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Sample records for underlying finite-difference solver

  1. Development of a multigrid finite difference solver for benchmark permeability analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loendersloot, Richard; Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Akkerman, Remko; de Boer, Andries; Michaud, V.

    2010-01-01

    A finite difference solver, dedicated to flow around fibre architectures is currently being developed. The complexity of the internal geometry of textile reinforcements results in extreme computation times, or inaccurate solutions. A compromise between the two is found by implementing a multigrid

  2. M2Di: MATLAB 2D Stokes solvers using the Finite Difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räss, Ludovic; Duretz, Thibault; Schmalholz, Stefan; Podladchikov, Yury

    2017-04-01

    The study of coupled processes in Earth Sciences leads to the development of multiphysics modelling tools. Mechanical solvers represent the essential ingredient of any of these tools such that their performance and robustness is generally dictated by that of the mechanical solver. Here, we present M2Di, a collection of MATLAB routines designed for studying 2D linear and power law incompressible viscous flow using Finite Difference discretisation. The scripts are written in a concise vectorised MATLAB fashion and rely on fast and robust linear and non-linear solvers (Picard and Newton iterations). As a result, time to solution of 22 seconds for linear viscous flow with 104 viscosity jump on 10002 grid points can be achieved on a standard personal computer. We will present a numerous example of applications that span from high resolution crystal-melt dynamics, deformation of heterogeneous power law viscous fluids, instantaneous mantle flow patterns in cylindrical coordinates, and calculation of pressure gradients around inclusions using variable grid spacing. We use analytical solution for linear viscous flow with highly variable viscosity to validate the linear flow solver. Validation of the non-linear solver is achieved by comparing numerical solution to analytic and benchmark solutions of power law viscous folding and necking. The M2Di codes are open source and can hence be used for research or educational purposes.

  3. Customized finite difference Maxwell solver for elimination of numerical Cherenkov instability in EM-PIC code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peicheng; Li, Fei; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Fiuza, Frederico; Decyk, Viktor; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank; Fonseca, Ricardo; Lu, Wei; Vieira, Jorge; Silva, Luis; Mori, Warren

    2016-10-01

    we present a finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) Maxwell solver for the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm, which is customized to effectively eliminate the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) which arises when a plasma (neutral or non-neutral) relativistically drifts on a grid when using the PIC algorithm. We control the EM dispersion curve in the direction of the plasma drift of a FDTD Maxwell solver by using a customized higher order finite difference operator for the spatial derivative along the direction of the drift (1& circ; direction). We show that this eliminates the main NCI modes with moderate | k1 | , while keeps additional main NCI modes well outside the range of physical interest with higher | k1 | . These main NCI modes can be easily filtered out along with first spatial aliasing NCI modes which are also at the edge of the fundamental Brillouin zone. The customized solver has the possible advantage of improved parallel scalability because it can be easily partitioned along 1& circ; which typically has many more cells than other directions for the problems of interest.

  4. Performance prediction of finite-difference solvers for different computer architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louboutin, Mathias; Lange, Michael; Herrmann, Felix J.; Kukreja, Navjot; Gorman, Gerard

    2017-08-01

    The life-cycle of a partial differential equation (PDE) solver is often characterized by three development phases: the development of a stable numerical discretization; development of a correct (verified) implementation; and the optimization of the implementation for different computer architectures. Often it is only after significant time and effort has been invested that the performance bottlenecks of a PDE solver are fully understood, and the precise details varies between different computer architectures. One way to mitigate this issue is to establish a reliable performance model that allows a numerical analyst to make reliable predictions of how well a numerical method would perform on a given computer architecture, before embarking upon potentially long and expensive implementation and optimization phases. The availability of a reliable performance model also saves developer effort as it both informs the developer on what kind of optimisations are beneficial, and when the maximum expected performance has been reached and optimisation work should stop. We show how discretization of a wave-equation can be theoretically studied to understand the performance limitations of the method on modern computer architectures. We focus on the roofline model, now broadly used in the high-performance computing community, which considers the achievable performance in terms of the peak memory bandwidth and peak floating point performance of a computer with respect to algorithmic choices. A first principles analysis of operational intensity for key time-stepping finite-difference algorithms is presented. With this information available at the time of algorithm design, the expected performance on target computer systems can be used as a driver for algorithm design.

  5. FDiff3: a finite-difference solver for facilitating understanding of heat conduction and numerical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, M.B. [University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield (United Kingdom). Department of Aerospace, Automotive and Design Engineering; Probert, S.D. [Cranfield University, Bedfordshire (United Kingdom). School of Engineering

    2004-12-01

    The growing requirement for energy thrift and hence the increasing emphasis on 'low-purchased-energy' designs are stimulating the need for more accurate insights into the thermal behaviours of buildings and their components. This better understanding is preferably achieved, rather than by using 'closed software' or teaching the relevant mathematics outside heat-transfer lessons, but from embedding the pertinent tutoring while dealing with heat-transfer problems using an open-source code approach. Hence a finite-difference software program (FDiff3) has been composed to show the principles of numerical analysis as well as improve the undergraduates' perception of transient conduction. The pedagogic approach behind the development, its present capabilities and applications to sample test-cases are discussed. (author)

  6. Finite-difference method Stokes solver (FDMSS) for 3D pore geometries: Software development, validation and case studies

    KAUST Repository

    Gerke, Kirill M.

    2018-01-17

    Permeability is one of the fundamental properties of porous media and is required for large-scale Darcian fluid flow and mass transport models. Whilst permeability can be measured directly at a range of scales, there are increasing opportunities to evaluate permeability from pore-scale fluid flow simulations. We introduce the free software Finite-Difference Method Stokes Solver (FDMSS) that solves Stokes equation using a finite-difference method (FDM) directly on voxelized 3D pore geometries (i.e. without meshing). Based on explicit convergence studies, validation on sphere packings with analytically known permeabilities, and comparison against lattice-Boltzmann and other published FDM studies, we conclude that FDMSS provides a computationally efficient and accurate basis for single-phase pore-scale flow simulations. By implementing an efficient parallelization and code optimization scheme, permeability inferences can now be made from 3D images of up to 109 voxels using modern desktop computers. Case studies demonstrate the broad applicability of the FDMSS software for both natural and artificial porous media.

  7. A mass-conservative adaptive FAS multigrid solver for cell-centered finite difference methods on block-structured, locally-cartesian grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenqiang; Guo, Zhenlin; Lowengrub, John S.; Wise, Steven M.

    2018-01-01

    We present a mass-conservative full approximation storage (FAS) multigrid solver for cell-centered finite difference methods on block-structured, locally cartesian grids. The algorithm is essentially a standard adaptive FAS (AFAS) scheme, but with a simple modification that comes in the form of a mass-conservative correction to the coarse-level force. This correction is facilitated by the creation of a zombie variable, analogous to a ghost variable, but defined on the coarse grid and lying under the fine grid refinement patch. We show that a number of different types of fine-level ghost cell interpolation strategies could be used in our framework, including low-order linear interpolation. In our approach, the smoother, prolongation, and restriction operations need never be aware of the mass conservation conditions at the coarse-fine interface. To maintain global mass conservation, we need only modify the usual FAS algorithm by correcting the coarse-level force function at points adjacent to the coarse-fine interface. We demonstrate through simulations that the solver converges geometrically, at a rate that is h-independent, and we show the generality of the solver, applying it to several nonlinear, time-dependent, and multi-dimensional problems. In several tests, we show that second-order asymptotic (h → 0) convergence is observed for the discretizations, provided that (1) at least linear interpolation of the ghost variables is employed, and (2) the mass conservation corrections are applied to the coarse-level force term.

  8. Controlling the numerical Cerenkov instability in PIC simulations using a customized finite difference Maxwell solver and a local FFT based current correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Fiuza, Frederico; Decyk, Viktor K.; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Mori, Warren B.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we present a customized finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) Maxwell solver for the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. The solver is customized to effectively eliminate the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) which arises when a plasma (neutral or non-neutral) relativistically drifts on a grid when using the PIC algorithm. We control the EM dispersion curve in the direction of the plasma drift of a FDTD Maxwell solver by using a customized higher order finite difference operator for the spatial derivative along the direction of the drift (1 ˆ direction). We show that this eliminates the main NCI modes with moderate |k1 | , while keeps additional main NCI modes well outside the range of physical interest with higher |k1 | . These main NCI modes can be easily filtered out along with first spatial aliasing NCI modes which are also at the edge of the fundamental Brillouin zone. The customized solver has the possible advantage of improved parallel scalability because it can be easily partitioned along 1 ˆ which typically has many more cells than other directions for the problems of interest. We show that FFTs can be performed locally to current on each partition to filter out the main and first spatial aliasing NCI modes, and to correct the current so that it satisfies the continuity equation for the customized spatial derivative. This ensures that Gauss' Law is satisfied. We present simulation examples of one relativistically drifting plasma, of two colliding relativistically drifting plasmas, and of nonlinear laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a Lorentz boosted frame that show no evidence of the NCI can be observed when using this customized Maxwell solver together with its NCI elimination scheme.

  9. Option Pricing under Risk-Minimization Criterion in an Incomplete Market with the Finite Difference Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinfeng Ruan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study option pricing with risk-minimization criterion in an incomplete market where the dynamics of the risky underlying asset is governed by a jump diffusion equation with stochastic volatility. We obtain the Radon-Nikodym derivative for the minimal martingale measure and a partial integro-differential equation (PIDE of European option. The finite difference method is employed to compute the European option valuation of PIDE.

  10. A high-order finite-difference linear seakeeping solver tool for calculation of added resistance in waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini Afshar, Mostafa; Bingham, Harry B.; Read, Robert

    potential ow forward-speed hydrodynamic problems; namely the steady, radiation and diraction problems. The near-eld formulation of the wave drift force has also been implemented, and development is under way to include far-eld methods. This paper presents validation results based on analytical solutions...

  11. Neurite, a finite difference large scale parallel program for the simulation of electrical signal propagation in neurites under mechanical loading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián A García-Grajales

    Full Text Available With the growing body of research on traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, computational neuroscience has recently focused its modeling efforts on neuronal functional deficits following mechanical loading. However, in most of these efforts, cell damage is generally only characterized by purely mechanistic criteria, functions of quantities such as stress, strain or their corresponding rates. The modeling of functional deficits in neurites as a consequence of macroscopic mechanical insults has been rarely explored. In particular, a quantitative mechanically based model of electrophysiological impairment in neuronal cells, Neurite, has only very recently been proposed. In this paper, we present the implementation details of this model: a finite difference parallel program for simulating electrical signal propagation along neurites under mechanical loading. Following the application of a macroscopic strain at a given strain rate produced by a mechanical insult, Neurite is able to simulate the resulting neuronal electrical signal propagation, and thus the corresponding functional deficits. The simulation of the coupled mechanical and electrophysiological behaviors requires computational expensive calculations that increase in complexity as the network of the simulated cells grows. The solvers implemented in Neurite--explicit and implicit--were therefore parallelized using graphics processing units in order to reduce the burden of the simulation costs of large scale scenarios. Cable Theory and Hodgkin-Huxley models were implemented to account for the electrophysiological passive and active regions of a neurite, respectively, whereas a coupled mechanical model accounting for the neurite mechanical behavior within its surrounding medium was adopted as a link between electrophysiology and mechanics. This paper provides the details of the parallel implementation of Neurite, along with three different application examples: a long myelinated axon

  12. Finite Difference Methods for Option Pricing under Lévy Processes: Wiener-Hopf Factorization Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kudryavtsev, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, we consider the problem of pricing options in wide classes of Lévy processes. We propose a general approach to the numerical methods based on a finite difference approximation for the generalized Black-Scholes equation. The goal of the paper is to incorporate the Wiener-Hopf factorization into finite difference methods for pricing options in Lévy models with jumps. The method is applicable for pricing barrier and American options. The pricing problem is reduced to the sequence o...

  13. Finite difference methods for option pricing under Lévy processes: Wiener-Hopf factorization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, we consider the problem of pricing options in wide classes of Lévy processes. We propose a general approach to the numerical methods based on a finite difference approximation for the generalized Black-Scholes equation. The goal of the paper is to incorporate the Wiener-Hopf factorization into finite difference methods for pricing options in Lévy models with jumps. The method is applicable for pricing barrier and American options. The pricing problem is reduced to the sequence of linear algebraic systems with a dense Toeplitz matrix; then the Wiener-Hopf factorization method is applied. We give an important probabilistic interpretation based on the infinitely divisible distributions theory to the Laurent operators in the correspondent factorization identity. Notice that our algorithm has the same complexity as the ones which use the explicit-implicit scheme, with a tridiagonal matrix. However, our method is more accurate. We support the advantage of the new method in terms of accuracy and convergence by using numerical experiments.

  14. A 3D Finite-Difference BiCG Iterative Solver with the Fourier-Jacobi Preconditioner for the Anisotropic EIT/EEG Forward Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Turovets

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT and electroencephalography (EEG forward problems in anisotropic inhomogeneous media like the human head belongs to the class of the three-dimensional boundary value problems for elliptic equations with mixed derivatives. We introduce and explore the performance of several new promising numerical techniques, which seem to be more suitable for solving these problems. The proposed numerical schemes combine the fictitious domain approach together with the finite-difference method and the optimally preconditioned Conjugate Gradient- (CG- type iterative method for treatment of the discrete model. The numerical scheme includes the standard operations of summation and multiplication of sparse matrices and vector, as well as FFT, making it easy to implement and eligible for the effective parallel implementation. Some typical use cases for the EIT/EEG problems are considered demonstrating high efficiency of the proposed numerical technique.

  15. Pricing derivatives under Lévy models modern finite-difference and pseudo-differential operators approach

    CERN Document Server

    Itkin, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    This monograph presents a novel numerical approach to solving partial integro-differential equations arising in asset pricing models with jumps, which greatly exceeds the efficiency of existing approaches. The method, based on pseudo-differential operators and several original contributions to the theory of finite-difference schemes, is new as applied to the Lévy processes in finance, and is herein presented for the first time in a single volume. The results within, developed in a series of research papers, are collected and arranged together with the necessary background material from Lévy processes, the modern theory of finite-difference schemes, the theory of M-matrices and EM-matrices, etc., thus forming a self-contained work that gives the reader a smooth introduction to the subject. For readers with no knowledge of finance, a short explanation of the main financial terms and notions used in the book is given in the glossary. The latter part of the book demonstrates the efficacy of the method by solvin...

  16. Electron–phonon coupling from finite differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2018-02-01

    The interaction between electrons and phonons underlies multiple phenomena in physics, chemistry, and materials science. Examples include superconductivity, electronic transport, and the temperature dependence of optical spectra. A first-principles description of electron–phonon coupling enables the study of the above phenomena with accuracy and material specificity, which can be used to understand experiments and to predict novel effects and functionality. In this topical review, we describe the first-principles calculation of electron–phonon coupling from finite differences. The finite differences approach provides several advantages compared to alternative methods, in particular (i) any underlying electronic structure method can be used, and (ii) terms beyond the lowest order in the electron–phonon interaction can be readily incorporated. But these advantages are associated with a large computational cost that has until recently prevented the widespread adoption of this method. We describe some recent advances, including nondiagonal supercells and thermal lines, that resolve these difficulties, and make the calculation of electron–phonon coupling from finite differences a powerful tool. We review multiple applications of the calculation of electron–phonon coupling from finite differences, including the temperature dependence of optical spectra, superconductivity, charge transport, and the role of defects in semiconductors. These examples illustrate the advantages of finite differences, with cases where semilocal density functional theory is not appropriate for the calculation of electron–phonon coupling and many-body methods such as the GW approximation are required, as well as examples in which higher-order terms in the electron–phonon interaction are essential for an accurate description of the relevant phenomena. We expect that the finite difference approach will play a central role in future studies of the electron–phonon interaction.

  17. A parallel finite-difference method for computational aerodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swisshelm, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for solving complex three-dimensional aerodynamic flow on parallel-processing supercomputers is presented. The method consists of a basic flow solver with multigrid convergence acceleration, embedded grid refinements, and a zonal equation scheme. Multitasking and vectorization have been incorporated into the algorithm. Results obtained include multiprocessed flow simulations from the Cray X-MP and Cray-2. Speedups as high as 3.3 for the two-dimensional case and 3.5 for segments of the three-dimensional case have been achieved on the Cray-2. The entire solver attained a factor of 2.7 improvement over its unitasked version on the Cray-2. The performance of the parallel algorithm on each machine is analyzed. 14 refs

  18. Finite difference computing with PDEs a modern software approach

    CERN Document Server

    Langtangen, Hans Petter

    2017-01-01

    This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license. This easy-to-read book introduces the basics of solving partial differential equations by means of finite difference methods. Unlike many of the traditional academic works on the topic, this book was written for practitioners. Accordingly, it especially addresses: the construction of finite difference schemes, formulation and implementation of algorithms, verification of implementations, analyses of physical behavior as implied by the numerical solutions, and how to apply the methods and software to solve problems in the fields of physics and biology.

  19. Finite difference simulation of biological chromium (VI) reduction in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For the first time, the performance of a simulated barrier was evaluated internally in porous media using a finite difference approach. Parameters in the model were optimised at transient-state and under near steady-state conditions with respect to biomass and effluent Cr(VI) concentration respectively. The best fitting model ...

  20. Numerical solution of a diffusion problem by exponentially fitted finite difference methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Raffaele; Paternoster, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    This paper is focused on the accurate and efficient solution of partial differential differential equations modelling a diffusion problem by means of exponentially fitted finite difference numerical methods. After constructing and analysing special purpose finite differences for the approximation of second order partial derivatives, we employed them in the numerical solution of a diffusion equation with mixed boundary conditions. Numerical experiments reveal that a special purpose integration, both in space and in time, is more accurate and efficient than that gained by employing a general purpose solver.

  1. Implementation of Generalized Modes in a 3D Finite Difference Based Seakeeping Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Matilde H.; Amini Afshar, Mostafa; Bingham, Harry B.

    This work is an extension of the finite difference potential flow solver OceanWave3D-Seakeepingdeveloped by Afshar (2014) to include generalized modes. The continuity equation is solvedusing a fourth-order centered finite difference scheme which requires that the entire fluid domainis discretized...... to the sparse nature of the coefficient matrix. Thesolver is built using the open source framework Overture which consists of C++ libraries forsolving partial differential equations on overlapping grids and has a built-in overlapping gridgenerator Ogen....

  2. Finite difference order doubling in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingbeck, John P [Mathematics Centre, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Jolicard, Georges [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut Utinam (UMR CNRS 6213), Observatoire de Besancon, 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP1615, 25010 Besancon cedex (France)

    2008-03-28

    An order doubling process previously used to obtain eighth-order eigenvalues from the fourth-order Numerov method is applied to the perturbed oscillator in two dimensions. A simple method of obtaining high order finite difference operators is reported and an odd parity boundary condition is found to be effective in facilitating the smooth operation of the order doubling process.

  3. Elementary introduction to finite difference equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    An elementary description is given of the basic vocabulary and concepts associated with finite difference modeling. The material discussed is biased toward the types of large computer programs used at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Particular attention is focused on truncation error and how it can be affected by zoning patterns. The principle of convergence is discussed, and convergence as a tool for improving calculational accuracy and efficiency is emphasized

  4. Modern solvers for Helmholtz problems

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jok; Vuik, Kees

    2017-01-01

    This edited volume offers a state of the art overview of fast and robust solvers for the Helmholtz equation. The book consists of three parts: new developments and analysis in Helmholtz solvers, practical methods and implementations of Helmholtz solvers, and industrial applications. The Helmholtz equation appears in a wide range of science and engineering disciplines in which wave propagation is modeled. Examples are: seismic inversion, ultrasone medical imaging, sonar detection of submarines, waves in harbours and many more. The partial differential equation looks simple but is hard to solve. In order to approximate the solution of the problem numerical methods are needed. First a discretization is done. Various methods can be used: (high order) Finite Difference Method, Finite Element Method, Discontinuous Galerkin Method and Boundary Element Method. The resulting linear system is large, where the size of the problem increases with increasing frequency. Due to higher frequencies the seismic images need to b...

  5. MGLab3D: An interactive environment for iterative solvers for elliptic PDEs in two and three dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordner, J.; Saied, F. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    GLab3D is an enhancement of an interactive environment (MGLab) for experimenting with iterative solvers and multigrid algorithms. It is implemented in MATLAB. The new version has built-in 3D elliptic pde`s and several iterative methods and preconditioners that were not available in the original version. A sparse direct solver option has also been included. The multigrid solvers have also been extended to 3D. The discretization and pde domains are restricted to standard finite differences on the unit square/cube. The power of this software studies in the fact that no programming is needed to solve, for example, the convection-diffusion equation in 3D with TFQMR and a customized V-cycle preconditioner, for a variety of problem sizes and mesh Reynolds, numbers. In addition to the graphical user interface, some sample drivers are included to show how experiments can be composed using the underlying suite of problems and solvers.

  6. Integral and finite difference inequalities and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pachpatte, B G

    2006-01-01

    The monograph is written with a view to provide basic tools for researchers working in Mathematical Analysis and Applications, concentrating on differential, integral and finite difference equations. It contains many inequalities which have only recently appeared in the literature and which can be used as powerful tools and will be a valuable source for a long time to come. It is self-contained and thus should be useful for those who are interested in learning or applying the inequalities with explicit estimates in their studies.- Contains a variety of inequalities discovered which find numero

  7. Optimized Finite-Difference Coefficients for Hydroacoustic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Responsible utilization of marine renewable energy sources through the use of current energy converter (CEC) and wave energy converter (WEC) devices requires an understanding of the noise generation and propagation from these systems in the marine environment. Acoustic noise produced by rotating turbines, for example, could adversely affect marine animals and human-related marine activities if not properly understood and mitigated. We are utilizing a 3-D finite-difference acoustic simulation code developed at Sandia that can accurately propagate noise in the complex bathymetry in the near-shore to open ocean environment. As part of our efforts to improve computation efficiency in the large, high-resolution domains required in this project, we investigate the effects of using optimized finite-difference coefficients on the accuracy of the simulations. We compare accuracy and runtime of various finite-difference coefficients optimized via criteria such as maximum numerical phase speed error, maximum numerical group speed error, and L-1 and L-2 norms of weighted numerical group and phase speed errors over a given spectral bandwidth. We find that those coefficients optimized for L-1 and L-2 norms are superior in accuracy to those based on maximal error and can produce runtimes of 10% of the baseline case, which uses Taylor Series finite-difference coefficients at the Courant time step limit. We will present comparisons of the results for the various cases evaluated as well as recommendations for utilization of the cases studied. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Abstract Level Parallelization of Finite Difference Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Vollebregt

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A formalism is proposed for describing finite difference calculations in an abstract way. The formalism consists of index sets and stencils, for characterizing the structure of sets of data items and interactions between data items (“neighbouring relations”. The formalism provides a means for lifting programming to a more abstract level. This simplifies the tasks of performance analysis and verification of correctness, and opens the way for automaticcode generation. The notation is particularly useful in parallelization, for the systematic construction of parallel programs in a process/channel programming paradigm (e.g., message passing. This is important because message passing, unfortunately, still is the only approach that leads to acceptable performance for many more unstructured or irregular problems on parallel computers that have non-uniform memory access times. It will be shown that the use of index sets and stencils greatly simplifies the determination of which data must be exchanged between different computing processes.

  9. Iterative solutions of finite difference diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.V.G.; Khandekar, D.C.; Trasi, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The heterogeneous arrangement of materials and the three-dimensional character of the reactor physics problems encountered in the design and operation of nuclear reactors makes it necessary to use numerical methods for solution of the neutron diffusion equations which are based on the linear Boltzmann equation. The commonly used numerical method for this purpose is the finite difference method. It converts the diffusion equations to a system of algebraic equations. In practice, the size of this resulting algebraic system is so large that the iterative methods have to be used. Most frequently used iterative methods are discussed. They include : (1) basic iterative methods for one-group problems, (2) iterative methods for eigenvalue problems, and (3) iterative methods which use variable acceleration parameters. Application of Chebyshev theorem to iterative methods is discussed. The extension of the above iterative methods to multigroup neutron diffusion equations is also considered. These methods are applicable to elliptic boundary value problems in reactor design studies in particular, and to elliptic partial differential equations in general. Solution of sample problems is included to illustrate their applications. The subject matter is presented in as simple a manner as possible. However, a working knowledge of matrix theory is presupposed. (M.G.B.)

  10. Determination of finite-difference weights using scaled binomial windows

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-05-01

    The finite-difference method evaluates a derivative through a weighted summation of function values from neighboring grid nodes. Conventional finite-difference weights can be calculated either from Taylor series expansions or by Lagrange interpolation polynomials. The finite-difference method can be interpreted as a truncated convolutional counterpart of the pseudospectral method in the space domain. For this reason, we also can derive finite-difference operators by truncating the convolution series of the pseudospectral method. Various truncation windows can be employed for this purpose and they result in finite-difference operators with different dispersion properties. We found that there exists two families of scaled binomial windows that can be used to derive conventional finite-difference operators analytically. With a minor change, these scaled binomial windows can also be used to derive optimized finite-difference operators with enhanced dispersion properties. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  11. A finite-difference contrast source inversion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abubakar, A; Hu, W; Habashy, T M; Van den Berg, P M

    2008-01-01

    We present a contrast source inversion (CSI) algorithm using a finite-difference (FD) approach as its backbone for reconstructing the unknown material properties of inhomogeneous objects embedded in a known inhomogeneous background medium. Unlike the CSI method using the integral equation (IE) approach, the FD-CSI method can readily employ an arbitrary inhomogeneous medium as its background. The ability to use an inhomogeneous background medium has made this algorithm very suitable to be used in through-wall imaging and time-lapse inversion applications. Similar to the IE-CSI algorithm the unknown contrast sources and contrast function are updated alternately to reconstruct the unknown objects without requiring the solution of the full forward problem at each iteration step in the optimization process. The FD solver is formulated in the frequency domain and it is equipped with a perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition. The FD operator used in the FD-CSI method is only dependent on the background medium and the frequency of operation, thus it does not change throughout the inversion process. Therefore, at least for the two-dimensional (2D) configurations, where the size of the stiffness matrix is manageable, the FD stiffness matrix can be inverted using a non-iterative inversion matrix approach such as a Gauss elimination method for the sparse matrix. In this case, an LU decomposition needs to be done only once and can then be reused for multiple source positions and in successive iterations of the inversion. Numerical experiments show that this FD-CSI algorithm has an excellent performance for inverting inhomogeneous objects embedded in an inhomogeneous background medium

  12. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  13. Exact Finite Differences. The Derivative on Non Uniformly Spaced Partitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Martínez-Pérez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We define a finite-differences derivative operation, on a non uniformly spaced partition, which has the exponential function as an exact eigenvector. We discuss some properties of this operator and we propose a definition for the components of a finite-differences momentum operator. This allows us to perform exact discrete calculations.

  14. Fourth order compact finite difference method for solving singularly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A numerical method based on finite difference scheme with uniform mesh is presented for solving singularly perturbed two-point boundary value problems of 1D reaction-diffusion equations. First, the derivatives of the given differential equation is replaced by the finite difference approximations and then, solved by using ...

  15. The representation of absorbers in finite difference diffusion codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckler, A.N.; Tyror, J.G.

    1963-10-01

    In this paper we present a new method of representing absorbers in finite difference codes utilising the analytical flux solution in the vicinity of the absorbers. Taking an idealised reactor model, numerical comparisons are made between the finite difference eigenvalues and fluxes and results obtained from a purely analytical treatment of control rods in a reactor (the Codd-Rennie method), and agreement is found to be encouraging. The method has been coded for the IBM7090. (author)

  16. Implicit finite-difference simulations of seismic wave propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-03-01

    We propose a new finite-difference modeling method, implicit both in space and in time, for the scalar wave equation. We use a three-level implicit splitting time integration method for the temporal derivative and implicit finite-difference operators of arbitrary order for the spatial derivatives. Both the implicit splitting time integration method and the implicit spatial finite-difference operators require solving systems of linear equations. We show that it is possible to merge these two sets of linear systems, one from implicit temporal discretizations and the other from implicit spatial discretizations, to reduce the amount of computations to develop a highly efficient and accurate seismic modeling algorithm. We give the complete derivations of the implicit splitting time integration method and the implicit spatial finite-difference operators, and present the resulting discretized formulas for the scalar wave equation. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis on grid dispersions of this new implicit modeling method. We show that implicit spatial finite-difference operators greatly improve the accuracy of the implicit splitting time integration simulation results with only a slight increase in computational time, compared with explicit spatial finite-difference operators. We further verify this conclusion by both 2D and 3D numerical examples. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  17. An implicit finite-difference operator for the Helmholtz equation

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-07-01

    We have developed an implicit finite-difference operator for the Laplacian and applied it to solving the Helmholtz equation for computing the seismic responses in the frequency domain. This implicit operator can greatly improve the accuracy of the simulation results without adding significant extra computational cost, compared with the corresponding conventional explicit finite-difference scheme. We achieved this by taking advantage of the inherently implicit nature of the Helmholtz equation and merging together the two linear systems: one from the implicit finite-difference discretization of the Laplacian and the other from the discretization of the Helmholtz equation itself. The end result of this simple yet important merging manipulation is a single linear system, similar to the one resulting from the conventional explicit finite-difference discretizations, without involving any differentiation matrix inversions. We analyzed grid dispersions of the discrete Helmholtz equation to show the accuracy of this implicit finite-difference operator and used two numerical examples to demonstrate its efficiency. Our method can be extended to solve other frequency domain wave simulation problems straightforwardly. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  18. Nonstandard Finite Difference Method Applied to a Linear Pharmacokinetics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseun Egbelowo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We extend the nonstandard finite difference method of solution to the study of pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic models. Pharmacokinetic (PK models are commonly used to predict drug concentrations that drive controlled intravenous (I.V. transfers (or infusion and oral transfers while pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PD interaction models are used to provide predictions of drug concentrations affecting the response of these clinical drugs. We structure a nonstandard finite difference (NSFD scheme for the relevant system of equations which models this pharamcokinetic process. We compare the results obtained to standard methods. The scheme is dynamically consistent and reliable in replicating complex dynamic properties of the relevant continuous models for varying step sizes. This study provides assistance in understanding the long-term behavior of the drug in the system, and validation of the efficiency of the nonstandard finite difference scheme as the method of choice.

  19. Finite-Difference Algorithms For Computing Sound Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    Governing equations considered as matrix system. Method variant of method described in "Scheme for Finite-Difference Computations of Waves" (ARC-12970). Present method begins with matrix-vector formulation of fundamental equations, involving first-order partial derivatives of primitive variables with respect to space and time. Particular matrix formulation places time and spatial coordinates on equal footing, so governing equations considered as matrix system and treated as unit. Spatial and temporal discretizations not treated separately as in other finite-difference methods, instead treated together by linking spatial-grid interval and time step via common scale factor related to speed of sound.

  20. Composing constraint solvers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Zoeteweij (Peter)

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstractComposing constraint solvers based on tree search and constraint propagation through generic iteration leads to efficient and flexible constraint solvers. This was demonstrated using OpenSolver, an abstract branch-and-propagate tree search engine that supports a wide range of relevant

  1. Object-Oriented Implementation of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method in Parallel Computing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kyungwon; Kim, Huioon; Hong, Hyunpyo; Chung, Youngjoo

    GMES which stands for GIST Maxwell's Equations Solver is a Python package for a Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulation. The FDTD method widely used for electromagnetic simulations is an algorithm to solve the Maxwell's equations. GMES follows Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) paradigm for the good maintainability and usability. With the several optimization techniques along with parallel computing environment, we could make the fast and interactive implementation. Execution speed has been tested in a single host and Beowulf class cluster. GMES is open source and available on the web (http://www.sf.net/projects/gmes).

  2. High-order finite-difference methods for Poisson's equation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linde, Hendrik Jan

    1971-01-01

    In this thesis finite-difference approximations to the three boundary value problems for Poisson’s equation are given, with discretization errors of O(H^3) for the mixed boundary value problem, O(H^3 |ln(h)| for the Neumann problem and O(H^4)for the Dirichlet problem respectively . First an operator

  3. Alternating Direction Implicit Finite Difference Time Domain Acoustic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A time domain numerical technique is presented for the modelling of acoustic wave phenomena. The technique is an adaptation of the alternating direction implicit finite difference time domain method. The stability condition for the algorithm is given. Simple illustrations of propagation in an infinite homogeneous medium are ...

  4. Black-box solvers for partial differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, R.; Schoenauer, W.

    1993-01-01

    The design principles of the black-box solvers FIDISOL/CADSOL and VECFEM are presented for the solution of system of elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations by the finite difference and the finite element method. Special focus is directed to a high flexibility of the programs in order to solve a large range of problems. The solvers use state-of-the-art algorithms and are adapted to advanced computer architectures in order to achieve a high performance. As quality control an error estimate is implemented. The resulting numerical problems focus in the iterative linear solvers. It is a real challenge to select robust and efficient iterative solvers for an extremely wide class of problems. The strong relation between application problem and mathematical problems is pointed out. (orig.)

  5. Finite-Difference Frequency-Domain Method in Nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra

    is often indispensable. This thesis presents the development of rigorous finite-difference method, a very general tool to solve Maxwell’s equations in arbitrary geometries in three dimensions, with an emphasis on the frequency-domain formulation. Enhanced performance of the perfectly matched layers...... is obtained through free space squeezing technique, and nonuniform orthogonal grids are built to greatly improve the accuracy of simulations of highly heterogeneous nanostructures. Examples of the use of the finite-difference frequency-domain method in this thesis range from simulating localized modes...... in a three-dimensional photonic-crystal membrane-based cavity, a quasi-one-dimensional nanobeam cavity and arrays of side-coupled nanobeam cavities, to modeling light propagation through metal films with single or periodically arranged multiple subwavelength slits....

  6. Non Standard Finite Difference Scheme for Mutualistic Interaction Description

    OpenAIRE

    Gabbriellini, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    One of the more interesting themes of the mathematical ecology is the description of the mutualistic interaction between two interacting species. Based on continuous-time model developed by Holland and DeAngelis 2009 for consumer-resource mutualism description, this work deals with the application of the Mickens Non Standard Finite Difference method to transform the continuous-time scheme into a discrete-time one. It has been proved that the Mickens scheme is dynamically consistent with the o...

  7. A finite difference method for free boundary problems

    KAUST Repository

    Fornberg, Bengt

    2010-04-01

    Fornberg and Meyer-Spasche proposed some time ago a simple strategy to correct finite difference schemes in the presence of a free boundary that cuts across a Cartesian grid. We show here how this procedure can be combined with a minimax-based optimization procedure to rapidly solve a wide range of elliptic-type free boundary value problems. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential equations problem solver

    CERN Document Server

    Arterburn, David R

    2012-01-01

    REA's Problem Solvers is a series of useful, practical, and informative study guides. Each title in the series is complete step-by-step solution guide. The Differential Equations Problem Solver enables students to solve difficult problems by showing them step-by-step solutions to Differential Equations problems. The Problem Solvers cover material ranging from the elementary to the advanced and make excellent review books and textbook companions. They're perfect for undergraduate and graduate studies.The Differential Equations Problem Solver is the perfect resource for any class, any exam, and

  9. Generalized energy and potential enstrophy conserving finite difference schemes for the shallow water equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramopoulos, Frank

    1988-01-01

    The conditions under which finite difference schemes for the shallow water equations can conserve both total energy and potential enstrophy are considered. A method of deriving such schemes using operator formalism is developed. Several such schemes are derived for the A-, B- and C-grids. The derived schemes include second-order schemes and pseudo-fourth-order schemes. The simplest B-grid pseudo-fourth-order schemes are presented.

  10. Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis

  11. Mimetic Finite Differences for Flow in Fractures from Microseismic Data

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for porous media flow in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach uses the Mimetic Finite Difference method (MFD) and takes advantage of MFD\\'s ability to solve over a general set of polyhedral cells. This flexibility is used to mesh fracture intersections in two and three-dimensional settings without creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how to use general polyhedra for embedding fracture boundaries in the reservoir domain. The target application is representing fracture networks inferred from microseismic analysis.

  12. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  13. Solving wave equation using finite differences and Taylor series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nečasová, Gabriela; Kocina, Filip; Veigend, Petr; Chaloupka, Jan; Šátek, Václav; Kunovský, Jiří

    2017-07-01

    The paper deals with the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), especially wave equation. Two methods are used to obtain numerical solution of the wave equation. The Finite Difference Method (FDM) is used for transformation of wave equation to the system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), different types of difference formulas are used. The influence of arithmetic to higher order difference formulas is also presented. The Modern Taylor Series Method (MTSM) allows to solve ODEs numerically with extremely high precision. An important feature of this method is an automatic integration order setting, i.e. using as many Taylor series terms as the defined accuracy requires.

  14. Finite difference techniques for nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study is concerned with numerical approximations to the initial value problem for nonlinear systems of conservative laws. Attention is given to the development of a class of conservation form finite difference schemes which are based on the finite volume method (i.e., the method of averages). These schemes do not fit into the classical framework of conservation form schemes discussed by Lax and Wendroff (1960). The finite volume schemes are specifically intended to approximate solutions of multidimensional problems in the absence of rectangular geometries. In addition, the development is reported of different schemes which utilize the finite volume approach for time discretization. Particular attention is given to local time discretization and moving spatial grids. 17 references

  15. A finite difference model for cMUT devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certon, Dominique; Teston, Franck; Patat, Frédéric

    2005-12-01

    A finite difference method was implemented to simulate capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (cMUTs) and compared to models described in the literature such as finite element methods. Similar results were obtained. It was found that one master curve described the clamped capacitance. We introduced normalized capacitance versus normalized bias voltage and metallization rate, independent of layer thickness, gap height, and size membrane, leading to the determination of a coupling factor master curve. We present here calculations and measurements of electrical impedance for cMUTs. An electromechanical equivalent circuit was used to perform simulations. Our experimental measurements confirmed the theoretical results in terms of resonance, anti-resonance frequencies, clamped capacitance, and electromechanical coupling factor. Due to inhomogeneity of the tested element array and strong parasitic capacitance between cells, the maximum coupling coefficient value achieved was 0.27. Good agreement with theory was obtained for all findings.

  16. Computational electrodynamics the finite-difference time-domain method

    CERN Document Server

    Taflove, Allen

    2005-01-01

    This extensively revised and expanded third edition of the Artech House bestseller, Computational Electrodynamics: The Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method, offers engineers the most up-to-date and definitive resource on this critical method for solving Maxwell's equations. The method helps practitioners design antennas, wireless communications devices, high-speed digital and microwave circuits, and integrated optical devices with unsurpassed efficiency. There has been considerable advancement in FDTD computational technology over the past few years, and the third edition brings professionals the very latest details with entirely new chapters on important techniques, major updates on key topics, and new discussions on emerging areas such as nanophotonics. What's more, to supplement the third edition, the authors have created a Web site with solutions to problems, downloadable graphics and videos, and updates, making this new edition the ideal textbook on the subject as well.

  17. Finite-difference modeling of commercial aircraft using TSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennock, S.T.; Poggio, A.J.

    1994-11-15

    Future aircraft may have systems controlled by fiber optic cables, to reduce susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. However, the digital systems associated with the fiber optic network could still experience upset due to powerful radio stations, radars, and other electromagnetic sources, with potentially serious consequences. We are modeling the electromagnetic behavior of commercial transport aircraft in support of the NASA Fly-by-Light/Power-by-Wire program, using the TSAR finite-difference time-domain code initially developed for the military. By comparing results obtained from TSAR with data taken on a Boeing 757 at the Air Force Phillips Lab., we hope to show that FDTD codes can serve as an important tool in the design and certification of U.S. commercial aircraft, helping American companies to produce safe, reliable air transportation.

  18. Visualization of elastic wavefields computed with a finite difference code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Harris, D.

    1994-11-15

    The authors have developed a finite difference elastic propagation model to simulate seismic wave propagation through geophysically complex regions. To facilitate debugging and to assist seismologists in interpreting the seismograms generated by the code, they have developed an X Windows interface that permits viewing of successive temporal snapshots of the (2D) wavefield as they are calculated. The authors present a brief video displaying the generation of seismic waves by an explosive source on a continent, which propagate to the edge of the continent then convert to two types of acoustic waves. This sample calculation was part of an effort to study the potential of offshore hydroacoustic systems to monitor seismic events occurring onshore.

  19. Flexible Automatic Discretization for Finite Differences: Eliminating the Human Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranger, Casper

    2017-04-01

    In the geophysical numerical modelling community, finite differences are (in part due to their small footprint) a popular spatial discretization method for PDEs in the regular-shaped continuum that is the earth. However, they rapidly become prone to programming mistakes when physics increase in complexity. To eliminate opportunities for human error, we have designed an automatic discretization algorithm using Wolfram Mathematica, in which the user supplies symbolic PDEs, the number of spatial dimensions, and a choice of symbolic boundary conditions, and the script transforms this information into matrix- and right-hand-side rules ready for use in a C++ code that will accept them. The symbolic PDEs are further used to automatically develop and perform manufactured solution benchmarks, ensuring at all stages physical fidelity while providing pragmatic targets for numerical accuracy. We find that this procedure greatly accelerates code development and provides a great deal of flexibility in ones choice of physics.

  20. Parallel finite-difference time-domain method

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wenhua

    2006-01-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FTDT) method has revolutionized antenna design and electromagnetics engineering. This book raises the FDTD method to the next level by empowering it with the vast capabilities of parallel computing. It shows engineers how to exploit the natural parallel properties of FDTD to improve the existing FDTD method and to efficiently solve more complex and large problem sets. Professionals learn how to apply open source software to develop parallel software and hardware to run FDTD in parallel for their projects. The book features hands-on examples that illustrate the power of parallel FDTD and presents practical strategies for carrying out parallel FDTD. This detailed resource provides instructions on downloading, installing, and setting up the required open source software on either Windows or Linux systems, and includes a handy tutorial on parallel programming.

  1. Acoustic, finite-difference, time-domain technique development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, K.

    1994-01-01

    A close analog exists between the behavior of sound waves in an ideal gas and the radiated waves of electromagnetics. This analog has been exploited to obtain an acoustic, finite-difference, time-domain (AFDTD) technique capable of treating small signal vibrations in elastic media, such as air, water, and metal, with the important feature of bending motion included in the behavior of the metal. This bending motion is particularly important when the metal is formed into sheets or plates. Bending motion does not have an analog in electromagnetics, but can be readily appended to the acoustic treatment since it appears as a single additional term in the force equation for plate motion, which is otherwise analogous to the electromagnetic wave equation. The AFDTD technique has been implemented in a code architecture that duplicates the electromagnetic, finite-difference, time-domain technique code. The main difference in the implementation is the form of the first-order coupled differential equations obtained from the wave equation. The gradient of pressure and divergence of velocity appear in these equations in the place of curls of the electric and magnetic fields. Other small changes exist as well, but the codes are essentially interchangeable. The pre- and post-processing for model construction and response-data evaluation of the electromagnetic code, in the form of the TSAR code at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, can be used for the acoustic version. A variety of applications is possible, pending validation of the bending phenomenon. The applications include acoustic-radiation-pattern predictions for a submerged object; mine detection analysis; structural noise analysis for cars; acoustic barrier analysis; and symphonic hall/auditorium predictions and speaker enclosure modeling

  2. The computer algebra approach of the finite difference methods for PDEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ruxun.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, a first attempt has been made to realize the computer algebra construction of the finite difference methods or the finite difference schemes for constant coefficient partial differential equations. (author). 9 refs, 2 tabs

  3. Full-Wave Analysis of Traveling-Wave Field-Effect Transistors Using Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Narahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear transmission lines, which define transmission lines periodically loaded with nonlinear devices such as varactors, diodes, and transistors, are modeled in the framework of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method. Originally, some root-finding routine is needed to evaluate the contributions of nonlinear device currents appropriately to the temporally advanced electrical fields. Arbitrary nonlinear transmission lines contain large amount of nonlinear devices; therefore, it costs too much time to complete calculations. To reduce the calculation time, we recently developed a simple model of diodes to eliminate root-finding routines in an FDTD solver. Approximating the diode current-voltage relation by a piecewise-linear function, an extended Ampere's law is solved in a closed form for the time-advanced electrical fields. In this paper, we newly develop an FDTD model of field-effect transistors (FETs, together with several numerical examples that demonstrate pulse-shortening phenomena in a traveling-wave FET.

  4. Calculating modes of quantum wire systems using a finite difference technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Mardani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, the Schrodinger equation for a quantum wire is solved using a finite difference approach. A new aspect in this work is plotting wave function on cross section of rectangular cross-sectional wire in two dimensions, periodically. It is found that the correct eigen energies occur when wave functions have a complete symmetry. If the value of eigen energy has a small increase or decrease in neighborhood of the correct energy the symmetry will be destroyed and aperturbation value at the first of wave function will be observed. In addition, the demand on computer memory varies linearly with the size of the system under investigation.

  5. High-resolution finite-difference algorithms for conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towers, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new class of Total Variation Decreasing (TVD) schemes for 2-dimensional scalar conservation laws is constructed using either flux-limited or slope-limited numerical fluxes. The schemes are proven to have formal second-order accuracy in regions where neither u/sub x/ nor y/sub y/ vanishes. A new class of high-resolution large-time-step TVD schemes is constructed by adding flux-limited correction terms to the first-order accurate large-time-step version of the Engquist-Osher scheme. The use of the transport-collapse operator in place of the exact solution operator for the construction of difference schemes is studied. The production of spurious extrema by difference schemes is studied. A simple condition guaranteeing the nonproduction of spurious extrema is derived. A sufficient class of entropy inequalities for a conservation law with a flux having a single inflection point is presented. Finite-difference schemes satisfying a discrete version of each entropy inequality are only first-order accurate

  6. A hybrid finite-difference and analytic element groundwater model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitjema, Henk M.; Feinstein, Daniel T.; Hunt, Randall J.; Gusyev, Maksym

    2010-01-01

    Regional finite-difference models tend to have large cell sizes, often on the order of 1–2 km on a side. Although the regional flow patterns in deeper formations may be adequately represented by such a model, the intricate surface water and groundwater interactions in the shallower layers are not. Several stream reaches and nearby wells may occur in a single cell, precluding any meaningful modeling of the surface water and groundwater interactions between the individual features. We propose to replace the upper MODFLOW layer or layers, in which the surface water and groundwater interactions occur, by an analytic element model (GFLOW) that does not employ a model grid; instead, it represents wells and surface waters directly by the use of point-sinks and line-sinks. For many practical cases it suffices to provide GFLOW with the vertical leakage rates calculated in the original coarse MODFLOW model in order to obtain a good representation of surface water and groundwater interactions. However, when the combined transmissivities in the deeper (MODFLOW) layers dominate, the accuracy of the GFLOW solution diminishes. For those cases, an iterative coupling procedure, whereby the leakages between the GFLOW and MODFLOW model are updated, appreciably improves the overall solution, albeit at considerable computational cost. The coupled GFLOW–MODFLOW model is applicable to relatively large areas, in many cases to the entire model domain, thus forming an attractive alternative to local grid refinement or inset models.

  7. A finite-difference frequency-domain code for electromagnetic induction tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.; Buettner, H.M.; Champagne, N.J.II.; Grant, J.B.; Sharpe, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    We are developing a new 3D code for application to electromagnetic induction tomography and applications to environmental imaging problems. We have used the finite-difference frequency- domain formulation of Beilenhoff et al. (1992) and the anisotropic PML (perfectly matched layer) approach (Berenger, 1994) to specify boundary conditions following Wu et al. (1997). PML deals with the fact that the computations must be done in a finite domain even though the real problem is effectively of infinite extent. The resulting formulas for the forward solver reduce to a problem of the form Ax = y, where A is a non-Hermitian matrix with real values off the diagonal and complex values along its diagonal. The matrix A may be either symmetric or nonsymmetric depending on details of the boundary conditions chosen (i.e., the particular PML used in the application). The basic equation must be solved for the vector x (which represents field quantities such as electric and magnetic fields) with the vector y determined by the boundary conditions and transmitter location. Of the many forward solvers that could be used for this system, relatively few have been thoroughly tested for the type of matrix encountered in our problem. Our studies of the stability characteristics of the Bi-CG algorithm raised questions about its reliability and uniform accuracy for this application. We have found the stability characteristics of Bi-CGSTAB [an alternative developed by van der Vorst (1992) for such problems] to be entirely adequate for our application, whereas the standard Bi-CG was quite inadequate. We have also done extensive validation of our code using semi-analytical results as well as other codes. The new code is written in Fortran and is designed to be easily parallelized, but we have not yet tested this feature of the code. An adjoint method is being developed for solving the inverse problem for conductivity imaging (for mapping underground plumes), and this approach, when ready, will

  8. A parallel adaptive finite difference algorithm for petroleum reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Hai Minh

    2005-07-01

    Adaptive finite differential for problems arising in simulation of flow in porous medium applications are considered. Such methods have been proven useful for overcoming limitations of computational resources and improving the resolution of the numerical solutions to a wide range of problems. By local refinement of the computational mesh where it is needed to improve the accuracy of solutions, yields better solution resolution representing more efficient use of computational resources than is possible with traditional fixed-grid approaches. In this thesis, we propose a parallel adaptive cell-centered finite difference (PAFD) method for black-oil reservoir simulation models. This is an extension of the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) methodology first developed by Berger and Oliger (1984) for the hyperbolic problem. Our algorithm is fully adaptive in time and space through the use of subcycling, in which finer grids are advanced at smaller time steps than the coarser ones. When coarse and fine grids reach the same advanced time level, they are synchronized to ensure that the global solution is conservative and satisfy the divergence constraint across all levels of refinement. The material in this thesis is subdivided in to three overall parts. First we explain the methodology and intricacies of AFD scheme. Then we extend a finite differential cell-centered approximation discretization to a multilevel hierarchy of refined grids, and finally we are employing the algorithm on parallel computer. The results in this work show that the approach presented is robust, and stable, thus demonstrating the increased solution accuracy due to local refinement and reduced computing resource consumption. (Author)

  9. Implicit time-dependent finite different algorithm for quench simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, Norikiyo; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1994-12-01

    A magnet in a fusion machine has many difficulties in its application because of requirement of a large operating current, high operating field and high breakdown voltage. A cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is the best candidate to overcome these difficulties. However, there remained uncertainty in a quench event in the cable-in-conduit conductor because of a difficulty to analyze a fluid dynamics equation. Several scientists, then, developed the numerical code for the quench simulation. However, most of them were based on an explicit time-dependent finite difference scheme. In this scheme, a discrete time increment is strictly restricted by CFL (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) condition. Therefore, long CPU time was consumed for the quench simulation. Authors, then, developed a new quench simulation code, POCHI1, which is based on an implicit time dependent scheme. In POCHI1, the fluid dynamics equation is linearlized according to a procedure applied by Beam and Warming and then, a tridiagonal system can be offered. Therefore, no iteration is necessary to solve the fluid dynamics equation. This leads great reduction of the CPU time. Also, POCHI1 can cope with non-linear boundary condition. In this study, comparison with experimental results was carried out. The normal zone propagation behavior was investigated in two samples of CIC conductors which had different hydraulic diameters. The measured and simulated normal zone propagation length showed relatively good agreement. However, the behavior of the normal voltage shows a little disagreement. These results indicate necessity to improve the treatment of the heat transfer coefficient in the turbulent flow region and the electric resistivity of the copper stabilizer in high temperature and high field region. (author).

  10. Implicit time-dependent finite different algorithm for quench simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Norikiyo; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    1994-12-01

    A magnet in a fusion machine has many difficulties in its application because of requirement of a large operating current, high operating field and high breakdown voltage. A cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is the best candidate to overcome these difficulties. However, there remained uncertainty in a quench event in the cable-in-conduit conductor because of a difficulty to analyze a fluid dynamics equation. Several scientists, then, developed the numerical code for the quench simulation. However, most of them were based on an explicit time-dependent finite difference scheme. In this scheme, a discrete time increment is strictly restricted by CFL (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) condition. Therefore, long CPU time was consumed for the quench simulation. Authors, then, developed a new quench simulation code, POCHI1, which is based on an implicit time dependent scheme. In POCHI1, the fluid dynamics equation is linearlized according to a procedure applied by Beam and Warming and then, a tridiagonal system can be offered. Therefore, no iteration is necessary to solve the fluid dynamics equation. This leads great reduction of the CPU time. Also, POCHI1 can cope with non-linear boundary condition. In this study, comparison with experimental results was carried out. The normal zone propagation behavior was investigated in two samples of CIC conductors which had different hydraulic diameters. The measured and simulated normal zone propagation length showed relatively good agreement. However, the behavior of the normal voltage shows a little disagreement. These results indicate necessity to improve the treatment of the heat transfer coefficient in the turbulent flow region and the electric resistivity of the copper stabilizer in high temperature and high field region. (author)

  11. A General Symbolic PDE Solver Generator: Beyond Explicit Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sheshadri

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an extension of our Mathematica- and MathCode-based symbolic-numeric framework for solving a variety of partial differential equation (PDE problems. The main features of our earlier work, which implemented explicit finite-difference schemes, include the ability to handle (1 arbitrary number of dependent variables, (2 arbitrary dimensionality, and (3 arbitrary geometry, as well as (4 developing finite-difference schemes to any desired order of approximation. In the present paper, extensions of this framework to implicit schemes and the method of lines are discussed. While C++ code is generated, using the MathCode system for the implicit method, Modelica code is generated for the method of lines. The latter provides a preliminary PDE support for the Modelica language. Examples illustrating the various aspects of the solver generator are presented.

  12. Staggered-Grid Finite Difference Method with Variable-Order Accuracy for Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghuai Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical modeling of wave field in porous media generally requires more computation time than that of acoustic or elastic media. Usually used finite difference methods adopt finite difference operators with fixed-order accuracy to calculate space derivatives for a heterogeneous medium. A finite difference scheme with variable-order accuracy for acoustic wave equation has been proposed to reduce the computation time. In this paper, we develop this scheme for wave equations in porous media based on dispersion relation with high-order staggered-grid finite difference (SFD method. High-order finite difference operators are adopted for low-velocity regions, and low-order finite difference operators are adopted for high-velocity regions. Dispersion analysis and modeling results demonstrate that the proposed SFD method can decrease computational costs without reducing accuracy.

