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Sample records for underlying chronic pain

  1. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. × ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. ...

  2. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who have chronic pain may also have low self-esteem, depression, and anger. Symptoms of chronic pain Chronic ... itself often leads to other symptoms. These include low self-esteem, anger, depression, anxiety, or frustration. What causes chronic ...

  3. Chronic pain after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsborg, B.; Nikolajsen, L.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a well-known adverse effect of surgery, but the risk of chronic pain after gynaecological surgery is less established. METHOD: This review summarizes studies on chronic pain following hysterectomy. The underlying mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic...... post-hysterectomy pain are discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Chronic pain is reported by 5-32% of women after hysterectomy. A guideline is proposed for future prospective studies Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  4. Chronic Pain in People with an Intellectual Disability: Under-Recognised and Under-Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, B. E.; Daly, P.; Smyth, F.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To examine the nature, prevalence and impact of chronic pain in adults with an intellectual disability (ID) based on carer report. Methods: Postal questionnaires were sent to 250 care-givers and 157 responses were received (63%). Results: Chronic pain was reported in 13% of the sample (n = 21), 6.3% had pain in two sites and 2% had pain in…

  5. Prognostic factors and underlying mechanisms in chronic low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos-van der Hulst, Marije

    2009-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is defined as pain localised between the 12th rib and the inferior gluteal folds. At any moment, about 15% of adults have LBP. In the majority of the cases, LBP is a self-limiting disease and 90% of the attacks of LBP recover within 6-8 weeks. A minority of subjects with

  6. Treatment for chronic low back pain: the focus should change to multimodal management that reflects the underlying pain mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Schwefe, Gerhard; Morlion, Bart; Ahlbeck, Karsten; Alon, Eli; Coaccioli, Stefano; Coluzzi, Flaminia; Huygen, Frank; Jaksch, Wolfgang; Kalso, Eija; Kocot-Kępska, Magdalena; Kress, Hans-Georg; Mangas, Ana Cristina; Margarit Ferri, Cesar; Mavrocordatos, Philippe; Nicolaou, Andrew; Hernández, Concepción Pérez; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Schäfer, Michael; Sichère, Patrick

    2017-07-01

    Chronic low back pain: Chronic pain is the most common cause for people to utilize healthcare resources and has a considerable impact upon patients' lives. The most prevalent chronic pain condition is chronic low back pain (CLBP). CLBP may be nociceptive or neuropathic, or may incorporate both components. The presence of a neuropathic component is associated with more intense pain of longer duration, and a higher prevalence of co-morbidities. However, many physicians' knowledge of chronic pain mechanisms is currently limited and there are no universally accepted treatment guidelines, so the condition is not particularly well managed. Diagnosis should begin with a focused medical history and physical examination, to exclude serious spinal pathology that may require evaluation by an appropriate specialist. Most patients have non-specific CLBP, which cannot be attributed to a particular cause. It is important to try and establish whether a neuropathic component is present, by combining the findings of physical and neurological examinations with the patient's history. This may prove difficult, however, even when using screening instruments. Multimodal management: The multifactorial nature of CLBP indicates that the most logical treatment approach is multimodal: i.e. integrated multidisciplinary therapy with co-ordinated somatic and psychotherapeutic elements. As both nociceptive and neuropathic components may be present, combining analgesic agents with different mechanisms of action is a rational treatment modality. Individually tailored combination therapy can improve analgesia whilst reducing the doses of constituent agents, thereby lessening the incidence of side effects. This paper outlines the development of CLBP and the underlying mechanisms involved, as well as providing information on diagnosis and the use of a wide range of pharmaceutical agents in managing the condition (including NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, opioids and

  7. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learned Going to the ER Communication Tools Pain Management Programs Videos Resources FAQs Glossary Surveys Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments The Art of Pain Management Partners for Understanding Pain Pain Awareness Toolkits September ...

  8. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surveys Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments The Art of Pain Management Partners for Understanding Pain Pain ... The physician and the patient are accustomed to deal with acute pain and both naturally expect that ...

  9. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surveys Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments The Art of Pain Management Partners for Understanding Pain Pain ... web site was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Medtronic Foundation and Purdue Pharma. Medtronic ...

  10. Low back pain - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007422.htm Low back pain - chronic To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Low back pain refers to pain that you feel in your ...

  11. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... acute pain and both naturally expect that some cause will be found, and when it’s found, it ... pain even in the absence of an apparent cause. But chronic pain has a physiological or neurological ...

  12. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the pain will go away. Part of the problem with chronic pain is that when we start ... is that the presence of a severe pain problem which exists for some period of time can ...

  13. [Benign chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrie, A; Thurel, C

    1994-09-15

    Recent data indicate that 25 to 30% of the population in industrialized countries suffers from benign chronic pain. Among these patients, 50 to 75% are professionally incapable for varied lengths of time, from a few days to some weeks or months, or even definitively. The aetiology and clinical presentation of chronic benign pain are enormously varied because this definition includes such different pathologies as headache, pain of rheumatologic, postsurgical, organic, and post-zoster origin, lombalgia, radiculalgia, post-amputation pain, neuropathologic pain, causalgia, algoneurodystrophic pain, psychosomatic and idiopathic pain. Since these syndromes and causes of pain could not be discussed individually, they have been grouped according to their neurophysiology and pathophysiology.

  14. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chronic pain there may be no apparent physical injury or illness to explain it. The physician and ... expected period of healing for an illness or injury. You can experience pain even if you are ...

  15. Employees with Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the work-site and an accessible entrance Install automatic door openers Provide an accessible route of travel ... resources manager had chronic pain due to a car accident. The individual was having difficulty getting to ...

  16. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... there’s a broken bone. With chronic pain there may be no apparent physical injury or illness to ... re looking in the wrong place, but we may be looking in the wrong time. And what ...

  17. Chronic pelvic pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It affects all spheres of life, from physical and psychological ... Peripheral sensitisation: This refers to overactive afferent nerve pathways. • Pelvic floor hypertonicity: This refers to upregulation of the pelvic muscle tone. ... Chronic pelvic pain is defined as pain in the pelvis lasting for more than six months (some say three).

  18. Chronic female pelvic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurab Maitra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pelvic pain (CPP is defined as nonmalignant pain perceived in the structures related to the pelvis that has been present for more than 6 months or a non acute pain mechanism of shorter duration. Pain in the pelvic region can arise from musculoskeletal, gynaecological, urologic, gastrointestinal and or neurologic conditions. Key gynaecological conditions that contribute to CPP include pelvic inflammatory disease (PID, endometriosis, adnexa pathologies (ovarian cysts, ovarian remnant syndrome, uterine pathologies (leiomyoma, adenomyosis and pelvic girdle pain associated with pregnancy. Several major and minor sexually transmitted diseases (STD can cause pelvic and vulvar pain. A common painful condition of the urinary system is Interstitial cystitis(IC. A second urologic condition that can lead to development of CPP is urethral syndrome. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is associated with dysmenorrhoea in 60% of cases. Other bowel conditions contributing to pelvic pain include diverticular disease,Crohn′s disease ulcerative colitis and chronic appendicitis. Musculoskeletal pathologies that can cause pelvic pain include sacroiliac joint (SIJ dysfunction, symphysis pubis and sacro-coccygeal joint dysfunction, coccyx injury or malposition and neuropathic structures in the lower thoracic, lumbar and sacral plexus. Prolonged pelvic girdle pain, lasting more than 6 months postpartum is estimated in 3% to 30% of women. Nerve irritation or entrapment as a cause of pelvic pain can be related to injury of the upper lumbar segments giving rise to irritation of the sensory nerves to the ventral trunk or from direct trauma from abdominal incisions or retractors used during abdominal surgical procedures. Afflictions of the iliohypogastric, ilioinguinal, genitofemoral, pudendal and obturator nerves are of greatest concern in patients with pelvic pain. Patient education about the disease and treatment involved is paramount. A knowledge of the differential

  19. Acetaminophen for Chronic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ennis, Zandra Nymand; Dideriksen, Dorthe; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is the most commonly used analgesic worldwide and recommended as first-line treatment in all pain conditions by WHO. We performed a systematic literature review to evaluate the efficacy of acetaminophen when used for chronic pain conditions. Applying three broad search...... strategies for acetaminophen use in chronic pain in both Embase and PubMed, 1,551 hits were obtained. Following cross-reference searches of both trials and 38 reviews, seven studies comparing acetaminophen in continuous dosing regimens of more than two weeks with placebo were included. The review...... evidence to support the efficacy of acetaminophen treatment in patients with chronic pain conditions. Assessment of continuous efficacy in the many patients using acetaminophen worldwide is recommended. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  20. Coping Styles, Pain Expressiveness, and Implicit Theories of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, N C; Bailey, S Jeffrey; LaChapelle, Diane L; Harman, Katherine; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Whereas some individuals use active coping strategies and are able to adaptively cope with their pain, others use passive strategies and catastrophic appraisals, which are often associated with increased displays of pain behavior and negative pain-related outcomes. To investigate attribution-based implicit theories as a potential underlying mechanism that might affect coping success, we hypothesized that pain patients with an incremental implicit theory of pain (i.e., view pain as malleable) would have more active coping strategies, lower levels of pain expressiveness, and better pain-related outcomes than those with an entity implicit theory of pain (i.e., view pain as nonmalleable). Patients with chronic back pain undergoing a functional assessment completed a variety of self-report measures and participated in a pain-inducing physiotherapy procedure. The results revealed those with an incremental theory of pain used more active coping strategies, displayed less pain behavior, and reported better pain-related outcomes (e.g., lower levels of depression) than individuals with an entity theory of pain. The findings suggest implicit theories of pain may represent an underlying social-cognitive mechanism linked to important coping, emotional, and expressive reactions to chronic pain. Identifying such a mechanism may provide valuable information for the assessment and treatment of chronic pain.

  1. Buprenorphine for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Raul; Copenhaver, David

    2013-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions, analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The use of transdermal buprenorphine for chronic pain management is discussed. A brief history of the medication is provided. The use of the medication in opioid maintenance, and withdrawal and other concerns are discussed. Possible side effects are described.

  2. Chronicity of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerschman, J A

    2000-10-01

    Acute and chronic orofacial pain continues to be poorly understood and managed. The National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) 1999 report on acute pain management promotes the development of evidence based clinical practice guidelines aimed at improving both the quality of health care and health outcomes in medical and dental practice in Australia. Nerve signals arising from sites of tissue or nerve injury lead to long term changes in the central nervous system and the amplification and persistence of pain. These nociceptor activity-induced neuronal changes known as central sensitization, have important clinical implications in the development of new approaches to the management of persistent pain. These findings and implications are discussed in relationship to poorly managed and understood conditions such as oral dysaesthesia, burning mouth syndrome, atypical facial pain/atypical odontalgia, peripheral nerve injury, deafferentation and phantom tooth syndrome.

  3. Under Pressure: Applying Practice-Based Learning and Improvement to the Treatment of Chronic Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapolti, Mihaela; Wu, Cindy; Schuth, Olga A; Hultman, Charles Scott

    2017-10-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain after burn injury may have multiple causes, such as direct nerve injury, nerve compression, or neuroma formation, and can significantly impair quality of life and limit functional recovery. Management includes a team-based approach that involves close collaboration between occupational and physical therapists, plastic surgeons, and experts in chronic pain, from neurology, anesthesia, psychiatry, and physiatry. Carefully selected patients with an anatomic cause of chronic neuropathic pain unequivocally benefit from surgical intervention. Self-reflection and analysis yield improvement in both efficiency and effectiveness when managing patients with burns with chronic neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality of life under oxycodone/naloxone, oxycodone, or morphine treatment for chronic low back pain in routine clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueberall MA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael A Ueberall,1 Alice Eberhardt,2 Gerhard HH Mueller-Schwefe3 1Institute for Neurological Sciences, Nuernberg, Germany; 2Mundipharma GmbH, Limburg, Germany; 3Interdisciplinary Center for Pain and Palliative Care Medicine, Goeppingen, Germany Objective: To compare the quality of life of patients with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain under treatment with the WHO-step III opioids oxycodone/naloxone, oxycodone, or morphine in routine clinical practice. Study design: Prospective, 12-week, randomized, open-label, blinded end-point study in 88 medical centers in Germany. Patients and methods: A total of 901 patients requiring around-the-clock pain treatment with a WHO-step III opioid were randomized to either morphine, oxycodone, or oxycodone/naloxone (1:1:1. Changes from baseline to week 12 in quality of life were assessed using different validated tools (EuroQoL-5 Dimensions [EQ-5D], Short Form 12 [SF-12], quality of life impairment by pain inventory [QLIP]. Results: EQ-5D weighted index scores significantly improved over the 12-week treatment period under all three opioids (P<0.001 with significantly greater improvements under oxycodone/naloxone (65.2% vs 49.6% for oxycodone and 48.2% for morphine, P<0.001. The proportion of patients without EQ-5D complaints was also significantly higher under oxycodone/naloxone (P<0.001. Although quality of life ratings with the QLIP inventory showed significant improvements in all the three treatment arms, improvements were significantly higher under oxycodone/naloxone than under oxycodone and morphine (P<0.001: 90.7% of all oxycodone/naloxone patients achieved ≥30% improvements in quality of life, 72.8% had ≥50%, and 33.2% ≥70% improvements. Similarly, both physical and mental SF-12 component scores showed significantly greater improvements under oxycodone/naloxone with both scores close to the German population norm after 12 weeks. Conclusion: Treatment with morphine, oxycodone, or oxycodone

  5. The burden of chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Sjøgren, Per; Juel, Knud

    2012-01-01

    sample consisted of 25,000 individuals (≥16 years old) living in Denmark. In all, 60.7% completed a mailed or online questionnaire. Associations were examined with multiple logistic regression analysis. The study population consisted of 14,925 individuals in whom a high prevalence of chronic pain (26......Chronic pain is currently considered a public health problem with high costs to the individual and society. To improve prevention and treatment of chronic pain, epidemiologic studies are mandatory for assessing chronic pain. The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of chronic pain...

  6. Anatomy and physiology of chronic scrotal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Abhishek P

    2017-05-01

    This article reviews the anatomy and physiology of the scrotum and its contents as it pertains to chronic scrotal pain. Physiology of chronic pain is reviewed, as well as the pathophysiology involved in the development of chronic pain.

  7. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Going to the ER Communication Tools Pain Management Programs Videos Resources FAQs Glossary Surveys Resource Guide to ... MD, director of the Cleveland Clinic Pain Management Program, explains some of the physiology of pain. Narrator: ...

  8. Buprenorphine Buccal (chronic pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buprenorphine (Belbuca) is used to relieve severe pain in people who are expected to need pain medication ... and who cannot be treated with other medications. Buprenorphine (Belbuca) should not be used to treat pain ...

  9. Fighting Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from clogged arteries Stomach/Digestive: Gallstones, intestinal obstruction, diverticulitis, ulcers, severe indigestion, severe gas pain, inflammatory bowel disease, colitis Urinary/Reproductive: Kidney stones, pelvic pain, vulvodynia, ...

  10. Neurovascular Unit in Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Mihaela Radu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a debilitating condition with major socioeconomic impact, whose neurobiological basis is still not clear. An involvement of the neurovascular unit (NVU has been recently proposed. In particular, the blood-brain barrier (BBB and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB, two NVU key players, may be affected during the development of chronic pain; in particular, transient permeabilization of the barrier is suggested by several inflammatory- and nerve-injury-based pain models, and we argue that the clarification of molecular BBB/BSCB permeabilization events will shed new light in understanding chronic pain mechanisms. Possible biases in experiments supporting this theory and its translational potentials are discussed. Moving beyond an exclusive focus on the role of the endothelium, we propose that our understanding of the mechanisms subserving chronic pain will benefit from the extension of research efforts to the NVU as a whole. In this view, the available evidence on the interaction between analgesic drugs and the NVU is here reviewed. Chronic pain comorbidities, such as neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, are also discussed in view of NVU changes, together with innovative pharmacological solutions targeting NVU components in chronic pain treatment.

  11. Chronic pain management: nonpharmacological therapies for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ku-Lang; Fillingim, Roger; Hurley, Robert W; Schmidt, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    Nonpharmacologic therapies have become a vital part of managing chronic pain (CP). Although these can be used as stand-alone therapies, nonpharmacologic treatments often are used to augment and complement pharmacologic treatments (ie, multimodal therapy). Nonpharmacologic approaches can be classified as behavioral, cognitive, integrative, and physical therapies. Core principles in developing a treatment plan are explaining the nature of the CP condition, setting appropriate goals, and developing a comprehensive treatment approach and plan for adherence. Clinicians should become familiar with these interventions so that they can offer patients flexibility in the pain management approach. Effective noninvasive treatment modalities for CP include behavioral therapy for short-term pain relief; cognitive behavioral therapy for reducing long-term pain and disability; hypnosis as adjunctive therapy; guided imagery, diaphragmatic breathing, and muscle relaxation, especially for cancer-related pain; mindfulness-based stress reduction for patients with chronic low back pain; acupuncture for multiple pain conditions; combination manipulation, manual therapy, endurance exercise, stretching, and strengthening for chronic neck pain; animal-assisted therapy; and S-adenosyl-L-methionine for joint pain. Guidelines for use of these treatment modalities are based on expert panel recommendations in combination with data from randomized controlled trials. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  12. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Support the ACPA Contact Us Shop What We Have Learned Going to the ER Communication Tools Pain ... are no longer ill or if your injuries have healed. In fact, many persons experience pain even ...

  13. Pregabalin in acute and chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalim Kumar Baidya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregabalin is a gamma-amino-butyric acid analog shown to be effective in several models of neuropathic pain, incisional injury, and inflammatory injury. In this review, the role of pregabalin in acute postoperative pain and in chronic pain syndromes has been discussed. Multimodal perioperative analgesia with the use of gabapentinoids has become common. Based on available evidence from randomized controlled trials and meta-analysis, the perioperative administration of pregabalin reduces opioid consumption and opioid-related adverse effects in the first 24 h following surgery. Postoperative pain intensity is however not consistently reduced by pregabalin. Adverse effects like visual disturbance, sedation, dizziness, and headache are associated with higher doses. The advantage of the perioperative use of pregabalin is so far limited to laparoscopic, gynecological, and daycare surgeries which are not very painful. The role of the perioperative administration of pregabalin in preventing chronic pain following surgery, its efficacy in more painful surgeries and surgeries done under regional anesthesia, and the optimal dosage and duration of perioperative pregabalin need to be studied. The efficacy of pregabalin in chronic pain conditions like painful diabetic neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, central neuropathic pain, and fibromyalgia has been demonstrated.

  14. [Clinical practice data regarding tapentadol prolonged release treatment for severe chronic pain - improvement of analgesia, functional competence and quality of life in particular under tapentadol monotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Thomas; Krings, Doris; Waldmann-Rex, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    To assess effectiveness and tolerability of tapentadol prolonged release (PR, Palexia® retard) for the treatment of severe chronic pain under routine clinical practice conditions in Germany. In this prospective non-interventional study, data regarding previous and concomitant analgesic treatment, tapentadol dosage, pain intensity, functionality, quality of life, and tolerability of tapentadol PR were collected over a 3-month observation period. A total of 5,002 patients were included in the effectiveness analysis; a subgroup analysis assessed effectiveness for all patients receiving tapentadol monotherapy (n = 1476). Nearly all patients of the total study population (95.9%) had already received analgesic long-term treatment (31.7% strong opioids) prior to the start of the study. Treatment with tapentadol PR (mean daily dose 216 ± 103 mg at end of observation) resulted in a reduction in pain intensity of 3.9 points from 7.2 ± 1.4 at baseline (95%CI -3.93; -3.83; p ≤ 0.001; NRS-11); clinically relevant pain relief ≥ 50% was documented for 65.1% of the patients. All 4 evaluated aspects regarding pain-related functionality, and quality of life of the patients also improved significantly. Compared to the total patient population, pain relief was greater in the subgroup receiving tapentadol monotherapy; baseline pain intensity was comparable between the groups. Pain-related functional impairment also declined to a slightly greater extent, and quality of life was rated more positively at end of observation. Analgesic treatment with tapentadol PR in routine clinical practice resulted in a marked reduction of severe chronic pain with significant improvements of functionality and quality of life. On the basis of these results and the favourable safety profile, tapentadol PR can thus be considered an alternative to classical opioids in the treatment of severe chronic pain.

  15. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Such types include relaxation exercises and biofeedback . Nutrition therapy—Vitamin B 1 and magnesium may be used to relieve dysmenorrhea. Surgery—Pelvic pain that does not respond to other treatments can be relieved by surgery. Cutting or destroying nerves blocks pain signals from reaching ...

  16. Integrative medicine for chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Felix J.; Brüning, Alexander; Barcelona, Cyrus; Büssing, Arndt; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav; Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Integrative medicine inpatient treatment has been shown to improve physical and mental health in patients with internal medicine conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a 2-week integrative medicine inpatient treatment in patients with chronic pain syndromes and the association of treatment success with patient-related process variables. Methods: Inpatients with chronic pain syndromes participating in a 2-week integrative medicine inpatient program were included. Patients’ pain intensity, pain disability, pain perception, quality of life, depression, and perceived stress were measured on admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge. Likewise process variables including ability and will to change, emotional/rational disease acceptance, mindfulness, life and health satisfaction, and easiness of life were assessed. Results: A total of 310 inpatients (91% female, mean age 50.7 ± 12.4 year, 26.5% low back pain, and 22.9% fibromyalgia) were included. Using mixed linear models, significant improvements in pain intensity, pain disability, pain perception, quality of life, depression, and perceived stress were found (all P medicine inpatient treatment can benefit patients with chronic pain conditions. Functional improvements are associated with improved ability to change and implementation, disease acceptance, and satisfaction. PMID:27399133

  17. Pregabalin for Pain Treatment in Chronic Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren Schou; Bowense, S; Wilder-Smith, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Intractable pain usually dominates the clinical presentation of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Slowing of electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythmicity has been associated with abnormal cortical pain processing in other chronic pain disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectral distribution...

  18. Chronic nonmalignant pain in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Robert P; Purvis, Janey M; Mallett, Barbara S

    2008-11-15

    A systematic approach to chronic nonmalignant pain includes a comprehensive evaluation; a treatment plan determined by the diagnosis and mechanisms underlying the pain; patient education; and realistic goal setting. The main goal of treatment is to improve quality of life while decreasing pain. An initial comprehensive pain assessment is essential in developing a treatment plan that addresses the physical, social, functional, and psychological needs of the patient. One obstacle to appropriate pain management is managing the adverse effects of medication. Opioids pose challenges with abuse, addiction, diversion, lack of knowledge, concerns about adverse effects, and fears of regulatory scrutiny. These challenges may be overcome by adherence to the Federation of State Medical Boards guidelines, use of random urine drug screening, monitoring for aberrant behaviors, and anticipating adverse effects. When psychiatric comorbidities are present, risk of substance abuse is high and pain management may require specialized treatment or consultation. Referral to a pain management specialist can be helpful.

  19. Conditioned pain modulation in patients with nonspecific chronic back pain with chronic local pain, chronic widespread pain, and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Andreas; Eich, Wolfgang; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Tesarz, Jonas

    2017-03-01

    Findings considering conditioned pain modulation (CPM) in chronic back pain (CBP) are contradictory. This might be because many patients with CBP report pain in further areas of the body, and altered CPM might influence spatial extent of pain rather than CBP per se. Therefore, we compared CPM in patients with CBP with different pain extent. Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), for whom CPM impairment is reported most consistently, were measured for comparison. Based on clinical evaluation and pain drawings, patients were categorized into chronic local back pain (CLP; n = 53), chronic widespread back pain (CWP; n = 32), and FMS (n = 92). Conditioned pain modulation was measured by the difference in pressure pain threshold (test stimuli) at the lower back before and after tonic heat pain (conditioning stimulus). We also measured psychosocial variables. Pressure pain threshold was significantly increased in CLP patients after tonic heat pain (P pain modulation in CLP was significantly higher than that in CWP and FMS (P painful areas (0-10) were associated with lower CPM (r = 0.346, P = 0.001) in CBP but not in FMS (r = -0.013, P = 0.903). Anxiety and depression were more pronounced in FMS than in CLP or CWP (P values pain inhibition seem to be more indicated the higher the pain extent.

  20. Tips for Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... let stress compound your pain. • Stress is the result of the way you react to the world, and heightened stress equals heightened pain. Learn relaxation techniques or seek help in reducing your stress level. Get enough sleep. • Practice good sleep habits and get adequate sleep on a continuing basis. ...

  1. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... there are even changes in various levels of the brain. So that to explain a person’s pain one day it may be necessary to look at an illness that actually went away several ... any pain that continues beyond the expected period of healing for an illness or ...

  2. Medication Overuse in Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eric S

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain is usually managed by various pharmacotherapies after exhausting the conservative modalities such as over-the-counter choices. The goal of this review is to investigate current state of opioids and non-opioid medication overuse that includes NSAIDs, skeletal muscle relaxants, antidepressants, membrane stabilization agents, and benzodiazepine. How to minimize medication overuse and achieve better outcome in chronic pain management? Although antidepressants and membrane stabilization agents contribute to the crucial components for neuromodulation, opioids were frequently designated as a rescue remedy in chronic pain since adjunct analgesics usually do not provide instantaneous relief. The updated CDC guideline for prescribing opioids has gained widespread attention via media exposure. Both patients and prescribers are alerted to respond to the opioid epidemic and numerous complications. However, there has been overuse of non-opioid adjunct analgesics that caused significant adverse effects in addition to concurrent opioid consumption. It is a common practice to extrapolate the WHO three-step analgesic ladder for cancer pain to apply in non-cancer pain that emphasizes solely on pharmacologic therapy which may result in overuse and escalation of opioids in non-cancer pain. There has been promising progress in non-pharmacologic therapies such as biofeedback, complementary, and alternative medicine to facilitate pain control instead of dependency on pharmacologic therapies. This review article presents the current state of medication overuse in chronic pain and proposes precaution to balance the risk and benefit ratio. It may serve as a premier for future study on clinical pathway for comprehensive chronic pain management and reduce medication overuse.

  3. [Correlation between dental pulp demyelination degree and pain visual analogue scale scores data under acute and chronic pulpitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsantiia, N B; Davarashvili, X T; Gogiashvili, L E; Mamaladze, M T; Tsagareli, Z G; Melikadze, E B

    2013-05-01

    The aim of study is the analysis of pulp nerve fibers demyelination degree and its relationship with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score that may be measured as objective criteria. Material and methods of study. Step I: electron micrografs of dental pulp simples with special interest of myelin structural changes detected in 3 scores system, obtained from 80 patients, displays in 4 groups: 1) acute and 2) chronic pulpitis without and with accompined systemic deseases, 20 patients in each group. Dental care was realized in Kutaisi N1 Dental clinic. Step II - self-reported VAS used for describing dental pain. All data were performed by SPSS 10,0 version statistics including Spearmen-rank and Mann-Whitny coefficients for examine the validity between pulp demyelination degree and pain intensity in verbal, numbered and box scales. Researched Data were shown that damaged myelin as focal decomposition of membranes and Schwann cells hyperthrophia correspond with acute dental pain intensity as Spearman index reported in VAS numbered Scales, myelin and axoplasm degeneration as part of chronic gangrenous pulpitis disorders are in direct correlation with VAS in verbal, numbered and behavioral Rating Scales. In fact, all morphological and subjective data, including psychomotoric assessment of dental painin pulpitis may be used in dental practice for evaluation of pain syndrome considered personal story.

  4. Success or failure of chronic pain rehabilitation: the importance of good interaction - a qualitative study under patients and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhof, B; Dekker, J H M; Sloots, M; Bartels, E A C; Dekker, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore which factors are associated with a successful treatment outcome in chronic pain patients and professionals participating in a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program, with a specific focus on the patient-professional interaction. Patients (n = 16) and professionals (n = 10) were interviewed and/or observed. The transcribed interviews and observations were analyzed and themes were described. Patients with a positive treatment outcome came to a shared understanding of their pain with their professional, demonstrated new learned behavior and were able to continue their learning process at home. Patients with a negative treatment outcome did not reach a shared understanding of their pain with their professional, were not able to change their behavior and wanted more help to achieve this. Both patient groups experienced organizational barriers within the treatment process. Factors associated with a high quality of patient-professional interaction included the patient experience of being taken seriously, the involvement of the professional with the patient, a clear explanation of the pain, and an open interaction between patient and professional. This study provides insight into factors which were related to a positively or negatively experienced outcome of pain rehabilitation. A good match within the patient-professional interaction seems essential. IMPLICATIONS OF REHABILITATION: Within chronic pain rehabilitation good didactic skills and a client-centered attitude of the professional may be helpful in order to make the patient feel being taken seriously. An assessment of the patient's learning style might lead to a better fit of the patient education and training according to an individual's learning style. Relapse might be prevented by paying special attention to the integration of new behavior within important life areas as work and sports.

  5. Managing your chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if bending to pick up heavy pots sends shooting pain down your back, rearrange your kitchen so ... Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also ...

  6. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... So that to explain a person’s pain one day it may be necessary to look at an ... We comply with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: Verify here Certified by: Independent Charities of ...

  7. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is that the presence of a severe pain problem which exists for some period of time can actually change the nervous system so that ... Certified by: Independent Charities of ...

  8. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  9. Glia and pain: is chronic pain a gliopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Berta, Temugin; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-12-01

    Activation of glial cells and neuro-glial interactions are emerging as key mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Accumulating evidence has implicated 3 types of glial cells in the development and maintenance of chronic pain: microglia and astrocytes of the central nervous system (CNS), and satellite glial cells of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. Painful syndromes are associated with different glial activation states: (1) glial reaction (ie, upregulation of glial markers such as IBA1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and/or morphological changes, including hypertrophy, proliferation, and modifications of glial networks); (2) phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways; (3) upregulation of adenosine triphosphate and chemokine receptors and hemichannels and downregulation of glutamate transporters; and (4) synthesis and release of glial mediators (eg, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases) to the extracellular space. Although widely detected in chronic pain resulting from nerve trauma, inflammation, cancer, and chemotherapy in rodents, and more recently, human immunodeficiency virus-associated neuropathy in human beings, glial reaction (activation state 1) is not thought to mediate pain sensitivity directly. Instead, activation states 2 to 4 have been demonstrated to enhance pain sensitivity via a number of synergistic neuro-glial interactions. Glial mediators have been shown to powerfully modulate excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission at presynaptic, postsynaptic, and extrasynaptic sites. Glial activation also occurs in acute pain conditions, and acute opioid treatment activates peripheral glia to mask opioid analgesia. Thus, chronic pain could be a result of "gliopathy," that is, dysregulation of glial functions in the central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, we provide an update on recent advances and discuss remaining questions. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the

  10. Glia and pain: Is chronic pain a gliopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Berta, Temugin; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-01-01

    Activation of glial cells and neuro-glial interactions are emerging as key mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Accumulating evidence has implicated 3 types of glial cells in the development and maintenance of chronic pain: microglia and astrocytes of the central nervous system (CNS), and satellite glial cells of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. Painful syndromes are associated with different glial activation states: (1) glial reaction (ie, upregulation of glial markers such as IBA1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and/or morphological changes, including hypertrophy, proliferation, and modifications of glial networks); (2) phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways; (3) upregulation of adenosine triphosphate and chemokine receptors and hemichannels and downregulation of glutamate transporters; and (4) synthesis and release of glial mediators (eg, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases) to the extracellular space. Although widely detected in chronic pain resulting from nerve trauma, inflammation, cancer, and chemotherapy in rodents, and more recently, human immunodeficiency virus-associated neuropathy in human beings, glial reaction (activation state 1) is not thought to mediate pain sensitivity directly. Instead, activation states 2 to 4 have been demonstrated to enhance pain sensitivity via a number of synergistic neuro-glial interactions. Glial mediators have been shown to powerfully modulate excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission at presynaptic, postsynaptic, and extrasynaptic sites. Glial activation also occurs in acute pain conditions, and acute opioid treatment activates peripheral glia to mask opioid analgesia. Thus, chronic pain could be a result of “gliopathy,” that is, dysregulation of glial functions in the central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, we provide an update on recent advances and discuss remaining questions. PMID:23792284

  11. Pain in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: time for specific pain treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, J.; Crombez, G.; Meeus, M.; Knoop, H.; Damme, S.V.; Cauwenbergh, V.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Besides chronic fatigue, patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have debilitating widespread pain. Yet pain from CFS is often ignored by clinicians and researchers. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether pain is a unique feature of CFS, or does it share the same underlying mechanisms as

  12. Evidence based practice of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The patients with chronic pain are increasingly reporting to the physicians for its management. Chronic pain are associated with head, neck and shoulder pain, spinal pain, pain in the joints and extremities, complex regional pain syndrome and phantom pain. The chronic pain is being managed worldwide. The different specialty of medicine is producing a lot of evidence through the published literature but the same is not being published in the field of chronic pain management. Though some evidence is being reported as to different aspects of pain management from different parts of the world but same is lacking from Indian subcontinent. This is in contrast to much done clinical work in this field as well. We present here the available evidence in relation to chronic pain management.

  13. The Pharmacotherapy of Chronic Pain: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Lynch

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have contributed a large body of preclinical work that has assisted in our understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that cause chronic pain. In this context, it has been recognized that effective treatment of pain is a priority and that treatment often involves the use of one or a combination of agents with analgesic action. The current review presents an evidence-based approach to the pharmacotherapy of chronic pain. Medline searches were done for all agents used as conventional treatment in chronic pain. Published papers up to June 2005 were included. The search strategy included randomized, controlled trials, and where available, systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Further references were found in reference sections of papers located using the above search strategy. Agents for which there were no controlled trials supporting efficacy in treatment of chronic pain were not included in the present review, except in cases where preclinical science was compelling, or where initial human work has been positive and where it was thought the reader would be interested in the scientific evidence to date.

