary, Joanne; Haiying, Tan; Wang, Hongling; Sitwala, Kajal; Markovitz, David M

    2003-01-01

    Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we examined sequence-specific binding of DEK, a potential autoantigen in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, to conserved Y-box regulatory sequences in class II MHC gene promoters. Nuclear extracts from several cell lines of different phenotypes contained sequence-specific binding activity recognizing DRA, DQA1*0101, and DQA1*0501 Y-box sequences. Participation of both DEK and NF-Y in the DQA1 Y-box binding complex was confirmed by 'supershifting' with anti-DEK and anti-NF-Y antibodies. Recombinant DEK also bound specifically to the DQA1*0101 Y box and to the polymorphic DQA1*0501 Y box, but not to the consensus DRA Y box. Measurement of the apparent dissociation constants demonstrated a two- to fivefold difference in DEK binding to the DQA1 Y-box sequence in comparison with other class II MHC Y-box sequences. Residues that are crucial for DEK binding to the DQA1*0101 Y box were identified by DNase I footprinting. The specific characteristics of DEK binding to these related sequences suggests a potential role for DEK in differential regulation of class II MHC expression, and thus in the pathogenesis of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:12823858

  19. Spatiotonal adaptivity in super-resolution of under-sampled image sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, T.Q.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis concerns the use of spatial and tonal adaptivity in improving the resolution of aliased image sequences under scene or camera motion. Each of the five content chapters focuses on a different subtopic of super-resolution: image registration (chapter 2), image fusion (chapter 3 and 4),

  20. RNA Sequencing and Coexpression Analysis Reveal Key Genes Involved in α-Linolenic Acid Biosynthesis in Perilla frutescens Seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyuan Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Perilla frutescen is used as traditional food and medicine in East Asia. Its seeds contain high levels of α-linolenic acid (ALA, which is important for health, but is scarce in our daily meals. Previous reports on RNA-seq of perilla seed had identified fatty acid (FA and triacylglycerol (TAG synthesis genes, but the underlying mechanism of ALA biosynthesis and its regulation still need to be further explored. So we conducted Illumina RNA-sequencing in seven temporal developmental stages of perilla seeds. Sequencing generated a total of 127 million clean reads, containing 15.88 Gb of valid data. The de novo assembly of sequence reads yielded 64,156 unigenes with an average length of 777 bp. A total of 39,760 unigenes were annotated and 11,693 unigenes were found to be differentially expressed in all samples. According to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analysis, 486 unigenes were annotated in the “lipid metabolism” pathway. Of these, 150 unigenes were found to be involved in fatty acid (FA biosynthesis and triacylglycerol (TAG assembly in perilla seeds. A coexpression analysis showed that a total of 104 genes were highly coexpressed (r > 0.95. The coexpression network could be divided into two main subnetworks showing over expression in the medium or earlier and late phases, respectively. In order to identify the putative regulatory genes, a transcription factor (TF analysis was performed. This led to the identification of 45 gene families, mainly including the AP2-EREBP, bHLH, MYB, and NAC families, etc. After coexpression analysis of TFs with highly expression of FAD2 and FAD3 genes, 162 TFs were found to be significantly associated with two FAD genes (r > 0.95. Those TFs were predicted to be the key regulatory factors in ALA biosynthesis in perilla seed. The qRT-PCR analysis also verified the relevance of expression pattern between two FAD genes and partial candidate TFs. Although it has been reported that some TFs

  1. Major soybean maturity gene haplotypes revealed by SNPViz analysis of 72 sequenced soybean genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Langewisch

    Full Text Available In this Genomics Era, vast amounts of next-generation sequencing data have become publicly available for multiple genomes across hundreds of species. Analyses of these large-scale datasets can become cumbersome, especially when comparing nucleotide polymorphisms across many samples within a dataset and among different datasets or organisms. To facilitate the exploration of allelic variation and diversity, we have developed and deployed an in-house computer software to categorize and visualize these haplotypes. The SNPViz software enables users to analyze region-specific haplotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP datasets for different sequenced genomes. The examination of allelic variation and diversity of important soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] flowering time and maturity genes may provide additional insight into flowering time regulation and enhance researchers' ability to target soybean breeding for particular environments. For this study, we utilized two available soybean genomic datasets for a total of 72 soybean genotypes encompassing cultivars, landraces, and the wild species Glycine soja. The major soybean maturity genes E1, E2, E3, and E4 along with the Dt1 gene for plant growth architecture were analyzed in an effort to determine the number of major haplotypes for each gene, to evaluate the consistency of the haplotypes with characterized variant alleles, and to identify evidence of artificial selection. The results indicated classification of a small number of predominant haplogroups for each gene and important insights into possible allelic diversity for each gene within the context of known causative mutations. The software has both a stand-alone and web-based version and can be used to analyze other genes, examine additional soybean datasets, and view similar genome sequence and SNP datasets from other species.

  2. Major soybean maturity gene haplotypes revealed by SNPViz analysis of 72 sequenced soybean genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langewisch, Tiffany; Zhang, Hongxin; Vincent, Ryan; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Bilyeu, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    In this Genomics Era, vast amounts of next-generation sequencing data have become publicly available for multiple genomes across hundreds of species. Analyses of these large-scale datasets can become cumbersome, especially when comparing nucleotide polymorphisms across many samples within a dataset and among different datasets or organisms. To facilitate the exploration of allelic variation and diversity, we have developed and deployed an in-house computer software to categorize and visualize these haplotypes. The SNPViz software enables users to analyze region-specific haplotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) datasets for different sequenced genomes. The examination of allelic variation and diversity of important soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] flowering time and maturity genes may provide additional insight into flowering time regulation and enhance researchers' ability to target soybean breeding for particular environments. For this study, we utilized two available soybean genomic datasets for a total of 72 soybean genotypes encompassing cultivars, landraces, and the wild species Glycine soja. The major soybean maturity genes E1, E2, E3, and E4 along with the Dt1 gene for plant growth architecture were analyzed in an effort to determine the number of major haplotypes for each gene, to evaluate the consistency of the haplotypes with characterized variant alleles, and to identify evidence of artificial selection. The results indicated classification of a small number of predominant haplogroups for each gene and important insights into possible allelic diversity for each gene within the context of known causative mutations. The software has both a stand-alone and web-based version and can be used to analyze other genes, examine additional soybean datasets, and view similar genome sequence and SNP datasets from other species.

  3. Identification of expressed resistance gene-like sequences by data mining in 454-derived transcriptomic sequences of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is one of the most important legumes in the world. Several diseases severely reduce bean production and quality; therefore, it is very important to better understand disease resistance in common bean in order to prevent these losses. More than 70 resistance (R) genes which confer resistance against various pathogens have been cloned from diverse plant species. Most R genes share highly conserved domains which facilitates the identification of new candidate R genes from the same species or other species. The goals of this study were to isolate expressed R gene-like sequences (RGLs) from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of common bean, and to develop RGL-tagged molecular markers. Results A data-mining approach was used to identify tentative P. vulgaris R gene-like sequences from approximately 1.69 million 454-derived sequences and 116,716 ESTs deposited in GenBank. A total of 365 non-redundant sequences were identified and named as common bean (P. vulgaris = Pv) resistance gene-like sequences (PvRGLs). Among the identified PvRGLs, about 60% (218 PvRGLs) were from 454-derived sequences. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed that PvRGLs were actually expressed in the leaves of common bean. Upon comparison to P. vulgaris genomic sequences, 105 (28.77%) of the 365 tentative PvRGLs could be integrated into the existing common bean physical map. Based on the syntenic blocks between common bean and soybean, 237 (64.93%) PvRGLs were anchored on the P. vulgaris genetic map and will need to be mapped to determine order. In addition, 11 sequence-tagged-site (STS) and 19 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) molecular markers were developed for 25 unique PvRGLs. Conclusions In total, 365 PvRGLs were successfully identified from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and ESTs available in GenBank and about 65% of PvRGLs were integrated into the common

  4. Identification of expressed resistance gene-like sequences by data mining in 454-derived transcriptomic sequences of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhanji

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is one of the most important legumes in the world. Several diseases severely reduce bean production and quality; therefore, it is very important to better understand disease resistance in common bean in order to prevent these losses. More than 70 resistance (R genes which confer resistance against various pathogens have been cloned from diverse plant species. Most R genes share highly conserved domains which facilitates the identification of new candidate R genes from the same species or other species. The goals of this study were to isolate expressed R gene-like sequences (RGLs from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and expressed sequence tags (ESTs of common bean, and to develop RGL-tagged molecular markers. Results A data-mining approach was used to identify tentative P. vulgaris R gene-like sequences from approximately 1.69 million 454-derived sequences and 116,716 ESTs deposited in GenBank. A total of 365 non-redundant sequences were identified and named as common bean (P. vulgaris = Pv resistance gene-like sequences (PvRGLs. Among the identified PvRGLs, about 60% (218 PvRGLs were from 454-derived sequences. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis confirmed that PvRGLs were actually expressed in the leaves of common bean. Upon comparison to P. vulgaris genomic sequences, 105 (28.77% of the 365 tentative PvRGLs could be integrated into the existing common bean physical map. Based on the syntenic blocks between common bean and soybean, 237 (64.93% PvRGLs were anchored on the P. vulgaris genetic map and will need to be mapped to determine order. In addition, 11 sequence-tagged-site (STS and 19 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS molecular markers were developed for 25 unique PvRGLs. Conclusions In total, 365 PvRGLs were successfully identified from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and ESTs available in GenBank and about 65% of PvRGLs were integrated

  5. Peripheral blood transcriptome sequencing reveals rejection-relevant genes in long-term heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Haibo; Xiao, Xue; Jia, Yixin; Wu, Weili; Liu, Licheng; Jiang, Jun; Zhu, Baoli; Meng, Xu; Chen, Weijun

    2013-10-03

    Peripheral blood-based gene expression patterns have been investigated as biomarkers to monitor the immune system and rule out rejection after heart transplantation. Recent advances in the high-throughput deep sequencing (HTS) technologies provide new leads in transcriptome analysis. By performing Solexa/Illumina's digital gene expression (DGE) profiling, we analyzed gene expression profiles of PBMCs from 6 quiescent (grade 0) and 6 rejection (grade 2R&3R) heart transplant recipients at more than 6 months after transplantation. Subsequently, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was carried out in an independent validation cohort of 47 individuals from three rejection groups (ISHLT, grade 0,1R, 2R&3R). Through DGE sequencing and qPCR validation, 10 genes were identified as informative genes for detection of cardiac transplant rejection. A further clustering analysis showed that the 10 genes were not only effective for distinguishing patients with acute cardiac allograft rejection, but also informative for discriminating patients with renal allograft rejection based on both blood and biopsy samples. Moreover, PPI network analysis revealed that the 10 genes were connected to each other within a short interaction distance. We proposed a 10-gene signature for heart transplant patients at high-risk of developing severe rejection, which was found to be effective as well in other organ transplant. Moreover, we supposed that these genes function systematically as biomarkers in long-time allograft rejection. Further validation in broad transplant population would be required before the non-invasive biomarkers can be generally utilized to predict the risk of transplant rejection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Whole exome sequencing identifies novel candidate genes that modify chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruse, Shannon; Moreau, Michael; Bromberg, Yana; Jang, Jun-Ho; Wang, Nan; Ha, Hongseok; Picchi, Maria; Lin, Yong; Langley, Raymond J; Qualls, Clifford; Klensney-Tait, Julia; Zabner, Joseph; Leng, Shuguang; Mao, Jenny; Belinsky, Steven A; Xing, Jinchuan; Nyunoya, Toru

    2016-01-07

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by an irreversible airflow limitation in response to inhalation of noxious stimuli, such as cigarette smoke. However, only 15-20 % smokers manifest COPD, suggesting a role for genetic predisposition. Although genome-wide association studies have identified common genetic variants that are associated with susceptibility to COPD, effect sizes of the identified variants are modest, as is the total heritability accounted for by these variants. In this study, an extreme phenotype exome sequencing study was combined with in vitro modeling to identify COPD candidate genes. We performed whole exome sequencing of 62 highly susceptible smokers and 30 exceptionally resistant smokers to identify rare variants that may contribute to disease risk or resistance to COPD. This was a cross-sectional case-control study without therapeutic intervention or longitudinal follow-up information. We identified candidate genes based on rare variant analyses and evaluated exonic variants to pinpoint individual genes whose function was computationally established to be significantly different between susceptible and resistant smokers. Top scoring candidate genes from these analyses were further filtered by requiring that each gene be expressed in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). A total of 81 candidate genes were thus selected for in vitro functional testing in cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-exposed HBECs. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing experiments, we showed that silencing of several candidate genes augmented CSE-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. Our integrative analysis through both genetic and functional approaches identified two candidate genes (TACC2 and MYO1E) that augment cigarette smoke (CS)-induced cytotoxicity and, potentially, COPD susceptibility.