  13. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  14. On the Use of a Direct Radiative Transfer Equation Solver for Path Loss Calculation in Underwater Optical Wireless Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Changping

    2015-07-22

    In this letter, we propose a fast numerical solution for the steady state radiative transfer equation based on the approach in [1] in order to calculate the optical path loss of light propagation suffering from attenuation due to the absorption and scattering in various water types. We apply an optimal non-uniform method to discretize the angular space and an upwind type finite difference method to discretize the spatial space. A Gauss-Seidel iterative method is then applied to solve the fully discretized system of linear equations. Finally, we extend the resulting radiance in 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional by the azimuthal symmetric assumption to compute the received optical power under the given receiver aperture and field of view. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed scheme are validated by uniform RTE solver and Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Simulation of acoustic streaming by means of the finite-difference time-domain method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of acoustic streaming generated by a standing wave in a narrow twodimensional cavity are presented. In this case, acoustic streaming arises from the viscous boundary layers set up at the surfaces of the walls. It is known that streaming vortices inside the boundary layer have...... directions of rotation that are opposite to those of the outer streaming vortices (Rayleigh streaming). The general objective of the work described in this paper has been to study the extent to which it is possible to simulate both the outer streaming vortices and the inner boundary layer vortices using...... the finite-difference time-domain method. To simplify the problem, thermal effects are not considered. The motivation of the described investigation has been the possibility of using the numerical method to study acoustic streaming, particularly under non-steady conditions. Results are discussed for channels...

  16. SHTP-E, a computer implementation of the finite-difference embedding method of ablation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, J D

    1978-05-01

    PL/I procedures have been developed that use finite-difference techniques to analyze ablation problems by embedding them in inverse-heat-conduction problems with no moving boundaries. The procedures form a set of subroutines that can be called from a problem-oriented main program written by the user. The procedures include provisions for one-, two-, or three-dimensional conduction, parallel modes of heat transfer, thermal contact, choices of implicit and explicit difference techniques, temperature-dependent and directional thermal properties, radiation relief, aerodynamic heating, chemical ablation, and material removal from combinations of flat, cylindrical, and spherical surfaces. This report is meant to serve as a source of underlying theory not covered elsewhere and as a user's manual for the PL/I procedures. Also included are useful debugging aids and external identifiers, a directory of Applied Physics Laboratory computer libraries pertaining to the PL/I procedures, and an illustrative problem as an example.

  17. An Investigation of the Performance of the Colored Gauss-Seidel Solver on CPU and GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jong Seon; Choi, Hyoung Gwon; Jeon, Byoung Jin

    2017-01-01

    The performance of the colored Gauss–Seidel solver on CPU and GPU was investigated for the two- and three-dimensional heat conduction problems by using different mesh sizes. The heat conduction equation was discretized by the finite difference method and finite element method. The CPU yielded good performance for small problems but deteriorated when the total memory required for computing was larger than the cache memory for large problems. In contrast, the GPU performed better as the mesh size increased because of the latency hiding technique. Further, GPU computation by the colored Gauss–Siedel solver was approximately 7 times that by the single CPU. Furthermore, the colored Gauss–Seidel solver was found to be approximately twice that of the Jacobi solver when parallel computing was conducted on the GPU.

  18. Parallel time domain solvers for electrically large transient scattering problems

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2014-09-26

    Marching on in time (MOT)-based integral equation solvers represent an increasingly appealing avenue for analyzing transient electromagnetic interactions with large and complex structures. MOT integral equation solvers for analyzing electromagnetic scattering from perfect electrically conducting objects are obtained by enforcing electric field boundary conditions and implicitly time advance electric surface current densities by iteratively solving sparse systems of equations at all time steps. Contrary to finite difference and element competitors, these solvers apply to nonlinear and multi-scale structures comprising geometrically intricate and deep sub-wavelength features residing atop electrically large platforms. Moreover, they are high-order accurate, stable in the low- and high-frequency limits, and applicable to conducting and penetrable structures represented by highly irregular meshes. This presentation reviews some recent advances in the parallel implementations of time domain integral equation solvers, specifically those that leverage multilevel plane-wave time-domain algorithm (PWTD) on modern manycore computer architectures including graphics processing units (GPUs) and distributed memory supercomputers. The GPU-based implementation achieves at least one order of magnitude speedups compared to serial implementations while the distributed parallel implementation are highly scalable to thousands of compute-nodes. A distributed parallel PWTD kernel has been adopted to solve time domain surface/volume integral equations (TDSIE/TDVIE) for analyzing transient scattering from large and complex-shaped perfectly electrically conducting (PEC)/dielectric objects involving ten million/tens of millions of spatial unknowns.

  19. Accurate finite difference beam propagation method for complex integrated optical structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1993-01-01

    A simple and effective finite-difference beam propagation method in a z-varying nonuniform mesh is developed. The accuracy and computation time for this method are compared with a standard finite-difference method for both the 3-D and 2-D versions...

  20. Electric circuits problem solver

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    Each Problem Solver is an insightful and essential study and solution guide chock-full of clear, concise problem-solving gems. All your questions can be found in one convenient source from one of the most trusted names in reference solution guides. More useful, more practical, and more informative, these study aids are the best review books and textbook companions available. Nothing remotely as comprehensive or as helpful exists in their subject anywhere. Perfect for undergraduate and graduate studies.Here in this highly useful reference is the finest overview of electric circuits currently av

  1. Advanced calculus problem solver

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    Each Problem Solver is an insightful and essential study and solution guide chock-full of clear, concise problem-solving gems. All your questions can be found in one convenient source from one of the most trusted names in reference solution guides. More useful, more practical, and more informative, these study aids are the best review books and textbook companions available. Nothing remotely as comprehensive or as helpful exists in their subject anywhere. Perfect for undergraduate and graduate studies.Here in this highly useful reference is the finest overview of advanced calculus currently av

  2. Energy stable and efficient finite-difference nonlinear multigrid schemes for the modified phase field crystal equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Arvind; Hu, Zhengzheng; Lowengrub, John S.; Wang, Cheng; Wise, Steven M.; Zhou, Peng

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present two unconditionally energy stable finite difference schemes for the modified phase field crystal (MPFC) equation, a sixth-order nonlinear damped wave equation, of which the purely parabolic phase field crystal (PFC) model can be viewed as a special case. The first is a convex splitting scheme based on an appropriate decomposition of the discrete energy and is first order accurate in time and second order accurate in space. The second is a new, fully second-order scheme that also respects the convex splitting of the energy. Both schemes are nonlinear but may be formulated from the gradients of strictly convex, coercive functionals. Thus, both are uniquely solvable regardless of the time and space step sizes. The schemes are solved by efficient nonlinear multigrid methods. Numerical results are presented demonstrating the accuracy, energy stability, efficiency, and practical utility of the schemes. In particular, we show that our multigrid solvers enjoy optimal, or nearly optimal complexity in the solution of the nonlinear schemes.

  3. Iterative methods for 3D implicit finite-difference migration using the complex Padé approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Carlos A N; Campos, Itamara S; Costa, Jessé C; Neto, Francisco A; Schleicher, Jörg; Novais, Amélia

    2013-01-01

    Conventional implementations of 3D finite-difference (FD) migration use splitting techniques to accelerate performance and save computational cost. However, such techniques are plagued with numerical anisotropy that jeopardises the correct positioning of dipping reflectors in the directions not used for the operator splitting. We implement 3D downward continuation FD migration without splitting using a complex Padé approximation. In this way, the numerical anisotropy is eliminated at the expense of a computationally more intensive solution of a large-band linear system. We compare the performance of the iterative stabilized biconjugate gradient (BICGSTAB) and that of the multifrontal massively parallel direct solver (MUMPS). It turns out that the use of the complex Padé approximation not only stabilizes the solution, but also acts as an effective preconditioner for the BICGSTAB algorithm, reducing the number of iterations as compared to the implementation using the real Padé expansion. As a consequence, the iterative BICGSTAB method is more efficient than the direct MUMPS method when solving a single term in the Padé expansion. The results of both algorithms, here evaluated by computing the migration impulse response in the SEG/EAGE salt model, are of comparable quality. (paper)

  4. Uncertainty Quantification for Production Navier-Stokes Solvers, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The uncertainty quantification methods developed under this program are designed for use with current state-of-the-art flow solvers developed by and in use at NASA....

  5. The finite-difference and finite-element modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moszo, P.; Kristek, J.; Galis, M.; Pazak, P.; Balazovijech, M.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion is an irreplaceable tool in investigation of the Earth's structure, processes in the Earth, and particularly earthquake phenomena. Among various numerical methods, the finite-difference method is the dominant method in the modeling of earthquake motion. Moreover, it is becoming more important in the seismic exploration and structural modeling. At the same time we are convinced that the best time of the finite-difference method in seismology is in the future. This monograph provides tutorial and detailed introduction to the application of the finite-difference, finite-element, and hybrid finite-difference-finite-element methods to the modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion. The text does not cover all topics and aspects of the methods. We focus on those to which we have contributed. (Author)

  6. Combined finite difference-lumped modelling of fluid loaded Cmut arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynier, Cyril; Teston, Franck; Jeanne, Edgard; Bernard, Jean Edouard; Certon, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a model based on mixed finite-difference - lumped modeling to compute the frequency response of cMUTs in array element. Electrical impedance and laser interferometry measurements are presented and compared with theory.

  7. A non-linear constrained optimization technique for the mimetic finite difference method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Svyatskiy, Daniil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bertolazzi, Enrico [Univ. of Trento (Italy); Frego, Marco [Univ. of Trento (Italy)

    2014-09-30

    This is a strategy for the construction of monotone schemes in the framework of the mimetic finite difference method for the approximation of diffusion problems on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes.

  8. Anti-Diffusive Finite Difference WENO Methods for Shallow Water with Transport of Pollutant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Zhengfu; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we further explore and apply our recent anti-diffusive flux corrected high order finite difference WENO schemes for conservation laws to compute the Saint-Venant system of shallow water...

  9. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  10. NITSOL: A Newton iterative solver for nonlinear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernice, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Walker, H.F. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Newton iterative methods, also known as truncated Newton methods, are implementations of Newton`s method in which the linear systems that characterize Newton steps are solved approximately using iterative linear algebra methods. Here, we outline a well-developed Newton iterative algorithm together with a Fortran implementation called NITSOL. The basic algorithm is an inexact Newton method globalized by backtracking, in which each initial trial step is determined by applying an iterative linear solver until an inexact Newton criterion is satisfied. In the implementation, the user can specify inexact Newton criteria in several ways and select an iterative linear solver from among several popular {open_quotes}transpose-free{close_quotes} Krylov subspace methods. Jacobian-vector products used by the Krylov solver can be either evaluated analytically with a user-supplied routine or approximated using finite differences of function values. A flexible interface permits a wide variety of preconditioning strategies and allows the user to define a preconditioner and optionally update it periodically. We give details of these and other features and demonstrate the performance of the implementation on a representative set of test problems.

  11. Newton-Krylov-BDDC solvers for nonlinear cardiac mechanics

    KAUST Repository

    Pavarino, L.F.

    2015-07-18

    The aim of this work is to design and study a Balancing Domain Decomposition by Constraints (BDDC) solver for the nonlinear elasticity system modeling the mechanical deformation of cardiac tissue. The contraction–relaxation process in the myocardium is induced by the generation and spread of the bioelectrical excitation throughout the tissue and it is mathematically described by the coupling of cardiac electro-mechanical models consisting of systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. In this study, the discretization of the electro-mechanical models is performed by Q1 finite elements in space and semi-implicit finite difference schemes in time, leading to the solution of a large-scale linear system for the bioelectrical potentials and a nonlinear system for the mechanical deformation at each time step of the simulation. The parallel mechanical solver proposed in this paper consists in solving the nonlinear system with a Newton-Krylov-BDDC method, based on the parallel solution of local mechanical problems and a coarse problem for the so-called primal unknowns. Three-dimensional parallel numerical tests on different machines show that the proposed parallel solver is scalable in the number of subdomains, quasi-optimal in the ratio of subdomain to mesh sizes, and robust with respect to tissue anisotropy.

  12. A systematic approach to numerical dispersion in Maxwell solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinne, Alexander; Schinkel, David; Kuschel, Stephan; Elkina, Nina; Rykovanov, Sergey G.; Zepf, Matt

    2018-03-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is a well established method for solving the time evolution of Maxwell's equations. Unfortunately the scheme introduces numerical dispersion and therefore phase and group velocities which deviate from the correct values. The solution to Maxwell's equations in more than one dimension results in non-physical predictions such as numerical dispersion or numerical Cherenkov radiation emitted by a relativistic electron beam propagating in vacuum. Improved solvers, which keep the staggered Yee-type grid for electric and magnetic fields, generally modify the spatial derivative operator in the Maxwell-Faraday equation by increasing the computational stencil. These modified solvers can be characterized by different sets of coefficients, leading to different dispersion properties. In this work we introduce a norm function to rewrite the choice of coefficients into a minimization problem. We solve this problem numerically and show that the minimization procedure leads to phase and group velocities that are considerably closer to c as compared to schemes with manually set coefficients available in the literature. Depending on a specific problem at hand (e.g. electron beam propagation in plasma, high-order harmonic generation from plasma surfaces, etc.), the norm function can be chosen accordingly, for example, to minimize the numerical dispersion in a certain given propagation direction. Particle-in-cell simulations of an electron beam propagating in vacuum using our solver are provided.

  13. High-order finite difference methods for earthquake rupture dynamics in complex geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, O.; Kozdon, J. E.; Dunham, E. M.; Nordström, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work we continue our development of high-order summation-by-parts (SBP) finite difference methods for earthquake rupture dynamics. SBP methods use centered spatial differences in the interior and one-sided differences near the boundary. The transition to one-sided differences is done in a particular manner that permits one to provably maintain stability and accuracy. In many methods the boundary conditions are strongly enforced by modifying the difference operator at the boundary so that the solution there exactly satisfies the boundary condition. Though conceptually straightforward, this approach can introduce instabilities. In contrast, when boundary conditions are enforced weakly by adding a penalty term to the spatial discretization, it is possible to prove that the method is strictly stable, dissipating energy slightly faster than the continuous problem (with the additional dissipation vanishing under grid refinement). Another benefit of SBP operators is their built-in inner product which, if correctly constructed, can be interpreted as a quadrature operator. Thus, important integrated quantities such as the total mechanical energy in the system, the energy dissipation rate along faults, and the radiated energy flux through exterior boundaries can be rigorously calculated. These numerically integrated quantities converge to their true values with the same order of accuracy as the difference approximation. Though standard SBP methods are based on uniform Cartesian grids, it is possible to use the methods for problems with nonplanar faults, free surface topography, and branching faults through the use of coordinate transforms. Recently, it has also been shown how second-order SBP methods can be extended to unstructured grids. Due to the SBP character of both the finite difference and node-centered finite volume method they can be used together in a stable and accurate way. Inclusion of these techniques will be important for problems that have regions

  14. Evaluation of explicit finite-difference techniques for LMFBR safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, D.; Golden, R.D.; Gross, M.B.; Hofmann, R.

    1976-01-01

    In the past few years, the use of explicit finite-difference (EFD) and finite-element computer programs for reactor safety calculations has steadily increased. One of the major areas of application has been for the analysis of hypothetical core disruptive accidents in liquid metal fast breeder reactors. Most of these EFD codes were derived to varying degrees from the same roots, but the codes are large and have progressed rapidly, so there may be substantial differences among them in spite of a common ancestry. When this fact is coupled with the complexity of HCDA calculations, it is not possible to assure that independent calculations of an HCDA will produce substantially the same results. Given the extreme importance of nuclear safety, it is essential to be sure that HCDA analyses are correct, and additional code validation is therefore desirable. A comparative evaluation of HCDA computational techniques is being performed under an ERDA-sponsored program called APRICOT (Analysis of PRImary COntainment Transients). The philosophy, calculations, and preliminary results from this program are described in this paper

  15. Solution to PDEs using radial basis function finite-differences (RBF-FD) on multiple GPUs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollig, Evan F.; Flyer, Natasha; Erlebacher, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents parallelization strategies for the radial basis function-finite difference (RBF-FD) method. As a generalized finite differencing scheme, the RBF-FD method functions without the need for underlying meshes to structure nodes. It offers high-order accuracy approximation and scales as O(N) per time step, with N being with the total number of nodes. To our knowledge, this is the first implementation of the RBF-FD method to leverage GPU accelerators for the solution of PDEs. Additionally, this implementation is the first to span both multiple CPUs and multiple GPUs. OpenCL kernels target the GPUs and inter-processor communication and synchronization is managed by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). We verify our implementation of the RBF-FD method with two hyperbolic PDEs on the sphere, and demonstrate up to 9x speedup on a commodity GPU with unoptimized kernel implementations. On a high performance cluster, the method achieves up to 7x speedup for the maximum problem size of 27,556 nodes.

  16. A finite difference scheme for a degenerated diffusion equation arising in microbial ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann J. Eberl

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A finite difference scheme is presented for a density-dependent diffusion equation that arises in the mathematical modelling of bacterial biofilms. The peculiarity of the underlying model is that it shows degeneracy as the dependent variable vanishes, as well as a singularity as the dependent variable approaches its a priori known upper bound. The first property leads to a finite speed of interface propagation if the initial data have compact support, while the second one introduces counter-acting super diffusion. This squeezing property of this model leads to steep gradients at the interface. Moving interface problems of this kind are known to be problematic for classical numerical methods and introduce non-physical and non-mathematical solutions. The proposed method is developed to address this observation. The central idea is a non-local (in time representation of the diffusion operator. It can be shown that the proposed method is free of oscillations at the interface, that the discrete interface satisfies a discrete version of the continuous interface condition and that the effect of interface smearing is quantitatively small.

  17. Perfectly matched layer method in the finite-difference time-domain and frequency-domain calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shyroki, Dzmitry; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    A complex-coordinate method known under the guise of the perfectly matched layer (PML) method for treating unbounded domains in computational electrodynamics is related to similar techniques in fluid dynamics and classical quantum theory. It may also find use in electronic-structure finite......-difference simulations. Straightforward transfer of the PML formulation to other fields does not seem feasible, however, since it is a unique feature of electrodynamics - the natural invariance - that allows analytic trick of complex coordinate scaling to be represented as pure modification of local material parameters...

  18. A highly accurate finite-difference method with minimum dispersion error for solving the Helmholtz equation

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2018-04-05

    Numerical simulation of the acoustic wave equation in either isotropic or anisotropic media is crucial to seismic modeling, imaging and inversion. Actually, it represents the core computation cost of these highly advanced seismic processing methods. However, the conventional finite-difference method suffers from severe numerical dispersion errors and S-wave artifacts when solving the acoustic wave equation for anisotropic media. We propose a method to obtain the finite-difference coefficients by comparing its numerical dispersion with the exact form. We find the optimal finite difference coefficients that share the dispersion characteristics of the exact equation with minimal dispersion error. The method is extended to solve the acoustic wave equation in transversely isotropic (TI) media without S-wave artifacts. Numerical examples show that the method is is highly accurate and efficient.

  19. A finite difference, multipoint flux numerical approach to flow in porous media: Numerical examples

    KAUST Repository

    Osman, Hossam Omar

    2012-06-17

    It is clear that none of the current available numerical schemes which may be adopted to solve transport phenomena in porous media fulfill all the required robustness conditions. That is while the finite difference methods are the simplest of all, they face several difficulties in complex geometries and anisotropic media. On the other hand, while finite element methods are well suited to complex geometries and can deal with anisotropic media, they are more involved in coding and usually require more execution time. Therefore, in this work we try to combine some features of the finite element technique, namely its ability to work with anisotropic media with the finite difference approach. We reduce the multipoint flux, mixed finite element technique through some quadrature rules to an equivalent cell-centered finite difference approximation. We show examples on using this technique to single-phase flow in anisotropic porous media.

  20. Modeling seismic wave propagation using staggered-grid mimetic finite differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freysimar Solano-Feo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mimetic finite difference (MFD approximations of continuous gradient and divergence operators satisfy a discrete version of the Gauss-Divergence theorem on staggered grids. On the mimetic approximation of this integral conservation principle, an unique boundary flux operator is introduced that also intervenes on the discretization of a given boundary value problem (BVP. In this work, we present a second-order MFD scheme for seismic wave propagation on staggered grids that discretized free surface and absorbing boundary conditions (ABC with same accuracy order. This scheme is time explicit after coupling a central three-level finite difference (FD stencil for numerical integration. Here, we briefly discuss the convergence properties of this scheme and show its higher accuracy on a challenging test when compared to a traditional FD method. Preliminary applications to 2-D seismic scenarios are also presented and show the potential of the mimetic finite difference method.

  1. Formulation of coarse mesh finite difference to calculate mathematical adjoint flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Valmir; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is the obtention of the mathematical adjoint flux, having as its support the nodal expansion method (NEM) for coarse mesh problems. Since there are difficulties to evaluate this flux by using NEM. directly, a coarse mesh finite difference program was developed to obtain this adjoint flux. The coarse mesh finite difference formulation (DFMG) adopted uses results of the direct calculation (node average flux and node face averaged currents) obtained by NEM. These quantities (flux and currents) are used to obtain the correction factors which modify the classical finite differences formulation . Since the DFMG formulation is also capable of calculating the direct flux it was also tested to obtain this flux and it was verified that it was able to reproduce with good accuracy both the flux and the currents obtained via NEM. In this way, only matrix transposition is needed to calculate the mathematical adjoint flux. (author)

  2. Accuracy of finite-difference modeling of seismic waves : Simulation versus laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntsen, B.

    2017-12-01

    The finite-difference technique for numerical modeling of seismic waves is still important and for some areas extensively used.For exploration purposes is finite-difference simulation at the core of both traditional imaging techniques such as reverse-time migration and more elaborate Full-Waveform Inversion techniques.The accuracy and fidelity of finite-difference simulation of seismic waves are hard to quantify and meaningfully error analysis is really onlyeasily available for simplistic media. A possible alternative to theoretical error analysis is provided by comparing finite-difference simulated data with laboratory data created using a scale model. The advantage of this approach is the accurate knowledge of the model, within measurement precision, and the location of sources and receivers.We use a model made of PVC immersed in water and containing horizontal and tilted interfaces together with several spherical objects to generateultrasonic pressure reflection measurements. The physical dimensions of the model is of the order of a meter, which after scaling represents a model with dimensions of the order of 10 kilometer and frequencies in the range of one to thirty hertz.We find that for plane horizontal interfaces the laboratory data can be reproduced by the finite-difference scheme with relatively small error, but for steeply tilted interfaces the error increases. For spherical interfaces the discrepancy between laboratory data and simulated data is sometimes much more severe, to the extent that it is not possible to simulate reflections from parts of highly curved bodies. The results are important in view of the fact that finite-difference modeling is often at the core of imaging and inversion algorithms tackling complicatedgeological areas with highly curved interfaces.

  3. Finite-difference modeling of Bragg fibers with ultrathin cladding layers via adaptive coordinate transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shyroki, Dzmitry; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole

    As an alternative to the finite-element analysis or subgridding, coordinate transformation is used to “stretch” the fine-structured cladding of a Bragg fiber, and then the fullvector, equidistant-grid finite-difference computations of the modal structure are performed.......As an alternative to the finite-element analysis or subgridding, coordinate transformation is used to “stretch” the fine-structured cladding of a Bragg fiber, and then the fullvector, equidistant-grid finite-difference computations of the modal structure are performed....

  4. Introduction to the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Method for Electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Gedney, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Method for Electromagnetics provides a comprehensive tutorial of the most widely used method for solving Maxwell's equations -- the Finite Difference Time-Domain Method. This book is an essential guide for students, researchers, and professional engineers who want to gain a fundamental knowledge of the FDTD method. It can accompany an undergraduate or entry-level graduate course or be used for self-study. The book provides all the background required to either research or apply the FDTD method for the solution of Maxwell's equations to p

  5. Perfectly Matched Layer for the Wave Equation Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yutaka; Tsuchiya, Takao

    2012-07-01

    The perfectly matched layer (PML) is introduced into the wave equation finite difference time domain (WE-FDTD) method. The WE-FDTD method is a finite difference method in which the wave equation is directly discretized on the basis of the central differences. The required memory of the WE-FDTD method is less than that of the standard FDTD method because no particle velocity is stored in the memory. In this study, the WE-FDTD method is first combined with the standard FDTD method. Then, Berenger's PML is combined with the WE-FDTD method. Some numerical demonstrations are given for the two- and three-dimensional sound fields.

  6. Iterative Addition of Kinetic Effects to Cold Plasma RF Wave Solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David; Berry, Lee; RF-SciDAC Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The hot nature of fusion plasmas requires a wave vector dependent conductivity tensor for accurate calculation of wave heating and current drive. Traditional methods for calculating the linear, kinetic full-wave plasma response rely on a spectral method such that the wave vector dependent conductivity fits naturally within the numerical method. These methods have seen much success for application to the well-confined core plasma of tokamaks. However, quantitative prediction of high power RF antenna designs for fusion applications has meant a requirement of resolving the geometric details of the antenna and other plasma facing surfaces for which the Fourier spectral method is ill-suited. An approach to enabling the addition of kinetic effects to the more versatile finite-difference and finite-element cold-plasma full-wave solvers was presented by where an operator-split iterative method was outlined. Here we expand on this approach, examine convergence and present a simplified kinetic current estimator for rapidly updating the right-hand side of the wave equation with kinetic corrections. This research used resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  7. Accurate, stable and efficient Navier-Stokes solvers based on explicit treatment of the pressure term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Hans; Liu Jianguo

    2004-01-01

    We present numerical schemes for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations based on a primitive variable formulation in which the incompressibility constraint has been replaced by a pressure Poisson equation. The pressure is treated explicitly in time, completely decoupling the computation of the momentum and kinematic equations. The result is a class of extremely efficient Navier-Stokes solvers. Full time accuracy is achieved for all flow variables. The key to the schemes is a Neumann boundary condition for the pressure Poisson equation which enforces the incompressibility condition for the velocity field. Irrespective of explicit or implicit time discretization of the viscous term in the momentum equation the explicit time discretization of the pressure term does not affect the time step constraint. Indeed, we prove unconditional stability of the new formulation for the Stokes equation with explicit treatment of the pressure term and first or second order implicit treatment of the viscous term. Systematic numerical experiments for the full Navier-Stokes equations indicate that a second order implicit time discretization of the viscous term, with the pressure and convective terms treated explicitly, is stable under the standard CFL condition. Additionally, various numerical examples are presented, including both implicit and explicit time discretizations, using spectral and finite difference spatial discretizations, demonstrating the accuracy, flexibility and efficiency of this class of schemes. In particular, a Galerkin formulation is presented requiring only C 0 elements to implement

  8. Linear and nonlinear Stability analysis for finite difference discretizations of higher order Boussinesq equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, David R.; Bingham, Harry B.; Madsen, Per A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers a method of lines stability analysis for finite difference discretizations of a recently published Boussinesq method for the study of highly nonlinear and extremely dispersive water waves. The analysis demonstrates the near-equivalence of classical linear Fourier (von Neumann...

  9. Finite-difference time domain solution of light scattering by arbitrarily shaped particles and surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan; Sun, Wenbo

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews the fundamental methods and some of the applications of the three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique for the modeling of light scattering by arbitrarily shaped dielectric particles and surfaces. The emphasis is on the details of the FDTD algorithm...

  10. Nonuniform grid implicit spatial finite difference method for acoustic wave modeling in tilted transversely isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-01-01

    Discrete earth models are commonly represented by uniform structured grids. In order to ensure accurate numerical description of all wave components propagating through these uniform grids, the grid size must be determined by the slowest velocity of the entire model. Consequently, high velocity areas are always oversampled, which inevitably increases the computational cost. A practical solution to this problem is to use nonuniform grids. We propose a nonuniform grid implicit spatial finite difference method which utilizes nonuniform grids to obtain high efficiency and relies on implicit operators to achieve high accuracy. We present a simple way of deriving implicit finite difference operators of arbitrary stencil widths on general nonuniform grids for the first and second derivatives and, as a demonstration example, apply these operators to the pseudo-acoustic wave equation in tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media. We propose an efficient gridding algorithm that can be used to convert uniformly sampled models onto vertically nonuniform grids. We use a 2D TTI salt model to demonstrate its effectiveness and show that the nonuniform grid implicit spatial finite difference method can produce highly accurate seismic modeling results with enhanced efficiency, compared to uniform grid explicit finite difference implementations. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  11. The finite-difference time-domain method for electromagnetics with Matlab simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the powerful Finite-Difference Time-Domain method to students and interested researchers and readers. An effective introduction is accomplished using a step-by-step process that builds competence and confidence in developing complete working codes for the design and analysis of various antennas and microwave devices.

  12. On a Stable and Consistent Finite Difference Scheme for a Time ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a stable and consistent criterion to an explicit finite difference scheme for a time-dependent Schrodinger wave equation (TDSWE) was presented. This paper is a departure from the well-established time independent Schrodinger Wave Equation (SWE). To develop the stability criterion for the scheme, the ...

  13. Stability of finite difference schemes for generalized von Foerster equations with renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Leszczyński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a von Foerster-type equation describing the dynamics of a population with the production of offsprings given by the renewal condition. We construct a finite difference scheme for this problem and give sufficient conditions for its stability with respect to \\(l^1\\ and \\(l^\\infty\\ norms.

  14. Comparison of the calculated neutron noise using finite differences and the Analytical Nodal Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Viktor; Demazière, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Numerical neutron noise calculations for a commercial PWR. ► Comparison using finite differences and the Analytical Nodal Method. ► Little gain for the higher cost of more advanced methods. ► Finite difference adequate for neutron noise calculations. - Abstract: In this paper, a comparison of the calculated neutron noise, i.e. the fluctuation of the neutron flux around its average value assuming that all processes are stationary, is conducted, where the neutron noise is calculated using finite differences alone and with finite differences where the Analytical Nodal Method is used to correct the neutron currents, respectively. It is seen that the lower the frequency of the noise source, the larger difference between the two solutions. The main conclusion from this work is that the gain of calculating the neutron noise using the more sophisticated Analytical Nodal Method compared to the increase of the corresponding computational burden is too little to motivate the use of the ANM.

  15. Numerical solution method of nonlinear guided modes with a finite difference complex axis beam propagation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, F.H.G.M.; Wijnands, Frank; Hoekstra, Hugo; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; de Ridder, R.M.

    A method to construct modal fields for an arbitrary one- or two-dimensional intensity dependent refractive index structure is described. An arbitrary starting field is propagated along an imaginary axis using the Finite Difference Beam Propagation Method (FDBPM) based upon the Slowly Varying

  16. Finite-difference time-domain analysis of time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper; Cooke, David G.; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report on the numerical analysis of a time-resolved terahertz (THz) spectroscopy experiment using a modified finite-difference time-domain method. Using this method, we show that ultrafast carrier dynamics can be extracted with a time resolution smaller than the duration of the THz...

  17. A Comparison of Continuous Mass-lumped Finite Elements and Finite Differences for 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.; Kononov, A.; Mulder, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    The finite-difference method is widely used for time-domain modelling of the wave equation because of its ease of implementation of high-order spatial discretization schemes, parallelization and computational efficiency. However, finite elements on tetrahedral meshes are more accurate in complex

  18. Some remarks on multilevel algorithms for finite difference discretizationson sparse grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Sprengel

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we propose some algorithms to solve the system of linear equations arising from the finite difference discretization on sparse grids. For this, we will use the multilevel structure of the sparse grid space or its full grid subspaces, respectively.

  19. On the representation of functions and finite difference operators on adaptive sparse grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W. Hemker (Piet); F. Sprengel

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we describe methods to approximate functions and differential operators on adaptive sparse grids. We distinguish between several representations of a function on the sparse grid, and we describe how finite difference (FD) operators can be applied to these representations.

  20. Application of compact finite-difference schemes to simulations of stably stratified fluid flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bodnár, Tomáš; Beneš, L.; Fraunie, P.; Kozel, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 219, č. 7 (2012), s. 3336-3353 ISSN 0096-3003 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : stratification * finite-difference * finite-volume * Runge-Kutta Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.349, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0096300311010988

  1. A survey of deterministic solvers for rarefied flows (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieussens, Luc

    2014-12-01

    Numerical simulations of rarefied gas flows are generally made with DSMC methods. Up to a recent period, deterministic numerical methods based on a discretization of the Boltzmann equation were restricted to simple problems (1D, linearized flows, or simple geometries, for instance). In the last decade, several deterministic solvers have been developed in different teams to tackle more complex problems like 2D and 3D flows. Some of them are based on the full Boltzmann equation. Solving this equation numerically is still very challenging, and 3D solvers are still restricted to monoatomic gases, even if recent works have proved it was possible to simulate simple flows for polyatomic gases. Other solvers are based on simpler BGK like models: they allow for much more intensive simulations on 3D flows for realistic geometries, but treating complex gases requires extended BGK models that are still under development. In this paper, we discuss the main features of these existing solvers, and we focus on their strengths and inefficiencies. We will also review some recent results that show how these solvers can be improved: - higher accuracy (higher order finite volume methods, discontinuous Galerkin approaches) - lower memory and CPU costs with special velocity discretization (adaptive grids, spectral methods) - multi-scale simulations by using hybrid and asymptotic preserving schemes - efficient implementation on high performance computers (parallel computing, hybrid parallelization) Finally, we propose some perspectives to make these solvers more efficient and more popular.

  2. High-performance parallel solver for 3D time-dependent Schrodinger equation for large-scale nanosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainullin, I. K.; Sonkin, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    A parallelized three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE) solver for one-electron systems is presented in this paper. The TDSE Solver is based on the finite-difference method (FDM) in Cartesian coordinates and uses a simple and explicit leap-frog numerical scheme. The simplicity of the numerical method provides very efficient parallelization and high performance of calculations using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). For example, calculation of 106 time-steps on the 1000ṡ1000ṡ1000 numerical grid (109 points) takes only 16 hours on 16 Tesla M2090 GPUs. The TDSE Solver demonstrates scalability (parallel efficiency) close to 100% with some limitations on the problem size. The TDSE Solver is validated by calculation of energy eigenstates of the hydrogen atom (13.55 eV) and affinity level of H- ion (0.75 eV). The comparison with other TDSE solvers shows that a GPU-based TDSE Solver is 3 times faster for the problems of the same size and with the same cost of computational resources. The usage of a non-regular Cartesian grid or problem-specific non-Cartesian coordinates increases this benefit up to 10 times. The TDSE Solver was applied to the calculation of the resonant charge transfer (RCT) in nanosystems, including several related physical problems, such as electron capture during H+-H0 collision and electron tunneling between H- ion and thin metallic island film.

  3. Euler/Navier-Stokes Solvers Applied to Ducted Fan Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    1997-01-01

    Due to noise considerations, ultra high bypass ducted fans have become a more viable design. These ducted fans typically consist of a rotor stage containing a wide chord fan and a stator stage. One of the concerns for this design is the classical flutter that keeps occurring in various unducted fan blade designs. These flutter are catastrophic and are to be avoided in the flight envelope of the engine. Some numerical investigations by Williams, Cho and Dalton, have suggested that a duct around a propeller makes it more unstable. This needs to be further investigated. In order to design an engine to safely perform a set of desired tasks, accurate information of the stresses on the blade during the entire cycle of blade motion is required. This requirement in turn demands that accurate knowledge of steady and unsteady blade loading be available. Aerodynamic solvers based on unsteady three-dimensional analysis will provide accurate and fast solutions and are best suited for aeroelastic analysis. The Euler solvers capture significant physics of the flowfield and are reasonably fast. An aerodynamic solver Ref. based on Euler equations had been developed under a separate grant from NASA Lewis in the past. Under the current grant, this solver has been modified to calculate the aeroelastic characteristics of unducted and ducted rotors. Even though, the aeroelastic solver based on three-dimensional Euler equations is computationally efficient, it is still very expensive to investigate the effects of multiple stages on the aeroelastic characteristics. In order to investigate the effects of multiple stages, a two-dimensional multi stage aeroelastic solver was also developed under this task, in collaboration with Dr. T. S. R. Reddy of the University of Toledo. Both of these solvers were applied to several test cases and validated against experimental data, where available.

  4. A Finite Difference Solution of a Simply Supported Beam of Orthotropic Composite Materials Using Displacement Potential Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Deb Nath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here an efficient displacement potential formulation based finite difference technique is used to solve the elastic field of a simply supported beam of orthotropic composite materials. A simply supported beam made of orthotropic composite material under uniformly distributed loading is considered and its elastic behaviors under such loading conditions are analyzed considering plane stress condition. The solutions of the problem satisfy the force equilibrium conditions as well as boundary conditions. For understanding the elastic behavior of a simply supported beam, the displacement and stress components of some important sections of the beam are shown graphically. Effects of different orthotropic composite materials on the solutions are also analyzed. Besides, at a particular section of the beam, the comparative analysis of the elastic field is carried out by using the FDM and FEM methods.

  5. Finite Difference Methods for Option Pricing under Lévy Processes: Wiener-Hopf Factorization Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Kudryavtsev

    2013-01-01

    factorization identity. Notice that our algorithm has the same complexity as the ones which use the explicit-implicit scheme, with a tridiagonal matrix. However, our method is more accurate. We support the advantage of the new method in terms of accuracy and convergence by using numerical experiments.

  6. 3D Staggered-Grid Finite-Difference Simulation of Acoustic Waves in Turbulent Moving Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, N. P.; Aldridge, D. F.; Marlin, D.; Wilson, D. K.; Sullivan, P.; Ostashev, V.

    2003-12-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in a three-dimensional heterogeneous moving atmosphere is accurately simulated with a numerical algorithm recently developed under the DOD Common High Performance Computing Software Support Initiative (CHSSI). Sound waves within such a dynamic environment are mathematically described by a set of four, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing small-amplitude fluctuations in pressure and particle velocity. The system is rigorously derived from fundamental principles of continuum mechanics, ideal-fluid constitutive relations, and reasonable assumptions that the ambient atmospheric motion is adiabatic and divergence-free. An explicit, time-domain, finite-difference (FD) numerical scheme is used to solve the system for both pressure and particle velocity wavefields. The atmosphere is characterized by 3D gridded models of sound speed, mass density, and the three components of the wind velocity vector. Dependent variables are stored on staggered spatial and temporal grids, and centered FD operators possess 2nd-order and 4th-order space/time accuracy. Accurate sound wave simulation is achieved provided grid intervals are chosen appropriately. The gridding must be fine enough to reduce numerical dispersion artifacts to an acceptable level and maintain stability. The algorithm is designed to execute on parallel computational platforms by utilizing a spatial domain-decomposition strategy. Currently, the algorithm has been validated on four different computational platforms, and parallel scalability of approximately 85% has been demonstrated. Comparisons with analytic solutions for uniform and vertically stratified wind models indicate that the FD algorithm generates accurate results with either a vanishing pressure or vanishing vertical-particle velocity boundary condition. Simulations are performed using a kinematic turbulence wind profile developed with the quasi-wavelet method. In addition, preliminary results are presented

  7. Generalized finite-difference time-domain schemes for solving nonlinear Schrodinger equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxley, Frederick Ira, III

    The nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE) is one of the most widely applicable equations in physical science, and characterizes nonlinear dispersive waves, optics, water waves, and the dynamics of molecules. The NLSE satisfies many mathematical conservation laws. Moreover, due to the nonlinearity, the NLSE often requires a numerical solution, which also satisfies the conservation laws. Some of the more popular numerical methods for solving the NLSE include the finite difference, finite element, and spectral methods such as the pseudospectral, split-step with Fourier transform, and integrating factor coupled with a Fourier transform. With regard to the finite difference and finite element methods, higher-order accurate and stable schemes are often required to solve a large-scale linear system. Conversely, spectral methods via Fourier transforms for space discretization coupled with Runge-Kutta methods for time stepping become too complex when applied to multidimensional problems. One of the most prevalent challenges in developing these numerical schemes is that they satisfy the conservation laws. The objective of this dissertation was to develop a higher-order accurate and simple finite difference scheme for solving the NLSE. First, the wave function was split into real and imaginary components and then substituted into the NLSE to obtain coupled equations. These components were then approximated using higher-order Taylor series expansions in time, where the derivatives in time were replaced by the derivatives in space via the coupled equations. Finally, the derivatives in space were approximated using higher-order accurate finite difference approximations. As such, an explicit and higher order accurate finite difference scheme for solving the NLSE was obtained. This scheme is called the explicit generalized finite-difference time-domain (explicit G-FDTD). For purposes of completeness, an implicit G-FDTD scheme for solving the NLSE was also developed. In this

  8. Test set for IVP solvers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Lioen (Walter); J.J.B. de Swart (Jacques); W.A. van der Veen

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper a collection of Initial Value test Problems for systems of Ordinary Differential Equations, Implicit Differential Equations and Differential-Algebraic Equations is presented. This test set is maintained by the project group for Parallel IVP Solvers of CWI, department of

  9. High‐order rotated staggered finite difference modeling of 3D elastic wave propagation in general anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the dispersion properties and stability conditions of the high‐order convolutional finite difference operators and compare them with the conventional finite difference schemes. We observe that the convolutional finite difference method has better dispersion properties and becomes more efficient than the conventional finite difference method with the increasing order of accuracy. This makes the high‐order convolutional operator a good choice for anisotropic elastic wave simulations on rotated staggered grids since its enhanced dispersion properties can help to suppress the numerical dispersion error that is inherent in the rotated staggered grid structure and its efficiency can help us tackle 3D problems cost‐effectively.

  10. The Incorporation of Truncated Fourier Series into Finite Difference Approximations of Structural Stability Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, S. R.; Palazotto, A. N.

    1978-01-01

    A new trigonometric approach to the finite difference calculus was applied to the problem of beam buckling as represented by virtual work and equilibrium equations. The trigonometric functions were varied by adjusting a wavelength parameter in the approximating Fourier series. Values of the critical force obtained from the modified approach for beams with a variety of boundary conditions were compared to results using the conventional finite difference method. The trigonometric approach produced significantly more accurate approximations for the critical force than the conventional approach for a relatively wide range in values of the wavelength parameter; and the optimizing value of the wavelength parameter corresponded to the half-wavelength of the buckled mode shape. It was found from a modal analysis that the most accurate solutions are obtained when the approximating function closely represents the actual displacement function and matches the actual boundary conditions.

  11. THE SOLUTION OF THE CABLE EQUATIONS BY MEANS OF FINITE DIFFERENCE TIME DOMAIN METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsiuk V.I.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis and comparison of accuracy of numerical solutions received by Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD method and Godunov's method at the solution of the cable equations is carried out. It is demonstrated, that at sudden short circuits and at transition to idling mode in numerical solutions received by means of FDTD method for long lines with the distributed parameters appear strong nonphysical oscillations. It is shown, that the settlement scheme offered by authors on the basis of Godunov's method is deprived these lacks and provides high accuracy for the numerical solutions received at the analysis of dynamic modes in long lines, caused by sudden short circuits and line transitions in an idling mode. Key words: cable equations, finite difference time domain method, Godunov’s scheme.

  12. Implementation of compact finite-difference method to parabolized Navier-Stokes equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfahanian, V.; Hejranfar, K.; Darian, H.M.

    2005-01-01

    The numerical simulation of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) equations for supersonic/hypersonic flow field is obtained by using the fourth-order compact finite-difference method. The PNS equations in the general curvilinear coordinates are solved by using the implicit finite-difference algorithm of Beam and Warming. A shock fitting procedure is utilized to obtain the accurate solution in the vicinity of the shock. The computations are performed for hypersonic axisymmetric flow over a blunt cone. The present results for the flow field along with those of the second-order method are presented and accuracy analysis is performed to insure the fourth-order accuracy of the method. (author)

  13. Application of the finite-difference approximation to electrostatic problems in gaseous proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.P.R.; Urbanczyk, K.M.

    1975-01-01

    The basic principles of the finite-difference approximation applied to the solution of electrostatic field distributions in gaseous proportional counters are given. Using this method, complicated two-dimensional electrostatic problems may be solved, taking into account any number of anodes, each with its own radius, and any cathode shape. A general formula for introducing the anode radii into the calculations is derived and a method of obtaining extremely accurate (up to 0.1%) solutions is developed. Several examples of potential and absolute field distributions for single rectangular and multiwire proportional counters are calculated and compared with exact results according to Tomitani, in order to discuss in detail errors of the finite-difference approximation. (author)

  14. Accuracy of finite-difference harmonic frequencies in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Jie; Herbert, John M

    2017-07-15

    Analytic Hessians are often viewed as essential for the calculation of accurate harmonic frequencies, but the implementation of analytic second derivatives is nontrivial and solution of the requisite coupled-perturbed equations engenders a sizable memory footprint for large systems, given that these equations are not required for energy and gradient calculations in density functional theory. Here, we benchmark the alternative approach to harmonic frequencies based on finite differences of analytic first derivatives, a procedure that is amenable to large-scale parallelization. Not only for absolute frequencies but also for isotopic and conformer-dependent frequency shifts in flexible molecules, we find that the finite-difference approach exhibits mean errors numbers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Stability and non-standard finite difference method of the generalized Chua's circuit

    KAUST Repository

    Radwan, Ahmed G.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we develop a framework to obtain approximate numerical solutions of the fractional-order Chua\\'s circuit with Memristor using a non-standard finite difference method. Chaotic response is obtained with fractional-order elements as well as integer-order elements. Stability analysis and the condition of oscillation for the integer-order system are discussed. In addition, the stability analyses for different fractional-order cases are investigated showing a great sensitivity to small order changes indicating the poles\\' locations inside the physical s-plane. The GrnwaldLetnikov method is used to approximate the fractional derivatives. Numerical results are presented graphically and reveal that the non-standard finite difference scheme is an effective and convenient method to solve fractional-order chaotic systems, and to validate their stability. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Linear finite-difference bond graph model of an ionic polymer actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentefrit, M.; Grondel, S.; Soyer, C.; Fannir, A.; Cattan, E.; Madden, J. D.; Nguyen, T. M. G.; Plesse, C.; Vidal, F.

    2017-09-01

    With the recent growing interest for soft actuation, many new types of ionic polymers working in air have been developed. Due to the interrelated mechanical, electrical, and chemical properties which greatly influence the characteristics of such actuators, their behavior is complex and difficult to understand, predict and optimize. In light of this challenge, an original linear multiphysics finite difference bond graph model was derived to characterize this ionic actuation. This finite difference scheme was divided into two coupled subparts, each related to a specific physical, electrochemical or mechanical domain, and then converted into a bond graph model as this language is particularly suited for systems from multiple energy domains. Simulations were then conducted and a good agreement with the experimental results was obtained. Furthermore, an analysis of the power efficiency of such actuators as a function of space and time was proposed and allowed to evaluate their performance.

  17. Single-cone finite difference scheme for the (2+1)D Dirac von Neumann equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötz, Walter; Schreilechner, Magdalena

    2017-11-01

    An explicit finite difference scheme is presented for the von Neumann equation for (2+1)D Dirac fermions. It is founded upon a staggered space-time grid which ensures a single-cone energy dispersion and performs the time-derivative in one sweep using a three-step leap-frog procedure. It enables a space-time-resolved numerical treatment of the mixed-state dynamics of Dirac fermions within the effective single-particle density matrix formalism. Energy-momentum dispersion, stability and convergence properties are derived. Elementary numerical tests to demonstrate stability properties use parameters which pertain to topological insulator surface states. A method for the simulation of charge injection from an electric contact is presented and tested numerically. Potential extensions of the scheme to a Dirac-Lindblad equation, real-space-time Green's function formulations, and higher-order finite-difference schemes are discussed.

  18. Numerical study of water diffusion in biological tissues using an improved finite difference method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Junzhong; Does, Mark D; Gore, John C

    2007-01-01

    An improved finite difference (FD) method has been developed in order to calculate the behaviour of the nuclear magnetic resonance signal variations caused by water diffusion in biological tissues more accurately and efficiently. The algorithm converts the conventional image-based finite difference method into a convenient matrix-based approach and includes a revised periodic boundary condition which eliminates the edge effects caused by artificial boundaries in conventional FD methods. Simulated results for some modelled tissues are consistent with analytical solutions for commonly used diffusion-weighted pulse sequences, whereas the improved FD method shows improved efficiency and accuracy. A tightly coupled parallel computing approach was also developed to implement the FD methods to enable large-scale simulations of realistic biological tissues. The potential applications of the improved FD method for understanding diffusion in tissues are also discussed. (note)

  19. Finite difference discretization of semiconductor drift-diffusion equations for nanowire solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinega, Alexei; John, Sajeev

    2012-10-01

    We introduce a finite difference discretization of semiconductor drift-diffusion equations using cylindrical partial waves. It can be applied to describe the photo-generated current in radial pn-junction nanowire solar cells. We demonstrate that the cylindrically symmetric (l=0) partial wave accurately describes the electronic response of a square lattice of silicon nanowires at normal incidence. We investigate the accuracy of our discretization scheme by using different mesh resolution along the radial direction r and compare with 3D (x, y, z) discretization. We consider both straight nanowires and nanowires with radius modulation along the vertical axis. The charge carrier generation profile inside each nanowire is calculated using an independent finite-difference time-domain simulation.

  20. Analysis for pressure transient of coalbed methane reservoir based on Laplace transform finite difference method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on fractal geometry, fractal medium of coalbed methane mathematical model is established by Langmuir isotherm adsorption formula, Fick's diffusion law, Laplace transform formula, considering the well bore storage effect and skin effect. The Laplace transform finite difference method is used to solve the mathematical model. With Stehfest numerical inversion, the distribution of dimensionless well bore flowing pressure and its derivative was obtained in real space. According to compare with the results from the analytical method, the result from Laplace transform finite difference method turns out to be accurate. The influence factors are analyzed, including fractal dimension, fractal index, skin factor, well bore storage coefficient, energy storage ratio, interporosity flow coefficient and the adsorption factor. The calculating error of Laplace transform difference method is small. Laplace transform difference method has advantages in well-test application since any moment simulation does not rely on other moment results and space grid.

  1. Convergence of finite differences schemes for viscous and inviscid conservation laws with rough coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsen, Kenneth Hvistendal; Risebro, Nils Henrik

    2000-09-01

    We consider the initial value problem for degenerate viscous and inviscid scalar conservation laws where the flux function depends on the spatial location through a ''rough'' coefficient function k(x). we show that the Engquist-Osher (and hence all monotone) finite difference approximations converge to the unique entropy solution of the governing equation if, among other demands, k' is in BV, thereby providing alternative (new) existence proofs for entropy solutions of degenerate convection-diffusion equations as well as new convergence results for their finite difference approximations. In the inviscid case, we also provide a rate of convergence. Our convergence proofs are based on deriving a series of a priori estimates and using a general L{sup p} compactness criterion. (author)

  2. On the Stability of the Finite Difference based Lattice Boltzmann Method

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    This paper is devoted to determining the stability conditions for the finite difference based lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM). In the current scheme, the 9-bit two-dimensional (D2Q9) model is used and the collision term of the Bhatnagar- Gross-Krook (BGK) is treated implicitly. The implicitness of the numerical scheme is removed by introducing a new distribution function different from that being used. Therefore, a new explicit finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method is obtained. Stability analysis of the resulted explicit scheme is done using Fourier expansion. Then, stability conditions in terms of time and spatial steps, relaxation time and explicitly-implicitly parameter are determined by calculating the eigenvalues of the given difference system. The determined conditions give the ranges of the parameters that have stable solutions.

  3. Iterative solvers in forming process simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Rietman, Bert; Huetink, Han

    1998-01-01

    The use of iterative solvers in implicit forming process simulations is studied. The time and memory requirements are compared with direct solvers and assessed in relation with the rest of the Newton-Raphson iteration process. It is shown that conjugate gradient{like solvers with a proper

  4. Stress Wave Propagation in Cracked Geological Solids Using Finite Difference Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakavas, P. A.; Kalapodis, N. A.

    The aim of this study is the numerical computation of the wave propagation in crack geological solids. The finite difference method was applied to solve the differential equations involved in the problem. Since the problem is symmetric, we prefer to use this technique instead of the finite element method and/or boundary elements technique. A comparison of the numerical results with analytical solutions is provided.

  5. Efficient finite difference solutions to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, P.L.; Chen, L.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The matrix elements of the exponential of a finite difference realization of the one-dimensional Laplacian are found exactly. This matrix is used to formulate an efficient algorithm for the numerical solution to the time-dependent quantum mechanical scattering of a single particle from a time-independent potential in one-space and one-time dimension. The method generalizes to high spatial dimensions, as well as to multiparticle problems. 8 refs

  6. Finite element, discontinuous Galerkin, and finite difference evolution schemes in spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumbusch, G

    2009-01-01

    Numerical schemes for Einstein's vacuum equation are developed. Einstein's equation in harmonic gauge is second-order symmetric hyperbolic. It is discretized in four-dimensional spacetime by finite differences, finite elements and interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin methods, the latter being related to Regge calculus. The schemes are split into space and time and new time-stepping schemes for wave equations are derived. The methods are evaluated for linear and nonlinear test problems of the Apples-with-Apples collection.

  7. TRUMP3-JR: a finite difference computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1984-02-01

    Computer program TRUMP3-JR is a revised version of TRUMP3 which is a finite difference computer program used for the solution of multi-dimensional nonlinear heat conduction problems. Pre- and post-processings for input data generation and graphical representations of calculation results of TRUMP3 are avaiable in TRUMP3-JR. The calculation equations, program descriptions and user's instruction are presented. A sample problem is described to demonstrate the use of the program. (author)

  8. Explicit finite difference predictor and convex corrector with applications to hyperbolic partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, C.; Dey, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    An explicit finite difference scheme consisting of a predictor and a corrector has been developed and applied to solve some hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDEs). The corrector is a convex-type function which is applied at each time level and at each mesh point. It consists of a parameter which may be estimated such that for larger time steps the algorithm should remain stable and generate a fast speed of convergence to the steady-state solution. Some examples have been given.

  9. The calculation of rectangular plates on elastic foundation the finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komlev, A. A.; Makeev, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    The article describes the main advantages and disadvantages existing in the present time of calculation methods for plates on elastic Foundation. Consider automation of the calculation of rectangular plates on elastic basis by finite difference method, on the basis of which received automatic design algorithms. Conducted research of discretization on the accuracy of the calculations. The comparison of the results of strain and effort obtained by the finite element method and the proposed method.