  14. Altered Pain Sensitivity in Elderly Women with Chronic Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthaikhup, Sureeporn; Prasert, Romchat; Paungmali, Aatit; Boontha, Kritsana

    2015-01-01

    Background Age-related changes occur in both the peripheral and central nervous system, yet little is known about the influence of chronic pain on pain sensitivity in older persons. The aim of this study was to investigate pain sensitivity in elders with chronic neck pain compared to healthy elders. Methods Thirty elderly women with chronic neck pain and 30 controls were recruited. Measures of pain sensitivity included pressure pain thresholds, heat/cold pain thresholds and suprathreshold heat pain responses. The pain measures were assessed over the cervical spine and at a remote site, the tibialis anterior muscle. Results Elders with chronic neck pain had lower pressure pain threshold over the articular pillar of C5-C6 and decreased cold pain thresholds over the cervical spine and tibialis anterior muscle when compared with controls (p pain thresholds and suprathreshold heat pain responses (p > 0.05). Conclusion The presence of pain hypersensitivity in elderly women with chronic neck pain appears to be dependent on types of painful stimuli. This may reflect changes in the peripheral and central nervous system with age. PMID:26039149

  15. Shared genetic factors underlie chronic pain syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Zavos, Helena M. S.; Lachance, Genevieve; Hammond, Christopher J.; Williams, Frances M. K.

    Chronic pain syndromes (CPS) are highly prevalent in the general population, and increasingly the evidence points to a common etiological pathway. Using a large cohort of twins (n = 8564) characterized for chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain (CWP), chronic pelvic pain (PP), migraine (MIG), dry

  16. Central sensitization in chronic low back pain: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzarello, Ilaria; Merlini, Luciano; Rosa, Michele Attilio; Perrone, Mariada; Frugiuele, Jacopo; Borghi, Raffaele; Faldini, Cesare

    2016-11-21

    Low back pain is one of the four most common disorders in all regions, and the greatest contributor to disability worldwide, adding 10.7% of total years lost due to this health state. The etiology of chronic low back pain is, in most of the cases (up to 85%), unknown or nonspecific, while the specific causes (specific spinal pathology and neuropathic/radicular disorders) are uncommon. Central sensitization has been recently recognized as a potential pathophysiological mechanism underlying a group of chronic pain conditions, and may be a contributory factor for a sub-group of patients with chronic low back pain. The purposes of this narrative review are twofold. First, to describe central sensitization and its symptoms and signs in patients with chronic pain disorders in order to allow its recognition in patients with nonspecific low back pain. Second, to provide general treatment principles of chronic low back pain with particular emphasis on pharmacotherapy targeting central sensitization.

  17. Multidimensional features of pain in patients with chronic neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabianna Resende de Jesus-Moraleida

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Chronic neck pain is associated with significant health costs and loss of productivity at work. Objective: to assess pain and disability in individuals with chronic neck pain. Methods: 31 volunteers with chronic neck pain, mean age 29, 65 years, were assessed using the McGill Pain Questionnaire in Brazilian version (Br-MPQ and Neck Disability Index (NDI. The Br-MPQ analysis was performed based on the numerical values associated with the words selected to describe the experience of pain (Pain Rating Index - PRI, and present pain intensity (PPI. NDI was used to evaluate the influence of neck pain in performance of everyday tasks. Finally, we investigated the association between PPI and NDI. Results: PRI revealed that the most significant dimension was the sensory pain (70%, and the number of chosen words was 10 (2,62 out of 20 words. Mean PPI value was 1,23 (0,76 in five points; 40% of participants described pain intensity as moderate. NDI score was 9,77 (3,34, indicating mild disability. There was a positive association between disability and pain intensity (r = 0,36; p =0,046. Pain intensity and duration of pain were not associated. Conclusions: Findings of this study identified important information related to neck pain experienced by patients when suffering from chronic neck pain, moreover, the association between disability and pain intensity reinforces the importance of complementary investigation of these aspects to optimize function in them.

  18. [Association between chronic pain and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Fernández, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The comorbidity integrated by chronic pain and depression is very common. The somatoform depressive symptoms appear often as diferent types of pain. Amon them premenstrual pain and fibromialgia are some of the most important clinical pictures. Chronic pain leads to depression as a consequence of these three kinds of factors: biomedical, psychosocial (passive attitude, disability) and pharmacological agents. Copping and acceptance of chronic pain is associated with lower pain intensity, less depression and less psychosocial disability. The appropriate use of analgesics in the management of chronic pain demands individualization. Several antidepressants have possitive effects on pain syndrom. Depression is underrecognized ad undertreated above all in patients with chronic pain. In order screening the depression seven ways are described here: personal and family history, type of the personality, clinic and evolutive aspects of somatoform symptom, search of other depressive symptoms and positive therapeutic effect determinated by an antidepressant.

  19. The role of helplessness, fear of pain, and passive pain-coping in chronic pain patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samwel, J.J.A.; Evers, A.W.M.; Crul, B.J.P.; Kraaimaat, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to examine the relative contribution of helplessness, fear of pain, and passive pain-coping to pain level, disability, and depression in chronic pain patients attending an interdisciplinary pain center. METHODS: One hundred sixty-nine chronic pain patients who

  20. Chronic widespread pain in spondyloarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pain associated with spondyloarthritis (SpA can be intense, persistent and disabling. It frequently has a multifactorial, simultaneously central and peripheral origin, and may be due to currently active inflammation, or joint damage and tissue destruction arising from a previous inflammatory condition. Inflammatory pain symptoms can be reduced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but many patients continue to experience moderate pain due to alterations in the mechanisms that regulate central pain, as in the case of the chronic widespread pain (CWP that characterises fibromyalgia (FM. The importance of distinguishing SpA and FM is underlined by the fact that SpA is currently treated with costly drugs such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF inhibitors, and direct costs are higher in patients with concomitant CWP or FM than in those with FM or SpA alone. Optimal treatment needs to take into account symptoms such as fatigue, mood, sleep, and the overall quality of life, and is based on the use of tricyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine, rather than adjustments in the dose of anti-TNF agents or disease-modifying drugs.

  1. Classification of Chronic Pain at a Multidisciplinary Pain Rehabilitation Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lidbeck

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To make a detailed diagnostic analysis of patients with chronic pain syndromes, including classification according to the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP.

  2. Neurophysiology of pain and hypnosis for chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Dillworth, Tiara; Mendoza, M Elena; Jensen, Mark P

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade there has been a dramatic increase in (1) understanding the neurophysiological components of the pain experiences, (2) randomized clinical trials testing the efficacy of hypnotic treatments on chronic pain, and (3) laboratory research examining the effects of hypnosis on the neurophysiological processes implicated in pain. Work done in these areas has not only demonstrated the efficacy of hypnosis for treating chronic pain but is beginning to shed light on neurophysiologica...

  3. Eating Disorders in Adolescents With Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Leslie A; Lebow, Jocelyn; Weiss, Karen; Harrison, Tracy; Bruce, Barbara

    Given that youth with chronic pain frequently experience disruptions in eating patterns that may place them at risk for disordered eating, the purpose of this study was to examine the clinical characteristics and illness course of adolescents with chronic pain and comorbid eating disorders. Using a retrospective chart review, 34 adolescents with chronic pain and concurrent eating disorders were identified. These adolescents were compared with 34 age-, gender-, and eating disorder symptom-matched adolescents who had an eating disorder without chronic pain. The majority of adolescents with chronic pain and an eating disorder had a primary medical diagnosis of abdominal pain (n = 14), followed by autonomic dysfunction (n = 10) and headache (n = 6). Although in 41.2% of teens with chronic pain, eating disorder symptoms developed after the onset of their pain, 35.3% reported having eating disorder symptoms before they experienced chronic pain. Body mass index did not differ between the groups, but the duration of eating disorder symptoms was significantly longer for the chronic pain group (p eating disorders are undetected for longer periods in patients with chronic pain, which may contribute to a poorer prognosis. Implications for eating disorder conceptualization, detection, and treatment are discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Management of chronic visceral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne E; Farmer, Adam D; Olesen, Søren S

    2016-01-01

    ' symptoms, adopting an empathic approach and taking time to educate patients. To optimize treatment and outcomes in chronic visceral pain we need to move away from approaches exclusively based on dealing with peripheral nociceptive input toward more holistic strategies, taking into account alterations...... and psychological interventions, thereby providing a mechanism-orientated approach to treatment. Patients can frequently become disenfranchised, and subsequently disengaged, with healthcare providers leading to repeated consultations. Thus, a key aspect of management is to break this cycle by validating patients...

  5. Cannabis and Cannabinoids for Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Sandoval, E Alfonso; Kolano, Ashley L; Alvarado-Vázquez, P Abigail

    2017-10-05

    The purpose of this study was to provide the most up-to-date scientific evidence of the potential analgesic effects, or lack thereof, of the marijuana plant (cannabis) or cannabinoids, and of safety or tolerability of their long-term use. We found that inhaled (smoked or vaporized) cannabis is consistently effective in reducing chronic non-cancer pain. Oral cannabinoids seem to improve some aspects of chronic pain (sleep and general quality of life), or cancer chronic pain, but they do not seem effective in acute postoperative pain, abdominal chronic pain, or rheumatoid pain. The available literature shows that inhaled cannabis seems to be more tolerable and predictable than oral cannabinoids. Cannabis or cannabinoids are not universally effective for pain. Continued research on cannabis constituents and improving bioavailability for oral cannabinoids is needed. Other aspects of pain management in patients using cannabis require further open discussion: concomitant opioid use, medical vs. recreational cannabis, abuse potential, etc.

  6. Mindfulness, acceptance and catastrophizing in chronic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike J de Boer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Catastrophizing is often the primary target of the cognitive-behavioral treatment of chronic pain. Recent literature on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT suggests an important role in the pain experience for the concepts mindfulness and acceptance. The aim of this study is to examine the influence of mindfulness and general psychological acceptance on pain-related catastrophizing in patients with chronic pain. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted, including 87 chronic pain patients from an academic outpatient pain center. RESULTS: The results show that general psychological acceptance (measured with the AAQ-II is a strong predictor of pain-related catastrophizing, independent of gender, age and pain intensity. Mindfulness (measured with the MAAS did not predict levels of pain-related catastrophizing. DISCUSSION: Acceptance of psychological experiences outside of pain itself is related to catastrophizing. Thus, acceptance seems to play a role in the pain experience and should be part of the treatment of chronic pain. The focus of the ACT treatment of chronic pain does not necessarily have to be on acceptance of pain per se, but may be aimed at acceptance of unwanted experiences in general. Mindfulness in the sense of "acting with awareness" is however not related to catastrophizing. Based on our research findings in comparisons with those of other authors, we recommend a broader conceptualization of mindfulness and the use of a multifaceted questionnaire for mindfulness instead of the unidimensional MAAS.

  7. Mechanism of Chronic Pain in Rodent Brain Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Ching

    Chronic pain is a significant health problem that greatly impacts the quality of life of individuals and imparts high costs to society. Despite intense research effort in understanding of the mechanism of pain, chronic pain remains a clinical problem that has few effective therapies. The advent of human brain imaging research in recent years has changed the way that chronic pain is viewed. To further extend the use of human brain imaging techniques for better therapies, the adoption of imaging technique onto the animal pain models is essential, in which underlying brain mechanisms can be systematically studied using various combination of imaging and invasive techniques. The general goal of this thesis is to addresses how brain develops and maintains chronic pain in an animal model using fMRI. We demonstrate that nucleus accumbens, the central component of mesolimbic circuitry, is essential in development of chronic pain. To advance our imaging technique, we develop an innovative methodology to carry out fMRI in awake, conscious rat. Using this cutting-edge technique, we show that allodynia is assoicated with shift brain response toward neural circuits associated nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex that regulate affective and cognitive component of pain. Taken together, this thesis provides a deeper understanding of how brain mediates pain. It builds on the existing body of knowledge through maximizing the depth of insight into brain imaging of chronic pain.

  8. Neurobiology of fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluka, Kathleen A; Clauw, Daniel J

    2016-12-03

    Fibromyalgia is the current term for chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain for which no alternative cause can be identified. The underlying mechanisms, in both human and animal studies, for the continued pain in individuals with fibromyalgia will be explored in this review. There is a substantial amount of support for alterations of central nervous system nociceptive processing in people with fibromyalgia, and that psychological factors such as stress can enhance the pain experience. Emerging evidence has begun exploring other potential mechanisms including a peripheral nervous system component to the generation of pain and the role of systemic inflammation. We will explore the data and neurobiology related to the role of the CNS in nociceptive processing, followed by a short review of studies examining potential peripheral nervous system changes and cytokine involvement. We will not only explore the data from human subjects with fibromyalgia but will relate this to findings from animal models of fibromyalgia. We conclude that fibromyalgia and related disorders are heterogenous conditions with a complicated pathobiology with patients falling along a continuum with one end a purely peripherally driven painful condition and the other end of the continuum is when pain is purely centrally driven. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Early visceral pain predicts chronic pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten Rune; Ording, Helle; Andersen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is related to postoperative pain during the first postoperative week, but it is unknown which components of the early pain response is important. In this prospective study, 100 consecutive patients were examined preoperatively, 1week postoperatively...

  10. [PAIN AND GUIDELINES FOR PAIN PREVENTION IN CHRONIC WOUND].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persoli-Gudelj, M; Lončarić-Katušin, M; Mišković, P

    2016-01-01

    This review article describes the occurrence of painful sensation with special reference to the occurrence of pain in chronic wounds, and presents recommendations for medical treatment of pain. Treatment is focused on pharmacotherapy. The recommended basis for rational use of analgesics is the WHO ‘three-degree’ scale. The need for combining pharmacotherapy with non-pharmacological treatment is also stressed. The positive effect of Visible Incoherent Polarized (VIP) light on the acceleration of chronic wound healing is highlighted.

  11. Chronic pain after childhood groin hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Kehlet, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to the well-described 10% risk of chronic pain affecting daily activities after adult groin hernia repair, chronic pain after childhood groin hernia repair has never been investigated. Studies of other childhood surgery before the age of 3 months suggest a risk of increased...... pain responsiveness later in life, but its potential relationship to chronic pain in adult life is unknown. METHODS: This was a nationwide detailed questionnaire study of chronic groin pain in adults having surgery for a groin hernia repair before the age of 5 years (n = 1075). RESULTS: The response...... the age of 3 months (n = 122) did not report groin pain more often or with higher intensity than other patients did. CONCLUSIONS: Groin pain in adult patients operated on for a groin hernia in childhood is uncommon and usually mild and occurs in relation to physical activity. Operation before the age of 3...

  12. Psychological flexibility and catastrophizing as associated change mechanisms during online Acceptance & Commitment Therapy for chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trompetter, H.R.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst Thomas; Fox, Gerardus J.A.; Schreurs, Karlein Maria Gertrudis

    2015-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural interventions for chronic pain need further clarification. The role of, and associations between, pain-related psychological flexibility (PF) and pain catastrophizing (PC) were examined during a randomized controlled trial on

  13. Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Pain Disorders in Head, Abdomen, Muscles and Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J. Friedrichsdorf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary pain disorders (formerly “functional pain syndromes” are common, under-diagnosed and under-treated in children and teenagers. This manuscript reviews key aspects which support understanding the development of pediatric chronic pain, points to the current pediatric chronic pain terminology, addresses effective treatment strategies, and discusses the evidence-based use of pharmacology. Common symptoms of an underlying pain vulnerability present in the three most common chronic pain disorders in pediatrics: primary headaches, centrally mediated abdominal pain syndromes, and/or chronic/recurrent musculoskeletal and joint pain. A significant number of children with repeated acute nociceptive pain episodes develop chronic pain in addition to or as a result of their underlying medical condition “chronic-on-acute pain.” We provide description of the structure and process of our interdisciplinary, rehabilitative pain clinic in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA with accompanying data in the treatment of chronic pain symptoms that persist beyond the expected time of healing. An interdisciplinary approach combining (1 rehabilitation; (2 integrative medicine/active mind-body techniques; (3 psychology; and (4 normalizing daily school attendance, sports, social life and sleep will be presented. As a result of restored function, pain improves and commonly resolves. Opioids are not indicated for primary pain disorders, and other medications, with few exceptions, are usually not first-line therapy.

  14. Electronic momentary assessment in chronic pain 1: psychological pain responses as predictors of pain intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorbi, M.J.; Peters, M.L.; Kruise, D.A.; Maas, C.J.M.; Kerssens, J.J.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bensing, J.

    Objectives and Methods: Electronic momentary assessment was employed to substantiate the relevance of psychological functioning in chronic pain. More than 7100 electronic diaries from 80 patients with varying IASP classified types of chronic pain served to investigate to what extent

  15. Unravelling the Relationship Between Parent and Child PTSD and Pediatric Chronic Pain: the Mediating Role of Pain Catastrophizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Alexandra; Soltani, Sabine; Pavlova, Maria; Noel, Melanie

    2018-02-01

    Clinically elevated rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are found among many youth with chronic pain and their parents and are linked to worse child pain outcomes. Conceptual models of mutual maintenance in pediatric PTSD and chronic pain posit that child and parent pain catastrophizing are key mechanisms underlying this co-occurrence. To our knowledge, the current study is the first to examine child and parent pain catastrophizing as potential mediators in the child PTSD-child pain and parent PTSD-child pain relationships among a cohort of youth with chronic pain. One hundred two children (72.5% female, mean age=13.5 years), recruited from a tertiary level chronic pain program, and 1 of their parents participated. At intake, parents completed psychometrically sound self-report measures of PTSD symptoms and catastrophizing about child pain. Children completed self-report measures of PTSD symptoms, pain catastrophizing, pain interference, and pain intensity. Findings revealed that relationships between child PTSD and child pain as well as parent PTSD and child pain were mediated by child (but not parent) pain catastrophizing. This suggests that children's catastrophic thinking about pain may explain how child and parent PTSD symptoms influence children's experience of chronic pain and is a potential target in family-based interventions to improve pain and mental health outcomes. Consistent with conceptual models of co-occurring PTSD and chronic pain, children's catastrophic thinking about child pain mediated relationships between parent and child PTSD symptoms and child chronic pain outcomes. Child pain catastrophizing may be a fruitful target in interventions to improve children's chronic pain and mental health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nonspecificity of Chronic Soft Tissue Pain Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldon Tunks

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent (or chronic pain occurs with a prevalence of about 10% in the adult population, and chronic soft tissue pain is especially problematic. Criteria for diagnosis of these soft tissue pain disorders appear to suffer from specificity problems, even though they appear to be sensitive in distinguishing normal from soft tissue pain sufferers. A few decades ago the term 'neuraesthenia' was used as a diagnosis in individuals who now would probably be diagnosed as suffering from fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and anxiety disorders with fatigue. Soft tissue pain provokes skepticism, especially among third-party payers, and controversy among clinicians. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated sex differences in the prevalence of widespread pain and multiple tender points, which are distributed variably throughout the adult population and tend to be correlated with subjective symptoms. Although there is a tendency for these syndromes to persist, follow-up studies show that they tend to vary in extent and sometimes show remissions over longer follow-up, casting doubt about the distinctions between chronic diffuse pains and localized chronic soft tissue pains. Because both accidents and soft tissue pains are relatively prevalent problems, the possibility of chance coincidence of accident and chronic soft tissue pain in an individual creates the need to be cautious in attributing these syndromes to specific accidents in medicolegal situations. At the same time, the available evidence does not support a generally dismissive attitude towards these patients.

  17. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength

  18. Review of occupational therapy for people with chronic pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robinson, Katie

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pain is a significant health-care problem. This review aims to critically analyse occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain and identify significant factors influencing the future development of occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain.

  19. Brain morphological signatures for chronic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan N Baliki

    Full Text Available Chronic pain can be understood not only as an altered functional state, but also as a consequence of neuronal plasticity. Here we use in vivo structural MRI to compare global, local, and architectural changes in gray matter properties in patients suffering from chronic back pain (CBP, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS and knee osteoarthritis (OA, relative to healthy controls. We find that different chronic pain types exhibit unique anatomical 'brain signatures'. Only the CBP group showed altered whole-brain gray matter volume, while regional gray matter density was distinct for each group. Voxel-wise comparison of gray matter density showed that the impact on the extent of chronicity of pain was localized to a common set of regions across all conditions. When gray matter density was examined for large regions approximating Brodmann areas, it exhibited unique large-scale distributed networks for each group. We derived a barcode, summarized by a single index of within-subject co-variation of gray matter density, which enabled classification of individual brains to their conditions with high accuracy. This index also enabled calculating time constants and asymptotic amplitudes for an exponential increase in brain re-organization with pain chronicity, and showed that brain reorganization with pain chronicity was 6 times slower and twice as large in CBP in comparison to CRPS. The results show an exuberance of brain anatomical reorganization peculiar to each condition and as such reflecting the unique maladaptive physiology of different types of chronic pain.

  20. Psychological Neuromodulatory Treatments for Young People with Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Miró

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of young people with chronic pain is a complex endeavor. Many of these youth do not obtain adequate relief from available interventions. Psychological neuromodulatory treatments have been shown to have potential benefit for adults with chronic pain. Here, we review and summarize the available information about the efficacy of three promising psychological neuromodulatory treatments—neurofeedback, meditation and hypnosis—when provided to young people with chronic pain. A total of 16 articles were identified and reviewed. The findings from these studies show that hypnotic treatments are effective in reducing pain intensity for a variety of pediatric chronic pain problems, although research suggests variability in outcomes as a function of the specific pain problem treated. There are too few studies evaluating the efficacy of neurofeedback or meditation training in young people with chronic pain to draw firm conclusions regarding their efficacy. However, preliminary data indicate that these treatments could potentially have positive effects on a variety of outcomes (e.g., pain intensity, frequency of pain episodes, physical and psychological function, at least in the short term. Clinical trials are needed to evaluate the effects of neurofeedback and meditation training, and research is needed to identify the moderators of treatment benefits as well as better understand the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of all three of these treatments. The findings from such research could enhance overall treatment efficacy by: (1 providing an empirical basis for better patient-treatment matching; and (2 identifying specific mechanisms that could be targeted with treatment.

  1. Hypnotherapy for the management of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Gary; Jensen, Mark P; Patterson, David R

    2007-07-01

    This article reviews controlled prospective trials of hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain. Thirteen studies, excluding studies of headaches, were identified that compared outcomes from hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain to either baseline data or a control condition. The findings indicate that hypnosis interventions consistently produce significant decreases in pain associated with a variety of chronic-pain problems. Also, hypnosis was generally found to be more effective than nonhypnotic interventions such as attention, physical therapy, and education. Most of the hypnosis interventions for chronic pain include instructions in self-hypnosis. However, there is a lack of standardization of the hypnotic interventions examined in clinical trials, and the number of patients enrolled in the studies has tended to be low and lacking long-term follow-up. Implications of the findings for future clinical research and applications are discussed.

  2. Hypnotherapy for the Management of Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Gary; Jensen, Mark P.; Patterson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews controlled prospective trials of hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain. Thirteen studies, excluding studies of headaches, were identified that compared outcomes from hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain to either baseline data or a control condition. The findings indicate that hypnosis interventions consistently produce significant decreases in pain associated with a variety of chronic-pain problems. Also, hypnosis was generally found to be more effective than nonhypnotic interventions such as attention, physical therapy, and education. Most of the hypnosis interventions for chronic pain include instructions in self-hypnosis. However, there is a lack of standardization of the hypnotic interventions examined in clinical trials, and the number of patients enrolled in the studies has tended to be low and lacking long-term follow-up. Implications of the findings for future clinical research and applications are discussed. PMID:17558718

  3. Osteomalacia as a Cause of Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Teasell

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomalacia is a form of metabolic bone disease that can present as chronic pain. A 36-year-old woman presented with a three-year history of bilateral leg and back pain, and proximal leg weakness. Repeated consultations and investigations failed to discover a cause for her pain, and a diagnosis of chronic benign pain was made. She was admitted to hospital where the bone scan, laboratory investigation and bone biopsy established a diagnosis of renal phosphate-wasting adult-onset rickets (osteomalacia. Radiographs of the hip and magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral femoral neck fractures and segmental, avascular necrosis of the femoral heads. The patient was treated with high dose phosphate and vitamin D with marked relief of pain. Osteomalacia should be considered in unusual cases of intractable chronic pain.

  4. Hostility and Anger in Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Oliveira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The affective component of pain incorporates various emotions, primarily negative in quality. A great emphasis has been traditionally given to the role of depression and anxiety in chronic pain. More recently, the focus has been directed towards hostility and anger, as fundamental components of the emotional experience of chronic pain. Objective: The aim of this article is to present a literature’s review about the association between chronic pain, anger and hostility. Discussion: Patients with several chronic disorders are characterized by high levels of trait anger and hostility. On the other hand, the manner in which angry feelings are typically handled (anger management style, especially the marked tendency to suppress or express angry feelings, is a particularly important determinant of the chronic pain severity. Conclusion: Hostility and anger are involved in the development, maintenance and treatment of chronic pain. Further research is needed to clarify its relationship with chronic pain and to evaluate the effects of anger management on treatment outcomes.

  5. Hostility and Anger in Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Ribeiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The affective component of pain incorporates various emotions, primarily negative in quality. A great emphasis has been traditionally given to the role of depression and anxiety in chronic pain. More recently, the focus has been directed towards hostility and anger, as fundamental components of the emotional experience of chronic pain. Objective: The aim of this article is to present a literature’s review about the association between chronic pain, anger and hostility. Discussion: Patients with several chronic disorders are characterized by high levels of trait anger and hostility. On the other hand, the manner in which angry feelings are typically handled (anger management style, especially the marked tendency to suppress or express angry feelings, is a particularly important determinant of the chronic pain severity. Conclusion: Hostility and anger are involved in the development, maintenance and treatment of chronic pain. Further research is needed to clarify its relationship with chronic pain and to evaluate the effects of anger management on treatment outcomes.

  6. Lamotrigine for acute and chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an update of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. Some antiepileptic medicines have a place in the treatment of neuropathic pain (pain due to nerve damage). This updated review adds five new additional studies looking at evidence for Lamotrigine as an effective treatment for acute and chronic pain. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of the antiepileptic drug lamotrigine in acute and chronic pain. Search methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of lamotrigine in acute, and chronic pain (including cancer pain) were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL up to January 2011. Additional studies were sought from the reference list of the retrieved papers. Selection criteria RCTs investigating the use of lamotrigine (any dose, by any route, and for any study duration) for the treatment of acute or chronic pain. Assessment of pain intensity or pain relief, or both, using validated scales. Participants were adults aged 18 and over. Only full journal publication articles were included. Data collection and analysis Dichotomous data (ideally for the outcome of at least 50% pain relief) were used to calculate relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. Meta-analysis was undertaken using a fixed-effect model. Numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNTs) were calculated as the reciprocal of the absolute risk reduction. For unwanted effects, the NNT becomes the number needed to harm (NNH) and was calculated. Main results Twelve included studies in 11 publications (1511 participants), all with chronic neuropathic pain: central post stroke pain (1), chemotherapy induced neuropathic pain (1), diabetic neuropathy (4), HIV related neuropathy (2), mixed neuropathic pain (2), spinal cord injury related pain (1), and trigeminal neuralgia (1); none investigated lamotrigine in acute pain. The update had five additional studies (1111 additional participants). Participants were aged between 26 and 77 years. Study duration

  7. Integrative medicine approach to chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teets, Raymond Y; Dahmer, Stephen; Scott, Emilie

    2010-06-01

    Chronic pain can be a frustrating condition for patient and clinician. The integrative medicine approach to pain can offer hope, adding safe complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies to mitigate pain and suffering. Such CAM therapies include nutrition, supplements and herbs, manual medicine, acupuncture, yoga, and mind-body approaches. The evidence is heterogeneous regarding these approaches, but some evidence suggests efficacy and confirms safety. The integrative medicine approach can be beneficial in a patient with chronic pain. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Goal Pursuit in Youth with Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Fisher

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Children and adolescents frequently experience chronic pain that can disrupt their usual activities and lead to poor physical and emotional functioning. The fear avoidance model of pain with an emphasis on the maladaptive behaviors that lead to activity avoidance has guided research and clinical practice. However, this model does not take into consideration variability in responses to pain, in particular the active pursuit of goals despite pain. This review aims to introduce a novel conceptualization of children’s activity engagement versus avoidance using the framework of goal pursuit. We propose a new model of Goal Pursuit in Pediatric Chronic Pain, which proposes that the child’s experience of pain is modified by child factors (e.g., goal salience, motivation/energy, pain-related anxiety/fear, and self-efficacy and parent factors (e.g., parent expectations for pain, protectiveness behaviors, and parent anxiety, which lead to specific goal pursuit behaviors. Goal pursuit is framed as engagement or avoidance of valued goals when in pain. Next, we recommend that research in youth with chronic pain should be reframed to account for the pursuit of valued goals within the context of pain and suggest directions for future research.

  9. Neuroimmunological mechanisms of chronic pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vyshlova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the mechanisms of chronic low back pain. Three pathophysiological mechanisms: nociceptive, neurogenic (neuropathic, and psychogenic are noted to be involved in the development of pain syndrome. The role of cellular and molecular changes in the posterior horn and in the somatosensory dysregulated mechanism of neuropathic pain is shown. Immunological processes, including neurohumoral (serotoninergic and hormonal (sex hormones and specific proteins ones, play an important role in the development of pain. The generalization and further study of these mechanisms are embodied in approaches to therapy for pain syndromes and hence these require analysis and further investigation. 

  10. Managing painful chronic wounds: the Wound Pain Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Patricia; Fogh, Karsten; Glynn, Chris

    2007-01-01

    of the pain experience: location, duration, intensity, quality, onset and impact on activities of daily living. Holistic management must be based on a safe and effective mix of psychosocial approaches together with local and systemic pain management. It is no longer acceptable to ignore or inadequately...... document persistent wound pain and not to develop a treatment and monitoring strategy to improve the lives of persons with chronic wounds. Unless wound pain is optimally managed, patient suffering and costs to health care systems will increase. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr...

  11. Interstitial Cystitis: Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Atuğ

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bladder of unknown etiology characterized by urinary frequency, urgency, nocturia and suprapubic pain. The syndrome presents differently in many patients, with the unifying factor being chronic pelvic pain and disruption of daily life activities.Although there are abundance of theories, the etiology of the condition remains unclear. This review focuses on recently published literature on the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis.

  12. Chronic pain: Model of psychosomatic disorder (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernus N.P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a detailed review on epidemiology, pathogenesis and interrelation of serotonin neuromedia-tor metabolism in the central nervous system in state of chronic pain and depression. It has been demonstrated that neurophysiological conditions serve as psychological defense of an individual. That mechanism has been proved to «transform» serious emotions onto the inner level (body and it assists in the development of psychosomatic disorders — chronic pain syndrome

  13. Differences in pain processing between patients with chronic low back pain, recurrent low back pain and fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Goubert, Dorien; Danneels, Lieven; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Descheemaeker, Filip; Coppieters, Iris; Meeus, Mira

    2017-01-01

    Background: The impairment in musculoskeletal structures in patients with low back pain (LBP) is often disproportionate to their complaint. Therefore, the need arises for exploration of alternative mechanisms contributing to the origin and maintenance of non-specific LBP. The recent focus has been on central nervous system phenomena in LBP and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the various symptoms and characteristics of chronic pain. Knowledge concerning changes in pain processing ...

  14. Easing Chronic Pain: Better Treatments and Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Easing Chronic Pain: Better Treatments and Medications Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. What Is Pain? You know it at once. It may be ...

  15. Neuroimaging revolutionizes therapeutic approaches to chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borsook David

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An understanding of how the brain changes in chronic pain or responds to pharmacological or other therapeutic interventions has been significantly changed as a result of developments in neuroimaging of the CNS. These developments have occurred in 3 domains : (1 Anatomical Imaging which has demonstrated changes in brain volume in chronic pain; (2 Functional Imaging (fMRI that has demonstrated an altered state in the brain in chronic pain conditions including back pain, neuropathic pain, and complex regional pain syndromes. In addition the response of the brain to drugs has provided new insights into how these may modify normal and abnormal circuits (phMRI or pharmacological MRI; (3 Chemical Imaging (Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy or MRS has helped our understanding of measures of chemical changes in chronic pain. Taken together these three domains have already changed the way in which we think of pain – it should now be considered an altered brain state in which there may be altered functional connections or systems and a state that has components of degenerative aspects of the CNS.

  16. School impairment in adolescents with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Deirdre E; Simons, Laura E; Stein, Michelle J; Chastain, Laura

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and describe school functioning among adolescents presenting for evaluation in a tertiary care pediatric chronic pain clinic. Adolescents (n = 220, aged 12-17) and their parents participated in the study, providing self-reported data on school attendance, school performance, and perceived academic competence. Participants' schools provided official attendance records, descriptions of accommodations implemented to address the student's pain problems in the school setting, and teacher ratings of academic competence. Results show that many adolescents with chronic pain miss a significant amount of school, experience a decline in grades, and perceive pain to interfere with their school success. Various indicators of school impairment are highly intercorrelated, suggesting that impairment or success in 1 domain is typically associated with similar patterns in other domains of school functioning. However, as a group, adolescents with pain are viewed by themselves and their teachers as academically competent. Strong correlations emerged between different reporters of school functioning indicators such as attendance, suggesting that reliance on parent or adolescent reporting may be sufficient when assessing these domains. Findings underscore the importance of broadly assessing school functioning in adolescents with chronic pain. This study extends our understanding of school functioning among adolescents with chronic pain. It highlights the need to assess both school attendance and performance in this population as well as how schools respond to pain problems. Devising summary indicators of school impairment can be useful in both clinical and research contexts.