  7. Molecular Diagnostics of Gliomas Using Next Generation Sequencing of a Glioma-Tailored Gene Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Angela; Kaulich, Kerstin; Stepanow, Stefanie; Wolter, Marietta; Köhrer, Karl; Felsberg, Jörg; Malzkorn, Bastian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Current classification of gliomas is based on histological criteria according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. Over the past years, characteristic genetic profiles have been identified in various glioma types. These can refine tumor diagnostics and provide important prognostic and predictive information. We report on the establishment and validation of gene panel next generation sequencing (NGS) for the molecular diagnostics of gliomas. We designed a glioma-tailored gene panel covering 660 amplicons derived from 20 genes frequently aberrant in different glioma types. Sensitivity and specificity of glioma gene panel NGS for detection of DNA sequence variants and copy number changes were validated by single gene analyses. NGS-based mutation detection was optimized for application on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens including small stereotactic biopsy samples. NGS data obtained in a retrospective analysis of 121 gliomas allowed for their molecular classification into distinct biological groups, including (i) isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH) 1 or 2 mutant astrocytic gliomas with frequent α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) gene mutations, (ii) IDH mutant oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q codeletion, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation and frequent Drosophila homolog of capicua (CIC) gene mutation, as well as (iii) IDH wildtype glioblastomas with frequent TERT promoter mutation, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification. Oligoastrocytic gliomas were genetically assigned to either of these groups. Our findings implicate gene panel NGS as a promising diagnostic technique that may facilitate integrated histological and molecular glioma classification. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  8. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  9. Identification of Six Introns in a Partial Sequence of Echinococcus granulosus Paramyosin Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaelizad, Majid; Ramezan, Atefeh; Razmaraii, Nasser; Mirjalili, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Paramyosin is a major protein produced by the metacestode cyst of Echinococcus granulosus, the causative agent of cystic hydatid disease. This protein has been shown to play an important role in modulating host immune responses. In this study, we attempted to characterize the noncoding sequence of the paramyosin gene. Genomic DNA was isolated from G1 Iranian hydatid cysts. A DNA fragment of 3200 bp in length was amplified from the paramyosin gene. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product was cloned to the pTZ57T vector and sequenced by M13 primers and then compared with unique cDNA coding sequences of E. granulosus (Z21787) and Taenia solium (AY034087). Six introns I (107 bp), II (75 bp), III (47 bp), IV (921 bp), V (19 bp), and VI (456 bp) were identified in the partial sequence of the paramyosin gene. Some nucleotide changes were observed in three exons I, IV, and VI. This data could help scientists in better understanding the possible alternative splicing and designing a real-time PCR technique for the evaluation of the transcription levels of paramyosin in the stages of the Echinococcus sp. life cycle.

  10. A method for high precision sequencing of near full-length 16S rRNA genes on an Illumina MiSeq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Burke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The bacterial 16S rRNA gene has historically been used in defining bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny. However, there are currently no high-throughput methods to sequence full-length 16S rRNA genes present in a sample with precision. Results We describe a method for sequencing near full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons using the high throughput Illumina MiSeq platform and test it using DNA from human skin swab samples. Proof of principle of the approach is demonstrated, with the generation of 1,604 sequences greater than 1,300 nt from a single Nano MiSeq run, with accuracy estimated to be 100-fold higher than standard Illumina reads. The reads were chimera filtered using information from a single molecule dual tagging scheme that boosts the signal available for chimera detection. Conclusions This method could be scaled up to generate many thousands of sequences per MiSeq run and could be applied to other sequencing platforms. This has great potential for populating databases with high quality, near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences from under-represented taxa and environments and facilitates analyses of microbial communities at higher resolution.

  11. dsPIG: a tool to predict imprinted genes from the deep sequencing of whole transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hua

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulation of imprinted genes, which are expressed in a parent-of-origin-specific manner, plays an important role in various human diseases, such as cancer and behavioral disorder. To date, however, fewer than 100 imprinted genes have been identified in the human genome. The recent availability of high-throughput technology makes it possible to have large-scale prediction of imprinted genes. Here we propose a Bayesian model (dsPIG to predict imprinted genes on the basis of allelic expression observed in mRNA-Seq data of independent human tissues. Results Our model (dsPIG was capable of identifying imprinted genes with high sensitivity and specificity and a low false discovery rate when the number of sequenced tissue samples was fairly large, according to simulations. By applying dsPIG to the mRNA-Seq data, we predicted 94 imprinted genes in 20 cerebellum samples and 57 imprinted genes in 9 diverse tissue samples with expected low false discovery rates. We also assessed dsPIG using previously validated imprinted and non-imprinted genes. With simulations, we further analyzed how imbalanced allelic expression of non-imprinted genes or different minor allele frequencies affected the predictions of dsPIG. Interestingly, we found that, among biallelically expressed genes, at least 18 genes expressed significantly more transcripts from one allele than the other among different individuals and tissues. Conclusion With the prevalence of the mRNA-Seq technology, dsPIG has become a useful tool for analysis of allelic expression and large-scale prediction of imprinted genes. For ease of use, we have set up a web service and also provided an R package for dsPIG at http://www.shoudanliang.com/dsPIG/.

  12. Reliable reference gene selection for Cordyceps militaris gene expression studies under different developmental stages and media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Liu, Guijun; Sun, Junde; Dong, Caihong

    2014-07-01

    Cordyceps militaris is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species, which are highly prized in traditional Chinese medicine. Gene expression analysis has become more popular and important in studies of this fungus. Reference gene validation under different experimental conditions is crucial for RT-qPCR analysis. In this study, eight candidate reference genes, actin, cox5, gpd, rpb1, tef1, try, tub, and ubi, were selected and their expression stability was evaluated in C. militaris samples using four algorithms, genorm, normfinder, bestkeeper, and the comparative ∆Ct method. Three sets of samples, five different developmental stages cultured in wheat medium and pupae, and all the samples pool were included. The results showed that rpb1 was the best reference gene during all developmental stages examined, while the most common reference genes, actin and tub, were not suitable internal controls. Cox5 also performed poorly and was less stable in our analysis. The ranks of ubi and gpd were inconsistent in different sample sets by different methods. Our results provide guidelines for reference gene selection at different developmental stages and also represent a foundation for more accurate and widespread use of RT-qPCR in C. militaris gene expression analysis. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phylogenetic relationships between Sarcocystis species from reindeer and other Sarcocystidae deduced from ssu rRNA gene sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, S.S.; Oliveira, Rodrigo Gouveia; Gjerde, B.

    2008-01-01

    any effect on previously inferred phylogenetic relationships within the Sarcocystidae. The complete small subunit (ssu) rRNA gene sequences of all six Sarcocystis species from reindeer were used in the phylogenetic analyses along with ssu rRNA gene sequences of 85 other members of the Coccidea. Trees...

  14. Performance of amplicon-based next generation DNA sequencing for diagnostic gene mutation profiling in oncopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sie, Daoud; Snijders, Peter J F; Meijer, Gerrit A; Doeleman, Marije W; van Moorsel, Marinda I H; van Essen, Hendrik F; Eijk, Paul P; Grünberg, Katrien; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Thunnissen, Erik; Verheul, Henk M; Smit, Egbert F; Ylstra, Bauke; Heideman, Daniëlle A M

    2014-10-01

    Next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) holds promise for diagnostic applications, yet implementation in routine molecular pathology practice requires performance evaluation on DNA derived from routine formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens. The current study presents a comprehensive analysis of TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel-based NGS using a MiSeq Personal sequencer (TSACP-MiSeq-NGS) for somatic mutation profiling. TSACP-MiSeq-NGS (testing 212 hotspot mutation amplicons of 48 genes) and a data analysis pipeline were evaluated in a retrospective learning/test set approach (n = 58/n = 45 FFPE-tumor DNA samples) against 'gold standard' high-resolution-melting (HRM)-sequencing for the genes KRAS, EGFR, BRAF and PIK3CA. Next, the performance of the validated test algorithm was assessed in an independent, prospective cohort of FFPE-tumor DNA samples (n = 75). In the learning set, a number of minimum parameter settings was defined to decide whether a FFPE-DNA sample is qualified for TSACP-MiSeq-NGS and for calling mutations. The resulting test algorithm revealed 82% (37/45) compliance to the quality criteria and 95% (35/37) concordant assay findings for KRAS, EGFR, BRAF and PIK3CA with HRM-sequencing (kappa = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.81-1.03) in the test set. Subsequent application of the validated test algorithm to the prospective cohort yielded a success rate of 84% (63/75), and a high concordance with HRM-sequencing (95% (60/63); kappa = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.84-1.01). TSACP-MiSeq-NGS detected 77 mutations in 29 additional genes. TSACP-MiSeq-NGS is suitable for diagnostic gene mutation profiling in oncopathology.

  15. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the gene encoding the extracellular metalloprotease of Aeromonas caviae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, K; Toma, C; Honma, Y

    2000-01-01

    A gene (apk) encoding the extracellular protease of Aeromonas caviae Ae6 has been cloned and sequenced. For cloning the gene, the DNA genomic library was screened using skim milk LB agar. One clone harboring plasmid pKK3 was selected for sequencing. Nucleotide sequencing of the 3.5 kb region of pKK3 revealed a single open reading frame (ORF) of 1,785 bp encoding 595 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide contained a putative 16-amino acid signal peptide followed by a large propeptide. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified recombinant protein (APK) was consistent with the DNA sequence. This result suggested a mature protein of 412 amino acids with a molecular mass of 44 kDa. However, the molecular mass of purified recombinant APK revealed 34 kDa by SDS-PAGE, suggesting that further processing at the C-terminal region took place. The 2 motifs of zinc binding sites deduced are highly conserved in the APK as well as in other zinc metalloproteases including Vibrio proteolyticus neutral protease, Emp V from Vibrio vulnificus, HA/P from Vibrio cholerae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase. Proteolytic activity was inhibited by EDTA, Zincov, 1,10-phenanthroline and tetraethylenepentamine while unaffected by the other inhibitors tested. The protease showed maximum activity at pH 7.0 and was inactivated by heating at 80 C for 15 min. These results together suggest that APK belongs to the thermolysin family of metalloendopeptidases.