  10. Finite difference numerical methods for boundary control problems governed by hyperbolic partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Zheng, Q.; Coleman, M.; Weerakoon, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews convergent finite difference schemes for hyperbolic initial boundary value problems and their applications to boundary control systems of hyperbolic type which arise in the modelling of vibrations. These difference schemes are combined with the primal and the dual approaches to compute the optimal control in the unconstrained case, as well as the case when the control is subject to inequality constraints. Some of the preliminary numerical results are also presented.

  11. A nine-point finite difference scheme for one-dimensional wave equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyszka, Barbara

    2017-07-01

    The paper is devoted to an implicit finite difference method (FDM) for solving initial-boundary value problems (IBVP) for one-dimensional wave equation. The second-order derivatives in the wave equation have been approximated at the four intermediate points, as a consequence, an implicit nine-point difference scheme has been obtained. Von Neumann stability analysis has been conducted and we have demonstrated, that the presented difference scheme is unconditionally stable.

  12. Hexagonal vs. Rectilinear Grids for Explicit Finite Difference Schemes for the Two-dimensional Wave Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Brian; Bilbao, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Finite difference schemes for the 2-D wave equation operating on hexagonal grids and the accompanyingnumerical dispersion properties have received little attention in comparison to schemes operating on rectilinear grids. This paper considers the hexagonal tiling of the wavenumber plane in order to show that thehexagonal grid is a more natural choice to emulate the isotropy of the Laplacian operator and the wave equation. Performance of the 7-point scheme on a hexagonal grid is better than pre...

  13. Collocation and finite difference-collocation methods for the solution of nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakestani, Mehrdad; Dehghan, Mehdi

    2010-08-01

    Two numerical techniques based on the finite difference and collocation methods are presented for the solution of nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation. The operational matrix of derivative for the cubic B-spline scaling functions is presented and is utilized to reduce the solution of nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation to the solution of algebraic equations. Illustrative examples are included to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the new techniques.

  14. A nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpusik, Adam

    2017-02-01

    We present a nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection. The main advantage of this approach is that it preserves the essential qualitative features of the original continuous model (non-negativity and boundedness of the solution, equilibria and their stability conditions), while being easy to implement. All of the qualitative features are preserved independently of the chosen step-size. Numerical simulations of our approach and comparison with other conventional simulation methods are presented.

  15. ANALYSIS OF NON-CIRCULAR MEMBERS SUBJECTED TO TWISTING LOADS: A FINITE DIFFERENCE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Goteti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many torque carrying members have circular sections such as shafts. However, there are certain structural members like automotive chassis frames, cross members and machine frames which are often subjected to twisting loads and their cross sections are non circular. several methods were developed to analyze such sections such as Saint Venant’s semi inverse method, Prandtl’s elastic membrane analogy...etc. In this paper, the second order partial differential stress function equation for non-circular torsional members is applied on a rectangular section for different b/h (height /width of section values and the solutions for maximum torsional shear stress are found by employing second order finite difference method. The results are compared to the results obtained from commercial finite element software (ANSYS 10 and by direct solution of the stress function equation using analytical correlations available for rectangular sections. The results obtained by different approaches are in close congruence with a percentage deviation of only 3.22. It is observed that, in implementing second order finite difference scheme, the error in estimating stress is proportional to S2. Where “S” is the grid size.   Keywords: Non-Circular Section, Prandtl’s stress function, Finite difference scheme, Grid size

  16. Rotational degree-of-freedom synthesis: An optimised finite difference method for non-exact data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, T. J.; Öztürk, E.; Sims, N. D.

    2018-01-01

    Measuring the rotational dynamic behaviour of a structure is important for many areas of dynamics such as passive vibration control, acoustics, and model updating. Specialist and dedicated equipment is often needed, unless the rotational degree-of-freedom is synthesised based upon translational data. However, this involves numerically differentiating the translational mode shapes to approximate the rotational modes, for example using a finite difference algorithm. A key challenge with this approach is choosing the measurement spacing between the data points, an issue which has often been overlooked in the published literature. The present contribution will for the first time prove that the use of a finite difference approach can be unstable when using non-exact measured data and a small measurement spacing, for beam-like structures. Then, a generalised analytical error analysis is used to propose an optimised measurement spacing, which balances the numerical error of the finite difference equation with the propagation error from the perturbed data. The approach is demonstrated using both numerical and experimental investigations. It is shown that by obtaining a small number of test measurements it is possible to optimise the measurement accuracy, without any further assumptions on the boundary conditions of the structure.

  17. Broadband ground motion simulation using a paralleled hybrid approach of Frequency Wavenumber and Finite Difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Wei, S.

    2016-12-01

    The serious damage of Mexico City caused by the 1985 Michoacan earthquake 400 km away indicates that urban areas may be affected by remote earthquakes. To asses earthquake risk of urban areas imposed by distant earthquakes, we developed a hybrid Frequency Wavenumber (FK) and Finite Difference (FD) code implemented with MPI, since the computation of seismic wave propagation from a distant earthquake using a single numerical method (e.g. Finite Difference, Finite Element or Spectral Element) is very expensive. In our approach, we compute the incident wave field (ud) at the boundaries of the excitation box, which surrounding the local structure, using a paralleled FK method (Zhu and Rivera, 2002), and compute the total wave field (u) within the excitation box using a parallelled 2D FD method. We apply perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing condition to the diffracted wave field (u-ud). Compared to previous Generalized Ray Theory and Finite Difference (Wen and Helmberger, 1998), Frequency Wavenumber and Spectral Element (Tong et al., 2014), and Direct Solution Method and Spectral Element hybrid method (Monteiller et al., 2013), our absorbing boundary condition dramatically suppress the numerical noise. The MPI implementation of our method can greatly speed up the calculation. Besides, our hybrid method also has a potential use in high resolution array imaging similar to Tong et al. (2014).

  18. Direct Calculation of Permeability by High-Accurate Finite Difference and Numerical Integration Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yi

    2016-07-21

    Velocity of fluid flow in underground porous media is 6~12 orders of magnitudes lower than that in pipelines. If numerical errors are not carefully controlled in this kind of simulations, high distortion of the final results may occur [1-4]. To fit the high accuracy demands of fluid flow simulations in porous media, traditional finite difference methods and numerical integration methods are discussed and corresponding high-accurate methods are developed. When applied to the direct calculation of full-tensor permeability for underground flow, the high-accurate finite difference method is confirmed to have numerical error as low as 10-5% while the high-accurate numerical integration method has numerical error around 0%. Thus, the approach combining the high-accurate finite difference and numerical integration methods is a reliable way to efficiently determine the characteristics of general full-tensor permeability such as maximum and minimum permeability components, principal direction and anisotropic ratio. Copyright © Global-Science Press 2016.

  19. Enhanced finite difference scheme for the neutron diffusion equation using the importance function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagheian, Mehran; Vosoughi, Naser; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An enhanced finite difference scheme for the neutron diffusion equation is proposed. • A seven-step algorithm is considered based on the importance function. • Mesh points are distributed through entire reactor core with respect to the importance function. • The results all proved that the proposed algorithm is highly efficient. - Abstract: Mesh point positions in Finite Difference Method (FDM) of discretization for the neutron diffusion equation can remarkably affect the averaged neutron fluxes as well as the effective multiplication factor. In this study, by aid of improving the mesh point positions, an enhanced finite difference scheme for the neutron diffusion equation is proposed based on the neutron importance function. In order to determine the neutron importance function, the adjoint (backward) neutron diffusion calculations are performed in the same procedure as for the forward calculations. Considering the neutron importance function, the mesh points can be improved through the entire reactor core. Accordingly, in regions with greater neutron importance, density of mesh elements is higher than that in regions with less importance. The forward calculations are then performed for both of the uniform and improved non-uniform mesh point distributions and the results (the neutron fluxes along with the corresponding eigenvalues) for the two cases are compared with each other. The results are benchmarked against the reference values (with fine meshes) for Kang and Rod Bundle BWR benchmark problems. These benchmark cases revealed that the improved non-uniform mesh point distribution is highly efficient.

  20. Modeling and Simulation of Hamburger Cooking Process Using Finite Difference and CFD Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sargolzaei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsteady-state heat transfer in hamburger cooking process was modeled using one dimensional finite difference (FD and three dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD models. A double-sided cooking system was designed to study the effect of pressure and oven temperature on the cooking process. Three different oven temperatures (114, 152, 204°C and three different pressures (20, 332, 570 pa were selected and 9 experiments were performed. Applying pressure to hamburger increases the contact area of hamburger with heating plate and hence the heat transfer rate to the hamburger was increased and caused the weight loss due to water evaporation and decreasing cooking time, while increasing oven temperature led to increasing weight loss and decreasing cooking time. CFD predicted results were in good agreement with the experimental results than the finite difference (FD ones. But considering the long time needed for CFD model to simulate the cooking process (about 1 hour, using the finite difference model would be more economic.

  1. Convergence Property of Response Matrix Method for Various Finite-Difference Formulations Used in the Nonlinear Acceleration Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio

    2005-01-01

    Convergence properties were investigated for the response matrix method with various finite-difference formulations that can be utilized in the nonlinear acceleration method. The nonlinear acceleration method is commonly used for the diffusion calculation with the advanced nodal method or the transport calculation with the method of characteristics. Efficiency of the nonlinear acceleration method depends on convergences on two different levels, i.e., those of the finite-difference calculation and the correction factor. This paper focuses on the former topic, i.e., the convergence property of finite-difference calculations using the response matrix method. Though various finite-difference formulations can be used in the nonlinear acceleration method, systematic analysis of the convergence property for the finite-difference calculation has not been carried out so far. The spectral radius of iteration matrixes was estimated for the various finite-difference calculations assuming the response matrix method with the red-black sweep. From the calculation results, numerical stability of the various finite-difference formulations was clarified, and a favorable form of the finite-difference formulation for the nonlinear iteration was recommended. The result of this paper will be useful for implementation of the nonlinear acceleration scheme with the response matrix method

  2. Analysis of transient plasmonic interactions using an MOT-PMCHWT integral equation solver

    KAUST Repository

    Uysal, Ismail Enes

    2014-07-01

    Device design involving metals and dielectrics at nano-scales and optical frequencies calls for simulation tools capable of analyzing plasmonic interactions. To this end finite difference time domain (FDTD) and finite element methods have been used extensively. Since these methods require volumetric meshes, the discretization size should be very small to accurately resolve fast-decaying fields in the vicinity of metal/dielectric interfaces. This can be avoided using integral equation (IE) techniques that discretize only on the interfaces. Additionally, IE solvers implicitly enforce the radiation condition and consequently do not need (approximate) absorbing boundary conditions. Despite these advantages, IE solvers, especially in time domain, have not been used for analyzing plasmonic interactions.

  3. Numerical simulation of temperature distribution using finite difference equations and estimation of the grain size during friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, H.S.; Singh, H.; Dhindaw, B.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Magnesium alloy AE42 was friction stir processed under different cooling conditions. ► Heat flow model was developed using finite difference heat equations. ► Generalized MATLAB code was developed for solving heat flow model. ► Regression equation for estimation of grain size was developed. - Abstract: The present investigation is aimed at developing a heat flow model to simulate temperature history during friction stir processing (FSP). A new approach of developing implicit form of finite difference heat equations solved using MATLAB code was used. A magnesium based alloy AE42 was friction stir processed (FSPed) at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions. Temperature history was continuously recorded in the nugget zone during FSP using data acquisition system and k type thermocouples. The developed code was validated at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions during FSP experimentation. The temperature history at different locations in the nugget zone at different instants of time was further utilized for the estimation of grain growth rate and final average grain size of the FSPed specimen. A regression equation relating the final grain size, maximum temperature during FSP and the cooling rate was developed. The metallurgical characterization was done using optical microscopy, SEM, and FIB-SIM analysis. The simulated temperature profiles and final average grain size were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The presence of fine precipitate particles generated in situ in the investigated magnesium alloy also contributed in the evolution of fine grain structure through Zener pining effect at the grain boundaries.

  4. Finite difference applied to the reconstruction method of the nuclear power density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessoa, Paulo O.; Silva, Fernando C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A method for reconstruction of the power density distribution is presented. • The method uses discretization by finite differences of 2D neutrons diffusion equation. • The discretization is performed homogeneous meshes with dimensions of a fuel cell. • The discretization is combined with flux distributions on the four node surfaces. • The maximum errors in reconstruction occur in the peripheral water region. - Abstract: In this reconstruction method the two-dimensional (2D) neutron diffusion equation is discretized by finite differences, employed to two energy groups (2G) and meshes with fuel-pin cell dimensions. The Nodal Expansion Method (NEM) makes use of surface discontinuity factors of the node and provides for reconstruction method the effective multiplication factor of the problem and the four surface average fluxes in homogeneous nodes with size of a fuel assembly (FA). The reconstruction process combines the discretized 2D diffusion equation by finite differences with fluxes distribution on four surfaces of the nodes. These distributions are obtained for each surfaces from a fourth order one-dimensional (1D) polynomial expansion with five coefficients to be determined. The conditions necessary for coefficients determination are three average fluxes on consecutive surfaces of the three nodes and two fluxes in corners between these three surface fluxes. Corner fluxes of the node are determined using a third order 1D polynomial expansion with four coefficients. This reconstruction method uses heterogeneous nuclear parameters directly providing the heterogeneous neutron flux distribution and the detailed nuclear power density distribution within the FAs. The results obtained with this method has good accuracy and efficiency when compared with reference values.

  5. An outgoing energy flux boundary condition for finite difference ICRP antenna models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Carter, M.D.

    1992-11-01

    For antennas at the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) modeling in vacuum can now be carried out to a high level of detail such that shaping of the current straps, isolating septa, and discrete Faraday shield structures can be included. An efficient approach would be to solve for the fields in the vacuum region near the antenna in three dimensions by finite methods and to match this solution at the plasma-vacuum interface to a solution obtained in the plasma region in one dimension by Fourier methods. This approach has been difficult to carry out because boundary conditions must be imposed at the edge of the finite difference grid on a point-by-point basis, whereas the condition for outgoing energy flux into the plasma is known only in terms of the Fourier transform of the plasma fields. A technique is presented by which a boundary condition can be imposed on the computational grid of a three-dimensional finite difference, or finite element, code by constraining the discrete Fourier transform of the fields at the boundary points to satisfy an outgoing energy flux condition appropriate for the plasma. The boundary condition at a specific grid point appears as a coupling to other grid points on the boundary, with weighting determined by a kemel calctdated from the plasma surface impedance matrix for the various plasma Fourier modes. This boundary condition has been implemented in a finite difference solution of a simple problem in two dimensions, which can also be solved directly by Fourier transformation. Results are presented, and it is shown that the proposed boundary condition does enforce outgoing energy flux and yields the same solution as is obtained by Fourier methods.

  6. A multilevel in space and energy solver for multigroup diffusion eigenvalue problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben C. Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new multilevel in space and energy diffusion (MSED method for solving multigroup diffusion eigenvalue problems. The MSED method can be described as a PI scheme with three additional features: (1 a grey (one-group diffusion equation used to efficiently converge the fission source and eigenvalue, (2 a space-dependent Wielandt shift technique used to reduce the number of PIs required, and (3 a multigrid-in-space linear solver for the linear solves required by each PI step. In MSED, the convergence of the solution of the multigroup diffusion eigenvalue problem is accelerated by performing work on lower-order equations with only one group and/or coarser spatial grids. Results from several Fourier analyses and a one-dimensional test code are provided to verify the efficiency of the MSED method and to justify the incorporation of the grey diffusion equation and the multigrid linear solver. These results highlight the potential efficiency of the MSED method as a solver for multidimensional multigroup diffusion eigenvalue problems, and they serve as a proof of principle for future work. Our ultimate goal is to implement the MSED method as an efficient solver for the two-dimensional/three-dimensional coarse mesh finite difference diffusion system in the Michigan parallel characteristics transport code. The work in this paper represents a necessary step towards that goal.

  7. High-order Finite Difference Solution of Euler Equations for Nonlinear Water Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben Robert Bilgrav; Bingham, Harry B.; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2012-01-01

    The incompressible Euler equations are solved with a free surface, the position of which is captured by applying an Eulerian kinematic boundary condition. The solution strategy follows that of [1, 2], applying a coordinate-transformation to obtain a time-constant spatial computational domain which...... with a two-dimensional implementation of the model are compared with highly accurate stream function solutions to the nonlinear wave problem, which show the approximately expected convergence rates and a clear advantage of using high-order finite difference schemes in combination with the Euler equations....

  8. An improved finite-difference beam propagation method and its application in arrayed waveguide grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Liu, De-ming; Wu, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Finite-Difference Beam Propagation Method (FD-BPM) in conventional is modified, according to more accurate Helmholtz equation, a new arithmetic is advanced. By using the new arithmetic and the old arithmetic in calculating slab waveguide and calculate the parameter which scales the precision of the method and the calculating time, we prove that the accuracy of the new arithmetic is improved without affecting time performance. At last we calculate the transmission mode in the AWG by the new method to show the practical value of the modified arithmetic.

  9. A finite difference treatment of differential equation systems with widely differing time constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, G.R.; Gamble, M.T.

    1983-01-01

    A consistent method of solving systems of coupled time-dependent differential equations with vastly divergent time constants has been developed. This method is directly applicable to finite difference techniques of solutions using matrix algebra. Application to systems of isotope burnup and buildup equations with time constants ranging from minutes to millions of years demonstrates the utility of the method. Similarity to the prompt jump method of reactor kinetics indicates applicability to a wider range of positive as well as negative time constant systems

  10. High-order finite difference solution for 3D nonlinear wave-structure interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducrozet, Guillaume; Bingham, Harry B.; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2010-01-01

    This contribution presents our recent progress on developing an efficient fully-nonlinear potential flow model for simulating 3D wave-wave and wave-structure interaction over arbitrary depths (i.e. in coastal and offshore environment). The model is based on a high-order finite difference scheme...... OceanWave3D presented in [1, 2]. A nonlinear decomposition of the solution into incident and scattered fields is used to increase the efficiency of the wave-structure interaction problem resolution. Application of the method to the diffraction of nonlinear waves around a fixed, bottom mounted circular...

  11. Finite difference schemes for a nonlinear black-scholes model with transaction cost and volatility risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mashayekhi, Sima; Hugger, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Several nonlinear Black-Scholes models have been proposed to take transaction cost, large investor performance and illiquid markets into account. One of the most comprehensive models introduced by Barles and Soner in [4] considers transaction cost in the hedging strategy and risk from an illiquid...... market. In this paper, we compare several finite difference methods for the solution of this model with respect to precision and order of convergence within a computationally feasible domain allowing at most 200 space steps and 10000 time steps. We conclude that standard explicit Euler comes out...

  12. A multigrid algorithm for the cell-centered finite difference scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Richard E.; Shen, Jian

    1993-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a non-variational V-cycle multigrid algorithm based on the cell-centered finite difference scheme for solving a second-order elliptic problem with discontinuous coefficients. Due to the poor approximation property of piecewise constant spaces and the non-variational nature of our scheme, one step of symmetric linear smoothing in our V-cycle multigrid scheme may fail to be a contraction. Again, because of the simple structure of the piecewise constant spaces, prolongation and restriction are trivial; we save significant computation time with very promising computational results.

  13. Accuracy of spectral and finite difference schemes in 2D advection problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the accuracy of two numerical procedures commonly used to solve 2D advection problems: spectral and finite difference (FD) schemes. These schemes are widely used, simulating, e.g., neutral and plasma flows. FD schemes have long been considered fast, relatively easy...... that the accuracy of FD schemes can be significantly improved if one is careful in choosing an appropriate FD scheme that reflects conservation properties of the nonlinear terms and in setting up the grid in accordance with the problem....

  14. The finite-difference and finite-element modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moczo, P.; Kristek, J.; Pazak, P.; Balazovjech, M.; Moczo, P.; Kristek, J.; Galis, M.

    2007-01-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion is an irreplaceable tool in investigation of the Earth's structure, processes in the Earth, and particularly earthquake phenomena. Among various numerical methods, the finite-difference method is the dominant method in the modeling of earthquake motion. Moreover, it is becoming more important in the seismic exploration and structural modeling. At the same time we are convinced that the best time of the finite-difference method in seismology is in the future. This monograph provides tutorial and detailed introduction to the application of the finite difference (FD), finite-element (FE), and hybrid FD-FE methods to the modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion. The text does not cover all topics and aspects of the methods. We focus on those to which we have contributed. We present alternative formulations of equation of motion for a smooth elastic continuum. We then develop alternative formulations for a canonical problem with a welded material interface and free surface. We continue with a model of an earthquake source. We complete the general theoretical introduction by a chapter on the constitutive laws for elastic and viscoelastic media, and brief review of strong formulations of the equation of motion. What follows is a block of chapters on the finite-difference and finite-element methods. We develop FD targets for the free surface and welded material interface. We then present various FD schemes for a smooth continuum, free surface, and welded interface. We focus on the staggered-grid and mainly optimally-accurate FD schemes. We also present alternative formulations of the FE method. We include the FD and FE implementations of the traction-at-split-nodes method for simulation of dynamic rupture propagation. The FD modeling is applied to the model of the deep sedimentary Grenoble basin, France. The FD and FE methods are combined in the hybrid FD-FE method. The hybrid

  15. Scattering analysis of periodic structures using finite-difference time-domain

    CERN Document Server

    ElMahgoub, Khaled; Elsherbeni, Atef Z

    2012-01-01

    Periodic structures are of great importance in electromagnetics due to their wide range of applications such as frequency selective surfaces (FSS), electromagnetic band gap (EBG) structures, periodic absorbers, meta-materials, and many others. The aim of this book is to develop efficient computational algorithms to analyze the scattering properties of various electromagnetic periodic structures using the finite-difference time-domain periodic boundary condition (FDTD/PBC) method. A new FDTD/PBC-based algorithm is introduced to analyze general skewed grid periodic structures while another algor

  16. Implicit finite difference solution for time-fractional diffusion equations using AOR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunarto, A; Sulaiman, J; Saudi, A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we derive an implicit finite difference approximation equation of the one-dimensional linear time fractional diffusion equations, based on the Caputo's time fractional derivative. Then this approximation equation leads the corresponding system of linear equation, which is large scale and sparse. Due to the characteristics of the coefficient matrix, we use the Accelerated Over-Relaxation (AOR) iterative method for solving the generated linear system. One example of the problem is presented to illustrate the effectiveness of AOR method. The numerical results of this study show that the proposed iterative method is superior compared with the existing one weighted parameter iterative method.

  17. Finite Difference Time-Domain Modelling of Metamaterials: GPU Implementation of Cylindrical Cloak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dawood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Finite difference time-domain (FDTD technique can be used to model metamaterials by treating them as dispersive material. Drude or Lorentz model can be incorporated into the standard FDTD algorithm for modelling negative permittivity and permeability. FDTD algorithm is readily parallelisable and can take advantage of GPU acceleration to achieve speed-ups of 5x-50x depending on hardware setup. Metamaterial scattering problems are implemented using dispersive FDTD technique on GPU resulting in performance gain of 10x-15x compared to conventional CPU implementation.

  18. A finite-difference method for the variable coefficient Poisson equation on hierarchical Cartesian meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeli, Alice; Bergmann, Michel; Iollo, Angelo

    2018-02-01

    We consider problems governed by a linear elliptic equation with varying coefficients across internal interfaces. The solution and its normal derivative can undergo significant variations through these internal boundaries. We present a compact finite-difference scheme on a tree-based adaptive grid that can be efficiently solved using a natively parallel data structure. The main idea is to optimize the truncation error of the discretization scheme as a function of the local grid configuration to achieve second-order accuracy. Numerical illustrations are presented in two and three-dimensional configurations.

  19. Finite difference approximations for measure-valued solutions of a hierarchically size-structured population model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackleh, Azmy S; Chellamuthu, Vinodh K; Ito, Kazufumi

    2015-04-01

    We study a quasilinear hierarchically size-structured population model presented in [4]. In this model the growth, mortality and reproduction rates are assumed to depend on a function of the population density. In [4] we showed that solutions to this model can become singular (measure-valued) in finite time even if all the individual parameters are smooth. Therefore, in this paper we develop a first order finite difference scheme to compute these measure-valued solutions. Convergence analysis for this method is provided. We also develop a high resolution second order scheme to compute the measure-valued solution of the model and perform a comparative study between the two schemes.

  20. A finite difference method for space fractional differential equations with variable diffusivity coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Mustapha, K.

    2017-06-03

    Anomalous diffusion is a phenomenon that cannot be modeled accurately by second-order diffusion equations, but is better described by fractional diffusion models. The nonlocal nature of the fractional diffusion operators makes substantially more difficult the mathematical analysis of these models and the establishment of suitable numerical schemes. This paper proposes and analyzes the first finite difference method for solving {\\\\em variable-coefficient} fractional differential equations, with two-sided fractional derivatives, in one-dimensional space. The proposed scheme combines first-order forward and backward Euler methods for approximating the left-sided fractional derivative when the right-sided fractional derivative is approximated by two consecutive applications of the first-order backward Euler method. Our finite difference scheme reduces to the standard second-order central difference scheme in the absence of fractional derivatives. The existence and uniqueness of the solution for the proposed scheme are proved, and truncation errors of order $h$ are demonstrated, where $h$ denotes the maximum space step size. The numerical tests illustrate the global $O(h)$ accuracy of our scheme, except for nonsmooth cases which, as expected, have deteriorated convergence rates.

  1. A coarse-mesh nodal method-diffusive-mesh finite difference method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, H.; Nichols, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    Modern nodal methods have been successfully used for conventional light water reactor core analyses where the homogenized, node average cross sections (XSs) and the flux discontinuity factors (DFs) based on equivalence theory can reliably predict core behavior. For other types of cores and other geometries characterized by tightly-coupled, heterogeneous core configurations, the intranodal flux shapes obtained from a homogenized nodal problem may not accurately portray steep flux gradients near fuel assembly interfaces or various reactivity control elements. This may require extreme values of DFs (either very large, very small, or even negative) to achieve a desired solution accuracy. Extreme values of DFs, however, can disrupt the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node average fluxes, and can lead to a difficulty in interpolating adjacent DF values. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made, but nothing has been satisfactory. A new coarse-mesh nodal scheme called the Diffusive-Mesh Finite Difference (DMFD) technique, as contrasted with the coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) technique, has been developed to resolve this problem. This new technique and the development of a few-group, multidimensional kinetics computer program are described in this paper

  2. A fast referenceless PRFS-based MR thermometry by phase finite difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chao; Shen, Huan; He, Mengyue; Tie, Changjun; Chung, Yiu-Cho; Liu, Xin

    2013-08-21

    Proton resonance frequency shift-based MR thermometry is a promising temperature monitoring approach for thermotherapy but its accuracy is vulnerable to inter-scan motion. Model-based referenceless thermometry has been proposed to address this problem but phase unwrapping is usually needed before the model fitting process. In this paper, a referenceless MR thermometry method using phase finite difference that avoids the time consuming phase unwrapping procedure is proposed. Unlike the previously proposed phase gradient technique, the use of finite difference in the new method reduces the fitting error resulting from the ringing artifacts associated with phase discontinuity in the calculation of the phase gradient image. The new method takes into account the values at the perimeter of the region of interest because of their direct relevance to the extrapolated baseline phase of the region of interest (where temperature increase takes place). In simulation study, in vivo and ex vivo experiments, the new method has a root-mean-square temperature error of 0.35 °C, 1.02 °C and 1.73 °C compared to 0.83 °C, 2.81 °C, and 3.76 °C from the phase gradient method, respectively. The method also demonstrated a slightly higher, albeit small, temperature accuracy than the original referenceless MR thermometry method. The proposed method is computationally efficient (~0.1 s per image), making it very suitable for the real time temperature monitoring.

  3. Polarization effects on spectra of spherical core/shell nanostructures: Perturbation theory against finite difference approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibral, Asmaa; Zouitine, Asmaa; Assaid, El Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Poisson equation is solved analytically in the case of a point charge placed anywhere in a spherical core/shell nanostructure, immersed in aqueous or organic solution or embedded in semiconducting or insulating matrix. Conduction and valence band-edge alignments between core and shell are described by finite height barriers. Influence of polarization charges induced at the surfaces where two adjacent materials meet is taken into account. Original expressions of electrostatic potential created everywhere in the space by a source point charge are derived. Expressions of self-polarization potential describing the interaction of a point charge with its own image–charge are deduced. Contributions of double dielectric constant mismatch to electron and hole ground state energies as well as nanostructure effective gap are calculated via first order perturbation theory and also by finite difference approach. Dependencies of electron, hole and gap energies against core to shell radii ratio are determined in the case of ZnS/CdSe core/shell nanostructure immersed in water or in toluene. It appears that finite difference approach is more efficient than first order perturbation method and that the effect of polarization charge may in no case be neglected as its contribution can reach a significant proportion of the value of nanostructure gap

  4. A Proposed Stochastic Finite Difference Approach Based on Homogenous Chaos Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. H. Galal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a stochastic finite difference approach, based on homogenous chaos expansion (SFDHC. The said approach can handle time dependent nonlinear as well as linear systems with deterministic or stochastic initial and boundary conditions. In this approach, included stochastic parameters are modeled as second-order stochastic processes and are expanded using Karhunen-Loève expansion, while the response function is approximated using homogenous chaos expansion. Galerkin projection is used in converting the original stochastic partial differential equation (PDE into a set of coupled deterministic partial differential equations and then solved using finite difference method. Two well-known equations were used for efficiency validation of the method proposed. First one being the linear diffusion equation with stochastic parameter and the second is the nonlinear Burger's equation with stochastic parameter and stochastic initial and boundary conditions. In both of these examples, the probability distribution function of the response manifested close conformity to the results obtained from Monte Carlo simulation with optimized computational cost.

  5. A fast referenceless PRFS-based MR thermometry by phase finite difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chao; Shen, Huan; He, Mengyue; Tie, Changjun; Chung, Yiu-Cho; Liu, Xin

    2013-08-01

    Proton resonance frequency shift-based MR thermometry is a promising temperature monitoring approach for thermotherapy but its accuracy is vulnerable to inter-scan motion. Model-based referenceless thermometry has been proposed to address this problem but phase unwrapping is usually needed before the model fitting process. In this paper, a referenceless MR thermometry method using phase finite difference that avoids the time consuming phase unwrapping procedure is proposed. Unlike the previously proposed phase gradient technique, the use of finite difference in the new method reduces the fitting error resulting from the ringing artifacts associated with phase discontinuity in the calculation of the phase gradient image. The new method takes into account the values at the perimeter of the region of interest because of their direct relevance to the extrapolated baseline phase of the region of interest (where temperature increase takes place). In simulation study, in vivo and ex vivo experiments, the new method has a root-mean-square temperature error of 0.35 °C, 1.02 °C and 1.73 °C compared to 0.83 °C, 2.81 °C, and 3.76 °C from the phase gradient method, respectively. The method also demonstrated a slightly higher, albeit small, temperature accuracy than the original referenceless MR thermometry method. The proposed method is computationally efficient (∼0.1 s per image), making it very suitable for the real time temperature monitoring.

  6. A least squares principle unifying finite element, finite difference and nodal methods for diffusion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackroyd, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    A least squares principle is described which uses a penalty function treatment of boundary and interface conditions. Appropriate choices of the trial functions and vectors employed in a dual representation of an approximate solution established complementary principles for the diffusion equation. A geometrical interpretation of the principles provides weighted residual methods for diffusion theory, thus establishing a unification of least squares, variational and weighted residual methods. The complementary principles are used with either a trial function for the flux or a trial vector for the current to establish for regular meshes a connection between finite element, finite difference and nodal methods, which can be exact if the mesh pitches are chosen appropriately. Whereas the coefficients in the usual nodal equations have to be determined iteratively, those derived via the complementary principles are given explicitly in terms of the data. For the further development of the connection between finite element, finite difference and nodal methods, some hybrid variational methods are described which employ both a trial function and a trial vector. (author)

  7. High-order asynchrony-tolerant finite difference schemes for partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, Konduri; Donzis, Diego A.

    2017-12-01

    Synchronizations of processing elements (PEs) in massively parallel simulations, which arise due to communication or load imbalances between PEs, significantly affect the scalability of scientific applications. We have recently proposed a method based on finite-difference schemes to solve partial differential equations in an asynchronous fashion - synchronization between PEs is relaxed at a mathematical level. While standard schemes can maintain their stability in the presence of asynchrony, their accuracy is drastically affected. In this work, we present a general methodology to derive asynchrony-tolerant (AT) finite difference schemes of arbitrary order of accuracy, which can maintain their accuracy when synchronizations are relaxed. We show that there are several choices available in selecting a stencil to derive these schemes and discuss their effect on numerical and computational performance. We provide a simple classification of schemes based on the stencil and derive schemes that are representative of different classes. Their numerical error is rigorously analyzed within a statistical framework to obtain the overall accuracy of the solution. Results from numerical experiments are used to validate the performance of the schemes.

  8. Investigation of finite difference recession computation techniques applied to a nonlinear recession problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, J D

    1978-03-01

    This report presents comparisons of results of five implicit and explicit finite difference recession computation techniques with results from a more accurate ''benchmark'' solution applied to a simple one-dimensional nonlinear ablation problem. In the comparison problem a semi-infinite solid is subjected to a constant heat flux at its surface and the rate of recession is controlled by the solid material's latent heat of fusion. All thermal properties are assumed constant. The five finite difference methods include three front node dropping schemes, a back node dropping scheme, and a method in which the ablation problem is embedded in an inverse heat conduction problem and no nodes are dropped. Constancy of thermal properties and the semiinfinite and one-dimensional nature of the problem at hand are not necessary assumptions in applying the methods studied to more general problems. The best of the methods studied will be incorporated into APL's Standard Heat Transfer Program.

  9. Numerically stable finite difference simulation for ultrasonic NDE in anisotropic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Quintanilla, Francisco Hernando; Cole, Christina M.

    2018-04-01

    Simulation tools can enable optimized inspection of advanced materials and complex geometry structures. Recent work at NASA Langley is focused on the development of custom simulation tools for modeling ultrasonic wave behavior in composite materials. Prior work focused on the use of a standard staggered grid finite difference type of mathematical approach, by implementing a three-dimensional (3D) anisotropic Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (EFIT) code. However, observations showed that the anisotropic EFIT method displays numerically unstable behavior at the locations of stress-free boundaries for some cases of anisotropic materials. This paper gives examples of the numerical instabilities observed for EFIT and discusses the source of instability. As an alternative to EFIT, the 3D Lebedev Finite Difference (LFD) method has been implemented. The paper briefly describes the LFD approach and shows examples of stable behavior in the presence of stress-free boundaries for a monoclinic anisotropy case. The LFD results are also compared to experimental results and dispersion curves.

  10. PROPAGATION-BASED CONSTRAINT SOLVER IN IMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Ol. Blynov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Article compiling the main ideas of creating propagation-based constraint solver, theoretical basis of constraint programming and its implementation in IMS (Insertion Modeling System

  11. A hybrid finite difference and integral equation method for modeling and inversion of marine CSEM data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Daeung; Zhdanov, Michael; Cai, Hongzhu

    2015-01-01

    One of the major problems in the modeling and inversion of marine controlled source electromagnetic (MCSEM) data is related to the need for accurate representation of very complex geoelectrical models typical for marine environment. At the same time, the corresponding forward modeling algorithms...... should be powerful and fast enough to be suitable for repeated use in hundreds of iterations of the inversion and for multiple transmitter/receiver positions. To this end, we have developed a novel 3D modeling and inversion approach, which combines the advantages of the finite difference (FD......) and integral equation (IE) methods. In the framework of this approach, we solve the Maxwell's equations for anomalous electric fields using the FD approximation on a staggered grid. Once the unknown electric fields in the computation domain of the FD method are computed, the electric and magnetic fields...

  12. An unsteady finite-difference scheme for 3-D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Byeong R.; Ikohagi, Toshiaki; Daiguji, Hisaaki

    An implicit finite-difference SMAC scheme is developed for solving unsteady 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. The time-dependent momentum equations of contravariant velocity components are solved by the approximate-factorization method and the Newton iterative method. Alternatively, an elliptic equation in pressure derived by decoupling the continuity equation from the momentum equations is solved by the Chebyshev SLOR method using a staggered mesh system. An unsteady 3D duct flow over a backward-facing step is computed and presented at a high Reynolds number. The present scheme is found to be robust on supercomputing for the unsteady flow simulation of long time runs.

  13. CASKETSS-HEAT: a finite difference computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1988-12-01

    A heat conduction program CASKETSS-HEAT has been developed. CASKETSS-HEAT is a finite difference computer program used for the solution of multi-dimensional nonlinear heat conduction problems. Main features of CASKETSS-HEAT are as follows. (1) One, two and three-dimensional geometries for heat conduction calculation are available. (2) Convection and radiation heat transfer of boundry can be specified. (3) Phase change and chemical change can be treated. (4) Finned surface heat transfer can be treated easily. (5) Data memory allocation in the program is variable according to problem size. (6) The program is a compatible heat transfer analysis program to the stress analysis program SAP4 and SAP5. (7) Pre- and post-processing for input data generation and graphic representation of calculation results are available. In the paper, brief illustration of calculation method, input data and sample calculation are presented. (author)

  14. An energy-stable finite-difference scheme for the binary fluid-surfactant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuting; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhengru

    2014-08-01

    We present an unconditionally energy stable finite-difference scheme for the binary fluid-surfactant system. The proposed method is based on the convex splitting of the energy functional with two variables. Here are two distinct features: (i) the convex splitting energy method is applied to energy functional with two variables, and (ii) the stability issue is related to the decay of the corresponding energy. The full discrete scheme leads to a decoupled system including a linear sub-system and a nonlinear sub-system. Algebraic multigrid and Newton-multigrid methods are adopted to solve the linear and nonlinear systems, respectively. Numerical experiments are shown to verify the stability of such a scheme.

  15. High-order Finite Difference Solution of Euler Equations for Nonlinear Water Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben Robert Bilgrav; Bingham, Harry B.; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2012-01-01

    implicitly, at the end of each time stage, by constructing the pressure from a discrete Poisson equation, derived from the discrete continuity and momentum equations and taking the time-dependent physical domain into account. An efficient preconditionedDefect Correction (DC) solution of the discrete Poisson......The incompressible Euler equations are solved with a free surface, the position of which is captured by applying an Eulerian kinematic boundary condition. The solution strategy follows that of [1, 2], applying a coordinate-transformation to obtain a time-constant spatial computational domain which...... is discretized using arbitrary-order finite difference schemes on a staggered grid with one optional stretching in each coordinate direction. The momentum equations and kinematic free surface condition are integrated in time using the classic fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme. Mass conservation is satisfied...

  16. Five-point form of the nodal diffusion method and comparison with finite-difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Nodal Methods have been derived, implemented and numerically tested for several problems in physics and engineering. In the field of nuclear engineering, many nodal formalisms have been used for the neutron diffusion equation, all yielding results which were far more computationally efficient than conventional Finite Difference (FD) and Finite Element (FE) methods. However, not much effort has been devoted to theoretically comparing nodal and FD methods in order to explain the very high accuracy of the former. In this summary we outline the derivation of a simple five-point form for the lowest order nodal method and compare it to the traditional five-point, edge-centered FD scheme. The effect of the observed differences on the accuracy of the respective methods is established by considering a simple test problem. It must be emphasized that the nodal five-point scheme derived here is mathematically equivalent to previously derived lowest order nodal methods. 7 refs., 1 tab

  17. An improved finite difference method for fixed-bed multicomponent sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L.M.; Meunier, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a new computational procedure based on the finite difference methods developed to solve the coupled partial differential equations describing nonisothermal and nonequilibrium sorption of multiple adsorbate systems on a fixed bed that contains bidispersed pellets. In this numerical method, a solution-adaptive gridding technique (SAG) is applied in combination with a four-point quadratic upstream differencing scheme to satisfactorily resolve very sharp concentration and temperature variations occurring in the case of small dispersing effects. Furthermore, the method resorts to a noniterative implicit procedure for solving the coupling between the column transport equations and the adsorption kinetics inside the pellets, which may be particularly efficient when the particle kinetics are highly stiff

  18. Solving Elliptical Equations in 3D by Means of an Adaptive Refinement in Generalized Finite Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gavete

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply a 3D adaptive refinement procedure using meshless generalized finite difference method for solving elliptic partial differential equations. This adaptive refinement, based on an octree structure, allows adding nodes in a regular way in order to obtain smooth transitions with different nodal densities in the model. For this purpose, we define an error indicator as stop condition of the refinement, a criterion for choosing nodes with the highest errors, and a limit for the number of nodes to be added in each adaptive stage. This kind of equations often appears in engineering problems such as simulation of heat conduction, electrical potential, seepage through porous media, or irrotational flow of fluids. The numerical results show the high accuracy obtained.

  19. Representation of boundary conditions in thermal reactor global analysis by diffusion theory employing finite difference approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, O.P.K.

    1978-01-01

    An approach to simulate the flux vanishing boundary condition in solving the two group coupled neutron diffusion equations in three dimensions (x, y, z) employed to calculate the flux distribution and keff of the reactor is summarised. This is of particular interest when the flux vanishing boundary in x, y, z directions is not an integral multiple of the mesh spacings in these directions. The method assumes the flux to be negative, hypothetically at the mesh points lying outside the boundary and thus the finite difference formalism for Laplacian operator, taking into account six neighbours of a mesh point in a square mesh arrangement, is expressed in a general form so as to account for the boundary mesh points of the system. This approach has been incorporated in a three dimensional diffusion code similar to TAPPS23 and has been used for IRT-2000 reactor and the results are quite satisfactory. (author)

  20. A coupled boundary element-finite difference solution of the elliptic modified mild slope equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naserizadeh, R.; Bingham, Harry B.; Noorzad, A.

    2011-01-01

    The modified mild slope equation of [5] is solved using a combination of the boundary element method (BEM) and the finite difference method (FDM). The exterior domain of constant depth and infinite horizontal extent is solved by a BEM using linear or quadratic elements. The interior domain...... with variable depth is solved by a flexible order of accuracy FDM in boundary-fitted curvilinear coordinates. The two solutions are matched along the common boundary of two methods (the BEM boundary) to ensure continuity of value and normal flux. Convergence of the individual methods is shown and the combined...... solution is tested against several test cases. Results for refraction and diffraction of waves from submerged bottom mounted obstacles compare well with experimental measurements and other computed results from the literature....

  1. Transient analysis of printed lines using finite-difference time-domain method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Shahid [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12050 Jefferson Avenue, Suite 704, Newport News, VA, 23606, USA

    2012-03-29

    Comprehensive studies of ultra-wideband pulses and electromagnetic coupling on printed coupled lines have been performed using full-wave 3D finite-difference time-domain analysis. Effects of unequal phase velocities of coupled modes, coupling between line traces, and the frequency dispersion on the waveform fidelity and crosstalk have been investigated in detail. To discriminate the contributions of different mechanisms into pulse evolution, single and coupled microstrip lines without (ϵr = 1) and with (ϵr > 1) dielectric substrates have been examined. To consistently compare the performance of the coupled lines with substrates of different permittivities and transients of different characteristic times, a generic metric similar to the electrical wavelength has been introduced. The features of pulse propagation on coupled lines with layered and pedestal substrates and on the irregular traces have been explored. Finally, physical interpretations of the simulation results are discussed in the paper.

  2. Comparing finite elements and finite differences for developing diffusive models of glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roniotis, Alexandros; Marias, Kostas; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Stamatakos, Georgios; Zervakis, Michalis

    2010-01-01

    Glioma is the most aggressive type of brain tumor. Several mathematical models have been developed during the last two decades, towards simulating the mechanisms that govern the development of glioma. The most common models use the diffusion-reaction equation (DRE) for simulating the spatiotemporal variation of tumor cell concentration. The proposed diffusive models have mainly used finite differences (FDs) or finite elements (FEs) for the approximation of the solution of the partial differential DRE. This paper presents experimental results on the comparison of the FEs and FDs, especially focused on the glioma model case. It is studied how the different meshes of brain can affect computational consistency, simulation time and efficiency of the model. The experiments have been studied on a test case, for which there is a known algebraic expression of the solution. Thus, it is possible to calculate the error that the different models yield.

  3. Isotropic finite-difference discretization of stochastic conservation laws preserving detailed balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Mahan Raj; Succi, Sauro; Ansumali, Santosh; Adhikari, R.

    2017-10-01

    The dynamics of thermally fluctuating conserved order parameters are described by stochastic conservation laws. Thermal equilibrium in such systems requires the dissipative and stochastic components of the flux to be related by detailed balance. Preserving this relation in spatial and temporal discretization is necessary to obtain solutions that have fidelity to the continuum. Here, we propose a finite-difference discretization that preserves the detailed balance on the lattice, has a spatial error that is isotropic to leading order in lattice spacing, and can be integrated accurately in time using a delayed difference method. We benchmark the method for model B dynamics with a φ4 Landau free energy and obtain excellent agreement with the analytical results.

  4. Dispersive finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) analysis of the elliptic cylindrical cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. Y.; Ahn, D. [University of Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A dispersive full-wave finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model is used to calculate the performance of elliptic cylindrical cloaking devices. The permittivity and the permeability tensors for the cloaking structure are derived by using an effective medium approach in general relativity. The elliptic cylindrical invisibility devices are found to show imperfect cloaking, and the cloaking performance is found to depend on the polarization of the incident waves, the direction of the propagation of those waves, the semi-focal distances and the loss tangents of the meta-material. When the semifocal distance of the elliptic cylinder decreases, the performance of the cloaking becomes very good, with neither noticeable scatterings nor field penetrations. For a larger semi-focal distance, only the TM wave with a specific propagation direction shows good cloaking performance. Realistic cloaking materials with loss still show a cloak that is working, but attenuated back-scattering waves exist.

  5. Thermal Analysis of Ball screw Systems by Explicit Finite Difference Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Bog Ki [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chun Hong; Chung, Sung Chong [KIMM, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Friction generated from balls and grooves incurs temperature rise in the ball screw system. Thermal deformation due to the heat degrades positioning accuracy of the feed drive system. To compensate for the thermal error, accurate prediction of the temperature distribution is required first. In this paper, to predict the temperature distribution according to the rotational speed, solid and hollow cylinders are applied for analysis of the ball screw shaft and nut, respectively. Boundary conditions such as the convective heat transfer coefficient, friction torque, and thermal contact conductance (TCC) between balls and grooves are formulated according to operating and fabrication conditions of the ball screw. Explicit FDM (finite difference method) is studied for development of a temperature prediction simulator. Its effectiveness is verified through numerical analysis.

  6. Two-dimensional finite difference time domain inverse scattering scheme for a perfectly conducting cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Hung; Chiu, Chien-Ching; Sun, Chi-Hsien; Chang, Wan-Ling

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a two-dimensional time-domain inverse scattering algorithm based upon the finite-difference time domain method (FDTD) for determining the shape of a perfectly conducting cylinder. FDTD is used to solve the scattering electromagnetic wave of a perfectly conducting cylinder. The inverse problem is resolved by an optimization approach and the global searching scheme asynchronous particle swarm optimization is then employed to search the parameter space. By properly processing the scattered field, some electromagnetic properties can be reconstructed. A set of representative numerical results is presented to demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to efficiently reconstruct the electromagnetic properties of metallic scatterer even when the initial guess is far away from the exact one. In addition, the effects of Gaussian noises on imaging reconstruction are also investigated.

  7. The analysis of reactively loaded microstrip antennas by finite difference time domain modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, G. S.; Beach, M. A.; Railton, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    In recent years, much interest has been shown in the use of printed circuit antennas in mobile satellite and communications terminals at microwave frequencies. Although such antennas have many advantages in weight and profile size over more conventional reflector/horn configurations, they do, however, suffer from an inherently narrow bandwidth. A way of optimizing the bandwidth of such antennas by an electronic tuning technique using a loaded probe mounted within the antenna structure is examined, and the resulting far-field radiation patterns are shown. Simulation results from a 2D finite difference time domain (FDTD) model for a rectangular microstrip antenna loaded with shorting pins are given and compared to results obtained with an actual antenna. It is hoped that this work will result in a design package for the analysis of microstrip patch antenna elements.

  8. Numerical Simulations of Stably Stratified Fluid Flow Using Compact Finite-Difference Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnár, T.; Fraunié, Ph.; Kozel, K.

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the class of high order compact schemes in the context of numerical simulation of stratified flow. The numerical schemes presented here are based on the approach outlined in Lele [1]. The numerical model presented in this contribution is based on the solution of the Boussinesq approximation by a finite-difference scheme. The numerical scheme itself follows the principle of semi-discretization, with high order compact discretization in space, while the time integration is carried out by suitable Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme. In the case presented here the steady flow was considered and thus the artificial compressibility method was used to resolve the pressure from the modified continuity equation. The test case used to demonstrate the capabilities of the selected model consists of the flow of stably stratified fluid over low, smooth hill.

  9. On-the-fly Numerical Surface Integration for Finite-Difference Poisson-Boltzmann Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qin; Ye, Xiang; Wang, Jun; Luo, Ray

    2011-11-01

    Most implicit solvation models require the definition of a molecular surface as the interface that separates the solute in atomic detail from the solvent approximated as a continuous medium. Commonly used surface definitions include the solvent accessible surface (SAS), the solvent excluded surface (SES), and the van der Waals surface. In this study, we present an efficient numerical algorithm to compute the SES and SAS areas to facilitate the applications of finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann methods in biomolecular simulations. Different from previous numerical approaches, our algorithm is physics-inspired and intimately coupled to the finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann methods to fully take advantage of its existing data structures. Our analysis shows that the algorithm can achieve very good agreement with the analytical method in the calculation of the SES and SAS areas. Specifically, in our comprehensive test of 1,555 molecules, the average unsigned relative error is 0.27% in the SES area calculations and 1.05% in the SAS area calculations at the grid spacing of 1/2Å. In addition, a systematic correction analysis can be used to improve the accuracy for the coarse-grid SES area calculations, with the average unsigned relative error in the SES areas reduced to 0.13%. These validation studies indicate that the proposed algorithm can be applied to biomolecules over a broad range of sizes and structures. Finally, the numerical algorithm can also be adapted to evaluate the surface integral of either a vector field or a scalar field defined on the molecular surface for additional solvation energetics and force calculations.

  10. Computing the demagnetizing tensor for finite difference micromagnetic simulations via numerical integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyshenko, Dmitri; Fangohr, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In the finite difference method which is commonly used in computational micromagnetics, the demagnetizing field is usually computed as a convolution of the magnetization vector field with the demagnetizing tensor that describes the magnetostatic field of a cuboidal cell with constant magnetization. An analytical expression for the demagnetizing tensor is available, however at distances far from the cuboidal cell, the numerical evaluation of the analytical expression can be very inaccurate. Due to this large-distance inaccuracy numerical packages such as OOMMF compute the demagnetizing tensor using the explicit formula at distances close to the originating cell, but at distances far from the originating cell a formula based on an asymptotic expansion has to be used. In this work, we describe a method to calculate the demagnetizing field by numerical evaluation of the multidimensional integral in the demagnetizing tensor terms using a sparse grid integration scheme. This method improves the accuracy of computation at intermediate distances from the origin. We compute and report the accuracy of (i) the numerical evaluation of the exact tensor expression which is best for short distances, (ii) the asymptotic expansion best suited for large distances, and (iii) the new method based on numerical integration, which is superior to methods (i) and (ii) for intermediate distances. For all three methods, we show the measurements of accuracy and execution time as a function of distance, for calculations using single precision (4-byte) and double precision (8-byte) floating point arithmetic. We make recommendations for the choice of scheme order and integrating coefficients for the numerical integration method (iii). - Highlights: • We study the accuracy of demagnetization in finite difference micromagnetics. • We introduce a new sparse integration method to compute the tensor more accurately. • Newell, sparse integration and asymptotic method are compared for all ranges

  11. Divergence correction schemes in finite difference method for 3D tensor CSAMT in axial anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kunpeng; Tan, Handong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Li, Zhiqiang; Cao, Meng

    2017-05-01

    Resistivity anisotropy and full-tensor controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotellurics (CSAMT) have gradually become hot research topics. However, much of the current anisotropy research for tensor CSAMT only focuses on the one-dimensional (1D) solution. As the subsurface is rarely 1D, it is necessary to study three-dimensional (3D) model response. The staggered-grid finite difference method is an effective simulation method for 3D electromagnetic forward modelling. Previous studies have suggested using the divergence correction to constrain the iterative process when using a staggered-grid finite difference model so as to accelerate the 3D forward speed and enhance the computational accuracy. However, the traditional divergence correction method was developed assuming an isotropic medium. This paper improves the traditional isotropic divergence correction method and derivation process to meet the tensor CSAMT requirements for anisotropy using the volume integral of the divergence equation. This method is more intuitive, enabling a simple derivation of a discrete equation and then calculation of coefficients related to the anisotropic divergence correction equation. We validate the result of our 3D computational results by comparing them to the results computed using an anisotropic, controlled-source 2.5D program. The 3D resistivity anisotropy model allows us to evaluate the consequences of using the divergence correction at different frequencies and for two orthogonal finite length sources. Our results show that the divergence correction plays an important role in 3D tensor CSAMT resistivity anisotropy research and offers a solid foundation for inversion of CSAMT data collected over an anisotropic body.

  12. Test set for initial value problem solvers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Lioen (Walter); J.J.B. de Swart (Jacques)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe CWI test set for IVP solvers presents a collection of Initial Value Problems to test solvers for implicit differential equations. This test set can both decrease the effort for the code developer to test his software in a reliable way, and cross the bridge between the application

  13. Computable error estimates of a finite difference scheme for option pricing in exponential Lévy models

    KAUST Repository

    Kiessling, Jonas

    2014-05-06

    Option prices in exponential Lévy models solve certain partial integro-differential equations. This work focuses on developing novel, computable error approximations for a finite difference scheme that is suitable for solving such PIDEs. The scheme was introduced in (Cont and Voltchkova, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 43(4):1596-1626, 2005). The main results of this work are new estimates of the dominating error terms, namely the time and space discretisation errors. In addition, the leading order terms of the error estimates are determined in a form that is more amenable to computations. The payoff is only assumed to satisfy an exponential growth condition, it is not assumed to be Lipschitz continuous as in previous works. If the underlying Lévy process has infinite jump activity, then the jumps smaller than some (Formula presented.) are approximated by diffusion. The resulting diffusion approximation error is also estimated, with leading order term in computable form, as well as the dependence of the time and space discretisation errors on this approximation. Consequently, it is possible to determine how to jointly choose the space and time grid sizes and the cut off parameter (Formula presented.). © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  14. Numerical stability of the Saul'yev finite difference algorithms for electrochemical kinetic simulations: Matrix stability analysis for an example problem involving mixed boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieniasz, Leslaw K.; Østerby, Ole; Britz, Dieter

    1995-01-01

    The stepwise numerical stability of the Saul'yev finite difference discretization of an example diffusional initial boundary value problem from electrochemical kinetics has been investigated using the matrix method of stability analysis. Special attention has been paid to the effect...... of unconditional stability of the Saul'yev algorithms, reported in the literature, the left-right variant of the Saul'yev algorithm becomes unstable for large values of the dimensionless diffusion parameter λ = δt/h2, under mixed boundary conditions. This limitation is not, however, severe for most practical...