  17. The impact of pain-related fear on neural pathways of pain modulation in chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lukas Meier

    2017-06-01

    Discussion:. Our findings might indicate a maladaptive psychobiological interaction in chronic LBP patients characterized by a disrupted amygdala-PAG-FC that is modulated by the degree of pain-related fear. These results shed new light on brain mechanisms underlying psychological factors that may have pronociceptive effects in chronic LBP.

  18. Stress-Induced Chronic Visceral Pain of Gastrointestinal Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Johnson, Anthony C.

    2017-01-01

    Visceral pain is generally poorly localized and characterized by hypersensitivity to a stimulus such as organ distension. In concert with chronic visceral pain, there is a high comorbidity with stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. The mechanisms linking visceral pain with these overlapping comorbidities remain to be elucidated. Evidence suggests that long term stress facilitates pain perception and sensitizes pain pathways, leading to a feed-forward cycle promoting chronic visceral pain disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Early life stress (ELS) is a risk-factor for the development of IBS, however the mechanisms responsible for the persistent effects of ELS on visceral perception in adulthood remain incompletely understood. In rodent models, stress in adult animals induced by restraint and water avoidance has been employed to investigate the mechanisms of stress-induce pain. ELS models such as maternal separation, limited nesting, or odor-shock conditioning, which attempt to model early childhood experiences such as neglect, poverty, or an abusive caregiver, can produce chronic, sexually dimorphic increases in visceral sensitivity in adulthood. Chronic visceral pain is a classic example of gene × environment interaction which results from maladaptive changes in neuronal circuitry leading to neuroplasticity and aberrant neuronal activity-induced signaling. One potential mechanism underlying the persistent effects of stress on visceral sensitivity could be epigenetic modulation of gene expression. While there are relatively few studies examining epigenetically mediated mechanisms involved in visceral nociception, stress-induced visceral pain has been linked to alterations in DNA methylation and histone acetylation patterns within the brain, leading to increased expression of pro-nociceptive neurotransmitters. This review will discuss the potential neuronal pathways and mechanisms responsible for stress

  19. Complementary medicine in chronic pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Charles A

    2015-05-01

    This article discusses several issues related to therapies that are considered "complementary" or "alternative" to conventional medicine. A definition of "complementary and alternative medicine" (CAM) is considered in the context of the evolving health care field of complementary medicine. A rationale for pain physicians and clinicians to understand these treatments of chronic pain is presented. The challenges of an evidence-based approach to incorporating CAM therapies are explored. Finally, a brief survey of the evidence that supports several widely available and commonly used complementary therapies for chronic pain is provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Frida Kahlo: Portrait of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Carol A; O'Hearn, Michael A; Franck, Carla C

    2017-01-01

    The Mexican artist Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) is one of the most celebrated artists of the 20th century. Although famous for her colorful self-portraits and associations with celebrities Diego Rivera and Leon Trotsky, less known is the fact that she had lifelong chronic pain. Frida Kahlo developed poliomyelitis at age 6 years, was in a horrific trolley car accident in her teens, and would eventually endure numerous failed spinal surgeries and, ultimately, limb amputation. She endured several physical, emotional, and psychological traumas in her lifetime, yet through her art, she was able to transcend a life of pain and disability. Of her work, her self-portraits are conspicuous in their capacity to convey her life experience, much of which was imbued with chronic pain. Signs and symptoms of chronic neuropathic pain and central sensitization of nociceptive pathways are evident when analyzing her paintings and medical history. This article uses a narrative approach to describe how events in the life of this artist contributed to her chronic pain. The purpose of this article is to discuss Frida Kahlo's medical history and her art from a modern pain sciences perspective, and perhaps to increase our understanding of the pain experience from the patient's perspective. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association.

  1. Anxiety and Related Factors in Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon JG Asmundson

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinicians often encounter patients who present with both chronic pain and elevated levels of anxiety. In some cases, the source of the anxiety is vague and diffuse. For others, there is an identifiable precipitating object, event or situation. For example, some patients with chronic pain are able to attribute their anxiety to the possibility of not regaining lost functional abilities, financial difficulties, feelings of social inadequacy, or uncertainty about the meaning and consequences of pain. The association between chronic pain and anxiety may not be particularly surprising when one considers that, in the acute phase, both pain and target-oriented anxiety (or fear motivate actions that serve to minimize the threat and maximize the likelihood of successful escape. As well, their neurobiology, while distinct, interacts in the reticular system (1. Evaluations of the association between chronic pain and fear-relevant constructs were initiated in the 1960s and 1970s (2,3. It has only been of late, however, that theorists and researchers have begun to focus their attention on delineating the precise nature of the relationship and its specific implications for the assessment and management of pain.

  2. Neurophysiology of pain and hypnosis for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillworth, Tiara; Mendoza, M Elena; Jensen, Mark P

    2012-03-01

    In the past decade there has been a dramatic increase in (1) understanding the neurophysiological components of the pain experiences, (2) randomized clinical trials testing the efficacy of hypnotic treatments on chronic pain, and (3) laboratory research examining the effects of hypnosis on the neurophysiological processes implicated in pain. Work done in these areas has not only demonstrated the efficacy of hypnosis for treating chronic pain but is beginning to shed light on neurophysiological processes that may play a role in its effectiveness. This paper reviews a selection of published studies from these areas of research, focusing on recent findings that have the most potential to inform both clinical work and research in this area. The paper concludes with research and clinical recommendations for maximizing treatment efficacy based on the research findings that are available.

  3. Biopsychosocial model of chronic recurrent pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatka Rakovec-Felser

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Pain is not merely a symptom of disease but a complex independent phenomenon where psychological factors are always present (Sternberg, 1973. Especially by chronic, recurrent pain it's more constructive to think of chronic pain as a syndrome that evolves over time, involving a complex interaction of physiological/organic, psychological, and behavioural processes. Study of chronic recurrent functional pain covers tension form of headache. 50 suffering persons were accidentally chosen among those who had been seeking medical help over more than year ago. We tested their pain intensity and duration, extent of subjective experience of accommodation efforts, temperament characteristics, coping strategies, personal traits, the role of pain in intra- and interpersonal communication. At the end we compared this group with control group (without any manifest physical disorders and with analyse of variance (MANOVA. The typical person who suffers and expects medical help is mostly a woman, married, has elementary or secondary education, is about 40. Pain, seems to appear in the phase of stress-induced psychophysical fatigue, by persons with lower constitutional resistance to different influences, greater irritability and number of physiologic correlates of emotional tensions. Because of their ineffective style of coping, it seems they quickly exhausted their adaptation potential too. Through their higher level of social–field dependence, reactions of other persons (doctor, spouse could be important factors of reinforcement and social learning processes. In managing of chronic pain, especially such as tension headache is, it's very important to involve bio-psychosocial model of pain and integrative model of treatment. Intra- and inter-subjective psychological functions of pain must be recognised as soon as possible.

  4. Contemporary Management of Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistro, Giuseppe; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Grabe, Magnus; Weidner, Wolfgang; Stief, Christian G; Nickel, J Curtis

    2016-02-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a common condition that causes severe symptoms, bother, and quality-of-life impact in the 8.2% of men who are believed to be affected. Research suggests a complex pathophysiology underlying this syndrome that is mirrored by its heterogeneous clinical presentation. Management of patients diagnosed with CP/CPPS has always been a formidable task in clinical practice. Due to its enigmatic etiology, a plethora of clinical trials failed to identify an efficient monotherapy. A comprehensive review of published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the treatment of CP/CPPS and practical best evidence recommendations for management. Medline and the Cochrane database were screened for RCTs on the treatment of CP/CPPS from 1998 to December 2014, using the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index as an objective outcome measure. Published data in concert with expert opinion were used to formulate a practical best evidence statement for the management of CP/CPPS. Twenty-eight RCTs identified were eligible for this review and presented. Trials evaluating antibiotics, α-blockers, anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating substances, hormonal agents, phytotherapeutics, neuromodulatory drugs, agents that modify bladder function, and physical treatment options failed to reveal a clear therapeutic benefit. With its multifactorial pathophysiology and its various clinical presentations, the management of CP/CPPS demands a phenotypic-directed approach addressing the individual clinical profile of each patient. Different categorization algorithms have been proposed. First studies applying the UPOINTs classification system provided promising results. Introducing three index patients with CP/CPPS, we present practical best evidence recommendations for management. Our current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying CP/CPPS resulting in this highly variable syndrome does not speak in favor of a

  5. Neuromodulatory treatments for chronic pain: efficacy and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P.; Day, Melissa A.; Miró, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain is common, and the available treatments do not provide adequate relief for most patients. Neuromodulatory interventions that modify brain processes underlying the experience of pain have the potential to provide substantial relief for some of these patients. The purpose of this Review is to summarize the state of knowledge regarding the efficacy and mechanisms of noninvasive neuromodulatory treatments for chronic pain. The findings provide support for the efficacy and positive side-effect profile of hypnosis, and limited evidence for the potential efficacy of meditation training, noninvasive electrical stimulation procedures, and neurofeedback procedures. Mechanisms research indicates that hypnosis influences multiple neurophysiological processes involved in the experience of pain. Evidence also indicates that mindfulness meditation has both immediate and long-term effects on cortical structures and activity involved in attention, emotional responding and pain. Less is known about the mechanisms of other neuromodulatory treatments. On the basis of the data discussed in this Review, training in the use of self-hypnosis might be considered a viable ‘first-line’ approach to treat chronic pain. More-definitive research regarding the benefits and costs of meditation training, noninvasive brain stimulation and neurofeedback is needed before these treatments can be recommended for the treatment of chronic pain. PMID:24535464

  6. [Pathophysiology of chronic pain. Classification of three subtypes of pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyron, Roland

    2013-06-01

    Pain is a physiological sensation which aim is to alert for an upcoming danger that may threaten the individual. This system includes peripheral nociceptors that initiate the nociceptive message. Then, the information is conveyed to the brain through the spinothalamic tract that projects to the thalamus, insula, SII and other areas. In clinical situations, a dysfunction of this nociceptive system explains chronic pain that can be simply classified into 3 subtypes according to pathophysiological mechanisms. Case 1: the nociceptive system is functioning normally, and provides (appropriately) a pain message that informs the brain of a local inflammation, or cancer, or infection... This is the situation of chronic pain because of an excess of nociception. Case 2: there is a (past or present) lesion of the nervous system that induces a dysfunction in the pain system. This is the neuropathic pain. Case 3: between the two former cases, there is no evidence for a lesion in the nociceptive system, and there are no evidences for lesion at the peripheral level, but there are evidences of dysregulation(s). These are the cases of dysfunctional pain.

  7. Opioid Therapy for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell K Portenoy

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term administration of an opioid drug for chronic nonmalignant pain continues to be controversial, but is no longer uniformly rejected by pain specialists. This is true despite concerns that the regulatory agencies that oversee physician prescribing of opioid drugs continue to stigmatize the practice. The changing clinical perspective has been driven, in part, by widespread acknowledgement of the remarkably favourable outcomes achieved during opioid treatment of cancer pain. These outcomes contrast starkly with popular teaching about chronic opioid therapy and affirm the potential for prolonged efficacy, tolerable side effects, enhanced function associated with improved comfort and minimal risk of aberrant drug-related behaviours consistent with addiction. A large anecdotal experience in populations with nonmalignant pain suggests that these patients are more heterogeneous and that opioid therapy will greatly benefit some and will contribute to negative outcomes for others. The few controlled clinical trials that have been performed support the safety and efficacy of opioid therapy, but have been too limited to ensure generalization to the clinical setting. A critical review of the medical literature pertaining to chronic pain, opioid pharmacology and addiction medicine can clarify misconceptions about opioid therapy and provide a foundation for patient selection and drug administration. The available data support the view that opioids are no panacea for chronic pain, but should be considered in carefully selected patients using clinically derived guidelines that stress a structured approach and ongoing monitoring of efficacy, adverse effects, functional outcomes and the occurrence of aberrant drug-related behaviours.

  8. Chronic pain management in pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, F; Valensise, H; Sacco, M; Allegri, M

    2014-02-01

    During pregnancy most of women will experience some kind of pain, either as a result of a pre-existing condition (low back pain, headache, fibromyalgia, and rheumatoid arthritis) or as a direct consequence of pregnancy (weight gain, postural changes, pelvic floor dysfunction, hormonal factors). However, chronic pain management during pregnancy and lactation remains a challenge for clinicians and pregnant women are at risk of undertreatment for painful conditions, because of fear about use of drugs during pregnancy. Few analgesic drugs have been demonstrated to be absolutely contraindicated during pregnancy and breastfeeding, but studies in pregnant women are not available for most of pain medications. The aim of this paper is to review the safety profile in pregnancy or lactation of the commonly prescribed pain medications and non-pharmacological treatments. In addition to the conventional classifications from the Food and Drug Administration and the American Academy of Paediatrics, authors analyzed the currently available clinical data from literature.

  9. Physical deconditioning in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Ivan; Parra, José-Hernán; Duvallet, Alain

    2009-03-01

    To establish the level of cardiorespiratory fitness and the rate of decrease in maximal aerobic capacity according to age in patients with chronic low back pain and compare these with normative data. Prospective case series with historical controls. Seventy patients with chronic low back pain. A maximal cycle ergometer protocol was used to measure VO2max, heart rate, respiratory exchange ratio and blood lactate levels. Seventy patients achieved absolute and normalized for weight VO2max values of 2.17 (standard deviation (SD) 0.65) l/min and 30.79 (SD 7.77) ml/kg/min, respectively. Absolute VO2max was poorly related to age in both men and women with chronic low back pain (r = -0.22 and r = -0.28, respectively). VO2max normalized for weight was also inversely related to age in both men and women (r = -0.36 and r = -0.42, respectively). The rate of VO2max decline between 20 and 59 years was -3.3 ml/kg/min/decade for the entire population and -1.2 and -5.4 ml/kg/min/decade in men and women, respectively. The level of physical fitness of patients with chronic low back pain is comparable to the physical fitness of healthy, but poorly conditioned subjects. Patients with chronic low back pain show a VO2max decline with ageing that is slower than of active subjects.

  10. Latent profile analysis of pelvic floor muscle pain in patients with chronic pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, B W; Grey, S F; Armstrong, A; McCarroll, M; Von Gruenigen, V

    2013-02-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a syndrome of related diagnoses including pain originating from the muscles of the pelvic floor. The objective of this study was to evaluate which muscles are important to examine, in what manner pelvic floor muscle pain contributes to patients' pain experience, or what thresholds should be applied to identify significant pelvic floor muscle pain by comparing exam findings with outcome measures A total of 428 patients meeting the definition for CPP were evaluated using a standardized physical examination of the abdominal wall, pelvic floor, and vestibule along with the 12 domain Patient Reported Outcome Measures Information System (PROMIS). These scores were evaluated for unidimensionality followed by latent profile analysis. The areas under the receiver operator characteristic curves were used to identify the best pain threshold for each muscle. The eight pelvic floor muscle sites all loaded onto a single factor, separate from other areas examined. Two latent classes were found within all the variables. Patients in the severe pelvic floor pain class had significantly worse pain related PROMIS scores. Optimal thresholds for identifying significant pelvic floor pain ranged between 3 and 5. Pain in the pelvic floor muscles is distinguishable from pain in the abdominal wall and vulva. Any of the lateral muscle sites evaluated can be used to identify patients with significant pelvic floor pain. Two latent classes of CPP patients were identified: those with limited and those with severe pain, as identified by moderate to severe pelvic floor tenderness.

  11. Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Chronic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Peter; Petersen, Marian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This randomized controlled clinical trial investigated the effects of mindfulness meditation on chronic pain. DESIGN: A total of 109 patients with nonspecific chronic pain were randomized to either a standardized mindfulness meditation program (mindfulness-based stress reduction [MBSR......]) or to a wait list control. METHODS: Pain, physical function, mental function, pain acceptance, and health-related quality of life were measured. The SF36 vitality scale was chosen as the primary outcome measure; the primary end point was after completing the MBSR course. Within a 2.5-year period, 43 of the 109...... randomized patients completed the mindfulness program, while 47 remained in the control group. Data were compared at three time points: at baseline, after completion of the course/waiting period, and at the 6-month follow-up. RESULTS: Significant effect (Cohen's d = 0.39) was found on the primary outcome...

  12. [Suburethral sling removal due to chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, P; Hensel, G; Škorničková, Z; Košťál, M

    2017-01-01

    To point out one possible complication after suburethral tape insertion. To present methods of treatment, especially partial or total removal of the tape. Few successful cases of treatment are shown in case reports. Case report. Department of obstetrics and gynecology, Pardubice hospital. Chronic pain after insertion of suburethral tape is a rare complication. There are several possible causes, such as tape erosion with chronic inflamation, post-colposuspension syndrome, myo-fascial syndrome, nerve damage during tape implantation or due to overproduction of fibrous tissue. Partial or total tape removal is needed when the conservative treatment fails. Patients may remain continent or a new tape is placed. Pain relief is usually complete but there are times when additional treatment is needed. Sling removal is a successful method of treating chronic pain after suburethral tape insertion. Patients describe plain relief and improvement of quality of life.

  13. Chronic Pain and Neuropathy Following Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventzel, Lise; Madsen, Caspar S; Karlsson, Páll

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine symptoms and characteristics of chronic sensory neuropathy in patients treated with oxaliplatin and docetaxel, including patterns of somatosensory abnormalities, pain descriptors, and psychological functioning. Design: A retrospective cross-sectional study. Setting......: A chronic pain research center. Subjects: Thirty-eight patients with chronic peripheral pain and/or dysesthesia following chemotherapy. Methods:  Sensory profiles, psychological functioning, and quality of life were assessed using standardized questionnaires. In addition, standardized quantitative sensory...... with decreased mechanical and vibration detection thresholds. A high frequency of abnormalities in thermal sensory limen and the presence of paradoxical heat sensation seem to be sensitive markers of small fiber loss. Both groups had mainly sensory, axonal large fiber or mixed fiber polyneuropathy, which tended...

  14. Chronic Widespread Back Pain is Distinct From Chronic Local Back Pain: Evidence From Quantitative Sensory Testing, Pain Drawings, and Psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Andreas; Eich, Wolfgang; Janke, Susanne; Leisner, Sabine; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Tesarz, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    Whether chronic localized pain (CLP) and chronic widespread pain (CWP) have different mechanisms or to what extent they overlap in their pathophysiology is controversial. The study compared quantitative sensory testing profiles of nonspecific chronic back pain patients with CLP (n=48) and CWP (n=29) with and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients (n=90) and pain-free controls (n = 40). The quantitative sensory testing protocol of the "German-Research-Network-on-Neuropathic-Pain" was used to measure evoked pain on the painful area in the lower back and the pain-free hand (thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds, vibration threshold, pain sensitivity to sharp and blunt mechanical stimuli). Ongoing pain and psychometrics were captured with pain drawings and questionnaires. CLP patients did not differ from pain-free controls, except for lower pressure pain threshold (PPT) on the back. CWP and FMS patients showed lower heat pain threshold and higher wind-up ratio on the back and lower heat pain threshold and cold pain threshold on the hand. FMS showed lower PPT on back and hand, and higher comorbidity of anxiety and depression and more functional impairment than all other groups. Even after long duration CLP presents with a local hypersensitivity for PPT, suggesting a somatotopically specific sensitization of nociceptive processing. However, CWP patients show widespread ongoing pain and hyperalgesia for different stimuli that is generalized in space, suggesting the involvement of descending control systems, as also suggested for FMS patients. Because mechanisms in nonspecific chronic back pain with CLP and CWP differ, these patients should be distinguished in future research and allocated to different treatments.

  15. Validity of electrical stimulus magnitude matching in chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Ann L; Westermark, Sofia; Merrick, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the validity of the PainMatcher in chronic pain. DESIGN: Comparison of parallel pain estimates from visual analogue scales with electrical stimulus magnitude matching. PATIENTS: Thirty-one patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. METHODS: Twice a day ongoing pain was rated...

  16. Surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Dejan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The principal indication for surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis is intractable pain. Depending upon the presence of dilated pancreatic ductal system, pancreatic duct drainage procedures and different kinds of pancreatic resections are applied. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to show the most appropriate procedure to gain the most possible benefits in dependence of type of pathohistological process in chronic pancreatitis. METHOD: Our study included 58 patients with intractable pain caused by chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic genesis. The first group consisted of 30 patients with dilated pancreatic ductal system more than 10 mm. The second group involved 28 patients without dilated pancreatic ductal system. Pain relief, weight gain and glucose tolerance were monitored. RESULTS: All patients of Group I (30 underwent latero-lateral pancreaticojejunal - Puestow operation. 80% of patients had no pain after 6 month, 13.6% had rare pain and 2 patients, i.e. 6.4%, who continued to consume alcohol, had strong pain. Group II consisting of 28 patients was without dilated pancreatic ductal system. This group was subjected to various types of pancreatic resections. Whipple procedure (W was done in 6 patients, pylorus preserving Whipple (PPW in 7 cases, and duodenum preserving cephalic pancreatectomy (DPCP was performed in 15 patients. Generally, 89.2% of patients had no pain 6 month after the operation. An average weight gain was 1.9 kg in W group, 2.8 kg in PPW group and 4.1 kg in DPCP group. Insulin-dependent diabetes was recorded in 66.6% in W group, 57.1% in PPW group and 0% in DPCP group. CONCLUSION: According to our opinion, DPCP may be considered the procedure of choice for surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis in patients without dilatation of pancreas ductal system because of no serious postoperative metabolic consequences.

  17. Prevalence of sleep disturbance in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, S; Karaman, T; Dogru, S; Onder, Y; Citil, R; Bulut, Y E; Tapar, H; Sahin, A; Arici, S; Kaya, Z; Suren, M

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is a vital function for human beings, which can be affected by several factors. Chronic pain is one of these factors where it is the most frequent cause for seeking medical care in combination with insomnia. The aim of this study is to examine the prevalence and relationship between sleep disturbance and chronic pain. After approval, a total of 85 Family Medicine Units from over 170 in Tokat were randomly selected using a 50% sampling. A sample of 2635 subjects, over the age of 19 years, who were registered with the selected Family Medicine Units, were assessed due to gender, age group, and the urban/rural population size of Tokat using the stratified sampling method. The sample size distribution was calculated as 1515 urban subjects, 1120 rural subjects; 1345 female subjects, 1290 male subjects; 1123 subjects between 20-39 years of age, 1103 subjects between the ages of 40-64, and 409 subjects over 64 years of age. After sampling, subjects were invited to participate in the study via an invitation letter, and agreeing individuals were taken to the Family Medicine Unit for face-to-face meetings. Written, informed consent was obtained, along with demographic data. The presence of chronic pain was recorded. According to the presence of chronic pain, all subjects were separated into two groups as Group Chronic Pain and Group Non-Chronic Pain. The visual analog scale for pain intensity, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index for sleep quality, were performed with all subjects. A multiple linear regression model was used to assess the predictors of sleep quality. Analyses were conducted using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences program (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA), version 20.0. The statistical significance for all analyses was set at p 5. A moderate positive correlation was found between the global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Visual Analog Scale scores (r = 0.310, p < 0.01). A multiple linear regression analysis showed that age, gender, income, Visual

  18. Cannabis for Chronic Pain: Challenges and Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Sandoval, E Alfonso; Fincham, Jack E; Kolano, Ashley L; Sharpe, Brandi; Alvarado-Vázquez, P Abigail

    2018-04-10

    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has found substantial evidence that cannabis (plant) is effective for the treatment of chronic pain in adults, and moderate evidence that oromucosal cannabinoids (extracts, especially nabiximols) improve short-term sleep disturbances in chronic pain. The paradoxical superiority of the cannabis plant over cannabinoid molecules represents a challenge for the medical community and the established processes that define modern pharmacy. The expanding and variable legalization of cannabis in multiple states nationwide represents an additional challenge for patients and the medical community because recreational and medicinal cannabis are irresponsibly overlapped. Cannabis designed for recreational use (containing high levels of active ingredients) is increasingly available to patients with chronic pain who do not find relief with current pharmacologic entities, which exposes patients to potential harm. This article analyzes the available scientific evidence to address controversial questions that the current state of cannabis poses for health-care professionals and chronic pain patients, and sets the basis for a more open discussion about the role of cannabis in modern medicine for pain management. A critical discussion on these points, the legal status of cannabis, and considerations for healthcare providers is presented. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN SYNDROME: A PSYCHOPATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Kryuchkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS is a chronic pain disease with high prevalence rates. The etiology and pathogenesis of this problem remains poorly understood. No uniform solitary treatment is known for CPPS. As a result, a multimodal approach is most likely to demonstrate benefit for this disease. An interdisciplinary classification system is commonly used (UPOINT which includes psychosocial domain. Nevertheless, psychosocial and psychopathological influences on CPPS only recently became a research focus. This literature review investigated the association of personality traits, mental disorders with the baseline clinical characteristics of patients with CPPS. We aimed to synthesize the existing data and to identify further research topics.

  20. Overlapping Chronic Pain Conditions: Implications for Diagnosis and Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maixner, William; Fillingim, Roger B; Williams, David A; Smith, Shad B; Slade, Gary D

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing recognition that many if not most common chronic pain conditions are heterogeneous with a high degree of overlap or coprevalence of other common pain conditions along with influences from biopsychosocial factors. At present, very little attention is given to the high degree of overlap of many common pain conditions when recruiting for clinical trials. As such, many if not most patients enrolled into clinical studies are not representative of most chronic pain patients. The failure to account for the heterogeneous and overlapping nature of most common pain conditions may result in treatment responses of small effect size when these treatments are administered to patients with chronic overlapping pain conditions (COPCs) represented in the general population. In this brief review we describe the concept of COPCs and the putative mechanisms underlying COPCs. Finally, we present a series of recommendations that will advance our understanding of COPCs. This brief review describes the concept of COPCs. A mechanism-based heuristic model is presented and current knowledge and evidence for COPCs are presented. Finally, a set of recommendations is provided to advance our understanding of COPCs. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cholelithiasis presented as chronic right back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobé-Armant, Francesc; Buil-Arasanz, Maria Eugenia; Trubat-Muñoz, Griselda; Llor-Vilà, Carles; Vicente-Guillen, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Chronic right back pain is a symptom in both biliary lithiasis and chronic cholecystitis. Ten percent of the population in the world suffers from biliary lithiasis. Only 20% are symptomatic. The first diagnostic test of choice is an abdominal ultrasound. When a suggestive clinical sign of biliary colic with negative abdominal ultrasound is identified, we should consider the option of carrying out an endoscopic ultrasound in order to rule out microlithiasis. The case discussed in the report presented with chronic right back pain, which is an atypical manifestation of biliary lithiasis and chronic cholecystitis. It is important to know about the atypical manifestations of the prevalent illnesses as well as the limits of the diagnostic tests, in order to avoid diagnostic delays which may cause complications that could worsen a patient's prognosis. This case should contribute to the medical knowledge and must have educational value or highlight the need for a change in clinical practice, especially in primary care.

  2. Electronic diary assessment of pain-related fear, attention to pain, and pain intensity in chronic low back pain patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, J.; Peters, M.L.; Patijn, J.; Schouten, E.G.; Vlaeyen, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between pain-related fear, attention to pain, and pain intensity in daily life in patients with chronic low back pain. An experience sampling methodology was used in which electronic diary data were collected by means of palmtop computers from 40

  3. Temporomandibular disorders, headaches and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2015-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are a major cause of non-dental orofacial pain with a suggested prevalence of 3% to 5% in the general population. TMDs present as unilateral or bilateral pain centered round the pre-auricular area and can be associated with clicking and limitation in jaw movements. It is important to ascertain if there are other comorbid factors such as headaches, widespread chronic pain and mood changes. A biopsychosocial approach is crucial with a careful explanation and self-care techniques encouraged.

  4. Effect of pain chronification and chronic pain on an endogenous pain modulation circuit in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J; Lamana, S M S; Dias, E V; Athie, M; Parada, C A; Tambeli, C H

    2015-02-12

    We tested the hypothesis that chronic pain development (pain chronification) and ongoing chronic pain (chronic pain) reduce the activity and induce plastic changes in an endogenous analgesia circuit, the ascending nociceptive control. An important mechanism mediating this form of endogenous analgesia, referred to as capsaicin-induced analgesia, is its dependence on nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptor mechanisms. Therefore, we also investigated whether pain chronification and chronic pain alter the requirement for nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptor mechanisms in capsaicin-induced analgesia. We used an animal model of pain chronification in which daily subcutaneous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) injections into the rat's hind paw for 14 days, referred to as the induction period of persistent hyperalgesia, induce a long-lasting state of nociceptor sensitization referred to as the maintenance period of persistent hyperalgesia, that lasts for at least 30 days following the cessation of the PGE2 treatment. The nociceptor hypersensitivity was measured by the shortening of the time interval for the animal to respond to a mechanical stimulation of the hind paw. We found a significant reduction in the duration of capsaicin-induced analgesia during the induction and maintenance period of persistent mechanical hyperalgesia. Intra-accumbens injection of the μ-opioid receptor selective antagonist Cys(2),Tyr(3),Orn(5),Pen(7)amide (CTOP) 10 min before the subcutaneous injection of capsaicin into the rat's fore paw blocked capsaicin-induced analgesia. Taken together, these findings indicate that pain chronification and chronic pain reduce the duration of capsaicin-induced analgesia, without affecting its dependence on nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptor mechanisms. The attenuation of endogenous analgesia during pain chronification and chronic pain suggests that endogenous pain circuits play an important role in the development and maintenance of chronic pain. Copyright © 2014 IBRO

  5. Cholelithiasis Presented as Chronic Right Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Bob?-Armant, Francesc; Buil-Arasanz, Maria Eugenia; Trubat-Mu?oz, Griselda; Llor-Vil?, Carles; Vicente-Guillen, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Chronic right back pain is a symptom in both biliary lithiasis and chronic cholecystitis. Ten percent of the population in the world suffers from biliary lithiasis. Only 20% are symptomatic. The first diagnostic test of choice is an abdominal ultrasound. When a suggestive clinical sign of biliary colic with negative abdominal ultrasound is identified, we should consider the option of carrying out an endoscopic ultrasound in order to rule out microlithiasis. The case discussed in the report pr...

  6. Chronic widespread pain : clinical comorbidities and psychological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burri, Andrea; Ogata, Soshiro; Vehof, Jelle; Williams, Frances

    Recent studies have provided consistent evidence for a genetic influence on chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aim of this study was to investigate (1) the etiological structure underlying CWP by examining the covariation between CWP and psychological comorbidities and psychoaffective correlates and

  7. Altered resting state EEG in chronic pancreatitis patients: toward a marker for chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Jongsma, M.L.A.; Broeke, E.N. van den; Arns, M.W.; Goor, H. van; Rijn, C.M. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Electroencephalography (EEG) may be a promising source of physiological biomarkers accompanying chronic pain. Several studies in patients with chronic neuropathic pain have reported alterations in central pain processing, manifested as slowed EEG rhythmicity and increased EEG power in

  8. Neurodegenerative Properties of Chronic Pain: Cognitive Decline in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, M.L.A.; Postma, S.A.E.; Souren, P.M.; Arns, M.W.; Gordon, E.; Vissers, K.C.P.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Rijn, C.M. van; Goor, H. van

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain has been associated with impaired cognitive function. We examined cognitive performance in patients with severe chronic pancreatitis pain. We explored the following factors for their contribution to observed cognitive deficits: pain duration, comorbidity (depression, sleep disturbance),

  9. Beyond pain: modeling decision-making deficits in chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Emanuel Hess

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Risky decision-making seems to be markedly disrupted in patients with chronic pain, probably due to the high cost that impose pain and negative mood on executive control functions. Patients’ behavioral performance on decision-making tasks such as the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT is characterized by selecting cards more frequently from disadvantageous than from advantageous decks, and by switching often between competing responses in comparison with healthy controls. In the present study, we developed a simple heuristic model to simulate individuals’ choice behavior by varying the level of decision randomness and the importance given to gains and losses. The findings revealed that the model was able to differentiate the behavioral performance of patients with chronic pain and healthy controls at the group, as well as at the individual level. The best fit of the model in patients with chronic pain was yielded when decisions were not based on previous choices and when gains were considered more relevant than losses. By contrast, the best account of the available data in healthy controls was obtained when decisions were based on previous experiences and losses loomed larger than gains. In conclusion, our model seems to provide useful information to measure each individual participant extensively, and to deal with the data on a participant-by-participant basis.

  10. Beyond pain: modeling decision-making deficits in chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Leonardo Emanuel; Haimovici, Ariel; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Montoya, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Risky decision-making seems to be markedly disrupted in patients with chronic pain, probably due to the high cost that impose pain and negative mood on executive control functions. Patients’ behavioral performance on decision-making tasks such as the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is characterized by selecting cards more frequently from disadvantageous than from advantageous decks, and by switching often between competing responses in comparison with healthy controls (HCs). In the present study, we developed a simple heuristic model to simulate individuals’ choice behavior by varying the level of decision randomness and the importance given to gains and losses. The findings revealed that the model was able to differentiate the behavioral performance of patients with chronic pain and HCs at the group, as well as at the individual level. The best fit of the model in patients with chronic pain was yielded when decisions were not based on previous choices and when gains were considered more relevant than losses. By contrast, the best account of the available data in HCs was obtained when decisions were based on previous experiences and losses loomed larger than gains. In conclusion, our model seems to provide useful information to measure each individual participant extensively, and to deal with the data on a participant-by-participant basis. PMID:25136301

  11. Pain adaptability in individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain is not associated with conditioned pain modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Dawn Wong Lit; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Wang, Kelun

    2018-01-01

    (MSK). CPTs at 2°C and 7°C were used to assess the status of pain adaptability in participants with either chronic non-specific low back pain or knee osteoarthritis. The participants' potency of conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and local inhibition were measured. The strengths of pain adaptability...... at both CPTs were highly correlated. PA and PNA did not differ in their demographics, pain thresholds from thermal and pressure stimuli, or potency of local inhibition or CPM. PA reached their maximum pain faster than PNA (t41=-2.76, p... days whereas PNA did not (F (6,246) = 3.01, p = 0.01). The dichotomy of pain adaptability exists in MSK patients. Consistent with the healthy human study, the strength of pain adaptability and potency of CPM are not related. Pain adaptability could be another form of endogenous pain inhibition which...