  16. Molecular phylogeny of some avian species using Cytochrome b gene sequence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, A; Khalil, S. R; Abd-Elhakim, Y. M

    2015-01-01

    Veritable identification and differentiation of avian species is a vital step in conservative, taxonomic, forensic, legal and other ornithological interventions. Therefore, this study involved the application of molecular approach to identify some avian species i.e. Chicken (Gallus gallus), Muskovy duck (Cairina moschata), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), Laughing dove (Streptopelia senegalensis), and Rock pigeon (Columba livia). Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples and partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (358 bp) was amplified and sequenced using universal primers. Sequences alignment and phylogenetic analyses were performed by CLC main workbench program. The obtained five sequences were deposited in GenBank and compared with those previously registered in GenBank. The similarity percentage was 88.60% between Gallus gallus and Coturnix japonica and 80.46% between Gallus gallus and Columba livia. The percentage of identity between the studied species and GenBank species ranged from 77.20% (Columba oenas and Anas platyrhynchos) to 100% (Gallus gallus and Gallus sonneratii, Coturnix coturnix and Coturnix japonica, Meleagris gallopavo and Columba livia). Amplification of the partial sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene proved to be practical for identification of an avian species unambiguously. PMID:27175180

  17. Amplification of complete gag gene sequences from geographically distinct equine infectious anemia virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Bazartseren, Tsevel; Koba, Ryota; Murakami, Hironobu; Oguma, Keisuke; Murakami, Kenji; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    In the current study, primers described previously and modified versions of these primers were evaluated for amplification of full-length gag genes from different equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) strains from several countries, including the USA, Germany and Japan. Each strain was inoculated into a primary horse leukocyte culture, and the full-length gag gene was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Each amplified gag gene was cloned into a plasmid vector for sequencing, and the detectable copy numbers of target DNA were determined. Use of a mixture of two forward primers and one reverse primer in the polymerase chain reaction enabled the amplification of all EIAV strains used in this study. However, further study is required to confirm these primers as universal for all EIAV strains. The nucleotide sequence of gag is considered highly conserved, as evidenced by the use of gag-encoded capsid proteins as a common antigen for the detection of EIAV in serological tests. However, significant sequence variation in the gag genes of different EIAV strains was found in the current study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Zooplankton diversity analysis through single-gene sequencing of a community sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Mutsumi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oceans cover more than 70% of the earth's surface and are critical for the homeostasis of the environment. Among the components of the ocean ecosystem, zooplankton play vital roles in energy and matter transfer through the system. Despite their importance, understanding of zooplankton biodiversity is limited because of their fragile nature, small body size, and the large number of species from various taxonomic phyla. Here we present the results of single-gene zooplankton community analysis using a method that determines a large number of mitochondrial COI gene sequences from a bulk zooplankton sample. This approach will enable us to estimate the species richness of almost the entire zooplankton community. Results A sample was collected from a depth of 721 m to the surface in the western equatorial Pacific off Pohnpei Island, Micronesia, with a plankton net equipped with a 2-m2 mouth opening. A total of 1,336 mitochondrial COI gene sequences were determined from the cDNA library made from the sample. From the determined sequences, the occurrence of 189 species of zooplankton was estimated. BLASTN search results showed high degrees of similarity (>98% between the query and database for 10 species, including holozooplankton and merozooplankton. Conclusion In conjunction with the Census of Marine Zooplankton and Barcode of Life projects, single-gene zooplankton community analysis will be a powerful tool for estimating the species richness of zooplankton communities.

  19. Identification and characterization of rhizospheric microbial diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Naveed

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, samples of rhizosphere and root nodules were collected from different areas of Pakistan to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Identification of bacterial isolates was made by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and taxonomical confirmation on EzTaxon Server. The identified bacterial strains were belonged to 5 genera i.e. Ensifer, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Leclercia and Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the evolutionary relationship of bacterial strains with the respective genera. Based on phylogenetic analysis, some candidate novel species were also identified. The bacterial strains were also characterized for morphological, physiological, biochemical tests and glucose dehydrogenase (gdh gene that involved in the phosphate solublization using cofactor pyrroloquinolone quinone (PQQ. Seven rhizoshperic and 3 root nodulating stains are positive for gdh gene. Furthermore, this study confirms a novel association between microbes and their hosts like field grown crops, leguminous and non-leguminous plants. It was concluded that a diverse group of bacterial population exist in the rhizosphere and root nodules that might be useful in evaluating the mechanisms behind plant microbial interactions and strains QAU-63 and QAU-68 have sequence similarity of 97 and 95% which might be declared as novel after further taxonomic characterization.

  20. Breaking the 1000-gene barrier for Mimivirus using ultra-deep genome and transcriptome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mimivirus, a giant dsDNA virus infecting Acanthamoeba, is the prototype of the mimiviridae family, the latest addition to the family of the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs. Its 1.2 Mb-genome was initially predicted to encode 917 genes. A subsequent RNA-Seq analysis precisely mapped many transcript boundaries and identified 75 new genes. Findings We now report a much deeper analysis using the SOLiD™ technology combining RNA-Seq of the Mimivirus transcriptome during the infectious cycle (202.4 Million reads, and a complete genome re-sequencing (45.3 Million reads. This study corrected the genome sequence and identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms. Our results also provided clear evidence of previously overlooked transcription units, including an important RNA polymerase subunit distantly related to Euryarchea homologues. The total Mimivirus gene count is now 1018, 11% greater than the original annotation. Conclusions This study highlights the huge progress brought about by ultra-deep sequencing for the comprehensive annotation of virus genomes, opening the door to a complete one-nucleotide resolution level description of their transcriptional activity, and to the realistic modeling of the viral genome expression at the ultimate molecular level. This work also illustrates the need to go beyond bioinformatics-only approaches for the annotation of short protein and non-coding genes in viral genomes.

  1. Sequence and transcription analysis of the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzarides, T.; Bankier, A.T.; Satchwell, S.C.; Weston, K.; Tomlinson, P.; Barrell, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis has revealed that the gene coding for the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA polymerase is present within the long unique region of the virus genome. Identification is based on extensive amino acid homology between the predicted HCMV open reading frame HFLF2 and the DNA polymerase of herpes simplex virus type 1. The authors present here a 5280 base-pair DNA sequence containing the HCMV pol gene, along with the analysis of transcripts encoded within this region. Since HCMV pol also shows homology to the predicted Epstein-Barr virus pol, they were able to analyze the extent of homology between the DNA polymerases of three distantly related herpes viruses, HCMV, Epstein-Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus. The comparison shows that these DNA polymerases exhibit considerable amino acid homology and highlights a number of highly conserved regions; two such regions show homology to sequences within the adenovirus type 2 DNA polymerase. The HCMV pol gene is flanked by open reading frames with homology to those of other herpes viruses; upstream, there is a reading frame homologous to the glycoprotein B gene of herpes simplex virus type I and Epstein-Barr virus, and downstream there is a reading frame homologous to BFLF2 of Epstein-Barr virus

  2. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the PSA genes from Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ruiz, A; Boceta, C; Bonay, P; Requena, J M; Alonso, C

    1998-01-15

    We describe the molecular cloning of the PSA genes from the Leishmania infantum parasite, which show high sequence similarity with the L. major PSA-2 and L. amazonensis GP46/M2 genes. The PSA genes in L. infantum are arrayed in tandem with a repetition unit of 6 kb. A single-size class of PSA mRNA of 4 kb was detected. The characterised L. infantum PSA genes code for a protein lacking the glycosylphosphatidylinositol addition signal described in other Leishmania species due to the presence of a stop codon located upstream from the DNA sequence coding for the signal. The data obtained after immunoprecipitation of PSA indicate that the protein is present as a water-soluble form, but that also a membrane-anchored form can be detected. The amino acid sequence derived from the isolated PSA gene shows that 60% of the deduced protein is formed by 13 leucine-rich repeats, each one of which is 24 amino acids long. The analysis of the consensus sequence of the repeats revealed that the L. infantum PSA as well as the described L. major PSA-2 and L. amazonensis GP46/M2 proteins may be classified as new members of the leucine-rich repeat-containing protein superfamily. The number of leucine-rich motifs, however, varies considerably between the PSA protein from L. infantum and from the other Leishmania species. The PSA protein is a major antigen determinant during L. infantum infections since 87% of the sera from naturally infected dogs recognise the recombinant PSA purified from Escherichia coli.

  3. Patterns of homoeologous gene expression shown by RNA sequencing in hexaploid bread wheat.

    KAUST Repository

    Leach, Lindsey J

    2014-04-11

    BACKGROUND: Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) has a large, complex and hexaploid genome consisting of A, B and D homoeologous chromosome sets. Therefore each wheat gene potentially exists as a trio of A, B and D homoeoloci, each of which may contribute differentially to wheat phenotypes. We describe a novel approach combining wheat cytogenetic resources (chromosome substitution \\'nullisomic-tetrasomic\\' lines) with next generation deep sequencing of gene transcripts (RNA-Seq), to directly and accurately identify homoeologue-specific single nucleotide variants and quantify the relative contribution of individual homoeoloci to gene expression. RESULTS: We discover, based on a sample comprising ~5-10% of the total wheat gene content, that at least 45% of wheat genes are expressed from all three distinct homoeoloci. Most of these genes show strikingly biased expression patterns in which expression is dominated by a single homoeolocus. The remaining ~55% of wheat genes are expressed from either one or two homoeoloci only, through a combination of extensive transcriptional silencing and homoeolocus loss. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that wheat is tending towards functional diploidy, through a variety of mechanisms causing single homoeoloci to become the predominant source of gene transcripts. This discovery has profound consequences for wheat breeding and our understanding of wheat evolution.

  4. Rapid cloning of disease-resistance genes in plants using mutagenesis and sequence capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuernagel, Burkhard; Periyannan, Sambasivam K; Hernández-Pinzón, Inmaculada; Witek, Kamil; Rouse, Matthew N; Yu, Guotai; Hatta, Asyraf; Ayliffe, Mick; Bariana, Harbans; Jones, Jonathan D G; Lagudah, Evans S; Wulff, Brande B H

    2016-06-01

    Wild relatives of domesticated crop species harbor multiple, diverse, disease resistance (R) genes that could be used to engineer sustainable disease control. However, breeding R genes into crop lines often requires long breeding timelines of 5-15 years to break linkage between R genes and deleterious alleles (linkage drag). Further, when R genes are bred one at a time into crop lines, the protection that they confer is often overcome within a few seasons by pathogen evolution. If several cloned R genes were available, it would be possible to pyramid R genes in a crop, which might provide more durable resistance. We describe a three-step method (MutRenSeq)-that combines chemical mutagenesis with exome capture and sequencing for rapid R gene cloning. We applied MutRenSeq to clone stem rust resistance genes Sr22 and Sr45 from hexaploid bread wheat. MutRenSeq can be applied to other commercially relevant crops and their relatives, including, for example, pea, bean, barley, oat, rye, rice and maize.