  15. SUDOKU A STORY & A SOLVER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GARDNER, P.R.

    2006-04-01

    Sudoku, also known as Number Place, is a logic-based placement puzzle. The aim of the puzzle is to enter a numerical digit from 1 through 9 in each cell of a 9 x 9 grid made up of 3 x 3 subgrids (called ''regions''), starting with various digits given in some cells (the ''givens''). Each row, column, and region must contain only one instance of each numeral. Completing the puzzle requires patience and logical ability. Although first published in a U.S. puzzle magazine in 1979, Sudoku initially caught on in Japan in 1986 and attained international popularity in 2005. Last fall, after noticing Sudoku puzzles in some newspapers and magazines, I attempted a few just to see how hard they were. Of course, the difficulties varied considerably. ''Obviously'' one could use Trial and Error but all the advice was to ''Use Logic''. Thinking to flex, and strengthen, those powers, I began to tackle the puzzles systematically. That is, when I discovered a new tactical rule, I would write it down, eventually generating a list of ten or so, with some having overlap. They served pretty well except for the more difficult puzzles, but even then I managed to develop an additional three rules that covered all of them until I hit the Oregonian puzzle shown. With all of my rules, I could not seem to solve that puzzle. Initially putting my failure down to rapid mental fatigue (being unable to hold a sufficient quantity of information in my mind at one time), I decided to write a program to implement my rules and see what I had failed to notice earlier. The solver, too, failed. That is, my rules were insufficient to solve that particular puzzle. I happened across a book written by a fellow who constructs such puzzles and who claimed that, sometimes, the only tactic left was trial and error. With a trial and error routine implemented, my solver successfully completed the Oregonian puzzle, and has successfully

  16. Unsteady streamflow simulation using a linear implicit finite-difference model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Larry F.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for simulating one-dimensional subcritical, gradually varied, unsteady flow in a stream has been developed and documented. Given upstream and downstream boundary conditions and channel geometry data, roughness coefficients, stage, and discharge can be calculated anywhere within the reach as a function of time. The program uses a linear implicit finite-difference technique that discritizes the partial differential equations. Then it arranges the coefficients of the continuity and momentum equations into a pentadiagonal matrix for solution. Because it is a reasonable compromise between computational accuracy, speed and ease of use,the technique is one of the most commonly used. The upstream boundary condition is a depth hydrograph. However, options also allow the boundary condition to be discharge or water-surface elevation. The downstream boundary condition is a depth which may be constant, self-setting, or unsteady. The reach may be divided into uneven increments and the cross sections may be nonprismatic and may vary from one to the other. Tributary and lateral inflow may enter the reach. The digital model will simulate such common problems as (1) flood waves, (2) releases from dams, and (3) channels where storage is a consideration. It may also supply the needed flow information for mass-transport simulation. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Data assimilation method for fractured reservoirs using mimetic finite differences and ensemble Kalman filter

    KAUST Repository

    Ping, Jing

    2017-05-19

    Optimal management of subsurface processes requires the characterization of the uncertainty in reservoir description and reservoir performance prediction. For fractured reservoirs, the location and orientation of fractures are crucial for predicting production characteristics. With the help of accurate and comprehensive knowledge of fracture distributions, early water/CO 2 breakthrough can be prevented and sweep efficiency can be improved. However, since the rock property fields are highly non-Gaussian in this case, it is a challenge to estimate fracture distributions by conventional history matching approaches. In this work, a method that combines vector-based level-set parameterization technique and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for estimating fracture distributions is presented. Performing the necessary forward modeling is particularly challenging. In addition to the large number of forward models needed, each model is used for sampling of randomly located fractures. Conventional mesh generation for such systems would be time consuming if possible at all. For these reasons, we rely on a novel polyhedral mesh method using the mimetic finite difference (MFD) method. A discrete fracture model is adopted that maintains the full geometry of the fracture network. By using a cut-cell paradigm, a computational mesh for the matrix can be generated quickly and reliably. In this research, we apply this workflow on 2D two-phase fractured reservoirs. The combination of MFD approach, level-set parameterization, and EnKF provides an effective solution to address the challenges in the history matching problem of highly non-Gaussian fractured reservoirs.

  18. Finite difference solution of the time dependent neutron group diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.; Henry, A.F.

    1975-08-01

    In this thesis two unrelated topics of reactor physics are examined: the prompt jump approximation and alternating direction checkerboard methods. In the prompt jump approximation it is assumed that the prompt and delayed neutrons in a nuclear reactor may be described mathematically as being instantaneously in equilibrium with each other. This approximation is applied to the spatially dependent neutron diffusion theory reactor kinetics model. Alternating direction checkerboard methods are a family of finite difference alternating direction methods which may be used to solve the multigroup, multidimension, time-dependent neutron diffusion equations. The reactor mesh grid is not swept line by line or point by point as in implicit or explicit alternating direction methods; instead, the reactor mesh grid may be thought of as a checkerboard in which all the ''red squares'' and '' black squares'' are treated successively. Two members of this family of methods, the ADC and NSADC methods, are at least as good as other alternating direction methods. It has been found that the accuracy of implicit and explicit alternating direction methods can be greatly improved by the application of an exponential transformation. This transformation is incompatible with checkerboard methods. Therefore, a new formulation of the exponential transformation has been developed which is compatible with checkerboard methods and at least as good as the former transformation for other alternating direction methods

  19. Finite difference method and algebraic polynomial interpolation for numerically solving Poisson's equation over arbitrary domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsugio Fukuchi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The finite difference method (FDM based on Cartesian coordinate systems can be applied to numerical analyses over any complex domain. A complex domain is usually taken to mean that the geometry of an immersed body in a fluid is complex; here, it means simply an analytical domain of arbitrary configuration. In such an approach, we do not need to treat the outer and inner boundaries differently in numerical calculations; both are treated in the same way. Using a method that adopts algebraic polynomial interpolations in the calculation around near-wall elements, all the calculations over irregular domains reduce to those over regular domains. Discretization of the space differential in the FDM is usually derived using the Taylor series expansion; however, if we use the polynomial interpolation systematically, exceptional advantages are gained in deriving high-order differences. In using the polynomial interpolations, we can numerically solve the Poisson equation freely over any complex domain. Only a particular type of partial differential equation, Poisson's equations, is treated; however, the arguments put forward have wider generality in numerical calculations using the FDM.

  20. Mimetic finite difference method for the stokes problem on polygonal meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipnikov, K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beirao Da Veiga, L [DIPARTIMENTO DI MATE; Gyrya, V [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV; Manzini, G [ISTIUTO DI MATEMATICA

    2009-01-01

    Various approaches to extend the finite element methods to non-traditional elements (pyramids, polyhedra, etc.) have been developed over the last decade. Building of basis functions for such elements is a challenging task and may require extensive geometry analysis. The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method has many similarities with low-order finite element methods. Both methods try to preserve fundamental properties of physical and mathematical models. The essential difference is that the MFD method uses only the surface representation of discrete unknowns to build stiffness and mass matrices. Since no extension inside the mesh element is required, practical implementation of the MFD method is simple for polygonal meshes that may include degenerate and non-convex elements. In this article, we develop a MFD method for the Stokes problem on arbitrary polygonal meshes. The method is constructed for tensor coefficients, which will allow to apply it to the linear elasticity problem. The numerical experiments show the second-order convergence for the velocity variable and the first-order for the pressure.

  1. A fluid discontinuity tracking methodology for finite difference thermal-hydraulic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavisca, M.J.; Doster, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Finite difference schemes currently applied to the modeling of two-phase flows in flow networks exhibit difficulties in properly simulating certain spatial and temporal discontinuities. These discontinuities include points along the one-dimensional flow axis where density and other thermophysical properties become discontinuous or experience rapid state domain changes. A methodology for treating spatial and temporal discontinuities is presented. This methodology consists of three main features: (a) subnode time-averaged donoring of thermodynamic properties, (b) a variable pressure-at-discontinuity staggered mesh discretization, and (c) a variable point state equation linearization. The proposed scheme is similar in form to standard semi-implicit, staggered mesh discretizations, requires little extra overhead, and results in substantially improved accuracy and code execution times. Comparisons are made with standard time and spatial discretizations, as well as with two simpler alternate methods for recognizing and tracking discontinuities. The first of these attempts is to adjust the time-step size such that the fluid discontinuity arrives at a node boundary, or a change in fluid state occurs precisely at the end of a time advancement. The second attempts to redistribute mass and energy to correct for improperly donored values when a discontinuity crosses a node boundary during a time step. Neither of these alternatives proved adequate

  2. A Finite-Difference Solution of Solute Transport through a Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Godongwana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper presents a theoretical analysis of the transport of solutes through a fixed-film membrane bioreactor (MBR, immobilised with an active biocatalyst. The dimensionless convection-diffusion equation with variable coefficients was solved analytically and numerically for concentration profiles of the solutes through the MBR. The analytical solution makes use of regular perturbation and accounts for radial convective flow as well as axial diffusion of the substrate species. The Michaelis-Menten (or Monod rate equation was assumed for the sink term, and the perturbation was extended up to second-order. In the analytical solution only the first-order limit of the Michaelis-Menten equation was considered; hence the linearized equation was solved. In the numerical solution, however, this restriction was lifted. The solution of the nonlinear, elliptic, partial differential equation was based on an implicit finite-difference method (FDM. An upwind scheme was employed for numerical stability. The resulting algebraic equations were solved simultaneously using the multivariate Newton-Raphson iteration method. The solution allows for the evaluation of the effect on the concentration profiles of (i the radial and axial convective velocity, (ii the convective mass transfer rates, (iii the reaction rates, (iv the fraction retentate, and (v the aspect ratio.

  3. An Efficient Explicit Finite-Difference Scheme for Simulating Coupled Biomass Growth on Nutritive Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel explicit finite-difference (FD method is presented to simulate the positive and bounded development process of a microbial colony subjected to a substrate of nutrients, which is governed by a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equations (PDE system. Our explicit FD scheme is uniquely designed in such a way that it transfers the nonlinear terms in the original PDE into discrete sets of linear ones in the algebraic equation system that can be solved very efficiently, while ensuring the stability and the boundedness of the solution. This is achieved through (1 a proper design of intertwined FD approximations for the diffusion function term in both time and spatial variations and (2 the control of the time-step through establishing theoretical stability criteria. A detailed theoretical stability analysis is conducted to reveal that our FD method is indeed stable. Our examples verified the fact that the numerical solution can be ensured nonnegative and bounded to simulate the actual physics. Numerical examples have also been presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed scheme. The present scheme is applicable for solving similar systems of PDEs in the investigation of the dynamics of biological films.

  4. Accelerated cardiac cine MRI using locally low rank and finite difference constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xin; Lingala, Sajan Goud; Guo, Yi; Jao, Terrence; Usman, Muhammad; Prieto, Claudia; Nayak, Krishna S

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the potential value of combining multiple constraints for highly accelerated cardiac cine MRI. A locally low rank (LLR) constraint and a temporal finite difference (FD) constraint were combined to reconstruct cardiac cine data from highly undersampled measurements. Retrospectively undersampled 2D Cartesian reconstructions were quantitatively evaluated against fully-sampled data using normalized root mean square error, structural similarity index (SSIM) and high frequency error norm (HFEN). This method was also applied to 2D golden-angle radial real-time imaging to facilitate single breath-hold whole-heart cine (12 short-axis slices, 9-13s single breath hold). Reconstruction was compared against state-of-the-art constrained reconstruction methods: LLR, FD, and k-t SLR. At 10 to 60 spokes/frame, LLR+FD better preserved fine structures and depicted myocardial motion with reduced spatio-temporal blurring in comparison to existing methods. LLR yielded higher SSIM ranking than FD; FD had higher HFEN ranking than LLR. LLR+FD combined the complimentary advantages of the two, and ranked the highest in all metrics for all retrospective undersampled cases. Single breath-hold multi-slice cardiac cine with prospective undersampling was enabled with in-plane spatio-temporal resolutions of 2×2mm(2) and 40ms. Highly accelerated cardiac cine is enabled by the combination of 2D undersampling and the synergistic use of LLR and FD constraints. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring a coarse-grained distributive strategy for finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Meng-Juei; Luo, Ray

    2011-08-01

    We have implemented and evaluated a coarse-grained distributive method for finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann (FDPB) calculations of large biomolecular systems. This method is based on the electrostatic focusing principle of decomposing a large fine-grid FDPB calculation into multiple independent FDPB calculations, each of which focuses on only a small and a specific portion (block) of the large fine grid. We first analyzed the impact of the focusing approximation upon the accuracy of the numerical reaction field energies and found that a reasonable relative accuracy of 10(-3) can be achieved when the buffering space is set to be 16 grid points and the block dimension is set to be at least (1/6)(3) of the fine-grid dimension, as in the one-block focusing method. The impact upon efficiency of the use of buffering space to maintain enough accuracy was also studied. It was found that an "optimal" multi-block dimension exists for a given computer hardware setup, and this dimension is more or less independent of the solute geometries. A parallel version of the distributive focusing method was also implemented. Given the proper settings, the distributive method was able to achieve respectable parallel efficiency with tested biomolecular systems on a loosely connected computer cluster.

  6. Design and development of an air humidifier using finite difference method for a solar desalination plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiranjeevi, C.; Srinivas, T.

    2017-11-01

    Humidifier is an important component in air humidification-dehumidification desalination plant for fresh water production. Liquid to air flow rate ratio is optimization is reported for an industrial cooling towers but for an air humidifier it is not addressed. The current work is focused on the design and analysis of an air humidifier for solar desalination plant to maximize the yield with better humidification, using finite difference method (FDM). The outlet conditions of air from the humidifier are theoretically predicted by FDM with the given inlet conditions, which will be further used in the design calculation of the humidifier. Hot water to air flow rate ratio and inlet hot water temperature are identified as key operating parameters to evaluate the humidifier performance. The maximum and optimal values of mass flow rate ratio of water to air are found to be 2.15 and 1.5 respectively using packing function and Merkel Integral. The height of humidifier is constrained to 1.5 m and the diameter of the humidifier is found as 0.28m. The performance of humidifier and outlet conditions of air are simulated using FDM and compared with experimental results. The obtained results are within an agreeable range of deviation.

  7. Calculation of electrical potentials on the surface of a realistic head model by finite differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemieux, L.; McBride, A.; Hand, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a method for the calculation of electrical potentials at the surface of realistic head models from a point dipole generator based on a 3D finite-difference algorithm. The model was validated by comparing calculated values with those obtained algebraically for a three-shell spherical model. For a 1.25 mm cubic grid size, the mean error was 4.9% for a superficial dipole (3.75 mm from the inner surface of the skull) pointing in the radial direction. The effect of generator discretization and node spacing on the accuracy of the model was studied. Three values of the node spacing were considered: 1, 1.25 and 1.5 mm. The mean relative errors were 4.2, 6.3 and 9.3%, respectively. The quality of the approximation of a point dipole by an array of nodes in a spherical neighbourhood did not depend significantly on the number of nodes used. The application of the method to a conduction model derived from MRI data is demonstrated. (author)

  8. Wavelet-based adaptation methodology combined with finite difference WENO to solve ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Seongju; Li, Haojun; Kang, Myungjoo

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we present an accurate and efficient wavelet-based adaptive weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for hydrodynamics and ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations arising from the hyperbolic conservation systems. The proposed method works with the finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (FD-WENO) method in space and the third order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta (RK) method in time. The philosophy of this work is to use the lifted interpolating wavelets as not only detector for singularities but also interpolator. Especially, flexible interpolations can be performed by an inverse wavelet transformation. When the divergence cleaning method introducing auxiliary scalar field ψ is applied to the base numerical schemes for imposing divergence-free condition to the magnetic field in a MHD equation, the approximations to derivatives of ψ require the neighboring points. Moreover, the fifth order WENO interpolation requires large stencil to reconstruct high order polynomial. In such cases, an efficient interpolation method is necessary. The adaptive spatial differentiation method is considered as well as the adaptation of grid resolutions. In order to avoid the heavy computation of FD-WENO, in the smooth regions fixed stencil approximation without computing the non-linear WENO weights is used, and the characteristic decomposition method is replaced by a component-wise approach. Numerical results demonstrate that with the adaptive method we are able to resolve the solutions that agree well with the solution of the corresponding fine grid.

  9. Memory-optimized shift operator alternating direction implicit finite difference time domain method for plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wanjun; Zhang, Hou

    2017-11-01

    Through introducing the alternating direction implicit (ADI) technique and the memory-optimized algorithm to the shift operator (SO) finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, the memory-optimized SO-ADI FDTD for nonmagnetized collisional plasma is proposed and the corresponding formulae of the proposed method for programming are deduced. In order to further the computational efficiency, the iteration method rather than Gauss elimination method is employed to solve the equation set in the derivation of the formulae. Complicated transformations and convolutions are avoided in the proposed method compared with the Z transforms (ZT) ADI FDTD method and the piecewise linear JE recursive convolution (PLJERC) ADI FDTD method. The numerical dispersion of the SO-ADI FDTD method with different plasma frequencies and electron collision frequencies is analyzed and the appropriate ratio of grid size to the minimum wavelength is given. The accuracy of the proposed method is validated by the reflection coefficient test on a nonmagnetized collisional plasma sheet. The testing results show that the proposed method is advantageous for improving computational efficiency and saving computer memory. The reflection coefficient of a perfect electric conductor (PEC) sheet covered by multilayer plasma and the RCS of the objects coated by plasma are calculated by the proposed method and the simulation results are analyzed.

  10. Improved stiffness confinement method within the coarse mesh finite difference framework for efficient spatial kinetics calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Beom Woo; Joo, Han Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The stiffness confinement method is combined with multigroup CMFD with SENM nodal kernel. • The systematic methods for determining the shape and amplitude frequencies are established. • Eigenvalue problems instead of fixed source problems are solved in the transient calculation. • It is demonstrated that much larger time step sizes can be used with the SCM–CMFD method. - Abstract: An improved Stiffness Confinement Method (SCM) is formulated within the framework of the coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) formulation for efficient multigroup spatial kinetics calculation. The algorithm for searching for the amplitude frequency that makes the dynamic eigenvalue unity is developed in a systematic way along with the methods for determining the shape and precursor frequencies. A nodal calculation scheme is established within the CMFD framework to incorporate the cross section changes due to thermal feedback and dynamic frequency update. The conditional nodal update scheme is employed such that the transient calculation is performed mostly with the CMFD formulation and the CMFD parameters are conditionally updated by intermittent nodal calculations. A quadratic representation of amplitude frequency is introduced as another improvement. The performance of the improved SCM within the CMFD framework is assessed by comparing the solution accuracy and computing times for the NEACRP control rod ejection benchmark problems with those obtained with the Crank–Nicholson method with exponential transform (CNET). It is demonstrated that the improved SCM is beneficial for large time step size calculations with stability and accuracy enhancement

  11. A direct parallel sparse matrix solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, T.M.; Gruber, R.; Appert, K.; Wuthrich, S.

    1995-08-01

    The direct sparse matrix solver is based on a domain decomposition technique to achieve data and work parallelization. Geometries that have long and thin structures are specially efficiently tractable with this solver, provided that they can be decomposed mainly in one direction. Due to the separation of the algorithm into a factorization stage and a solution stage, time-dependent problems with a constant coefficient matrix are particularly well suited for this solver. The parallelization performances obtained on a Cray T3D show that the method scales up to at least 256 processors. (author) 5 figs., 2 tabs., 9 refs

  12. Fast Poisson Solvers for Self-Consistent Beam-Beam and Space-Charge Field Computation in Multiparticle Tracking Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Florio, Adrien; Pieloni, Tatiana; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    We present two different approaches to solve the 2-dimensional electrostatic problem with open boundary conditions to be used in fast tracking codes for beam-beam and space charge simulations in high energy accelerators. We compare a fast multipoles method with a hybrid Poisson solver based on the fast Fourier transform and finite differences in polar coordinates. We show that the latter outperforms the first in terms of execution time and precision, allowing for a reduction of the noise in the tracking simulation. Furthermore the new algorithm is shown to scale linearly on parallel architectures with shared memory. We conclude by effectively replacing the HFMM by the new Poisson solver in the COMBI code.

  13. Benchmarking optimization solvers for structural topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas Labanda, Susana; Stolpe, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    sizes is developed for this benchmarking. The problems are based on a material interpolation scheme combined with a density filter. Different optimization solvers including Optimality Criteria (OC), the Method of Moving Asymptotes (MMA) and its globally convergent version GCMMA, the interior point...... solvers in IPOPT and FMINCON, and the sequential quadratic programming method in SNOPT, are benchmarked on the library using performance profiles. Whenever possible the methods are applied to both the nested and the Simultaneous Analysis and Design (SAND) formulations of the problem. The performance...... profiles conclude that general solvers are as efficient and reliable as classical structural topology optimization solvers. Moreover, the use of the exact Hessians in SAND formulations, generally produce designs with better objective function values. However, with the benchmarked implementations solving...

  14. True Concurrent Thermal Engineering Integrating CAD Model Building with Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panczak, Tim; Ring, Steve; Welch, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Thermal engineering has long been left out of the concurrent engineering environment dominated by CAD (computer aided design) and FEM (finite element method) software. Current tools attempt to force the thermal design process into an environment primarily created to support structural analysis, which results in inappropriate thermal models. As a result, many thermal engineers either build models "by hand" or use geometric user interfaces that are separate from and have little useful connection, if any, to CAD and FEM systems. This paper describes the development of a new thermal design environment called the Thermal Desktop. This system, while fully integrated into a neutral, low cost CAD system, and which utilizes both FEM and FD methods, does not compromise the needs of the thermal engineer. Rather, the features needed for concurrent thermal analysis are specifically addressed by combining traditional parametric surface based radiation and FD based conduction modeling with CAD and FEM methods. The use of flexible and familiar temperature solvers such as SINDA/FLUINT (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator) is retained.

  15. Finite difference analysis of an advance core pre-reinforcement system for Toulon's south tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fethi Kitchah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The stability of shallow tunnels excavated in full face has been a major challenge to the scientific community for a long time. In recent years, new techniques based on the installation of a pre-reinforcement system ahead of the tunnel face were developed to control the deformations and surface settlements induced by the excavation and to ensure the sustainability of the tunnel in the long term. In this paper, a finite difference numerical simulation was conducted to study the behaviors and effects of two pre-reinforcement systems, i.e. the face bolting and the umbrella arch system installed in a section of southern Toulon tunnel in France. For this purpose, two approaches were taken and compared: a two-dimensional (2D approach based on the convergence–confinement method, and a three-dimensional (3D approach taking into account the complete modeling of the tunnel. A 2D numerical back-analysis was performed to identify the geomechanical parameters that offer satisfactory agreement with the measurement results. The limit of this method lies in the exact choice of the stress relaxation ratio λ. To overcome this uncertainty, a 3D model was developed, which permitted to study the influence of different pre-support systems on the reaction of ground mass. Both 2D and 3D numerical approaches have been fitted to measurements recorded in a section of the Toulon tunnel and the very satisfactory correspondence has allowed validating the simulations. The results show that the 3D numerical analysis with a full discretization of the inclusions seems unquestionably the most reliable approach.

  16. Pressure transient analysis in single and two-phase water by finite difference methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, G.F.; Daley, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    An important consideration in the design of LMFBR steam generators is the possibility of leakage from a steam generator water tube. The ensuing sodium/water reaction will be largely controlled by the amount of water available at the leak site, thus analysis methods treating this event must have the capability of accurately modeling pressure transients through all states of water occurring in a steam generator, whether single or two-phase. The equation systems of the present model consist of the conservation equations together with an equation of state for one-dimensional homogeneous flow. These equations are then solved using finite difference techniques with phase considerations and non-equilibrium effects being treated through the equation of state. The basis for water property computation is Keenan's 'fundamental equation of state' which is applicable to single-phase water at pressures less than 1000 bars and temperatures less than 1300 0 C. This provides formulations allowing computation of any water property to any desired precision. Two-phase properties are constructed from values on the saturation line. The use of formulations permits the direct calculation of any thermodynamic property (or property derivative) to great precision while requiring very little computer storage, but does involve considerable computation time. For this reason an optional calculation scheme based on the method of 'transfinite interpolation' is included to give rapid computation in selected regions with decreased precision. The conservation equations were solved using the second order Lax-Wendroff scheme which includes wall friction, allows the formation of shocks and locally supersonic flow. Computational boundary conditions were found from a method-of-characteristics solution at the reservoir and receiver ends. The local characteristics were used to interpolate data from inside the pipe to the boundary

  17. New 2D adaptive mesh refinement algorithm based on conservative finite-differences with staggered grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, T.; Duretz, T.; May, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    We present new 2D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm based on stress-conservative finite-differences formulated for non-uniform rectangular staggered grid. The refinement approach is based on a repetitive cell splitting organized via a quad-tree construction (every parent cell is split into 4 daughter cells of equal size). Irrespective of the level of resolution every cell has 5 staggered nodes (2 horizontal velocities, 2 vertical velocities and 1 pressure) for which respective governing equations, boundary conditions and interpolation equations are formulated. The connectivity of the grid is achieved via cross-indexing of grid cells and basic nodal points located in their corners: four corner nodes are indexed for every cell and up to 4 surrounding cells are indexed for every node. The accuracy of the approach depends critically on the formulation of the stencil used at the "hanging" velocity nodes located at the boundaries between different levels of resolution. Most accurate results are obtained for the scheme based on the volume flux balance across the resolution boundary combined with stress-based interpolation of velocity orthogonal to the boundary. We tested this new approach with a number of 2D variable viscosity analytical solutions. Our tests demonstrate that the adaptive staggered grid formulation has convergence properties similar to those obtained in case of a standard, non-adaptive staggered grid formulation. This convergence is also achieved when resolution boundary crosses sharp viscosity contrast interfaces. The convergence rates measured are found to be insensitive to scenarios when the transition in grid resolution crosses sharp viscosity contrast interfaces. We compared various grid refinement strategies based on distribution of different field variables such as viscosity, density and velocity. According to these tests the refinement allows for significant (0.5-1 order of magnitude) increase in the computational accuracy at the same

  18. Use of the finite-difference time-domain method in electromagnetic dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Although there are acceptable methods for calculating whole body electromagnetic absorption, no completely acceptable method for calculating the local specific absorption rate (SAR) at points within the body has been developed. Frequency domain methods, such as the method of moments (MoM) have achieved some success; however, the MoM requires computer storage on the order of (3N) 2 , and computation time on the order of (3N) 3 where N is the number of cells. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been employed extensively in calculating the scattering from metallic objects, and recently is seeing some use in calculating the interaction of EM fields with complex, lossy dielectric bodies. Since the FDTD method has storage and time requirements proportional to N, it presents an attractive alternative to calculating SAR distribution in large bodies. This dissertation describes the FDTD method and evaluates it by comparing its results with analytic solutions in 2 and 3 dimensions. The results obtained demonstrate that the FDTD method is capable of calculating internal SAR distribution with acceptable accuracy. The construction of a data base to provide detailed, inhomogeneous man models for use with the FDTD method is described. Using this construction method, a model of 40,000 1.31 cm. cells is developed for use at 350 MHz, and another model consisting of 5000 2.62 cm. cells is developed for use at 100 MHz. To add more realism to the problem, a ground plane is added to the FDTD software. The needed changes to the software are described, along with a test which confirms its accuracy. Using the CRAY II supercomputer, SAR distributions in human models are calculated using incident frequencies of 100 MHz and 350 MHz for three different cases: (1) A homogeneous man model in free space, (2) an inhomogeneous man model in free space, and (3) an inhomogeneous man model standing on a ground plane

  19. Development and application of a third order scheme of finite differences centered in mesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfin L, A.; Alonso V, G.; Valle G, E. del

    2003-01-01

    In this work the development of a third order scheme of finite differences centered in mesh is presented and it is applied in the numerical solution of those diffusion equations in multi groups in stationary state and X Y geometry. Originally this scheme was developed by Hennart and del Valle for the monoenergetic diffusion equation with a well-known source and they show that the one scheme is of third order when comparing the numerical solution with the analytical solution of a model problem using several mesh refinements and boundary conditions. The scheme by them developed it also introduces the application of numeric quadratures to evaluate the rigidity matrices and of mass that its appear when making use of the finite elements method of Galerkin. One of the used quadratures is the open quadrature of 4 points, no-standard, of Newton-Cotes to evaluate in approximate form the elements of the rigidity matrices. The other quadrature is that of 3 points of Radau that it is used to evaluate the elements of all the mass matrices. One of the objectives of these quadratures are to eliminate the couplings among the Legendre moments 0 and 1 associated to the left and right faces as those associated to the inferior and superior faces of each cell of the discretization. The other objective is to satisfy the particles balance in weighed form in each cell. In this work it expands such development to multiplicative means considering several energy groups. There are described diverse details inherent to the technique, particularly those that refer to the simplification of the algebraic systems that appear due to the space discretization. Numerical results for several test problems are presented and are compared with those obtained with other nodal techniques. (Author)

  20. A finite difference method for off-fault plasticity throughout the earthquake cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Brittany A.; Dunham, Eric M.; Khosravifar, Arash

    2017-12-01

    We have developed an efficient computational framework for simulating multiple earthquake cycles with off-fault plasticity. The method is developed for the classical antiplane problem of a vertical strike-slip fault governed by rate-and-state friction, with inertial effects captured through the radiation-damping approximation. Both rate-independent plasticity and viscoplasticity are considered, where stresses are constrained by a Drucker-Prager yield condition. The off-fault volume is discretized using finite differences and tectonic loading is imposed by displacing the remote side boundaries at a constant rate. Time-stepping combines an adaptive Runge-Kutta method with an incremental solution process which makes use of an elastoplastic tangent stiffness tensor and the return-mapping algorithm. Solutions are verified by convergence tests and comparison to a finite element solution. We quantify how viscosity, isotropic hardening, and cohesion affect the magnitude and off-fault extent of plastic strain that develops over many ruptures. If hardening is included, plastic strain saturates after the first event and the response during subsequent ruptures is effectively elastic. For viscoplasticity without hardening, however, successive ruptures continue to generate additional plastic strain. In all cases, coseismic slip in the shallow sub-surface is diminished compared to slip accumulated at depth during interseismic loading. The evolution of this slip deficit with each subsequent event, however, is dictated by the plasticity model. Integration of the off-fault plastic strain from the viscoplastic model reveals that a significant amount of tectonic offset is accommodated by inelastic deformation ( ∼ 0.1 m per rupture, or ∼ 10% of the tectonic deformation budget).

  1. A parallel PCG solver for MODFLOW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanhui; Li, Guomin

    2009-01-01

    In order to simulate large-scale ground water flow problems more efficiently with MODFLOW, the OpenMP programming paradigm was used to parallelize the preconditioned conjugate-gradient (PCG) solver with in this study. Incremental parallelization, the significant advantage supported by OpenMP on a shared-memory computer, made the solver transit to a parallel program smoothly one block of code at a time. The parallel PCG solver, suitable for both MODFLOW-2000 and MODFLOW-2005, is verified using an 8-processor computer. Both the impact of compilers and different model domain sizes were considered in the numerical experiments. Based on the timing results, execution times using the parallel PCG solver are typically about 1.40 to 5.31 times faster than those using the serial one. In addition, the simulation results are the exact same as the original PCG solver, because the majority of serial codes were not changed. It is worth noting that this parallelizing approach reduces cost in terms of software maintenance because only a single source PCG solver code needs to be maintained in the MODFLOW source tree. Copyright © 2009 The Author(s). Journal Compilation © 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  2. A spectral Poisson solver for kinetic plasma simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeremley, Daniel; Obberath, Jens; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    Plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well established plasma diagnostic method, realized in several designs. One of these designs is the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In its idealized - geometrically simplified - version it consists of two dielectrically shielded, hemispherical electrodes to which an RF signal is applied. A numerical tool is under development which is capable of simulating the dynamics of the plasma surrounding the MRP in electrostatic approximation. In this contribution we concentrate on the specialized Poisson solver for that tool. The plasma is represented by an ensemble of point charges. By expanding both the charge density and the potential into spherical harmonics, a largely analytical solution of the Poisson problem can be employed. For a practical implementation, the expansion must be appropriately truncated. With this spectral solver we are able to efficiently solve the Poisson equation in a kinetic plasma simulation without the need of introducing a spatial discretization.

  3. Pseudospectral Maxwell solvers for an accurate modeling of Doppler harmonic generation on plasma mirrors with particle-in-cell codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaclard, G.; Vincenti, H.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J. L.

    2017-09-01

    With the advent of petawatt class lasers, the very large laser intensities attainable on target should enable the production of intense high-order Doppler harmonics from relativistic laser-plasma mirror interactions. At present, the modeling of these harmonics with particle-in-cell (PIC) codes is extremely challenging as it implies an accurate description of tens to hundreds of harmonic orders on a broad range of angles. In particular, we show here that due to the numerical dispersion of waves they induce in vacuum, standard finite difference time domain (FDTD) Maxwell solvers employed in most PIC codes can induce a spurious angular deviation of harmonic beams potentially degrading simulation results. This effect was extensively studied and a simple toy model based on the Snell-Descartes law was developed that allows us to finely predict the angular deviation of harmonics depending on the spatiotemporal resolution and the Maxwell solver used in the simulations. Our model demonstrates that the mitigation of this numerical artifact with FDTD solvers mandates very high spatiotemporal resolution preventing realistic three-dimensional (3D) simulations even on the largest computers available at the time of writing. We finally show that nondispersive pseudospectral analytical time domain solvers can considerably reduce the spatiotemporal resolution required to mitigate this spurious deviation and should enable in the near future 3D accurate modeling on supercomputers in a realistic time to solution.

  4. Linear and non-linear stability analysis for finite difference discretizations of high-order Boussinesq equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Bingham, Harry B.; Madsen, Per A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers a method of lines stability analysis for finite difference discretizations of a recently published Boussinesq method for the study of highly non-linear and extremely dispersive water waves. The analysis demonstrates the near-equivalence of classical linear Fourier (von Neumann...

  5. Comparison of finite difference and finite element methods for simulating two-dimensional scattering of elastic waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frehner, Marcel; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Saenger, Erik H.; Steeb, Holger Karl

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional scattering of elastic waves in a medium containing a circular heterogeneity is investigated with an analytical solution and numerical wave propagation simulations. Different combinations of finite difference methods (FDM) and finite element methods (FEM) are used to numerically solve

  6. Linear and non-linear stability analysis for finite difference discretizations of high-order Boussinesq equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Bingham, Harry B.; Madsen, Per A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers a method of lines stability analysis for finite difference discretizations of a recently published Boussinesq method for the study of highly non-linear and extremely dispersive water waves. The analysis demonstrates the near-equivalence of classical linear Fourier (von Neuman...

  7. A Moving Mesh Finite Difference Method for Non-Monotone Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Equations in Porous Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Hong; Zegeling, Paul Andries

    2017-01-01

    An adaptive moving mesh finite difference method is presented to solve two types of equations with dynamic capillary pressure effect in porous media. One is the non-equilibrium Richards Equation and the other is the modified Buckley-Leverett equation. The governing equations are discretized with an

  8. Plasmonic Resonances for Spectroscopy Applications using 3D Finite-Difference Time-Domain Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Aruna

    Tuning plasmonic extinction resonances of sub-wavelength scale structures is essential to achieve maximum sensitivity and accuracy. These resonances can be controlled with careful design of nanoparticle geometries and incident wave attributes. In the first part of this dissertation, plasmonically enhanced effects on hexagonal-arrays of metal nanoparticles, metal-hole arrays (micro-mesh), and linear-arrays of metal nanorings are analyzed using three-dimensional Finite-Difference Time-Domain (3D-FDTD) simulations. The effect of particle size, lattice spacing, and lack of monodispersity of a self-assembled, hexagonal array layer of silver (Ag) nanoparticles on the extinction resonance is investigated to help determine optimal design specifications for efficient organic solar power harvesting. The enhancement of transmission resonances using plasmonic thin metal films with arrays of holes which enable recording of scatter-free infrared (IR) transmission spectra of individual particles is also explored. This method is quantitative, non-destructive and helps in better understanding the interaction of light with sub-wavelength particles. Next, plasmonically enhanced effects on linear arrays of gold (Au) rings are studied. Simulations employing 3D-FDTD can be used to determine the set of geometrical parameters to attain localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The shifts in resonances due to changes in the effective dielectric of the structure are investigated, which is useful in sensing applications. Computational models enrich experimental studies. In the second part of this dissertation, the effect of particle size, shape and orientation on the IR spectra is investigated using 3D-FDTD and Mie-Bruggeman models. This computational analysis is extended to include clusters of particles of mixed composition. The prediction of extinction and absorption spectra of single particles of mixed composition helps in interpreting their physical properties and predict chemical

  9. An immersed interface vortex particle-mesh solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marichal, Yves; Chatelain, Philippe; Winckelmans, Gregoire

    2014-11-01

    An immersed interface-enabled vortex particle-mesh (VPM) solver is presented for the simulation of 2-D incompressible viscous flows, in the framework of external aerodynamics. Considering the simulation of free vortical flows, such as wakes and jets, vortex particle-mesh methods already provide a valuable alternative to standard CFD methods, thanks to the interesting numerical properties arising from its Lagrangian nature. Yet, accounting for solid bodies remains challenging, despite the extensive research efforts that have been made for several decades. The present immersed interface approach aims at improving the consistency and the accuracy of one very common technique (based on Lighthill's model) for the enforcement of the no-slip condition at the wall in vortex methods. Targeting a sharp treatment of the wall calls for substantial modifications at all computational levels of the VPM solver. More specifically, the solution of the underlying Poisson equation, the computation of the diffusion term and the particle-mesh interpolation are adapted accordingly and the spatial accuracy is assessed. The immersed interface VPM solver is subsequently validated on the simulation of some challenging impulsively started flows, such as the flow past a cylinder and that past an airfoil. Research Fellow (PhD student) of the F.R.S.-FNRS of Belgium.

  10. Fast linear solvers for variable density turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouransari, Hadi; Mani, Ali; Darve, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Variable density flows are ubiquitous in variety of natural and industrial systems. Two-phase and multi-phase flows in natural and industrial processes, astrophysical flows, and flows involved in combustion processes are such examples. For an ideal gas subject to low-Mach approximation, variations in temperature can lead to a non-uniform density field. In this work, we consider radiatively heated particle-laden turbulent flows as an example application in which density variability is resulted from inhomogeneities in the heat absorption by an inhomogeneous particle field. Under such conditions, the divergence constraint of the fluid is enforced through a variable coefficient Poisson equation. Inversion of the discretized variable coefficient Poisson operator is difficult using the conventional linear solvers as the size of the problem grows. We apply a novel hierarchical linear solve algorithm based on low-rank approximations. The proposed linear solver could be applied to variety of linear systems arising from discretized partial differential equations. It can be used as a standalone direct-solver with tunable accuracy and linear complexity, or as a high-accuracy pre-conditioner in conjunction with other iterative methods.

  11. Continuous Genetic Algorithm as a Novel Solver for Stokes and Nonlinear Navier Stokes Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. S. Abo-Hammour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The one-dimensional continuous genetic algorithm (CGA previously developed by the principal author is extended and enhanced to deal with two-dimensional spaces in this paper. The enhanced CGA converts the partial differential equations into algebraic equations by replacing the derivatives appearing in the differential equation with their proper finite difference formula in 2D spaces. This optimization methodology is then applied for the solution of steady-state two-dimensional Stokes and nonlinear Navier Stokes problems. The main advantage of using CGA for the solution of partial differential equations is that the algorithm can be applied to linear and nonlinear equations without any modification in its structure. A comparison between the results obtained using the 2D CGA and the known Galerkin finite element method using COMSOL is presented in this paper. The results showed that CGA has an excellent accuracy as compared to other numerical solvers.

  12. Inductive ionospheric solver for magnetospheric MHD simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vanhamäki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new scheme for solving the ionospheric boundary conditions required in magnetospheric MHD simulations. In contrast to the electrostatic ionospheric solvers currently in use, the new solver takes ionospheric induction into account by solving Faraday's law simultaneously with Ohm's law and current continuity. From the viewpoint of an MHD simulation, the new inductive solver is similar to the electrostatic solvers, as the same input data is used (field-aligned current [FAC] and ionospheric conductances and similar output is produced (ionospheric electric field. The inductive solver is tested using realistic, databased models of an omega-band and westward traveling surge. Although the tests were performed with local models and MHD simulations require a global ionospheric solution, we may nevertheless conclude that the new solution scheme is feasible also in practice. In the test cases the difference between static and electrodynamic solutions is up to ~10 V km−1 in certain locations, or up to 20-40% of the total electric field. This is in agreement with previous estimates. It should also be noted that if FAC is replaced by the ground magnetic field (or ionospheric equivalent current in the input data set, exactly the same formalism can be used to construct an inductive version of the KRM method originally developed by Kamide et al. (1981.

  13. Using SPARK as a Solver for Modelica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetter, Michael; Wetter, Michael; Haves, Philip; Moshier, Michael A.; Sowell, Edward F.

    2008-06-30

    Modelica is an object-oriented acausal modeling language that is well positioned to become a de-facto standard for expressing models of complex physical systems. To simulate a model expressed in Modelica, it needs to be translated into executable code. For generating run-time efficient code, such a translation needs to employ algebraic formula manipulations. As the SPARK solver has been shown to be competitive for generating such code but currently cannot be used with the Modelica language, we report in this paper how SPARK's symbolic and numerical algorithms can be implemented in OpenModelica, an open-source implementation of a Modelica modeling and simulation environment. We also report benchmark results that show that for our air flow network simulation benchmark, the SPARK solver is competitive with Dymola, which is believed to provide the best solver for Modelica.

  14. New iterative solvers for the NAG Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvini, S.; Shaw, G. [Numerical Algorithms Group Ltd., Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the work which has been carried out at NAG Ltd to update the iterative solvers for sparse systems of linear equations, both symmetric and unsymmetric, in the NAG Fortran 77 Library. Our current plans to extend this work and include it in our other numerical libraries in our range are also briefly mentioned. We have added to the Library the new Chapter F11, entirely dedicated to sparse linear algebra. At Mark 17, the F11 Chapter includes sparse iterative solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-box routines for sparse symmetric (both positive-definite and indefinite) linear systems. Mark 18 will add solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-boxes for sparse unsymmetric systems: the development of these has already been completed.

  15. Finite difference method for inner-layer equations in the resistive MagnetoHydroDynamic stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuda, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Watanabe, Tomoko

    1996-08-01

    The matching problem in resistive MagnetoHydroDynamic stability analysis by the asymptotic matching method has been reformulated as an initial-boundary value problem for the inner-layer equations describing the plasma dynamics in the thin layer around a rational surface. The third boundary conditions at boundaries of a finite interval are imposed on the inner layer equations in the formulation instead of asymptotic conditions at infinities. The finite difference method for this problem has been applied to model equations whose solutions are known in a closed form. It has been shown that the initial value problem and the associated eigenvalue problem for the model equations can be solved by the finite difference method with numerical stability. The formulation presented here enables the asymptotic matching method to be a practical method for the resistive MHD stability analysis. (author)

  16. Finite-difference theory for sound propagation in a lined duct with uniform flow using the wave envelope concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Finite difference equations are derived for sound propagation in a two dimensional, straight, soft wall duct with a uniform flow by using the wave envelope concept. This concept reduces the required number of finite difference grid points by one to two orders of magnitude depending on the length of the duct and the frequency of the sound. The governing acoustic difference equations in complex notation are derived. An exit condition is developed that allows a duct of finite length to simulate the wave propagation in an infinitely long duct. Sample calculations presented for a plane wave incident upon the acoustic liner show the numerical theory to be in good agreement with closed form analytical theory. Complete pressure and velocity printouts are given to some sample problems and can be used to debug and check future computer programs.

  17. Acoustic Wave Propagation Modeling by a Two-dimensional Finite-difference Summation-by-parts Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Petersson, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rodgers, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-25

    Acoustic waveform modeling is a computationally intensive task and full three-dimensional simulations are often impractical for some geophysical applications such as long-range wave propagation and high-frequency sound simulation. In this study, we develop a two-dimensional high-order accurate finite-difference code for acoustic wave modeling. We solve the linearized Euler equations by discretizing them with the sixth order accurate finite difference stencils away from the boundary and the third order summation-by-parts (SBP) closure near the boundary. Non-planar topographic boundary is resolved by formulating the governing equation in curvilinear coordinates following the interface. We verify the implementation of the algorithm by numerical examples and demonstrate the capability of the proposed method for practical acoustic wave propagation problems in the atmosphere.

  18. DIF3D: a code to solve one-, two-, and three-dimensional finite-difference diffusion theory problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derstine, K.L.

    1984-04-01

    The mathematical development and numerical solution of the finite-difference equations are summarized. The report provides a guide for user application and details the programming structure of DIF3D. Guidelines are included for implementing the DIF3D export package on several large scale computers. Optimized iteration methods for the solution of large-scale fast-reactor finite-difference diffusion theory calculations are presented, along with their theoretical basis. The computational and data management considerations that went into their formulation are discussed. The methods utilized include a variant of the Chebyshev acceleration technique applied to the outer fission source iterations and an optimized block successive overrelaxation method for the within-group iterations. A nodal solution option intended for analysis of LMFBR designs in two- and three-dimensional hexagonal geometries is incorporated in the DIF3D package and is documented in a companion report, ANL-83-1

  19. Single-cone finite-difference schemes for the (2+1)-dimensional Dirac equation in general electromagnetic textures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötz, Walter

    2017-11-01

    A single-cone finite-difference lattice scheme is developed for the (2+1)-dimensional Dirac equation in presence of general electromagnetic textures. The latter is represented on a (2+1)-dimensional staggered grid using a second-order-accurate finite difference scheme. A Peierls-Schwinger substitution to the wave function is used to introduce the electromagnetic (vector) potential into the Dirac equation. Thereby, the single-cone energy dispersion and gauge invariance are carried over from the continuum to the lattice formulation. Conservation laws and stability properties of the formal scheme are identified by comparison with the scheme for zero vector potential. The placement of magnetization terms is inferred from consistency with the one for the vector potential. Based on this formal scheme, several numerical schemes are proposed and tested. Elementary examples for single-fermion transport in the presence of in-plane magnetization are given, using material parameters typical for topological insulator surfaces.

  20. Realization of the chess mate solver application

    OpenAIRE

    Vučković Vladan V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents details of the chess mate solver application, which is a part of the author’s Geniss general chess application. The problem chess is an important domain connected with solving of the chess problems. The Geniss Mate Solver (G.M.S.) application solves Mate-in-N-move problems. Main techniques used for the implementation of the application are full-width searching with Alpha-Beta pruning technique and zero evaluation function. The application is written in Delphi for Windows p...

  1. An algorithm for a valved brass instrument synthesis environment using finite-difference time-domain methods with performance optimisation

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Reginald L.; Bilbao, Stefan; Perry, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a physical modelling sound synthesis environment for the production of valved brass instrument sounds. The governing equations of the system are solved using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods and the environment is implemented in the C programming language. Users of the environment can create their own custom instruments and are able to control player parameters such as lip frequency, mouth pressure and valve openings through the use of instrument and score file...

  2. A new time–space domain high-order finite-difference method for the acoustic wave equation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2009-12-01

    A new unified methodology was proposed in Finkelstein and Kastner (2007) [39] to derive spatial finite-difference (FD) coefficients in the joint time-space domain to reduce numerical dispersion. The key idea of this method is that the dispersion relation is completely satisfied at several designated frequencies. We develop this new time-space domain FD method further for 1D, 2D and 3D acoustic wave modeling using a plane wave theory and the Taylor series expansion. New spatial FD coefficients are frequency independent though they lead to a frequency dependent numerical solution. We prove that the modeling accuracy is 2nd-order when the conventional (2 M)th-order space domain FD and the 2nd-order time domain FD stencils are directly used to solve the acoustic wave equation. However, under the same discretization, the new 1D method can reach (2 M)th-order accuracy and is always stable. The 2D method can reach (2 M)th-order accuracy along eight directions and has better stability. Similarly, the 3D method can reach (2 M)th-order accuracy along 48 directions and also has better stability than the conventional FD method. The advantages of the new method are also demonstrated by the results of dispersion analysis and numerical modeling of acoustic wave equation for homogeneous and inhomogeneous acoustic models. In addition, we study the influence of the FD stencil length on numerical modeling for 1D inhomogeneous media, and derive an optimal FD stencil length required to balance the accuracy and efficiency of modeling. A new time-space domain high-order staggered-grid FD method for the 1D acoustic wave equation with variable densities is also developed, which has similar advantages demonstrated by dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modeling experiments. The methodology presented in this paper can be easily extended to solve similar partial difference equations arising in other fields of science and engineering. © 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  3. SBP-SAT finite difference discretization of acoustic wave equations on staggered block-wise uniform grids

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Longfei

    2018-02-16

    We consider the numerical simulation of the acoustic wave equations arising from seismic applications, for which staggered grid finite difference methods are popular choices due to their simplicity and efficiency. We relax the uniform grid restriction on finite difference methods and allow the grids to be block-wise uniform with nonconforming interfaces. In doing so, variations in the wave speeds of the subterranean media can be accounted for more efficiently. Staggered grid finite difference operators satisfying the summation-by-parts (SBP) property are devised to approximate the spatial derivatives appearing in the acoustic wave equation. These operators are applied within each block independently. The coupling between blocks is achieved through simultaneous approximation terms (SATs), which impose the interface condition weakly, i.e., by penalty. Ratio of the grid spacing of neighboring blocks is allowed to be rational number, for which specially designed interpolation formulas are presented. These interpolation formulas constitute key pieces of the simultaneous approximation terms. The overall discretization is shown to be energy-conserving and examined on test cases of both theoretical and practical interests, delivering accurate and stable simulation results.

  4. Java Based Symbolic Circuit Solver For Electrical Engineering Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruba Akram Amarin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The interactive technical electronic book, TechEBook, currently under development at the University of Central Florida (UCF, introduces a paradigm shift by replacing the traditional electrical engineering course with topic-driven modules that provide a useful tool for engineers and scientists. The TechEBook comprises the two worlds of classical circuit books and interactive operating platforms such as iPads, laptops and desktops. The TechEBook provides an interactive applets screen that holds many modules, each of which has a specific application in the self learning process. This paper describes one of the interactive techniques in the TechEBook known as Symbolic Circuit Solver (SymCirc. The SymCirc develops a versatile symbolic based linear circuit with a switches solver. The solver works by accepting a Netlist and the element that the user wants to find the voltage across or current on, as input parameters. Then it either produces the plot or the time domain expression of the output. Frequency domain plots or Symbolic Transfer Functions are also produced. The solver gets its input from a Web-based GUI circuit drawer developed at UCF. Typical simulation tools that electrical engineers encounter are numerical in nature, that is, when presented with an input circuit they iteratively solve the circuit across a set of small time steps. The result is represented as a data set of output versus time, which can be plotted for further inspection. Such results do not help users understand the ultimate nature of circuits as Linear Time Invariant systems with a finite dimensional basis in the solution space. SymCirc provides all simulation results as time domain expressions composed of the basic functions that exclusively include exponentials, sines, cosines and/or t raised to any power. This paper explains the motivation behind SymCirc, the Graphical User Interface front end and how the solver actually works. The paper also presents some examples and

  5. The analytic nodal diffusion solver ANDES in multigroups for 3D rectangular geometry: Development and performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, Juan-Andres; Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Ahnert, Carol; Aragones, Jose-Maria

    2008-01-01

    In this work we address the development and implementation of the analytic coarse-mesh finite-difference (ACMFD) method in a nodal neutron diffusion solver called ANDES. The first version of the solver is implemented in any number of neutron energy groups, and in 3D Cartesian geometries; thus it mainly addresses PWR and BWR core simulations. The details about the generalization to multigroups and 3D, as well as the implementation of the method are given. The transverse integration procedure is the scheme chosen to extend the ACMFD formulation to multidimensional problems. The role of the transverse leakage treatment in the accuracy of the nodal solutions is analyzed in detail: the involved assumptions, the limitations of the method in terms of nodal width, the alternative approaches to implement the transverse leakage terms in nodal methods - implicit or explicit -, and the error assessment due to transverse integration. A new approach for solving the control rod 'cusping' problem, based on the direct application of the ACMFD method, is also developed and implemented in ANDES. The solver architecture turns ANDES into an user-friendly, modular and easily linkable tool, as required to be integrated into common software platforms for multi-scale and multi-physics simulations. ANDES can be used either as a stand-alone nodal code or as a solver to accelerate the convergence of whole core pin-by-pin code systems. The verification and performance of the solver are demonstrated using both proof-of-principle test cases and well-referenced international benchmarks

  6. On a construction of fast direct solvers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Práger, Milan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2003), s. 225-236 ISSN 0862-7940 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905; CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : Poisson equation * boundary value problem * fast direct solver Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  7. A Parallel Algebraic Multigrid Solver on Graphics Processing Units

    KAUST Repository

    Haase, Gundolf

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a multi-GPU implementation of the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm with an algebraic multigrid preconditioner (PCG-AMG) for an elliptic model problem on a 3D unstructured grid. An efficient parallel sparse matrix-vector multiplication scheme underlying the PCG-AMG algorithm is presented for the many-core GPU architecture. A performance comparison of the parallel solver shows that a singe Nvidia Tesla C1060 GPU board delivers the performance of a sixteen node Infiniband cluster and a multi-GPU configuration with eight GPUs is about 100 times faster than a typical server CPU core. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  8. LaMEM: a Massively Parallel Staggered-Grid Finite-Difference Code for Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Lithospheric Deformation with Visco-Elasto-Plastic Rheologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, B.; Popov, A.