  12. EAU Guidelines on Chronic Pelvic Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fall, Magnus; Baranowski, Andrew P.; Elneil, Sohier; Engeler, Daniel; Hughes, John; Messelink, Embert J.; Oberpenning, Frank; Williams, Amanda C. de C.

    Context: These guidelines were prepared on behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU) to help urologists assess the evidence-based management of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and to incorporate the recommendations into their clinical practice. Objective: To revise guidelines for the diagnosis,

  13. Millon Behavioral Health Inventory norms for chronic pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, E E; Goldberg, M; Fishbain, D; Rosomoff, H; Steele-Rosomoff, R

    1989-05-01

    The Millon Behavioral Health Inventory (MBHI) is being used more widely in pain treatment settings; however, normative data on a large sample of chronic pain patients have not been published. In the present study, norms were established for 247 chronic pain patients. The chronic pain patient norms then were compared statistically to norms for non-medical population. Overall, the results showed that the score distributions for chronic pain patients and normals were similar on most MBHI scales. The differences that were found are consistent with other research on pain patients and indicate that chronic pain patients are more likely to be depressed and anxious. Differences in scales between chronic pain patients and controls may be explained by state vs. trait factors. In evaluating chronic pain patients by personality tests, one needs to keep in mind state-trait problems and their potential influence on test results.

  14. Personality disparity in chronic regional and widespread pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Chung; Chen, Po-Fei; Lung, For-Wey

    2017-08-01

    Chronic pain has high comorbidity with psychiatric disorders, therefore, better understanding of the relationship between chronic pain and mental illness is needed. This study aimed to investigate the pathway relationships among parental attachment, personality characteristics, alexithymic trait and mental health in patients with chronic widespread pain, those with chronic regional pain, and controls. Two hundred and thirty participants were recruited. The parental Bonding Inventory, Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI), 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), Chinese Health Questionnaire, and Short-Form 36 were filled out. The pathway relationships revealed that patients of mothers who were more protective were more neurotic, had more difficulty identifying feelings (DIF), worse mental health, and a higher association with chronic widespread pain. No differences were found between patients with chronic regional pain and the controls. The predisposing factors for chronic widespread pain, when compared with chronic regional pain, may be more closely related to psychiatric disorders. The pathways to chronic regional pain and chronic widespread pain differ, with neuroticism and the alexithymic DIF trait being the main factors defining chronic widespread pain. Therefore, besides therapies targeting pain symptoms, psychiatric consultation, medication and psychotherapy are also recommended for those with chronic widespread pain to alleviate their mental health conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Art Therapy for Chronic Pain: Applications and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angheluta, Anne-Marie; Lee, Bonnie K.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is acknowledged as a phenomenological experience resulting from biological, psychological, and social interactions. Consequently, treatment for this complex and debilitating health phenomenon is often approached from multidisciplinary and biopsychosocial perspectives. One approach to treating chronic pain involves implementing…

  16. Social, Psychological, and Medical Aspects of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Jayne A.; Clark, Donald W.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses certain factors that contribute to the development of chronic pain. Psychosocial factors are explored with a summary of their implications for treatment. Medical treatment for chronic pain is reviewed and holistic treatment is surveyed. (Author)

  17. Chronic Pain in Canada: Have We Improved Our Management of Chronic Noncancer Pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Boulanger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP is a global issue, not only affecting individual suffering, but also impacting the delivery of health care and the strength of local economies.

  18. Management of chronic pain using complementary and integrative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lucy; Michalsen, Andreas

    2017-04-24

    Complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) encompasses both Western-style medicine and complementary health approaches as a new combined approach to treat a variety of clinical conditions. Chronic pain is the leading indication for use of CIM, and about 33% of adults and 12% of children in the US have used it in this context. Although advances have been made in treatments for chronic pain, it remains inadequately controlled for many people. Adverse effects and complications of analgesic drugs, such as addiction, kidney failure, and gastrointestinal bleeding, also limit their use. CIM offers a multimodality treatment approach that can tackle the multidimensional nature of pain with fewer or no serious adverse effects. This review focuses on the use of CIM in three conditions with a high incidence of chronic pain: back pain, neck pain, and rheumatoid arthritis. It summarizes research on the mechanisms of action and clinical studies on the efficacy of commonly used CIM modalities such as acupuncture, mind-body system, dietary interventions and fasting, and herbal medicine and nutrients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Investigation of Chronic Pain Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    GROUP patient group/primary diagnosis 0=healthy control; 1= fibromyalgia ; 2=migraine; 3=TBI-chronic pain; 4=TBI+chronic pain HC healthy control 0 OR 1...FIBRO Diagnosis of fibromyalgia 0 OR 1 MIG Diagnosis of migraine 0 OR 1 TBI Diagnosis of TBI 0 OR 1 CPtbi Diagnosis of chronic pain resulting from...to those in other chronic pain states such as migraine and fibromyalgia when controlled for co-morbid insomnia, depression and PTSD. The study groups

  20. Effects of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) on non-specific chronic back pain: a randomized controlled trial with additional exploration of the underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesarz, Jonas; Gerhardt, Andreas; Leisner, Sabine; Janke, Susanne; Hartmann, Mechthild; Seidler, Günther H; Eich, Wolfgang

    2013-08-30

    Non-specific chronic back pain (CBP) is often accompanied by psychological trauma, but treatment for this associated condition is often insufficient.Nevertheless, despite the common co-occurrence of pain and psychological trauma, a specific trauma-focused approach for treating CBP has been neglected to date. Accordingly, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), originally developed as a treatment approach for posttraumatic stress disorders, is a promising approach for treating CBP in patients who have experienced psychological trauma.Thus, the aim of this study is to determine whether a standardized, short-term EMDR intervention added to treatment as usual (TAU) reduces pain intensity in CBP patients with psychological trauma vs. TAU alone. The study will recruit 40 non-specific CBP patients who have experienced psychological trauma. After a baseline assessment, the patients will be randomized to either an intervention group (n = 20) or a control group (n = 20). Individuals in the EMDR group will receive ten 90-minute sessions of EMDR fortnightly in addition to TAU. The control group will receive TAU alone. The post-treatment assessments will take place two weeks after the last EMDR session and six months later.The primary outcome will be the change in the intensity of CBP within the last four weeks (numeric rating scale 0-10) from the pre-treatment assessment to the post-treatment assessment two weeks after the completion of treatment.In addition, the patients will undergo a thorough assessment of the change in the experience of pain, disability, trauma-associated distress, mental co-morbidities, resilience, and quality of life to explore distinct treatment effects. To explore the mechanisms of action that are involved, changes in pain perception and pain processing (quantitative sensory testing, conditioned pain modulation) will also be assessed.The statistical analysis of the primary outcome will be performed on an intention-to-treat basis

  1. Pain catastrophizing, physiological indexes, and chronic pain severity: tests of mediation and moderation models

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, Brandy; Burns, John W.; Quartana, Phillip J.; Lofland, Kenneth; Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y.

    2008-01-01

    Catastrophizing about pain is related to elevated pain severity and poor adjustment among chronic pain patients, but few physiological mechanisms by which pain catastrophizing maintains and exacerbates pain have been explored. We hypothesized that resting levels of lower paraspinal muscle tension and/or lower paraspinal and cardiovascular reactivity to emotional arousal may: (a) mediate links between pain catastrophizing and chronic pain intensity; (b) moderate these links such that only pati...

  2. Somatosensory symptoms and signs and conditioned pain modulation in chronic post-stroke shoulder pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosink, M.; Renzenbrink, G.J.; Buitenweg, J.R.; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.; IJzerman, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Persistent shoulder pain is a common complication after stroke. Its etiology and underlying mechanisms are not well understood and treatment is generally unsatisfactory. The objective of this study was to assess the role of central sensitization and disinhibition in chronic stroke patients with

  3. Chronic post-thoracotomy pain: a retrospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluijms, W.A.; Steegers, M.A.H.; Verhagen, A.F.T.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is common after thoracotomy. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the incidence of chronic post-thoracotomy pain. The secondary goal was to identify possible risk factors associated with the development of chronic post-operative pain. METHODS: We contacted 255

  4. Perspectives on Music Imagery and complex chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sanfi, Ilan; Christensen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the article is to examine the concept of chronic pain as a complex phenomenon and to highlight the potential role of music therapy – in particular, music imagery – in the treatment of chronic pain. Theories of pain, along with research on pain pathways and pain control in the nervous system, support the evidence from clinical practice that music interventions can alleviate the sensation of pain whilst also offering a pleasant aesthetic experience. Music therapy provides opportuniti...

  5. An improved behavioural assay demonstrates that ultrasound vocalizations constitute a reliable indicator of chronic cancer pain and neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Deepitha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On-going pain is one of the most debilitating symptoms associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders. An understanding of mechanisms underlying on-going pain, i.e. stimulus-independent pain has been hampered so far by a lack of behavioural parameters which enable studying it in experimental animals. Ultrasound vocalizations (USVs have been proposed to correlate with pain evoked by an acute activation of nociceptors. However, literature on the utility of USVs as an indicator of chronic pain is very controversial. A majority of these inconsistencies arise from parameters confounding behavioural experiments, which include novelty, fear and stress due to restrain, amongst others. Results We have developed an improved assay which overcomes these confounding factors and enables studying USVs in freely moving mice repetitively over several weeks. Using this improved assay, we report here that USVs increase significantly in mice with bone metastases-induced cancer pain or neuropathic pain for several weeks, in comparison to sham-treated mice. Importantly, analgesic drugs which are known to alleviate tumour pain or neuropathic pain in human patients significantly reduce USVs as well as mechanical allodynia in corresponding mouse models. Conclusions We show that studying USVs and mechanical allodynia in the same cohort of mice enables comparing the temporal progression of on-going pain (i.e. stimulus-independent pain and stimulus-evoked pain in these clinically highly-relevant forms of chronic pain.

  6. Electronic momentary assessment in chronic pain (I): pain and psychological pain responses as predictors of pain intensity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorbi, M.J.; Peters, M.L.; Kruise, D.A.; Maas, C.J.M.; Kerssens, J.J.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bensing, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives and Methods: Electronic momentary assessment was employed to substantiate the relevance of psychological functioning in chronic pain. More than 7100 electronic diaries from 80 patients with varying IASP classified types of chronic pain served to investigate to what extent fear-avoidance,

  7. Early maladaptive schema factors, chronic pain and depressiveness: a study with 271 chronic pain patients and 331 control participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saariaho, Tom; Saariaho, Anita; Karila, Irma; Joukamaa, Matti

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain and depression are coexisting entities with high simultaneous prevalence. Both are linked with early adversities. Early maladaptive schemas (EMS) can be seen as a reflection of these adversities. EMSs extensively indicate underlying psychic patterns and provide a good opportunity to detect covert processes and psychic shapes (latent factors), which create the basis of how people rate their schemas. The purpose of this study was to explore these latent, higher order schema factors (SF) and to find out how they are associated with pain intensity or depression in chronic pain patients and a control sample. The study subjects consisted of 271 first-visit pain patients and 331 control participants. Sociodemographic and pain data were gathered by questionnaire; 18 EMSs were measured with the Young Schema Questionnaire (short form) and depressiveness was measured with the Beck Depression Inventory, Version II. Exploratory factor and regression analyses were used. The chronic pain patient group showed two SFs. The first SF showed a shameful, defective, socially isolated, failure, emotionally inhibited, deprived, submissive and resigned pattern. The second SF showed a demanding, approval seeking, self-sacrificing and punitive pattern. SF1 predicted more than half of the depressiveness in the pain patient sample. A three-factor structure was found in the control sample, and SFs 1 and 3 together predicted almost one-third of depressiveness. The pain patient and the control groups had a different, higher order factor structure. We assume that SF1 in the pain patients reflected a rather serious, undefined early psychic trauma and was also associated with their depressiveness. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Electronic momentary assessment in chronic pain (II): pain and psychological pain responses as predictors of pain disability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorbi, M.J.; Peters, M.L.; Kruise, D.A.; Maas, C.J.M.; Kerssens, J.J.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bensing, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives and Methods: More than 7,100 electronic diaries from 80 patients with chronic pain (mean: 89.3, range 30-115) entered multilevel analyses to establish the statistical prediction of disability by pain intensity and by psychological functioning (fear avoidance, cognitive, and spousal pain

  9. Differences in Pain Processing Between Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain, Recurrent Low Back Pain, and Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubert, Dorien; Danneels, Lieven; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Descheemaeker, Filip; Meeus, Mira

    2017-05-01

    The impairment in musculoskeletal structures in patients with low back pain (LBP) is often disproportionate to their complaint. Therefore, the need arises for exploration of alternative mechanisms contributing to the origin and maintenance of non-specific LBP. The recent focus has been on central nervous system phenomena in LBP and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the various symptoms and characteristics of chronic pain. Knowledge concerning changes in pain processing in LBP remains ambiguous, partly due to the diversity in the LBP population. The purpose of this study is to compare quantitative sensory assessment in different groups of LBP patients with regard to chronicity. Recurrent low back pain (RLBP), mild chronic low back pain (CLBP), and severe CLBP are compared on the one hand with healthy controls (HC), and on the other hand with fibromyalgia (FM) patients, in which abnormal pain processing has previously been reported. Cross-sectional study. Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium. Twenty-three RLBP, 15 mild CLBP, 16 severe CLBP, 26 FM, and 21 HC participated in this study. Quantitative sensory testing was conducted by manual pressure algometry and computer-controlled cuff algometry. A manual algometer was used to evaluate hyperalgesia as well as temporal summation of pain and a cuff algometer was used to evaluate deep tissue hyperalgesia, the efficacy of the conditioned pain modulation and spatial summation of pain. Pressure pain thresholds by manual algometry were significantly lower in FM compared to HC, RLBP, and severe CLBP. Temporal summation of pain was significantly higher in FM compared to HC and RLBP. Pain tolerance thresholds assessed by cuff algometry were significantly lower in FM compared to HC and RLBP and also in severe CLBP compared to RLBP. No significant differences between groups were found for spatial summation or conditioned pain modulation. No psychosocial issues were taken into account for this

  10. Chronic pain, perceived stress, and cellular aging: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibille Kimberly T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic pain conditions are characterized by significant individual variability complicating the identification of pathophysiological markers. Leukocyte telomere length (TL, a measure of cellular aging, is associated with age-related disease onset, psychosocial stress, and health-related functional decline. Psychosocial stress has been associated with the onset of chronic pain and chronic pain is experienced as a physical and psychosocial stressor. However, the utility of TL as a biological marker reflecting the burden of chronic pain and psychosocial stress has not yet been explored. Findings The relationship between chronic pain, stress, and TL was analyzed in 36 ethnically diverse, older adults, half of whom reported no chronic pain and the other half had chronic knee osteoarthritis (OA pain. Subjects completed a physical exam, radiographs, health history, and psychosocial questionnaires. Blood samples were collected and TL was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. Four groups were identified characterized by pain status and the Perceived Stress Scale scores: 1 no pain/low stress, 2 no pain/high stress, chronic pain/low stress, and 4 chronic pain/high stress. TL differed between the pain/stress groups (p = 0.01, controlling for relevant covariates. Specifically, the chronic pain/high stress group had significantly shorter TL compared to the no pain/low stress group. Age was negatively correlated with TL, particularly in the chronic pain/high stress group (p = 0.03. Conclusions Although preliminary in nature and based on a modest sample size, these findings indicate that cellular aging may be more pronounced in older adults experiencing high levels of perceived stress and chronic pain.

  11. Looking ahead: chronic spinal pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkin-Smith GF

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gregory F Parkin-Smith,1,2 Stephanie J Davies,3–5 Lyndon G Amorin-Woods2,61General Practice, Dunsborough WA, Australia; 2School of Health Professions, Murdoch University, Perth, WA, Australia; 3Private Practice Pain Medicine, Painless Clinic, Perth, WA, Australia; 4School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia; 5School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Bentley, WA, Australia; 6Private Chiropractic Practice, Canning Vale, WA, AustraliaThe other day, we oversaw a seminar on pain management for a local consumer pain group, where all consumers (patients in attendance were experiencing chronic, persistent spinal pain. Each person had a unique story, and their experience and perceived cause of their pain differed. The quality of life in all these consumers was markedly reduced, which was the only clear similarity, confirming that there may be some similarities in the pain experience, but the pain experience was more often unique and individual. These consumers’ criticisms of care services were consistent, however, with dissatisfaction with their access to care and overall management of their pain. They described variable and often difficult access, limited continuity of care, they were often not taken seriously by health care providers, they received scant information about chronic pain and its prognosis and there were often noteworthy variations in the treatment they received. We agree that these criticisms are commonplace and a frequent gripe directed at health care practitioners about the “system.”1 Moreover, the problems associated with care delivery are confounded by a number of patient/consumer factors, such as lifestyle habits, nutrition, body weight, depression, health literacy, geographical isolation and poor socioeconomic conditions, making the management of persistent pain even more complicated.2 There is no doubt that, in the future, matching the care service and

  12. Medication Treatment Efficacy and Chronic Orofacial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Glenn T; Padilla, Mariela; Dionne, Raymond

    2016-08-01

    Chronic pain in the orofacial region has always been a vexing problem for dentists to diagnose and treat effectively. For trigeminal neuropathic pain, there are 3 medications (gabapentinoids, tricyclic antidepressants, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors) to use plus topical anesthetics that have therapeutic efficacy. For chronic daily headaches (often migraine in origin), 3 prophylactic medications have reasonable therapeutic efficacy (β-blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, and antiepileptic drugs). The 3 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs for fibromyalgia (pregabalin, duloxetine, and milnacipran) are not robust, with poor efficacy. For osteroarthritis, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have therapeutic efficacy and when gastritis contraindicates them, corticosteriod injections are helpful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pain education to prevent chronic low back pain: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeger, Adrian C; Moseley, G Lorimer; Hübscher, Markus; Lee, Hopin; Skinner, Ian W; Nicholas, Michael K; Henschke, Nicholas; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Blyth, Fiona M; Main, Chris J; Hush, Julia M; Pearce, Garry; McAuley, James H

    2014-06-02

    Low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Of those patients who present to primary care with acute LBP, 40% continue to report symptoms 3 months later and develop chronic LBP. Although it is possible to identify these patients early, effective interventions to improve their outcomes are not available. This double-blind (participant/outcome assessor) randomised controlled trial will investigate the efficacy of a brief educational approach to prevent chronic LBP in 'at-risk' individuals. Participants will be recruited from primary care practices in the Sydney metropolitan area. To be eligible for inclusion participants will be aged 18-75 years, with acute LBP (free period and at-risk of developing chronic LBP. Potential participants with chronic spinal pain and those with suspected serious spinal pathology will be excluded. Eligible participants who agree to take part will be randomly allocated to receive 2×1 h sessions of pain biology education or 2×1 h sessions of sham education from a specially trained study physiotherapist. The study requires 101 participants per group to detect a 1-point difference in pain intensity 3 months after pain onset. Secondary outcomes include the incidence of chronic LBP, disability, pain intensity, depression, healthcare utilisation, pain attitudes and beliefs, global recovery and recurrence and are measured at 1 week post-intervention, and at 3, 6 and 12 months post LBP onset. Ethical approval was obtained from the University of New South Wales Human Ethics Committee in June 2013 (ref number HC12664). Outcomes will be disseminated through publication in peer-reviewed journals and presentations at international conference meetings. https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?ACTRN=12612001180808. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. The relationship between chronic musculoskeletal pain, anxiety and mindfulness: Adjustments to the Fear-Avoidance Model of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Katherine B; Norris, Deborah

    2017-10-01

    The Fear-Avoidance Model of Chronic Pain proposed by Vlaeyen and Linton states individuals enter a cycle of chronic pain due to predisposing psychological factors, such as negative affectivity, negative appraisal or anxiety sensitivity. They do not, however, address the closely related concept of anxious rumination. Although Vlaeyen and Linton suggest cognitive-behavioral treatment methods for chronic pain patients who exhibit pain-related fear, they do not consider mindfulness treatments. This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP), ruminative anxiety and mindfulness to determine if (1) ruminative anxiety is a risk factor for developing chronic pain and (2) mindfulness is a potential treatment for breaking the cycle of chronic pain. Middle-aged adults ages 35-50 years (N=201) with self-reported CMP were recruited online. Participants completed standardized questionnaires assessing elements of chronic pain, anxiety, and mindfulness. Ruminative anxiety was positively correlated with pain catastrophizing, pain-related fear and avoidance, pain interference, and pain severity but negatively correlated with mindfulness. High ruminative anxiety level predicted significantly higher elements of chronic pain and significantly lower level of mindfulness. Mindfulness significantly predicted variance (R 2 ) in chronic pain and anxiety outcomes. Pain severity, ruminative anxiety, pain catastrophizing, pain-related fear and avoidance, and mindfulness significantly predicted 70.0% of the variance in pain interference, with pain severity, ruminative anxiety and mindfulness being unique predictors. The present study provides insight into the strength and direction of the relationships between ruminative anxiety, mindfulness and chronic pain in a CMP population, demonstrating the unique associations between specific mindfulness factors and chronic pain elements. It is possible that ruminative anxiety and mindfulness should be

  15. Stereotyped perceptions of chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Østergaard

    2010-01-01

    Artiklen undersøger hvordan stærke sociale stereotyper former socialarbejderes tilgang til hjælpesøgende borgere. Den empiriske analyse fokuserer på betydningen af 'deservingness' kriterier, samt på hvordan paternalistiske og følelsesmæssige argumenter bliver brugt af socialarbejdere til at retfæ......Artiklen undersøger hvordan stærke sociale stereotyper former socialarbejderes tilgang til hjælpesøgende borgere. Den empiriske analyse fokuserer på betydningen af 'deservingness' kriterier, samt på hvordan paternalistiske og følelsesmæssige argumenter bliver brugt af socialarbejdere til...... at retfærdiggøre stereotype kategoriseringer....

  16. Accounting for the Association Between BPD Features and Chronic Pain Complaints in a Pain Patient Sample: The Role of Emotion Dysregulation Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Caleb J; Carpenter, Ryan W; Tragesser, Sarah L

    2017-02-16

    Although borderline personality disorder (BPD) features consistently show strong relations with chronic pain, the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. BPD is characterized by dysregulated emotion. Given previously observed relationships between emotion dysregulation and pain, we hypothesized that components of this dysregulation-elevated and labile negative affect and emotion sensitivity-would account for the relationship between BPD features and various pain complaints in a chronic pain patient sample. Specifically, we hypothesized that negative affect would indirectly predict pain through higher emotion sensitivity to pain, operationalized as pain anxiety sensitivity. To test these hypotheses, we administered a series of self-report measures to 147 patients at a chronic pain treatment facility. As expected, BPD features predicted pain severity (β = .19, p = .029), activity interference from pain (β = .22, p = .015), and affective interference from pain (β = .41, p BPD features and pain severity and interference were accounted for by serial indirect pathways through affective lability then pain anxiety and, to a lesser extent, through trait anxiety then pain anxiety. This is the first study to demonstrate roles for affective lability and pain anxiety sensitivity in the association between BPD features and chronic pain complaints in a chronic pain sample. We discuss implications for the relationship between dysregulated emotion and pain as well as for psychologically-focused treatment interventions for pain. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Nordic walking and chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Hartvigsen, Jan; Puggaard, Lis

    2006-01-01

    activity provide similar benefits. Nordic Walking is a popular and fast growing type of exercise in Northern Europe. Initial studies have demonstrated that persons performing Nordic Walking are able to exercise longer and harder compared to normal walking thereby increasing their cardiovascular metabolism....... Until now no studies have been performed to investigate whether Nordic Walking has beneficial effects in relation to low back pain. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether supervised Nordic Walking can reduce pain and improve function in a population of chronic low back pain patients...... when compared to unsupervised Nordic Walking and advice to stay active. In addition we investigate whether there is an increase in the cardiovascular metabolism in persons performing supervised Nordic Walking compared to persons who are advised to stay active. Finally, we investigate whether...

  18. Implicit associations between pain and self-schema in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri M L; De Houwer, Jan; Van Bockstaele, Bram; Van Damme, Stefaan; De Schryver, Maarten; Crombez, Geert

    2013-12-01

    Chronic pain often interferes with daily functioning, and may become a threat to an individual's sense of self. Despite the development of a recent theoretical account focussing upon the relationship between the presence of chronic pain and a person's self, research investigating this idea is limited. In the present study we aimed to (1) compare the strength of association between self- and pain schema in patients with chronic pain and healthy control subjects and (2) research whether the strength of association between self- and pain-schema is related to particular pain-related outcomes and individual differences of patients with chronic pain. Seventy-three patients with chronic pain (M(age) = 49.95; SD = 9.76) and 53 healthy volunteers (M(age) = 48.53; SD = 10.37) performed an Implicit Association Test (IAT) to assess the strength of association between pain- and self-schema. Patients with chronic pain also filled out self-report measures of pain severity, pain suffering, disability, depression, anxiety, acceptance, and helplessness. Results indicated that the pain- and self-schema were more strongly associated in patients with chronic pain than in healthy control subjects. Second, results indicated that, in patients with chronic pain, a stronger association between self- and pain-schema, as measured with the IAT, is related to a heightened level of pain severity, pain suffering, anxiety, and helplessness. Current findings give first support for the use of an IAT to investigate the strength of association between self- and pain-schema in patients with chronic pain and suggest that pain therapies may incorporate techniques that intervene on the level of self-pain enmeshment. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Sickle Cell Disease Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampier, Carlton; Palermo, Tonya M; Darbari, Deepika S; Hassell, Kathryn; Smith, Wally; Zempsky, William

    2017-05-01

    Pain in sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and high health care costs. Although episodic acute pain is the hallmark of this disorder, there is an increasing awareness that chronic pain is part of the pain experience of many older adolescents and adults. A common set of criteria for classifying chronic pain associated with SCD would enhance SCD pain research efforts in epidemiology, pain mechanisms, and clinical trials of pain management interventions, and ultimately improve clinical assessment and management. As part of the collaborative effort between the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations Innovations Opportunities and Networks public-private partnership with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the American Pain Society, the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations Innovations Opportunities and Networks-American Pain Society Pain Taxonomy initiative developed the outline of an optimal diagnostic system for chronic pain conditions. Subsequently, a working group of experts in SCD pain was convened to generate core diagnostic criteria for chronic pain associated with SCD. The working group synthesized available literature to provide evidence for the dimensions of this disease-specific pain taxonomy. A single pain condition labeled chronic SCD pain was derived with 3 modifiers reflecting different clinical features. Future systematic research is needed to evaluate the feasibility, validity, and reliability of these criteria. An evidence-based classification system for chronic SCD pain was constructed for the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations Innovations Opportunities and Networks-American Pain Society Pain Taxonomy initiative. Applying this taxonomy may improve assessment and management of SCD pain and accelerate research on epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatments for chronic SCD pain. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  20. Descending inhibitory pain modulation is impaired in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olesen, S.S.; Brock, C.; Krarup, A.L.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Arendt-Nielsen, L.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drewes, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Pain is a prominent symptom in chronic pancreatitis (CP), but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. We investigated the role of descending pain modulation from supraspinal structures as well as central nervous system sensitization in patients with pain from CP.

  1. Comparing pain severity vs. pain location in the MOBILIZE Boston Study: Chronic pain and lower extremity function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggermont, L.H.P.; Bean, J.F.; Guralnik, J.M.; Leveille, S.G.

    2009-01-01

    Background. This study compared measures of chronic pain, for example, number of pain sites and overall pain severity, in relation to lower extremity function in the older population. Methods. Six hundred older adults (mean age 77.9 years, 64% female) were queried about presence of chronic pain.

  2. Cholelithiasis presented as chronic right back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Bobé-Armant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic right back pain is a symptom in both biliary lithiasis and chronic cholecystitis. Ten percent of the population in the world suffers from biliary lithiasis. Only 20% are symptomatic. The first diagnostic test of choice is an abdominal ultrasound. When a suggestive clinical sign of biliary colic with negative abdominal ultrasound is identified, we should consider the option of carrying out an endoscopic ultrasound in order to rule out microlithiasis. The case discussed in the report presented with chronic right back pain, which is an atypical manifestation of biliary lithiasis and chronic cholecystitis. It is important to know about the atypical manifestations of the prevalent illnesses as well as the limits of the diagnostic tests, in order to avoid diagnostic delays which may cause complications that could worsen a patient′s prognosis. This case should contribute to the medical knowledge and must have educational value or highlight the need for a change in clinical practice, especially in primary care.

  3. Perceived stereotyping and seeking care for chronic vulvar pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ruby H N; Turner, Rachael M; Rydell, Sarah A; Maclehose, Richard F; Harlow, Bernard L

    2013-10-01

    We examined stereotyping of chronic pain sufferers among women aged 18-40 years and determined whether perceived stereotyping affects seeking care for women with chronic vulvar pain. Cross-sectional study using a community-based survey of vulvodynia asking if "Doctors think that people with chronic pain exaggerate their pain," and if "People believe that vulvar pain is used as an excuse to avoid having sex". Twelve thousand eight hundred thirty-four women aged 18-40 years in metropolitan Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota. Women were considered to have a history of chronic vulvar pain if they reported vulvar burning lasting more than 3 months or vulvar pain on contact. Four thousand nine hundred eighty-seven (38.9%) women reported a chronic pain condition; 1,651 had chronic vulvar pain. Women experiencing chronic pain were more likely than those without to perceive stereotyping from both doctors and others; a dose-response with the number of pain conditions existed. Women with chronic vulvar pain were more likely to believe that people think vulvar pain is an excuse to avoid intercourse. Half of the women with chronic vulvar pain did not seek medical care for it; of these, 40.4% perceived stereotyping from doctors. However, it was women who actually sought care (45.1%) who were more likely to feel stigmatized by doctors (adjusted relative risk = 1.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.23). Perceived negative stereotyping among chronic pain sufferers is common, particularly negative perceptions about physicians. In fact, chronic vulvar pain sufferers who felt stigmatized were more likely to have sought care than those who did not feel stigmatized. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Chronic Pain Among Homeless Persons with Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Marc; Frank, Anastasia; Choi, Fiona; Strehlau, Verena; Nikoo, Nooshin; Nikoo, Mohammadali; Hwang, Stephen W; Somers, Julian; Krausz, Michael R; Schütz, Christian G

    2017-12-01

    Chronic pain is an important public health issue. However, characteristics and needs of marginalized populations have received limited attention. Studies on prevalence and correlates of chronic pain among homeless persons are lacking. We assessed chronic pain among homeless persons with mental illness in the At Home/Chez Soi study. Cross-sectional data from a randomized controlled trial on homelessness and mental health. Data collected between 2009 and 2013 in three Canadian cities. One thousand two hundred eighty-seven homeless persons with mental illness. Data on chronic pain and utilization of prescribed and nonprescribed interventions was assessed using a chronic pain screening instrument. Mental illness was diagnosed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Forty-three percent reported moderate to severe chronic pain, interfering with general daily activities (80%), sleep (78%), and social interactions (61%). Multivariate analysis indicated that increasing age and diagnoses of major depressive disorder, mood disorder with psychotic features, panic disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were independent predictors of chronic pain. Chronic pain was further associated with increased suicidality. Among participants reporting chronic pain, 64% had sought medical treatment and 56% treated pain with prescribed drugs, while 38% used illicit drugs for pain relief. Chronic pain is very common among homeless persons with mental illness and affects activities of daily living. Clinicians treating this population should be aware of the common connections between chronic pain, depression, panic disorder, PTSD, and substance use. While the data indicate the contribution of chronic pain to complex treatment needs, they also indicate a clear treatment gap. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Chronic pain patients' perspectives of medical cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Brian J; Beals, Monica L; Abess, Alexander T; Nichols, Stephanie D; Martin, Maurice W; Cobb, Catherine M; DeKeuster, Rebecca M

    2017-07-01

    Medical cannabis (MC) is used for a variety of conditions including chronic pain. The goal of this report was to provide an in-depth qualitative exploration of patient perspectives on the strengths and limitations of MC. Members of MC dispensaries (N = 984) in New England including two-thirds with a history of chronic pain completed an online survey. In response to "How effective is medical cannabis in treating your symptoms or conditions?," with options of 0% "no relief" to 100% "complete relief," the average was 74.6% ± 0.6. The average amount spent on MC each year was $3064.47 ± 117.60, median = $2320.23, range = $52.14 to $52,140.00. Open-ended responses were coded into themes and subthemes. Analysis of answers to "What is it that you like most about MC?" (N = 2592 responses) identified 10 themes, including health benefits (36.0% of responses, eg, "Changes perception and experience of my chronic pain."), the product (14.2%, eg, "Knowing exactly what strain you are getting"), nonhealth benefits (14.1%), general considerations (10.3%), and medications (7.1%). Responses (N = 1678) to "What is it that you like least about MC?" identified 12 themes, including money (28.4%, eg, "The cost is expensive for someone on a fixed income"), effects (21.7%, eg, "The effects on my lungs"), the view of others (11.4%), access (8.2%), and method of administration (7.1%). These findings provide a patient-centered view on the advantages (eg, efficacy in pain treatment, reduced use of other medications) and disadvantages (eg, economic and stigma) of MC.

  6. A bibliometric approach to the Alternative Medicine in chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ennio Cocco

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the interest of science for the Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in the chronic pain treatment using the number of articles registered by PubMed as an indicator. On Medline system with the key words: CAM and Pain 11.671 papers are available; 2.167 with the key words: CAM and chronic pain; 192 papers deal with the topic chronic pain and dementia. The interest of science for CAM in chronic pain is increasing, but few studies deal with the e...