  5. Discovery of differentially expressed genes in cashmere goat (Capra hircus) hair follicles by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, X; Wu, J H; Wu, R B; Su, R; Li, C; Zhang, Y J; Wang, R J; Zhao, Y H; Fan, Y X; Zhang, W G; Li, J Q

    2016-09-02

    The mammalian hair follicle (HF) is a unique, highly regenerative organ with a distinct developmental cycle. Cashmere goat (Capra hircus) HFs can be divided into two categories based on structure and development time: primary and secondary follicles. To identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the primary and secondary HFs of cashmere goats, the RNA sequencing of six individuals from Arbas, Inner Mongolia, was performed. A total of 617 DEGs were identified; 297 were upregulated while 320 were downregulated. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the main functions of the upregulated genes were electron transport, respiratory electron transport, mitochondrial electron transport, and gene expression. The downregulated genes were mainly involved in cell autophagy, protein complexes, neutrophil aggregation, and bacterial fungal defense reactions. According to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database, these genes are mainly involved in the metabolism of cysteine and methionine, RNA polymerization, and the MAPK signaling pathway, and were enriched in primary follicles. A microRNA-target network revealed that secondary follicles are involved in several important biological processes, such as the synthesis of keratin-associated proteins and enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. In summary, these findings will increase our understanding of the complex molecular mechanisms of HF development and cycling, and provide a basis for the further study of the genes and functions of HF development.

  6. [Analyses of coding sequence point mutation and polymorphism of TGFBI gene in Chinese patients with keratoconus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUAN, Tao; MA, Zhang-wei; DING, Shi-ping

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the point mutations and polymorphisms of transforming growth factor beta-induced gene (TGFBI) in Chinese patients with keratoconus and discuss the relationship between the feature of gene mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms of TGFBI gene and keratoconus. Polymerase chain reaction single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA direct sequencing were performed in 30 keratoconus cases and 30 healthy controls. All 17 exons of the TGFBI gene were analyzed for point mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Totally two heterozygous nucleotide changes were identified in exon 12 of the TGFBI gene. The codon 535 is changed from GGA to TGA in 1 patient, leading to a substitution of glycine to a stop codon at the protein level (G535X). The codon 540 is changed from TTT to TTC in 2 patients and 1 control individual, resulting in a nonsense mutation (F54F), and is a single nucleotide polymorphism of the gene. Mutation and polymorphisms of the TGFBI gene were detected in Chinese patients with keratoconus in this study. The results suggest that TGFBI gene might play an important role in the pathogenesis of keratoconus.

  7. Gene profiling of bone around orthodontic mini-implants by RNA-sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Kyung-Yen; Heo, Jung Sun; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Dong-Yeol; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Ahn, Hyo-Won; Kim, Seong-Hun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the genes that were expressed in the healing bones around SLA-treated titanium orthodontic mini-implants in a beagle at early (1-week) and late (4-week) stages with RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq). Samples from sites of surgical defects were used as controls. Total RNA was extracted from the tissue around the implants, and an RNA-Seq analysis was performed with Illumina TruSeq. In the 1-week group, genes in the gene ontology (GO) categories of cell growth and the extracellular matrix (ECM) were upregulated, while genes in the categories of the oxidation-reduction process, intermediate filaments, and structural molecule activity were downregulated. In the 4-week group, the genes upregulated included ECM binding, stem cell fate specification, and intramembranous ossification, while genes in the oxidation-reduction process category were downregulated. GO analysis revealed an upregulation of genes that were related to significant mechanisms, including those with roles in cell proliferation, the ECM, growth factors, and osteogenic-related pathways, which are associated with bone formation. From these results, implant-induced bone formation progressed considerably during the times examined in this study. The upregulation or downregulation of selected genes was confirmed with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The RNA-Seq strategy was useful for defining the biological responses to orthodontic mini-implants and identifying the specific genetic networks for targeted evaluations of successful peri-implant bone remodeling.

  8. Discerning the Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of API X65 Steels Under Sequence Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. I. Mansor

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents the effect of sequence loading on fatigue crack growth of API X65 steel tested in room temperature. Most of pipeline steels are subjected to wide spectrum of loading during the length of service. Influence of load history effect can cause a trickier assessment to the fatigue behaviour. The objective of this study is to determine the fatigue crack growth behaviour under sequence loading. The material used in this study is X65 steel grade, broadly used in transporting the oil and gas. The constant amplitude loading under mode-I loading and stress ratio of 0.1 and 0.7 are investigate. The effects of sequence load are presents by the two-level block loading. The retardation effect is more intense for block sequence loading. At least about 9.7x104 delayed numbers of cycles was observed which is two times longer compared to constant amplitude loading. The load sequence was suggested affected by retardation consequently delayed the crack growth. It was further observed an increase of overload load ratio consequently resulted a crack grows faster about 18%. It was concluded a lengthy in crack growth was associated with the delay cycles suggesting that the fatigue life depends mainly on size of delay zone and compressive residual stress near the crack tip.

  9. Identification of TP53 as an Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Susceptibility Gene Through Exome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Bradford C.; Jiang, Lichun; Muzny, Donna M.; Treviño, Lisa R.; Dreyer, ZoAnn E.; Strong, Louise C.; Wheeler, David A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Plon, Sharon E.

    2014-01-01

    Although acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer, genetic predisposition to ALL remains poorly understood. Whole-exome sequencing was performed in an extended kindred in which five individuals had been diagnosed with leukemia. Analysis revealed a nonsense variant of TP53 which has been previously reported in families with sarcomas and other typical Li Fraumeni syndrome-associated cancers but never in a familial leukemia kindred. This unexpected finding enabled identification of an appropriate sibling bone marrow donor and illustrates that exome sequencing will reveal atypical clinical presentations of even well-studied genes. PMID:23255406

  10. Sequence analysis of tyrosinase gene in ocular and oculocutaneous albinism patients: introducing three novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordadpoor-Deilamani, Faravareh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Karimipoor, Morteza; Javadi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Albinism is a heterogeneous genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented eyes (in patients with ocular albinism) or hair, skin, and eyes (in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism). It is associated with decreased visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, and photophobia. The tyrosinase gene is known to be involved in both oculocutaneous albinism and autosomal recessive ocular albinism. In this study, we aimed to screen the mutations in the TYR gene in the nonsyndromic OCA and autosomal recessive ocular albinism patients from Iran. The tyrosinase gene was examined in 23 unrelated patients with autosomal recessive ocular albinism or nonsyndromic OCA using DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. TYR gene mutations were identified in 14 (app. 60%) albinism patients. We found 10 mutations, 3 of which were novel. No mutation was found in our ocular albinism patients, but one of them was heterozygous for the p.R402Q polymorphism.

  11. Effect of 5'-flanking sequence deletions on expression of the human insulin gene in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromont-Racine, M; Bucchini, D; Madsen, O

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific......, and -168 allowed correct initiation of the transcripts and cell specificity of expression, while quantitative expression gradually decreased. Deletion to -58 completely abolished the expression of the gene. The amount of human product that in mice harboring the longest fragment contributes up to 50......% of the total insulin does not alter the normal proportion of mice insulins I and II. These results suggest that expression of the human insulin gene in vivo results from the cooperation of several cis-regulatory elements present in the various deleted fragments. With none of the deletions used, expression...

  12. Analysis of a gene panel for targeted sequencing of colorectal cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Klaus Højgaard; Izarzugaza, Jose M.G; Sierakowska Juncker, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    stratification is necessary for the identification of the subset of patients likely responding to treatment, while sparing others from pernicious treatment. Targeted sequencing approaches may help in this regard, enabling rapid genetic investigation, and at the same time easily applicable in routine diagnosis....... We propose a set of guidelines for the identification, including variant calling and filtering, of somatic mutations driving tumorigenesis in the absence of matched healthy tissue. We also discuss the inclusion criteria for the generation of our gene panel. Furthermore, we evaluate the prognostic...... impact of individual genes, using Cox regression models in the context of overall survival and disease-free survival. These analyses confirmed the role of commonly used biomarkers, and shed light on controversial genes such as CYP2C8. Applying those guidelines, we created a novel gene panel...

  13. Comparative analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs between drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes of chickpea under terminal drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju N L

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. is an important grain-legume crop that is mainly grown in rainfed areas, where terminal drought is a major constraint to its productivity. We generated expressed sequence tags (ESTs by suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH to identify differentially expressed genes in drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes in chickpea. Results EST libraries were generated by SSH from root and shoot tissues of IC4958 (drought tolerant and ICC 1882 (drought resistant exposed to terminal drought conditions by the dry down method. SSH libraries were also constructed by using 2 sets of bulks prepared from the RNA of root tissues from selected recombinant inbred lines (RILs (10 each for the extreme high and low root biomass phenotype. A total of 3062 unigenes (638 contigs and 2424 singletons, 51.4% of which were novel in chickpea, were derived by cluster assembly and sequence alignment of 5949 ESTs. Only 2185 (71% unigenes showed significant BLASTX similarity ( Conclusion Our study compares not only genes that are up- and down-regulated in a drought-tolerant genotype under terminal drought stress and a drought susceptible genotype but also between the bulks of the selected RILs exhibiting extreme phenotypes. More than 50% of the genes identified have been shown to be associated with drought stress in chickpea for the first time. This study not only serves as resource for marker discovery, but can provide a better insight into the selection of candidate genes (both up- and downregulated associated with drought tolerance. These results can be used to identify suitable targets for manipulating the drought-tolerance trait in chickpea.

  14. Extensive 16S rRNA gene sequence diversity in Campylobacter hyointestinalis strains: taxonomic and applied implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, C.S.; On, Stephen L.W.

    1999-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subspecies were examined by means of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Sequence similarities among C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii strains exceeded 99.0 %, but values among C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis strains ranged from 96...... of the genus Campylobacter, emphasizing the need for multiple strain analysis when using 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons for taxonomic investigations........4 to 100 %. Sequence similarites between strains representing the two different subspecies ranged from 95.7 to 99.0 %. An intervening sequence was identified in certain of the C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii strains. C. hyointestinalis strains occupied two distinct branches in a phylogenetic analysis...

  15. Genetic divergence of Asiatic Bdellocephala (Turbellaria, Tricladida, Paludicola) as revealed by partial 18S rRNA gene sequence comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznedelov, K D; Timoshkin, O A; Goldman, E

    1997-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing of small ribosomal RNA genes were used for analysis of genetic differences among Asiatic species of freshwater triclad genus Bdellocephala. Representatives of four species and four subspecies of this genus were used to establish homology between nucleotides in the 5'-end portion of small ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Within 552 nucleotide sites of aligned sequences compared, six variable base positions were discovered, dividing Bdellocephala into five different genotypes. Sequence data allow to distinguish two groups of these genotypes. One of them unites species from Kamchatka and Japan, another one unites Baikalian taxa. Agreement between available morphological, cytological and sequence data is discussed.