    2014-12-01

    The complexity of lithospheric rheology and the necessity to resolve the deformation patterns near the free surface (faults and folds) sufficiently well places a great demand on a stable and scalable modeling tool that is capable of efficiently handling nonlinearities. Our code LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model) is an attempt to satisfy this demand. The code utilizes a stable and numerically inexpensive finite difference discretization with the spatial staggering of velocity, pressure, and temperature unknowns (a so-called staggered grid). As a time discretization method the forward Euler, or a combination of the predictor-corrector and the fourth-order Runge-Kutta can be chosen. Elastic stresses are rotated on the markers, which are also used to track all relevant material properties and solution history fields. The Newtonian nonlinear iteration, however, is handled at the level of the grid points to avoid spurious averaging between markers and grid. Such an arrangement required us to develop a non-standard discretization of the effective strain-rate second invariant. Important feature of the code is its ability to handle stress-free and open-box boundary conditions, in which empty cells are simply eliminated from the discretization, which also solves the biggest problem of the sticky-air approach - namely large viscosity jumps near the free surface. We currently support an arbitrary combination of linear elastic, nonlinear viscous with multiple creep mechanisms, and plastic rheologies based on either a depth-dependent von Mises or pressure-dependent Drucker-Prager yield criteria.LaMEM is being developed as an inherently parallel code. Structurally all its parts are based on the building blocks provided by PETSc library. These include Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov nonlinear solvers with convergence globalization techniques (line search), equipped with different linear preconditioners. We have also implemented the coupled velocity-pressure multigrid

  9. Multi-GPU-based acceleration of the explicit time domain volume integral equation solver using MPI-OpenACC

    KAUST Repository

    Feki, Saber

    2013-07-01

    An explicit marching-on-in-time (MOT)-based time-domain volume integral equation (TDVIE) solver has recently been developed for characterizing transient electromagnetic wave interactions on arbitrarily shaped dielectric bodies (A. Al-Jarro et al., IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., vol. 60, no. 11, 2012). The solver discretizes the spatio-temporal convolutions of the source fields with the background medium\\'s Green function using nodal discretization in space and linear interpolation in time. The Green tensor, which involves second order spatial and temporal derivatives, is computed using finite differences on the temporal and spatial grid. A predictor-corrector algorithm is used to maintain the stability of the MOT scheme. The simplicity of the discretization scheme permits the computation of the discretized spatio-temporal convolutions on the fly during time marching; no \\'interaction\\' matrices are pre-computed or stored resulting in a memory efficient scheme. As a result, most often the applicability of this solver to the characterization of wave interactions on electrically large structures is limited by the computation time but not the memory. © 2013 IEEE.

  10. A convergent 2D finite-difference scheme for the Dirac-Poisson system and the simulation of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Brinkman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We present a convergent finite-difference scheme of second order in both space and time for the 2D electromagnetic Dirac equation. We apply this method in the self-consistent Dirac-Poisson system to the simulation of graphene. The model is justified for low energies, where the particles have wave vectors sufficiently close to the Dirac points. In particular, we demonstrate that our method can be used to calculate solutions of the Dirac-Poisson system where potentials act as beam splitters or Veselago lenses. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Double-grid finite-difference frequency-domain (DG-FDFD) method for scattering from chiral objects

    CERN Document Server

    Alkan, Erdogan; Elsherbeni, Atef

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the application of the overlapping grids approach to solve chiral material problems using the FDFD method. Due to the two grids being used in the technique, we will name this method as Double-Grid Finite Difference Frequency-Domain (DG-FDFD) method. As a result of this new approach the electric and magnetic field components are defined at every node in the computation space. Thus, there is no need to perform averaging during the calculations as in the aforementioned FDFD technique [16]. We formulate general 3D frequency-domain numerical methods based on double-grid

  12. Development of the software Conden 1.0 in finite differences to model electrostatics problems 2D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Rodríguez Calderón

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work consists on the development and implementation of the finite differences method for over-relaxation adapted to irregular meshes to determine the influence of the air frontiers on the potencial values and field electricians, calculated inside a badges parallel condenser, using GID like a pre/post-process platform and Fortran like a programming language of the calculation motor of differences Conden 1.0. The problem domain is constituted by two rectangles that represent the condenser and the air layer that covers it, divided in rectangular meshes no standardize.

  13. A finite difference method for a two-point boundary value problem with a Caputo fractional derivative

    OpenAIRE

    Stynes, Martin; Gracia, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    A two-point boundary value problem whose highest-order term is a Caputo fractional derivative of order $\\delta \\in (1,2)$ is considered. Al-Refai's comparison principle is improved and modified to fit our problem. Sharp a priori bounds on derivatives of the solution $u$ of the boundary value problem are established, showing that $u''(x)$ may be unbounded at the interval endpoint $x=0$. These bounds and a discrete comparison principle are used to prove pointwise convergence of a finite differe...

  14. Optimization study of the explicit finite-difference method for quasi-static thermomechanical simulations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, D.E.; Hofmann, R.; Wahi, K.K.

    1978-03-01

    The developments presented make it economically feasible to use a time-explicit numerical code to perform thermomechanical simulations of quasi-static systems that incorporate physically small source regions (or centers of activity) in a relatively large space. A nuclear waste repository in a geological medium is an example of such a system. The technique developed make it possible to eliminate two major restrictions that explicit-finite difference codes generally have that can considerably limit their efficiency. The technique is a time-step optimization method called pseudo-time steps (PTS). This report describes the motivation, derivation, and implementation of the PTS method

  15. Aleph Field Solver Challenge Problem Results Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Russell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Aleph models continuum electrostatic and steady and transient thermal fields using a finite-element method. Much work has gone into expanding the core solver capability to support enriched modeling consisting of multiple interacting fields, special boundary conditions and two-way interfacial coupling with particles modeled using Aleph's complementary particle-in-cell capability. This report provides quantitative evidence for correct implementation of Aleph's field solver via order- of-convergence assessments on a collection of problems of increasing complexity. It is intended to provide Aleph with a pedigree and to establish a basis for confidence in results for more challenging problems important to Sandia's mission that Aleph was specifically designed to address.

  16. Fostering Creative Problem Solvers in Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized issues of social emergence based on thinking of societies as complex systems. The complexity of professional practice has been recognized as the root of challenges for higher education. To foster creative problem solvers is a key response of higher education in order...... to meet such challenges. This chapter aims to illustrate how to understand: 1) complexity as the nature of professional practice; 2) creative problem solving as the core skill in professional practice; 3) creativity as interplay between persons and their environment; 4) higher education as the context...... of fostering creative problem solvers; and 5) some innovative strategies such as Problem-Based Learning (PBL) and building a learning environment by Information Communication Technology (ICT) as potential strategies of creativity development. Accordingly, this chapter contributes to bridge the complexity...

  17. Mathematical programming solver based on local search

    CERN Document Server

    Gardi, Frédéric; Darlay, Julien; Estellon, Bertrand; Megel, Romain

    2014-01-01

    This book covers local search for combinatorial optimization and its extension to mixed-variable optimization. Although not yet understood from the theoretical point of view, local search is the paradigm of choice for tackling large-scale real-life optimization problems. Today's end-users demand interactivity with decision support systems. For optimization software, this means obtaining good-quality solutions quickly. Fast iterative improvement methods, like local search, are suited to satisfying such needs. Here the authors show local search in a new light, in particular presenting a new kind of mathematical programming solver, namely LocalSolver, based on neighborhood search. First, an iconoclast methodology is presented to design and engineer local search algorithms. The authors' concern about industrializing local search approaches is of particular interest for practitioners. This methodology is applied to solve two industrial problems with high economic stakes. Software based on local search induces ex...

  18. Realization of the chess mate solver application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučković Vladan V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents details of the chess mate solver application, which is a part of the author’s Geniss general chess application. The problem chess is an important domain connected with solving of the chess problems. The Geniss Mate Solver (G.M.S. application solves Mate-in-N-move problems. Main techniques used for the implementation of the application are full-width searching with Alpha-Beta pruning technique and zero evaluation function. The application is written in Delphi for Windows programming environment and the searching engine is completely coded in assembly language (about 10000 lines. This hybrid software structure enables efficient program development by using high-level programming environment and the realization of a very fast searching engine at the same time. The machine code is manually coded and could achieve above 7 million generated positions per second on the 1Ghz Celeron PC.

  19. Evolving effective incremental SAT solvers with GP

    OpenAIRE

    Bader, Mohamed; Poli, R.

    2008-01-01

    Hyper-Heuristics could simply be defined as heuristics to choose other heuristics, and it is a way of combining existing heuristics to generate new ones. In a Hyper-Heuristic framework, the framework is used for evolving effective incremental (Inc*) solvers for SAT. We test the evolved heuristics (IncHH) against other known local search heuristics on a variety of benchmark SAT problems.

  20. Asynchronous Parallelization of a CFD Solver

    OpenAIRE

    Abdi, Daniel S.; Bitsuamlak, Girma T.

    2015-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/295393 A Navier-Stokes equations solver is parallelized to run on a cluster of computers using the domain decomposition method. Two approaches of communication and computation are investigated, namely, synchronous and asynchronous methods. Asynchronous communication between subdomains is not commonly used inCFDcodes; however, it has a potential to alleviate scaling bottlenecks incurred due to process...

  1. Chemical Mechanism Solvers in Air Quality Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Linford

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The solution of chemical kinetics is one of the most computationally intensivetasks in atmospheric chemical transport simulations. Due to the stiff nature of the system,implicit time stepping algorithms which repeatedly solve linear systems of equations arenecessary. This paper reviews the issues and challenges associated with the construction ofefficient chemical solvers, discusses several families of algorithms, presents strategies forincreasing computational efficiency, and gives insight into implementing chemical solverson accelerated computer architectures.

  2. A Modified Equation Approach to Selecting a Nonstandard Finite Difference Scheme Applied to the Regularized Long Wave Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Momoniat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two nonstandard finite difference schemes are derived to solve the regularized long wave equation. The criteria for choosing the “best” nonstandard approximation to the nonlinear term in the regularized long wave equation come from considering the modified equation. The two “best” nonstandard numerical schemes are shown to preserve conserved quantities when compared to an implicit scheme in which the nonlinear term is approximated in the usual way. Comparisons to the single solitary wave solution show significantly better results, measured in the L2 and L∞ norms, when compared to results obtained using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element method and a splitted quadratic B-spline collocation method. The growth in the error when simulating the single solitary wave solution using the two “best” nonstandard numerical schemes is shown to be linear implying the nonstandard finite difference schemes are conservative. The formation of an undular bore for both steep and shallow initial profiles is captured without the formation of numerical instabilities.

  3. Hybrid lattice Boltzmann finite difference simulation of mixed convection flows in a lid-driven square cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettaibi, Soufiene, E-mail: Bettaibisoufiene@gmail.com [UR: Rayonnement Thermique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Kuznik, Frédéric [INSA-Lyon, CETHIL, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Université de Lyon, CNRS, UMR5008, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Sediki, Ezeddine [UR: Rayonnement Thermique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • Mixed convection heat transfer in 2D lid-driven cavity is studied numerically. • Hybrid scheme with multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method is used to obtain the velocity field. • Finite difference method is used to compute the temperature. • Effect of both Richardson and Reynolds numbers for mixed convection is studied. - Abstract: Mixed convection heat transfer in two-dimensional lid-driven rectangular cavity filled with air (Pr=0.71) is studied numerically. A hybrid scheme with multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) is used to obtain the velocity field while the temperature field is deduced from energy balance equation by using the finite difference method (FDM). The main objective of this work is to investigate the model effectiveness for mixed convection flow simulation. Results are presented in terms of streamlines, isotherms and Nusselt numbers. Excellent agreement is obtained between our results and previous works. The different comparisons demonstrate the robustness and the accuracy of our proposed approach.

  4. A hybrid finite-volume and finite difference scheme for depth-integrated non-hydrostatic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jing; Sun, Jia-wen; Wang, Xing-gang; Yu, Yong-hai; Sun, Zhao-chen

    2017-06-01

    A depth-integrated, non-hydrostatic model with hybrid finite difference and finite volume numerical algorithm is proposed in this paper. By utilizing a fraction step method, the governing equations are decomposed into hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic parts. The first part is solved by using the finite volume conservative discretization method, whilst the latter is considered by solving discretized Poisson-type equations with the finite difference method. The second-order accuracy, both in time and space, of the finite volume scheme is achieved by using an explicit predictor-correction step and linear construction of variable state in cells. The fluxes across the cell faces are computed in a Godunov-based manner by using MUSTA scheme. Slope and flux limiting technique is used to equip the algorithm with total variation dimensioning property for shock capturing purpose. Wave breaking is treated as a shock by switching off the non-hydrostatic pressure in the steep wave front locally. The model deals with moving wet/dry front in a simple way. Numerical experiments are conducted to verify the proposed model.

  5. Model for describing plasmonic nanolasers using Maxwell-Liouville equations with finite-difference time-domain calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Dhara J.; Wang, Danqing; Odom, Teri W.; Schatz, George C.

    2017-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of lasing action when plasmonic metallic structures that show lattice plasmon resonances are embedded in a gain medium. Our model combines classical electrodynamics for arrays of gold nanoparticles with a four-level quantum Liouville model of the laser dye photophysics. A numerical solution was implemented using finite-difference time-domain calculations coupled with a finite-difference solution to the Liouville equation. A particular focus of this work is the influence of dephasing in the quantum dynamics on the emission intensity at the threshold for lasing. We find that dephasing in the quantum system leads to reduced lasing emission, but with little effect on the long-term population inversion. Both electronic and vibrational dephasing is considered, but only electronic dephasing is significant, with the fully dephased result appearing for dephasing times comparable to plasmon dephasing (˜10 fs) while fully coherent results involve >100 ps dephasing times as determined by the rate of stimulated emission. There are factor-of-2 differences between the Maxwell-Liouville results (greater emission intensities and narrower widths) compared to the corresponding results of rate-equation models of the dye states, which indicates the importance of using the Maxwell-Liouville approach in modeling these systems. We also examine rate-equation models with and without constraints arising from the Pauli exclusion principle, and we find relatively small effects.

  6. The cost of continuity: A study of the performance of isogeometric finite elements using direct solvers

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2012-03-01

    We study the performance of direct solvers on linear systems of equations resulting from isogeometric analysis. The problem of choice is the canonical Laplace equation in three dimensions. From this study we conclude that for a fixed number of unknowns and polynomial degree of approximation, a higher degree of continuity k drastically increases the CPU time and RAM needed to solve the problem when using a direct solver. This paper presents numerical results detailing the phenomenon as well as a theoretical analysis that explains the underlying cause. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Parallel multigrid solver of radiative transfer equation for photon transport via graphics processing unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hao; Phan, Lan; Lin, Yuting

    2012-09-01

    A graphics processing unit-based parallel multigrid solver for a radiative transfer equation with vacuum boundary condition or reflection boundary condition is presented for heterogeneous media with complex geometry based on two-dimensional triangular meshes or three-dimensional tetrahedral meshes. The computational complexity of this parallel solver is linearly proportional to the degrees of freedom in both angular and spatial variables, while the full multigrid method is utilized to minimize the number of iterations. The overall gain of speed is roughly 30 to 300 fold with respect to our prior multigrid solver, which depends on the underlying regime and the parallelization. The numerical validations are presented with the MATLAB codes at https://sites.google.com/site/rtefastsolver/.

  8. Finite-Difference Algorithm for Simulating 3D Electromagnetic Wavefields in Conductive Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) wavefields are routinely used in geophysical exploration for detection and characterization of subsurface geological formations of economic interest. Recorded EM signals depend strongly on the current conductivity of geologic media. Hence, they are particularly useful for inferring fluid content of saturated porous bodies. In order to enhance understanding of field-recorded data, we are developing a numerical algorithm for simulating three-dimensional (3D) EM wave propagation and diffusion in heterogeneous conductive materials. Maxwell's equations are combined with isotropic constitutive relations to obtain a set of six, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing the electric and magnetic vectors. An advantage of this system is that it does not contain spatial derivatives of the three medium parameters electric permittivity, magnetic permeability, and current conductivity. Numerical solution methodology consists of explicit, time-domain finite-differencing on a 3D staggered rectangular grid. Temporal and spatial FD operators have order 2 and N, where N is user-selectable. We use an artificially-large electric permittivity to maximize the FD timestep, and thus reduce execution time. For the low frequencies typically used in geophysical exploration, accuracy is not unduly compromised. Grid boundary reflections are mitigated via convolutional perfectly matched layers (C-PMLs) imposed at the six grid flanks. A shared-memory-parallel code implementation via OpenMP directives enables rapid algorithm execution on a multi-thread computational platform. Good agreement is obtained in comparisons of numerically-generated data with reference solutions. EM wavefields are sourced via point current density and magnetic dipole vectors. Spatially-extended inductive sources (current carrying wire loops) are under development. We are particularly interested in accurate representation of high-conductivity sub-grid-scale features that are common

  9. Directional excitation of Rg due to ripple-fired explosions: 2-Dimensional finite-difference simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jih, Rong-Song

    1993-01-01

    A major issue for the Non-Proliferation Treaty is the discrimination of large chemical explosions from possible clandestine or small nuclear tests. Unless discrimination is possible, the numerous mining blasts could give ample opportunity for concealing clandestine tests. Ripple-fired explosions are commonly used to fragment rocks during quarry and open-pit mining. The periodicity inherent in the ripple firing could produce a seismic reinforcement at the frequency of the delay between shots or rows. It has been suggested that the convolution of a single explosion with a comb function of variable spacing and variable amplitude can be used to model the distinctive signature of ripple firing. Baumgardt and Ziegler (1988) delicately demonstrated that the incoherent array-stack spectra can be used to identify some multiple shots recorded at NORSAR. By superpositioning the waveform due to a single shot with proper time delay, they were able to model the source multiplicity under the assumption that the spatial spreading of the shots is negligible with respect to the distance to the receiver. The work by Stump et al. successfully characterized the major features of the wavefield due to ripple firings at near-source ranges

  10. Modeling of frequency-domain scalar wave equation with the average-derivative optimal scheme based on a multigrid-preconditioned iterative solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Chen, Jing-Bo; Dai, Meng-Xue

    2018-01-01

    An efficient finite-difference frequency-domain modeling of seismic wave propagation relies on the discrete schemes and appropriate solving methods. The average-derivative optimal scheme for the scalar wave modeling is advantageous in terms of the storage saving for the system of linear equations and the flexibility for arbitrary directional sampling intervals. However, using a LU-decomposition-based direct solver to solve its resulting system of linear equations is very costly for both memory and computational requirements. To address this issue, we consider establishing a multigrid-preconditioned BI-CGSTAB iterative solver fit for the average-derivative optimal scheme. The choice of preconditioning matrix and its corresponding multigrid components is made with the help of Fourier spectral analysis and local mode analysis, respectively, which is important for the convergence. Furthermore, we find that for the computation with unequal directional sampling interval, the anisotropic smoothing in the multigrid precondition may affect the convergence rate of this iterative solver. Successful numerical applications of this iterative solver for the homogenous and heterogeneous models in 2D and 3D are presented where the significant reduction of computer memory and the improvement of computational efficiency are demonstrated by comparison with the direct solver. In the numerical experiments, we also show that the unequal directional sampling interval will weaken the advantage of this multigrid-preconditioned iterative solver in the computing speed or, even worse, could reduce its accuracy in some cases, which implies the need for a reasonable control of directional sampling interval in the discretization.

  11. Finite differences versus finite elements in slab geometry, even-parity transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.F. Jr.; Noh, T.

    1993-01-01

    There continues to be considerable interest in the application of the even-parity transport equation to problems of radiation transfer and neutron transport. The motivation for this interest arises from several potential advantages of this equation when compared with the more traditional first-order form of the equation. First, assuming that the scalar flux is of primary interest, the angular domain under consideration is one-half of that required for the first-order equation. Thus, for the same degree of accuracy, one would hopefully require substantiably fewer unknown values of the dependent variable to be determined. Secondly, the elliptic-like nature of the set of even-parity equations should allow certain parallel computer architectures to be used more readily. In a recent paper, it was shown that for neutron transport applications in slab geometry, finite differencing the even-parity equation on the cell edges yields algebraic equations with numerical properties that are superior to the traditional diamond difference approach. Specifically, a positive, second-order method with a rapidly convergent iteration approach emerged from cell-edge differencing. Additionally, for radiation transfer problems that are optically thick, it was shown that cell-edge differencing demonstrates better behavior than does diamond-differencing. However, some problems in accuracy could occur due to vacuum boundaries as well as at interfaces between very different types of material regions. These problems emerge from a boundary-layer analysis of the so called open-quotes thickclose quotes diffusion limit. For neutronics calculations, which are the subject of this paper, however, the open-quotes thickclose quotes diffusion limit analysis has little applicability, and the cell-edge differencing derived previously seems to have considerable promise. 13 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Inverse Interpolation: The Rate of Enzymatic Reaction based Finite differences, Formulas for obtaining intermediate values of Temperature, Substrate Concentration, Enzyme Concentration and their Estimation of Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Nizam Uddin

    2013-01-01

    Inverse interpolation is the process of finding the values of the argument corresponding to a given value of the function when the latter is intermediate between two tabulated values. The finite differences are differences between the values of the function or the difference between the past differences. Finite differences are forward difference, backward difference and divide difference. Temperature, concentration of substrate, concentration of enzyme and other factors are affected the rate ...

  13. Second order accurate finite difference approximations for the transonic small disturbance equation and the full potential equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostrel, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    New shock-capturing finite difference approximations for solving two scalar conservation law nonlinear partial differential equations describing inviscid, isentropic, compressible flows of aerodynamics at transonic speeds are presented. A global linear stability theorem is applied to these schemes in order to derive a necessary and sufficient condition for the finite element method. A technique is proposed to render the described approximations total variation-stable by applying the flux limiters to the nonlinear terms of the difference equation dimension by dimension. An entropy theorem applying to the approximations is proved, and an implicit, forward Euler-type time discretization of the approximation is presented. Results of some numerical experiments using the approximations are reported.

  14. Finite-Difference Time-Domain Simulation of Light Propagation in 2D Periodic and Quasi-Periodic Photonic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dadashzadeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-short pulse is a promising technology for achieving ultra-high data rate transmission which is required to follow the increased demand of data transport over an optical communication system. Therefore, the propagation of such type of pulses and the effects that it may suffer during its transmission through an optical waveguide has received a great deal of attention in the recent years. We provide an overview of recent theoretical developments in a numerical modeling of Maxwell's equations to analyze the propagation of short laser pulses in photonic structures. The process of short light pulse propagation through 2D periodic and quasi-periodic photonic structures is simulated based on Finite-Difference Time-Domain calculations of Maxwell’s equations.

  15. Solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equation using cubic B-spline interpolation and finite difference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Azhar; Azmi, Amirah; Majid, Ahmad Abd.; Hamid, Nur Nadiah Abd

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, Nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with Neumann boundary conditions is solved using finite difference method (FDM) and cubic B-spline interpolation method (CuBSIM). First, the approach is based on the FDM applied on the time and space discretization with the help of theta-weighted method. However, our main interest is the second approach, whereby FDM is applied on the time discretization and cubic B-spline is utilized as an interpolation function in the space dimension with the same help of theta-weighted method. The CuBSIM is shown to be stable by using von Neumann stability analysis. The proposed method is tested on a test problem with single soliton motion of the NLS equation. The accuracy of the numerical results is measured by the Euclidean-norm and infinity-norm. CuBSIM is found to produce more accurate results than the FDM.

  16. Performance Improvements for Coarse Mesh Finite Difference Acceleration L3:RTM.PRT.P13.02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Benjamin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hamilton, Steven P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yee, Ben [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Larsen, Edward W. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kochunas, Brendan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-05-31

    The development of VERA-CS in recent years has focused on developing the capability to simulate multiple cycles of operating commercial nuclear power plants. Now that these capabilities have advanced to the point where it is being deployed to users, the focus is on improving the computational performance of various components in VERA-CS. In this work, the focus is on the Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) solution in MPACT. CMFD serves multiple purposes in the 2D/1D solution methodology. First, it is a natural mechanism to tie together the radial MOC transport and the axial SP3 solution. Because the CMFD system solves the multigroup three-dimensional core in one system, it pulls together the global response of the system. In addition, the CMFD solution provides a framework to accelerate the convergence of the eigenvalue problem.

  17. A Radial Basis Function (RBF)-Finite Difference (FD) Method for Diffusion and Reaction-Diffusion Equations on Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Varun; Wright, Grady B; Kirby, Robert M; Fogelson, Aaron L

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a method based on Radial Basis Function (RBF)-generated Finite Differences (FD) for numerically solving diffusion and reaction-diffusion equations (PDEs) on closed surfaces embedded in ℝ d . Our method uses a method-of-lines formulation, in which surface derivatives that appear in the PDEs are approximated locally using RBF interpolation. The method requires only scattered nodes representing the surface and normal vectors at those scattered nodes. All computations use only extrinsic coordinates, thereby avoiding coordinate distortions and singularities. We also present an optimization procedure that allows for the stabilization of the discrete differential operators generated by our RBF-FD method by selecting shape parameters for each stencil that correspond to a global target condition number. We show the convergence of our method on two surfaces for different stencil sizes, and present applications to nonlinear PDEs simulated both on implicit/parametric surfaces and more general surfaces represented by point clouds.

  18. A study of infrasound propagation based on high-order finite difference solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, O; Bogey, C; Bailly, C

    2014-03-01

    The feasibility of using numerical simulation of fluid dynamics equations for the detailed description of long-range infrasound propagation in the atmosphere is investigated. The two dimensional (2D) Navier Stokes equations are solved via high fidelity spatial finite differences and Runge-Kutta time integration, coupled with a shock-capturing filter procedure allowing large amplitudes to be studied. The accuracy of acoustic prediction over long distances with this approach is first assessed in the linear regime thanks to two test cases featuring an acoustic source placed above a reflective ground in a homogeneous and weakly inhomogeneous medium, solved for a range of grid resolutions. An atmospheric model which can account for realistic features affecting acoustic propagation is then described. A 2D study of the effect of source amplitude on signals recorded at ground level at varying distances from the source is carried out. Modifications both in terms of waveforms and arrival times are described.

  19. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L. (U.S. Army Research Laboratory); Marlin, David H. (U.S. Army Research Laboratory); Ostashev, Vladimir E. (NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory); Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith (U.S. Army Cold Regions Research Engineering Lab.)

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  20. Tomographic reconstruction of melanin structures of optical coherence tomography via the finite-difference time-domain simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Hao; Wang, Shiang-Jiu; Tseng, Snow H.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high resolution, cross-sectional image of internal microstructure of biological tissue. We use the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method (FDTD) to analyze the data acquired by OCT, which can help us reconstruct the refractive index of the biological tissue. We calculate the refractive index tomography and try to match the simulation with the data acquired by OCT. Specifically, we try to reconstruct the structure of melanin, which has complex refractive indices and is the key component of human pigment system. The results indicate that better reconstruction can be achieved for homogenous sample, whereas the reconstruction is degraded for samples with fine structure or with complex interface. Simulation reconstruction shows structures of the Melanin that may be useful for biomedical optics applications.

  1. Combining finite element and finite difference methods for isotropic elastic wave simulations in an energy-conserving manner

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Longfei

    2018-02-22

    We consider numerical simulation of the isotropic elastic wave equations arising from seismic applications with non-trivial land topography. The more flexible finite element method is applied to the shallow region of the simulation domain to account for the topography, and combined with the more efficient finite difference method that is applied to the deep region of the simulation domain. We demonstrate that these two discretization methods, albeit starting from different formulations of the elastic wave equation, can be joined together smoothly via weakly imposed interface conditions. Discrete energy analysis is employed to derive the proper interface treatment, leading to an overall discretization that is energy-conserving. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed interface treatment.

  2. On Long-Time Instabilities in Staggered Finite Difference Simulations of the Seismic Acoustic Wave Equations on Discontinuous Grids

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Longfei

    2017-10-26

    We consider the long-time instability issue associated with finite difference simulation of seismic acoustic wave equations on discontinuous grids. This issue is exhibited by a prototype algebraic problem abstracted from practical application settings. Analysis of this algebraic problem leads to better understanding of the cause of the instability and provides guidance for its treatment. Specifically, we use the concept of discrete energy to derive the proper solution transfer operators and design an effective way to damp the unstable solution modes. Our investigation shows that the interpolation operators need to be matched with their companion restriction operators in order to properly couple the coarse and fine grids. Moreover, to provide effective damping, specially designed diffusive terms are introduced to the equations at designated locations and discretized with specially designed schemes. These techniques are applied to simulations in practical settings and are shown to lead to superior results in terms of both stability and accuracy.

  3. The finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method for electromagnetic scattering and interaction problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taflove, A.; Umashankar, K. R.

    1987-01-01

    The formulation and recent applications of the finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method for the numerical modeling of electromagnetic scattering and interaction problems are considered. It is shown that improvements in FD-TD modeling concepts and software implementation often make it a preferable choice for structures which cannot be easily treated by conventional integral equations and asymptotic approaches. Recent FD-TD modeling validations in research areas including coupling to wires and wire bundles in free space and cavities, scattering from surfaces in relativistic motion, inverse scattering, and radiation condition theory, are reviewed. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of FD-TD, and guidelines concerning when FD-TD should and should not be used in high-frequency electromagnetic modeling problems, are summarized.

  4. Implementation of Unsplit Perfectly Matched Layer Absorbing Boundary Condition in 3 Dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. U. Musa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The C++ programming language was used to implement three-dimensional (3-D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD technique to simulate radiation of high frequency electromagnetic waves in free space. To achieve any meaningful results the computational domain of interest should have to be truncated in some way and this is achieved by applying absorbing boundary conditions. A uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML absorbing boundary condition is used in this work. The discretised equations of the UPML in FDTD time stepping scheme were derived and has been successfully implemented using the computer program. Simulation results showed that the UPML behaves as an absorber. This was confirmed by comparing the results with another boundary condition, the Mur ABC.

  5. An efficient finite differences method for the computation of compressible, subsonic, unsteady flows past airfoils and panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colera, Manuel; Pérez-Saborid, Miguel

    2017-09-01

    A finite differences scheme is proposed in this work to compute in the time domain the compressible, subsonic, unsteady flow past an aerodynamic airfoil using the linearized potential theory. It improves and extends the original method proposed in this journal by Hariharan, Ping and Scott [1] by considering: (i) a non-uniform mesh, (ii) an implicit time integration algorithm, (iii) a vectorized implementation and (iv) the coupled airfoil dynamics and fluid dynamic loads. First, we have formulated the method for cases in which the airfoil motion is given. The scheme has been tested on well known problems in unsteady aerodynamics -such as the response to a sudden change of the angle of attack and to a harmonic motion of the airfoil- and has been proved to be more accurate and efficient than other finite differences and vortex-lattice methods found in the literature. Secondly, we have coupled our method to the equations governing the airfoil dynamics in order to numerically solve problems where the airfoil motion is unknown a priori as happens, for example, in the cases of the flutter and the divergence of a typical section of a wing or of a flexible panel. Apparently, this is the first self-consistent and easy-to-implement numerical analysis in the time domain of the compressible, linearized coupled dynamics of the (generally flexible) airfoil-fluid system carried out in the literature. The results for the particular case of a rigid airfoil show excellent agreement with those reported by other authors, whereas those obtained for the case of a cantilevered flexible airfoil in compressible flow seem to be original or, at least, not well-known.

  6. A new 3D Eikonal solver for accurate traveltimes, take-off angles and amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Mark; Gesret, Alexandrine

    2013-04-01

    The finite-difference approximation to the eikonal equation was first introduced by J.Vidale in 1988 to propagate first-arrival times throughout a 2D or 3D gridded velocity model. Even today this method is still very attractive from a computational point of view when dealing with large datasets. Among many domains of application, the eikonal solver may be used for 2-D or 3-D depth migration, tomography or microseismicity data analysis. The original 3D method proposed by Vidale in 1990 did exhibit some degree of travel time error that may lead to poor image focusing in migration or inaccurate velocities estimated via tomographic inversion. The method even failed when large and sharp velocity contrasts were encountered. To try and overcome these limitations many authors proposed alternative algorithms, incorporating new finite-difference operators and/or new schemes of implementing the operators to propagate the travel times through the velocity model. If many recently published algorithms for resolving the 3D eikonal equation do yield fairly accurate travel times for most applications, the spatial derivatives of travel times remain very approximate and prevent reliable computation of auxiliary quantities such as take-off angle and amplitude. This limitation is due to the fact that the finite-difference operators locally assume that the wavefront is flat (plane wave). This assumption is in particularly wrong when close to the source where a spherical approximation would be more suitable. To overcome this singularity at the source, some authors proposed an adaptive method that reduces inaccuracies, however, the cost is more algorithmic complexity. The objective of this study is to develop an efficient simple 3D eikonal solver that is able to: overcome the problem of the source singularity, handle velocity models that exhibit strong vertical and horizontal velocity variations, use different grid spacing in x, y and z axis of model. The final goal is of course to

  7. vZ - An Optimizing SMT Solver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Nikolaj; Dung, Phan Anh; Fleckenstein, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Z provides a portfolio of approaches for solving linear optimization problems over SMT formulas, MaxSMT, and their combinations. Objective functions are combined as either Pareto fronts, lexicographically, or each objective is optimized independently. We describe usage scenarios of vZ, outline the tool......vZ is a part of the SMT solver Z3. It allows users to pose and solve optimization problems modulo theories. Many SMT applications use models to provide satisfying assignments, and a growing number of these build on top of Z3 to get optimal assignments with respect to objective functions. v...

  8. The Openpipeflow Navier–Stokes solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley P. Willis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pipelines are used in a huge range of industrial processes involving fluids, and the ability to accurately predict properties of the flow through a pipe is of fundamental engineering importance. Armed with parallel MPI, Arnoldi and Newton–Krylov solvers, the Openpipeflow code can be used in a range of settings, from large-scale simulation of highly turbulent flow, to the detailed analysis of nonlinear invariant solutions (equilibria and periodic orbits and their influence on the dynamics of the flow.

  9. Metaheuristics progress as real problem solvers

    CERN Document Server

    Nonobe, Koji; Yagiura, Mutsunori

    2005-01-01

    Metaheuristics: Progress as Real Problem Solvers is a peer-reviewed volume of eighteen current, cutting-edge papers by leading researchers in the field. Included are an invited paper by F. Glover and G. Kochenberger, which discusses the concept of Metaheuristic agent processes, and a tutorial paper by M.G.C. Resende and C.C. Ribeiro discussing GRASP with path-relinking. Other papers discuss problem-solving approaches to timetabling, automated planograms, elevators, space allocation, shift design, cutting stock, flexible shop scheduling, colorectal cancer and cartography. A final group of methodology papers clarify various aspects of Metaheuristics from the computational view point.

  10. New multigrid solver advances in TOPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falgout, R D; Brannick, J; Brezina, M; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we highlight new multigrid solver advances in the Terascale Optimal PDE Simulations (TOPS) project in the Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. We discuss two new algebraic multigrid (AMG) developments in TOPS: the adaptive smoothed aggregation method (αSA) and a coarse-grid selection algorithm based on compatible relaxation (CR). The αSA method is showing promising results in initial studies for Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) applications. The CR method has the potential to greatly improve the applicability of AMG

  11. A finite element field solver for dipole modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element field solver for dipole modes in axisymmetric structures has been written. The second-order elements used in this formulation yield accurate mode frequencies with no spurious modes. Quasi-periodic boundaries are included to allow travelling waves in periodic structures. The solver is useful in applications requiring precise frequency calculations such as detuned accelerator structures for linear colliders. Comparisons are made with measurements and with the popular but less accurate field solver URMEL. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs

  12. Two-dimensional finite difference model to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise in cold climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Babita; Adlakha, Neeru

    2015-02-01

    Thermoregulation is a complex mechanism regulating heat production within the body (chemical thermoregulation) and heat exchange between the body and the environment (physical thermoregulation) in such a way that the heat exchange is balanced and deep body temperatures are relatively stable. The external heat transfer mechanisms are radiation, conduction, convection and evaporation. The physical activity causes thermal stress and poses challenges for this thermoregulation. In this paper, a model has been developed to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise under cold climate. It is assumed that the subject is doing exercise initially and comes to rest at time t = 0. The human limb is assumed to be of cylindrical shape. The peripheral region of limb is divided into three natural components namely epidermis, dermis and subdermal tissues (SST). Appropriate boundary conditions have been framed based on the physical conditions of the problem. Finite difference has been employed for time, radial and angular variables. The numerical results have been used to obtain temperature profiles in the SST region immediately after continuous exercise for a two-dimensional unsteady state case. The results have been used to analyze the thermal stress in relation to light, moderate and vigorous intensity exercise.

  13. Three-dimensional inversion of magnetotelluric data from the Coso Geothermal Field, based on a finite difference Gauss-Newton method parallelized on a multicore workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Virginie

    An existing 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) inversion program written for a single processor personal computer (PC) has been modified and parallelized using OpenMP, in order to run the program efficiently on a multicore workstation. The program uses the Gauss-Newton inversion algorithm based on a staggered-grid finite-difference forward problem, requiring explicit calculation of the Frechet derivatives. The most time-consuming tasks are calculating the derivatives and determining the model parameters at each iteration. Forward modeling and derivative calculations are parallelized by assigning the calculations for each frequency to separate threads, which execute concurrently. Model parameters are obtained by factoring the Hessian using the LDLT method, implemented using a block-cyclic algorithm and compact storage. MT data from 102 tensor stations over the East Flank of the Coso Geothermal Field, California are inverted. Less than three days are required to invert the dataset for ˜ 55,000 inversion parameters on a 2.66 GHz 8-CPU PC with 16 GB of RAM. Inversion results, recovered from a halfspace rather than initial 2-D inversions, qualitatively resemble models from massively parallel 3-D inversion by other researchers and overall, exhibit an improved fit. A steeply west-dipping conductor under the western East Flank is tentatively correlated with a zone of high-temperature ionic fluids based on known well production and lost circulation intervals. Beneath the Main Field, vertical and north-trending shallow conductors are correlated with geothermal producing intervals as well.

  14. Water quality model parameter identification of an open channel in a long distance water transfer project based on finite difference, difference evolution and Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dongguo; Yang, Haidong; Xiao, Yi; Liu, Biyu

    2014-01-01

    A new method is proposed based on the finite difference method (FDM), differential evolution algorithm and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation to identify water quality model parameters of an open channel in a long distance water transfer project. Firstly, this parameter identification problem is considered as a Bayesian estimation problem and the forward numerical model is solved by FDM, and the posterior probability density function of the parameters is deduced. Then these parameters are estimated using a sampling method with differential evolution algorithm and MCMC simulation. Finally this proposed method is compared with FDM-MCMC by a twin experiment. The results show that the proposed method can be used to identify water quality model parameters of an open channel in a long distance water transfer project under different scenarios better with fewer iterations, higher reliability and anti-noise capability compared with FDM-MCMC. Therefore, it provides a new idea and method to solve the traceability problem in sudden water pollution accidents.

  15. Optimización con Solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez Álvarez , I.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available La relevancia de los problemas de optimización en el mundo empresarial ha generado la introducción de herramientas de optimización cada vez más sofisticadas en las últimas versiones de las hojas de cálculo de utilización generalizada. Estas utilidades, conocidas habitualmente como «solvers», constituyen una alternativa a los programas especializados de optimización cuando no se trata de problemas de gran escala, presentado la ventaja de su facilidad de uso y de comunicación con el usuario final. Frontline Systems Inc es la empresa que desarrolla el «solver» de Excel, si bien existen asimismo versiones para Lotus y Quattro Pro con ligeras diferencias de uso. En su dirección de internet (www.frontsys.com se puede obtener información técnica sobre las diferentes versiones de dicha utilidad y diversos aspectos operativos del programa, algunos de los cuales se comentan en este trabajo.

  16. A sparse-grid isogeometric solver

    KAUST Repository

    Beck, Joakim

    2018-02-28

    Isogeometric Analysis (IGA) typically adopts tensor-product splines and NURBS as a basis for the approximation of the solution of PDEs. In this work, we investigate to which extent IGA solvers can benefit from the so-called sparse-grids construction in its combination technique form, which was first introduced in the early 90’s in the context of the approximation of high-dimensional PDEs.The tests that we report show that, in accordance to the literature, a sparse-grid construction can indeed be useful if the solution of the PDE at hand is sufficiently smooth. Sparse grids can also be useful in the case of non-smooth solutions when some a-priori knowledge on the location of the singularities of the solution can be exploited to devise suitable non-equispaced meshes. Finally, we remark that sparse grids can be seen as a simple way to parallelize pre-existing serial IGA solvers in a straightforward fashion, which can be beneficial in many practical situations.

  17. A sparse version of IGA solvers

    KAUST Repository

    Beck, Joakim

    2017-07-30

    Isogeometric Analysis (IGA) typically adopts tensor-product splines and NURBS as a basis for the approximation of the solution of PDEs. In this work, we investigate to which extent IGA solvers can benefit from the so-called sparse-grids construction in its combination technique form, which was first introduced in the early 90s in the context of the approximation of high-dimensional PDEs. The tests that we report show that, in accordance to the literature, a sparse grids construction can indeed be useful if the solution of the PDE at hand is sufficiently smooth. Sparse grids can also be useful in the case of non-smooth solutions when some a-priori knowledge on the location of the singularities of the solution can be exploited to devise suitable non-equispaced meshes. Finally, we remark that sparse grids can be seen as a simple way to parallelize pre-existing serial IGA solvers in a straightforward fashion, which can be beneficial in many practical situations.

  18. Periodic Density Functional Theory Solver using Multiresolution Analysis with MADNESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert; Thornton, William

    2011-03-01

    We describe the first implementation of the all-electron Kohn-Sham density functional periodic solver (DFT) using multi-wavelets and fast integral equations using MADNESS (multiresolution adaptive numerical environment for scientific simulation; http://code.google.com/p/m-a-d-n-e-s-s). The multiresolution nature of a multi-wavelet basis allows for fast computation with guaranteed precision. By reformulating the Kohn-Sham eigenvalue equation into the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, we can avoid using the derivative operator which allows better control of overall precision for the all-electron problem. Other highlights include the development of periodic integral operators with low-rank separation, an adaptable model potential for nuclear potential, and an implementation for Hartree Fock exchange. This work was supported by NSF project OCI-0904972 and made use of resources at the Center for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  19. Optimally Accurate Second-Order Time-Domain Finite-Difference Scheme for Acoustic, Electromagnetic, and Elastic Wave Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bommaraju

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical methods are extremely useful in solving real-life problems with complex materials and geometries. However, numerical methods in the time domain suffer from artificial numerical dispersion. Standard numerical techniques which are second-order in space and time, like the conventional Finite Difference 3-point (FD3 method, Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method, and Finite Integration Technique (FIT provide estimates of the error of discretized numerical operators rather than the error of the numerical solutions computed using these operators. Here optimally accurate time-domain FD operators which are second-order in time as well as in space are derived. Optimal accuracy means the greatest attainable accuracy for a particular type of scheme, e.g., second-order FD, for some particular grid spacing. The modified operators lead to an implicit scheme. Using the first order Born approximation, this implicit scheme is transformed into a two step explicit scheme, namely predictor-corrector scheme. The stability condition (maximum time step for a given spatial grid interval for the various modified schemes is roughly equal to that for the corresponding conventional scheme. The modified FD scheme (FDM attains reduction of numerical dispersion almost by a factor of 40 in 1-D case, compared to the FD3, FDTD, and FIT. The CPU time for the FDM scheme is twice of that required by the FD3 method. The simulated synthetic data for a 2-D P-SV (elastodynamics problem computed using the modified scheme are 30 times more accurate than synthetics computed using a conventional scheme, at a cost of only 3.5 times as much CPU time. The FDM is of particular interest in the modeling of large scale (spatial dimension is more or equal to one thousand wave lengths or observation time interval is very high compared to reference time step wave propagation and scattering problems, for instance, in ultrasonic antenna and synthetic scattering data modeling for Non

  20. Experiences with linear solvers for oil reservoir simulation problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joubert, W.; Janardhan, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Biswas, D.; Carey, G.

    1996-12-31

    This talk will focus on practical experiences with iterative linear solver algorithms used in conjunction with Amoco Production Company`s Falcon oil reservoir simulation code. The goal of this study is to determine the best linear solver algorithms for these types of problems. The results of numerical experiments will be presented.

  1. A Novel Interactive MINLP Solver for CAPE Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Peter; Støy, S.; Russel, Boris Mariboe

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive MINLP solver that is particularly suitable for solution of process synthesis, design and analysis problems. The interactive MINLP solver is based on the decomposition based MINLP algorithms, where a NLP sub-problem is solved in the innerloop and a MILP master...

  2. Integrating Problem Solvers from Analogous Markets in New Product Ideation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franke, Nikolaus; Poetz, Marion; Schreier, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Who provides better inputs to new product ideation tasks, problem solvers with expertise in the area for which new products are to be developed or problem solvers from “analogous” markets that are distant but share an analogous problem or need? Conventional wisdom appears to suggest that target...

  3. VDJSeq-Solver: in silico V(DJ recombination detection tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Paciello

    Full Text Available In this paper we present VDJSeq-Solver, a methodology and tool to identify clonal lymphocyte populations from paired-end RNA Sequencing reads derived from the sequencing of mRNA neoplastic cells. The tool detects the main clone that characterises the tissue of interest by recognizing the most abundant V(DJ rearrangement among the existing ones in the sample under study. The exact sequence of the clone identified is capable of accounting for the modifications introduced by the enzymatic processes. The proposed tool overcomes limitations of currently available lymphocyte rearrangements recognition methods, working on a single sequence at a time, that are not applicable to high-throughput sequencing data. In this work, VDJSeq-Solver has been applied to correctly detect the main clone and identify its sequence on five Mantle Cell Lymphoma samples; then the tool has been tested on twelve Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma samples. In order to comply with the privacy, ethics and intellectual property policies of the University Hospital and the University of Verona, data is available upon request to supporto.utenti@ateneo.univr.it after signing a mandatory Materials Transfer Agreement. VDJSeq-Solver JAVA/Perl/Bash software implementation is free and available at http://eda.polito.it/VDJSeq-Solver/.

  4. Three-dimensional viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference seismic modelling using the staggered Adams-Bashforth time integrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlen, Thomas; Wittkamp, Florian

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the performance of a higher order accurate staggered viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference method, in which the staggered Adams-Bashforth (ABS) third-order and fourth-order accurate time integrators are used for temporal discretization. ABS is a multistep method that uses previously calculated wavefields to increase the order of accuracy in time. The analysis shows that the numerical dispersion is much lower than that of the widely used second-order leapfrog method. Numerical dissipation is introduced by the ABS method which is significantly smaller for fourth-order than third-order accuracy. In 1-D and 3-D simulation experiments, we verify the convincing improvements of simulation accuracy of the fourth-order ABS method. In a realistic elastic 3-D scenario, the computing time reduces by a factor of approximately 2.4, whereas the memory requirements increase by approximately a factor of 2.2. The ABS method thus provides an alternative strategy to increase the simulation accuracy in time by investing computer memory instead of computing time.

  5. Hybrid approach combining dissipative particle dynamics and finite-difference diffusion model: simulation of reactive polymer coupling and interfacial polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezkin, Anatoly V; Kudryavtsev, Yaroslav V

    2013-10-21

    A novel hybrid approach combining dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and finite difference (FD) solution of partial differential equations is proposed to simulate complex reaction-diffusion phenomena in heterogeneous systems. DPD is used for the detailed molecular modeling of mass transfer, chemical reactions, and phase separation near the liquid∕liquid interface, while FD approach is applied to describe the large-scale diffusion of reactants outside the reaction zone. A smooth, self-consistent procedure of matching the solute concentration is performed in the buffer region between the DPD and FD domains. The new model is tested on a simple model system admitting an analytical solution for the diffusion controlled regime and then applied to simulate practically important heterogeneous processes of (i) reactive coupling between immiscible end-functionalized polymers and (ii) interfacial polymerization of two monomers dissolved in immiscible solvents. The results obtained due to extending the space and time scales accessible to modeling provide new insights into the kinetics and mechanism of those processes and demonstrate high robustness and accuracy of the novel technique.

  6. Numerical solution of the state-delayed optimal control problems by a fast and accurate finite difference θ-method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajipour, Mojtaba; Jajarmi, Amin

    2018-02-01

    Using the Pontryagin's maximum principle for a time-delayed optimal control problem results in a system of coupled two-point boundary-value problems (BVPs) involving both time-advance and time-delay arguments. The analytical solution of this advance-delay two-point BVP is extremely difficult, if not impossible. This paper provides a discrete general form of the numerical solution for the derived advance-delay system by applying a finite difference θ-method. This method is also implemented for the infinite-time horizon time-delayed optimal control problems by using a piecewise version of the θ-method. A matrix formulation and the error analysis of the suggested technique are provided. The new scheme is accurate, fast and very effective for the optimal control of linear and nonlinear time-delay systems. Various types of finite- and infinite-time horizon problems are included to demonstrate the accuracy, validity and applicability of the new technique.

  7. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity Using Finite-Difference Fluid/Finite-Element Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In recent years significant advances have been made for parallel computers in both hardware and software. Now parallel computers have become viable tools in computational mechanics. Many application codes developed on conventional computers have been modified to benefit from parallel computers. Significant speedups in some areas have been achieved by parallel computations. For single-discipline use of both fluid dynamics and structural dynamics, computations have been made on wing-body configurations using parallel computers. However, only a limited amount of work has been completed in combining these two disciplines for multidisciplinary applications. The prime reason is the increased level of complication associated with a multidisciplinary approach. In this work, procedures to compute aeroelasticity on parallel computers using direct coupling of fluid and structural equations will be investigated for wing-body configurations. The parallel computer selected for computations is an Intel iPSC/860 computer which is a distributed-memory, multiple-instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computer with 128 processors. In this study, the computational efficiency issues of parallel integration of both fluid and structural equations will be investigated in detail. The fluid and structural domains will be modeled using finite-difference and finite-element approaches, respectively. Results from the parallel computer will be compared with those from the conventional computers using a single processor. This study will provide an efficient computational tool for the aeroelastic analysis of wing-body structures on MIMD type parallel computers.

  8. Experiences with explicit finite-difference schemes for complex fluid dynamics problems on STAR-100 and CYBER-203 computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Rudy, D. H.; Drummond, J. P.; Harris, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Several two- and three-dimensional external and internal flow problems solved on the STAR-100 and CYBER-203 vector processing computers are described. The flow field was described by the full Navier-Stokes equations which were then solved by explicit finite-difference algorithms. Problem results and computer system requirements are presented. Program organization and data base structure for three-dimensional computer codes which will eliminate or improve on page faulting, are discussed. Storage requirements for three-dimensional codes are reduced by calculating transformation metric data in each step. As a result, in-core grid points were increased in number by 50% to 150,000, with a 10% execution time increase. An assessment of current and future machine requirements shows that even on the CYBER-205 computer only a few problems can be solved realistically. Estimates reveal that the present situation is more storage limited than compute rate limited, but advancements in both storage and speed are essential to realistically calculate three-dimensional flow.

  9. Finite Difference Energy Method for nonlinear numerical analysis of reinforced concrete slab using simplified isotropic damage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. A. Lima

    Full Text Available This work presents a model to predict the flexural behavior of reinforced concrete slabs, combining the Mazars damage model for simulation of the loss of stiffness of the concrete during the cracking process and the Classical Theory of Laminates, to govern the bending of the structural element. A variational formulation based on the principle of virtual work was developed for the model, and then treated numerically according to the Finite Difference Energy Method, with the end result a program developed in Fortran. To validate the model thus proposed have been simulated with the program, some cases of slabs in flexure in the literature. The evaluation of the results obtained in this study demonstrated the capability of the model, in view of the good predictability of the behavior of slabs in flexure, sweeping the path of equilibrium to the rupture of the structural element. Besides the satisfactory prediction of the behavior observed as positive aspects of the model to its relative simplicity and reduced number of experimental parameters necessary for modeling.

  10. A novel 2.5D finite difference scheme for simulations of resistivity logging in anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shubin; Chen, Fangzhou; Li, Dawei; Chen, Ji; Chen, Jiefu

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a method to model 3D resistivity well logging problems in 2D formation with anisotropy, known as 2.5D modeling. The traditional 1D forward modeling extensively used in practice lacks the capability of modeling 2D formation. A 2.5D finite difference method (FDM) solving all the electric and magnetic field components simultaneously is proposed. Compared to other previous 2.5D FDM schemes, this method is more straightforward in modeling fully anisotropic media and easy to be implemented. Fourier transform is essential to this FDM scheme, and by employing Gauss-Legendre (GL) quadrature rule the computational time of this step can be greatly reduced. In the numerical examples, we first demonstrate the validity of the FDM scheme with GL rule by comparing with 1D forward modeling for layered anisotropic problems, and then we model a complicated 2D formation case and find that the proposed 2.5D FD scheme is much more efficient than 3D numerical methods.

  11. An efficient hybrid pseudospectral/finite-difference scheme for solving the TTI pure P-wave equation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Ge

    2013-02-19

    The pure P-wave equation for modelling and migration in tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media has attracted more and more attention in imaging seismic data with anisotropy. The desirable feature is that it is absolutely free of shear-wave artefacts and the consequent alleviation of numerical instabilities generally suffered by some systems of coupled equations. However, due to several forward-backward Fourier transforms in wavefield updating at each time step, the computational cost is significant, and thereby hampers its prevalence. We propose to use a hybrid pseudospectral (PS) and finite-difference (FD) scheme to solve the pure P-wave equation. In the hybrid solution, most of the cost-consuming wavenumber terms in the equation are replaced by inexpensive FD operators, which in turn accelerates the computation and reduces the computational cost. To demonstrate the benefit in cost saving of the new scheme, 2D and 3D reverse-time migration (RTM) examples using the hybrid solution to the pure P-wave equation are carried out, and respective runtimes are listed and compared. Numerical results show that the hybrid strategy demands less computation time and is faster than using the PS method alone. Furthermore, this new TTI RTM algorithm with the hybrid method is computationally less expensive than that with the FD solution to conventional TTI coupled equations. © 2013 Sinopec Geophysical Research Institute.