  7. Sleep quality in subjects suffering from chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Keilani, Mohammad; Crevenna, Richard; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Sleeping problems are very common in patients with chronic pain. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between different dimensions of chronic pain and sleep quality in chronic pain patients. Methods In this cross-sectional interview-based questionnaire study, patients from 3 different pain treatment centers in Vienna aged 18–65 years, with pain lasting 3 months or longer were asked to participate. The association between the short-form McGill pain questio...

  8. Association between chronic pain and the sperm motion characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dardmeh, Fereshteh; Alipour, Hiva; Nielsen, Hans Ingolf

    2015-01-01

    Sex hormones play an important role in pain in many chronic pain conditions. Relationship between chronic pain and sperm quality has not been investigated thoroughly and may provide an insight to better understanding, management and treatment of cases where chronic pain and male sub-fertility co...... between the pain and control group. However the percentage of non-progressive motile spermatozoa (type B) was significantly higher in the pain group (27.96) compared to the control group (15.96Straight line trajectories including linearity, straightness, wobble and beat cross frequency were also...

  9. Exercise therapy for chronic nonspecific low-back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Verhagen, Arianne P; Ostelo, Raymond W; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W

    Exercise therapy is the most widely used type of conservative treatment for low back pain. Systematic reviews have shown that exercise therapy is effective for chronic but not for acute low back pain. During the past 5 years, many additional trials have been published on chronic low back pain. This

  10. Cortical plasticity as a new endpoint measurement for chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Min

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Animal models of chronic pain are widely used to investigate basic mechanisms of chronic pain and to evaluate potential novel drugs for treating chronic pain. Among the different criteria used to measure chronic pain, behavioral responses are commonly used as the end point measurements. However, not all chronic pain conditions can be easily measured by behavioral responses such as the headache, phantom pain and pain related to spinal cord injury. Here I propose that cortical indexes, that indicate neuronal plastic changes in pain-related cortical areas, can be used as endpoint measurements for chronic pain. Such cortical indexes are not only useful for those chronic pain conditions where a suitable animal model is lacking, but also serve as additional screening methods for potential drugs to treat chronic pain in humans. These cortical indexes are activity-dependent immediate early genes, electrophysiological identified plastic changes and biochemical assays of signaling proteins. It can be used to evaluate novel analgesic compounds that may act at peripheral or spinal sites. I hope that these new cortical endpoint measurements will facilitate our search for new, and more effective, pain medicines, and help to reduce false lead drug targets.

  11. Chronic pain in hemodialysis patients: Role of bone mineral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... lower calcium, lower 25(OH) D3 levels, higher parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and experienced chronic pain (p< 0.001). Conclusion: Chronic pain is highly experienced in long-term hemodialysis patients. Malnutrition, high CRP and disturbed bone mineral metabolism are highly correlated with the incident of this pain.

  12. Cognitive function in patients with chronic pain treated with opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; de Mattos Pimenta, C A; Braga, P E

    2012-01-01

    The paucity of studies regarding cognitive function in patients with chronic pain, and growing evidence regarding the cognitive effects of pain and opioids on cognitive function prompted us to assess cognition via neuropsychological measurement in patients with chronic non-cancer pain treated...... with opioids....

  13. Untying chronic pain: prevalence and societal burden of chronic pain stages in the general population - a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, Winfried; Wolfe, Frederik; Henningsen, Peter; Schmutzer, Gabriele; Brähler, Elmar; Hinz, Andreas

    2014-04-13

    Chronic pain is a major public health problem. The impact of stages of chronic pain adjusted for disease load on societal burden has not been assessed in population surveys. A cross-sectional survey with 4360 people aged  ≥ 14 years representative of the German population was conducted. Measures obtained included demographic variables, presence of chronic pain (based on the definition of the International Association for the Study of Pain), chronic pain stages (by chronic pain grade questionnaire), disease load (by self-reported comorbidity questionnaire) and societal burden (by self-reported number of doctor visits, nights spent in hospital and days of sick leave/disability in the previous 12 months, and by current unemployment). Associations between chronic pain stages with societal burden, adjusted for demographic variables and disease load, were tested by Poisson and logistic regression analyses. 2508 responses were received. 19.4% (95% CI 16.8% to 22.0%) of participants met the criteria of chronic non-disabling non-malignant pain. 7.4% (95% CI 5.0% to 9.9%) met criteria for chronic disabling non-malignant pain. Compared with no chronic pain, the rate ratio (RR) of days with sick leave/disability was 1.6 for non-disabling pain and 6.4 for disabling pain. After adjusting for age and disease load, the RRs increased to 1.8 and 6.8. The RR of doctor visits was 2.5 for non-disabling pain and 4.5 for disabling pain if compared with no chronic pain. After adjusting for age and disease load, the RR fell to 1.7 and 2.6. The RR of days in hospital was 2.7 for non-disabling pain and 11.7 for disabling pain if compared with no chronic pain. After adjusting for age and disease load, the RR fell to 1.5 and 4.0. Unemployment was predicted by lower educational level (Odds Ratio OR 3.27 [95% CI 1.70-6.29]), disabling pain (OR 3.30 [95% CI 1.76-6.21]) and disease load (OR 1.70 [95% CI 1.41-2.05]). Chronic pain stages, but also disease load and societal inequalities

  14. [Contribution of the sensitization of supraspinal nociceptive transmission in chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Shohei; Ono, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Central sensitization in the spinal cord is well known to be involved in chronic pain. Recent investigations indicated that the protein expressions involving the synaptic plasticity are changed in several brain areas under a chronic pain condition. These changes in supraspinal neural function might cause the emotional and memory dysfunction. It is also possible that these changes are involved in the chronic pain. Indeed, since the improvement of spinal and peripheral sensitization showed limited relief in the neuropathic pain, the sensitization of supraspinal nociceptive transmission might be involved in the expression of chronic pain. We recently found that intra-thalamic treatment with excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate caused hyperalgesia, which is mediated by the stimulation of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. Moreover, intracerebroventricular treatment with gabapentin, a calcium channel alpha2delta-1 subunit blocker, attenuated the hyperalgesia in the nerve-injury model of mice. These results suggest that the sensitization of supraspinal nociceptive transmission is involved in neuropathic pain. It is also indicated that neuropathic pain is resulted from the activations of spinal glial cells. Likewise, the supraspinal glial activation was observed in the neuropathic pain. Therefore, the sensitization of supraspinal nociceptive transmission might be important for a chronic pain. In this review, we would like to discuss the possible involvement of the supraspinal sensitization in neuropathic pain and in its application for the curative treatment in chronic pain.

  15. The Impact of Pain on Different Aspects of Life Among Older People With Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mahmoud Mirzamani

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to investe the impact of pain on older people with chronic pain. Methods & Materials: Participants were 585 individuals (n=77 aged 60 years andover, n=508 aged Lessthan 60 years old with chronic pain in their leg, back, hands, neck and shoulders. The main assessment measure was the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI. Results: The two groups showed significant differences in three scales of important dimentions of pain experience. The old patients experienced more sever pain which effected their life, family supports and dependency. There were significant differents in three scales of evaluation and report of routin activities in the two groups. Conclusion: The old patients with chronic pain experienced more sever pain. The more sever pain, the more negative impact of pain in their life, requirement family support and dependency. Also, in the old patients with chronic pain group, the effect of chronic pain was more on outdoor activities, social and general activities than the group of usual patients with chronic pain. So, we should have more attention to general and social activities for providing care among older people with chrcnic pain than the other goups with chronic pain.

  16. Overgeneral autobiographical memory in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianhua; Liu, Yanling; Li, Li; Hu, Yiqiu; Wu, Siwei; Yao, Shuqiao

    2014-03-01

    Overgenerality and delay of the retrieval of autobiographical memory (AM) are well documented in a range of clinical conditions, particularly in patients with emotional disorder. The present study extended the investigation to chronic pain, attempting to identify whether the retrieval of AM in patients with chronic pain tends to be overgeneral or delayed. With an observational cross-sectional design, we evaluated the AM both in patients with chronic pain and healthy controls by Autobiographical Memory Test. Pain conditions were assessed using the pain diagnostic protocol, the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), and the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ). Emotion was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory. Subjects included 176 outpatients with chronic pain lasting for at least 6 months and 170 healthy controls. 1) Compared with the healthy group, the chronic pain group had more overgeneral memories (OGMs) (F = 29.061, P OGM were significant (P OGM scores could be predicted by the BDI score (9.7%), pain chronicity (4.3%), PSEQ score (7.1%), and Affective Index (of SF-MPQ) score (2.7%). 3) In the chronic pain group, the stepwise multiple regression models for variables predicting latency were significant (P < 0.05). Specifically, the variance in latency could be predicted by age (3.1%), pain chronicity (2.7%), pain duration (4.3%), and PSEQ score (2.0%). The retrieval of AM in patients with chronic pain tends to be overgeneral and delayed, and the retrieval style of AM may be contributed to negative emotions and chronic pain conditions. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Magnetic resonance arthrography in chronic wrist pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeri, G.; Ferrara, C.; Carloni, S.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical role of Magnetic Resonance Arthrography (MRA) of the wrist in subjects with chronic pain. Thirty-five patients complaining of wrist pain for more than 6 months were submitted to MRI an MRA. All patients received and intra-articular injection of 2-10 mL of a 10 mmol saline solution of Gd-DPTA. The overall diagnostic accuracy rates of MRI and MRA were 40% and 81% respectively, with sensitivity and specificity of 63% and 39% (MRI) and of 82% and 79% (MRA). The conclusion is that compared with MRI, MRA can be considered a useful tool for the visualization of interosseus carpal ligaments and of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. MRA also helps detect injuries in these structures [it

  18. Therapeutic writing and chronic pain: experiences of therapeutic writing in a cognitive behavioural programme for people with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnes, Bodil; Dysvik, Elin

    2012-12-01

    To examine the experiences of therapeutic writing from the perspectives of patients attending a chronic pain management programme. Pain is a multifaceted experience. Increased awareness, understanding and gaining new insights are essential aspects of dealing with chronic pain. It is crucial to find powerful ways to cope with chronic pain. Several studies point to writing as a tool for managing such demanding life experiences. Therapeutic writing in a cognitive behavioural approach may be used to facilitate the rehabilitation process. A qualitative study with a descriptive and explorative design including a phenomenological perspective was used. A consecutive sample of 34 outpatients with chronic pain was recruited to an eight-week group-based pain management programme. A therapeutic writing tool was developed and included as part of the homework tasks. Guidelines were used to initiate and guide the therapeutic writing activity. Written reports were collected after completion. Three thematic findings emerged from the analysis: 'increased understanding of chronic pain as a multifaceted experience', 'new insights into managing the chronic pain situation' and 'different performances lead to different experiences with therapeutic writing'. Increased awareness, understanding and new insights are essential to dealing with chronic pain. People with chronic pain need tools and skills for optimal adaptation. Our findings suggest therapeutic writing may strengthen cognitive behavioural therapy by facilitating cognitive restructuring processes. Therapeutic writing may be used as a tool to express individual experiences and to improve adaptation to chronic pain. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Cyberhugs: creating a voice for chronic pain sufferers through technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Karin L

    2013-02-01

    Chronic pain is a pervasive and expensive public health problem affecting roughly one-third of the American population. The inability of language to accurately convey pain expressions combined with the social stigmas associated with discussing pain persuade many sufferers to remain silent about their pain. Gender politics and fear of professional repercussions further encourage silence. This article explores the need for a safe and secure place for chronic pain sufferers to talk of their pain experiences. The extent to which digital communication technology can fulfill this need is examined. This descriptive study examines the use of one online chronic pain management workshop for its ability to create an engaged community of choice. Workshop admittance was based on participants having a qualifying chronic pain condition. A thematic discourse analysis is conducted of all entries chronic pain participants posted. In addition to goal setting, participants discuss the ways in which pain affects them on a daily basis. Two themes emerge: validation and encouragement. This study suggests that chronic pain users need a discursive space to legitimate their chronic pain identity. It confirms that online websites and virtual audiences facilitate disclosure and allow for authentic communication. The benefits of computer-mediated discussion as well as its limitations are examined.

  20. Chronic pain during pregnancy: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray-Griffith, Shona L; Wendel, Michael P; Stowe, Zachary N; Magann, Everett F

    2018-01-01

    The majority of the reviews and studies on chronic pain in pregnancy have primarily focused on the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options. The purpose of our review was to identify evidence-based clinical research for the evaluation and management of preexisting chronic pain in pregnancy, chronic pain associated with pregnancy, and chronic pain in relation to mode of delivery. A literature search was undertaken using the search engines PubMed, CINAHL, EBSCOhost, and Web of Science. Search terms used included "chronic pain" AND "pregnant OR pregnancy" OR "pregnancy complications" from inception through August 2016. The basis of this review was the 144 articles that met inclusion criteria for this review. Based on our review of the current literature, we recommend 7 guidelines for chronic pain management during and after pregnancy: 1) complete history and physical examination; 2) monitor patients for alcohol, nicotine, and substance use; 3) collaborate with patient to set treatment goals; 4) develop a management plan; 5) for opioids, use lowest effective dose; 6) formulate a pain management plan for labor and delivery; and 7) discuss reproductive health with women with chronic pain. The management of chronic pain associated with pregnancy is understudied. Obstetrical providers primarily manage chronic pain during pregnancy. Some general guidelines are provided for those health care providers until more information is available.

  1. Increased pain sensitivity in accident-related chronic pain patients with comorbid posttraumatic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Harvold, Mathea

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is prevalent in chronic pain, and associated with increased pain, hyperalgesia and psychological distress. This study aimed to investigate anti-nociceptive and pro-nociceptive pain mechanisms, pain intensity, and psychological distress (depression......, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement) in patients with accident-related chronic spinal pain with (N=44) and without (N=64) comorbid PTSD characteristics. METHODS: Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs to assess pressure pain threshold (cPPT), tolerance (cPTT), temporal summation...... of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to ten repeated stimulations), and conditioning pain modulation (CPM: increase in cPPT during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Warmth detection threshold (WDT) and heat pain threshold (HPT) at the hand were also assessed. Clinical pain intensity...

  2. Neuroinflammation and Central Sensitization in Chronic and Widespread Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Nackley, Andrea; Huh, Yul; Terrando, Niccolò; Maixner, William

    2018-02-19

    Chronic pain is maintained in part by central sensitization, a phenomenon of synaptic plasticity, and increased neuronal responsiveness in central pain pathways after painful insults. Accumulating evidence suggests that central sensitization is also driven by neuroinflammation in the peripheral and central nervous system. A characteristic feature of neuroinflammation is the activation of glial cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, in the spinal cord and brain, leading to the release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Recent studies suggest that central cytokines and chemokines are powerful neuromodulators and play a sufficient role in inducing hyperalgesia and allodynia after central nervous system administration. Sustained increase of cytokines and chemokines in the central nervous system also promotes chronic widespread pain that affects multiple body sites. Thus, neuroinflammation drives widespread chronic pain via central sensitization. We also discuss sex-dependent glial/immune signaling in chronic pain and new therapeutic approaches that control neuroinflammation for the resolution of chronic pain.

  3. Morphine for chronic neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Tess E; Chen, Junqiao; Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Carr, Daniel B; Aldington, Dominic; Cole, Peter; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-05-22

    Neuropathic pain, which is caused by a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system, may be central or peripheral in origin. Neuropathic pain often includes symptoms such as burning or shooting sensations, abnormal sensitivity to normally painless stimuli, or an increased sensitivity to normally painful stimuli. Neuropathic pain is a common symptom in many diseases of the nervous system. Opioid drugs, including morphine, are commonly used to treat neuropathic pain. Most reviews have examined all opioids together. This review sought evidence specifically for morphine; other opioids are considered in separate reviews. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of morphine for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and Embase for randomised controlled trials from inception to February 2017. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and reviews, and online clinical trial registries. We included randomised, double-blind trials of two weeks' duration or longer, comparing morphine (any route of administration) with placebo or another active treatment for neuropathic pain, with participant-reported pain assessment. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality and potential bias. Primary outcomes were participants with substantial pain relief (at least 50% pain relief over baseline or very much improved on Patient Global Impression of Change scale (PGIC)), or moderate pain relief (at least 30% pain relief over baseline or much or very much improved on PGIC). Where pooled analysis was possible, we used dichotomous data to calculate risk ratio (RR) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) or harmful outcome (NNH). We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE and created 'Summary of findings' tables. We identified five randomised, double-blind, cross-over studies with treatment periods of four to

  4. Medical marijuana use for chronic pain: risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, Garth T

    2012-01-01

    Questions from patients about medical marijuana use for chronic pain are becoming more common. The information in this report will help patients understand the potential risks and benefits of using this substance for painful conditions.

  5. Research design considerations for chronic pain prevention clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C

    2015-01-01

    Although certain risk factors can identify individuals who are most likely to develop chronic pain, few interventions to prevent chronic pain have been identified. To facilitate the identification of preventive interventions, an IMMPACT meeting was convened to discuss research design considerations...... for clinical trials investigating the prevention of chronic pain. We present general design considerations for prevention trials in populations that are at relatively high risk for developing chronic pain. Specific design considerations included subject identification, timing and duration of treatment...... element exposure), and are chronically painful conditions that are treated with a range of interventions. Improvements in the design of chronic pain prevention trials could improve assay sensitivity and thus accelerate the identification of efficacious interventions. Such interventions would have...

  6. Chronic Pain in Chronic Heart Failure: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Alemzadeh-Ansari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is one of the main causes of death and disability in the world. The prevalence of HF in developed countries is between 1% and 2% of the adult population and approximately between 6% and 10% in the elderly, giving rise to high costs of care and treatment. Indeed, in the United States, the direct and indirect costs exceeded 23 billion dollars in 2002.  HF is typically characterized by periods of acute symptoms followed by returns to nearly asymptomatic periods. As dyspnea and fatigue are considered the signature symptoms of HF, other symptoms such as pain go unnoticed. Awareness of the burden of pain, however, is growing in patients with chronic HF. The past 2 decades have witnessed remarkable technical headway in cardiology and many patients have survived despite the progressive impairment of their cardiovascular function. It is, therefore, of great value to investigate the prevalence and management of pain in patients with HF. To that end, we undertook a comprehensive search using the MEDLINE database for studies and guidelines on the subject of pain and HF and the complications and considerations and finally selected 65 studies for review.

  7. The Impact of Virtual Reality on Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ted; Moore, Todd; Choo, James

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of chronic pain could benefit from additional non-opioid interventions. Virtual reality (VR) has been shown to be effective in decreasing pain for procedural or acute pain but to date there have been few studies on its use in chronic pain. The present study was an investigation of the impact of a virtual reality application for chronic pain. Thirty (30) participants with various chronic pain conditions were offered a five-minute session using a virtual reality application called Cool! Participants were asked about their pain using a 0-10 visual analog scale rating before the VR session, during the session and immediately after the session. They were also asked about immersion into the VR world and about possible side effects. Pain was reduced from pre-session to post-session by 33%. Pain was reduced from pre-session during the VR session by 60%. These changes were both statistically significant at the p virtual reality session. All participants (100%) reported a decrease in pain to some degree between pre-session pain and during-session pain. The virtual reality experience was found here to provide a significant amount of pain relief. A head mounted display (HMD) was used with all subjects and no discomfort was experienced. Only one participant noted any side effects. VR seems to have promise as a non-opioid treatment for chronic pain and further investigation is warranted.

  8. Pain catastrophizing, physiological indexes, and chronic pain severity: tests of mediation and moderation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Brandy; Burns, John W; Quartana, Phillip J; Lofland, Kenneth; Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y

    2008-04-01

    Catastrophizing about pain is related to elevated pain severity and poor adjustment among chronic pain patients, but few physiological mechanisms by which pain catastrophizing maintains and exacerbates pain have been explored. We hypothesized that resting levels of lower paraspinal muscle tension and/or lower paraspinal and cardiovascular reactivity to emotional arousal may: (a) mediate links between pain catastrophizing and chronic pain intensity; (b) moderate these links such that only patients described by certain combinations of pain catastrophizing and physiological indexes would report pronounced chronic pain. Chronic low back pain patients (N = 97) participated in anger recall and sadness recall interviews while lower paraspinal and trapezius EMG and systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded. Mediation models were not supported. However, pain catastrophizing significantly interacted with resting lower paraspinal muscle tension to predict pain severity such that high catastrophizers with high resting lower paraspinal tension reported the greatest pain. Pain catastrophizing also interacted with SBP, DBP and HR reactivity to affect pain such that high catastrophizers who showed low cardiovascular reactivity to the interviews reported the greatest pain. Results support a multi-variable profile approach to identifying pain catastrophizers at greatest risk for pain severity by virtue of resting muscle tension and cardiovascular stress function.

  9. Chronic pain during pregnancy: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray-Griffith SL

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Shona L Ray-Griffith,1,2 Michael P Wendel,2 Zachary N Stowe,3 Everett F Magann2 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA Background and purpose: The majority of the reviews and studies on chronic pain in pregnancy have primarily focused on the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options. The purpose of our review was to identify evidence-based clinical research for the evaluation and management of preexisting chronic pain in pregnancy, chronic pain associated with pregnancy, and chronic pain in relation to mode of delivery. Methods: A literature search was undertaken using the search engines PubMed, CINAHL, EBSCOhost, and Web of Science. Search terms used included “chronic pain” AND “pregnant OR pregnancy” OR “pregnancy complications” from inception through August 2016. Results: The basis of this review was the 144 articles that met inclusion criteria for this review. Based on our review of the current literature, we recommend 7 guidelines for chronic pain management during and after pregnancy: 1 complete history and physical examination; 2 monitor patients for alcohol, nicotine, and substance use; 3 collaborate with patient to set treatment goals; 4 develop a management plan; 5 for opioids, use lowest effective dose; 6 formulate a pain management plan for labor and delivery; and 7 discuss reproductive health with women with chronic pain. Conclusion: The management of chronic pain associated with pregnancy is understudied. Obstetrical providers primarily manage chronic pain during pregnancy. Some general guidelines are provided for those health care providers until more information is available. Keywords: chronic pain, pregnancy, pregnancy complications, chronic pain in pregnancy

  10. Chronic Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury: The Patient's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Henwood

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic neuropathic pain (CNP in spinal cord injury (SCI is recognized as severely compromising, in both adjustment after injury and quality of life. Studies indicate that chronic pain in SCI is associated with great emotional distress over and above that of the injury itself. Currently, little is known about the SCI patient's perception of the impact of living with chronic neuropathic pain.

  11. Duloxetine in the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Howard; Smith,; Smith,

    2012-01-01

    Howard S Smith,1 Eric J Smith,2 Benjamin R Smith21Department of Anesthesiology, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY; 2The Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Rensselaer, NY, USAAbstract: Chronic musculoskeletal pain is among the most frequent painful complaints that healthcare providers address. The bulk of these complaints are chronic low back pain and chronic osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the United State...

  12. Psychosocial risks for disability in children with chronic back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Anne M; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Goldschneider, Kenneth R; Jones, Benjamin A

    2006-04-01

    Psychosocial factors related to disability in adults with chronic back pain have been well studied, but little is known about factors associated with functional impairment in pediatric patients with chronic back pain. The purpose of this study was to examine whether 2 potential risk factors-use of catastrophizing as a coping technique and presence of a familial pain history-were associated with disability in pediatric back pain patients. Participants were 65 patients (ages 8-18) with chronic back pain seen at a multidisciplinary pain clinic. Patients completed measures of pain (visual analog scales), disability (Functional Disability Inventory), and catastrophizing (Internalizing/Catastrophizing subscale of the Pain Coping Questionnaire). Parents provided demographic information and familial pain history. Patients reported that chronic back pain caused disruptions in their daily functioning and they missed, on average, 2.5 days of school every month. Catastrophizing and familial chronic pain history both were significantly associated with greater disability, with use of catastrophizing being the stronger predictor of disability. This study presents important findings on potential psychosocial risk factors of functional disability in children and adolescents with chronic back pain. Future research might clarify mechanisms by which such coping styles are developed and explore how familial communication about pain might influence a child's coping ability. Pediatric patients seeking treatment for chronic back pain often present with substantial functional impairment that is not well explained by disease variables or pain intensity. Two important psychosocial variables (catastrophizing and familial pain history) may provide a context for a better understanding of pain-related disability in children.

  13. Brain imaging tests for chronic pain: medical, legal and ethical issues and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Karen D; Flor, Herta; Greely, Henry T; Iannetti, Gian Domenico; Mackey, Sean; Ploner, Markus; Pustilnik, Amanda; Tracey, Irene; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Wager, Tor D

    2017-10-01

    Chronic pain is the greatest source of disability globally and claims related to chronic pain feature in many insurance and medico-legal cases. Brain imaging (for example, functional MRI, PET, EEG and magnetoencephalography) is widely considered to have potential for diagnosis, prognostication, and prediction of treatment outcome in patients with chronic pain. In this Consensus Statement, a presidential task force of the International Association for the Study of Pain examines the capabilities of brain imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pain, and the ethical and legal implications of its use in this way. The task force emphasizes that the use of brain imaging in this context is in a discovery phase, but has the potential to increase our understanding of the neural underpinnings of chronic pain, inform the development of therapeutic agents, and predict treatment outcomes for use in personalized pain management. The task force proposes standards of evidence that must be satisfied before any brain imaging measure can be considered suitable for clinical or legal purposes. The admissibility of such evidence in legal cases also strongly depends on laws that vary between jurisdictions. For these reasons, the task force concludes that the use of brain imaging findings to support or dispute a claim of chronic pain - effectively as a pain lie detector - is not warranted, but that imaging should be used to further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying pain.

  14. Revising the negative meaning of chronic pain - A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Tapio; Häkkinen, Arja; Karppinen, Jaro; Sipilä, Kirsi; Suutama, Timo; Piirainen, Arja

    2015-06-01

    Chronic pain may disable the body, depress the mind and ruin the quality of life. The aim of this study was to use the participants' personal experiences to explore the meaning of the experience of chronic pain and to find successful ways to manage chronic pain. Thirty-four participants with chronic pain were interviewed. The transcribed interviews were analysed using Giorgi's phenomenological method consisting of four phases: (1) reading the transcriptions several times, (2) discriminating meaning units, (3) collecting meaning units into groups and (4) the synthesis. The participants stated that the key to managing chronic pain was to reconsider the individual meaning of the experience of pain. As a result of the interviews, seven subthemes were found based on the 'Negativity of chronic pain', namely, 'State of reflection', 'Reconsidering values', 'Acceptance of pain', 'Support network', 'Altered self', 'Joys in life' and 'Pain dissociation'. Pain is an aversive sensation, which leads to the conclusion that the meaning of the experience is also negative, but it can be reversed. In clinical practice, the focus should be on revising the subjective meaning of pain in order to manage pain and to restore positivity in personal life. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Depression, anxiety, health-related quality of life and pain in patients with chronic fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormsen, Lise; Rosenberg, Raben; Bach, Flemming W; Jensen, Troels S

    2010-02-01

    Chronic pain is often associated with comorbidities such as anxiety and depression, resulting in a low health-related quality of life. The mechanisms underlying this association are not clear, but a disturbance in the pain control systems from the brain stem has been suggested. Thirty neuropathic pain (NP) patients, 28 patients with fibromyalgia (FM), and 26 pain-free age- and gender-matched controls were included and examined with respect to mental distress (self-rated Symptom Checklist-92), depression (doctor-rated Hamilton Depression Scale and self-rated Major Depression Inventory), and anxiety (doctor-rated Hamilton Anxiety Scale and self-rated Anxiety Inventory). In addition, patients assessed their health-related quality of life (SF-36). Chronic pain patients with FM and NP had significantly more mental distress including depression and anxiety than healthy controls both by self-rating and by a professional rating. However, these scores are low compared to other studies on mental distress in chronic pain patients. Only few chronic pain patients meet the diagnostic criteria for depression (NP 3.3%, FM 7.1%), and associations between pain and mental symptoms were only found in the FM group despite similar pain intensities. The findings suggest that different mechanisms are responsible for the development of mood disorders in the two patient groups.

  16. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervicogenic Headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Frank L.; Schofferman, Jerome

    2003-11-01

    Chronic axial neck pain and cervicogenic headache are common problems, and there have been significant advances in the understanding of the etiology and treatment of each. The severity and duration of pain drives the process. For patients who have had slight to moderate pain that has been present for less than 6 months and have no significant motor loss, strength training of anterior, posterior, and interscapular muscle groups coupled with body mechanics training is prescribed. After 8 weeks, if the patient is better, exercises are continued at home or in a gym. If the patient is not better, physical therapy is continued for up to 8 more weeks. In patients with motor loss or severe pain, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be ordered at the initial visit. In patients with slight to moderate pain who are not better by 4 to 6 months, plain radiographs of the neck and MRI should be ordered. Based on the results, a spinal injection is usually prescribed. If MRI reveals spinal stenosis of the central or lateral canal, or a disc herniation, an epidural corticosteroid injection should be ordered. If the epidural provides good relief, the patient can be referred for more aggressive physical therapy and repeat the epidural as needed up to a maximum of three times. If there is no pathology within the canal, medial branch blocks and intra-articular steroid injections can be ordered based on the joints that are most tender or where disc space narrowing is greatest, or MRI or radiographs are recommended. If there is excellent relief from the medial branch block and joint injections, repeat when the steroids wear off. If there is good relief again, but pain recurs, medial branch radiofrequency neurotomy is recommended. For patients with one or two level disc degeneration that has not responded, a psychologic evaluation and discography is recommended. If there are no significant psychologic abnormalities, and one or two (rarely three) painful discs, surgical

  17. Internalized stigma in people living with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Olivia C; Byrne, Donald G; Nicholas, Michael K

    2014-05-01

    Although persistent pain occurs in a sociocultural context, the influence of personal devaluation and invalidation is often neglected. As such, the present study sought to consider whether individuals' experience, perception, or anticipation of negative social reactions to their pain may become internalized and affect the self. To examine this issue, 92 adults with chronic pain responded to a questionnaire exploring the presence of internalized stigma and its association with a range of psychological consequences. As predicted, a large percentage of people with chronic pain (38%) endorsed the experience of internalized stigma. The results showed that internalized stigma has a negative relationship with self-esteem and pain self-efficacy, after controlling for depression. Internalized stigma was also associated with cognitive functioning in relation to pain, in terms of a greater tendency to catastrophize about pain and a reduced sense of personal control over pain. Overall, this study presents a new finding regarding the application of internalized stigma to a chronic pain population. It offers a means of extending our understanding of chronic pain's psychosocial domain. Implications are discussed in terms of the potential to inform clinical treatment and resiliency into the future. This article presents a novel finding regarding the presence of internalized stigma among people living with chronic pain. Internalized stigma is strongly associated with indicators of patient outcome. It presents an area for future work with the aim to improve our understanding and treatment of people living with pain. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychogenic chronic pelvic pain: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D P; Wiesner, M G; Reiter, R C

    1990-03-01

    By the time that the pelvalgia patient seeks treatment, her chronic tension, anxiety, stress, and related somatic symptoms, which usually have moderated her fear of repeat assault or punishment by the aggressor-parent, has begun to disintegrate. The patient usually has little or no insight into the fact that her feelings of being trapped, helpless, and victimized in her marriage, job, or other interpersonal relationships can be symbols of the original sexual trauma. The depressed patient may be unaware that suicidal thoughts and actions, if present, are a reflection of her sense of helplessness, hopelessness, and victimization. Hence, CPP may be a symptom of a wide spectrum of disorders, both organic and psychological. While the patient is undergoing evaluation of pelvic pain, it is essential that clinicians remain aware that the patient's psychogenic symptoms are an attempt to reinforce a faltering ego. Additionally, it is important that they recognize that previous attempts at diagnosis and therapy of CPP and other somatic complaints usually have reinforced the belief that the symptoms are physically based and unrelated to any psychological factors. A number of prospective studies currently are underway to characterize further the relationships between complaints of chronic pelvic pain, personality functioning, and history of sexual trauma. Without data on very long-term follow-up, our understanding of the precise psychodevelopmental pathophysiology and long-term prognosis of CPP currently remains incomplete.

  19. Cognitive processes in comorbid poor sleep and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Haley D; Lichstein, Kenneth L; Thorn, Beverly E

    2016-04-01

    We examined the unique and shared contributions of pain catastrophizing, cognitive pre-sleep arousal, and somatic pre-sleep arousal, to the prediction of insomnia severity in chronic pain. Forty-eight adults with chronic pain completed self-report measures of these study variables, health, and mood. Hierarchical regression showed that pain catastrophizing accounted for unique variance in insomnia severity, independent of pain intensity, depression, restless legs symptoms, and demographics. However, when cognitive and somatic pre-sleep arousal were also taken into account, the significance of cognitive pre-sleep arousal rendered pain catastrophizing non-significant. We identify research and clinical implications of this study.

  20. Chronic pelvic pain: Pathogenesis and validated assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yosef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pelvic pain (CPP is a disabling disease that causes distress as the quality of life of CPP patients is vastly diminished. In addition, CPP is a public health crisis and is a burden on healthcare expenditure. In the United States, the annual costs for the diagnosis and treatment of CPP are 2.8 billion US $. Moreover, to the indirect cost resulting from the absence from work and CPP associated family problems add 550 million US $ more making the economic burden more than 3.4 billion US $ (Mathias et al., 1996. Yet, the diagnosis of CPP is usually complicated as there are no gold standard guidelines that clearly define this syndrome. Although we have a limited understanding of its etiology, CPP has been found to be correlated with central sensitization, painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, endometriosis and adhesions. As such, in the evaluation of patients, it is imperative to take a comprehensive patient history. Performing physical examinations and ultrasound imaging is of particular value to elucidate the etiology of pain. As CPP patients are at risk for psychological disorders, psychological assessments are critical to diagnose associated psychological disorders and to take these into account in planning a holistic treatment plan for patients. By such evaluation techniques, we can provide better diagnostic service and patient care to people with CPP.