  16. High-throughput sequencing identification of genes involved with Varroa destructor resistance in the eastern honeybee, Apis cerana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, T; Yin, L; Liu, Z; Shen, F; Shen, J

    2014-10-31

    Varroa destructor is the greatest threat to the honeybee Apis mellifera worldwide, while it rarely causes serious harm to its native host, the Eastern honeybee Apis cerana. The genetic mechanisms underlying the resistance of A. cerana to Varroa remain unclear. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanism of resistance to Varroa may provide useful insights for reducing this disease in other organisms. In this study, the transcriptomes of two A. cerana colonies were sequenced using the Illumina Solexa sequencing method. One colony was highly affected by mites, whereas the other colony displayed strong resistance to V. destructor. We determined differences in gene expression in the two colonies after challenging the colonies with V. destructor. After de novo transcriptome assembly, we obtained 91,172 unigenes for A. cerana and found that 288 differentially expressed genes varied by more than 15-fold. A total of 277 unigenes were present at higher levels in the non-affected colony. Genes involved in resistance to Varroa included unigenes related to skeletal muscle movement, olfactory sensitivity, and transcription factors. This suggests that hygienic behavior and grooming behavior may play important roles in the resistance to Varroa.

  17. Occurrence and Evolutionary Analysis of Coat Protein Gene Sequences of Iranian Isolates ofSugarcane mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Zohreh; Nazifi, Ehsan; Mehrvar, Mohsen

    2017-06-01

    Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) is one of the most damaging viruses infecting sugarcane, maize and some other graminaceous species around the world. To investigate the genetic diversity of SCMV in Iran, the coat protein (CP) gene sequences of 23 SCMV isolates from different hosts were determined. The nucleotide sequence identity among Iranian isolates was more than 96%. They shared nucleotide identities of 75.5-99.9% with those of other SCMV isolates available in GenBank, the highest with the Egyptian isolate EGY7-1 (97.5-99.9%). The results of phylogenetic analysis suggested five divergent evolutionary lineages that did not completely reflect the geographical origin or host plant of the isolates. Population genetic analysis revealed greater between-group than within-group evolutionary divergence values, further supporting the results of the phylogenetic analysis. Our results indicated that natural selection might have contributed to the evolution of isolates belonging to the five identified SCMV groups, with infrequent genetic exchanges occurring between them. Phylogenetic analyses and the estimation of genetic distance indicated that Iranian isolates have low genetic diversity. No recombination was found in the CP cistron of Iranian isolates and the CP gene was under negative selection. These findings provide a comprehensive analysis of the population structure and driving forces for the evolution of SCMV with implications for global exchange of sugarcane germplasm. Gene flow, selection and somehow homologous recombination were found to be the important evolutionary factors shaping the genetic structure of SCMV populations.

  18. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of mock microbial populations- impact of DNA extraction method, primer choice and sequencing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouhy, Fiona; Clooney, Adam G; Stanton, Catherine; Claesson, Marcus J; Cotter, Paul D

    2016-06-24

    Next-generation sequencing platforms have revolutionised our ability to investigate the microbiota composition of complex environments, frequently through 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the bacterial component of the community. Numerous factors, including DNA extraction method, primer sequences and sequencing platform employed, can affect the accuracy of the results achieved. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of these three factors on 16S rRNA gene sequencing results, using mock communities and mock community DNA. The use of different primer sequences (V4-V5, V1-V2 and V1-V2 degenerate primers) resulted in differences in the genera and species detected. The V4-V5 primers gave the most comparable results across platforms. The three Ion PGM primer sets detected more of the 20 mock community species than the equivalent MiSeq primer sets. Data generated from DNA extracted using the 2 extraction methods were very similar. Microbiota compositional data differed depending on the primers and sequencing platform that were used. The results demonstrate the risks in comparing data generated using different sequencing approaches and highlight the merits of choosing a standardised approach for sequencing in situations where a comparison across multiple sequencing runs is required.

  19. Transcriptome profiling of bovine milk oligosaccharide metabolism genes using RNA-sequencing.

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    Saumya Wickramasinghe

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the genes coding for enzymes involved in bovine milk oligosaccharide metabolism by comparing the oligosaccharide profiles with the expressions of glycosylation-related genes. Fresh milk samples (n = 32 were collected from four Holstein and Jersey cows at days 1, 15, 90 and 250 of lactation and free milk oligosaccharide profiles were analyzed. RNA was extracted from milk somatic cells at days 15 and 250 of lactation (n = 12 and gene expression analysis was conducted by RNA-Sequencing. A list was created of 121 glycosylation-related genes involved in oligosaccharide metabolism pathways in bovine by analyzing the oligosaccharide profiles and performing an extensive literature search. No significant differences were observed in either oligosaccharide profiles or expressions of glycosylation-related genes between Holstein and Jersey cows. The highest concentrations of free oligosaccharides were observed in the colostrum samples and a sharp decrease was observed in the concentration of free oligosaccharides on day 15, followed by progressive decrease on days 90 and 250. Ninety-two glycosylation-related genes were expressed in milk somatic cells. Most of these genes exhibited higher expression in day 250 samples indicating increases in net glycosylation-related metabolism in spite of decreases in free milk oligosaccharides in late lactation milk. Even though fucosylated free oligosaccharides were not identified, gene expression indicated the likely presence of fucosylated oligosaccharides in bovine milk. Fucosidase genes were expressed in milk and a possible explanation for not detecting fucosylated free oligosaccharides is the degradation of large fucosylated free oligosaccharides by the fucosidases. Detailed characterization of enzymes encoded by the 92 glycosylation-related genes identified in this study will provide the basic knowledge for metabolic network analysis of oligosaccharides in mammalian milk. These candidate

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study with Sequence Variants Identifies Candidate Genes for Mastitis Resistance in Dairy Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahana, Goutam; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Bendixen, Christian

    component in a linear mixed model. A total of 90 bulls’ whole genomes were sequenced with a coverage > 10X. Sequence reads were aligned to the cattle reference genome and polymorphisms in candidate regions were identified when one or more samples differed from the reference sequence. The polymorphisms...... Factor Receptor Alpha (LIFR) emerged as a strong candidate gene for mastitis resistance. The LIFR gene is involved in acute phase response and is expressed in saliva and mammary gland....

  1. Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant clinical Bacteroides fragilis isolates by whole genome shotgun sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Sóki, József; Hasman, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis constitutes the most frequent anaerobic bacterium causing bacteremia in humans. The genetic background for antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis is diverse with some genes requiring insertion sequence (IS) elements inserted upstream for increased expression. To evaluate whole...... genome shotgun sequencing as a method for predicting antimicrobial resistance properties, one meropenem resistant and five multidrug-resistant blood culture isolates were sequenced and antimicrobial resistance genes and IS elements identified using ResFinder 2.1 (http...

  2. RNA sequencing of Populus x canadensis roots identifies key molecular mechanisms underlying physiological adaption to excess zinc.

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    Andrea Ariani

    Full Text Available Populus x canadensis clone I-214 exhibits a general indicator phenotype in response to excess Zn, and a higher metal uptake in roots than in shoots with a reduced translocation to aerial parts under hydroponic conditions. This physiological adaptation seems mainly regulated by roots, although the molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes are still poorly understood. Here, differential expression analysis using RNA-sequencing technology was used to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in the response to excess Zn in root. In order to maximize specificity of detection of differentially expressed (DE genes, we consider the intersection of genes identified by three distinct statistical approaches (61 up- and 19 down-regulated and validate them by RT-qPCR, yielding an agreement of 93% between the two experimental techniques. Gene Ontology (GO terms related to oxidation-reduction processes, transport and cellular iron ion homeostasis were enriched among DE genes, highlighting the importance of metal homeostasis in adaptation to excess Zn by P. x canadensis clone I-214. We identified the up-regulation of two Populus metal transporters (ZIP2 and NRAMP1 probably involved in metal uptake, and the down-regulation of a NAS4 gene involved in metal translocation. We identified also four Fe-homeostasis transcription factors (two bHLH38 genes, FIT and BTS that were differentially expressed, probably for reducing Zn-induced Fe-deficiency. In particular, we suggest that the down-regulation of FIT transcription factor could be a mechanism to cope with Zn-induced Fe-deficiency in Populus. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in adaption to excess Zn in Populus spp., but could also constitute a starting point for the identification and characterization of molecular markers or biotechnological targets for possible improvement of phytoremediation performances of poplar trees.

  3. Intervening sequences in a plant gene-comparison of the partial sequence of cDNA and genomic DNA of French bean phaseolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S. M.; Slightom, J. L.; Hall, T. C.

    1981-01-01

    A plant gene coding for the major storage protein (phaseolin, G1-globulin) of the French bean was isolated from a genomic library constructed in the phage vector Charon 24A. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of part of the gene with that of the cloned messenger RNA (cDNA) revealed the presence of three intervening sequences, all beginning with GTand ending with AG. The 5' and 3' boundaries of intervening sequences TVS-A (88 base pairs) and IVS-B (124 base pairs) are similar to those described for animal and viral genes, but the 3' boundary of IVS-C (129 base pairs) shows some differences. A sequence of 185 amino acids deduced from the cloned DMAs represents about 40% of a phaseolin polypeptide.

  4. Deep RNA sequencing analysis of readthrough gene fusions in human prostate adenocarcinoma and reference samples

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    Nacu Serban

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Readthrough fusions across adjacent genes in the genome, or transcription-induced chimeras (TICs, have been estimated using expressed sequence tag (EST libraries to involve 4-6% of all genes. Deep transcriptional sequencing (RNA-Seq now makes it possible to study the occurrence and expression levels of TICs in individual samples across the genome. Methods We performed single-end RNA-Seq on three human prostate adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding normal tissues, as well as brain and universal reference samples. We developed two bioinformatics methods to specifically identify TIC events: a targeted alignment method using artificial exon-exon junctions within 200,000 bp from adjacent genes, and genomic alignment allowing splicing within individual reads. We performed further experimental verification and characterization of selected TIC and fusion events using quantitative RT-PCR and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Results Targeted alignment against artificial exon-exon junctions yielded 339 distinct TIC events, including 32 gene pairs with multiple isoforms. The false discovery rate was estimated to be 1.5%. Spliced alignment to the genome was less sensitive, finding only 18% of those found by targeted alignment in 33-nt reads and 59% of those in 50-nt reads. However, spliced alignment revealed 30 cases of TICs with intervening exons, in addition to distant inversions, scrambled genes, and translocations. Our findings increase the catalog of observed TIC gene pairs by 66%. We verified 6 of 6 predicted TICs in all prostate samples, and 2 of 5 predicted novel distant gene fusions, both private events among 54 prostate tumor samples tested. Expression of TICs correlates with that of the upstream gene, which can explain the prostate-specific pattern of some TIC events and the restriction of the SLC45A3-ELK4 e4-e2 TIC to ERG-negative prostate samples, as confirmed in 20 matched prostate tumor and normal