  12. Three-Dimensional Finite Difference Simulation of Ground Motions from the August 24, 2014 South Napa Earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, Arthur J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dreger, Douglas S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Pitarka, Arben [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We performed three-dimensional (3D) anelastic ground motion simulations of the South Napa earthquake to investigate the performance of different finite rupture models and the effects of 3D structure on the observed wavefield. We considered rupture models reported by Dreger et al. (2015), Ji et al., (2015), Wei et al. (2015) and Melgar et al. (2015). We used the SW4 anelastic finite difference code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Petersson and Sjogreen, 2013) and distributed by the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics. This code can compute the seismic response for fully 3D sub-surface models, including surface topography and linear anelasticity. We use the 3D geologic/seismic model of the San Francisco Bay Area developed by the United States Geological Survey (Aagaard et al., 2008, 2010). Evaluation of earlier versions of this model indicated that the structure can reproduce main features of observed waveforms from moderate earthquakes (Rodgers et al., 2008; Kim et al., 2010). Simulations were performed for a domain covering local distances (< 25 km) and resolution providing simulated ground motions valid to 1 Hz.

  13. Global SH-wave propagation using a parallel axisymmetric spherical finite-difference scheme: application to whole mantle scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Gunnar; Thorne, Michael S.; Cochard, Alain; Igel, Heiner

    2008-06-01

    We extended a high-order finite-difference scheme for the elastic SH-wave equation in axisymmetric media for use on parallel computers with distributed memory architecture. Moreover, we derive an analytical description of the implemented ring source and compare it quantitatively with a double couple source. The restriction to axisymmetry and the use of high performance computers and PC networks allows computation of synthetic seismograms at dominant periods down to 2.5 s for global mantle models. We give a description of our algorithm (SHaxi) and its verification against an analytical solution. As an application, we compute synthetic seismograms for global mantle models with additional stochastic perturbations applied to the background S-wave velocity model. We investigate the influence of the perturbations on the SH wavefield for a suite of models with varying perturbation amplitudes, correlation length scales, and spectral characteristics. The inclusion of stochastic perturbations in the models broadens the pulse width of teleseismic body wave arrivals and delays their peak arrival times. Coda wave energy is also generated which is observed as additional energy after prominent body wave arrivals. The SHaxi method has proven to be a valuable method for computing global synthetic seismograms at high frequencies and for studying the seismic waveform effects from models where rotational symmetry may be assumed.

  14. A two dimensional finite difference time domain analysis of the quiet zone fields of an anechoic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Deirdre A.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Kunz, Karl S.; Steich, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Prediction of anechoic chamber performance is a difficult problem. Electromagnetic anechoic chambers exist for a wide range of frequencies but are typically very large when measured in wavelengths. Three dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of anechoic chambers is possible with current computers but at frequencies lower than most chamber design frequencies. However, two dimensional FDTD (2D-FTD) modeling enables much greater detail at higher frequencies and offers significant insight into compact anechoic chamber design and performance. A major subsystem of an anechoic chamber for which computational electromagnetic analyses exist is the reflector. First, an analysis of the quiet zone fields of a low frequency anechoic chamber produced by a uniform source and a reflector in two dimensions using the FDTD method is presented. The 2D-FDTD results are compared with results from a three dimensional corrected physical optics calculation and show good agreement. Next, a directional source is substituted for the uniform radiator. Finally, a two dimensional anechoic chamber geometry, including absorbing materials, is considered, and the 2D-FDTD results for these geometries appear reasonable.

  15. A multithreaded and GPU-optimized compact finite difference algorithm for turbulent mixing at high Schmidt number using petascale computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, M. P.; Yeung, P. K.; Buaria, D.; Gotoh, T.

    2017-11-01

    Turbulent mixing at high Schmidt number is a multiscale problem which places demanding requirements on direct numerical simulations to resolve fluctuations down the to Batchelor scale. We use a dual-grid, dual-scheme and dual-communicator approach where velocity and scalar fields are computed by separate groups of parallel processes, the latter using a combined compact finite difference (CCD) scheme on finer grid with a static 3-D domain decomposition free of the communication overhead of memory transposes. A high degree of scalability is achieved for a 81923 scalar field at Schmidt number 512 in turbulence with a modest inertial range, by overlapping communication with computation whenever possible. On the Cray XE6 partition of Blue Waters, use of a dedicated thread for communication combined with OpenMP locks and nested parallelism reduces CCD timings by 34% compared to an MPI baseline. The code has been further optimized for the 27-petaflops Cray XK7 machine Titan using GPUs as accelerators with the latest OpenMP 4.5 directives, giving 2.7X speedup compared to CPU-only execution at the largest problem size. Supported by NSF Grant ACI-1036170, the NCSA Blue Waters Project with subaward via UIUC, and a DOE INCITE allocation at ORNL.

  16. Development of an Analytic Nodal Diffusion Solver in Multi-groups for 3D Reactor Cores with Rectangular or Hexagonal Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, Juan Andres; Aragones, Jose Maria; Garcia-Herranz, Nuria [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    More accurate modelling of physical phenomena involved in present and future nuclear reactors requires a multi-scale and multi-physics approach. This challenge can be accomplished by the coupling of best-estimate core-physics, thermal-hydraulics and multi-physics solvers. In order to make viable that coupling, the current trends in reactor simulations are along the development of a new generation of tools based on user-friendly, modular, easily linkable, faster and more accurate codes to be integrated in common platforms. These premises are in the origin of the NURESIM Integrated Project within the 6. European Framework Program, which is envisaged to provide the initial step towards a Common European Standard Software Platform for nuclear reactors simulations. In the frame of this project and to reach the above-mentioned goals, a 3-D multigroup nodal solver for neutron diffusion calculations called ANDES (Analytic Nodal Diffusion Equation Solver) has been developed and tested in-depth in this Thesis. ANDES solves the steady-state and time-dependent neutron diffusion equation in three-dimensions and any number of energy groups, utilizing the Analytic Coarse-Mesh Finite-Difference (ACMFD) scheme to yield the nodal coupling equations. It can be applied to both Cartesian and triangular-Z geometries, so that simulations of LWR as well as VVER, HTR and fast reactors can be performed. The solver has been implemented in a fully encapsulated way, enabling it as a module to be readily integrated in other codes and platforms. In fact, it can be used either as a stand-alone nodal code or as a solver to accelerate the convergence of whole core pin-by-pin code systems. Verification of performance has shown that ANDES is a code with high order definition for whole core realistic nodal simulations. In this paper, the methodology developed and involved in ANDES is presented. (authors)

  17. Optimising a parallel conjugate gradient solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, M.R. [O`Reilly Institute, Dublin (Ireland)

    1996-12-31

    This work arises from the introduction of a parallel iterative solver to a large structural analysis finite element code. The code is called FEX and it was developed at Hitachi`s Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. The FEX package can deal with a large range of structural analysis problems using a large number of finite element techniques. FEX can solve either stress or thermal analysis problems of a range of different types from plane stress to a full three-dimensional model. These problems can consist of a number of different materials which can be modelled by a range of material models. The structure being modelled can have the load applied at either a point or a surface, or by a pressure, a centrifugal force or just gravity. Alternatively a thermal load can be applied with a given initial temperature. The displacement of the structure can be constrained by having a fixed boundary or by prescribing the displacement at a boundary.

  18. High order Poisson Solver for unbounded flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Chatelain, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a high order method for solving the unbounded Poisson equation on a regular mesh using a Green’s function solution. The high order convergence was achieved by formulating mollified integration kernels, that were derived from a filter regularisation of the solution field...... the equations of fluid mechanics as an example, but can be used in many physical problems to solve the Poisson equation on a rectangular unbounded domain. For the two-dimensional case we propose an infinitely smooth test function which allows for arbitrary high order convergence. Using Gaussian smoothing....... The method was implemented on a rectangular domain using fast Fourier transforms (FFT) to increase computational efficiency. The Poisson solver was extended to directly solve the derivatives of the solution. This is achieved either by including the differential operator in the integration kernel...

  19. Asynchronous Parallelization of a CFD Solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Abdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A Navier-Stokes equations solver is parallelized to run on a cluster of computers using the domain decomposition method. Two approaches of communication and computation are investigated, namely, synchronous and asynchronous methods. Asynchronous communication between subdomains is not commonly used in CFD codes; however, it has a potential to alleviate scaling bottlenecks incurred due to processors having to wait for each other at designated synchronization points. A common way to avoid this idle time is to overlap asynchronous communication with computation. For this to work, however, there must be something useful and independent a processor can do while waiting for messages to arrive. We investigate an alternative approach of computation, namely, conducting asynchronous iterations to improve local subdomain solution while communication is in progress. An in-house CFD code is parallelized using message passing interface (MPI, and scalability tests are conducted that suggest asynchronous iterations are a viable way of parallelizing CFD code.

  20. Parallel sparse direct solver for integrated circuit simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiaoming; Yang, Huazhong

    2017-01-01

    This book describes algorithmic methods and parallelization techniques to design a parallel sparse direct solver which is specifically targeted at integrated circuit simulation problems. The authors describe a complete flow and detailed parallel algorithms of the sparse direct solver. They also show how to improve the performance by simple but effective numerical techniques. The sparse direct solver techniques described can be applied to any SPICE-like integrated circuit simulator and have been proven to be high-performance in actual circuit simulation. Readers will benefit from the state-of-the-art parallel integrated circuit simulation techniques described in this book, especially the latest parallel sparse matrix solution techniques. · Introduces complicated algorithms of sparse linear solvers, using concise principles and simple examples, without complex theory or lengthy derivations; · Describes a parallel sparse direct solver that can be adopted to accelerate any SPICE-like integrated circuit simulato...

  1. PolyRES: A polygon-based Richards equation solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hills, R.G. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Meyer, P.D.; Rockhold, M.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    This document describes the theory, implementation, and use of a software package designed to solve the transient, two-dimensional, Richards equation for water flow in unsaturated-saturated soils. This package was specifically designed to model complex geometries with minimal input from the user and to simulate groundwater flow related to assessment of low-level radioactive waste disposal sites and engineered facilities. The spatial variation of the hydraulic properties can be defined across individual polygon-shaped subdomains, called objects. These objects combine to form a polygon-shaped model domain. Each object can have its own distribution of hydraulic parameters. The resulting model domain and polygon-shaped internal objects are mapped onto a rectangular, finite-volume, computational grid by a preprocessor. This allows the user to specify model geometry independently of the underlying grid and greatly simplifies user input for complex geometries. In addition, this approach significantly reduces the computational requirements since complex geometries are actually modeled on a rectangular grid. This results in well-structured, finite difference-like systems of equations that require minimal storage and are very efficient to solve. The documentation for this software package includes a user`s manual, a detailed description of the underlying theory, and a detailed discussion of program flow. Several example problems are presented that show the use and features of the software package. The water flow predictions for several of these example problems are compared to those of another algorithm to test for prediction equivalency.

  2. Stochastic Partial Differential Equation Solver for Hydroacoustic Modeling: Improvements to Paracousti Sound Propagation Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices offer a clean, renewable alternative energy source for the future. Responsible utilization of MHK devices, however, requires that the effects of acoustic noise produced by these devices on marine life and marine-related human activities be well understood. Paracousti is a 3-D full waveform acoustic modeling suite that can accurately propagate MHK noise signals in the complex bathymetry found in the near-shore to open ocean environment and considers real properties of the seabed, water column, and air-surface interface. However, this is a deterministic simulation that assumes the environment and source are exactly known. In reality, environmental and source characteristics are often only known in a statistical sense. Thus, to fully characterize the expected noise levels within the marine environment, this uncertainty in environmental and source factors should be incorporated into the acoustic simulations. One method is to use Monte Carlo (MC) techniques where simulation results from a large number of deterministic solutions are aggregated to provide statistical properties of the output signal. However, MC methods can be computationally prohibitive since they can require tens of thousands or more simulations to build up an accurate representation of those statistical properties. An alternative method, using the technique of stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE), allows computation of the statistical properties of output signals at a small fraction of the computational cost of MC. We are developing a SPDE solver for the 3-D acoustic wave propagation problem called Paracousti-UQ to help regulators and operators assess the statistical properties of environmental noise produced by MHK devices. In this presentation, we present the SPDE method and compare statistical distributions of simulated acoustic signals in simple models to MC simulations to show the accuracy and efficiency of the SPDE method. Sandia National Laboratories

  3. Formulation of coarse mesh finite difference to calculate mathematical adjoint flux; Formulacao de diferencas finitas de malha grossa para calculo do fluxo adjunto matematico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Valmir; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this work is the obtention of the mathematical adjoint flux, having as its support the nodal expansion method (NEM) for coarse mesh problems. Since there are difficulties to evaluate this flux by using NEM. directly, a coarse mesh finite difference program was developed to obtain this adjoint flux. The coarse mesh finite difference formulation (DFMG) adopted uses results of the direct calculation (node average flux and node face averaged currents) obtained by NEM. These quantities (flux and currents) are used to obtain the correction factors which modify the classical finite differences formulation . Since the DFMG formulation is also capable of calculating the direct flux it was also tested to obtain this flux and it was verified that it was able to reproduce with good accuracy both the flux and the currents obtained via NEM. In this way, only matrix transposition is needed to calculate the mathematical adjoint flux. (author)

  4. Radiative Heat Transfer in Combustion Applications: Parallel Efficiencies of Two Gas Models, Turbulent Radiation Interactions in Particulate Laden Flows, and Coarse Mesh Finite Difference Acceleration for Improved Temporal Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Mathew A.

    initialization. The TRI effects are very sensitive to the initialization of the turbulence in the system. The TRI parameters are somewhat sensitive to the treatment of particulate temperature and the particulate optical thickness, and this effect are amplified by increased particulate loading. Monte Carlo radiative heat transfer simulations of time-dependent combustion processes generally involve an explicit evaluation of emission source because of the expense of the transport solver. Recently, Park et al. [5] have applied quasi-diffusion with Monte Carlo in high energy density radiative transfer applications. We employ a Crank-Nicholson temporal integration scheme in conjunction with the coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) method, in an effort to improve the temporal accuracy of the Monte Carlo solver. Our results show that this CMFD-CN method is an improvement over Monte Carlo with CMFD time-differenced via Backward Euler, and Implicit Monte Carlo [6] (IMC). The increase in accuracy involves very little increase in computational cost, and the figure of merit for the CMFD-CN scheme is greater than IMC.

  5. Multi-GPU three dimensional Stokes solver for simulating glacier flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licul, Aleksandar; Herman, Frédéric; Podladchikov, Yuri; Räss, Ludovic; Omlin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Here we present how we have recently developed a three-dimensional Stokes solver on the GPUs and apply it to a glacier flow. We numerically solve the Stokes momentum balance equations together with the incompressibility equation, while also taking into account strong nonlinearities for ice rheology. We have developed a fully three-dimensional numerical MATLAB application based on an iterative finite difference scheme with preconditioning of residuals. Differential equations are discretized on a regular staggered grid. We have ported it to C-CUDA to run it on GPU's in parallel, using MPI. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our developed model by manufactured analytical solution test for three-dimensional Stokes ice sheet models (Leng et al.,2013) and by comparison with other well-established ice sheet models on diagnostic ISMIP-HOM benchmark experiments (Pattyn et al., 2008). The results show that our developed model is capable to accurately and efficiently solve Stokes system of equations in a variety of different test scenarios, while preserving good parallel efficiency on up to 80 GPU's. For example, in 3D test scenarios with 250000 grid points our solver converges in around 3 minutes for single precision computations and around 10 minutes for double precision computations. We have also optimized the developed code to efficiently run on our newly acquired state-of-the-art GPU cluster octopus. This allows us to solve our problem on more than 20 million grid points, by just increasing the number of GPU used, while keeping the computation time the same. In future work we will apply our solver to real world applications and implement the free surface evolution capabilities. REFERENCES Leng,W.,Ju,L.,Gunzburger,M. & Price,S., 2013. Manufactured solutions and the verification of three-dimensional stokes ice-sheet models. Cryosphere 7,19-29. Pattyn, F., Perichon, L., Aschwanden, A., Breuer, B., de Smedt, B., Gagliardini, O., Gudmundsson,G.H., Hindmarsh, R

  6. Improvement of the prediction of surface ozone concentration over conterminous U.S. by a computationally efficient second-order Rosenbrock solver in CAM4-Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Fu, Joshua S.; Drake, John; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Vitt, Francis

    2017-03-01

    The global chemistry-climate model (CAM4-Chem) overestimates the surface ozone concentration over the conterminous U.S. (CONUS). Reasons for this positive bias include emission, meteorology, chemical mechanism, and solver. In this study, we explore the last possibility by examining the sensitivity to the numerical methods for solving the chemistry equations. A second-order Rosenbrock (ROS-2) solver is implemented in CAM4-Chem to examine its influence on the surface ozone concentration and the computational performance of the chemistry program. Results show that under the same time step size (1800 s), statistically significant reduction of positive bias is achieved by the ROS-2 solver. The improvement is as large as 5.2 ppb in Eastern U.S. during summer season. The ROS-2 solver is shown to reduce the positive bias in Europe and Asia as well, indicating the lower surface ozone concentration over the CONUS predicted by the ROS-2 solver is not a trade-off consequence with increasing the ozone concentration at other global regions. In addition, by refining the time step size to 180 s, the first-order implicit solver does not provide statistically significant improvement of surface ozone concentration. It reveals that the better prediction from the ROS-2 solver is not only due to its accuracy but also due to its suitability for stiff chemistry equations. As an added benefit, the computation cost of the ROS-2 solver is almost half of first-order implicit solver. The improved computational efficiency of the ROS-2 solver is due to the reuse of the Jacobian matrix and lower upper (LU) factorization during its multistage calculation.

  7. Finite-difference modeling and dispersion analysis of high-frequency love waves for near-surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.; Liu, J.

    2010-01-01

    Love-wave propagation has been a topic of interest to crustal, earthquake, and engineering seismologists for many years because it is independent of Poisson's ratio and more sensitive to shear (S)-wave velocity changes and layer thickness changes than are Rayleigh waves. It is well known that Love-wave generation requires the existence of a low S-wave velocity layer in a multilayered earth model. In order to study numerically the propagation of Love waves in a layered earth model and dispersion characteristics for near-surface applications, we simulate high-frequency (>5 Hz) Love waves by the staggered-grid finite-difference (FD) method. The air-earth boundary (the shear stress above the free surface) is treated using the stress-imaging technique. We use a two-layer model to demonstrate the accuracy of the staggered-grid modeling scheme. We also simulate four-layer models including a low-velocity layer (LVL) or a high-velocity layer (HVL) to analyze dispersive energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that: (1) the staggered-grid FD code and stress-imaging technique are suitable for treating the free-surface boundary conditions for Love-wave modeling, (2) Love-wave inversion should be treated with extra care when a LVL exists because of a lack of LVL information in dispersions aggravating uncertainties in the inversion procedure, and (3) energy of high modes in a low-frequency range is very weak, so that it is difficult to estimate the cutoff frequency accurately, and "mode-crossing" occurs between the second higher and third higher modes when a HVL exists. ?? 2010 Birkh??user / Springer Basel AG.

  8. A New Accurate Finite-Difference Scheme Based on the Optimally Accurate Operators and Boundary-Condition Consistent Material Parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristek, J.; Moczo, P.; Galis, M.

    2005-12-01

    Geller and Takeuchi (1995) developed optimally accurate finite-difference (FD) operators. The operators minimize the error of the numerical solution of the discretized equation of motion. The criterion for obtaining the optimally accurate operators requires that the leading term of the truncation error of the discretized homogeneous (without body-force term) equation of motion (that is if operand is an eigenfunction and frequency is equal to eigenfrequency) is zero. Consequently, the optimally accurate operators satisfy (up to the leading term of the truncation error) homogeneous equation of motion. The grid dispersion of an optimally accurate FD scheme is significantly smaller than that of a standard FD scheme. A heterogeneous FD scheme cannot be anything else than a FD approximation to the heterogeneous formulation of the equation of motion (the same form of the equation for a point away from a material discontinuity and a point at the material discontinuity). If an optimally accurate FD scheme for heterogeneous media is to be obtained, the optimally accurate operators have to be applied to the heterogeneous formulation of the equation of motion. Moczo et al. (2002) found a heterogeneous formulation and developed a FD scheme based on standard staggered-grid 4th-order operators. The scheme is capable to sense both smooth material heterogeneity and material discontinuity at any position in a spatial grid. We present a new FD scheme that combines optimally accurate operators of Geller and Takeuchi (1995) with a material parameterization of Moczo et al. (2002). Models of a single material discontinuity, interior constant-velocity layer, and interior layer with the velocity gradient were calculated with the new scheme, conventional-operator scheme and analytically. Numerical results clearly isolate and demonstrate effects of the boundary and grid dispersion. The results demonstrate significant accuracy improvement compared to previous FD schemes.

  9. Analysis of the nine-point finite difference approximation for the heat conduction equation in a nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadri, M.

    1983-01-01

    The time dependent heat conduction equation in the x-y Cartesian geometry is formulated in terms of a nine-point finite difference relation using a Taylor series expansion technique. The accuracy of the nine-point formulation over the five-point formulation has been tested and evaluated for various reactor fuel-cladding plate configurations using a computer program. The results have been checked against analytical solutions for various model problems. The following cases were considered in the steady-state condition: (a) The thermal conductivity and the heat generation were uniform. (b) The thermal conductivity was constant, the heat generation variable. (c) The thermal conductivity varied linearly with the temperature, the heat generation was uniform. (d) Both thermal conductivity and heat generation vary. In case (a), approximately, for the same accuracy, 85% fewer grid points were needed for the nine-point relation which has a 14% higher convergence rate as compared to the five-point relation. In case (b), on the average, 84% fewer grid points were needed for the nine-point relation which has a 65% higher convergence rate as compared to the five-point relation. In case (c) and (d), there is significant accuracy (91% higher than the five-point relation) for the nine-point relation when a worse grid was used. The numerical solution of the nine-point formula in the time dependent case was also more accurate and converges faster than the numerical solution of the five-point formula for all comparative tests related to heat conduction problems in a nuclear fuel element

  10. GroPBS: Fast Solver for Implicit Electrostatics of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska eBertelshofer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the electrostatic potential on the surface of biomolecules or biomembranes under physiological conditions is an important step in the attempt to characterize the physico-chemical properties of these molecules and in particular also their interactions with each other. Additionally, knowledge about solution electrostatics may guide also the design of molecules with specified properties. However, explicit water models come at a high computational cost, rendering them unsuitable for large design studies or for docking purposes. Implicit models with the water phase treated as a continuum require the numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann Equation (PBE. Here, we present a new flexible program for the numerical solution of the PBE, allowing for different geometries, and the explicit and implicit inclusion of membranes. It involves a discretization of space and the computation of the molecular surface. The PBE is solved using finite differences, the resulting set of equations is solved using a Gauss-Seidel method. It is shown for the example of the sucrose transporter ScrY that the implicit inclusion of a surrounding membrane has a strong effect also on the electrostatics within the pore region and thus need to be carefully considered e.g. in design studies on membrane proteins.

  11. A Finite Difference, Semi-implicit, Equation-of-State Efficient Algorithm for the Compositional Flow Modeling in the Subsurface: Numerical Examples

    KAUST Repository

    Saavedra, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    The mathematical model that has been recognized to have the more accurate approximation to the physical laws govern subsurface hydrocarbon flow in reservoirs is the Compositional Model. The features of this model are adequate to describe not only the performance of a multiphase system but also to represent the transport of chemical species in a porous medium. Its importance relies not only on its current relevance to simulate petroleum extraction processes, such as, Primary, Secondary, and Enhanced Oil Recovery Process (EOR) processes but also, in the recent years, carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. The purpose of this study is to investigate the subsurface compositional flow under isothermal conditions for several oil well cases. While simultaneously addressing computational implementation finesses to contribute to the efficiency of the algorithm. This study provides the theoretical framework and computational implementation subtleties of an IMplicit Pressure Explicit Composition (IMPEC)-Volume-balance (VB), two-phase, equation-of-state, approach to model isothermal compositional flow based on the finite difference scheme. The developed model neglects capillary effects and diffusion. From the phase equilibrium premise, the model accounts for volumetric performances of the phases, compressibility of the phases, and composition-dependent viscosities. The Equation of State (EoS) employed to approximate the hydrocarbons behaviour is the Peng Robinson Equation of State (PR-EOS). Various numerical examples were simulated. The numerical results captured the complex physics involved, i.e., compositional, gravitational, phase-splitting, viscosity and relative permeability effects. Regarding the numerical scheme, a phase-volumetric-flux estimation eases the calculation of phase velocities by naturally fitting to phase-upstream-upwinding. And contributes to a faster computation and an efficient programming development.

  12. A non-conforming 3D spherical harmonic transport solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Criekingen, S.

    2006-01-01

    A new 3D transport solver for the time-independent Boltzmann transport equation has been developed. This solver is based on the second-order even-parity form of the transport equation. The angular discretization is performed through the expansion of the angular neutron flux in spherical harmonics (PN method). The novelty of this solver is the use of non-conforming finite elements for the spatial discretization. Such elements lead to a discontinuous flux approximation. This interface continuity requirement relaxation property is shared with mixed-dual formulations such as the ones based on Raviart-Thomas finite elements. Encouraging numerical results are presented. (authors)

  13. Comparison of the 2nd-order and 4th-order Staggered-Grid Finite-Difference Implementations of the TSN Method for Rupture Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristek, J.; Moczo, P.; Galis, M.

    2006-12-01

    The TSN (Traction-at-Split-Nodes) method has been developed independently by Andrews (1973, 1976, 1999) and Day (1977, 1982). Andrews implemented his TSN formulation in the finite-difference scheme in which spatial differentiation is equivalent to the 2nd-order finite-element method. Day implemented his slightly different formulation of the TSN method in the 2nd-order partly-staggered finite-difference scheme. Dalguer and Day (2006) adapted the TSN method to the velocity-stress staggered-grid finite-difference scheme. Whereas the 4th-order spatial differencing is applied outside the fault, the 2nd-order differencing is applied along the fault plane. We present two implementations of the Day's TSN formulation in the velocity-stress staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for a 3D viscoelastic medium. In the first one we apply the 2nd-order spatial differencing everywhere in the grid including derivatives at the fault in the direction perpendicular to the fault plane. In the second implementation we similarly apply the 4th-order spatial differencing. In both cases we use the adjusted finite-difference approximations (AFDA, Kristek et al. 2002, Moczo et al. 2004) to derivatives in the direction perpendicular to the fault plane in order to have the same order of approximation everywhere. We numerically investigate convergence rates of both implementations with respect to rupture-time, final-slip, and peak-slip-rate metrics. Moreover, we compare the numerical solutions to those obtained by the finite-element implementation of the TSN method.

  14. Observed seismic and infrasonic signals around the Hakone volcano -Discussion based on a finite-difference calculation-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamatu, S.; Kawakata, H.; Hirano, S.

    2017-12-01

    Observation and analysis of infrasonic waves are important for volcanology because they could be associated with mechanisms of volcanic tremors and earthquakes (Sakai et al., 2000). Around the Hakone volcano area, Japan, infrasonic waves had been observed many times in 2015 (Yukutake et al., 2016, JpGU). In the area, seismometers have been installed more than microphones, so that analysis of seismograms may also contribute to understanding some characteristics of the infrasonic waves. In this study, we focused on the infrasonic waves on July 1, 2015, at the area and discussed their propagation. We analyzed the vertical component of seven seismograms and two infrasound records; instruments for these data have been installed within 5 km from the vent emerged in the June 2015 eruption(HSRI, 2015). We summarized distances of the observation points from the vent and appearance of the signals in the seismograms and the microphone records in Table 1. We confirmed that, when the OWD microphone(Fig1) observed the infrasonic waves, seismometers of the OWD and the KIN surface seismic stations(Fig1) recorded pulse-like signals repeatedly while the other five buried seismometers did not. At the same time, the NNT microphone(Fig1) recorded no more than unclear signals despite the shorter distance to the vent than that of the KIN station. We found that the appearance of pulse-like signals at the KIN seismic station usually 10-11 seconds delay after the appearance at the OWD seismic station. The distance between these two stations is 3.5km, so that the signals in seismograms could represent propagation of the infrasonic waves rather than the seismic waves. If so, however, the infrasound propagation could be influenced by the topography of the area because the signals are unclear in the NNT microphone record.To validate the above interpretation, we simulated the diffraction of the infrasonic waves due to the topography. We executed a 3-D finite-difference calculation by

  15. Parallel iterative solvers and preconditioners using approximate hierarchical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grama, A.; Kumar, V.; Sameh, A. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we report results of the performance, convergence, and accuracy of a parallel GMRES solver for Boundary Element Methods. The solver uses a hierarchical approximate matrix-vector product based on a hybrid Barnes-Hut / Fast Multipole Method. We study the impact of various accuracy parameters on the convergence and show that with minimal loss in accuracy, our solver yields significant speedups. We demonstrate the excellent parallel efficiency and scalability of our solver. The combined speedups from approximation and parallelism represent an improvement of several orders in solution time. We also develop fast and paralellizable preconditioners for this problem. We report on the performance of an inner-outer scheme and a preconditioner based on truncated Green`s function. Experimental results on a 256 processor Cray T3D are presented.

  16. Two-dimensional time dependent Riemann solvers for neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, Thomas A.; Holloway, James Paul

    2005-01-01

    A two-dimensional Riemann solver is developed for the spherical harmonics approximation to the time dependent neutron transport equation. The eigenstructure of the resulting equations is explored, giving insight into both the spherical harmonics approximation and the Riemann solver. The classic Roe-type Riemann solver used here was developed for one-dimensional problems, but can be used in multidimensional problems by treating each face of a two-dimensional computation cell in a locally one-dimensional way. Several test problems are used to explore the capabilities of both the Riemann solver and the spherical harmonics approximation. The numerical solution for a simple line source problem is compared to the analytic solution to both the P 1 equation and the full transport solution. A lattice problem is used to test the method on a more challenging problem

  17. Modifications of steam condensation model implemented in commercial solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sova, Libor; Jun, Gukchol; ŠÅ¥astný, Miroslav

    2017-09-01

    Nucleation theory and droplet grow theory and methods how they are incorporated into numerical solvers are crucial factors for proper wet steam modelling. Unfortunately, they are still covered by cloud of uncertainty and therefore some calibration of these models according to reliable experimental results is important for practical analyses of steam turbines. This article demonstrates how is possible to calibrate wet steam model incorporated into commercial solver ANSYS CFX.

  18. Implementation of the far-field method for calculation of added resistance using a high order finite-difference approximation on overlapping grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini Afshar, Mostafa; Bingham, Harry B.

    The far-field method for calculation of the wave drift force is implemented in the high order finitedifferenceseakeeping solver. The implementation is based on the Maruo formulation which employesthe Kochin function to obtain the complex amplitude of the velocity potential in the far-field. There......The far-field method for calculation of the wave drift force is implemented in the high order finitedifferenceseakeeping solver. The implementation is based on the Maruo formulation which employesthe Kochin function to obtain the complex amplitude of the velocity potential in the far...

  19. Courant Number and Mach Number Insensitive CE/SE Euler Solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    2005-01-01

    It has been known that the space-time CE/SE method can be used to obtain ID, 2D, and 3D steady and unsteady flow solutions with Mach numbers ranging from 0.0028 to 10. However, it is also known that a CE/SE solution may become overly dissipative when the Mach number is very small. As an initial attempt to remedy this weakness, new 1D Courant number and Mach number insensitive CE/SE Euler solvers are developed using several key concepts underlying the recent successful development of Courant number insensitive CE/SE schemes. Numerical results indicate that the new solvers are capable of resolving crisply a contact discontinuity embedded in a flow with the maximum Mach number = 0.01.

  20. Parallel Computation of the Jacobian Matrix for Nonlinear Equation Solvers Using MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Geoffrey K.; Nguyen, Duc T.; Newman, Brett A.

    2017-01-01

    Demonstrating speedup for parallel code on a multicore shared memory PC can be challenging in MATLAB due to underlying parallel operations that are often opaque to the user. This can limit potential for improvement of serial code even for the so-called embarrassingly parallel applications. One such application is the computation of the Jacobian matrix inherent to most nonlinear equation solvers. Computation of this matrix represents the primary bottleneck in nonlinear solver speed such that commercial finite element (FE) and multi-body-dynamic (MBD) codes attempt to minimize computations. A timing study using MATLAB's Parallel Computing Toolbox was performed for numerical computation of the Jacobian. Several approaches for implementing parallel code were investigated while only the single program multiple data (spmd) method using composite objects provided positive results. Parallel code speedup is demonstrated but the goal of linear speedup through the addition of processors was not achieved due to PC architecture.

  1. A robust multilevel simultaneous eigenvalue solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costiner, Sorin; Taasan, Shlomo

    1993-01-01

    Multilevel (ML) algorithms for eigenvalue problems are often faced with several types of difficulties such as: the mixing of approximated eigenvectors by the solution process, the approximation of incomplete clusters of eigenvectors, the poor representation of solution on coarse levels, and the existence of close or equal eigenvalues. Algorithms that do not treat appropriately these difficulties usually fail, or their performance degrades when facing them. These issues motivated the development of a robust adaptive ML algorithm which treats these difficulties, for the calculation of a few eigenvectors and their corresponding eigenvalues. The main techniques used in the new algorithm include: the adaptive completion and separation of the relevant clusters on different levels, the simultaneous treatment of solutions within each cluster, and the robustness tests which monitor the algorithm's efficiency and convergence. The eigenvectors' separation efficiency is based on a new ML projection technique generalizing the Rayleigh Ritz projection, combined with a technique, the backrotations. These separation techniques, when combined with an FMG formulation, in many cases lead to algorithms of O(qN) complexity, for q eigenvectors of size N on the finest level. Previously developed ML algorithms are less focused on the mentioned difficulties. Moreover, algorithms which employ fine level separation techniques are of O(q(sub 2)N) complexity and usually do not overcome all these difficulties. Computational examples are presented where Schrodinger type eigenvalue problems in 2-D and 3-D, having equal and closely clustered eigenvalues, are solved with the efficiency of the Poisson multigrid solver. A second order approximation is obtained in O(qN) work, where the total computational work is equivalent to only a few fine level relaxations per eigenvector.

  2. Comparison of Integer Programming (IP) Solvers for Automated Test Assembly (ATA). Research Report. ETS RR-15-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, John R.

    2015-01-01

    At the heart of van der Linden's approach to automated test assembly (ATA) is a linear programming/integer programming (LP/IP) problem. A variety of IP solvers are available, ranging in cost from free to hundreds of thousands of dollars. In this paper, I compare several approaches to solving the underlying IP problem. These approaches range from…

  3. Finite-difference time-domain modeling of infrasound from pulsating auroras and comparison with recent experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Larquier, S.; Pasko, V. P.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wilson, C. R.; Olson, J. V.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric infrasonic waves are acoustic waves with frequencies ranging from 0.02 to 10 Hz, slightly higher than the acoustic cut-off frequency (approximately 0.032 Hz), but lower than the audible frequencies (typically 20 Hz-15 kHz) [e.g., Blanc, Ann. Geophys., 3, 673, 1985]. A number of natural events have been identified as generating atmospheric infrasound, such as volcanoes, tornadoes, avalanches, earthquakes [e.g., Bedard and Georges, Physics Today, S3, 32, 2000], ocean surfaces [e.g., Gossard and Hooke, Waves in the Atmosphere, Elsevier, 1975, Ch. 9], lightning [e.g., Assink et al., GRL, 35, L15802, 2008; Pasko, JGR, 114, D08205, 2009], or transient luminous events in the middle atmosphere termed sprites [e.g., Farges, Lightning: Principles, Instruments and Applications, H.D. Betz et al. (eds), Springer, 2009, Ch. 18]. The importance of infrasound studies has been emphasized in the past ten years from the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification perspective [e.g., Le Pichon et al., JGR, 114, D08112, 2009]. A proper understanding of infrasound propagation in the atmosphere is required for identification and classification of different infrasonic waves and their sources [Drob et al., JGR, 108, D21, 4680, 2003]. The goal of the present work is to provide a quantitative interpretation and explanation of infrasonic signatures from pulsating auroras reported recently by Wilson et al. [GRL, 32, L14810, 2005]. The infrasound signals observed with an infrasonic array at Fairbanks, Alaska had a mean amplitude of 0.05 Pa, a delay of about 5 minutes from the pulsating aurora, and an almost normal incidence on the ground plane [Wilson et al., 2005]. We employ a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model of infrasound propagation in a realistic atmosphere. We use the absorption model of infrasound introduced by Sutherland and Bass [J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 115, 1012, 2004]. Classical absorption mechanisms as well as molecular relaxation mechanisms are taken into

  4. A resistive magnetohydrodynamics solver using modern C++ and the Boost library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einkemmer, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we describe the implementation of our C++ resistive magnetohydrodynamics solver. The framework developed facilitates the separation of the code implementing the specific numerical method and the physical model from the handling of boundary conditions and the management of the computational domain. In particular, this will allow us to use finite difference stencils which are only defined in the interior of the domain (the boundary conditions are handled automatically). We will discuss this and other design considerations and their impact on performance in some detail. In addition, we provide a documentation of the code developed and demonstrate that a performance comparable to Fortran can be achieved, while still maintaining a maximum of code readability and extensibility. Catalogue identifier: AFAH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AFAH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 592774 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 43771395 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++03. Computer: PC, HPC systems. Operating system: POSIX compatible (extensively tested on various Linux systems). In fact only the timing class requires POSIX routines; all other parts of the program can be run on any system where a C++ compiler, Boost, CVODE, and an implementation of BLAS are available. RAM: Hundredths of Kilobytes to Gigabytes (depending on the problem size) Classification: 19.10, 4.3. External routines: Boost, CVODE, either a BLAS library or Intel MKL Nature of problem: An approximate solution to the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics for a given initial value and given boundary conditions is computed. Solution method: The discretization is performed using a finite difference approximation in

  5. Energies and wave functions of an off-centre donor in hemispherical quantum dot: Two-dimensional finite difference approach and ritz variational principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakra Mohajer, Soukaina; El Harouny, El Hassan [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abdelmalek Essaadi, B.P. 2121 M’Hannech II, 93030 Tétouan (Morocco); Ibral, Asmaa [Equipe d’Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida Principale, El Jadida (Morocco); Laboratoire d’Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida Principale, El Jadida (Morocco); El Khamkhami, Jamal [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abdelmalek Essaadi, B.P. 2121 M’Hannech II, 93030 Tétouan (Morocco); and others

    2016-09-15

    Eigenvalues equation solutions of a hydrogen-like donor impurity, confined in a hemispherical quantum dot deposited on a wetting layer and capped by an insulating matrix, are determined in the framework of the effective mass approximation. Conduction band alignments at interfaces between quantum dot and surrounding materials are described by infinite height barriers. Ground and excited states energies and wave functions are determined analytically and via one-dimensional finite difference approach in case of an on-center donor. Donor impurity is then moved from center to pole of hemispherical quantum dot and eigenvalues equation is solved via Ritz variational principle, using a trial wave function where Coulomb attraction between electron and ionized donor is taken into account, and by two-dimensional finite difference approach. Numerical codes developed enable access to variations of donor total energy, binding energy, Coulomb correlation parameter, spatial extension and radial probability density with respect to hemisphere radius and impurity position inside the quantum dot.

  6. Energies and wave functions of an off-centre donor in hemispherical quantum dot: Two-dimensional finite difference approach and ritz variational principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakra Mohajer, Soukaina; El Harouny, El Hassan; Ibral, Asmaa; El Khamkhami, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Eigenvalues equation solutions of a hydrogen-like donor impurity, confined in a hemispherical quantum dot deposited on a wetting layer and capped by an insulating matrix, are determined in the framework of the effective mass approximation. Conduction band alignments at interfaces between quantum dot and surrounding materials are described by infinite height barriers. Ground and excited states energies and wave functions are determined analytically and via one-dimensional finite difference approach in case of an on-center donor. Donor impurity is then moved from center to pole of hemispherical quantum dot and eigenvalues equation is solved via Ritz variational principle, using a trial wave function where Coulomb attraction between electron and ionized donor is taken into account, and by two-dimensional finite difference approach. Numerical codes developed enable access to variations of donor total energy, binding energy, Coulomb correlation parameter, spatial extension and radial probability density with respect to hemisphere radius and impurity position inside the quantum dot.

  7. Intercomparison of the finite difference and nodal discrete ordinates and surface flux transport methods for a LWR pool-reactor benchmark problem in X-Y geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, R.D.; Stepanek, J.; Wagner, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to compare and discuss the three of the most advanced two dimensional transport methods, the finite difference and nodal discrete ordinates and surface flux method, incorporated into the transport codes TWODANT, TWOTRAN-NODAL, MULTIMEDIUM and SURCU. For intercomparison the eigenvalue and the neutron flux distribution are calculated using these codes in the LWR pool reactor benchmark problem. Additionally the results are compared with some results obtained by French collision probability transport codes MARSYAS and TRIDENT. Because the transport solution of this benchmark problem is close to its diffusion solution some results obtained by the finite element diffusion code FINELM and the finite difference diffusion code DIFF-2D are included

  8. A Finite Difference Scheme for Double-Diffusive Unsteady Free Convection from a Curved Surface to a Saturated Porous Medium with a Non-Newtonian Fluid

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-05-14

    In this paper, a finite difference scheme is developed to solve the unsteady problem of combined heat and mass transfer from an isothermal curved surface to a porous medium saturated by a non-Newtonian fluid. The curved surface is kept at constant temperature and the power-law model is used to model the non-Newtonian fluid. The explicit finite difference method is used to solve simultaneously the equations of momentum, energy and concentration. The consistency of the explicit scheme is examined and the stability conditions are determined for each equation. Boundary layer and Boussinesq approximations have been incorporated. Numerical calculations are carried out for the various parameters entering into the problem. Velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are shown graphically. It is found that as time approaches infinity, the values of wall shear, heat transfer coefficient and concentration gradient at the wall, which are entered in tables, approach the steady state values.

  9. Refined isogeometric analysis for a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia, Daniel

    2018-02-12

    Starting from a highly continuous Isogeometric Analysis (IGA) discretization, refined Isogeometric Analysis (rIGA) introduces C0 hyperplanes that act as separators for the direct LU factorization solver. As a result, the total computational cost required to solve the corresponding system of equations using a direct LU factorization solver dramatically reduces (up to a factor of 55) Garcia et al. (2017). At the same time, rIGA enriches the IGA spaces, thus improving the best approximation error. In this work, we extend the complexity analysis of rIGA to the case of iterative solvers. We build an iterative solver as follows: we first construct the Schur complements using a direct solver over small subdomains (macro-elements). We then assemble those Schur complements into a global skeleton system. Subsequently, we solve this system iteratively using Conjugate Gradients (CG) with an incomplete LU (ILU) preconditioner. For a 2D Poisson model problem with a structured mesh and a uniform polynomial degree of approximation, rIGA achieves moderate savings with respect to IGA in terms of the number of Floating Point Operations (FLOPs) and computational time (in seconds) required to solve the resulting system of linear equations. For instance, for a mesh with four million elements and polynomial degree p=3, the iterative solver is approximately 2.6 times faster (in time) when applied to the rIGA system than to the IGA one. These savings occur because the skeleton rIGA system contains fewer non-zero entries than the IGA one. The opposite situation occurs for 3D problems, and as a result, 3D rIGA discretizations provide no gains with respect to their IGA counterparts when considering iterative solvers.

  10. Analysis of a finite-difference and a Galerkin technique applied to the simulation of advection and diffusion of air pollutants from a line source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runca, E.; Melli, P.; Sardei, F.

    1985-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme and a Galerkin scheme are compared with respect to a very accurate solution describing time-dependent advection and diffusion of air pollutants from a line source in an atmosphere vertically stratified and limited by an inversion layer. The accurate solution was achieved by applying the finite-difference scheme on a very refined grid with a very small time step. The grid size and time step were defined according to stability and accuracy criteria discussed in the text. It is found that for the problem considered the two methods can be considered equally accurate. However, the Galerkin method gives a better approximation in the vicinity of the source. This was assumed to be partly due to the different way the source term is taken into account in the two methods. Improvement of the accuracy of the finite-difference scheme was achieved by approximating, at every step, the contribution of the source term by a Gaussian puff moving and diffusing with the velocity and diffusivity of the source location, instead of utilizing a stepwise function for the numerical approximation of the delta function representing the source term

  11. Robust Multiscale Iterative Solvers for Nonlinear Flows in Highly Heterogeneous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Y.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we study robust iterative solvers for finite element systems resulting in approximation of steady-state Richards\\' equation in porous media with highly heterogeneous conductivity fields. It is known that in such cases the contrast, ratio between the highest and lowest values of the conductivity, can adversely affect the performance of the preconditioners and, consequently, a design of robust preconditioners is important for many practical applications. The proposed iterative solvers consist of two kinds of iterations, outer and inner iterations. Outer iterations are designed to handle nonlinearities by linearizing the equation around the previous solution state. As a result of the linearization, a large-scale linear system needs to be solved. This linear system is solved iteratively (called inner iterations), and since it can have large variations in the coefficients, a robust preconditioner is needed. First, we show that under some assumptions the number of outer iterations is independent of the contrast. Second, based on the recently developed iterative methods, we construct a class of preconditioners that yields convergence rate that is independent of the contrast. Thus, the proposed iterative solvers are optimal with respect to the large variation in the physical parameters. Since the same preconditioner can be reused in every outer iteration, this provides an additional computational savings in the overall solution process. Numerical tests are presented to confirm the theoretical results. © 2012 Global-Science Press.

  12. MINOS: A simplified Pn solver for core calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudron, A.M.; Lautard, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a new generation of the neutronic core solver MINOS resulting from developments done in the DESCARTES project. For performance reasons, the numerical method of the existing MINOS solver in the SAPHYR system has been reused in the new system. It is based on the mixed-dual finite element approximation of the simplified transport equation. We have extended the previous method to the treatment of unstructured geometries composed by quadrilaterals, allowing us to treat geometries where fuel pins are exactly represented. For Cartesian geometries, the solver takes into account assembly discontinuity coefficients in the simplified P n context. The solver has been rewritten in C + + programming language using an object-oriented design. Its general architecture was reconsidered in order to improve its capability of evolution and its maintainability. Moreover, the performance of the previous version has been improved mainly regarding the matrix construction time; this result improves significantly the performance of the solver in the context of industrial application requiring thermal-hydraulic feedback and depletion calculations. (authors)

  13. Parallel linear solvers for simulations of reactor thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y.; Antal, S.P.; Edge, B.; Keyes, D.E.; Shaver, D.; Bolotnov, I.A.; Podowski, M.Z.

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the-art multiphase fluid dynamics code, NPHASE-CMFD, performs multiphase flow simulations in complex domains using implicit nonlinear treatment of the governing equations and in parallel, which is a very challenging environment for the linear solver. The present work illustrates how the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) and scalable Algebraic Multigrid (AMG) preconditioner from Hypre can be utilized to construct robust and scalable linear solvers for the Newton correction equation obtained from the discretized system of governing conservation equations in NPHASE-CMFD. The overall long-tem objective of this work is to extend the NPHASE-CMFD code into a fully-scalable solver of multiphase flow and heat transfer problems, applicable to both steady-state and stiff time-dependent phenomena in complete fuel assemblies of nuclear reactors and, eventually, the entire reactor core (such as the Virtual Reactor concept envisioned by CASL). This campaign appropriately begins with the linear algebraic equation solver, which is traditionally a bottleneck to scalability in PDE-based codes. The computational complexity of the solver is usually superlinear in problem size, whereas the rest of the code, the “physics” portion, usually has its complexity linear in the problem size. (author)

  14. Directional Diffusion Regulator (DDR) for some numerical solvers of hyperbolic conservation laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisankar, S.; Sheshadri, T. S.

    2013-01-01

    A computational tool called "Directional Diffusion Regulator (DDR)" is proposed to bring forth real multidimensional physics into the upwind discretization in some numerical schemes of hyperbolic conservation laws. The direction based regulator when used with dimension splitting solvers, is set to moderate the excess multidimensional diffusion and hence cause genuine multidimensional upwinding like effect. The basic idea of this regulator driven method is to retain a full upwind scheme across local discontinuities, with the upwind bias decreasing smoothly to a minimum in the farthest direction. The discontinuous solutions are quantified as gradients and the regulator parameter across a typical finite volume interface or a finite difference interpolation point is formulated based on fractional local maximum gradient in any of the weak solution flow variables (say density, pressure, temperature, Mach number or even wave velocity etc.). DDR is applied to both the non-convective as well as whole unsplit dissipative flux terms of some numerical schemes, mainly of Local Lax-Friedrichs, to solve some benchmark problems describing inviscid compressible flow, shallow water dynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics. The first order solutions consistently improved depending on the extent of grid non-alignment to discontinuities, with the major influence due to regulation of non-convective diffusion. The application is also experimented on schemes such as Roe, Jameson-Schmidt-Turkel and some second order accurate methods. The consistent improvement in accuracy either at moderate or marked levels, for a variety of problems and with increasing grid size, reasonably indicate a scope for DDR as a regular tool to impart genuine multidimensional upwinding effect in a simpler framework.

  15. Advanced Algebraic Multigrid Solvers for Subsurface Flow Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Meng-Huo

    2015-09-13

    In this research we are particularly interested in extending the robustness of multigrid solvers to encounter complex systems related to subsurface reservoir applications for flow problems in porous media. In many cases, the step for solving the pressure filed in subsurface flow simulation becomes a bottleneck for the performance of the simulator. For solving large sparse linear system arising from MPFA discretization, we choose multigrid methods as the linear solver. The possible difficulties and issues will be addressed and the corresponding remedies will be studied. As the multigrid methods are used as the linear solver, the simulator can be parallelized (although not trivial) and the high-resolution simulation become feasible, the ultimately goal which we desire to achieve.

  16. An adaptive fast multipole accelerated Poisson solver for complex geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askham, T.; Cerfon, A. J.

    2017-09-01

    We present a fast, direct and adaptive Poisson solver for complex two-dimensional geometries based on potential theory and fast multipole acceleration. More precisely, the solver relies on the standard decomposition of the solution as the sum of a volume integral to account for the source distribution and a layer potential to enforce the desired boundary condition. The volume integral is computed by applying the FMM on a square box that encloses the domain of interest. For the sake of efficiency and convergence acceleration, we first extend the source distribution (the right-hand side in the Poisson equation) to the enclosing box as a C0 function using a fast, boundary integral-based method. We demonstrate on multiply connected domains with irregular boundaries that this continuous extension leads to high accuracy without excessive adaptive refinement near the boundary and, as a result, to an extremely efficient "black box" fast solver.

  17. A moving-mesh hydrodynamic solver for ChaNGa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Philip; Wadsley, James; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2017-11-01

    We describe the structure and implementation of a moving-mesh (MM) hydrodynamics (HD) solver in the large-scale parallel code, Charm N-body GrAvity solver (ChaNGa). While largely based on the algorithm implemented in AREPO, our implementation differs a few aspects. We describe our use of the Voronoi tessellation library, VORO++, to compute the Voronoi tessellation directly. We also incorporate some recent advances in gradient estimation and reconstruction that gives better accuracy in HD solutions at minimal computational cost. We validate this module with a small battery of test problems against the smooth particle HD solver included in ChaNGa. Finally, we study one example of a scientific problem involving the mergers of two main-sequence stars and highlight the small quantitative differences between smooth particle and MM HD. We close with a discussion of anticipated future improvements and advancements.

  18. An efficient spectral crystal plasticity solver for GPU architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malahe, Michael

    2018-03-01

    We present a spectral crystal plasticity (CP) solver for graphics processing unit (GPU) architectures that achieves a tenfold increase in efficiency over prior GPU solvers. The approach makes use of a database containing a spectral decomposition of CP simulations performed using a conventional iterative solver over a parameter space of crystal orientations and applied velocity gradients. The key improvements in efficiency come from reducing global memory transactions, exposing more instruction-level parallelism, reducing integer instructions and performing fast range reductions on trigonometric arguments. The scheme also makes more efficient use of memory than prior work, allowing for larger problems to be solved on a single GPU. We illustrate these improvements with a simulation of 390 million crystal grains on a consumer-grade GPU, which executes at a rate of 2.72 s per strain step.

  19. LAPACKrc: Fast linear algebra kernels/solvers for FPGA accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Juan; Nunez, Rafael C

    2009-01-01

    We present LAPACKrc, a family of FPGA-based linear algebra solvers able to achieve more than 100x speedup per commodity processor on certain problems. LAPACKrc subsumes some of the LAPACK and ScaLAPACK functionalities, and it also incorporates sparse direct and iterative matrix solvers. Current LAPACKrc prototypes demonstrate between 40x-150x speedup compared against top-of-the-line hardware/software systems. A technology roadmap is in place to validate current performance of LAPACKrc in HPC applications, and to increase the computational throughput by factors of hundreds within the next few years.

  20. Fast Euler solver for transonic airfoils. I - Theory. II - Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadone, Andrea; Moretti, Gino

    1988-01-01

    Equations written in terms of generalized Riemann variables are presently integrated by inverting six bidiagonal matrices and two tridiagonal matrices, using an implicit Euler solver that is based on the lambda-formulation. The solution is found on a C-grid whose boundaries are very close to the airfoil. The fast solver is then applied to the computation of several flowfields on a NACA 0012 airfoil at various Mach number and alpha values, yielding results that are primarily concerned with transonic flows. The effects of grid fineness and boundary distances are analyzed; the code is found to be robust and accurate, as well as fast.

  1. A finite difference Davidson procedure to sidestep full ab initio hessian calculation: Application to characterization of stationary points and transition state searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharada, Shaama Mallikarjun; Bell, Alexis T.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The cost of calculating nuclear hessians, either analytically or by finite difference methods, during the course of quantum chemical analyses can be prohibitive for systems containing hundreds of atoms. In many applications, though, only a few eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and not the full hessian, are required. For instance, the lowest one or two eigenvalues of the full hessian are sufficient to characterize a stationary point as a minimum or a transition state (TS), respectively. We describe here a method that can eliminate the need for hessian calculations for both the characterization of stationary points as well as searches for saddle points. A finite differences implementation of the Davidson method that uses only first derivatives of the energy to calculate the lowest eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the hessian is discussed. This method can be implemented in conjunction with geometry optimization methods such as partitioned-rational function optimization (P-RFO) to characterize stationary points on the potential energy surface. With equal ease, it can be combined with interpolation methods that determine TS guess structures, such as the freezing string method, to generate approximate hessian matrices in lieu of full hessians as input to P-RFO for TS optimization. This approach is shown to achieve significant cost savings relative to exact hessian calculation when applied to both stationary point characterization as well as TS optimization. The basic reason is that the present approach scales one power of system size lower since the rate of convergence is approximately independent of the size of the system. Therefore, the finite-difference Davidson method is a viable alternative to full hessian calculation for stationary point characterization and TS search particularly when analytical hessians are not available or require substantial computational effort.