  1. A typology of pain coping in pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Lynn S.; Baber, Kari Freeman; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to identify clinically meaningful profiles of pain coping strategies used by youth with chronic abdominal pain (CAP). Participants (n = 699) were pediatric patients (ages 8–18 years) and their parents. Patients completed the Pain Response Inventory (PRI) and measures of somatic and depressive symptoms, disability, pain severity and pain efficacy, and perceived competence. Parents rated their children’s pain severity and coping efficacy. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on ...

  2. Association between chronic pain and the sperm motion characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dardmeh, Fereshteh; Alipour, Hiva; Nielsen, Hans Ingolf

    2015-01-01

    Sex hormones play an important role in pain in many chronic pain conditions. Relationship between chronic pain and sperm quality has not been investigated thoroughly and may provide an insight to better understanding, management and treatment of cases where chronic pain and male sub-fertility co......-exist. Neat (fresh semen) and processed sperm from 15 males with orthopedic chronic pain (CP) were assessed and compared with 15 healthy age matched controls. Sperm analysis was performed using the SCA computer-aided sperm analyzer. There was no significant difference in any parameters of the neat semen...... significantly higher in the processed sample of the CP group. This study demonstrated that chronic pain does not affect the sperm morphology, total concentration and motility based on conventional analysis but has significant influence at the level of sperm motion kinetics which could prove to be clinically...

  3. The efficacy of adhesiolysis on chronic abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerner-Rasmussen, Jonas; Burcharth, Jakob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Abdominal adhesions are a frequent reason for chronic abdominal pain. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the evidence of performing laparoscopic adhesiolysis as a treatment for patients with chronic abdominal pain. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane...... Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for trials performing lysis of adhesions on patients suffering from chronic abdominal pain. Clinical studies on patients being treated for chronic abdominal pain with surgical adhesiolysis were included. The main outcome of the study...... chronic abdominal pain. A total of 22 trials were identified as case-series and included no control group. Three studies were identified as randomized controlled trials (RCT). A benefit of the intervention varied from 16 to 88 % in the non-randomized studies, with the majority reporting pain relief...

  4. Addiction to opioids in chronic pain patients: a literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Sjøgren, Per

    2007-01-01

    Opioids have proven very useful for treatment of acute pain and cancer pain, and in the developed countries opioids are increasingly used for treatment of chronic non-malignant pain patients as well. This literature review aims at giving an overview of definitions, mechanisms, diagnostic criteria......, incidence and prevalence of addiction in opioid treated pain patients, screening tools for assessing opioid addiction in chronic pain patients and recommendations regarding addiction problems in national and international guidelines for opioid treatment in cancer patients and chronic non-malignant pain...... patients. The review indicates that the prevalence of addiction varied from 0% up to 50% in chronic non-malignant pain patients, and from 0% to 7.7% in cancer patients depending of the subpopulation studied and the criteria used. The risk of addiction has to be considered when initiating long-term opioid...

  5. Laparoscopic Adhesiolysis and Relief of Chronic Pelvic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Nezhat, Farr R.; Crystal, Ruth Ann; Nezhat, Ceana H.; Nezhat, Camran R.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the short- and long-term results of laparoscopic enterolysis in patients with chronic pelvic pain following hysterectomy. Methods: Forty-eight patients were evaluated at time intervals from 2 weeks to 5 years after laparoscopic enterolysis. Patients were asked to rate postoperative relief of their pelvic pain as complete/near complete relief (80-100% pain relief), significant relief (50-80% pain relief), or less than 50% or no pain relief. Results: We found that after 2...

  6. Health Care Utilization and Costs Associated with Pediatric Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; Drees, David; Miller, Rebecca; Wrona, Sharon; Hayes, Don; Tobias, Joseph D; Bhalla, Tarun

    2018-03-30

    The population prevalence of pediatric chronic pain is not well characterized, in part due to lack of nationally representative data. Previous research suggests that pediatric chronic pain prolongs inpatient stay and increases costs, but the population-level association between pediatric chronic pain and health care utilization is unclear. We use the 2016 National Survey of Children's Health to describe the prevalence of pediatric chronic pain, and compare health care utilization among children ages 0-17 years according to the presence of chronic pain. Using a sample of 43,712 children, we estimate the population prevalence of chronic pain to be 6%. On multivariable analysis, chronic pain was not associated with increased odds of primary care or mental health care use, but was associated with greater odds of using other specialty care (OR=2.01, 95% CI: 1.62, 2.47; pcomplementary and alternative medicine (OR=2.32, 95% CI: 1.79, 3.03; pchronic pain were more likely to use specialty care but not mental health care. The higher likelihood of emergency care use in this group raises the question of whether better management of pediatric chronic pain could reduce emergency department use. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Perspectives on Music Imagery and complex chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan; Christensen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the article is to examine the concept of chronic pain as a complex phenomenon and to highlight the potential role of music therapy – in particular, music imagery – in the treatment of chronic pain. Theories of pain, along with research on pain pathways and pain control in the nervous...... system, support the evidence from clinical practice that music interventions can alleviate the sensation of pain whilst also offering a pleasant aesthetic experience. Music therapy provides opportunities for processing psychological and existential issues and enables patients to better cope with chronic...... pain. Related research in neuroscience and music medicine provides supplementary evidence that music can have a considerable impact on the physiological and psychological aspects of pain. This article summarises selected theoretical, clinical, and research–based knowledge relevant for music therapy...

  8. Dutch version of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire for adolescents with chronic pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Carolien; Bastiaenen, Caroline H.G.; de Vries, Janneke; Simons, Laura; Goossens, Mariëlle E.J.B.; Verbunt, Jeanine

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Fear of pain is important in the development and maintenance of chronic pain. The Fear of Pain Questionnaire-Child version has been developed to assess pain related fear in children and adolescents. Objective: Translating the original questionnaire into Dutch, and investigating

  9. Dutch version of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire for adolescents with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Carolien; Bastiaenen, Caroline H. G.; de Vries, Janneke E.; Simons, Laura E.; Goossens, Mariëlle E. J. B.; Verbunt, Jeanine A. M. C. F.

    2017-01-01

    Fear of pain is important in the development and maintenance of chronic pain. The Fear of Pain Questionnaire-Child version has been developed to assess pain related fear in children and adolescents. Translating the original questionnaire into Dutch, and investigating internal consistency and

  10. A preliminary investigation of affective interaction in chronic pain couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Ayna Beate; Cano, Annmarie

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to examine the extent to which affective marital interaction related to depressive symptoms in persons with chronic pain and their spouses and to pain severity in persons with pain. Couples from the community completed self-report surveys and engaged in a videotaped conversation on a topic of mutual disagreement that was coded for three affect types (i.e., anger/contempt, sadness, humor). Humor was positively related to marital satisfaction in both partners. Spouse anger/contempt and sadness were positively related to depressive symptoms in spouses. Several significant interaction effects between couple pain status (i.e., whether one or both partners reported pain) and affect also emerged. Specifically, sadness in the participant designated as the person with pain was associated with greater depressive symptoms and pain severity when only he or she reported pain whereas sadness was related to fewer depressive symptoms and less pain severity when both partners reported pain. The relationships between spouse anger and spouse depressive symptoms and between spouse humor and pain severity in the person with pain were also moderated by couple pain status. These exploratory findings can be interpreted in light of emotion regulation and pain empathy theories. For example, partners who have not experienced pain themselves may fail to empathize with persons in pain, thus preventing effective emotion regulation. When both spouses report chronic pain, expressions of negative affect may instead promote emotion regulation because the affect is experienced with a spouse who may be more empathetic.

  11. Medically unexplained chronic pain in Australia: difficulties for rehabilitation providers and workers in pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Coralie; Matthews, Lynda R; Donelly, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    In Australia, evidence of an ageing population and a skills shortage are imminent challenges for employers [5,50]. A further concern arises from the work injury and motor accident compensation schemes, where many claims for soft tissue injuries result in permanent impairment depriving the community of otherwise productive workers [85]. In many cases, it is chronic pain that becomes the major barrier to a return to productive work. This study will review the operation of rehabilitation within Australian Workers' and Motor Accidents compensation systems in order to identify values and attitudes underpinning the vocational rehabilitation ethos. The models underlying current practice will also be identified. A comprehensive review of published literature and policy documents was undertaken. We identified a variety of contextual factors that influenced progress back into the workforce for people living with persistent pain. The conceptual models underpinning these factors within rehabilitation systems were explored. They were all driven by a strong focus on early return to work and at the same time the sustainability of rehabilitation as a profitable industry. Implications of these findings on the relationship between the rehabilitation provider and the person in pain are discussed. Rehabilitation professionals are influenced by and in turn influence the context in which chronic pain is experienced. Empirical data about the experiences of vocational rehabilitation professionals in Australian personal injury rehabilitation systems is lacking, yet the implications of the cost of chronic pain to the nation are significant. It is recommended that rehabilitation providers increase their awareness of the perhaps unforeseen traps within the various practice models they might be using on the goal of sustainable return to work for people living with pain.

  12. Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders: disability, pain intensity and fear of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; López-López, Almudena; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; La Touche, Roy

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to compare and correlate disability, pain intensity, the impact of headache on daily life and the fear of movement between subgroups of patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients diagnosed with chronic painful TMD. Patients were divided into: 1) joint pain (JP); 2) muscle pain (MP); and 3) mixed pain. The following measures were included: Craniomandibular pain and disability (Craniofacial pain and disability inventory), neck disability (Neck Dsiability Index), pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale), impact of headache (Headache Impact Test 6) and kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-11). A total of 154 patients were recruited. The mixed pain group showed significant differences compared with the JP group or MP group in neck disability (p headache (p headache (p < 0.001, d = 1.08). Neck disability was a significant covariate (37 % of variance) of craniomandibular pain and disability for the MP group (β = 0.62; p < 0.001). In the mixed chronic pain group, neck disability (β = 0.40; p < 0.001) and kinesiophobia (β = 0.30; p = 0.03) were significant covariate (33 % of variance) of craniomandibular pain and disability. Mixed chronic pain patients show greater craniomandibular and neck disability than patients diagnosed with chronic JP or MP. Neck disability predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for patients with MP. Neck disability and kinesiophobia predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for those with chronic mixed pain.

  13. Different pain responses to chronic and acute pain in various ethnic/racial groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahavard, Behnoosh B; Candido, Kenneth D; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2017-09-01

    Our goal in this study was to review the similarities and differences among ethnic groups and their respective responses to acute and chronic clinically related and experimentally induced pain. In this review, the PUBMED and Google-Scholar databases were searched to analyze articles that have assessed the variations in both acute and chronic pain responses among different ethnic/racial groups. According to the results from 42 reviewed articles, significant differences exist among ethnic-racial groups for pain prevalence as well as responses to acute and chronic pain. Compared with Caucasians, other ethnic groups are more susceptible to acute pain responses to nociceptive stimulation and to the development of long-term chronic pain. These differences need to be addressed and assessed more extensively in the future in order to minimize the pain management disparities among various ethnic-racial groups and also to improve the relationship between pain management providers and their patients.

  14. Problem Adaptation Therapy for Pain (PATH-Pain): A Psychosocial Intervention for Older Adults with Chronic Pain and Negative Emotions in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiosses, Dimitris N; Ravdin, Lisa D; Stern, Amy; Bolier, Ruth; Kenien, Cara; Reid, M Carrington

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain is highly prevalent in older adults, contributes to activity restriction and social isolation, disrupts family and interpersonal relationships, and poses a significant economic burden to society. Negative emotions such as sadness, anxiety, helplessness, and hopelessness are associated with chronic pain and contribute to poor quality of life, impaired interpersonal and social functioning, and increased disability. Psychosocial interventions for older adults with chronic pain have been historically developed for, and are almost exclusively delivered to, cognitively intact patients. Therefore, many older adults with chronic pain and comorbid cognitive deficits have limited treatment options. Our multidisciplinary team developed Problem Adaptation Therapy for Pain in Primary Care (PATH-Pain), a psychosocial intervention for older adults with chronic pain, negative emotions, and a wide range of cognitive functioning, including mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment. In the current article, we describe the principles underlying PATH-Pain, review the steps taken to adapt the original PATH protocol, outline the treatment process, and present a case illustrating its potential value.

  15. Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant trauma and inflammation originating at the site of injury as well as from various systemic anatomical...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0806 TITLE: Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain Treatment...2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain

  16. Chronic Neck Pain: Making the Connection Between Capsular Ligament Laxity and Cervical Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steilen, Danielle; Hauser, Ross; Woldin, Barbara; Sawyer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    excessive motion between two adjacent cervical vertebrae and these associated symptoms is described as cervical instability. Therefore, we propose that in many cases of chronic neck pain, the cause may be underlying joint instability due to capsular ligament laxity. Currently, curative treatment options for this type of cervical instability are inconclusive and inadequate. Based on clinical studies and experience with patients who have visited our chronic pain clinic with complaints of chronic neck pain, we contend that prolotherapy offers a potentially curative treatment option for chronic neck pain related to capsular ligament laxity and underlying cervical instability. PMID:25328557

  17. [Chronic pain and associated factors amongst institutionalized elderly with arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jyy-I; Wang, Jing-Jy; Chiu, Hui-Ju; Lee, Chiung-Ying; Cheng, Su-Fen

    2011-02-01

    The World Health Organization has predicted that arthritis will rise to become the fourth ranked global disability among the elderly. Arthritis is already a main cause of chronic pain, depression, and institutionalization in this group. Chronic pain resulting from arthritis is a serious threat to the elderly population. Study purposes were to: (1) explore chronic pain in elderly residents with arthritis residing at long-term care facilities and to understand the relationship between associated chronic pain and associated factors, and (2) identify the predictive factors of chronic pain. This study used a cross-sectional, descriptive correlational research design. A sample of 114 elderly residents, 65 years of age and older, were recruited from five long-term care facilities in Kaohsiung and Pingtung, Taiwan. Findings showed that the average pain intensity resulting from chronic arthritis during the three months of study was medium (4.51 ± 1.75). There were positive relationships amongst average pain intensity, previous pain intensity, self-perception of arthritis severity and depression status. Negative correlations were found amongst age, self-perception of arthritis severity, number of chronic illnesses experienced, function of daily activity and social support. Previous pain intensity, self-perception of arthritis severity, number of chronic illnesses experienced, function of daily activity and depression status were all found to predict chronic pain. Together, these factors explained 40.4% of total variance. Study results provide information for nurses to consider the physical, psychological, and social aspects of chronic pain when caring for the elderly. Healthcare providers should design individualized health care interventions for elderly people to promote their quality of life.

  18. Functional Brain Network Mechanism of Hypersensitivity in Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, UnCheol; Kim, Minkyung; Lee, KyoungEun; Kaplan, Chelsea M; Clauw, Daniel J; Kim, Seunghwan; Mashour, George A; Harris, Richard E

    2018-01-10

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic widespread pain condition characterized by augmented multi-modal sensory sensitivity. Although the mechanisms underlying this sensitivity are thought to involve an imbalance in excitatory and inhibitory activity throughout the brain, the underlying neural network properties associated with hypersensitivity to pain stimuli are largely unknown. In network science, explosive synchronization (ES) was introduced as a mechanism of hypersensitivity in diverse biological and physical systems that display explosive and global propagations with small perturbations. We hypothesized that ES may also be a mechanism of the hypersensitivity in FM brains. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed resting state electroencephalogram (EEG) of 10 FM patients. First, we examined theoretically well-known ES conditions within functional brain networks reconstructed from EEG, then tested whether a brain network model with ES conditions identified in the EEG data is sensitive to an external perturbation. We demonstrate for the first time that the FM brain displays characteristics of ES conditions, and that these factors significantly correlate with chronic pain intensity. The simulation data support the conclusion that networks with ES conditions are more sensitive to perturbation compared to non-ES network. The model and empirical data analysis provide convergent evidence that ES may be a network mechanism of FM hypersensitivity.

  19. Role of Alternative Therapies for Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Donna-Ann; Maslin, Benjamin; Legler, Aron; Springer, Erin; Asgerally, Abbas; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the treatment of chronic pain. This review examines alternative and complimentary therapies, which can be incorporated as part of a biopsychosocial approach in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. In the present investigation, literature from articles indexed on PubMed was evaluated including topics of alternative therapies, complimentary therapies, pain psychology, biofeedback therapy, physical exercise therapies, acupuncture, natural and herbal supplements, whole-body cryotherapy, and smartphone technologies in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. This review highlights the key role of psychology in the treatment of chronic pain. Cognitive behavior therapy appears to be the most impactful while biofeedback therapy has also been shown to be effective for chronic pain. Exercise therapy has been shown to be effective in short-, intermediate-, and long-term pain states. When compared to that in sham controls, acupuncture has shown some benefit for neck pain immediately after the procedure and in the short term and improvement has also been demonstrated in the treatment of headaches. The role of smartphones and whole-body cryotherapy are new modalities and further studies are needed. Recent literature suggests that several alternate therapies could play a role in the treatment of chronic pain, supporting the biopsychosocial model in the treatment of pain states.

  20. Psychological aspects of chronic pain: a literature review | Walker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of psychological variables on the experience of chronic pain continues to be underestimated by many healthcare practitioners. This literature review attempts to highlight the applicability of the conceptualization of chronic pain within the biopsychosocial model and diathesis-stress framework. Within these ...

  1. Clinical Characteristics of Dry Eye Patients With Chronic Pain Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Smitt-Kamminga, Nicole Sillevis; Kozareva, Diana; Nibourg, Simone A.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    PURPOSE: To investigate clinical characteristics of dry eye disease (DED) patients with a chronic pain syndrome. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. study. METHODS: Four hundred twenty-five patients of a tertiary care DED patient cohort in the Netherlands were included. Chronic pain syndromes irritable bowel

  2. Mindfulness for adolescent chronic pain: a pilot feasibility study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Chronic pain is common in paediatric populations and many patients do not respond to the currently available evidence-based treatments. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have a growing evidence-base in adults, but evidence is limited in youth with chronic pain. Methods: We conducted an open-label ...

  3. Computer modeling of neuromodulation in the management of chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manola, L.

    2006-01-01

    Summary of the thesis: Computer modeling of neuromodulation in the management of chronic pain by: Ljubomir Manola Neuromodulation is an important and frequent therapy applied, among others, in the management of chronic pain. Neuromodulation is defined as “a therapeutic alteration of activity in

  4. Classification of chronic orofacial pain using an intravenous diagnostic test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjakkes, G. -H. E.; De Bont, L. G. M.; van Wijhe, M.; Stegenga, B.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of a preliminary intravenous diagnostic test to classify chronic orofacial pain patients into different subgroups. Patients with chronic orofacial pain conditions that could not be unambiguously diagnosed. A retrospective evaluation of series of

  5. Psychosocial assessment and self-management of chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Voerman (Jessica)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Chronic pain is prevalent in both children and adults and has major negative consequences for their daily life, e.g. reduced participation in activities and depressive and anxious feelings. Therefore, it is important to early signal and treat chronic pain. This thesis

  6. Chronic Post Inguinal Herniorraphy Pain: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Inguinal hernia is a common surgical condition. Whereas complications associated with hernia repair are well documented, chronic postoperative groin pain has received less attention. Objective: To review the frequency and associated risk factors for chronic post herniorrhaphy groin pain at a tertiary urban ...

  7. Chronic pain in children and adolescents: observational studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.W. Perquin (Christel)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn adults, chronic pain is by most people involved considered to be a serious disorder. Although chronic pain in adults is in general not life-threatening, a considerable amount of literature elucidates the large number of sufferers, the high cost to the person in question and to the

  8. Neuropeptide Y and its involvement in chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz-delCastillo, Marta; Woldbye, David P D; Heegaard, Anne Marie

    2018-01-01

    Chronic pain is a serious condition that significantly impairs the quality of life, affecting an estimate of 1.5 billion people worldwide. Despite the physiological, emotional and financial burden of chronic pain, there is still a lack of efficient treatments. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a highly...... and Y2 receptors. Intrathecal administration of NPY in animal models of neuropathic, inflammatory or postoperative pain has been shown to cause analgesia, even though its exact mechanisms are still unclear. It remains to be seen whether these promising central antinociceptive effects of NPY can...... be transferred into a future treatment for chronic pain....

  9. Classical Conditioning Differences Associated With Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, Daniel S; Moseley, G Lorimer; Hillier, Susan L; Meulders, Ann

    2017-08-01

    Prominent clinical models of chronic pain propose a fundamental role of classical conditioning in the development of pain-related disability. If classical conditioning is key to this process, then people with chronic pain may show a different response to pain-related conditioned stimuli than healthy control subjects. We set out to determine whether this is the case by undertaking a comprehensive and systematic review of the literature. To identify studies comparing classical conditioning between people with chronic pain and healthy control subjects, the databases MEDLINE, PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, Scopus, and CINAHL were searched using key words and medical subject headings consistent with 'classical conditioning' and 'pain.' Articles were included when: 1) pain-free control and chronic pain groups were included, and 2) a differential classical conditioning design was used. The systematic search revealed 7 studies investigating differences in classical conditioning between people with chronic pain and healthy control participants. The included studies involved a total of 129 people with chronic pain (fibromyalgia syndrome, spinal pain, hand pain, irritable bowel syndrome), and 104 healthy control participants. Outcomes included indices of pain-related conditioning such as unconditioned stimulus (US) expectancy and contingency awareness, self-report and physiological measures of pain-related fear, evaluative judgements of conditioned stimulus pleasantness, and muscular and cortical responses. Because of variability in outcomes, meta-analyses included a maximum of 4 studies. People with chronic pain tended to show reduced differential learning and flatter generalization gradients with respect to US expectancy and fear-potentiated eyeblink startle responses. Some studies showed a propensity for greater muscular responses and perceptions of unpleasantness in response to pain-associated cues, relative to control cues. The review revealed preliminary evidence that people

  10. Adult Attachment and Approaches to Activity Engagement in Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E Andrews

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The way in which individuals with chronic pain habitually approach activity engagement has been shown to impact daily functioning, with both avoidance of one’s daily activities and overactivity (activity engagement that significantly exacerbates pain associated with more pain, higher levels of physical disability and poorer psychological functioning.

  11. The Impact of Virtual Reality on Chronic Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Jones

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic pain could benefit from additional non-opioid interventions. Virtual reality (VR has been shown to be effective in decreasing pain for procedural or acute pain but to date there have been few studies on its use in chronic pain. The present study was an investigation of the impact of a virtual reality application for chronic pain. Thirty (30 participants with various chronic pain conditions were offered a five-minute session using a virtual reality application called Cool! Participants were asked about their pain using a 0-10 visual analog scale rating before the VR session, during the session and immediately after the session. They were also asked about immersion into the VR world and about possible side effects. Pain was reduced from pre-session to post-session by 33%. Pain was reduced from pre-session during the VR session by 60%. These changes were both statistically significant at the p < .001 level. Three participants (10% reported no change between pre and post pain ratings. Ten participants (33% reported complete pain relief while doing the virtual reality session. All participants (100% reported a decrease in pain to some degree between pre-session pain and during-session pain. The virtual reality experience was found here to provide a significant amount of pain relief. A head mounted display (HMD was used with all subjects and no discomfort was experienced. Only one participant noted any side effects. VR seems to have promise as a non-opioid treatment for chronic pain and further investigation is warranted.

  12. Epidemiology of chronic pain in Denmark: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgren, Per; Ekholm, Ola; Peuckmann, Vera

    2008-01-01

    /long-lasting pain lasting 6 months or more?' The prevalence of chronic pain among individuals with a present or earlier cancer diagnosis was also assessed. In all, 7275 individuals (66.6%) completed a personal interview and 5552 individuals (50.9% of the original sample) completed and returned the self...... rated their health and quality of life as poor. Persons with earlier or present cancer diagnosis were more likely to report chronic pain. A substantial part of persons with chronic pain were not satisfied with the examinations and treatments offered. In conclusion, over a five-year period the prevalence......The most recent Danish health survey of 2005 is based on a region-stratified random sample of 10.916 individuals. Data were collected via personal interviews and self-administrated questionnaires. Respondents suffering from chronic pain were identified through the question 'Do you have chronic...

  13. Ketamine for chronic pain: risks and benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesters, Marieke; Martini, Christian; Dahan, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The anaesthetic ketamine is used to treat various chronic pain syndromes, especially those that have a neuropathic component. Low dose ketamine produces strong analgesia in neuropathic pain states, presumably by inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor although other mechanisms are possibly involved, including enhancement of descending inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects at central sites. Current data on short term infusions indicate that ketamine produces potent analgesia during administration only, while three studies on the effect of prolonged infusion (4–14 days) show long-term analgesic effects up to 3 months following infusion. The side effects of ketamine noted in clinical studies include psychedelic symptoms (hallucinations, memory defects, panic attacks), nausea/vomiting, somnolence, cardiovascular stimulation and, in a minority of patients, hepatoxicity. The recreational use of ketamine is increasing and comes with a variety of additional risks ranging from bladder and renal complications to persistent psychotypical behaviour and memory defects. Blind extrapolation of these risks to clinical patients is difficult because of the variable, high and recurrent exposure to the drug in ketamine abusers and the high frequency of abuse of other illicit substances in this population. In clinical settings, ketamine is well tolerated, especially when benzodiazepines are used to tame the psychotropic side effects. Irrespective, close monitoring of patients receiving ketamine is mandatory, particularly aimed at CNS, haemodynamic, renal and hepatic symptoms as well as abuse. Further research is required to assess whether the benefits outweigh the risks and costs. Until definite proof is obtained ketamine administration should be restricted to patients with therapy-resistant severe neuropathic pain. PMID:23432384

  14. Patients' needs regarding chronic pain rehabilitation and management

    OpenAIRE

    Skjutar, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis is to explore and describe patients’ needs related to chronic pain rehabilitation and management from the perspectives of health care professionals and patients with chronic pain. Study I explores indicators of need for referral to pain rehabilitation using a Delphi study with a multidisciplinary expert panel (n=23). The results show a multifaceted view of indicators, including aspects of physical and mental health, coping strategies, and work ...

  15. Treatment Preferences for CAM in Children with Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Tsao, Jennie C. I.; Meldrum, Marcia; Kim, Su C.; Jacob, Margaret C.; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2006-01-01

    CAM therapies have become increasingly popular in pediatric populations. Yet, little is known about children's preferences for CAM. This study examined treatment preferences in chronic pediatric pain patients offered a choice of CAM therapies for their pain. Participants were 129 children (94 girls) (mean age = 14.5 years ± 2.4; range = 8–18 years) presenting at a multidisciplinary, tertiary clinic specializing in pediatric chronic pain. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examin...

  16. Predictive risk factors for chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Erhan Arif; Kocer, Bilge Gonenli

    2018-01-01

    Although previous studies have reported that the prevalence of low back pain in Parkinson's disease was over 50% and low back pain was often classified as chronic, risk factors of chronic low back pain have not been previously investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the predictive risk factors of chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease. One hundred and sixty-eight patients with Parkinson's disease and 179 controls were consecutively included in the study. Demographic data of the two groups and disease characteristics of Parkinson's disease patient group were recorded. Low back pain lasting for ≥3 months was evaluated as chronic. Firstly, the bivariate correlations were calculated between chronic low back pain and all possible risk factors. Then, a multivariate regression was used to evaluate the impact of the predictors of chronic low back pain. The frequency of chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease patients and controls were 48.2% and 26.7%, respectively (p Parkinson's disease were general factors including age (odds ratio = 1.053, p = 0.032) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale - Depression subscore (odds ratio = 1.218, p = 0.001), and Parkinson's disease-related factors including rigidity (odds ratio = 5.109, p = 0.002) and posture item scores (odds ratio = 5.019, p = 0.0001). The chronic low back pain affects approximately half of the patients with Parkinson's disease. Prevention of depression or treatment recommendations for managing depression, close monitoring of anti- parkinsonian medication to keep motor symptoms under control, and attempts to prevent, correct or reduce abnormal posture may help reduce the frequency of chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Do psychological states associate with pain and disability in chronic neck pain patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Kapreli, Eleni; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Oldham, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is one of the most usual neuromusculoskeletal pain conditions which can lead patients to chronic disability. Similarly to other pain conditions, the changed psychological status of these patients is believed to be associated with their pain condition and disability. However, the association between the psychological status of patients with idiopathic neck pain and their pain intensity and disability is minimally explored. This study was aimed at investigating the association between psychological states (anxiety, depression, kinesiophobia, catastrophizing) of patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain and self-reported pain and disability. Forty five patients with idiopathic chronic neck pain (more than 6 months, at least once a week) participated. Their psychological states were assessed by using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, Pain Catastrophizing scale and Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia. Self-reported disability was recorded with the Neck Disability Index. Pain intensity was recorded by using a visual analog scale. Neck pain intensity was significantly correlated with anxiety (pneck pain is associated with their self-reported disability, whereas anxiety is also associated with their pain intensity. Anxiety and catastrophizing may be important predicting markers of patients' self-reported disability.

  18. Depressed Mood Differentially Mediates the Relationship between Pain Intensity and Pain Disability Depending on Pain Duration: A Moderated Mediation Analysis in Chronic Pain Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Probst

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that pain is associated with disability and that depressed mood mediates the relationship between pain and disability. The question of whether duration of pain moderates these effects was addressed in this cross-sectional study with 356 chronic pain patients. A simple mediation model replicated the notion that depressed mood explains a significant proportion of the relationship between pain and disability (in the study at hand: 12%. A moderated mediation model revealed that the indirect effect of pain on disability through depressed mood is moderated by pain duration: while depressed mood did not mediate the effect of pain on disability in chronic pain patients with shorter pain duration, depressed mood significantly mediated the effect pain exerts on disability in chronic pain patients with longer pain duration. Pain duration did not moderate the direct effect of pain on disability. Implications of these findings for the treatment of chronic pain might be that targeting depressed mood is especially relevant in chronic pain patients with longer pain duration to reduce the effect of pain on disability.

  19. Depressed Mood Differentially Mediates the Relationship between Pain Intensity and Pain Disability Depending on Pain Duration: A Moderated Mediation Analysis in Chronic Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Thomas; Neumeier, Susanne; Altmeppen, Jürgen; Angerer, Michael; Loew, Thomas; Pieh, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that pain is associated with disability and that depressed mood mediates the relationship between pain and disability. The question of whether duration of pain moderates these effects was addressed in this cross-sectional study with 356 chronic pain patients. A simple mediation model replicated the notion that depressed mood explains a significant proportion of the relationship between pain and disability (in the study at hand: 12%). A moderated mediation model revealed that the indirect effect of pain on disability through depressed mood is moderated by pain duration: while depressed mood did not mediate the effect of pain on disability in chronic pain patients with shorter pain duration, depressed mood significantly mediated the effect pain exerts on disability in chronic pain patients with longer pain duration. Pain duration did not moderate the direct effect of pain on disability. Implications of these findings for the treatment of chronic pain might be that targeting depressed mood is especially relevant in chronic pain patients with longer pain duration to reduce the effect of pain on disability.

  20. Tapentadol Extended Release in the Treatment of Severe Chronic Low Back Pain and Osteoarthritis Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; LeQuang, Jo Ann; Raffa, Robert B; Bisney, John

    2018-04-05

    Tapentadol is a novel pain reliever with apparently synergistic dual mechanisms of action, capable of addressing both nociceptive and neuropathic components of chronic pain. As an effective analgesic with good tolerability, tapentadol may be appropriate for patients suffering from severe chronic pain associated with low back pain (LBP) or osteoarthritis (OA). Efficacy studies of tapentadol in populations of patients with severe chronic LBP or OA pain suggest that tapentadol is non-inferior to oxycodone. Its tolerability, especially with respect to gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, may be better than that of other strong opioids in clinical trials and analyses of multiple trials. Patient satisfaction with tapentadol extended release for chronic noncancer pain syndromes is good. Although tapentadol has an opioid component with abuse liability, it appears to be a difficult opioid for tampering with less appeal to abusers than other opioids. For patients with severe LBP and OA pain, tapentadol appears to hold promise as a safe, effective therapeutic option.

  1. Do illness perceptions of people with chronic low back pain differ from people without chronic low back pain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C. Paul; van Ittersum, Miriam W.; Kaptein, Ad A.