  5. Human case of bacteremia caused by Streptococcus canis sequence type 9 harboring the scm gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyama, Daisuke; Abe, Yoshihiko; Sakai, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Takahide; Takahashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus canis (Sc) is a zoonotic pathogen that is transferred mainly from companion animals to humans. One of the major virulence factors in Sc is the M-like protein encoded by the scm gene, which is involved in anti-phagocytic activities, as well as the recruitment of plasminogen to the bacterial surface in cooperation with enolase, and the consequent enhancement of bacterial transmigration and survival. This is the first reported human case of uncomplicated bacteremia following a dog bite, caused by Streptococcus canis harboring the scm gene. The similarity of the 16S rRNA from the infecting species to that of the Sc type strain, as well as the amplification of the species-specific cfg gene, encoding a co-hemolysin, was used to confirm the species identity. Furthermore, the isolate was confirmed as sequence type 9. The partial scm gene sequence harbored by the isolate was closely related to those of other two Sc strains. While this isolate did not possess the erm (A), erm (B), or mef (A), macrolide/lincosamide resistance genes, it was not susceptible to azithromycin: its susceptibility was intermediate. Even though human Sc bacteremia is rare, clinicians should be aware of this microorganism, as well as Pasteurella sp., Prevotella sp., and Capnocytophaga sp., when examining and treating patients with fever who maintain close contact with companion animals.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus oceanisediminis 2691, a reservoir of heavy-metal resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Jeong, Haeyoung; Kim, Hyun Ju; Lee, Dong-Woo; Lee, Sang Jun

    2016-12-01

    Ocean sediments are commonly subject to the pollution of various heavy metals. Intracellular heavy metal concentrations in marine microorganisms should be kept within allowable concentrations. Here, we report redundant heavy metal resistance related genes encoding heavy metal-sensing transcriptional regulators (i.e. cadC), heavy metal efflux pumps, and detoxifying enzymes in the complete genome sequence of Bacillus oceanisediminis 2691. By comparing CadC sequences of strain 2691 with those from other bacterial genomes, we demonstrated that each cadC gene located in the chromosome or plasmid of 2691 cells are similar to those of various near or distant microbes, which might shed light on evolutionary trajectories of redundant heavy metal resistance genes. In application aspects, these diverse heavy metal sensing genes can be harnessed as synthetic biological parts, modules, and devices for the development of heavy metal-specific biosensors. Heavy metal bioremediation technologies or platform cells can be also developed based on the marine genomic information of heavy metal resistance and/or detoxification genes in a bacterial isolate from ocean sediments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Human case of bacteremia caused by Streptococcus canis sequence type 9 harboring the scm gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Taniyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus canis (Sc is a zoonotic pathogen that is transferred mainly from companion animals to humans. One of the major virulence factors in Sc is the M-like protein encoded by the scm gene, which is involved in anti-phagocytic activities, as well as the recruitment of plasminogen to the bacterial surface in cooperation with enolase, and the consequent enhancement of bacterial transmigration and survival. This is the first reported human case of uncomplicated bacteremia following a dog bite, caused by Streptococcus canis harboring the scm gene. The similarity of the 16S rRNA from the infecting species to that of the Sc type strain, as well as the amplification of the species-specific cfg gene, encoding a co-hemolysin, was used to confirm the species identity. Furthermore, the isolate was confirmed as sequence type 9. The partial scm gene sequence harbored by the isolate was closely related to those of other two Sc strains. While this isolate did not possess the erm(A, erm(B, or mef(A, macrolide/lincosamide resistance genes, it was not susceptible to azithromycin: its susceptibility was intermediate. Even though human Sc bacteremia is rare, clinicians should be aware of this microorganism, as well as Pasteurella sp., Prevotella sp., and Capnocytophaga sp., when examining and treating patients with fever who maintain close contact with companion animals.

  8. Phylogenetic Relationships of Pseudorasbora, Pseudopungtungia, and Pungtungia (Teleostei; Cypriniformes; Gobioninae Inferred from Multiple Nuclear Gene Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun-Yong Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gobionine species belonging to the genera Pseudorasbora, Pseudopungtungia, and Pungtungia (Teleostei; Cypriniformes; Cyprinidae have been heavily studied because of problems on taxonomy, threats of extinction, invasion, and human health. Nucleotide sequences of three nuclear genes, that is, recombination activating protein gene 1 (rag1, recombination activating gene 2 (rag2, and early growth response 1 gene (egr1, from Pseudorasbora, Pseudopungtungia, and Pungtungia species residing in China, Japan, and Korea, were analyzed to elucidate their intergeneric and interspecific phylogenetic relationships. In the phylogenetic tree inferred from their multiple gene sequences, Pseudorasbora, Pseudopungtungia and Pungtungia species ramified into three phylogenetically distinct clades; the “tenuicorpa” clade composed of Pseudopungtungia tenuicorpa, the “parva” clade composed of all Pseudorasbora species/subspecies, and the “herzi” clade composed of Pseudopungtungia nigra, and Pungtungia herzi. The genus Pseudorasbora was recovered as monophyletic, while the genus Pseudopungtungia was recovered as polyphyletic. Our phylogenetic result implies the unstable taxonomic status of the genus Pseudopungtungia.

  9. Whole-genome sequencing of eight goat populations for the detection of selection signatures underlying production and adaptive traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Guangxian; Guo, Jiazhong; Yan, Hailong; Niu, Yiyuan; Li, Yan; Yuan, Chao; Geng, Rongqing; Lan, Xianyong; An, Xiaopeng; Tian, Xingui; Zhou, Huangkai; Song, Jiuzhou; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    The goat (Capra hircus) is one of the first farm animals that have undergone domestication and extensive natural and artificial selection by adapting to various environments, which in turn has resulted in its high level of phenotypic diversity. Here, we generated medium-coverage (9–13×) sequences from eight domesticated goat breeds, representing morphologically or geographically specific populations, to identify genomic regions representing selection signatures. We discovered ~10 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for each breed. By combining two approaches, ZHp and di values, we identified 22 genomic regions that may have contributed to the phenotypes in coat color patterns, body size, cashmere traits, as well as high altitude adaptation in goat populations. Candidate genes underlying strong selection signatures including coloration (ASIP, KITLG, HTT, GNA11, and OSTM1), body size (TBX15, DGCR8, CDC25A, and RDH16), cashmere traits (LHX2, FGF9, and WNT2), and hypoxia adaptation (CDK2, SOCS2, NOXA1, and ENPEP) were identified. We also identified candidate functional SNPs within selected genes that may be important for each trait. Our results demonstrated the potential of using sequence data in identifying genomic regions that are responsible for agriculturally significant phenotypes in goats, which in turn can be used in the selection of goat breeds for environmental adaptation and domestication. PMID:27941843

  10. Revealing Genomic Profile That Underlies Tropism of Myeloma Cells Using Whole Exome Sequencing

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    Youngil Koh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previously we established two cell lines (SNU_MM1393_BM and SNU_MM1393_SC from different tissues (bone marrow and subcutis of mice which were injected with single patient’s myeloma sample. We tried to define genetic changes specific for each cell line using whole exome sequencing (WES. Materials and Methods. We extracted DNA from SNU_MM1393_BM and SNU_MM1393_SC and performed WES. For single nucleotide variants (SNV calling, we used Varscan2. Annotation of mutation was performed using ANNOVAR. Results. When calling of somatic mutations was performed, 68 genes were nonsynonymously mutated only in SNU_MM1393_SC, while 136 genes were nonsynonymously mutated only in SNU_MM1393_BM. KIAA1199, FRY, AP3B2, and OPTC were representative genes specifically mutated in SNU_MM1393_SC. When comparison analysis was performed using TCGA data, mutational pattern of SNU_MM1393_SC resembled that of melanoma mostly. Pathway analysis using KEGG database showed that mutated genes specific of SNU_MM1393_BM were related to differentiation, while those of SNU_MM1393_SC were related to tumorigenesis. Conclusion. We found out genetic changes that underlie tropism of myeloma cells using WES. Genetic signature of cutaneous plasmacytoma shares that of melanoma implying common mechanism for skin tropism. KIAA1199, FRY, AP3B2, and OPTC are candidate genes for skin tropism of cancers.

  11. Ribosomal RNA gene sequences confirm that protistan endoparasite of larval cod Gadus morhua is Ichthyodinium sp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Alf; Meyer, Stefan; Overton, Julia Lynne

    2010-01-01

    An enigmatic protistan endoparasite found in eggs and larvae of cod Gadus morhua and turbot Psetta maxima was isolated from Baltic cod larvae, and DNA was extracted for sequencing of the parasite's small Subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. The endoparasite has previously been suggested...... to be related to Ichthyodinium chabelardi, a dinoflagellate-like protist that parasitizes yolk sacs of embryos and larvae of a variety of fish species. Comparison of a 1535 bp long fragment of the SSU rRNA gene of the cod endoparasite showed absolute identify with I. chabelardi, demonstrating that the 2...

  12. wzi Gene Sequencing, a Rapid Method for Determination of Capsular Type for Klebsiella Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passet, Virginie; Haugaard, Anita Björk; Babosan, Anamaria; Kassis-Chikhani, Najiby; Struve, Carsten; Decré, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens of the genus Klebsiella have been classified into distinct capsular (K) types for nearly a century. K typing of Klebsiella species still has important applications in epidemiology and clinical microbiology, but the serological method has strong practical limitations. Our objective was to evaluate the sequencing of wzi, a gene conserved in all capsular types of Klebsiella pneumoniae that codes for an outer membrane protein involved in capsule attachment to the cell surface, as a simple and rapid method for the prediction of K type. The sequencing of a 447-nucleotide region of wzi distinguished the K-type reference strains with only nine exceptions. A reference wzi sequence database was created by the inclusion of multiple strains representing K types associated with high virulence and multidrug resistance. A collection of 119 prospective clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae were then analyzed in parallel by wzi sequencing and classical K typing. Whereas K typing achieved typeability for 81% and discrimination for 94.4% of the isolates, these figures were 98.1% and 98.3%, respectively, for wzi sequencing. The prediction of K type once the wzi allele was known was 94%. wzi sequencing is a rapid and simple method for the determination of the K types of most K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. PMID:24088853

  13. Massively Parallel Sequencing of Genes Implicated in Heritable Cardiac Disorders: A Strategy for a Small Diagnostic Laboratory

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    Ivone U. S. Leong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD in people before the age of 35 years is a devastating event for any family. The causes of SCD in the young can be broadly divided into two groups: heritable cardiac disorders that affect the heart structure (cardiomyopathies and primary electrical disorders (cardiac ion channelopathies. Genetic testing is vital as those suffering from cardiac ion channelopathies have structurally normal hearts, and those with cardiomyopathies may only show subtle abnormalities in the heart and these signs may not be detected during an autopsy. Post-mortem genetic testing of SCD victims is important to identify the underlying genetic cause. This is important as family cascade screening may be undertaken to identify those who may be at risk and provide vital information about risk stratification and clinical management. The development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS has made it possible for the simultaneous screening of multiple patients for hundreds of genes. In light of this, we opted to develop an MPS approach for SCD analysis that would allow us to screen for mutations in genes implicated in cardiomyopathies and cardiac ion channelopathies. The rationale behind this panel was to limit it to genes carrying the greatest mutation load. If no likely pathogenic gene variant were found then testing could cascade to whole exome/genome sequencing as a gene-discovery exercise. The overarching aim was to design and validate a custom-cardiac panel that satisfies the diagnostic requirements of LabPLUS (Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, NZ and the guidelines provided by the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia and the Association for Clinical Genetic Science.