  2. VENTURE: a code block for solving multigroup neutronics problems applying the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport, version II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1977-11-01

    The report documents the computer code block VENTURE designed to solve multigroup neutronics problems with application of the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport (or alternatively simple P 1 ) in up to three-dimensional geometry. It uses and generates interface data files adopted in the cooperative effort sponsored by the Reactor Physics Branch of the Division of Reactor Research and Development of the Energy Research and Development Administration. Several different data handling procedures have been incorporated to provide considerable flexibility; it is possible to solve a wide variety of problems on a variety of computer configurations relatively efficiently

  3. VENTURE: a code block for solving multigroup neutronics problems applying the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport, version II. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1977-11-01

    The report documents the computer code block VENTURE designed to solve multigroup neutronics problems with application of the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport (or alternatively simple P/sub 1/) in up to three-dimensional geometry. It uses and generates interface data files adopted in the cooperative effort sponsored by the Reactor Physics Branch of the Division of Reactor Research and Development of the Energy Research and Development Administration. Several different data handling procedures have been incorporated to provide considerable flexibility; it is possible to solve a wide variety of problems on a variety of computer configurations relatively efficiently.

  4. Quarter-Sweep Iteration Concept on Conjugate Gradient Normal Residual Method via Second Order Quadrature - Finite Difference Schemes for Solving Fredholm Integro-Differential Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aruchunan, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have examined the effectiveness of the quarter-sweep iteration concept on conjugate gradient normal residual (CGNR) iterative method by using composite Simpson's (CS) and finite difference (FD) discretization schemes in solving Fredholm integro-differential equations. For comparison purposes, Gauss- Seidel (GS) and the standard or full- and half-sweep CGNR methods namely FSCGNR and HSCGNR are also presented. To validate the efficacy of the proposed method, several analyses were carried out such as computational complexity and percentage reduction on the proposed and existing methods. (author)

  5. VENTURE: a code block for solving multigroup neutronics problems applying the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1975-10-01

    The computer code block VENTURE, designed to solve multigroup neutronics problems with application of the finite-difference diffusion-theory approximation to neutron transport (or alternatively simple P 1 ) in up to three-dimensional geometry is described. A variety of types of problems may be solved: the usual eigenvalue problem, a direct criticality search on the buckling, on a reciprocal velocity absorber (prompt mode), or on nuclide concentrations, or an indirect criticality search on nuclide concentrations, or on dimensions. First-order perturbation analysis capability is available at the macroscopic cross section level

  6. Finite-Difference Solution for Laminar or Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Axisymmetric Bodies with Ideal Gas, CF4, or Equilibrium Air Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, H. Harris, II; Millman, Daniel R.; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code was developed that uses an implicit finite-difference technique to solve nonsimilar, axisymmetric boundary layer equations for both laminar and turbulent flow. The code can treat ideal gases, air in chemical equilibrium, and carbon tetrafluoride (CF4), which is a useful gas for hypersonic blunt-body simulations. This is the only known boundary layer code that can treat CF4. Comparisons with experimental data have demonstrated that accurate solutions are obtained. The method should prove useful as an analysis tool for comparing calculations with wind tunnel experiments and for making calculations about flight vehicles where equilibrium air chemistry assumptions are valid.

  7. Evolution operator equation: Integration with algebraic and finite difference methods. Applications to physical problems in classical and quantum mechanics and quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Torre, Amalia [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Ottaviani, Pier Luigi [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Bologna (Italy); Vasquez, Luis [Madris, Univ. Complutense (Spain). Dept. de Matemateca Aplicado

    1997-10-01

    The finite-difference based integration method for evolution-line equations is discussed in detail and framed within the general context of the evolution operator picture. Exact analytical methods are described to solve evolution-like equations in a quite general physical context. The numerical technique based on the factorization formulae of exponential operator is then illustrated and applied to the evolution-operator in both classical and quantum framework. Finally, the general view to the finite differencing schemes is provided, displaying the wide range of applications from the classical Newton equation of motion to the quantum field theory.

  8. The U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Model - PCGN: A Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Solver with Improved Nonlinear Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, Richard L.; Banta, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    The preconditioned conjugate gradient with improved nonlinear control (PCGN) package provides addi-tional means by which the solution of nonlinear ground-water flow problems can be controlled as compared to existing solver packages for MODFLOW. Picard iteration is used to solve nonlinear ground-water flow equations by iteratively solving a linear approximation of the nonlinear equations. The linear solution is provided by means of the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm where preconditioning is provided by the modi-fied incomplete Cholesky algorithm. The incomplete Cholesky scheme incorporates two levels of fill, 0 and 1, in which the pivots can be modified so that the row sums of the preconditioning matrix and the original matrix are approximately equal. A relaxation factor is used to implement the modified pivots, which determines the degree of modification allowed. The effects of fill level and degree of pivot modification are briefly explored by means of a synthetic, heterogeneous finite-difference matrix; results are reported in the final section of this report. The preconditioned conjugate gradient method is coupled with Picard iteration so as to efficiently solve the nonlinear equations associated with many ground-water flow problems. The description of this coupling of the linear solver with Picard iteration is a primary concern of this document.

  9. Numerical solver for compressible two-fluid flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Naber (Jorick)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis report treats the development of a numerical solver for the simulation of flows of two non-mixing fluids described by the two-dimensional Euler equations. A level-set equation in conservative form describes the interface. After each time step the deformed level-set function is

  10. Implementing parallel elliptic solver on a Beowulf cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Paprzycki

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In a recent paper cite{zara} a parallel direct solver for the linear systems arising from elliptic partial differential equations has been proposed. The aim of this note is to present the initial evaluation of the performance characteristics of this algorithm on Beowulf-type cluster. In this context the performance of PVM and MPI based implementations is compared.

  11. Navier-Stokes Solvers and Generalizations for Reacting Flow Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elman, Howard C

    2013-01-27

    This is an overview of our accomplishments during the final term of this grant (1 September 2008 -- 30 June 2012). These fall mainly into three categories: fast algorithms for linear eigenvalue problems; solution algorithms and modeling methods for partial differential equations with uncertain coefficients; and preconditioning methods and solvers for models of computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

  12. Using a satisfiability solver to identify deterministic finite state automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heule, M.J.H.; Verwer, S.

    2009-01-01

    We present an exact algorithm for identification of deterministic finite automata (DFA) which is based on satisfiability (SAT) solvers. Despite the size of the low level SAT representation, our approach seems to be competitive with alternative techniques. Our contributions are threefold: First, we

  13. SolveDB: Integrating Optimization Problem Solvers Into SQL Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siksnys, Laurynas; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2016-01-01

    for optimization problems, (2) an extensible infrastructure for integrating different solvers, and (3) query optimization techniques to achieve the best execution performance and/or result quality. Extensive experiments with the PostgreSQL-based implementation show that SolveDB is a versatile tool offering much...

  14. Linear system solvers based on space decompositions and parallel computations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blaheta, Radim; Jakl, Ondřej; Starý, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2003), s. 439-454 ISSN 1210-2717 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS3086102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3086906 Keywords : large scale modelling * FEM * iterative solvers Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  15. Thinking Process of Naive Problem Solvers to Solve Mathematical Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairing, Jackson Pasini

    2017-01-01

    Solving problems is not only a goal of mathematical learning. Students acquire ways of thinking, habits of persistence and curiosity, and confidence in unfamiliar situations by learning to solve problems. In fact, there were students who had difficulty in solving problems. The students were naive problem solvers. This research aimed to describe…

  16. Notes on the ExactPack Implementation of the DSD Explosive Arc Solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Doebling, Scott William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-12

    It has been shown above that the discretization scheme implemented in the ExactPack solver for the DSD Explosive Arc equation is consistent with the Explosive Arc PDE. In addition, a stability analysis has provided a CFL condition for a stable time step. Together, consistency and stability imply convergence of the scheme, which is expected to be close to first-order in time and second-order in space. It is understood that the nonlinearity of the underlying PDE will affect this rate somewhat.

  17. Parallel Solver for H(div) Problems Using Hybridization and AMG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chak S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vassilevski, Panayot S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, a scalable parallel solver is proposed for H(div) problems discretized by arbitrary order finite elements on general unstructured meshes. The solver is based on hybridization and algebraic multigrid (AMG). Unlike some previously studied H(div) solvers, the hybridization solver does not require discrete curl and gradient operators as additional input from the user. Instead, only some element information is needed in the construction of the solver. The hybridization results in a H1-equivalent symmetric positive definite system, which is then rescaled and solved by AMG solvers designed for H1 problems. Weak and strong scaling of the method are examined through several numerical tests. Our numerical results show that the proposed solver provides a promising alternative to ADS, a state-of-the-art solver [12], for H(div) problems. In fact, it outperforms ADS for higher order elements.

  18. Multiscale Universal Interface: A concurrent framework for coupling heterogeneous solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Kudo, Shuhei; Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-09-01

    Concurrently coupled numerical simulations using heterogeneous solvers are powerful tools for modeling multiscale phenomena. However, major modifications to existing codes are often required to enable such simulations, posing significant difficulties in practice. In this paper we present a C++ library, i.e. the Multiscale Universal Interface (MUI), which is capable of facilitating the coupling effort for a wide range of multiscale simulations. The library adopts a header-only form with minimal external dependency and hence can be easily dropped into existing codes. A data sampler concept is introduced, combined with a hybrid dynamic/static typing mechanism, to create an easily customizable framework for solver-independent data interpretation. The library integrates MPI MPMD support and an asynchronous communication protocol to handle inter-solver information exchange irrespective of the solvers' own MPI awareness. Template metaprogramming is heavily employed to simultaneously improve runtime performance and code flexibility. We validated the library by solving three different multiscale problems, which also serve to demonstrate the flexibility of the framework in handling heterogeneous models and solvers. In the first example, a Couette flow was simulated using two concurrently coupled Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of different spatial resolutions. In the second example, we coupled the deterministic SPH method with the stochastic Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method to study the effect of surface grafting on the hydrodynamics properties on the surface. In the third example, we consider conjugate heat transfer between a solid domain and a fluid domain by coupling the particle-based energy-conserving DPD (eDPD) method with the Finite Element Method (FEM).

  19. Migration of vectorized iterative solvers to distributed memory architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pommerell, C. [AT& T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Ruehl, R. [CSCS-ETH, Manno (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    Both necessity and opportunity motivate the use of high-performance computers for iterative linear solvers. Necessity results from the size of the problems being solved-smaller problems are often better handled by direct methods. Opportunity arises from the formulation of the iterative methods in terms of simple linear algebra operations, even if this {open_quote}natural{close_quotes} parallelism is not easy to exploit in irregularly structured sparse matrices and with good preconditioners. As a result, high-performance implementations of iterative solvers have attracted a lot of interest in recent years. Most efforts are geared to vectorize or parallelize the dominating operation-structured or unstructured sparse matrix-vector multiplication, or to increase locality and parallelism by reformulating the algorithm-reducing global synchronization in inner products or local data exchange in preconditioners. Target architectures for iterative solvers currently include mostly vector supercomputers and architectures with one or few optimized (e.g., super-scalar and/or super-pipelined RISC) processors and hierarchical memory systems. More recently, parallel computers with physically distributed memory and a better price/performance ratio have been offered by vendors as a very interesting alternative to vector supercomputers. However, programming comfort on such distributed memory parallel processors (DMPPs) still lags behind. Here the authors are concerned with iterative solvers and their changing computing environment. In particular, they are considering migration from traditional vector supercomputers to DMPPs. Application requirements force one to use flexible and portable libraries. They want to extend the portability of iterative solvers rather than reimplementing everything for each new machine, or even for each new architecture.

  20. A High Performance QDWH-SVD Solver using Hardware Accelerators

    KAUST Repository

    Sukkari, Dalal E.

    2015-04-08

    This paper describes a new high performance implementation of the QR-based Dynamically Weighted Halley Singular Value Decomposition (QDWH-SVD) solver on multicore architecture enhanced with multiple GPUs. The standard QDWH-SVD algorithm was introduced by Nakatsukasa and Higham (SIAM SISC, 2013) and combines three successive computational stages: (1) the polar decomposition calculation of the original matrix using the QDWH algorithm, (2) the symmetric eigendecomposition of the resulting polar factor to obtain the singular values and the right singular vectors and (3) the matrix-matrix multiplication to get the associated left singular vectors. A comprehensive test suite highlights the numerical robustness of the QDWH-SVD solver. Although it performs up to two times more flops when computing all singular vectors compared to the standard SVD solver algorithm, our new high performance implementation on single GPU results in up to 3.8x improvements for asymptotic matrix sizes, compared to the equivalent routines from existing state-of-the-art open-source and commercial libraries. However, when only singular values are needed, QDWH-SVD is penalized by performing up to 14 times more flops. The singular value only implementation of QDWH-SVD on single GPU can still run up to 18% faster than the best existing equivalent routines. Integrating mixed precision techniques in the solver can additionally provide up to 40% improvement at the price of losing few digits of accuracy, compared to the full double precision floating point arithmetic. We further leverage the single GPU QDWH-SVD implementation by introducing the first multi-GPU SVD solver to study the scalability of the QDWH-SVD framework.

  1. Motivations, Challenges, and Opportunities of Successful Solvers on an Innovation Intermediary Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify motivations, challenges, and opportunities of successful solvers participating in virtual teams of innovation contests (ICs) organized by an innovation intermediary. Based on 82 interviews of successful solvers, this study provides novel insights into ICs....... The main motivational factors of successful solvers engaged in problem solving are money, learning, fun, sense of achievement, passion, and networking. Major challenges solvers face include unclear or insufficient problem description, lack of option for communication, language barrier, time zone...

  2. On the Derivation of Highest-Order Compact Finite Difference Schemes for the One- and Two-Dimensional Poisson Equation with Dirichlet Boundary Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Settle, Sean O.

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this paper is to answer the question, What are the highest-order five- or nine-point compact finite difference schemes? To answer this question, we present several simple derivations of finite difference schemes for the one- and two-dimensional Poisson equation on uniform, quasi-uniform, and nonuniform face-to-face hyperrectangular grids and directly prove the existence or nonexistence of their highest-order local accuracies. Our derivations are unique in that we do not make any initial assumptions on stencil symmetries or weights. For the one-dimensional problem, the derivation using the three-point stencil on both uniform and nonuniform grids yields a scheme with arbitrarily high-order local accuracy. However, for the two-dimensional problem, the derivation using the corresponding five-point stencil on uniform and quasi-uniform grids yields a scheme with at most second-order local accuracy, and on nonuniform grids yields at most first-order local accuracy. When expanding the five-point stencil to the nine-point stencil, the derivation using the nine-point stencil on uniform grids yields at most sixth-order local accuracy, but on quasi- and nonuniform grids yields at most fourth- and third-order local accuracy, respectively. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  3. Aspects of numerical and representational methods related to the finite-difference simulation of advective and dispersive transport of freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of the transport of injected freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer, overlain and underlain by confining layers containing more saline water, is shown to be influenced by the choice of the finite-difference approximation method, the algorithm for representing vertical advective and dispersive fluxes, and the values assigned to parametric coefficients that specify the degree of vertical dispersion and molecular diffusion that occurs. Computed potable water recovery efficiencies will differ depending upon the choice of algorithm and approximation method, as will dispersion coefficients estimated based on the calibration of simulations to match measured data. A comparison of centered and backward finite-difference approximation methods shows that substantially different transition zones between injected and native waters are depicted by the different methods, and computed recovery efficiencies vary greatly. Standard and experimental algorithms and a variety of values for molecular diffusivity, transverse dispersivity, and vertical scaling factor were compared in simulations of freshwater storage in a thin brackish aquifer. Computed recovery efficiencies vary considerably, and appreciable differences are observed in the distribution of injected freshwater in the various cases tested. The results demonstrate both a qualitatively different description of transport using the experimental algorithms and the interrelated influences of molecular diffusion and transverse dispersion on simulated recovery efficiency. When simulating natural aquifer flow in cross-section, flushing of the aquifer occurred for all tested coefficient choices using both standard and experimental algorithms. ?? 1993.

  4. Three-dimensional TDEM modeling using finite-difference method; Sabunho ni yoru TDEM ho no sanjigen modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, K.; Endo, M. [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering

    1997-10-22

    Study is made on the theory of three-dimensional modelling of TDEM (Time Domain Electromagnetic) method based on the theory of Wang and Hohmann. A difference scheme is built and investigation is conducted about calculation accuracy with attention paid especially to space and time division, and the obtained optimum value is compared with the analytical solution for a homogeneous medium. As the result, it becomes possible to have a high-accuracy TDEM response thanks to the obtained optimum parameter. In an example, a response is determined in the case of a high-resistivity body in presence near the ground surface. Calculation is performed under the given conditions of a medium 100 ohm/m in resistivity, anomalous bodies 200, 500, 1000, 2000,5000, and 10,000 ohm/m in resistivity, respectively, and a distance in the direction of depth of 20m. The result indicates that it is possible to estimate the effect of the ground surface terrain on a TDEM response. Since the effect of the ground surface terrain emerges at the initial part of a response, it is inferred that consideration of terrain is mandatory in building a model if it is for interpreting the subsurface structure in detail. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Explicit finite-difference and particle method for the dynamics of mixed Bose-condensate and cold-atom clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignolo, P.; Chiofalo, M.L.; Tosi, M.P.; Succi, Sauro

    2002-01-01

    We present a new numerical method for studying the dynamics of quantum fluids composed of a Bose-Einstein condensate and a cloud of bosonic or fermionic atoms in a mean-field approximation. The method combines an explicit time-marching algorithm, previously developed for Bose-Einstein condensates in a harmonic or optical-lattice potential, with a particle-in-cell approach to the equation of motion for the one-body Wigner distribution function in the cold-atom cloud. The method is tested against known analytical results on the free expansion of a fermion cloud from a cylindrical harmonic trap and is validated by examining how the expansion of the fermionic cloud is affected by the simultaneous expansion of a condensate. We then present original calculations on a condensate and a thermal cloud inside a harmonic well and a superposed optical lattice, by addressing the free expansion of the two components and their oscillations under an applied harmonic force. These results are discussed in the light of relevant theories and experiments

  6. Numerical stability of finite difference algorithms for electrochemical kinetic simulations: Matrix stability analysis of the classic explicit, fully implicit and Crank-Nicolson methods and typical problems involving mixed boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieniasz, Leslaw K.; Østerby, Ole; Britz, Dieter

    1995-01-01

    The stepwise numerical stability of the classic explicit, fully implicit and Crank-Nicolson finite difference discretizations of example diffusional initial boundary value problems from electrochemical kinetics has been investigated using the matrix method of stability analysis. Special attention...

  7. Acceleration of the OpenFOAM-based MHD solver using graphics processing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Qingyun; Chen, Hongli; Feng, Jingchao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3D PISO-MHD was implemented on Kepler-class graphics processing units (GPUs) using CUDA technology. • A consistent and conservative scheme is used in the code which was validated by three basic benchmarks in a rectangular and round ducts. • Parallelized of CPU and GPU acceleration were compared relating to single core CPU in MHD problems and non-MHD problems. • Different preconditions for solving MHD solver were compared and the results showed that AMG method is better for calculations. - Abstract: The pressure-implicit with splitting of operators (PISO) magnetohydrodynamics MHD solver of the couple of Navier–Stokes equations and Maxwell equations was implemented on Kepler-class graphics processing units (GPUs) using the CUDA technology. The solver is developed on open source code OpenFOAM based on consistent and conservative scheme which is suitable for simulating MHD flow under strong magnetic field in fusion liquid metal blanket with structured or unstructured mesh. We verified the validity of the implementation on several standard cases including the benchmark I of Shercliff and Hunt's cases, benchmark II of fully developed circular pipe MHD flow cases and benchmark III of KIT experimental case. Computational performance of the GPU implementation was examined by comparing its double precision run times with those of essentially the same algorithms and meshes. The resulted showed that a GPU (GTX 770) can outperform a server-class 4-core, 8-thread CPU (Intel Core i7-4770k) by a factor of 2 at least.

  8. Benchmarking ICRF Full-wave Solvers for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budny, R.V.; Berry, L.; Bilato, R.; Bonoli, P.; Brambilla, M.; Dumont, R.J.; Fukuyama, A.; Harvey, R.; Jaeger, E.F.; Indireshkumar, K.; Lerche, E.; McCune, D.; Phillips, C.K.; Vdovin, V.; Wright, J.

    2011-01-01

    Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by six full-wave solver groups to simulate the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating, and by three of these groups to simulate the current-drive. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power for the DT and He4 cases. Factor of two disagreements are found for the cases with second harmonic He3 heating in bulk H cases. Approximate agreement is achieved simulating the ICRF current drive.

  9. Efficient use of iterative solvers in nested topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amir, Oded; Stolpe, Mathias; Sigmund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    In the nested approach to structural optimization, most of the computational effort is invested in the solution of the finite element analysis equations. In this study, it is suggested to reduce this computational cost by using an approximation to the solution of the nested problem, generated...... by a Krylov subspace iterative solver. By choosing convergence criteria for the iterative solver that are strongly related to the optimization objective and to the design sensitivities, it is possible to terminate the iterative solution of the nested equations earlier compared to traditional convergence...... measures. The approximation is shown to be sufficiently accurate for the practical purpose of optimization even though the nested equation system is not solved accurately. The approach is tested on several medium-scale topology optimization problems, including three dimensional minimum compliance problems...

  10. Efficient use of iterative solvers in nested topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amir, Oded; Stolpe, Mathias; Sigmund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    In the nested approach to structural optimization, most of the computational effort is invested in the solution of the analysis equations. In this study, it is suggested to reduce this computational cost by using an approximation to the solution of the analysis problem, generated by a Krylov...... subspace iterative solver. By choosing convergence criteria for the iterative solver that are strongly related to the optimization objective and to the design sensitivities, it is possible to terminate the iterative solution of the nested equations earlier compared to traditional convergence measures....... The approximation is computationally shown to be sufficiently accurate for the purpose of optimization though the nested equation system is not necessarily solved accurately. The approach is tested on several large-scale topology optimization problems, including minimum compliance problems and compliant mechanism...

  11. Nonlinear multigrid solvers exploiting AMGe coarse spaces with approximation properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Max la Cour; Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Villa, Umberto

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a nonlinear multigrid solver for mixed finite element discretizations based on the Full Approximation Scheme (FAS) and element-based Algebraic Multigrid (AMGe). The AMGe coarse spaces with approximation properties used in this work enable us to overcome the difficulties...... discretizations on general unstructured grids for a large class of nonlinear partial differential equations, including saddle point problems. The approximation properties of the coarse spaces ensure that our FAS approach for general unstructured meshes leads to optimal mesh-independent convergence rates similar...... to those achieved by geometric FAS on a nested hierarchy of refined meshes. In the numerical results, Newton’s method and Picard iterations with state-of-the-art inner linear solvers are compared to our FAS algorithm for the solution of a nonlinear saddle point problem arising from porous media flow...

  12. Comparison of Einstein-Boltzmann solvers for testing general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, E.; Barreira, A.; Frusciante, N.; Hu, B.; Peirone, S.; Raveri, M.; Zumalacárregui, M.; Avilez-Lopez, A.; Ballardini, M.; Battye, R. A.; Bolliet, B.; Calabrese, E.; Dirian, Y.; Ferreira, P. G.; Finelli, F.; Huang, Z.; Ivanov, M. M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Li, B.; Lima, N. A.; Pace, F.; Paoletti, D.; Sawicki, I.; Silvestri, A.; Skordis, C.; Umiltà, C.; Vernizzi, F.

    2018-01-01

    We compare Einstein-Boltzmann solvers that include modifications to general relativity and find that, for a wide range of models and parameters, they agree to a high level of precision. We look at three general purpose codes that primarily model general scalar-tensor theories, three codes that model Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) gravity, a code that models f (R ) gravity, a code that models covariant Galileons, a code that models Hořava-Lifschitz gravity, and two codes that model nonlocal models of gravity. Comparing predictions of the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and the power spectrum of dark matter for a suite of different models, we find agreement at the subpercent level. This means that this suite of Einstein-Boltzmann solvers is now sufficiently accurate for precision constraints on cosmological and gravitational parameters.

  13. Parallel Auxiliary Space AMG Solver for $H(div)$ Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolev, Tzanio V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vassilevski, Panayot S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-12-18

    We present a family of scalable preconditioners for matrices arising in the discretization of $H(div)$ problems using the lowest order Raviart--Thomas finite elements. Our approach belongs to the class of “auxiliary space''--based methods and requires only the finite element stiffness matrix plus some minimal additional discretization information about the topology and orientation of mesh entities. Also, we provide a detailed algebraic description of the theory, parallel implementation, and different variants of this parallel auxiliary space divergence solver (ADS) and discuss its relations to the Hiptmair--Xu (HX) auxiliary space decomposition of $H(div)$ [SIAM J. Numer. Anal., 45 (2007), pp. 2483--2509] and to the auxiliary space Maxwell solver AMS [J. Comput. Math., 27 (2009), pp. 604--623]. Finally, an extensive set of numerical experiments demonstrates the robustness and scalability of our implementation on large-scale $H(div)$ problems with large jumps in the material coefficients.

  14. Approximate Riemann solver for the two-fluid plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumlak, U.; Loverich, J.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the simulation of plasma dynamics using the two-fluid plasma model. The two-fluid plasma model is more general than the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model often used for plasma dynamic simulations. The two-fluid equations are derived in divergence form and an approximate Riemann solver is developed to compute the fluxes of the electron and ion fluids at the computational cell interfaces and an upwind characteristic-based solver to compute the electromagnetic fields. The source terms that couple the fluids and fields are treated implicitly to relax the stiffness. The algorithm is validated with the coplanar Riemann problem, Langmuir plasma oscillations, and the electromagnetic shock problem that has been simulated with the MHD plasma model. A numerical dispersion relation is also presented that demonstrates agreement with analytical plasma waves

  15. The Closest Point Method and Multigrid Solvers for Elliptic Equations on Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yujia

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. Elliptic partial differential equations are important from both application and analysis points of view. In this paper we apply the closest point method to solve elliptic equations on general curved surfaces. Based on the closest point representation of the underlying surface, we formulate an embedding equation for the surface elliptic problem, then discretize it using standard finite differences and interpolation schemes on banded but uniform Cartesian grids. We prove the convergence of the difference scheme for the Poisson\\'s equation on a smooth closed curve. In order to solve the resulting large sparse linear systems, we propose a specific geometric multigrid method in the setting of the closest point method. Convergence studies in both the accuracy of the difference scheme and the speed of the multigrid algorithm show that our approaches are effective.

  16. Matlab Geochemistry: An open source geochemistry solver based on MRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, C. J.; Raynaud, X.; Nilsen, H.; Hesse, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    The study of geological systems often requires the solution of complex geochemical relations. To address this need we present an open source geochemical solver based on the Matlab Reservoir Simulation Toolbox (MRST) developed by SINTEF. The implementation supports non-isothermal multicomponent aqueous complexation, surface complexation, ion exchange, and dissolution/precipitation reactions. The suite of tools available in MRST allows for rapid model development, in particular the incorporation of geochemical calculations into transport simulations of multiple phases, complex domain geometry and geomechanics. Different numerical schemes and additional physics can be easily incorporated into the existing tools through the object-oriented framework employed by MRST. The solver leverages the automatic differentiation tools available in MRST to solve arbitrarily complex geochemical systems with any choice of species or element concentration as input. Four mathematical approaches enable the solver to be quite robust: 1) the choice of chemical elements as the basis components makes all entries in the composition matrix positive thus preserving convexity, 2) a log variable transformation is used which transfers the nonlinearity to the convex composition matrix, 3) a priori bounds on variables are calculated from the structure of the problem, constraining Netwon's path and 4) an initial guess is calculated implicitly by sequentially adding model complexity. As a benchmark we compare the model to experimental and semi-analytic solutions of the coupled salinity-acidity transport system. Together with the reservoir simulation capabilities of MRST the solver offers a promising tool for geochemical simulations in reservoir domains for applications in a diversity of fields from enhanced oil recovery to radionuclide storage.

  17. Resolving Neighbourhood Relations in a Parallel Fluid Dynamic Solver

    KAUST Repository

    Frisch, Jerome

    2012-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations require an enormous computational effort if a physically reasonable accuracy should be reached. Therefore, a parallel implementation is inevitable. This paper describes the basics of our implemented fluid solver with a special aspect on the hierarchical data structure, unique cell and grid identification, and the neighbourhood relations in-between grids on different processes. A special server concept keeps track of every grid over all processes while minimising data transfer between the nodes. © 2012 IEEE.

  18. A hybrid finite-difference and integral-equation method for modeling and inversion of marine controlled-source electromagnetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Daeung; Zhdanov, Michael; Mattsson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    One of the major problems in the modeling and inversion of marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data is related to the need for accurate representation of very complex geoelectrical models typical for marine environment. At the same time, the corresponding forward-modeling algorithms...... should be powerful and fast enough to be suitable for repeated use in hundreds of iterations of the inversion and for multiple transmitter/receiver positions. To this end, we have developed a novel 3D modeling and inversion approach, which combines the advantages of the finite-difference (FD......) and integral-equation (IE) methods. In the framework of this approach, we have solved Maxwell’s equations for anomalous electric fields using the FD approximation on a staggered grid. Once the unknown electric fields in the computation domain of the FD method are computed, the electric and magnetic fields...

  19. Comparison between a finite difference model (PUMA) and a finite element model (DELFIN) for simulation of the reactor of the atomic power plant of Atucha I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    The reactor code PUMA, developed in CNEA, simulates nuclear reactors discretizing space in finite difference elements. Core representation is performed by means a cylindrical mesh, but the reactor channels are arranged in an hexagonal lattice. That is why a mapping using volume intersections must be used. This spatial treatment is the reason of an overestimation of the control rod reactivity values, which must be adjusted modifying the incremental cross sections. Also, a not very good treatment of the continuity conditions between core and reflector leads to an overestimation of channel power of the peripherical fuel elements between 5 to 8 per cent. Another code, DELFIN, developed also in CNEA, treats the spatial discretization using heterogeneous finite elements, allowing a correct treatment of the continuity of fluxes and current among elements and a more realistic representation of the hexagonal lattice of the reactor. A comparison between results obtained using both methods in done in this paper. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  20. Solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equation using cubic B-spline interpolation and finite difference methods on dual solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Azhar; Azmi, Amirah; Majid, Ahmad Abd.; Hamid, Nur Nadiah Abd

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, Nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with Neumann boundary conditions is solved using cubic B-spline interpolation method (CuBSIM) and finite difference method (FDM). Firstly, FDM is applied on the time discretization and cubic B-spline is utilized as an interpolation function in the space dimension with the help of theta-weighted method. The second approach is based on the FDM applied on the time and space discretization with the help of theta-weighted method. The CuBSIM is shown to be stable by using von Neumann stability analysis. The proposed method is tested on the interaction of the dual solitons of the NLS equation. The accuracy of the numerical results is measured by the Euclidean-norm and infinity-norm. CuBSIM is found to produce more accurate results than the FDM.

  1. Graphics-processing-unit-accelerated finite-difference time-domain simulation of the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolskiy, V. P.; Stegailov, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) serve as important tools for many modern technologies. However, the proper microscopic models of the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and metal NPs are currently not very well developed in many cases. One part of the problem is the description of the warm dense matter that is formed in NPs after intense irradiation. Another part of the problem is the description of the electromagnetic waves around NPs. Description of wave propagation requires the solution of Maxwell’s equations and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is the classic approach for solving them. There are many commercial and free implementations of FDTD, including the open source software that supports graphics processing unit (GPU) acceleration. In this report we present the results on the FDTD calculations for different cases of the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and metal nanoparticles. Following our previous results, we analyze the efficiency of the GPU acceleration of the FDTD algorithm.

  2. Comparison of finite element and finite difference methods for 2D and 3D calculations with Monte Carlo method results for idealized cases of a heavy water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Carlos; Marconi, Javier; Serra, Oscar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: grant@cnea.gov.ar; Mollerach, Ricardo; Fink, Jose [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: RMollerach@na-sa.com.ar; JFink@na-sa.com.ar

    2005-07-01

    Nowadays, the increased calculation capacity of modern computers allows us to evaluate the 2D and 3D flux and power distribution of nuclear reactor in a reasonable amount of time using a Monte Carlo method. This method gives results that can be considered the most reliable evaluation of flux and power distribution with a great amount of detail. This is the reason why these results can be considered as benchmark cases that can be used for the validation of other methods. For this purpose, idealized models were calculated using Monte Carlo (code MCNP5) for the ATUCHA I reactor. 2D and 3D cases with and without control rods and channels without fuel element were analyzed. All of them were modeled using a finite element code (DELFIN) and a finite difference code (PUMA). In both cases two energy groups were use. (author)

  3. The computation of turbulent recirculating flow using curvilinear finite differences. Application of the k - epsilon model to the flow in dredged trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfrink, B.J.

    1981-08-01

    The report treats the computation of turbulent recirculating flow in dredged trenches. The mathematical model consists of the full two-dimensional unsteady Reynolds equations, formulated in primitive variables. Turbulence closure is obtained by means of a two-equation (k - epsilon) model. The numerical technique is based on the use of curvilinear finite differences in space and of fractional steps in time. A procedure is proposed to apply the model for varying roughness circumstances. The value of the Von Karman constant can be determined from geometric information. Afterwards, only the c 1 -constant is adapted by means of a degenerated epsilon-equation. The report describes an extensive sensitivity study for the inlet conditions and the empirical constants. Ultimately, the results of the mathematical model are very satisfactory. Compared with laboratory experiments, the recirculation length is only underpredicted with 10%

  4. Three-dimensional efficient dispersive alternating-direction-implicit finite-difference time-domain algorithm using a quadratic complex rational function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E-K; Ha, S-G; Lee, J; Park, Y B; Jung, K-Y

    2015-01-26

    Efficient unconditionally stable FDTD method is developed for the electromagnetic analysis of dispersive media. Toward this purpose, a quadratic complex rational function (QCRF) dispersion model is applied to the alternating-direction-implicit finite-difference time-domain (ADI-FDTD) method. The 3-D update equations of QCRF-ADI-FDTD are derived using Maxwell's curl equations and the constitutive relation. The periodic boundary condition of QCRF-ADI-FDTD is discussed in detail. A 3-D numerical example shows that the time-step size can be increased by the proposed QCRF-ADI-FDTD beyond the Courant-Friedrich-Levy (CFL) number, without numerical instability. It is observed that, for refined computational cells, the computational time of QCRF-ADI-FDTD is reduced to 28.08 % of QCRF-FDTD, while the L2 relative error norm of a field distribution is 6.92 %.

  5. Geometrically nonlinear dynamic analysis of doubly curved isotropic shells resting on elastic foundation by a combination of harmonic differential quadrature-finite difference methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civalek, Oemer

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamic response of doubly curved shallow shells resting on Winkler-Pasternak elastic foundation has been studied for step and sinusoidal loadings. Dynamic analogues of Von Karman-Donnel type shell equations are used. Clamped immovable and simply supported immovable boundary conditions are considered. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations of the shell are discretized in space and time domains using the harmonic differential quadrature (HDQ) and finite differences (FD) methods, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed HDQ-FD coupled methodology is demonstrated by numerical examples. The shear parameter G of the Pasternak foundation and the stiffness parameter K of the Winkler foundation have been found to have a significant influence on the dynamic response of the shell. It is concluded from the present study that the HDQ-FD methodolgy is a simple, efficient, and accurate method for the nonlinear analysis of doubly curved shallow shells resting on two-parameter elastic foundation

  6. Direct solvers performance on h-adapted grids

    KAUST Repository

    Paszynski, Maciej

    2015-05-27

    We analyse the performance of direct solvers when applied to a system of linear equations arising from an hh-adapted, C0C0 finite element space. Theoretical estimates are derived for typical hh-refinement patterns arising as a result of a point, edge, or face singularity as well as boundary layers. They are based on the elimination trees constructed specifically for the considered grids. Theoretical estimates are compared with experiments performed with MUMPS using the nested-dissection algorithm for construction of the elimination tree from METIS library. The numerical experiments provide the same performance for the cases where our trees are identical with those constructed by the nested-dissection algorithm, and worse performance for some cases where our trees are different. We also present numerical experiments for the cases with mixed singularities, where how to construct optimal elimination trees is unknown. In all analysed cases, the use of hh-adaptive grids significantly reduces the cost of the direct solver algorithm per unknown as compared to uniform grids. The theoretical estimates predict and the experimental data confirm that the computational complexity is linear for various refinement patterns. In most cases, the cost of the direct solver per unknown is lower when employing anisotropic refinements as opposed to isotropic ones.

  7. IGA-ADS: Isogeometric analysis FEM using ADS solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łoś, Marcin M.; Woźniak, Maciej; Paszyński, Maciej; Lenharth, Andrew; Hassaan, Muhamm Amber; Pingali, Keshav

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we present a fast explicit solver for solution of non-stationary problems using L2 projections with isogeometric finite element method. The solver has been implemented within GALOIS framework. It enables parallel multi-core simulations of different time-dependent problems, in 1D, 2D, or 3D. We have prepared the solver framework in a way that enables direct implementation of the selected PDE and corresponding boundary conditions. In this paper we describe the installation, implementation of exemplary three PDEs, and execution of the simulations on multi-core Linux cluster nodes. We consider three case studies, including heat transfer, linear elasticity, as well as non-linear flow in heterogeneous media. The presented package generates output suitable for interfacing with Gnuplot and ParaView visualization software. The exemplary simulations show near perfect scalability on Gilbert shared-memory node with four Intel® Xeon® CPU E7-4860 processors, each possessing 10 physical cores (for a total of 40 cores).

  8. A Survey of Solver-Related Geometry and Meshing Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, James; Daniel, Derick; Gudenkauf, Jared; Hine, David; Sideroff, Chris

    2016-01-01

    There is a concern in the computational fluid dynamics community that mesh generation is a significant bottleneck in the CFD workflow. This is one of several papers that will help set the stage for a moderated panel discussion addressing this issue. Although certain general "rules of thumb" and a priori mesh metrics can be used to ensure that some base level of mesh quality is achieved, inadequate consideration is often given to the type of solver or particular flow regime on which the mesh will be utilized. This paper explores how an analyst may want to think differently about a mesh based on considerations such as if a flow is compressible vs. incompressible or hypersonic vs. subsonic or if the solver is node-centered vs. cell-centered. This paper is a high-level investigation intended to provide general insight into how considering the nature of the solver or flow when performing mesh generation has the potential to increase the accuracy and/or robustness of the solution and drive the mesh generation process to a state where it is no longer a hindrance to the analysis process.

  9. NONLINEAR MULTIGRID SOLVER EXPLOITING AMGe COARSE SPACES WITH APPROXIMATION PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Max La Cour [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Villa, Umberto E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Engsig-Karup, Allan P. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Vassilevski, Panayot S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-22

    The paper introduces a nonlinear multigrid solver for mixed nite element discretizations based on the Full Approximation Scheme (FAS) and element-based Algebraic Multigrid (AMGe). The main motivation to use FAS for unstruc- tured problems is the guaranteed approximation property of the AMGe coarse spaces that were developed recently at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These give the ability to derive stable and accurate coarse nonlinear discretization problems. The previous attempts (including ones with the original AMGe method, [5, 11]), were less successful due to lack of such good approximation properties of the coarse spaces. With coarse spaces with approximation properties, our FAS approach on un- structured meshes should be as powerful/successful as FAS on geometrically re ned meshes. For comparison, Newton's method and Picard iterations with an inner state-of-the-art linear solver is compared to FAS on a nonlinear saddle point problem with applications to porous media ow. It is demonstrated that FAS is faster than Newton's method and Picard iterations for the experiments considered here. Due to the guaranteed approximation properties of our AMGe, the coarse spaces are very accurate, providing a solver with the potential for mesh-independent convergence on general unstructured meshes.

  10. Scalable parallel prefix solvers for discrete ordinates transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautz, S.; Pandya, T.; Adams, M.

    2009-01-01

    The well-known 'sweep' algorithm for inverting the streaming-plus-collision term in first-order deterministic radiation transport calculations has some desirable numerical properties. However, it suffers from parallel scaling issues caused by a lack of concurrency. The maximum degree of concurrency, and thus the maximum parallelism, grows more slowly than the problem size for sweeps-based solvers. We investigate a new class of parallel algorithms that involves recasting the streaming-plus-collision problem in prefix form and solving via cyclic reduction. This method, although computationally more expensive at low levels of parallelism than the sweep algorithm, offers better theoretical scalability properties. Previous work has demonstrated this approach for one-dimensional calculations; we show how to extend it to multidimensional calculations. Notably, for multiple dimensions it appears that this approach is limited to long-characteristics discretizations; other discretizations cannot be cast in prefix form. We implement two variants of the algorithm within the radlib/SCEPTRE transport code library at Sandia National Laboratories and show results on two different massively parallel systems. Both the 'forward' and 'symmetric' solvers behave similarly, scaling well to larger degrees of parallelism then sweeps-based solvers. We do observe some issues at the highest levels of parallelism (relative to the system size) and discuss possible causes. We conclude that this approach shows good potential for future parallel systems, but the parallel scalability will depend heavily on the architecture of the communication networks of these systems. (authors)

  11. Immersed Boundary Method for Shallow-Water Flow Solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning

    2017-11-01

    The immersed boundary method (IBM) has been widely applied with Navier-Stoke equation solvers for flows over moving objects or objects with complex shapes. However, the IBM has not been often used with shallow-water flow solvers for estuary modeling applications. In regional scale hydrodynamic simulations, man-made or natural land structures such as levees, floodgates and small rivers/streams often have smaller scales than the grid resolutions in the simulations. Therefore, IBM could be a good candidate to realize the small shapes/forms of those structures on coarser simulation grids. In this study, IBM formulations have been developed to realize the floodgates and small rivers for several 2D depth-averaged shallow-water equation solvers. The research targets coastal areas in southwest Louisiana, particularly, the Calcasieu Lake and the surrounding coastal wetlands. The wetlands are protected by levees to avoid direct floods through the lake shore. The wetland water comes from the frequent floods through many small streams connecting the wetlands with the lake. It is very expensive to have grid resolutions smaller than the sizes of the streams. It is thus a good candidate for an IBM approach.

  12. An AMR capable finite element diffusion solver for ALE hydrocodes [An AMR capable diffusion solver for ALE-AMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bailey, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kaiser, T. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eder, D. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gunney, B. T. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Masters, N. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Koniges, A. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Anderson, R. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Here, we present a novel method for the solution of the diffusion equation on a composite AMR mesh. This approach is suitable for including diffusion based physics modules to hydrocodes that support ALE and AMR capabilities. To illustrate, we proffer our implementations of diffusion based radiation transport and heat conduction in a hydrocode called ALE-AMR. Numerical experiments conducted with the diffusion solver and associated physics packages yield 2nd order convergence in the L2 norm.

  13. Computations of two-fluid models based on a simple and robust hybrid primitive variable Riemann solver with AUSMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yang-Yao

    2016-03-01

    This paper is to continue our previous work in 2008 on solving a two-fluid model for compressible liquid-gas flows. We proposed a pressure-velocity based diffusion term original derived from AUSMD scheme of Wada and Liou in 1997 to enhance its robustness. The proposed AUSMD schemes have been applied to gas and liquid fluids universally to capture fluid discontinuities, such as the fluid interfaces and shock waves, accurately for the Ransom's faucet problem, air-water shock tube problems and 2D shock-water liquid interaction problems. However, the proposed scheme failed at computing liquid-gas interfaces in problems under large ratios of pressure, density and volume of fraction. The numerical instability has been remedied by Chang and Liou in 2007 using the exact Riemann solver to enhance the accuracy and stability of numerical flux across the liquid-gas interface. Here, instead of the exact Riemann solver, we propose a simple AUSMD type primitive variable Riemann solver (PVRS) which can successfully solve 1D stiffened water-air shock tube and 2D shock-gas interaction problems under large ratios of pressure, density and volume of fraction without the expensive cost of tedious computer time. In addition, the proposed approach is shown to deliver a good resolution of the shock-front, rarefaction and cavitation inside the evolution of high-speed droplet impact on the wall.

  14. Wing aeroelasticity analysis based on an integral boundary-layer method coupled with Euler solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yanfeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An interactive boundary-layer method, which solves the unsteady flow, is developed for aeroelastic computation in the time domain. The coupled method combines the Euler solver with the integral boundary-layer solver (Euler/BL in a “semi-inverse” manner to compute flows with the inviscid and viscous interaction. Unsteady boundary conditions on moving surfaces are taken into account by utilizing the approximate small-perturbation method without moving the computational grids. The steady and unsteady flow calculations for the LANN wing are presented. The wing tip displacement of high Reynolds number aero-structural dynamics (HIRENASD Project is simulated under different angles of attack. The flutter-boundary predictions for the AGARD 445.6 wing are provided. The results of the interactive boundary-layer method are compared with those of the Euler method and experimental data. The study shows that viscous effects are significant for these cases and the further data analysis confirms the validity and practicability of the coupled method.

  15. Approximate Riemann solvers and flux vector splitting schemes for two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.; Kumbaro, A.; Paillere, H.

    1999-01-01

    These course notes, presented at the 30. Von Karman Institute Lecture Series in Computational Fluid Dynamics, give a detailed and through review of upwind differencing methods for two-phase flow models. After recalling some fundamental aspects of two-phase flow modelling, from mixture model to two-fluid models, the mathematical properties of the general 6-equation model are analysed by examining the Eigen-structure of the system, and deriving conditions under which the model can be made hyperbolic. The following chapters are devoted to extensions of state-of-the-art upwind differencing schemes such as Roe's Approximate Riemann Solver or the Characteristic Flux Splitting method to two-phase flow. Non-trivial steps in the construction of such solvers include the linearization, the treatment of non-conservative terms and the construction of a Roe-type matrix on which the numerical dissipation of the schemes is based. Extension of the 1-D models to multi-dimensions in an unstructured finite volume formulation is also described; Finally, numerical results for a variety of test-cases are shown to illustrate the accuracy and robustness of the methods. (authors)

  16. Validation Process for LEWICE by Use of a Navier-Stokes Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William B.; Porter, Christopher E.

    2017-01-01

    A research project is underway at NASA Glenn to produce computer software that can accurately predict ice growth under any meteorological conditions for any aircraft surface. This report will present results from the latest LEWICE release, version 3.5. This program differs from previous releases in its ability to model mixed phase and ice crystal conditions such as those encountered inside an engine. It also has expanded capability to use structured grids and a new capability to use results from unstructured grid flow solvers. A quantitative comparison of the results against a database of ice shapes that have been generated in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) has also been performed. This paper will extend the comparison of ice shapes between LEWICE 3.5 and experimental data from a previous paper. Comparisons of lift and drag are made between experimentally collected data from experimentally obtained ice shapes and simulated (CFD) data on simulated (LEWICE) ice shapes. Comparisons are also made between experimentally collected and simulated performance data on select experimental ice shapes to ensure the CFD solver, FUN3D, is valid within the flight regime. The results show that the predicted results are within the accuracy limits of the experimental data for the majority of cases.

  17. Telescopic Hybrid Fast Solver for 3D Elliptic Problems with Point Singularities

    KAUST Repository

    Paszyńska, Anna

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a telescopic solver for two dimensional h adaptive grids with point singularities. The input for the telescopic solver is an h refined two dimensional computational mesh with rectangular finite elements. The candidates for point singularities are first localized over the mesh by using a greedy algorithm. Having the candidates for point singularities, we execute either a direct solver, that performs multiple refinements towards selected point singularities and executes a parallel direct solver algorithm which has logarithmic cost with respect to refinement level. The direct solvers executed over each candidate for point singularity return local Schur complement matrices that can be merged together and submitted to iterative solver. In this paper we utilize a parallel multi-thread GALOIS solver as a direct solver. We use Incomplete LU Preconditioned Conjugated Gradients (ILUPCG) as an iterative solver. We also show that elimination of point singularities from the refined mesh reduces significantly the number of iterations to be performed by the ILUPCG iterative solver.

  18. On the computational efficiency of isogeometric methods for smooth elliptic problems using direct solvers

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2014-09-17

    SUMMARY: We compare the computational efficiency of isogeometric Galerkin and collocation methods for partial differential equations in the asymptotic regime. We define a metric to identify when numerical experiments have reached this regime. We then apply these ideas to analyze the performance of different isogeometric discretizations, which encompass C0 finite element spaces and higher-continuous spaces. We derive convergence and cost estimates in terms of the total number of degrees of freedom and then perform an asymptotic numerical comparison of the efficiency of these methods applied to an elliptic problem. These estimates are derived assuming that the underlying solution is smooth, the full Gauss quadrature is used in each non-zero knot span and the numerical solution of the discrete system is found using a direct multi-frontal solver. We conclude that under the assumptions detailed in this paper, higher-continuous basis functions provide marginal benefits.

  19. Using Solver Interfaced Virtual Reality in PEACER Design Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyong Won; Nam, Won Chang; Jeong, Seung Ho; Hwang, Il Soon; Shin, Jong Gye; Kim, Chang Hyo

    2006-01-01

    The recent research progress in the area of plant design and simulation highlighted the importance of integrating design and analysis models on a unified environment. For currently developed advanced reactors, either for power production or research, this effort has embraced impressive state-of-the-art information and automation technology. The PEACER (Proliferation-resistant, Environment friendly, Accident-tolerant, Continual and Economical Reactor) is one of the conceptual fast reactor system cooled by LBE (Lead Bismuth Eutectic) for nuclear waste transmutation. This reactor system is composed of innovative combination between design process and analysis. To establish an integrated design process by coupling design, analysis, and post-processing technology while minimizing the repetitive and costly manual interactions for design changes, a solver interfaced virtual reality simulation system (SIVR) has been developed for a nuclear transmutation energy system as PEACER. The SIVR was developed using Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) in order to interface a commercial 3D CAD tool with various engineering solvers and to implement virtual reality presentation of results in a neutral format. In this paper, we have shown the SIVR approach viable and effective in the life-cycle management of complex nuclear energy systems, including design, construction and operation. For instance, The HELIOS is a down scaled model of the PEACER prototype to demonstrate the operability and safety as well as preliminary test of PEACER PLM (Product Life-cycle Management) with SIVR (Solver Interfaced Virtual Reality) concepts. Most components are designed by CATIA, which is 3D CAD tool. During the construction, 3D drawing by CATIA was effective to handle and arrange the loop configuration, especially when we changed the design. Most of all, This system shows the transparency of design and operational status of an energy complex to operators and inspectors can help ensure accident

  20. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Buren, Kendra L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Canfield, Jesse M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sauer, Jeremy A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  1. Using Solver Interfaced Virtual Reality in PEACER Design Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyong Won; Nam, Won Chang; Jeong, Seung Ho; Hwang, Il Soon; Shin, Jong Gye; Kim, Chang Hyo [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The recent research progress in the area of plant design and simulation highlighted the importance of integrating design and analysis models on a unified environment. For currently developed advanced reactors, either for power production or research, this effort has embraced impressive state-of-the-art information and automation technology. The PEACER (Proliferation-resistant, Environment friendly, Accident-tolerant, Continual and Economical Reactor) is one of the conceptual fast reactor system cooled by LBE (Lead Bismuth Eutectic) for nuclear waste transmutation. This reactor system is composed of innovative combination between design process and analysis. To establish an integrated design process by coupling design, analysis, and post-processing technology while minimizing the repetitive and costly manual interactions for design changes, a solver interfaced virtual reality simulation system (SIVR) has been developed for a nuclear transmutation energy system as PEACER. The SIVR was developed using Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) in order to interface a commercial 3D CAD tool with various engineering solvers and to implement virtual reality presentation of results in a neutral format. In this paper, we have shown the SIVR approach viable and effective in the life-cycle management of complex nuclear energy systems, including design, construction and operation. For instance, The HELIOS is a down scaled model of the PEACER prototype to demonstrate the operability and safety as well as preliminary test of PEACER PLM (Product Life-cycle Management) with SIVR (Solver Interfaced Virtual Reality) concepts. Most components are designed by CATIA, which is 3D CAD tool. During the construction, 3D drawing by CATIA was effective to handle and arrange the loop configuration, especially when we changed the design. Most of all, This system shows the transparency of design and operational status of an energy complex to operators and inspectors can help ensure accident

  2. A LBM-DEM solver for fast discrete particle simulation of particle-fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qingang; Madadi-Kandjani, Ehsan; Lorenzini, Giulio

    2014-04-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for simulating fluid phases was coupled with the discrete element method (DEM) for studying solid phases to formulate a novel solver for fast discrete particle simulation (DPS) of particle-fluid flows. The fluid hydrodynamics was obtained by solving LBM equations instead of solving the Navier-Stokes equation by the finite volume method (FVM). Interparticle and particle-wall collisions were determined by DEM. The new DPS solver was validated by simulating a three-dimensional gas-solid bubbling fluidized bed. The new solver was found to yield results faster than its FVM-DEM counterpart, with the increase in the domain-averaged gas volume fraction. Additionally, the scalability of the LBM-DEM DPS solver was superior to that of the FVM-DEM DPS solver in parallel computing. Thus, the LBM-DEM DPS solver is highly suitable for use in simulating dilute and large-scale particle-fluid flows.