    Objectives To determine why some people develop chronic low back pain, and whether illness perceptions are an important risk factor in the transition from acute to chronic low back pain. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants Four hundred and two members of the general Dutch population, with and

  2. Pain and pressure pain thresholds in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome and healthy controls: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, Anette; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Wyller, Vegard Bruun; Sulheim, Dag; Fagermoen, Even; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Helseth, Sølvi

    2014-10-06

    Although pain is a significant symptom in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), pain is poorly understood in adolescents with CFS. The aim of this study was to explore pain distribution and prevalence, pain intensity and its functional interference in everyday life, as well as pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in adolescents with CFS and compare this with a control group of healthy adolescents (HC). This is a case-control, cross-sectional study on pain including 120 adolescents with CFS and 39 HCs, aged 12-18 years. We measured pain frequency, pain severity and pain interference using self-reporting questionnaires. PPT was measured using pressure algometry. Data were collected from March 2010 until October 2012 as part of the Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial. Adolescents with CFS had significantly lower PPTs compared with HCs (pmuscles and joints. Moreover, in all sites, the pain intensity levels were significantly higher than in HCs (pFatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial (NorCAPITAL) http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Chronic Pain: How Challenging Are DDIs in the Analgesic Treatment of Inpatients with Multiple Chronic Conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenhuener, Klarissa; Eschmann, Emmanuel; Kienast, Alexander; Schneider, Dominik; Minder, Christoph E.; Saller, Reinhard; Zimmerli, Lukas; Blaser, Jürg; Battegay, Edouard

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is common in multimorbid patients. However, little is known about the implications of chronic pain and analgesic treatment on multimorbid patients. This study aimed to assess chronic pain therapy with regard to the interaction potential in a sample of inpatients with multiple chronic conditions. Methods and Findings We conducted a retrospective study with all multimorbid inpatients aged ≥18 years admitted to the Department of Internal Medicine of University Hospital Zurich in 2011 (n = 1,039 patients). Data were extracted from the electronic health records and reviewed. We identified 433 hospitalizations of patients with chronic pain and analyzed their combinations of chronic conditions (multimorbidity). We then classified all analgesic prescriptions according to the World Health Organization (WHO) analgesic ladder. Furthermore, we used a Swiss drug-drug interactions knowledge base to identify potential interactions between opioids and other drug classes, in particular coanalgesics and other concomitant drugs. Chronic pain was present in 38% of patients with multimorbidity. On average, patients with chronic pain were aged 65.7 years and had a mean number of 6.6 diagnoses. Hypertension was the most common chronic condition. Chronic back pain was the most common painful condition. Almost 90% of patients were exposed to polypharmacotherapy. Of the chronic pain patients, 71.1% received opioids for moderate to severe pain, 43.4% received coanalgesics. We identified 3,186 potential drug-drug interactions, with 17% classified between analgesics (without coanalgesics). Conclusions Analgesic drugs-related DDIs, in particular opioids, in multimorbid patients are often complex and difficult to assess by using DDI knowledge bases alone. Drug-multimorbidity interactions are not sufficiently investigated and understood. Today, the scientific literature is scarce for chronic pain in combination with multiple coexisting medical conditions and medication

  4. Trunk muscle recruitment patterns in specific chronic low back pain populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silfies, Sheri P; Squillante, Dawn; Maurer, Philip; Westcott, Sarah; Karduna, Andrew R

    2005-06-01

    It is hypothesized that injury or degeneration of osteoligamentous spinal structures would require compensation by trunk musculature and alterations in motor control to maintain spine stability. While, biomechanical modeling has supported this hypothesis, studies of muscle recruitment patterns in chronic low back pain patients both with and without significant osteoligamentous damage have been limited. This study utilized a non-randomized case-control design to investigate trunk muscle recruitment patterns around the neutral spine position between subgroups of patients with chronic mechanical low back pain and asymptomatic controls. Twenty subjects with chronic low back pain attributed to clinical lumbar instability were matched to 20 asymptomatic controls. In addition 12 patients with non-specific chronic low back pain were studied. Surface EMG from five trunk muscles was analyzed to determine activation levels and patterns of recruitment during a standing reach under two different loading conditions. The chronic low back pain group with symptoms attributed to clinical instability demonstrated significantly higher activation levels of the external oblique and rectus abdominus muscles and lower abdominal synergist ratios than the control group. No significant differences were found between patient subgroups. While these data demonstrate altered muscle recruitment patterns in patients with chronic low back pain, the changes are not consistent with Panjabi's theory suggesting that these alterations are driven by passive subsystem damage. However, the higher activation of global abdominal musculature and altered synergist patterns may represent a motor control pattern that has consequences for continued dysfunction and chronic pain.

  5. Pain catastrophizing as a risk factor for chronic pain after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burns LC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay C Burns,1–3 Sarah E Ritvo,1 Meaghan K Ferguson,1 Hance Clarke,3–5 Ze’ev Seltzer,3,5 Joel Katz1,3–5 1Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Arthritis Research Centre of Canada, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; 4Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Centre for the Study of Pain, Faculties of Dentistry and Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a common and costly surgical procedure. Despite high success rates, many TKA patients develop chronic pain in the months and years following surgery, constituting a public health burden. Pain catastrophizing is a construct that reflects anxious preoccupation with pain, inability to inhibit pain-related fears, amplification of the significance of pain vis-à-vis health implications, and a sense of helplessness regarding pain. Recent research suggests that it may be an important risk factor for untoward TKA outcomes. To clarify this impact, we systematically reviewed the literature to date on pain catastrophizing as a prospective predictor of chronic pain following TKA. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases to identify articles related to pain catastrophizing, TKA, risk models, and chronic pain. We reviewed titles and abstracts to identify original research articles that met our specified inclusion criteria. Included articles were then rated for methodological quality. including methodological quality. Due to heterogeneity in follow-up, analyses, and outcomes reported across studies, a quantitative meta-analysis could not be performed. Results: We identified six prospective longitudinal studies with small-to-mid-sized samples that met the inclusion criteria. Despite considerable variability in reported pain outcomes, pain catastrophizing was identified as a significant

  6. Acute and chronic pain syndromes in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    A representative sample of 117 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) was interviewed on pain syndromes. Chronic syndromes lasting more than one month included dysaestesthesia, low back pain, spasms, tonic seizures, tightening and painful sensations in the extremities. Acute syndromes...... with pain at the time of the examination increased with age and duration of disease. Patients with pain were significantly more often spastic and significantly more often sought alternative treatment forms. No difference was found for mean age, sex, physical impairment, duration of disease from onset of MS...... included neuralgia, L'Hermitte's sign and pain associated with optic neuritis. Thirty-five per cent were pain-free. Of the remaining patients had 45% pain at the time of the examination, 32% indicated pain among the most severe symptoms of MS and 23% had pain at the onset of MS. The number of patients...

  7. Acute and chronic pain syndromes in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    with pain at the time of the examination increased with age and duration of disease. Patients with pain were significantly more often spastic and significantly more often sought alternative treatment forms. No difference was found for mean age, sex, physical impairment, duration of disease from onset of MS......A representative sample of 117 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) was interviewed on pain syndromes. Chronic syndromes lasting more than one month included dysaestesthesia, low back pain, spasms, tonic seizures, tightening and painful sensations in the extremities. Acute syndromes...... included neuralgia, L'Hermitte's sign and pain associated with optic neuritis. Thirty-five per cent were pain-free. Of the remaining patients had 45% pain at the time of the examination, 32% indicated pain among the most severe symptoms of MS and 23% had pain at the onset of MS. The number of patients...

  8. AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Cancer Pain Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paice, Judith A; Mulvey, Matt; Bennett, Michael; Dougherty, Patrick M; Farrar, John T; Mantyh, Patrick W; Miaskowski, Christine; Schmidt, Brian; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-03-01

    Chronic cancer pain is a serious complication of malignancy or its treatment. Currently, no comprehensive, universally accepted cancer pain classification system exists. Clarity in classification of common cancer pain syndromes would improve clinical assessment and management. Moreover, an evidence-based taxonomy would enhance cancer pain research efforts by providing consistent diagnostic criteria, ensuring comparability across clinical trials. As part of a collaborative effort between the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTTION) and the American Pain Society (APS), the ACTTION-APS Pain Taxonomy initiative worked to develop the characteristics of an optimal diagnostic system. After the establishment of these characteristics, a working group consisting of clinicians and clinical and basic scientists with expertise in cancer and cancer-related pain was convened to generate core diagnostic criteria for an illustrative sample of 3 chronic pain syndromes associated with cancer (ie, bone pain and pancreatic cancer pain as models of pain related to a tumor) or its treatment (ie, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy). A systematic review and synthesis was conducted to provide evidence for the dimensions that comprise this cancer pain taxonomy. Future efforts will subject these diagnostic categories and criteria to systematic empirical evaluation of their feasibility, reliability, and validity and extension to other cancer-related pain syndromes. The ACTTION-APS chronic cancer pain taxonomy provides an evidence-based classification for 3 prevalent syndromes, namely malignant bone pain, pancreatic cancer pain, and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. This taxonomy provides consistent diagnostic criteria, common features, comorbidities, consequences, and putative mechanisms for these potentially serious cancer pain conditions that can be extended and applied with other cancer

  9. Locus of control in active physical therapy treatment for non-specific chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Alexandre Apolinário de Souza; Diniz, Leandro Silva Rezende; Oliveira, Vinícius Cunha; Venturini, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    AbstractIntroduction The health locus of control is defined as the perception of individuals in relation to whom they believe to be responsible for their health condition, including low back pain.Objective To identify whether individuals suffering from chronic low back pain in active physical therapy treatment believe they are responsible for their own condition.Material and methods Cross-sectional study involving 28 patients under active physical therapy treatment for non-specific chronic lo...

  10. AMELOTEX IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC BACK PAIN SYNDROMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Yuryevna Suvorova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a considerable increase in the number of patients with lingering recurrent and chronic pain syndromes of various origin. Forty-one patients with dorsopathies were examined. Two types of pain were identified; these were vertebrogenic and nonvertebrogenic pains. The appropriateness of this identification was confirmed by instrumental studies. Treatment was performed using a selective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (Amelotex. Pain syndrome relief was noted during the therapy

  11. AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Cancer Pain Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Paice, Judith A.; Mulvey, Matt; Bennett, Michael; Dougherty, Patrick M.; Farrar, John T.; Mantyh, Patrick W.; Miaskowski, Christine; Schmidt, Brian; Smith, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cancer pain is a serious complication of malignancy or its treatment. Currently, no comprehensive, universally accepted cancer pain classification system exists. Clarity in classification of common cancer pain syndromes would improve clinical assessment and management. Moreover, an evidence-based taxonomy would enhance cancer pain research efforts by providing consistent diagnostic criteria, ensuring comparability across clinical trials. As part of a collaborative effort between the A...

  12. Adjunctive cognitive behavioural treatment for chronic pain couples improves marital satisfaction but not pain management outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramke, S; Sharpe, L; Newton-John, T

    2016-11-01

    Data have consistently shown that patient coping with chronic pain can be affected by various factors associated with the primary relationship, and hence efforts to include the patient's partner in the treatment process have merit. This study evaluated the benefit of adding an adjunctive, couples-based, cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) for chronic pain to a standard cognitive behavioural pain management programme. Forty-five couples were randomly assigned to either an adjunctive couples intervention (n = 19) or the pain programme only (n = 26). All patient participants completed a 3-week multi-disciplinary pain management programme, to which their partners were invited to attend one full day. In addition, partners in the adjunctive condition received four, one hour treatment sessions focusing on pain education, patient-partner communication, operant behavioural principles and relapse prevention strategies. Partner sessions for the adjunctive intervention were provided over the telephone. By the completion of the pain programme the adjunctive couples intervention demonstrated significant improvements in marital satisfaction for the spouses over and above attendance at the pain management programme alone (p = 0.003). However, spouse involvement did not facilitate any additional response to treatment for pain patients on marital satisfaction, pain, disability or any indices of distress. All treatment gains were maintained at 1 month follow-up. These data demonstrate that a brief CBT intervention can significantly improve marital satisfaction for spouses of chronic pain patients, but the treatment does not translate to improvements in function on any outcomes, including marital satisfaction, for patients of chronic pain. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: A brief, telephone-based intervention for couples living with chronic pain is an acceptable format for intervention. This intervention can significantly improve marital satisfaction for partners of chronic pain

  13. Potential Mechanisms Underlying Centralized Pain and Emerging Therapeutic Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia C. Eller-Smith

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Centralized pain syndromes are associated with changes within the central nervous system that amplify peripheral input and/or generate the perception of pain in the absence of a noxious stimulus. Examples of idiopathic functional disorders that are often categorized as centralized pain syndromes include fibromyalgia, chronic pelvic pain syndromes, migraine, and temporomandibular disorder. Patients often suffer from widespread pain, associated with more than one specific syndrome, and report fatigue, mood and sleep disturbances, and poor quality of life. The high degree of symptom comorbidity and a lack of definitive underlying etiology make these syndromes notoriously difficult to treat. The main purpose of this review article is to discuss potential mechanisms of centrally-driven pain amplification and how they may contribute to increased comorbidity, poorer pain outcomes, and decreased quality of life in patients diagnosed with centralized pain syndromes, as well as discuss emerging non-pharmacological therapies that improve symptomology associated with these syndromes. Abnormal regulation and output of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is commonly associated with centralized pain disorders. The HPA axis is the primary stress response system and its activation results in downstream production of cortisol and a dampening of the immune response. Patients with centralized pain syndromes often present with hyper- or hypocortisolism and evidence of altered downstream signaling from the HPA axis including increased Mast cell (MC infiltration and activation, which can lead to sensitization of nearby nociceptive afferents. Increased peripheral input via nociceptor activation can lead to “hyperalgesic priming” and/or “wind-up” and eventually to central sensitization through long term potentiation in the central nervous system. Other evidence of central modifications has been observed through brain imaging studies of functional

  14. Deficient Pain Modulation in Patients with Chronic Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashi, Yafit; Ratmansky, Motti; Defrin, Ruth

    2017-11-14

    Hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) following stroke significantly affects the individual's function and quality of life. The mechanism of HSP is not clearly understood; hence, it is unclear why HSP resolves spontaneously or following routine care in some patients, while in others it becomes persistent. The aim was therefore to study whether HSP is associated with deficient pain modulation. Thirty post-stroke patients-16 with HSP and 14 without HSP-and 20 matched controls participated. Pain adaptation and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) were measured as indicators of pain modulation, in the affected (hemiplegic) and contralateral shoulder as well as in the affected shin among post-stroke patients, and in comparable body regions among controls. Post-stroke patients also underwent functional and physical evaluation of the shoulder. Pain adaptation was absent among HSP patients, in both the painful shoulder and the affected shin, but existed in the 2 control groups. In addition, the affected shoulder and shin among the HSP group had reduced thermal sensibility compared to the contralateral regions. CPM was similar across groups. Shoulder functional status and physical status were similar for the 2 post-stroke groups. The results suggest that HSP is associated with a lack of pain adaptation, characteristic not only of the painful shoulder but also of the affected side. Although we cannot determine whether lack of pain adaptation precedes the HSP or results from it, interventions that enhance descending pain inhibition may improve management and prevent HSP chronification. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  15. Measuring Emotional Intelligence Enhances the Psychological Evaluation of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Eva M; Walsh, Rosemary; Andrews, Leanne; McPherson, Susan

    2017-12-01

    The assessment of emotional factors, in addition to other psychosocial factors, has been recommended as a means of identifying individuals with chronic pain who may not respond to certain pain treatments. Systematic reviews of the evidence regarding the prediction of responsiveness to a treatment called the spinal cord stimulator (SCS) have yielded inconclusive results. Emotional intelligence is a term which refers to the ability to identify and manage emotions in oneself and others and has been shown to be inversely associated with emotional distress and acute pain. This study aims to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence, chronic pain, and the more established psychosocial factors usually used for SCS evaluations by clinical psychologists in medical settings. A sample of 112 patients with chronic pain on an acute hospital waiting list for SCS procedures in a pain medicine service were recruited. Psychological measures were completed including: a novel measure of emotional intelligence; usual measures of emotional distress and catastrophizing; and a numerical rating scale designed to assess pain intensity, pain-related distress, and interference. As predicted, findings revealed significant associations between most of the measures analyzed and current pain intensity. When entered into a simultaneous regression analysis, emotional intelligence scores remained the only significant predictor of current pain intensity. There are potential clinical, ethical, and organizational implications of emotional intelligence processes partially predicting pain in patients on a waiting list for a medical procedure. These results may offer new insight, understanding, and evaluation targets for clinical psychologists in the field of pain management.

  16. Breakthrough pain in opioid-treated chronic non-malignant pain patients referred to a multidisciplinary pain centre: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, J; Nielsen, P R; Eriksen, Jacob Gram

    2006-01-01

    Breakthrough pain (BTP) has not formerly been discussed as such in chronic non-malignant pain patients referred to pain centres and clinics. The purpose of the study was to investigate the prevalence, characteristics and mechanisms of BTP in opioid-treated chronic non-malignant pain patients...... referred to a pain centre and to assess the short-term effects of pain treatment....

  17. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  18. Mindfulness-based interventions for chronic pain: Evidence and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Muhammad Hassan; Ali, Ali Ahsan; Sudak, Donna M

    2018-02-01

    Chronic pain is estimated to occur in from 5.5% to 33% of the world's adult population (Gureje et al., 1998). Chronic pain is frequently treated with opiates, which has produced an opiate addiction crisis (Dowell et al., 2016). Several non-pharmacological treatment alternatives can help manage chronic pain. There is moderate evidence that mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) such as meditation, yoga, and stress reduction lower the perception of pain, increase mobility, improve functioning and well-being. By integrating MBIs and other therapeutic interventions in a multi-disciplinary pain management plan, clinicians can improve treatment outcomes and potentially decrease pain-related medication utilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Addiction to opioids in chronic pain patients: a literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Sjøgren, Per

    2007-01-01

    , incidence and prevalence of addiction in opioid treated pain patients, screening tools for assessing opioid addiction in chronic pain patients and recommendations regarding addiction problems in national and international guidelines for opioid treatment in cancer patients and chronic non-malignant pain...... patients. The review indicates that the prevalence of addiction varied from 0% up to 50% in chronic non-malignant pain patients, and from 0% to 7.7% in cancer patients depending of the subpopulation studied and the criteria used. The risk of addiction has to be considered when initiating long-term opioid...... treatment as addiction may result in poor pain control. Several screening tools were identified, but only a few were thoroughly validated with respect to validity and reliability. Most of the identified guidelines mention addiction as a potential problem. The guidelines in cancer pain management...

  20. Connecting parents of children with chronic pain through art therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielech, Melissa; Sieberg, Christine B; Simons, Laura E

    2013-09-01

    To help address the unique needs of parents of children with chronic pain, a four module, parent-only, group art therapy curriculum was designed and implemented within an interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation treatment program. We evaluated perceived satisfaction and helpfulness of the group intervention. Fifty-three parents of children experiencing chronic pain enrolled in a day hospital interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation program participated. The voluntary parent art therapy group was offered one time per week for one hour. Participants completed a measure of satisfaction, helpfulness, and perceived social support at the end of each group session. Parents enjoyed participating in the group, agreed that they would try art therapy again, and found it to be a helpful, supportive, and validating experience. Initial results are promising that group art therapy is an appropriate and helpful means of supporting parents of children with chronic pain during interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation.

  1. Factors associated with increased risk for pain catastrophizing in patients with chronic neck pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Jun; Lee, Rippy; Yoon, Duck Mi; Yoon, Kyung Bong; Kim, Kiwook; Kim, Shin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pain catastrophizing is becoming increasingly recognized as a clinically important psychological factor in chronic musculoskeletal pain. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, we have identified factors associated with an increased risk for pain catastrophizing in chronic neck pain (CNP) patients. We obtained data from our medical database on 331 patients who were treated for neck pain as their chief complaint at our clinic. The Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) was used to define a high pain catastrophizing state (PCS score ≥21) in this study. Patient demographics, pain-related factors, and psychological factors were evaluated with logistic regression analysis to identify risk factors of high pain catastrophizing among patients with CNP. A total of 256 patients with CNP satisfied the study inclusion criteria and were included in the analyses. The median PCS score was 16 (range, 0–45), and 86 of 256 patients (33.5%) reported a PCS score ≥21. In multivariate analysis, high pain intensity, clinical insomnia, and a high level of depression/anxiety were strongly associated with high pain catastrophizing in patients with CNP. Depression was the strongest predictor of high pain catastrophizing, with an odds ratio of 7.35 (95% confidence interval 2.23–24.22). High pain catastrophizing was not significantly related to age, gender, comorbidities, or neck pain-related physical symptoms. In conclusion, poor psychological states should be addressed as an important part of pain management in CNP patients who are susceptible to high pain catastrophizing. PMID:27631217

  2. Preoperative widespread pain sensitization and chronic pain after hip and knee replacement: a cohort analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Sayers, Adrian; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Pyke, Mark; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain after joint replacement is common, affecting approximately 10% of patients after total hip replacement (THR) and 20% of patients after total knee replacement (TKR). Heightened generalized sensitivity to nociceptive input could be a risk factor for the development of this pain. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was associated with chronic pain after joint replacement. Data were analyzed from 254 patients receiving THR and 239 patients receiving TKR. Pain was assessed preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Pain Scale. Preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was assessed through measurement of pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at the forearm using an algometer. Statistical analysis was conducted using linear regression and linear mixed models, and adjustments were made for confounding variables. In both the THR and TKR cohort, lower PPTs (heightened widespread pain sensitivity) were significantly associated with higher preoperative pain severity. Lower PPTs were also significantly associated with higher pain severity at 12 months after surgery in the THR cohort. However, PPTs were not associated with the change in pain severity from preoperative to 12 months postoperative in either the TKR or THR cohort. These findings suggest that although preoperative widespread pressure pain sensitivity is associated with pain severity before and after joint replacement, it is not a predictor of the amount of pain relief that patients gain from joint replacement surgery, independent of preoperative pain severity. PMID:25599300

  3. Individual and relational correlates of pain-related empathic accuracy in spouses of chronic pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Nathalie; Thibault, Pascal; Sullivan, Michael J L

    2008-10-01

    This study aims to investigate correlates of pain-related empathic accuracy in spouses of chronic pain patients. Specifically, analyses addressed: (1) the correlates of pain-related empathic accuracy, (2) the relation between pain-related empathic accuracy, and patient and spouse adaptational outcomes, and (3) the relation between pain-related empathic accuracy and relational outcomes. Fifty-eight chronic pain patients (28 women and 30 men) were filmed while participating in a simulated occupational lifting task. Patients were asked to report their level of pain while lifting canisters partially filled with sand. Spouses were later asked to view the video record of their partner's performance and to estimate their partner's level of pain. Empathic accuracy was defined in terms of the overall discrepancy between patients' pain ratings and spouses' pain estimates, and by the degree of covariation between patients' pain ratings and spouses' pain estimates across trials. Analysis revealed that patients' pain severity, catastrophizing, fear of pain, and level of disability were significant correlates of empathic accuracy. Higher levels of pain-related empathic accuracy were associated to negative adaptational outcomes for chronic pain patients. With regard to the spouse, empathic accuracy was associated with the spouses' perceiving that they express less punitive responses when the patient is in pain. Empathic accuracy was not significantly related to relational outcomes. The results of this study suggest that empathic accuracy is associated with negative outcomes for the patient, and might not be an important correlate of marital satisfaction in couples in which one of the partners is suffering from chronic pain.

  4. Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Shirvalkar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a subjective experience that alerts an individual to actual or potential tissue damage. Through mechanisms that are still unclear, normal physiological pain can lose its adaptive value and evolve into pathological chronic neuropathic pain. Chronic pain is a multifaceted experience that can be understood in terms of somatosensory, affective, and cognitive dimensions, each with associated symptoms and neural signals. While there have been many attempts to treat chronic pain, in this article we will argue that feedback-controlled ‘closed-loop’ deep brain stimulation (DBS offers an urgent and promising route for treatment. Contemporary DBS trials for chronic pain use “open-loop” approaches in which tonic stimulation is delivered with fixed parameters to a single brain region. The impact of key variables such as the target brain region and the stimulation waveform is unclear, and long-term efficacy has mixed results. We hypothesize that chronic pain is due to abnormal synchronization between brain networks encoding the somatosensory, affective and cognitive dimensions of pain, and that multisite, closed-loop DBS provides an intuitive mechanism for disrupting that synchrony. By (1 identifying biomarkers of the subjective pain experience and (2 integrating these signals into a state-space representation of pain, we can create a predictive model of each patient's pain experience. Then, by establishing how stimulation in different brain regions influences individual neural signals, we can design real-time, closed-loop therapies tailored to each patient. While chronic pain is a complex disorder that has eluded modern therapies, rich historical data and state-of-the-art technology can now be used to develop a promising treatment.

  5. European Pain Federation position paper on appropriate opioid use in chronic pain management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien, T; Christrup, L L; Drewes, A M

    2017-01-01

    Poorly controlled pain is a global public health issue. The personal, familial and societal costs are immeasurable. Only a minority of European patients have access to a comprehensive specialist pain clinic. More commonly the responsibility for chronic pain management and initiating opioid therap...

  6. Prevalence of facet joint pain in chronic spinal pain of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pampati Vidyasagar

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facet joints are a clinically important source of chronic cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pain. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the prevalence of facet joint pain by spinal region in patients with chronic spine pain referred to an interventional pain management practice. Methods Five hundred consecutive patients with chronic, non-specific spine pain were evaluated. The prevalence of facet joint pain was determined using controlled comparative local anesthetic blocks (1% lidocaine or 1% lidocaine followed by 0.25% bupivacaine, in accordance with the criteria established by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP. The study was performed in the United States in a non-university based ambulatory interventional pain management setting. Results The prevalence of facet joint pain in patients with chronic cervical spine pain was 55% 5(95% CI, 49% – 61%, with thoracic spine pain was 42% (95% CI, 30% – 53%, and in with lumbar spine pain was 31% (95% CI, 27% – 36%. The false-positive rate with single blocks with lidocaine was 63% (95% CI, 54% – 72% in the cervical spine, 55% (95% CI, 39% – 78% in the thoracic spine, and 27% (95% CI, 22% – 32% in the lumbar spine. Conclusion This study demonstrated that in an interventional pain management setting, facet joints are clinically important spinal pain generators in a significant proportion of patients with chronic spinal pain. Because these patients typically have failed conservative management, including physical therapy, chiropractic treatment and analgesics, they may benefit from specific interventions designed to manage facet joint pain.

  7. Enhanced Brain Responses to Pain-Related Words in Chronic Back Pain Patients and Their Modulation by Current Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ritter

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies in healthy controls (HC and pain-free migraine patients found activations to pain-related words in brain regions known to be activated while subjects experience pain. The aim of the present study was to identify neural activations induced by pain-related words in a sample of chronic back pain (CBP patients experiencing current chronic pain compared to HC. In particular, we were interested in how current pain influences brain activations induced by pain-related adjectives. Subjects viewed pain-related, negative, positive, and neutral words; subjects were asked to generate mental images related to these words during fMRI scanning. Brain activation was compared between CBP patients and HC in response to the different word categories and examined in relation to current pain in CBP patients. Pain-related words vs. neutral words activated a network of brain regions including cingulate cortex and insula in subjects and patients. There was stronger activation in medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior midcingulate cortex in CPB patients than in HC. The magnitude of activation for pain-related vs. negative words showed a negative linear relationship to CBP patients’ current pain. Our findings confirm earlier observations showing that pain-related words activate brain networks similar to noxious stimulation. Importantly, CBP patients show even stronger activation of these structures while merely processing pain-related words. Current pain directly influences on this activation.

  8. Enhanced Brain Responses to Pain-Related Words in Chronic Back Pain Patients and Their Modulation by Current Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Alexander; Franz, Marcel; Puta, Christian; Dietrich, Caroline; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2016-08-10

    Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in healthy controls (HC) and pain-free migraine patients found activations to pain-related words in brain regions known to be activated while subjects experience pain. The aim of the present study was to identify neural activations induced by pain-related words in a sample of chronic back pain (CBP) patients experiencing current chronic pain compared to HC. In particular, we were interested in how current pain influences brain activations induced by pain-related adjectives. Subjects viewed pain-related, negative, positive, and neutral words; subjects were asked to generate mental images related to these words during fMRI scanning. Brain activation was compared between CBP patients and HC in response to the different word categories and examined in relation to current pain in CBP patients. Pain-related words vs. neutral words activated a network of brain regions including cingulate cortex and insula in subjects and patients. There was stronger activation in medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior midcingulate cortex in CPB patients than in HC. The magnitude of activation for pain-related vs. negative words showed a negative linear relationship to CBP patients' current pain. Our findings confirm earlier observations showing that pain-related words activate brain networks similar to noxious stimulation. Importantly, CBP patients show even stronger activation of these structures while merely processing pain-related words. Current pain directly influences on this activation.

  9. Predictors of opioid efficacy in patients with chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Kasper; Olesen, Anne E; Gram, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    use for diverse types of chronic pain at five European centers. Quantitative sensory testing, electroencephalography (EEG) recordings, and assessment of pain catastrophizing were performed prior to treatment. The co-primary outcomes were change from baseline in ratings of chronic pain and quality...... of life after 14 days of opioid treatment. Secondary outcomes included patient's global impression of clinical change and side effects. Logistic regression models adjusted for age and sex were used to identify biomarkers predictive for successful treatment, defined as at least a 30% reduction in average...... pain intensity or an improvement in quality of life of at least 10 scale points. Fifty-nine patients (94%) completed the study. The mean age was 55 ± 16 years and 69% were females. Pain reduction was predicted by cold pain intensity (OR: 0.69; P = 0.01), pain catastrophizing (OR: 0.82; P = 0...

  10. A Pilot Study of Mindfulness Meditation for Pediatric Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn C. Waelde

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in psychological interventions for pediatric chronic pain, there has been little research examining mindfulness meditation for these conditions. This study presents data from a pilot clinical trial of a six-week manualized mindfulness meditation intervention offered to 20 adolescents aged 13–17 years. Measures of pain intensity, functional disability, depression and parent worry about their child’s pain were obtained at baseline and post-treatment. Results indicated no significant changes in pain or depression, however functional disability and frequency of pain functioning complaints improved with small effect sizes. Parents’ worry about child’s pain significantly decreased with a large effect size. Participants rated intervention components positively and most teens suggested that the number of sessions be increased. Three case examples illustrate mindfulness meditation effects and precautions. Mindfulness meditation shows promise as a feasible and acceptable intervention for youth with chronic pain. Future research should optimize intervention components and determine treatment efficacy.

  11. Chronic groin pain in an amateur soccer player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, C; Sekir, U; Yildiz, Y; Aydin, T; Ors, F; Kalyon, T A

    2004-04-01

    Chronic groin pain is common in soccer players because of the biomechanics of kicking causing recurrent stress to the abdominal muscles, groin flexors, and adductor muscles. Myositis ossificans in adductor muscles is a rare cause of chronic groin pain in soccer players. Only two cases have been reported and the iliopsoas muscle was involved in both. This case report emphasises the importance of direct radiography for diagnosis in chronic groin pain and is a reminder that the development of myositis ossificans in the adductor muscles may be a cause.

  12. Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    sensory axons of mice. The Journal of Physiology 550, 921-926 3. Milligan, E.D. & Linda Watkins, L.R. (2009) Pathological and protective roles of glia in...chronic neuropathic pain conditions3 and may result from a dysregulation of the spinal immunocompetent cells , glia , and their up regulation of...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0806 TITLE: Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain Treatment

  13. Medicate or Meditate? Greater Pain Acceptance is Related to Lower Pain Medication Use in Persons With Chronic Pain and Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Anna L; F Murphy, John; Kalpakjian, Claire Z; Chen, Philip

    2018-04-01

    There is little information about whether use of pain self-management skills that are common targets of psychosocial interventions for pain are associated with reduced reliance on pain medications. The aim of this study was to test whether higher chronic pain acceptance, which is a readily modified pain self-management approach, is related to lower use of pain medications (eg, opioid medications, and gabapentinoids) in a sample with chronic pain and spinal cord injury (SCI). This is a cross-sectional survey study of pain medication use, pain severity and distribution (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9]), and chronic pain acceptance (Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire [CPAQ]) administered to a sample of 120 adults with chronic pain and SCI. Regression results indicated that, above and beyond the effects of pain intensity, pain distribution, and depressive symptoms, higher pain acceptance was related to lower use of all types of pain medications, and lower odds of using opioid medications or gabapentinoids. Pain intensity was not related to pain medication use, but greater pain distribution was related to using more pain medications in general and to greater odds of using gabapentinoids. Findings from this study indicate that those with chronic pain and SCI who have a more accepting orientation to pain are less reliant on pain medications, and thereby experience lower risks associated with medication consumption. Longitudinal, daily process, and clinical trial studies are needed to better understand the association between pain acceptance and pain medication consumption.

  14. A Comprehensive Examination of Changes in Psychological Flexibility Following Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Whitney; Hann, Katie E J; McCracken, Lance M

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for chronic pain aims to improve patient functioning by fostering greater psychological flexibility. While promising, ACT treatment process research in the context of chronic pain so far has only focused on a few of the processes of psychological flexibility. Therefore, this study aimed to more comprehensively examine changes in processes of psychological flexibility following an ACT-based treatment for chronic pain, and to examine change in these processes in relation to improvements in patient functioning. Individuals with chronic pain attending an interdisciplinary ACT-based rehabilitation program completed measures of pain, functioning, depression, pain acceptance, cognitive fusion, decentering, and committed action at pre- and post-treatment and during a nine-month follow-up. Significant improvements were observed from pre- to post-treatment and pre-treatment to follow-up on each of the treatment outcome and process variables. Regression analyses indicated that change in psychological flexibility processes cumulatively explained 6-27 % of the variance in changes in functioning and depression over both assessment periods, even after controlling for changes in pain intensity. Further research is needed to maximize the effectiveness of ACT for chronic pain, and to determine whether larger improvements in the processes of psychological flexibility under study will produce better patient outcomes, as predicted by the psychological flexibility model.