  14. Massively Parallel Sequencing of Genes Implicated in Heritable Cardiac Disorders: A Strategy for a Small Diagnostic Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Ivone U S; Stuckey, Alexander; Belluoccio, Daniele; Fan, Vicky; Skinner, Jonathan R; Prosser, Debra O; Love, Donald R

    2017-10-10

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in people before the age of 35 years is a devastating event for any family. The causes of SCD in the young can be broadly divided into two groups: heritable cardiac disorders that affect the heart structure (cardiomyopathies) and primary electrical disorders (cardiac ion channelopathies). Genetic testing is vital as those suffering from cardiac ion channelopathies have structurally normal hearts, and those with cardiomyopathies may only show subtle abnormalities in the heart and these signs may not be detected during an autopsy. Post-mortem genetic testing of SCD victims is important to identify the underlying genetic cause. This is important as family cascade screening may be undertaken to identify those who may be at risk and provide vital information about risk stratification and clinical management. The development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS) has made it possible for the simultaneous screening of multiple patients for hundreds of genes. In light of this, we opted to develop an MPS approach for SCD analysis that would allow us to screen for mutations in genes implicated in cardiomyopathies and cardiac ion channelopathies. The rationale behind this panel was to limit it to genes carrying the greatest mutation load. If no likely pathogenic gene variant were found then testing could cascade to whole exome/genome sequencing as a gene-discovery exercise. The overarching aim was to design and validate a custom-cardiac panel that satisfies the diagnostic requirements of LabPLUS (Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, NZ) and the guidelines provided by the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia and the Association for Clinical Genetic Science.

  15. Rapid high resolution genotyping of Francisella tularensis by whole genome sequence comparison of annotated genes ("MLST+".

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    Markus H Antwerpen

    Full Text Available The zoonotic disease tularemia is caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. This pathogen is considered as a category A select agent with potential to be misused in bioterrorism. Molecular typing based on DNA-sequence like canSNP-typing or MLVA has become the accepted standard for this organism. Due to the organism's highly clonal nature, the current typing methods have reached their limit of discrimination for classifying closely related subpopulations within the subspecies F. tularensis ssp. holarctica. We introduce a new gene-by-gene approach, MLST+, based on whole genome data of 15 sequenced F. tularensis ssp. holarctica strains and apply this approach to investigate an epidemic of lethal tularemia among non-human primates in two animal facilities in Germany. Due to the high resolution of MLST+ we are able to demonstrate that three independent clones of this highly infectious pathogen were responsible for these spatially and temporally restricted outbreaks.

  16. Captured metagenomics: large-scale targeting of genes based on ?sequence capture? reveals functional diversity in soils

    OpenAIRE

    Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Kushwaha, Sandeep K.; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahr?n, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Microbial enzyme diversity is a key to understand many ecosystem processes. Whole metagenome sequencing (WMG) obtains information on functional genes, but it is costly and inefficient due to large amount of sequencing that is required. In this study, we have applied a captured metagenomics technique for functional genes in soil microorganisms, as an alternative to WMG. Large-scale targeting of functional genes, coding for enzymes related to organic matter degradation, was applied to two agric...

  17. Identification of Reproduction-Related Gene Polymorphisms Using Whole Transcriptome Sequencing in the Large White Pig Population

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Daniel; Laiho, Asta; Gyenesei, Attila; Sironen, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in high-throughput sequencing techniques have enabled large-scale analysis of genetic variations and gene expression in different tissues and species, but gene expression patterns and genetic variations in livestock are not well-characterized. In this study, we have used high-throughput transcriptomic sequencing of the Finnish Large White to identify gene expression patterns and coding polymorphisms within the breed in the testis and oviduct. The main objective of this stu...

  18. Low-pass shotgun sequencing of the barley genome facilitates rapid identification of genes, conserved non-coding sequences and novel repeats

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    Graner Andreas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barley has one of the largest and most complex genomes of all economically important food crops. The rise of new short read sequencing technologies such as Illumina/Solexa permits such large genomes to be effectively sampled at relatively low cost. Based on the corresponding sequence reads a Mathematically Defined Repeat (MDR index can be generated to map repetitive regions in genomic sequences. Results We have generated 574 Mbp of Illumina/Solexa sequences from barley total genomic DNA, representing about 10% of a genome equivalent. From these sequences we generated an MDR index which was then used to identify and mark repetitive regions in the barley genome. Comparison of the MDR plots with expert repeat annotation drawing on the information already available for known repetitive elements revealed a significant correspondence between the two methods. MDR-based annotation allowed for the identification of dozens of novel repeat sequences, though, which were not recognised by hand-annotation. The MDR data was also used to identify gene-containing regions by masking of repetitive sequences in eight de-novo sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones. For half of the identified candidate gene islands indeed gene sequences could be identified. MDR data were only of limited use, when mapped on genomic sequences from the closely related species Triticum monococcum as only a fraction of the repetitive sequences was recognised. Conclusion An MDR index for barley, which was obtained by whole-genome Illumina/Solexa sequencing, proved as efficient in repeat identification as manual expert annotation. Circumventing the labour-intensive step of producing a specific repeat library for expert annotation, an MDR index provides an elegant and efficient resource for the identification of repetitive and low-copy (i.e. potentially gene-containing sequences regions in uncharacterised genomic sequences. The restriction that a particular

  19. Advancing Eucalyptus genomics: identification and sequencing of lignin biosynthesis genes from deep-coverage BAC libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudrna David

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eucalyptus species are among the most planted hardwoods in the world because of their rapid growth, adaptability and valuable wood properties. The development and integration of genomic resources into breeding practice will be increasingly important in the decades to come. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries are key genomic tools that enable positional cloning of important traits, synteny evaluation, and the development of genome framework physical maps for genetic linkage and genome sequencing. Results We describe the construction and characterization of two deep-coverage BAC libraries EG_Ba and EG_Bb obtained from nuclear DNA fragments of E. grandis (clone BRASUZ1 digested with HindIII and BstYI, respectively. Genome coverages of 17 and 15 haploid genome equivalents were estimated for EG_Ba and EG_Bb, respectively. Both libraries contained large inserts, with average sizes ranging from 135 Kb (Eg_Bb to 157 Kb (Eg_Ba, very low extra-nuclear genome contamination providing a probability of finding a single copy gene ≥ 99.99%. Libraries were screened for the presence of several genes of interest via hybridizations to high-density BAC filters followed by PCR validation. Five selected BAC clones were sequenced and assembled using the Roche GS FLX technology providing the whole sequence of the E. grandis chloroplast genome, and complete genomic sequences of important lignin biosynthesis genes. Conclusions The two E. grandis BAC libraries described in this study represent an important milestone for the advancement of Eucalyptus genomics and forest tree research. These BAC resources have a highly redundant genome coverage (> 15×, contain large average inserts and have a very low percentage of clones with organellar DNA or empty vectors. These publicly available BAC libraries are thus suitable for a broad range of applications in genetic and genomic research in Eucalyptus and possibly in related species of Myrtaceae

  20. Moloney murine sarcoma virus MuSVts110 DNA: cloning, nucleotide sequence, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huai, L; Chiocca, S M; Gilbreth, M A; Ainsworth, J R; Bishop, L A; Murphy, E C

    1992-09-01

    We have cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MuSV) MuSVts110 DNA by assembly of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified segments of integrated viral DNA from infected NRK cells (6m2 cells) and determined its complete sequence. Previously, by direct sequencing of MuSVts110 RNA transcribed in 6m2 cells, we established that the thermosensitive RNA splicing phenotype uniquely characteristic of MuSVts110 results from a deletion of 1,487 nucleotides of progenitor MuSV-124 sequences. As anticipated, the sequence obtained in this study contained precisely this same deletion. In addition, several other unexpected sequence differences were found between MuSVts110 and MuSV-124. For example, in the noncoding region upstream of the gag gene, MuSVts110 DNA contained a 52-nucleotide tract typical of murine leukemia virus rather than MuSV-124, suggesting that MuSVts110 originated as a MuSV-helper murine leukemia virus recombinant during reverse transcription rather than from a straightforward deletion within MuSV-124. In addition, both MuSVts110 long terminal repeats contained head-to-tail duplications of eight nucleotides in the U3 region. Finally, seven single-nucleotide substitutions were found scattered throughout MuSVts110 DNA. Three of the nucleotide substitutions were in the gag gene, resulting in one coding change in p15 and one in p30. All of the remaining nucleotide changes were found in the noncoding region between the 5' long terminal repeat and the gag gene. In NIH 3T3 cells transfected with the cloned MuSVts110 DNA, the pattern of viral RNA expression conformed with that observed in cells infected with authentic MuSVts110 virus in that viral RNA splicing was 30 to 40% efficient at growth temperatures between 28 and 33 degrees C but reduced to trace levels above 37 degrees C.

  1. A phylogenetic framework for the kingdom Fungi based on 18S rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarza, Pablo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Panzer, Katrin; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Reich, Marlis

    2017-12-01

    The usage of molecular phylogenetic approaches is critical to advance the understanding of systematics and community processes in the kingdom Fungi. Among the possible phylogenetic markers (or combinations of them), the 18S rRNA gene appears currently as the most prominent candidate due to its large availability in public databases and informative content. The purpose of this work was the creation of a reference phylogenetic framework that can serve as ready-to-use package for its application on fungal classification and community analysis. The current database contains 9329 representative 18S rRNA gene sequences covering the whole fungal kingdom, a manually curated alignment, an annotated and revised phylogenetic tree with all the sequence entries, updated information on current taxonomy, and recommendations of use. Out of 201 total fungal taxa with more than two sequences in the dataset, 179 were monophyletic. From another perspective, 66% of the entries had a tree-derived classification identical to that obtained from the NCBI taxonomy, whereas 34% differed in one or the other rank. Most of the differences were associated to missing taxonomic assignments in NCBI taxonomy, or the unexpected position of sequences that positioned out of their theoretically corresponding clades. The strong correlation observed with current fungal taxonomy evidences that 18S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenies are adequate to reflect genealogy of Fungi at the levels of order and above, and justify their further usage and exploration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of the murine fatty acid transport protein gene and its insulin response sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, T Y; Frohnert, B I; Smith, A J; Schaffer, J E; Bernlohr, D A

    1998-10-16

    Fatty acid transport protein (FATP) was identified by expression cloning strategies (Schaffer, J. E., and Lodish, H. F. (1994) Cell 79, 427-436) and shown by transfection analysis to catalyze the transfer of long-chain fatty acids across the plasma membrane of cells. It is expressed highly in tissues exhibiting rapid fatty acid metabolism such as skeletal muscle, heart, and adipose. FATP mRNA levels are down-regulated by insulin in cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes and up-regulated by nutrient depletion in murine adipose tissue (Man, M. Z., Hui, T. Y., Schaffer, J. E., Lodish, H. F., and Bernlohr, D. A. (1996) Mol. Endocrinol. 10, 1021-1028). To determine the molecular mechanism of insulin regulation of FATP transcription, we have isolated the murine FATP gene and its 5'-flanking sequences. The FATP gene spans approximately 16 kilobases and contains 13 exons, of which exon 2 is alternatively spliced. S1 nuclease and RNase protection assays revealed the presence of multiple transcription start sites; the DNA sequence upstream of the predominant transcription start sites lacks a typical TATA box. By transient transfection assays in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, the inhibitory action of insulin on FATP transcription was localized to a cis-acting element with the sequence 5'-TGTTTTC-3' from -1347 to -1353. This sequence is very similar to the insulin response sequence found in the regulatory region of other genes negatively regulated by insulin such as those encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, tyrosine aminotransferase, and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the murine FATP gene is localized to chromosome 8, band 8B3.3. Interestingly, this region of chromosome 8 contains a cluster of three other genes important for fatty acid homeostasis, lipoprotein lipase, the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1. These results characterize the murine FATP gene and its