  3. Simplified Eigen-structure decomposition solver for the simulation of two-phase flow systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbaro, Anela

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a new solver for a system of first-order non-linear differential equations that model the dynamics of compressible two-phase flow. The solver presents a lower-complexity alternative to Roe-type solvers because it only makes use of a partial Eigen-structure information while maintaining its accuracy: the outcome is hence a good complexity-tractability trade-off to consider as relevant in a large number of situations in the scope of two-phase flow numerical simulation. A number of numerical and physical benchmarks are presented to assess the solver. Comparison between the computational results from the simplified Eigen-structure decomposition solver and the conventional Roe-type solver gives insight upon the issues of accuracy, robustness and efficiency. (authors)

  4. Parallel O(N) Stokes' solver towards scalable Brownian dynamics of hydrodynamically interacting objects in general geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xujun; Li, Jiyuan; Jiang, Xikai; Karpeev, Dmitry; Heinonen, Olle; Smith, Barry; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-06-01

    An efficient parallel Stokes' solver has been developed for complete description of hydrodynamic interactions between Brownian particles in bulk and confined geometries. A Langevin description of the particle dynamics is adopted, where the long-range interactions are included using a Green's function formalism. A scalable parallel computational approach is presented, where the general geometry Stokeslet is calculated following a matrix-free algorithm using the general geometry Ewald-like method. Our approach employs a highly efficient iterative finite-element Stokes' solver for the accurate treatment of long-range hydrodynamic interactions in arbitrary confined geometries. A combination of mid-point time integration of the Brownian stochastic differential equation, the parallel Stokes' solver, and a Chebyshev polynomial approximation for the fluctuation-dissipation theorem leads to an O(N) parallel algorithm. We illustrate the new algorithm in the context of the dynamics of confined polymer solutions under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The method is then extended to treat suspended finite size particles of arbitrary shape in any geometry using an immersed boundary approach.

  5. High Energy Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Mesh Euler Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Shishir A.; Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are often omitted or fared over in aerodynamic simulations of aircraft due to the complexities involving in the modeling of engine details such as complex geometry and flow physics. However, the assumption is often improper as inlet or plume flows have a substantial effect on vehicle aerodynamics. A tool for specifying inlet and exhaust plume conditions through the use of high-energy boundary conditions in an established inviscid flow solver is presented. The effects of the plume on the flow fields near the inlet and plume are discussed.

  6. Parallel implementations of 2D explicit Euler solvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, L.; Manzini, G.

    1996-01-01

    In this work we present a subdomain partitioning strategy applied to an explicit high-resolution Euler solver. We describe the design of a portable parallel multi-domain code suitable for parallel environments. We present several implementations on a representative range of MlMD computers that include shared memory multiprocessors, distributed virtual shared memory computers, as well as networks of workstations. Computational results are given to illustrate the efficiency, the scalability, and the limitations of the different approaches. We discuss also the effect of the communication protocol on the optimal domain partitioning strategy for the distributed memory computers

  7. Modelo de selección de cartera con Solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fogués Zornoza

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an example of linear optimization in the context of degrees in Economics or Business Administration and Management. We show techniques that enable students to go deep and investigate in real problems that have been modelled using the Excel platform. The model shown here has been developed by a student and it consists in minimizing the absolute deviations over the average expected return of a portfolio of securities, using the solver tool that it is included in this software.

  8. Algorithms for parallel flow solvers on message passing architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwijngaart, Rob F.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project has been to identify and test suitable technologies for implementation of fluid flow solvers -- possibly coupled with structures and heat equation solvers -- on MIMD parallel computers. In the course of this investigation much attention has been paid to efficient domain decomposition strategies for ADI-type algorithms. Multi-partitioning derives its efficiency from the assignment of several blocks of grid points to each processor in the parallel computer. A coarse-grain parallelism is obtained, and a near-perfect load balance results. In uni-partitioning every processor receives responsibility for exactly one block of grid points instead of several. This necessitates fine-grain pipelined program execution in order to obtain a reasonable load balance. Although fine-grain parallelism is less desirable on many systems, especially high-latency networks of workstations, uni-partition methods are still in wide use in production codes for flow problems. Consequently, it remains important to achieve good efficiency with this technique that has essentially been superseded by multi-partitioning for parallel ADI-type algorithms. Another reason for the concentration on improving the performance of pipeline methods is their applicability in other types of flow solver kernels with stronger implied data dependence. Analytical expressions can be derived for the size of the dynamic load imbalance incurred in traditional pipelines. From these it can be determined what is the optimal first-processor retardation that leads to the shortest total completion time for the pipeline process. Theoretical predictions of pipeline performance with and without optimization match experimental observations on the iPSC/860 very well. Analysis of pipeline performance also highlights the effect of uncareful grid partitioning in flow solvers that employ pipeline algorithms. If grid blocks at boundaries are not at least as large in the wall-normal direction as those

  9. Fast Multipole-Based Elliptic PDE Solver and Preconditioner

    KAUST Repository

    Ibeid, Huda

    2016-12-07

    Exascale systems are predicted to have approximately one billion cores, assuming Gigahertz cores. Limitations on affordable network topologies for distributed memory systems of such massive scale bring new challenges to the currently dominant parallel programing model. Currently, there are many efforts to evaluate the hardware and software bottlenecks of exascale designs. It is therefore of interest to model application performance and to understand what changes need to be made to ensure extrapolated scalability. Fast multipole methods (FMM) were originally developed for accelerating N-body problems for particle-based methods in astrophysics and molecular dynamics. FMM is more than an N-body solver, however. Recent efforts to view the FMM as an elliptic PDE solver have opened the possibility to use it as a preconditioner for even a broader range of applications. In this thesis, we (i) discuss the challenges for FMM on current parallel computers and future exascale architectures, with a focus on inter-node communication, and develop a performance model that considers the communication patterns of the FMM for spatially quasi-uniform distributions, (ii) employ this performance model to guide performance and scaling improvement of FMM for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of uniformly distributed particles, and (iii) demonstrate that, beyond its traditional use as a solver in problems for which explicit free-space kernel representations are available, the FMM has applicability as a preconditioner in finite domain elliptic boundary value problems, by equipping it with boundary integral capability for satisfying conditions at finite boundaries and by wrapping it in a Krylov method for extensibility to more general operators. Compared with multilevel methods, FMM is capable of comparable algebraic convergence rates down to the truncation error of the discretized PDE, and it has superior multicore and distributed memory scalability properties on commodity

  10. Avoiding Communication in the Lanczos Bidiagonalization Routine and Associated Least Squares QR Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-12

    Avoiding communication in the Lanczos bidiagonalization routine and associated Least Squares QR solver Erin Carson Electrical Engineering and...Bidiagonalization Routine and Associated Least Squares QR Solver 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...ASSOCIATED LEAST SQUARES QR SOLVER ERIN CARSON Abstract. Communication – the movement of data between levels of memory hierarchy or between processors

  11. Depropagation and propagation simulation of the acoustic waves by using finite differences operators; Simulacao da propagacao e depropagacao de ondas acusticas usando operadores de diferencas finitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marco A.B.; Santos, Roberto H.M. dos; Silva, Marcelo S. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa em Geofisica e Geologia

    2004-07-01

    The numerical simulation of shot gathers over a (2D) velocity field, which corresponds to a model of Atlantic continental shelf, at the continental break area, using a typical model of the Brazilian Atlantic coast, suggested by PETROBRAS. The finite difference technique (FD) is used to solve the second derivatives in time and space of the acoustic wave equation, using fourth order operators to solve the spatial derivatives and second order operators to solve the time derivative. It is applied an explicitly scheme to calculate the pressure field values at a future instant. The use of rectangular mesh helps to generate data less noisy, since we can control better the numerical dispersion. The source functions (wavelets), as the first and the second derivatives of the gaussian function, are proper to generate synthetic seismograms with the FD method, because they allow an easy discretization. On the forward modeling, which is the simulation of wave fields, allows to control the stability limit of the method, wherever be the given velocity field, just employing compatible small values of the sample rate. The algorithm developed here, which uses only the FD technique, is able to perform the forward modeling, saving the image times, which can be used latter to perform the retropropagation of the wave field and thus migrate the source-gathers the reverse time extrapolation is able to test the used velocity model, and detect determine errors up to 5% on the used velocity model. (author)

  12. A cell-local finite difference discretization of the low-order quasidiffusion equations for neutral particle transport on unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieselquist, William A.; Anistratov, Dmitriy Y.; Morel, Jim E.

    2014-09-01

    We present a quasidiffusion (QD) method for solving neutral particle transport problems in Cartesian XY geometry on unstructured quadrilateral meshes, including local refinement capability. Neutral particle transport problems are central to many applications including nuclear reactor design, radiation safety, astrophysics, medical imaging, radiotherapy, nuclear fuel transport/storage, shielding design, and oil well-logging. The primary development is a new discretization of the low-order QD (LOQD) equations based on cell-local finite differences. The accuracy of the LOQD equations depends on proper calculation of special non-linear QD (Eddington) factors from a transport solution. In order to completely define the new QD method, a proper discretization of the transport problem is also presented. The transport equation is discretized by a conservative method of short characteristics with a novel linear approximation of the scattering source term and monotonic, parabolic representation of the angular flux on incoming faces. Analytic and numerical tests are used to test the accuracy and spatial convergence of the non-linear method. All tests exhibit O(h2) convergence of the scalar flux on orthogonal, random, and multi-level meshes.

  13. Quantum confined Stark effects of single dopant in polarized hemispherical quantum dot: Two-dimensional finite difference approach and Ritz-Hassé variation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Harouny, El Hassan; Nakra Mohajer, Soukaina; Ibral, Asmaa; El Khamkhami, Jamal; Assaid, El Mahdi

    2018-05-01

    Eigenvalues equation of hydrogen-like off-center single donor impurity confined in polarized homogeneous hemispherical quantum dot deposited on a wetting layer, capped by insulated matrix and submitted to external uniform electric field is solved in the framework of the effective mass approximation. An infinitely deep potential is used to describe effects of quantum confinement due to conduction band offsets at surfaces where quantum dot and surrounding materials meet. Single donor ground state total and binding energies in presence of electric field are determined via two-dimensional finite difference approach and Ritz-Hassé variation principle. For the latter method, attractive coulomb correlation between electron and ionized single donor is taken into account in the expression of trial wave function. It appears that off-center single dopant binding energy, spatial extension and radial probability density are strongly dependent on hemisphere radius and single dopant position inside quantum dot. Influence of a uniform electric field is also investigated. It shows that Stark effect appears even for very small size dots and that single dopant energy shift is more significant when the single donor is near hemispherical surface.

  14. Study on Scattering and Absorption Properties of Quantum-Dot-Converted Elements for Light-Emitting Diodes Using Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiasheng; Tang, Yong; Li, Zongtao; Ding, Xinrui; Yuan, Dong; Yu, Binhai

    2017-11-03

    CdSe/ZnS quantum-dot-converted elements (QDCEs) are good candidates for substituting rare-earth phosphor-converted elements (PCEs) in white light-emitting diodes (LEDs); however, studies on their scattering and absorption properties are scarce, suppressing further increment in the optical and thermal performance of quantum-dot-converted LEDs. Therefore, we introduce the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to achieve the critical optical parameters of QDCEs when used in white LEDs; their scattering cross-section (coefficient), absorption cross-section (coefficient), and scattering phase distributions are presented and compared with those of traditional YAG phosphor-converted elements (PCEs) at varying particle size and concentration. At a commonly used concentration ( < 50 mg / cm 3 ), QDCEs exhibit stronger absorption (tens of millimeters, even for green-to-red-wavelength light) and weaker scattering ( < 1 mm - 1 ) compared to PCEs; the reabsorption, total internal reflection, angular uniformity, and thermal quenching would be more significant concerns for QDCEs. Therefore, the unique scattering and absorption properties of QDCEs should be considered when used in white LEDs. Furthermore, knowledge of these important optical parameters is helpful for beginning a theoretical study on quantum-dot-converted LEDs according to the ray tracing method.

  15. Motivations, Challenges, and Opportunities of Successful Solvers on an Innovation Intermediary Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify motivations, challenges, and opportunities of successful solvers participating in virtual teams of innovation contests (ICs) organized by an innovation intermediary. Based on 82 interviews of successful solvers, this study provides novel insights into IC...... other experts, the ability to work in a diverse environment, options of work after retirement and from distant locations, and a new source of income.......The objective of this study is to identify motivations, challenges, and opportunities of successful solvers participating in virtual teams of innovation contests (ICs) organized by an innovation intermediary. Based on 82 interviews of successful solvers, this study provides novel insights into ICs...

  16. Motivation, Challenge, and Opportunity of Successful Solvers on an Innovation Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify motivations, challenges, and opportunities of successful solvers participating in virtual teams of innovation contests (ICs) organized by an innovation intermediary. Based on 82 interviews of successful solvers, this study provides novel insights into IC...... other experts, the ability to work in a diverse environment, options of work after retirement and from distant locations, and a new source of income.......The objective of this study is to identify motivations, challenges, and opportunities of successful solvers participating in virtual teams of innovation contests (ICs) organized by an innovation intermediary. Based on 82 interviews of successful solvers, this study provides novel insights into ICs...

  17. Use of Tabu Search in a Solver to Map Complex Networks onto Emulab Testbeds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacDonald, Jason E

    2007-01-01

    The University of Utah's solver for the testbed mapping problem uses a simulated annealing metaheuristic algorithm to map a researcher's experimental network topology onto available testbed resources...

  18. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. III. MULTIGROUP RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Howell, L.; Burrows, A.; Dolence, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a formulation for multigroup radiation hydrodynamics that is correct to order O(v/c) using the comoving-frame approach and the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We describe a numerical algorithm for solving the system, implemented in the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses a Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. In our multigroup radiation solver, the system is split into three parts: one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, another part that advects the radiation in frequency space, and a parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem and the frequency space advection are solved explicitly with high-order Godunov schemes, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method. Our multigroup radiation solver works for both neutrino and photon radiation.

  19. Domain decomposition solvers for nonlinear multiharmonic finite element equations

    KAUST Repository

    Copeland, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    In many practical applications, for instance, in computational electromagnetics, the excitation is time-harmonic. Switching from the time domain to the frequency domain allows us to replace the expensive time-integration procedure by the solution of a simple elliptic equation for the amplitude. This is true for linear problems, but not for nonlinear problems. However, due to the periodicity of the solution, we can expand the solution in a Fourier series. Truncating this Fourier series and approximating the Fourier coefficients by finite elements, we arrive at a large-scale coupled nonlinear system for determining the finite element approximation to the Fourier coefficients. The construction of fast solvers for such systems is very crucial for the efficiency of this multiharmonic approach. In this paper we look at nonlinear, time-harmonic potential problems as simple model problems. We construct and analyze almost optimal solvers for the Jacobi systems arising from the Newton linearization of the large-scale coupled nonlinear system that one has to solve instead of performing the expensive time-integration procedure. © 2010 de Gruyter.

  20. Linear solver performance in elastoplastic problem solution on GPU cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalevitsky, Yu. V.; Konovalov, A. V.; Burmasheva, N. V.; Partin, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    Applying the finite element method to severe plastic deformation problems involves solving linear equation systems. While the solution procedure is relatively hard to parallelize and computationally intensive by itself, a long series of large scale systems need to be solved for each problem. When dealing with fine computational meshes, such as in the simulations of three-dimensional metal matrix composite microvolume deformation, tens and hundreds of hours may be needed to complete the whole solution procedure, even using modern supercomputers. In general, one of the preconditioned Krylov subspace methods is used in a linear solver for such problems. The method convergence highly depends on the operator spectrum of a problem stiffness matrix. In order to choose the appropriate method, a series of computational experiments is used. Different methods may be preferable for different computational systems for the same problem. In this paper we present experimental data obtained by solving linear equation systems from an elastoplastic problem on a GPU cluster. The data can be used to substantiate the choice of the appropriate method for a linear solver to use in severe plastic deformation simulations.

  1. Anisotropic resonator analysis using the Fourier-Bessel mode solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Robert C.

    2018-03-01

    A numerical mode solver for optical structures that conform to cylindrical symmetry using Faraday's and Ampere's laws as starting expressions is developed when electric or magnetic anisotropy is present. The technique builds on the existing Fourier-Bessel mode solver which allows resonator states to be computed exploiting the symmetry properties of the resonator and states to reduce the matrix system. The introduction of anisotropy into the theoretical frame work facilitates the inclusion of PML borders permitting the computation of open ended structures and a better estimation of the resonator state quality factor. Matrix populating expressions are provided that can accommodate any material anisotropy with arbitrary orientation in the computation domain. Several example of electrical anisotropic computations are provided for rationally symmetric structures such as standard optical fibers, axial Bragg-ring fibers and bottle resonators. The anisotropy present in the materials introduces off diagonal matrix elements in the permittivity tensor when expressed in cylindrical coordinates. The effects of the anisotropy of computed states are presented and discussed.

  2. Application of alternating decision trees in selecting sparse linear solvers

    KAUST Repository

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta

    2010-01-01

    The solution of sparse linear systems, a fundamental and resource-intensive task in scientific computing, can be approached through multiple algorithms. Using an algorithm well adapted to characteristics of the task can significantly enhance the performance, such as reducing the time required for the operation, without compromising the quality of the result. However, the best solution method can vary even across linear systems generated in course of the same PDE-based simulation, thereby making solver selection a very challenging problem. In this paper, we use a machine learning technique, Alternating Decision Trees (ADT), to select efficient solvers based on the properties of sparse linear systems and runtime-dependent features, such as the stages of simulation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method through empirical results over linear systems drawn from computational fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics applications. The results also demonstrate that using ADT can resolve the problem of over-fitting, which occurs when limited amount of data is available. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media LLC.

  3. The General-Use Nodal Network Solver (GUNNS) Modeling Package for Space Vehicle Flow System Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jason; Moore, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The General-Use Nodal Network Solver (GUNNS) is a modeling software package that combines nodal analysis and the hydraulic-electric analogy to simulate fluid, electrical, and thermal flow systems. GUNNS is developed by L-3 Communications under the TS21 (Training Systems for the 21st Century) project for NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), primarily for use in space vehicle training simulators at JSC. It has sufficient compactness and fidelity to model the fluid, electrical, and thermal aspects of space vehicles in real-time simulations running on commodity workstations, for vehicle crew and flight controller training. It has a reusable and flexible component and system design, and a Graphical User Interface (GUI), providing capability for rapid GUI-based simulator development, ease of maintenance, and associated cost savings. GUNNS is optimized for NASA's Trick simulation environment, but can be run independently of Trick.

  4. High-resolution coupled physics solvers for analysing fine-scale nuclear reactor design problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Vijay S.; Merzari, Elia; Tautges, Timothy; Jain, Rajeev; Obabko, Aleksandr; Smith, Michael; Fischer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    An integrated multi-physics simulation capability for the design and analysis of current and future nuclear reactor models is being investigated, to tightly couple neutron transport and thermal-hydraulics physics under the SHARP framework. Over several years, high-fidelity, validated mono-physics solvers with proven scalability on petascale architectures have been developed independently. Based on a unified component-based architecture, these existing codes can be coupled with a mesh-data backplane and a flexible coupling-strategy-based driver suite to produce a viable tool for analysts. The goal of the SHARP framework is to perform fully resolved coupled physics analysis of a reactor on heterogeneous geometry, in order to reduce the overall numerical uncertainty while leveraging available computational resources. The coupling methodology and software interfaces of the framework are presented, along with verification studies on two representative fast sodium-cooled reactor demonstration problems to prove the usability of the SHARP framework. PMID:24982250

  5. A GPU accelerated and error-controlled solver for the unbounded Poisson equation in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exl, Lukas

    2017-12-01

    An efficient solver for the three dimensional free-space Poisson equation is presented. The underlying numerical method is based on finite Fourier series approximation. While the error of all involved approximations can be fully controlled, the overall computation error is driven by the convergence of the finite Fourier series of the density. For smooth and fast-decaying densities the proposed method will be spectrally accurate. The method scales with O(N log N) operations, where N is the total number of discretization points in the Cartesian grid. The majority of the computational costs come from fast Fourier transforms (FFT), which makes it ideal for GPU computation. Several numerical computations on CPU and GPU validate the method and show efficiency and convergence behavior. Tests are performed using the Vienna Scientific Cluster 3 (VSC3). A free MATLAB implementation for CPU and GPU is provided to the interested community.

  6. Numerical and experimental analysis of the sedimentation of spherical colloidal suspensions under centrifugal force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonopoulou, Evangelia; Rohmann-Shaw, Connor F.; Sykes, Thomas C.; Cayre, Olivier J.; Hunter, Timothy N.; Jimack, Peter K.

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the sedimentation behaviour of colloidal suspensions is crucial in determining their stability. Since sedimentation rates are often very slow, centrifugation is used to expedite sedimentation experiments. The effect of centrifugal acceleration on sedimentation behaviour is not fully understood. Furthermore, in sedimentation models, interparticle interactions are usually omitted by using the hard-sphere assumption. This work proposes a one-dimensional model for sedimentation using an effective maximum volume fraction, with an extension for sedimentation under centrifugal force. A numerical implementation of the model using an adaptive finite difference solver is described. Experiments with silica suspensions are carried out using an analytical centrifuge. The model is shown to be a good fit with experimental data for 480 nm spherical silica, with the effects of centrifugation at 705 rpm studied. A conversion of data to Earth gravity conditions is proposed, which is shown to recover Earth gravity sedimentation rates well. This work suggests that the effective maximum volume fraction accurately captures interparticle interactions and provides insights into the effect of centrifugation on sedimentation.

  7. The SX Solver: A New Computer Program for Analyzing Solvent-Extraction Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, B.K.; Rapko, B.M.; Lumetta, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    A new computer program, the SX Solver, has been developed to analyze solvent-extraction equilibria. The program operates out of Microsoft Excel and uses the built-in ''Solver'' function to minimize the sum of the square of the residuals between measured and calculated distribution coefficients. The extraction of nitric acid by tributylphosphate has been modeled to illustrate the program's use

  8. Identification of severe wind conditions using a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes solver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Bechmann, Andreas; Johansen, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes the application of a Navier-Stokes solver to predict the presence of severe flow conditions in complex terrain, capturing conditions that may be critical to the siting of wind turbines in the terrain. First it is documented that the flow solver is capable of predicting...

  9. Cognitive Structures of Good and Poor Novice Problem Solvers in Physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Ferguson-Hessler, Monica G.M.

    1986-01-01

    The way knowledge is organized in memory is generally expected to relate to the degree of success in problem solving. In the present study, we investigated whether good novice problem solvers have their knowledge arranged around problem types to a greater extent than poor problem solvers have. In

  10. Domain Decomposition Solvers for Frequency-Domain Finite Element Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Copeland, Dylan

    2010-10-05

    The paper is devoted to fast iterative solvers for frequency-domain finite element equations approximating linear and nonlinear parabolic initial boundary value problems with time-harmonic excitations. Switching from the time domain to the frequency domain allows us to replace the expensive time-integration procedure by the solution of a simple linear elliptic system for the amplitudes belonging to the sine- and to the cosine-excitation or a large nonlinear elliptic system for the Fourier coefficients in the linear and nonlinear case, respectively. The fast solution of the corresponding linear and nonlinear system of finite element equations is crucial for the competitiveness of this method. © 2011 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  11. A high order solver for the unbounded Poisson equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Chatelain, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    A high order converging Poisson solver is presented, based on the Greenʼs function solution to Poissonʼs equation subject to free-space boundary conditions. The high order convergence is achieved by formulating regularised integration kernels, analogous to a smoothing of the solution field....... The method is extended to directly solve the derivatives of the solution to Poissonʼs equation. In this way differential operators such as the divergence or curl of the solution field can be solved to the same high order convergence without additional computational effort. The method, is applied...... and validated, however not restricted, to the equations of fluid mechanics, and can be used in many applications to solve Poissonʼs equation on a rectangular unbounded domain....

  12. Accurate derivative evaluation for any Grad–Shafranov solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricketson, L.F. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Cerfon, A.J., E-mail: cerfon@cims.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Rachh, M. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Freidberg, J.P. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We present a numerical scheme that can be combined with any fixed boundary finite element based Poisson or Grad–Shafranov solver to compute the first and second partial derivatives of the solution to these equations with the same order of convergence as the solution itself. At the heart of our scheme is an efficient and accurate computation of the Dirichlet to Neumann map through the evaluation of a singular volume integral and the solution to a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. Our numerical method is particularly useful for magnetic confinement fusion simulations, since it allows the evaluation of quantities such as the magnetic field, the parallel current density and the magnetic curvature with much higher accuracy than has been previously feasible on the affordable coarse grids that are usually implemented.

  13. Nonlinear Multigrid solver exploiting AMGe Coarse Spaces with Approximation Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Max la Cour; Villa, Umberto; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    spaces that were developed recently at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These give the ability to derive stable and accurate coarse nonlinear discretization problems. The previous attempts (including ones with the original AMGe method), were less successful due to lack of such good approximation...... properties of the coarse spaces. With coarse spaces with approximation properties, our FAS approach on unstructured meshes has the ability to be as powerful/successful as FAS on geometrically refined meshes. For comparison, Newton’s method and Picard iterations with an inner state-of-the-art linear solver...... are compared to FAS on a nonlinear saddle point problem with applications to porous media flow. It is demonstrated that FAS is faster than Newton’s method and Picard iterations for the experiments considered here. Due to the guaranteed approximation properties of our AMGe, the coarse spaces are very accurate...

  14. Extending the QUDA Library with the eigCG Solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strelchenko, Alexei [Fermilab; Stathopoulos, Andreas [William-Mary Coll.

    2014-12-12

    While the incremental eigCG algorithm [ 1 ] is included in many LQCD software packages, its realization on GPU micro-architectures was still missing. In this session we report our experi- ence of the eigCG implementation in the QUDA library. In particular, we will focus on how to employ the mixed precision technique to accelerate solutions of large sparse linear systems with multiple right-hand sides on GPUs. Although application of mixed precision techniques is a well-known optimization approach for linear solvers, its utilization for the eigenvector com- puting within eigCG requires special consideration. We will discuss implementation aspects of the mixed precision deflation and illustrate its numerical behavior on the example of the Wilson twisted mass fermion matrix inversions

  15. Fast Multipole-Based Preconditioner for Sparse Iterative Solvers

    KAUST Repository

    Ibeid, Huda

    2014-05-04

    Among optimal hierarchical algorithms for the computational solution of elliptic problems, the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) stands out for its adaptability to emerging architectures, having high arithmetic intensity, tunable accuracy, and relaxed global synchronization requirements. We demonstrate that, beyond its traditional use as a solver in problems for which explicit free-space kernel representations are available, the FMM has applicability as a preconditioner in finite domain elliptic boundary value problems, by equipping it with boundary integral capability for finite boundaries and by wrapping it in a Krylov method for extensibility to more general operators. Compared with multilevel methods, it is capable of comparable algebraic convergence rates down to the truncation error of the discretized PDE, and it has superior multicore and distributed memory scalability properties on commodity architecture supercomputers.

  16. A finite element Poisson solver for gyrokinetic particle simulations in a global field aligned mesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lin, Z.; Lewandowski, J.L.V.; Ethier, S.

    2006-01-01

    A new finite element Poisson solver is developed and applied to a global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) which employs the field aligned mesh and thus a logically non-rectangular grid in a general geometry. Employing test cases where the analytical solutions are known, the finite element solver has been verified. The CPU time scaling versus the matrix size employing portable, extensible toolkit for scientific computation (PETSc) to solve the sparse matrix is promising. Taking the ion temperature gradient modes (ITG) as an example, the solution from the new finite element solver has been compared to the solution from the original GTC's iterative solver which is only efficient for adiabatic electrons. Linear and nonlinear simulation results from the two different forms of the gyrokinetic Poisson equation (integral form and the differential form) coincide each other. The new finite element solver enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models for global electromagnetic simulations

  17. Domain decomposed preconditioners with Krylov subspace methods as subdomain solvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernice, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Domain decomposed preconditioners for nonsymmetric partial differential equations typically require the solution of problems on the subdomains. Most implementations employ exact solvers to obtain these solutions. Consequently work and storage requirements for the subdomain problems grow rapidly with the size of the subdomain problems. Subdomain solves constitute the single largest computational cost of a domain decomposed preconditioner, and improving the efficiency of this phase of the computation will have a significant impact on the performance of the overall method. The small local memory available on the nodes of most message-passing multicomputers motivates consideration of the use of an iterative method for solving subdomain problems. For large-scale systems of equations that are derived from three-dimensional problems, memory considerations alone may dictate the need for using iterative methods for the subdomain problems. In addition to reduced storage requirements, use of an iterative solver on the subdomains allows flexibility in specifying the accuracy of the subdomain solutions. Substantial savings in solution time is possible if the quality of the domain decomposed preconditioner is not degraded too much by relaxing the accuracy of the subdomain solutions. While some work in this direction has been conducted for symmetric problems, similar studies for nonsymmetric problems appear not to have been pursued. This work represents a first step in this direction, and explores the effectiveness of performing subdomain solves using several transpose-free Krylov subspace methods, GMRES, transpose-free QMR, CGS, and a smoothed version of CGS. Depending on the difficulty of the subdomain problem and the convergence tolerance used, a reduction in solution time is possible in addition to the reduced memory requirements. The domain decomposed preconditioner is a Schur complement method in which the interface operators are approximated using interface probing.

  18. Incompressible SPH (ISPH) with fast Poisson solver on a GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Alex D.; Rogers, Benedict D.; Lind, Steven J.; Stansby, Peter K.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a fast incompressible SPH (ISPH) solver implemented to run entirely on a graphics processing unit (GPU) capable of simulating several millions of particles in three dimensions on a single GPU. The ISPH algorithm is implemented by converting the highly optimised open-source weakly-compressible SPH (WCSPH) code DualSPHysics to run ISPH on the GPU, combining it with the open-source linear algebra library ViennaCL for fast solutions of the pressure Poisson equation (PPE). Several challenges are addressed with this research: constructing a PPE matrix every timestep on the GPU for moving particles, optimising the limited GPU memory, and exploiting fast matrix solvers. The ISPH pressure projection algorithm is implemented as 4 separate stages, each with a particle sweep, including an algorithm for the population of the PPE matrix suitable for the GPU, and mixed precision storage methods. An accurate and robust ISPH boundary condition ideal for parallel processing is also established by adapting an existing WCSPH boundary condition for ISPH. A variety of validation cases are presented: an impulsively started plate, incompressible flow around a moving square in a box, and dambreaks (2-D and 3-D) which demonstrate the accuracy, flexibility, and speed of the methodology. Fragmentation of the free surface is shown to influence the performance of matrix preconditioners and therefore the PPE matrix solution time. The Jacobi preconditioner demonstrates robustness and reliability in the presence of fragmented flows. For a dambreak simulation, GPU speed ups demonstrate up to 10-18 times and 1.1-4.5 times compared to single-threaded and 16-threaded CPU run times respectively.

  19. A Highly Stable Marching-on-in-Time Volume Integral Equation Solver for Analyzing Transient Wave Interactions on High-Contrast Scatterers

    KAUST Repository

    Bagci, Hakan

    2014-01-06

    Time domain integral equation (TDIE) solvers represent an attractive alternative to finite difference (FDTD) and finite element (FEM) schemes for analyzing transient electromagnetic interactions on composite scatterers. Current induced on a scatterer, in response to a transient incident field, generates a scattered field. First, the scattered field is expressed as a spatio-temporal convolution of the current and the Green function of the background medium. Then, a TDIE is obtained by enforcing boundary conditions and/or fundamental field relations. TDIEs are often solved for the unknown current using marching on-in-time (MOT) schemes. MOT-TDIE solvers expand the current using local spatio-temporal basis functions. Inserting this expansion into the TDIE and testing the resulting equation in space and time yields a lower triangular system of equations (termed MOT system), which can be solved by marching in time for the coefficients of the current expansion. Stability of the MOT scheme often depends on how accurately the spatio-temporal convolution of the current and the Green function is discretized. In this work, band-limited prolate-based interpolation functions are used as temporal bases in expanding the current and discretizing the spatio-temporal convolution. Unfortunately, these functions are two sided, i.e., they require ”future” current samples for interpolation, resulting in a non-causal MOT system. To alleviate the effect of non-causality and restore the ability to march in time, an extrapolation scheme can be used to estimate the future values of the currents from their past values. Here, an accurate, stable and band-limited extrapolation scheme is developed for this purpose. This extrapolation scheme uses complex exponents, rather than commonly used harmonics, so that propagating and decaying mode fields inside the dielectric scatterers are accurately modeled. The resulting MOT scheme is applied to solving the time domain volume integral equation (VIE

  20. A Fast Poisson Solver with Periodic Boundary Conditions for GPU Clusters in Various Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattermann, Dale Nicholas

    Fast Poisson solvers using the Fast Fourier Transform on uniform grids are especially suited for parallel implementation, making them appropriate for portability on graphical processing unit (GPU) devices. The goal of the following work was to implement, test, and evaluate a fast Poisson solver for periodic boundary conditions for use on a variety of GPU configurations. The solver used in this research was FLASH, an immersed-boundary-based method, which is well suited for complex, time-dependent geometries, has robust adaptive mesh refinement/de-refinement capabilities to capture evolving flow structures, and has been successfully implemented on conventional, parallel supercomputers. However, these solvers are still computationally costly to employ, and the total solver time is dominated by the solution of the pressure Poisson equation using state-of-the-art multigrid methods. FLASH improves the performance of its multigrid solvers by integrating a parallel FFT solver on a uniform grid during a coarse level. This hybrid solver could then be theoretically improved by replacing the highly-parallelizable FFT solver with one that utilizes GPUs, and, thus, was the motivation for my research. In the present work, the CPU-utilizing parallel FFT solver (PFFT) used in the base version of FLASH for solving the Poisson equation on uniform grids has been modified to enable parallel execution on CUDA-enabled GPU devices. New algorithms have been implemented to replace the Poisson solver that decompose the computational domain and send each new block to a GPU for parallel computation. One-dimensional (1-D) decomposition of the computational domain minimizes the amount of network traffic involved in this bandwidth-intensive computation by limiting the amount of all-to-all communication required between processes. Advanced techniques have been incorporated and implemented in a GPU-centric code design, while allowing end users the flexibility of parameter control at runtime in

  1. The impact of improved sparse linear solvers on industrial engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, M. [Cray Research, Inc., Eagan, MN (United States); Baddourah, M.; Poole, E.L.; Yang, Chao Wu

    1996-12-31

    There are usually many factors that ultimately determine the quality of computer simulation for engineering applications. Some of the most important are the quality of the analytical model and approximation scheme, the accuracy of the input data and the capability of the computing resources. However, in many engineering applications the characteristics of the sparse linear solver are the key factors in determining how complex a problem a given application code can solve. Therefore, the advent of a dramatically improved solver often brings with it dramatic improvements in our ability to do accurate and cost effective computer simulations. In this presentation we discuss the current status of sparse iterative and direct solvers in several key industrial CFD and structures codes, and show the impact that recent advances in linear solvers have made on both our ability to perform challenging simulations and the cost of those simulations. We also present some of the current challenges we have and the constraints we face in trying to improve these solvers. Finally, we discuss future requirements for sparse linear solvers on high performance architectures and try to indicate the opportunities that exist if we can develop even more improvements in linear solver capabilities.

  2. A parallel direct solver for the self-adaptive hp Finite Element Method

    KAUST Repository

    Paszyński, Maciej R.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we present a new parallel multi-frontal direct solver, dedicated for the hp Finite Element Method (hp-FEM). The self-adaptive hp-FEM generates in a fully automatic mode, a sequence of hp-meshes delivering exponential convergence of the error with respect to the number of degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) as well as the CPU time, by performing a sequence of hp refinements starting from an arbitrary initial mesh. The solver constructs an initial elimination tree for an arbitrary initial mesh, and expands the elimination tree each time the mesh is refined. This allows us to keep track of the order of elimination for the solver. The solver also minimizes the memory usage, by de-allocating partial LU factorizations computed during the elimination stage of the solver, and recomputes them for the backward substitution stage, by utilizing only about 10% of the computational time necessary for the original computations. The solver has been tested on 3D Direct Current (DC) borehole resistivity measurement simulations problems. We measure the execution time and memory usage of the solver over a large regular mesh with 1.5 million degrees of freedom as well as on the highly non-regular mesh, generated by the self-adaptive h p-FEM, with finite elements of various sizes and polynomial orders of approximation varying from p = 1 to p = 9. From the presented experiments it follows that the parallel solver scales well up to the maximum number of utilized processors. The limit for the solver scalability is the maximum sequential part of the algorithm: the computations of the partial LU factorizations over the longest path, coming from the root of the elimination tree down to the deepest leaf. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Robust large-scale parallel nonlinear solvers for simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Brett William; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Kolda, Tamara Gibson (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-11-01

    This report documents research to develop robust and efficient solution techniques for solving large-scale systems of nonlinear equations. The most widely used method for solving systems of nonlinear equations is Newton's method. While much research has been devoted to augmenting Newton-based solvers (usually with globalization techniques), little has been devoted to exploring the application of different models. Our research has been directed at evaluating techniques using different models than Newton's method: a lower order model, Broyden's method, and a higher order model, the tensor method. We have developed large-scale versions of each of these models and have demonstrated their use in important applications at Sandia. Broyden's method replaces the Jacobian with an approximation, allowing codes that cannot evaluate a Jacobian or have an inaccurate Jacobian to converge to a solution. Limited-memory methods, which have been successful in optimization, allow us to extend this approach to large-scale problems. We compare the robustness and efficiency of Newton's method, modified Newton's method, Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method, and our limited-memory Broyden method. Comparisons are carried out for large-scale applications of fluid flow simulations and electronic circuit simulations. Results show that, in cases where the Jacobian was inaccurate or could not be computed, Broyden's method converged in some cases where Newton's method failed to converge. We identify conditions where Broyden's method can be more efficient than Newton's method. We also present modifications to a large-scale tensor method, originally proposed by Bouaricha, for greater efficiency, better robustness, and wider applicability. Tensor methods are an alternative to Newton-based methods and are based on computing a step based on a local quadratic model rather than a linear model. The advantage of Bouaricha's method is that it can use any

  4. Assessment of the computational uncertainty of temperature rise and SAR in the eyes and brain under far-field exposure from 1 to 10 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakso, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of specific absorption rate (SAR) values in the head under plane-wave exposure from 1 to 10 GHz using a resolution of 0.5 mm in adult male and female voxel models. Temperature rise due to the power absorption is calculated by the bioheat equation using a multigrid method solver. The computational accuracy is investigated by repeating the calculations with resolutions of 1 mm and 2 mm and comparing the results. Cubically averaged 10 g SAR in the eyes and brain and eye-averaged SAR are calculated and compared to the corresponding temperature rise as well as the recommended limits for exposure. The results suggest that 2 mm resolution should only be used for frequencies smaller than 2.5 GHz, and 1 mm resolution only under 5 GHz. Morphological differences in models seemed to be an important cause of variation: differences in results between the two different models were usually larger than the computational error due to the grid resolution, and larger than the difference between the results for open and closed eyes. Limiting the incident plane-wave power density to smaller than 100 W m -2 was sufficient for ensuring that the temperature rise in the eyes and brain were less than 1 deg. C in the whole frequency range.

  5. Assessment of the computational uncertainty of temperature rise and SAR in the eyes and brain under far-field exposure from 1 to 10 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of specific absorption rate (SAR) values in the head under plane-wave exposure from 1 to 10 GHz using a resolution of 0.5 mm in adult male and female voxel models. Temperature rise due to the power absorption is calculated by the bioheat equation using a multigrid method solver. The computational accuracy is investigated by repeating the calculations with resolutions of 1 mm and 2 mm and comparing the results. Cubically averaged 10 g SAR in the eyes and brain and eye-averaged SAR are calculated and compared to the corresponding temperature rise as well as the recommended limits for exposure. The results suggest that 2 mm resolution should only be used for frequencies smaller than 2.5 GHz, and 1 mm resolution only under 5 GHz. Morphological differences in models seemed to be an important cause of variation: differences in results between the two different models were usually larger than the computational error due to the grid resolution, and larger than the difference between the results for open and closed eyes. Limiting the incident plane-wave power density to smaller than 100 W m-2 was sufficient for ensuring that the temperature rise in the eyes and brain were less than 1 °C in the whole frequency range.

  6. A three-dimensional mixed finite-difference Galerkin function model for the oceanic circulation in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Jung, Kyung Tae; Foreman, M. G. G.; Chung, Jong Yul

    2000-06-01

    A three-dimensional mixed-type model which uses a finite-difference approximation in the horizontal plane and function expansions in the vertical direction is developed for the simulation of oceanic flows in the Yellow Sea (YS) and the East China Sea (ECS). The model assumes a hydrostatic balance and solves the three-dimensional, non-linear free-surface, primitive equations for homogeneous fluids. To represent the velocity structure of oceanic currents, a set of linear interpolation functions is used from the sea surface to a depth of 300 m, characterizing the thickness of the oceanic flow, and a similarity function of the exponential type underneath. The vertical eddy viscosity takes a flow-related form in which the strong mixing due to the M 2 tide is incorporated as the background eddy viscosity. A radiation condition developed by Flather (1976. Memories de la Societe Royale des Science de Liege 10, 141-164) is employed along the open boundaries. A series of numerical experiments have been carried out using linear and quadratic bottom friction formulae. The coefficient of linear bottom friction was given by Hunter's formula (1975. Estarine and Coastal Marine Science 3, 473-475), taking into account that the oceanic flows in shelf seas are of secondary importance. The quadratic bottom friction coefficient was taken as 0.0025, the same value used in previous numerical experiments of oceanic circulation in the study area (for example, Lee, 1996. Ph.D. Thesis, Kyushu University). Both results are quite similar over the outer shelf region (Okinawa Trough and the shelf break west of Kyushu) in which tidal effects on the bottom friction are relatively small, and are qualitatively in good agreement with recent observations by ARGOS buoy tracking ( Lie and Cho, 1997. The Journal of the Korean Society of Oceanography 32, 1-7; Lie et al., 1998. Journal of Geophysical Research 103, 2963-2976). A clear difference was, however, found in the distribution of sea surface

  7. A generalized Poisson solver for first-principles device simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bani-Hashemian, Mohammad Hossein; VandeVondele, Joost, E-mail: joost.vandevondele@mat.ethz.ch [Nanoscale Simulations, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Brück, Sascha; Luisier, Mathieu [Integrated Systems Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-01-28

    Electronic structure calculations of atomistic systems based on density functional theory involve solving the Poisson equation. In this paper, we present a plane-wave based algorithm for solving the generalized Poisson equation subject to periodic or homogeneous Neumann conditions on the boundaries of the simulation cell and Dirichlet type conditions imposed at arbitrary subdomains. In this way, source, drain, and gate voltages can be imposed across atomistic models of electronic devices. Dirichlet conditions are enforced as constraints in a variational framework giving rise to a saddle point problem. The resulting system of equations is then solved using a stationary iterative method in which the generalized Poisson operator is preconditioned with the standard Laplace operator. The solver can make use of any sufficiently smooth function modelling the dielectric constant, including density dependent dielectric continuum models. For all the boundary conditions, consistent derivatives are available and molecular dynamics simulations can be performed. The convergence behaviour of the scheme is investigated and its capabilities are demonstrated.

  8. Parallelization of elliptic solver for solving 1D Boussinesq model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarwidi, D.; Adytia, D.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a parallel implementation of an elliptic solver in solving 1D Boussinesq model is presented. Numerical solution of Boussinesq model is obtained by implementing a staggered grid scheme to continuity, momentum, and elliptic equation of Boussinesq model. Tridiagonal system emerging from numerical scheme of elliptic equation is solved by cyclic reduction algorithm. The parallel implementation of cyclic reduction is executed on multicore processors with shared memory architectures using OpenMP. To measure the performance of parallel program, large number of grids is varied from 28 to 214. Two test cases of numerical experiment, i.e. propagation of solitary and standing wave, are proposed to evaluate the parallel program. The numerical results are verified with analytical solution of solitary and standing wave. The best speedup of solitary and standing wave test cases is about 2.07 with 214 of grids and 1.86 with 213 of grids, respectively, which are executed by using 8 threads. Moreover, the best efficiency of parallel program is 76.2% and 73.5% for solitary and standing wave test cases, respectively.

  9. Parallelizable approximate solvers for recursions arising in preconditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapira, Y. [Israel Inst. of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    1996-12-31

    For the recursions used in the Modified Incomplete LU (MILU) preconditioner, namely, the incomplete decomposition, forward elimination and back substitution processes, a parallelizable approximate solver is presented. The present analysis shows that the solutions of the recursions depend only weakly on their initial conditions and may be interpreted to indicate that the inexact solution is close, in some sense, to the exact one. The method is based on a domain decomposition approach, suitable for parallel implementations with message passing architectures. It requires a fixed number of communication steps per preconditioned iteration, independently of the number of subdomains or the size of the problem. The overlapping subdomains are either cubes (suitable for mesh-connected arrays of processors) or constructed by the data-flow rule of the recursions (suitable for line-connected arrays with possibly SIMD or vector processors). Numerical examples show that, in both cases, the overhead in the number of iterations required for convergence of the preconditioned iteration is small relatively to the speed-up gained.

  10. Verification of continuum drift kinetic equation solvers in NIMROD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y. [Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-4415 (United States); Kruger, S. E. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Belli, E. A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Lyons, B. C. [Program in Plasma Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Verification of continuum solutions to the electron and ion drift kinetic equations (DKEs) in NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comp. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is demonstrated through comparison with several neoclassical transport codes, most notably NEO [E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 015015 (2012)]. The DKE solutions use NIMROD's spatial representation, 2D finite-elements in the poloidal plane and a 1D Fourier expansion in toroidal angle. For 2D velocity space, a novel 1D expansion in finite elements is applied for the pitch angle dependence and a collocation grid is used for the normalized speed coordinate. The full, linearized Coulomb collision operator is kept and shown to be important for obtaining quantitative results. Bootstrap currents, parallel ion flows, and radial particle and heat fluxes show quantitative agreement between NIMROD and NEO for a variety of tokamak equilibria. In addition, velocity space distribution function contours for ions and electrons show nearly identical detailed structure and agree quantitatively. A Θ-centered, implicit time discretization and a block-preconditioned, iterative linear algebra solver provide efficient electron and ion DKE solutions that ultimately will be used to obtain closures for NIMROD's evolving fluid model.

  11. Towards Batched Linear Solvers on Accelerated Hardware Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haidar, Azzam [University of Tennessee (UT); Dong, Tingzing Tim [University of Tennessee (UT); Tomov, Stanimire [University of Tennessee (UT); Dongarra, Jack J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    As hardware evolves, an increasingly effective approach to develop energy efficient, high-performance solvers, is to design them to work on many small and independent problems. Indeed, many applications already need this functionality, especially for GPUs, which are known to be currently about four to five times more energy efficient than multicore CPUs for every floating-point operation. In this paper, we describe the development of the main one-sided factorizations: LU, QR, and Cholesky; that are needed for a set of small dense matrices to work in parallel. We refer to such algorithms as batched factorizations. Our approach is based on representing the algorithms as a sequence of batched BLAS routines for GPU-contained execution. Note that this is similar in functionality to the LAPACK and the hybrid MAGMA algorithms for large-matrix factorizations. But it is different from a straightforward approach, whereby each of GPU's symmetric multiprocessors factorizes a single problem at a time. We illustrate how our performance analysis together with the profiling and tracing tools guided the development of batched factorizations to achieve up to 2-fold speedup and 3-fold better energy efficiency compared to our highly optimized batched CPU implementations based on the MKL library on a two-sockets, Intel Sandy Bridge server. Compared to a batched LU factorization featured in the NVIDIA's CUBLAS library for GPUs, we achieves up to 2.5-fold speedup on the K40 GPU.

  12. A New Parallel N-Body Gravity Solver: TPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guohong

    1995-05-01

    We have developed a gravity solver based on combining the particle-mesh (PM) method and TREE methods. It is designed for and has been implemented on parallel computer architectures. The new code can deal with tens of millions of particles on current computers, with the calculation done on a parallel super- computer or a group of workstations. Typically, the spatial resolution is enhanced by more than a factor of 20 over the pure PM code with mass resolution retained at nearly the PM level. This code runs much faster than a pure TREE code with the same number of particles and maintains almost the same resolution in high-density regions. Multiple time step integration has also been implemented with the code, with second-order time accuracy. The performance of the code has been checked in several kinds of parallel computer configurations, including IBM SP1, SGI Challenge, and a group of workstations, with the speedup of the parallel code on a 32 processor IBM SP2 supercomputer nearly linear (efficiency ≍ 80%) in the number of processors. The computation/communication ratio is also very high (˜50), which means the code spends 95% of its CPU time in computation.

  13. Development and acceleration of unstructured mesh-based cfd solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, V.; Karpenko, A.; Volkov, K.

    2017-06-01

    The study was undertaken as part of a larger effort to establish a common computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for simulation of internal and external flows and involves some basic validation studies. The governing equations are solved with ¦nite volume code on unstructured meshes. The computational procedure involves reconstruction of the solution in each control volume and extrapolation of the unknowns to find the flow variables on the faces of control volume, solution of Riemann problem for each face of the control volume, and evolution of the time step. The nonlinear CFD solver works in an explicit time-marching fashion, based on a three-step Runge-Kutta stepping procedure. Convergence to a steady state is accelerated by the use of geometric technique and by the application of Jacobi preconditioning for high-speed flows, with a separate low Mach number preconditioning method for use with low-speed flows. The CFD code is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs). Speedup of solution on GPUs with respect to solution on central processing units (CPU) is compared with the use of different meshes and different methods of distribution of input data into blocks. The results obtained provide promising perspective for designing a GPU-based software framework for applications in CFD.

  14. Appropriate Coupling Solvers for the Numerical Simulation of Rolled Homogeneous Armor Plate Response Subjected to Blast Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mujahid Ahmad Zaidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rolled homogeneous armor (RHA plate subjected to blast loading is a complex problem involving the nonlinear fluid-structure interaction. The numerical techniques using the spatial discretization scheme that has been provided as a solver in the AUTODYN computer code will be used in this study in order to predict the RHA response subjected to explosive (TNT blast loading. The final deflection will be used as a reference in order to identify the suitable solver for both materials RHA and TNT; then the plastic deformation will be chosen in the simulation process. Instead of using the same solver for RHA and TNT domains, the optimization of solver can be achieved if it is only used in an appropriate domain, or in other words, a different domain will be using different solver. The solvers, which were available in AUTODYN, were used in the analysis of impact and explosion or fluid-structure interaction. Therefore, in this paper, we will determine the suitable solver for both materials (TNT and RHA plate, and the appropriate interaction coupling solver will be obtained. Defining TNT and RHA plates using the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian solver has found the best coupling solver for this case study when compared with existing experimental data. This coupling solver will be used for future analysis in simulating blast-loading phenomena.

  15. A distributed-memory hierarchical solver for general sparse linear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chao [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Inst. for Computational and Mathematical Engineering; Pouransari, Hadi [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Rajamanickam, Sivasankaran [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Computing Research; Boman, Erik G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Computing Research; Darve, Eric [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Inst. for Computational and Mathematical Engineering and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-12-20

    We present a parallel hierarchical solver for general sparse linear systems on distributed-memory machines. For large-scale problems, this fully algebraic algorithm is faster and more memory-efficient than sparse direct solvers because it exploits the low-rank structure of fill-in blocks. Depending on the accuracy of low-rank approximations, the hierarchical solver can be used either as a direct solver or as a preconditioner. The parallel algorithm is based on data decomposition and requires only local communication for updating boundary data on every processor. Moreover, the computation-to-communication ratio of the parallel algorithm is approximately the volume-to-surface-area ratio of the subdomain owned by every processor. We also provide various numerical results to demonstrate the versatility and scalability of the parallel algorithm.

  16. GPU-Accelerated Sparse Matrix Solvers for Large-Scale Simulations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — At the heart of scientific computing and numerical analysis are linear algebra solvers. In scientific computing, the focus is on the partial differential equations...

  17. Quasi-2D Unsteady Flow Solver Module for Rocket Engine and Propulsion System Simulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campell, Bryan T; Davis, Roger L

    2006-01-01

    .... The solver is targeted to the commercial dynamic simulation software package Simulink(Registered) for integration into a larger suite of modules developed for simulating rocket engines and propulsion systems...

  18. Hybrid direct and iterative solvers for h refined grids with singularities

    KAUST Repository

    Paszyński, Maciej R.

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a hybrid direct and iterative solver for two and three dimensional h adaptive grids with point singularities. The point singularities are eliminated by using a sequential linear computational cost solver O(N) on CPU [1]. The remaining Schur complements are submitted to incomplete LU preconditioned conjugated gradient (ILUPCG) iterative solver. The approach is compared to the standard algorithm performing static condensation over the entire mesh and executing the ILUPCG algorithm on top of it. The hybrid solver is applied for two or three dimensional grids automatically h refined towards point or edge singularities. The automatic refinement is based on the relative error estimations between the coarse and fine mesh solutions [2], and the optimal refinements are selected using the projection based interpolation. The computational mesh is partitioned into sub-meshes with local point and edge singularities separated. This is done by using the following greedy algorithm.

  19. i QIST: An open source continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Wang, Yilin; Meng, Zi Yang; Du, Liang; Werner, Philipp; Dai, Xi

    2015-10-01

    Quantum impurity solvers have a broad range of applications in theoretical studies of strongly correlated electron systems. Especially, they play a key role in dynamical mean-field theory calculations of correlated lattice models and realistic materials. Therefore, the development and implementation of efficient quantum impurity solvers is an important task. In this paper, we present an open source interacting quantum impurity solver toolkit (dubbed i QIST). This package contains several highly optimized quantum impurity solvers which are based on the hybridization expansion continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo algorithm, as well as some essential pre- and post-processing tools. We first introduce the basic principle of continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo algorithm and then discuss the implementation details and optimization strategies. The software framework, major features, and installation procedure for i QIST are also explained. Finally, several simple tutorials are presented in order to demonstrate the usage and power of i QIST.

  20. Modified Poisson solver for the simulation of the silicon-oxide interface in semiconductor detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castoldi, A. E-mail: andrea.castoldi@polimi.it; Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Guazzoni, C.; De Geronimo, G

    2000-01-11

    We present a modified Poisson solver for depleted semiconductor detectors that takes into account the effects of possible accumulation of mobile charge at the silicon-oxide interfaces. The solver is based on a physical model that closely approximates the correct boundary condition at the silicon-oxide interface. The model assumes that the silicon-oxide interface is divided into an equipotential region, where the electron layer is located, and a fully depleted region. The actual extension and potential of the electron layer region are approximated with the desired accuracy by an iterative procedure. This model has been implemented in 2- and 3-D Poisson solvers. The comparison with a 2-D drift-diffusion simulator has shown the accuracy of the proposed method. The modified Poisson solver has shown to be useful in giving accurate solutions to 3-D design problems at high CPU speed.