  3. The Tgif2 gene contains a retained intron within the coding sequence

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    Wotton David

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGIF and TGIF2 are homeodomain proteins, which act as TGFβ specific Smad transcriptional corepressors. TGIF recruits general repressors including mSin3 and CtBP. The related TGIF2 protein functions in a similar manner, but does not bind CtBP. In addition to repressing TGFβ activated gene expression, TGIF and TGIF2 repress gene expression by binding directly to DNA. TGIF and TGIF2 share two major blocks of similarity, encompassing the homeodomain, and a conserved carboxyl terminal repression domain. Here we characterize two splice variants of the Tgif2 gene from mouse and demonstrate that the Tgif2 gene contains a retained intron. Results By PCR from mouse cDNA, we identified two alternate splice forms of the Tgif2 gene. One splice variant encodes the full length 237 amino acid Tgif2, whereas the shorter form results in the removal of 39 codons from the centre of the coding region. The generation of this alternate splice form occurs with the mouse RNA, but not the human, and both splice forms are present in all mouse tissues analyzed. Human and mouse Tgif2 coding sequences contain a retained intron, which in mouse Tgif2 is removed by splicing from around 25–50% of RNAs, as assessed by RT-PCR. This splicing event is dependent on sequences within the mouse Tgif2 coding sequence. Both splice forms of mouse Tgif2 encode proteins which are active transcriptional repressors, and can repress both TGFβ dependent and independent transcription. In addition, we show that human and mouse Tgif2 interact with the transcriptional corepressor mSin3. Conclusion These data demonstrate that the Tgif2 gene contains a retained intron, within the second coding exon. This retained intron is not removed from the human mRNA at a detectable level, but is spliced out in a significant proportion of mouse RNAs. This alternate splicing is dependent entirely on sequences within the mouse Tgif2 coding sequence, suggesting the presence of an exonic

  4. How the Sequence of a Gene Specifies Structural Symmetry in Proteins.

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    Xiaojuan Shen

    Full Text Available Internal symmetry is commonly observed in the majority of fundamental protein folds. Meanwhile, sufficient evidence suggests that nascent polypeptide chains of proteins have the potential to start the co-translational folding process and this process allows mRNA to contain additional information on protein structure. In this paper, we study the relationship between gene sequences and protein structures from the viewpoint of symmetry to explore how gene sequences code for structural symmetry in proteins. We found that, for a set of two-fold symmetric proteins from left-handed beta-helix fold, intragenic symmetry always exists in their corresponding gene sequences. Meanwhile, codon usage bias and local mRNA structure might be involved in modulating translation speed for the formation of structural symmetry: a major decrease of local codon usage bias in the middle of the codon sequence can be identified as a common feature; and major or consecutive decreases in local mRNA folding energy near the boundaries of the symmetric substructures can also be observed. The results suggest that gene duplication and fusion may be an evolutionarily conserved process for this protein fold. In addition, the usage of rare codons and the formation of higher order of secondary structure near the boundaries of symmetric substructures might have coevolved as conserved mechanisms to slow down translation elongation and to facilitate effective folding of symmetric substructures. These findings provide valuable insights into our understanding of the mechanisms of translation and its evolution, as well as the design of proteins via symmetric modules.

  5. Sequencing the Gene Encoding Manganese-Dependent Superoxide Dismutase for Rapid Species Identification of Enterococci

    OpenAIRE

    Poyart, Claire; Quesnes, Gilles; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    Simple PCR and sequencing assays that utilize a single pair of degenerate primers were used to characterize a 438-bp-long DNA fragment internal (sodAint) to the sodA gene encoding the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase in 19 enterococcal type strains (Enterococcus avium, Enterococcus casseliflavus, Enterococcus cecorum, Enterococcus columbae, Enterococcus dispar, Enterococcus durans, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus flavescens, Enterococcus gallinarum, Enterococ...

  6. Phylogeny and comparative substitution rates of frogs inferred from sequences of three nuclear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegg, Simone; Vences, Miguel; Brinkmann, Henner; Meyer, Axel

    2004-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among major clades of anuran amphibians were studied using partial sequences of three nuclear protein coding genes, Rag-1, Rag-2, and rhodopsin in 26 frog species from 18 families. The concatenated nuclear data set comprised 2,616 nucleotides and was complemented by sequences of the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA genes for analyses of evolutionary rates. Separate and combined analyses of the nuclear markers supported the monophyly of modern frogs (Neobatrachia), whereas they did not provide support for the monophyly of archaic frog lineages (Archaeobatrachia), contrary to previous studies based on mitochondrial data. The Neobatrachia contain two well supported clades that correspond to the subfamilies Ranoidea (Hyperoliidae, Mantellidae, Microhylidae, Ranidae, and Rhacophoridae) and Hyloidea (Bufonidae, Hylidae, Leptodactylidae, and Pseudidae). Two other families (Heleophrynidae and Sooglossidae) occupied basal positions and probably represent ancient relicts within the Neobatrachia, which had been less clearly indicated by previous mitochondrial analyses. Branch lengths of archaeobatrachians were consistently shorter in all separate analyses, and nonparametric rate smoothing indicated accelerated substitution rates in neobatrachians. However, relative rate tests confirmed this tendency only for mitochondrial genes. In contrast, nuclear gene sequences from our study and from an additional GenBank survey showed no clear phylogenetic trends in terms of differences in rates of molecular evolution. Maximum likelihood trees based on Rag-1 and using only one neobatrachian and one archaeobatrachian sequence, respectively, even had longer archaeobatrachian branches averaged over all pairwise comparisons. More data are necessary to understand the significance of a possibly general assignation of short branches to basal and species-poor taxa by tree-reconstruction algorithms.

  7. An abundance of ubiquitously expressed genes revealed by tissue transcriptome sequence data.

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    Daniel Ramsköld

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The parts of the genome transcribed by a cell or tissue reflect the biological processes and functions it carries out. We characterized the features of mammalian tissue transcriptomes at the gene level through analysis of RNA deep sequencing (RNA-Seq data across human and mouse tissues and cell lines. We observed that roughly 8,000 protein-coding genes were ubiquitously expressed, contributing to around 75% of all mRNAs by message copy number in most tissues. These mRNAs encoded proteins that were often intracellular, and tended to be involved in metabolism, transcription, RNA processing or translation. In contrast, genes for secreted or plasma membrane proteins were generally expressed in only a subset of tissues. The distribution of expression levels was broad but fairly continuous: no support was found for the concept of distinct expression classes of genes. Expression estimates that included reads mapping to coding exons only correlated better with qRT-PCR data than estimates which also included 3' untranslated regions (UTRs. Muscle and liver had the least complex transcriptomes, in that they expressed predominantly ubiquitous genes and a large fraction of the transcripts came from a few highly expressed genes, whereas brain, kidney and testis expressed more complex transcriptomes with the vast majority of genes expressed and relatively small contributions from the most expressed genes. mRNAs expressed in brain had unusually long 3'UTRs, and mean 3'UTR length was higher for genes involved in development, morphogenesis and signal transduction, suggesting added complexity of UTR-based regulation for these genes. Our results support a model in which variable exterior components feed into a large, densely connected core composed of ubiquitously expressed intracellular proteins.

  8. Isolation and sequence analysis of the gene encoding triose phosphate isomerase from Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merico, A; Rodrigues, F; Côrte-Real, M; Porro, D; Ranzi, B M; Compagno, C

    2001-06-30

    The ZbTPI1 gene encoding triose phosphate isomerase (TIM) was cloned from a Zygosaccharomyces bailii genomic library by complementation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae tpi1 mutant strain. The nucleotide sequence of a 1.5 kb fragment showed an open reading frame (ORF) of 746 bp, encoding a protein of 248 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence shares a high degree of homology with TIMs from other yeast species, including some highly conserved regions. The analysis of the promoter sequence of the ZbTPI1 revealed the presence of putative motifs known to have regulatory functions in S. cerevisiae. The GenBank Accession No. of ZbTPI1 is AF325852. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Characterizing homologues of crop domestication genes in poorly described wild relatives by high-throughput sequencing of whole genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malory, Sylvia; Shapter, Frances M; Elphinstone, Martin S; Chivers, Ian H; Henry, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Wild crop relatives represent a source of novel alleles for crop genetic improvement. Screening biodiversity for useful or diverse gene homologues has often been based upon the amplification of targeted genes using available sequence information to design primers that amplify the target gene region across species. The crucial requirement of this approach is the presence of sequences with sufficient conservation across species to allow for the design of universal primers. This approach is often not successful with diverse organisms or highly variable genes. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) can quickly produce large amounts of sequence data and provides a viable option for characterizing homologues of known genes in poorly described genomes. MPS of genomic DNA was used to obtain species-specific sequence information for 18 rice genes related to domestication characteristics in a wild relative of rice, Microlaena stipoides. Species-specific primers were available for 16 genes compared with 12 genes using the universal primer method. The use of species-specific primers had the potential to cover 92% of the sequence of these genes, while traditional universal primers could only be designed to cover 80%. A total of 24 species-specific primer pairs were used to amplify gene homologues, and 11 primer pairs were successful in capturing six gene homologues. The 23 million, 36-base pair (bp) paired end reads, equated to an average of 2X genome coverage, facilitated the successful amplification and sequencing of six target gene homologues, illustrating an important approach to the discovery of useful genes in wild crop relatives. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Whole dystrophin gene analysis by next-generation sequencing: a comprehensive genetic diagnosis of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Yao; Liu, Jing; Chen, Xiao-Chun; Liu, Xin; Wang, Chun-Zhi; He, Xi-Yu

    2014-10-01

    Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophies are the most frequent inherited neuromuscular diseases caused by mutations of the dystrophin gene. However, approximately 30% of patients with the disease do not receive a molecular diagnosis because of the complex mutational spectrum and the large size of the gene. The introduction and use of next-generation sequencing have advanced clinical genetic research and might be a suitable method for the detection of various types of mutations in the dystrophin gene. To identify the mutational spectrum using a single platform, whole dystrophin gene sequencing was performed using next-generation sequencing. The entire dystrophin gene, including all exons, introns and promoter regions, was target enriched using a DMD whole gene enrichment kit. The enrichment libraries were sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer using paired read 100 bp sequencing. We studied 26 patients: 21 had known large deletion/duplications and 5 did not have detectable large deletion/duplications by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technology (MLPA). We applied whole dystrophin gene analysis by next-generation sequencing to the five patients who did not have detectable large deletion/duplications and to five randomly chosen patients from the 21 who did have large deletion/duplications. The sequencing data covered almost 100% of the exonic region of the dystrophin gene by ≥10