  15. Effects of a Guided Internet-Delivered Self-Help Intervention for Adolescents With Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voerman, Jessica S; Remerie, Sylvia; Westendorp, Tessa; Timman, Reinier; Busschbach, Jan J V; Passchier, Jan; de Klerk, Cora

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective in reducing the frequency and intensity of chronic pain in adolescents. However, CBT seems not to be considered acceptable by all adolescents. The main aim of our study was therefore to evaluate the effects of guided Internet-delivered self-help for adolescents with chronic pain. Adolescents (N = 69) were assessed on the outcome measures of pain, coping, disability, catastrophizing, rewarding of pain behavior by parents, and quality of life. Measures were taken 7 weeks before treatment and at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up. Multilevel modeling was used for longitudinal analysis of the data. Pain intensity, interference caused by pain, rewarding of pain behavior by parents, and sleep problems significantly decreased during the intervention. The quality-of-life scores for pain, general behavior, mental health, family activities, and health changes also significantly improved during the intervention. With regard to coping, only problem-focused avoidance behavior significantly increased. No significant differences were found for pain-related disability and pain catastrophizing. Contrary to expectations, guided Internet-delivered self-help for chronic pain is difficult to use in adolescents, resulting in treatment attrition and loss to follow-up. Dutch Trial Register NTR1926. The results of this trial suggest that Internet-based self-management is effective in decreasing pain intensity in adolescents with chronic pain. Because the intervention is grounded in CBT, we expect the underlying mechanism to be a change in self-management skills and in the ability of challenging dysfunctional thoughts. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nociceptor Sensitization Depends on Age and Pain Chronicity123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Amanda K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral inflammation causes mechanical pain behavior and increased action potential firing. However, most studies examine inflammatory pain at acute, rather than chronic time points, despite the greater burden of chronic pain on patient populations, especially aged individuals. Furthermore, there is disagreement in the field about whether primary afferents contribute to chronic pain. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the contribution of nociceptor activity to the generation of pain behaviors during the acute and chronic phases of inflammation in both young and aged mice. We found that both young (2 months old) and aged (>18 months old) mice exhibited prominent pain behaviors during both acute (2 day) and chronic (8 week) inflammation. However, young mice exhibited greater behavioral sensitization to mechanical stimuli than their aged counterparts. Teased fiber recordings in young animals revealed a twofold mechanical sensitization in C fibers during acute inflammation, but an unexpected twofold reduction in firing during chronic inflammation. Responsiveness to capsaicin and mechanical responsiveness of A-mechanonociceptor (AM) fibers were also reduced chronically. Importantly, this lack of sensitization in afferent firing during chronic inflammation occurred even as these inflamed mice exhibited continued behavioral sensitization. Interestingly, C fibers from inflamed aged animals showed no change in mechanical firing compared with controls during either the acute or chronic inflammatory phases, despite strong behavioral sensitization to mechanical stimuli at these time points. These results reveal the following two important findings: (1) nociceptor sensitization to mechanical stimulation depends on age and the chronicity of injury; and (2) maintenance of chronic inflammatory pain does not rely on enhanced peripheral drive. PMID:26866058

  17. Temperament traits and chronic pain: the association of harm avoidance and pain-related anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Knaster

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Anxiety symptoms are common in chronic pain patients. High levels of anxiety are associated with increased pain experience and disability. Proneness to anxiety has a large interindividual variation. The aim of the study was to determine whether the anxiety-related temperament trait Harm Avoidance (HA, is associated with pain-related anxiety. METHODS: One hundred chronic pain patients in a multidisciplinary pain clinic participated in the study. The patients were assessed using the HA scale of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI of Cloninger and Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 (PASS-20. Both the HA total score and the four subscales of HA were analyzed. Current pain intensity was measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was used to control for the influence of depression on the personality measurement. RESULTS: The HA total score was associated with PASS-20, but the association became non-significant after controlling for depression. The HA4 Fatigability subscale was associated with the PASS scales. Depression did not influence this association. Pain intensity was not correlated with HA or the PASS scales. However, the association between HA4 Fatigability and PASS was influenced by pain intensity. Higher pain intensity was associated with stronger association between the scales. CONCLUSION: Harm Avoidance, representing temperament and trait-related anxiety, has relevance in pain-related anxiety. Assessing personality and temperament may deepen the clinician's understanding of the pain experience and behavior in chronic pain patients.

  18. Temperament traits and chronic pain: the association of harm avoidance and pain-related anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, Peter; Estlander, Ann-Mari; Karlsson, Hasse; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kalso, Eija

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety symptoms are common in chronic pain patients. High levels of anxiety are associated with increased pain experience and disability. Proneness to anxiety has a large interindividual variation. The aim of the study was to determine whether the anxiety-related temperament trait Harm Avoidance (HA), is associated with pain-related anxiety. One hundred chronic pain patients in a multidisciplinary pain clinic participated in the study. The patients were assessed using the HA scale of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) of Cloninger and Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 (PASS-20). Both the HA total score and the four subscales of HA were analyzed. Current pain intensity was measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to control for the influence of depression on the personality measurement. The HA total score was associated with PASS-20, but the association became non-significant after controlling for depression. The HA4 Fatigability subscale was associated with the PASS scales. Depression did not influence this association. Pain intensity was not correlated with HA or the PASS scales. However, the association between HA4 Fatigability and PASS was influenced by pain intensity. Higher pain intensity was associated with stronger association between the scales. Harm Avoidance, representing temperament and trait-related anxiety, has relevance in pain-related anxiety. Assessing personality and temperament may deepen the clinician's understanding of the pain experience and behavior in chronic pain patients.

  19. Effects of noxious stimulation and pain expectations on neuromuscular control of the spine in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchoz, Yves; Tétreau, Charles; Abboud, Jacques; Piché, Mathieu; Descarreaux, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Alterations of the neuromuscular control of the lumbar spine have been reported in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). During trunk flexion and extension tasks, the reduced myoelectric activity of the low back extensor musculature observed during full trunk flexion is typically absent in patients with chronic LBP. To determine whether pain expectations could modulate neuromuscular responses to experimental LBP to a higher extent in patients with chronic LBP compared with controls. A cross-sectional, case-control study. Twenty-two patients with nonspecific chronic LBP and 22 age- and sex-matched control participants. Trunk flexion-extension tasks were performed under three experimental conditions: innocuous heat, noxious stimulation with low pain expectation, and noxious stimulation with high pain expectation. Noxious stimulations were delivered using a contact heat thermode applied on the skin of the lumbar region (L4-L5), whereas low or high pain expectations were induced by verbal and visual instructions. Surface electromyography of erector spinae at L2-L3 and L4-L5, as well as lumbopelvic kinematic variables were collected during the tasks. Pain was evaluated using a numerical rating scale. Pain catastrophizing, disability, anxiety, and fear-avoidance beliefs were measured using validated questionnaires. Two-way mixed analysis of variance revealed that pain was significantly different among the three experimental conditions (F2,84=317.5; plow back extensor musculature during full trunk flexion was observed in the high compared with low pain expectations condition at the L2-L3 level (F2,84=9.5; ppain catastrophizing in patients with chronic LBP (r=0.54; p=.012). Repeated exposure to pain appears to generate rigid and less variable patterns of muscle activation in patients with chronic LBP, which attenuate their response to pain expectations. Patients with high levels of pain catastrophizing show higher myoelectric activity of lumbar muscles in full flexion

  20. Duloxetine in the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith EJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Howard S Smith,1 Eric J Smith,2 Benjamin R Smith21Department of Anesthesiology, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY; 2The Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Rensselaer, NY, USAAbstract: Chronic musculoskeletal pain is among the most frequent painful complaints that healthcare providers address. The bulk of these complaints are chronic low back pain and chronic osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the United States. It is a chronic degenerative disorder characterized by a loss of cartilage, and occurs most often in older persons. The management of osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain may involve both nonpharmacologic (eg, weight loss, resistive and aerobic exercise, patient education, cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacologic approaches. Older adults with severe osteoarthritis pain are more likely to take analgesics than those with less severe pain. The pharmacologic approaches to painful osteoarthritis remain controversial, but may include topical as well as oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, duloxetine, and opioids. The role of duloxetine for musculoskeletal conditions is still evolving.Keywords: pain, musculoskeletal, duloxetine, osteoarthritis, low back, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor

  1. Adaptation of behavioral activation in the treatment of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ha; Crouch, Taylor B; Olatunji, Bunmi O

    2017-09-01

    Chronic pain is a common problem that can be challenging to treat because of its complex history, unclear etiology, and poor response to traditional treatment approaches. A growing body of research suggests that behavioral activation (BA), which was originally developed as a treatment for depression, may be a promising treatment for chronic pain. BA involves the identification and enactment of activities that are reinforcing to the individual and consistent with his or her long-term goals. The application of BA for the treatment of chronic pain is fully consistent with models of chronic pain which post that fear and avoidance leads to a cycle of physical deconditioning, increased pain as a result of deconditioning, lack of positive reinforcement, and low mood, and further reduced motivation to physically engage. The present paper will detail the assessment and use of BA to treat "Veteran," a patient with low back and bilateral foot pain. This case study highlights how gradually increasing engagement in previously avoided activities can help disrupt the harmful cycle among pain, fear and avoidance, and mood. The implication of the outcomes from this case study for future psychotherapy research on chronic pain is also discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Chronic pain and the interpersonal theory of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Keith G; Kowal, John; Henderson, Peter R; McWilliams, Lachlan A; Péloquin, Katherine

    2013-02-01

    Chronic pain is a known risk factor for suicide. To date, however, few studies of people with chronic pain have tested specific predictions about suicidal ideation that are derived from theory. The interpersonal theory of suicide proposes that the psychological constructs of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness are unique and independent precursors to suicidal ideation. We tested this hypothesis in a clinical sample of patients with chronic pain. A total of 303 patients of a chronic pain rehabilitation program completed measures of pain severity, duration, and disability; cognitive-affective measures of depression and catastrophizing; and interpersonal measures of relationship distress and self-perceived burden to others. The latter measures were included as indices of the belongingness and burdensomeness constructs. Participants also rated two items pertaining to suicidal ideation. In a multiple regression analysis, both distress in interpersonal relations (β = 0.12, p = .037) and self-perceived burden to others (β = 0.25, p < .001) were significant predictors of suicidal ideation, even after adjusting statistically for demographic characteristics, pain severity and duration, functional limitations, catastrophizing, and depression. These findings suggest that the interpersonal theory is relevant to understanding elevated rates of suicidal ideation among people with chronic pain, and may have broader applicability to other populations with chronic illness or disability.

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brent A; Tilburt, Jon C; Sood, Amit; Li, Guang-Xi; Wang, Shi-Han

    2016-06-01

    Pain afflflicts over 50 million people in the US, with 30.7% US adults suffering with chronic pain. Despite advances in therapies, many patients will continue to deal with ongoing symptoms that are not fully addressed by the best conventional medicine has to offer them. The patients frequently turn to therapies outside the usual purview of conventional medicine (herbs, acupuncture, meditation, etc.) called complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Academic and governmental groups are also starting to incorporate CAM recommendations into chronic pain management strategies. Thus, for any physician who care for patients with chronic pain, having some familiarity with these therapies-including risks and benefits-will be key to helping guide patients in making evidence-based, well informed decisions about whether or not to use such therapies. On the other hand, if a CAM therapy has evidence of both safety and efficacy then not making it available to a patient who is suffering does not meet the need of the patient. We summarize the current evidence of a wide variety of CAM modalities that have potential for helping patients with chronic pain in this article. The triad of chronic pain symptoms, ready access to information on the internet, and growing patient empowerment suggest that CAM therapies will remain a consistent part of the healthcare of patients dealing with chronic pain.

  4. Fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jowairiyya; Tagoe, Clement E

    2014-07-01

    Fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain syndromes are among the commonest diseases seen in rheumatology practice. Despite advances in the management of these conditions, they remain significant causes of morbidity and disability. Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most prevalent autoimmune disorder, affecting about 10 % of the population, and is a recognized cause of fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain. Recent reports are shedding light on the mechanisms of pain generation in autoimmune thyroid disease-associated pain syndromes including the role of inflammatory mediators, small-fiber polyneuropathy, and central sensitization. The gradual elucidation of these pain pathways is allowing the rational use of pharmacotherapy in the management of chronic widespread pain in autoimmune thyroid disease. This review looks at the current understanding of the prevalence of pain syndromes in autoimmune thyroid disease, their likely causes, present appreciation of the pathogenesis of chronic widespread pain, and how our knowledge can be used to find lasting and effective treatments for the pain syndromes associated with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  5. Current psychological approaches to the management of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molton, Ivan R; Graham, Christina; Stoelb, Brenda L; Jensen, Mark P

    2007-10-01

    To provide a review of the rationale and evidence supporting three frequently used psychosocial interventions for chronic pain: cognitive-behavioral therapy, operant behavioral therapy and self-hypnosis training. We also review recent work in these areas, with an emphasis on the 2006 publishing year. Recent clinical trials and laboratory work continue to support the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy and operant behavioral therapy as adjunctive treatments for chronic pain. Notable areas of new research include a novel program of systematic exposure to pain-related fear (such as fear of reinjury) and the adaptation of cognitive-behavioral therapy for special pain groups (e.g. juveniles and those with pain secondary to physical disability). Regarding self-hypnosis training, recent work suggests that hypnosis can provide temporary pain relief to the majority of individuals with chronic pain and that a substantial minority of these patients experience a clinically significant reduction in baseline pain over time. Cognitive-behavioral therapy and operant behavioral therapy treatments focus on factors that exacerbate or maintain suffering in chronic pain, and should be considered as part of a multidisciplinary treatment paradigm. Self-hypnosis training may also be of benefit, although it appears to be no more (or less) effective than other relaxation strategies that include hypnotic elements.

  6. Chronic pain and quality of life in schizophrenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouce Gabriela de Almeida

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and characteristics of chronic pain in schizophrenic patients and to compare the quality of life in patients with and without chronic pain. METHODS: Crossover design with a probablistic sample of 205 adult schizophrenic outpatients (80% paranoid schizophrenia. Socio-demographic, psychiatric disorder, pain and quality of life (WHOQOL- brief data were collected between June and September 2008. RESULTS: Mean age was 37 years, 65% were men, and the mean time spent in school was 9 years; 87% were single, 65% lived with parents and 25% had a job. Among patients with chronic pain, 70% did not receive treatment for pain. Regarding quality of life, patients with pain had more physical disabilities compared to those without pain (p < .001. There were no differences in other domains. Comparisons between patients with and without pain did not show any differences in how much they felt their mental health problems disabled them. Conclusion: Chronic pain was common in schizophrenic patients (similar to the general population of a similar age and decreased their quality of life. It is necessary to pay more attention to this co-morbidity.

  7. Mechanisms of chronic central neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsebosch, Claire E; Hains, Bryan C; Crown, Eric D; Carlton, Susan M

    2009-04-01

    Not all spinal contusions result in mechanical allodynia, in which non-noxious stimuli become noxious. The studies presented use the NYU impactor at 12.5 mm drop or the Infinite Horizons Impactor (150 kdyn, 1 s dwell) devices to model spinal cord injury (SCI). Both of these devices and injury parameters, if done correctly, will result in animals with above level (forelimb), at level (trunk) and below level (hindlimb) mechanical allodynia that model the changes in evoked somatosensation experienced by the majority of people with SCI. The sections are as follows: 1) Mechanisms of remote microglial activation and pain signaling in "below-level" central pain 2) Intracellular signaling mechanisms in central sensitization in "at-level" pain 3) Peripheral sensitization contributes to "above level" injury pain following spinal cord injury and 4) Role of reactive oxygen species in central sensitization in regional neuropathic pain following SCI. To summarize, differential regional mechanisms contribute to the regional chronic pain states. We propose the importance of understanding the mechanisms in the differential regional pain syndromes after SCI in the chronic condition. Targeting regional mechanisms will be of enormous benefit to the SCI population that suffer chronic pain, and will contribute to better treatment strategies for other chronic pain syndromes.

  8. Alexithymia and anxiety in female chronic pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saatcioglu Omer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Alexithymia is highly prevalent among chronic pain patients. Pain is a remarkable cause for high levels of chronic anxiety. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alexithymia and to determine anxiety levels among DSM-IV somatoform pain disorder (chronic pain female patients and to examine the relationship between alexithymia and the self-reporting of pain. Methods Thirty adult females (mean age: 34,63 ± 10,62 years, who applied to the outpatient psychiatry clinic at a public hospital with the diagnosis of chronic pain disorder (DSM-IV, were included in the study. Thirty seven healthy females (mean age: 34,46 ± 7,43 years, who matched for sociodemographic features with the patient group, consisted the control group. A sociodemographic data form, 26-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-26, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were administered to each subject and information was obtained on several aspects of the patients' pain, including intensity (measured by VAS, and duration. Results Chronic pain patients were found significantly more alexithymic than controls. There was a positive correlation between TAS-26 scores and the duration of pain. The alexithymic and nonalexithymic group did not differ in their perception of pain. Neither positive correlation nor significant difference was found between alexithymia and trait anxiety in pain patients. Discussion Alexithymia may be important in addressing the diversity of subjective factors involved in pain. The conceptualization of alexithymia as a personality trait as well as a secondary state reaction is underlined by our data.

  9. A typology of pain coping strategies in pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lynn S; Baber, Kari Freeman; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A

    2008-07-15

    This study aimed to identify clinically meaningful profiles of pain coping strategies used by youth with chronic abdominal pain (CAP). Participants (n=699) were pediatric patients (ages 8-18 years) and their parents. Patients completed the Pain Response Inventory (PRI) and measures of somatic and depressive symptoms, disability, pain severity and pain efficacy, and perceived competence. Parents rated their children's pain severity and coping efficacy. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on the 13 PRI subscales identified pain coping profiles in Sample 1 (n=311) that replicated in Sample 2 (n=388). Evidence was found of external validity and distinctiveness of the profiles. The findings support a typology of pain coping that reflects the quality of patients' pain mastery efforts and interpersonal relationships associated with pain coping. Results are discussed in relation to developmental processes, attachment styles, and treatment implications.

  10. Clinical study of acute and chronic pain after temporal craniotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Cheng-wei

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the correlation of chronic pain after surgery and acute pain within 48 h after temporal craniotomy. Methods One hundred and seventy-six patients who underwent surgery through temporal approach were divided into 3 groups and treated with morphine 30 mg (Group M, N = 57, tramadol 1000 mg (Group T, N = 60 and morphine 20 mg + flurbiprofen 200 mg (Group F, N = 59 by patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA. Postoperative acute pain (resting and movement was evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS at 4, 16, 24 and 48 h respectively. Chronic pain was measured by Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ 3 months after surgery. The characteristics of acute and chronic pain, the relationship between them and analgesic effect of 3 kinds of analgesic drugs were analyzed. Results The differences of observed indicators including gender, age, weight and operating time, which might affect the degree of postoperative pain between before and after surgery were not statistically significant (P > 0.05. VAS scores at different time points within 48 h after surgery in each group decreased gradually. The VAS scores in group T (2.91 ± 1.64 was significantly higher than group M (2.19 ± 1.68 and group F (1.71 ± 1.17, P 0.05. The overall incidence rate of chronic pain was 71.02% (125/176, with moderate and severe pain in 15.91% (28/176. Chronic pain and acute postoperative pain severity were positively correlated (resting: rs = 0.171, P = 0.012; movement: rs = 0.190, P = 0.006. The difference of the acute pain (VAS corresponding to SF-MPQ Ⅱ score > 0 and SF-MPQ Ⅱ score = 0 was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Conclusion The postoperative chronic pain following temporal craniotomy is related to acute pain within 48 h after operation. Effective treatment of early postoperative acute pain may reduce the incidence of chronic pain.

  11. Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Chronic Neuropathic or Radicular Pain: An Interaction of Pain and Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla Moriarty

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of empirical research has confirmed an association between chronic pain and cognitive dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cognitive function is affected in patients with a diagnosis of chronic neuropathic or radicular pain relative to healthy control participants matched by age, gender, and years of education. We also examined the interaction of pain with age in terms of cognitive performance. Some limitations of previous clinical research investigating the effects of chronic pain on cognitive function include differences in the pain and cognitive scale materials used, and the heterogeneity of patient participants, both in terms of their demographics and pathological conditions. To address these potential confounds, we have used a relatively homogenous patient group and included both experimental and statistical controls. We have also specifically investigated the interaction effect of pain and age on cognitive performance. Patients (n = 38 and controls (n = 38 were administered a battery of cognitive tests measuring IQ, spatial and verbal memory, attention, and executive function. Educational level, depressive symptoms, and state anxiety were assessed as were medication usage, caffeine, and nicotine consumption to control for possible confounding effects. Both the level of depressive symptoms and the state anxiety score were higher in chronic pain patients than in matched control participants. Chronic pain patients had a lower estimated IQ than controls, and showed impairments on measures of spatial and verbal memory. Attentional responding was altered in the patient group, possibly indicative of impaired inhibitory control. There were significant interactions between chronic pain condition and age on a number of cognitive outcome variables, such that older patients with chronic pain were more impaired than both age-matched controls and younger patients with chronic pain. Chronic pain did not appear

  12. Treating Chronic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    translational pain therapies after SCI. 3 Introduction Pain develops in approximately two-thirds of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) [24;54;55...useful model system for examining effects of candidate translational pain therapies . Methods Experimental Design Studies were performed using a...effect, suggesting that elevated connexin-43 maintains pain-like behaviors primarily through enhanced coupling between adjacent cells. These drugs had no

  13. Sleep quality in subjects suffering from chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilani, Mohammad; Crevenna, Richard; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

    2018-01-01

    Sleeping problems are very common in patients with chronic pain. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between different dimensions of chronic pain and sleep quality in chronic pain patients. In this cross-sectional interview-based questionnaire study, patients from 3 different pain treatment centers in Vienna aged 18-65 years, with pain lasting 3 months or longer were asked to participate. The association between the short-form McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and sleep quality (sleep onset latency, interrupted sleep due to pain, sleep duration and recovering effect of sleep) was assessed. In this study 121 patients (male 32, female 89, mean age 49 ± 9 years) could be analyzed. Of the patients 38.8% needed more than 30 min for falling asleep, 63.6% reported sleep fragmentation, 30.6% slept less than 5 h and 60.3% reported no recovering effect of sleep. The strongest associations between pain characteristics and sleep quality were found for pain intensity and affective pain aspects. Logistic regression analyses revealed that one point more in the total score of SF-MPQ increased the odds of needing more than 30 min for falling asleep, waking up more than 3 times due to pain, sleeping less than 5 h, and perceiving the sleep as non-recovering, by 6%. Adjusting for physical and psychological quality of life lowered the odds ratios and the association was no longer significant. The results underline the importance of paying attention to sleep quality in patients with chronic pain. The results also indicate that psychological factors might mediate the association between pain and sleep quality.

  14. Acute and chronic pain syndromes in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    A representative sample of 117 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) was interviewed on pain syndromes. Chronic syndromes lasting more than one month included dysaestesthesia, low back pain, spasms, tonic seizures, tightening and painful sensations in the extremities. Acute syndromes...... with pain at the time of the examination increased with age and duration of disease. Patients with pain were significantly more often spastic and significantly more often sought alternative treatment forms. No difference was found for mean age, sex, physical impairment, duration of disease from onset of MS...

  15. High incidence of chronic pain following surgery for pelvic fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, Christian Sylvest; Thomsen, Camilla Højland; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2006-01-01

    1996 to 2000. Chronic pain was defined as pain at present that related back to the pelvic fracture and was not a consequence of other disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the 15D questionnaire. RESULTS: The response rate was 72.9% after a median follow-up of 5.6 years. Chronic......OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of chronic pain after surgery for pelvic fracture using a strict definition and measures of intensity and health-related quality of life. METHODS: In April 2004, a questionnaire was sent to 221 patients who underwent surgery for pelvic fracture in the period...... pain was seen in 48.4% (95% confidence interval, 40.7%-56.2%). These patients had a combination of somatic nociceptive, visceral nociceptive, and neuropathic pain and had significantly lower health-related quality of life. Also, the use of opioids (14.1% vs. 4.8%) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories...

  16. A standard for terminology in chronic pelvic pain syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doggweiler, Regula; Whitmore, Kristene E; Meijlink, Jane M

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Terms used in the field of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) are poorly defined and often confusing. An International Continence Society (ICS) Standard for Terminology in chronic pelvic pain syndromes (CPPS) has been developed with the aim of improving diagnosis and treatment of patients affected...... by chronic pelvic pain syndromes. The standard aims to facilitate research, enhance therapy development and support healthcare delivery, for healthcare providers, and patients. This document looks at the whole person and all the domains (organ systems) in a systematic way. METHODS: A dedicated working group...... (WG) was instituted by the ICS Standardisation Steering Committee according to published procedures. The WG extracted information from existing relevant guidelines, consensus documents, and scientific publications. Medline and other databases were searched in relation to each chronic pelvic pain...

  17. Chronic Pain and PTSD: A Guide for Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... standing in line at a grocery store, going shopping, or working. Many patients with chronic pain cannot ... Advanced Search Where to Get Help PTSD Coach Online Tools to help you manage stress. Search Pilots ...

  18. Chronic pain epidemiology: from aetiology to public health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Croft, Peter, Prof; Blyth, Fiona M; Windt, Danielle van der

    2010-01-01

    "Chronic pain is a major cause of distress, disability, and work loss, and it is becoming increasingly prevalent through the general move towards an ageing population, which impacts dramatically upon...

  19. Addictive behaviors related to opioid use for chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Ekholm, Ola; Kurita, Geana Paula

    2013-01-01

    The growing body of research showing increased opioid use in patients with chronic pain coupled with concerns regarding addiction encouraged the development of this population-based study. The goal of the study was to investigate the co-occurrence of indicators of addictive behaviors in patients......,281 individuals were analyzed through multiple logistic regression analyses to assess the association between chronic pain (lasting ⩾6 months), opioid use, health behavior, and body mass index. Six potential addictive behaviors were identified: daily smoking; high alcohol intake; illicit drug use in the past year......; obesity; long-term use of benzodiazepines; and long-term use of benzodiazepine-related drugs. At least 2 of the 6 addictive behaviors were observed in 22.6% of the long-term opioid users with chronic pain compared with 11.5% of the non-opioid users with chronic pain and 8.9% of the individuals without...

  20. Evaluating the Association Between Acute and Chronic Pain After Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilron, Ian; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth; Katz, Joel

    2017-01-01

    AIM/OBJECTIVES/BACKGROUND: There is a need to predict chronic (Z3mo) postsurgical pain (CPSP). Acute (pain is a predictor, that is, more severe pain is associated with higher CPSP risk. However, reported associations vary widely. METHODS: Using a systematic search, we examined associations...... between 2 acute pain measures (pain at rest [PAR] and movement-evoked pain [MEP]) and CPSP outcomes (considering severity vs. any "nonzero" pain only) in 22 studies. RESULTS: Seven studies reported the relationship between CPSP and both PAR and MEP. Of these, 2/7 reported no association, 3/7 reported...... significant associations for both PAR and MEP, 1/7 reported an association for PAR only, and 1/7 reported an association for MEP only. Six of another 7 studies reporting only the association for MEP found a significant relationship. Three of the 5 studies that did not specify whether acute pain outcomes were...

  1. Hypoalgesia After Exercise and the Cold Pressor Test is Reduced in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Patients With High Pain Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik B; Handberg, Gitte; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In chronic pain patients, impaired conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) have been reported. No studies have compared CPM and EIH in chronic musculoskeletal pain patients with high pain sensitivity (HPS) and low pain sensitivity (LPS). MATERIALS.......005). Pain tolerance increased after the cold pressor test and exercise in both groups (PCPM and EIH were partly impaired in chronic pain patients with high versus less pain sensitivity, suggesting that the CPM and EIH responses depend on the degree of pain sensitivity. This has clinical...

  2. Attentional Avoidance is Associated with Increased Pain Sensitivity in Patients with Chronic Posttraumatic Pain and Comorbid Posttraumatic Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvold, Mathea; MacLeod, Colin; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common in chronic posttraumatic pain. Theoretical models suggest that attentional biases (AB) contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pain and PTSD, however, the influence of AB on clinical and heat pain sensitivity in chronic...... posttraumatic pain patients is unknown. This study investigated AB for linguistic pain- and trauma-related stimuli, and clinical and thermal sensitivity in patients with chronic posttraumatic pain with and without PTSD. METHODS: Thirty-four patients with chronic posttraumatic cervical pain performed the visual......-painful hand. Clinical pain intensity, psychological distress (anxiety, depression, and disability), and PTSD symptomatology were assessed with questionnaires. RESULTS: The Pain/PTSD group (N=14) demonstrated increased clinical and heat pain sensitivity as well as psychological distress compared with the Pain/No-PTSD...

  3. Prescribing smoked cannabis for chronic noncancer pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Meldon; Srivastava, Anita; Spithoff, Sheryl; Bromley, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective To offer preliminary guidance on prescribing smoked cannabis for chronic pain before the release of formal guidelines. Quality of evidence We reviewed the literature on the analgesic effectiveness of smoked cannabis and the harms of medical and recreational cannabis use. We developed recommendations on indications, contraindications, precautions, and dosing of smoked cannabis, and categorized the recommendations based on levels of evidence. Evidence is mostly level II (well conducted observational studies) and III (expert opinion). Main message Smoked cannabis might be indicated for patients with severe neuropathic pain conditions who have not responded to adequate trials of pharmaceutical cannabinoids and standard analgesics (level II evidence). Smoked cannabis is contraindicated in patients who are 25 years of age or younger (level II evidence); who have a current, past, or strong family history of psychosis (level II evidence); who have a current or past cannabis use disorder (level III evidence); who have a current substance use disorder (level III evidence); who have cardiovascular or respiratory disease (level III evidence); or who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant (level II evidence). It should be used with caution in patients who smoke tobacco (level II evidence), who are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (level III evidence), who have anxiety or mood disorders (level II evidence), or who are taking higher doses of opioids or benzodiazepines (level III evidence). Cannabis users should be advised not to drive for at least 3 to 4 hours after smoking, for at least 6 hours after oral ingestion, and for at least 8 hours if they experience a subjective “high” (level II evidence). The maximum recommended dose is 1 inhalation 4 times per day (approximately 400 mg per day) of dried cannabis containing 9% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (level III evidence). Physicians should avoid referring patients to “cannabinoid” clinics (level

  4. Activated microglia in the spinal cord underlies diabetic neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Couture, Réjean; Hong, Yanguo

    2014-04-05

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common chronic medical condition. Approximately 30% of diabetic patients develop neuropathic pain, manifested as spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia. Hyperglycemia induces metabolic changes in peripheral tissues and enhances oxidative stress in nerve fibers. The damages and subsequent reactive inflammation affect structural properties of Schwann cells and axons leading to the release of neuropoietic mediators, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-nociceptive mediators. Therefore, diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP) shares some histological features and underlying mechanisms with traumatic neuropathy. DNP displays, however, other distinct features; for instance, sensory input to the spinal cord decreases rather than increasing in diabetic patients. Consequently, development of central sensitization in DNP involves mechanisms that are distinct from traumatic neuropathic pain. In DNP, the contribution of spinal cord microglia activation to central sensitization and pain processes is emerging as a new concept. Besides inflammation in the periphery, hyperglycemia and the resulting production of reactive oxygen species affect the local microenvironment in the spinal cord. All these alterations could trigger resting and sessile microglia to the activated phenotype. In turn, microglia synthesize and release pro-inflammatory cytokines and neuroactive molecules capable of inducing hyperactivity of spinal nociceptive neurons. Hence, it is imperative to elucidate glial mechanisms underlying DNP for the development of effective therapeutic agents. The present review highlights the recent developments regarding the contribution of spinal microglia as compelling target for the treatment of DNP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Is Chronic Groin Pain a Bermuda Triangle of Sports Medicine?

    OpenAIRE

    Šebečić, Božidar; Japjec, Mladen; Janković, Saša; Čuljak, Vencel; Dojčinović, Bojan; Starešinić, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Chronic groin pain is one the most complex conditions encountered in the field of sports medicine. Conservative treatment is long lasting and the result of treatment is often uncertain and symptom recurrences are common, which can be very frustrating for both the patient and the physician. The complex etiology and uncertainties during treatment of chronic groin pain is the reason why some authors call it the Bermuda Triangle of sports medicine. In our prospective, 7-year study, 114 athletes w...

  6. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15 1-0252 TITLE: Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...14 Jul 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Center for Substance Abuse Research Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University 3500 N, Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19140 AND ADDRESS(ES) 8

  7. A randomized-controlled trial of using a book of metaphors to reconceptualize pain and decrease catastrophizing in people with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Laura; McAuley, James; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2013-01-01

    Reconceptualization of pain and reduction of pain-related catastrophizing are primary objectives in chronic pain rehabilitation. Teaching people about the underlying biology of pain has been shown to facilitate these objectives. The objective of this study was to investigate whether written metaphor and story can be used to increase knowledge of the biology of pain and reduce pain-related catastrophizing. In this randomized single-blind partial cross-over controlled trial, 79 people with chronic pain received either a booklet of metaphors and stories conveying key pain biology concepts or a booklet containing advice on how to manage chronic pain according to established cognitive-behavioral principles. The primary outcome variables, pain biology knowledge and catastrophizing, were measured before randomization, at 3 weeks and at 3 months, at which time the control group was crossed over to receive the metaphors and stories booklet. Pain and disability were secondary outcome variables. The Metaphors group showed larger changes in both variables (time × group interactions: P < 0.01, effect size Cohen d = 0.7 for catastrophizing and 1.7 for pain biology knowledge). Gains were maintained for at least 3 months. Changes were replicated in the Advice group when crossed over. There was no change in pain or self-reported disability in either group. We conclude that providing educational material through metaphor and story can assist patients to reconceptualize pain and reduce catastrophizing. Metaphor and story could be used as a precurser to other interventions that target functional capacity.

  8. Student nurses' misconceptions of adults with chronic nonmalignant pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Susan; Lee, Alison

    2010-03-01

    We present findings of a cross-sectional study that investigated the misconceptions student nurses hold, across 3 years of undergraduate education, of adults experiencing chronic nonmalignant pain. Earlier research has identified chronic pain as a leading cause of disability. The knowledge and attitudes of nurses have been found to affect patient experience and treatment. The study reported in this article addressed a gap in the existing research by exploring the misconceptions (inaccurate knowledge and inadequate attitudes) student nurses have of adults experiencing chronic nonmalignant pain. Previously identified misconceptions about patients with this type of pain were used as the basis for this study. Data were collected from a cross-sectional sample of student nurses (n = 430) using a specially designed survey. The study took place between 2001 and 2003 with students due to graduate between 2002 and 2005. The student nurses who participated in this study demonstrated that they held misconceptions about adults with chronic nonmalignant pain to a considerable degree. Students enrolled in semester six held the misconceptions to a slightly lesser degree than those enrolled in semesters one and four. The process of undergraduate education needs to equip nursing students with accurate knowledge about chronic nonmalignant pain and encourage them to develop the appropriate attitudes for working with patients experiencing it. Specific strategies must address gaps in knowledge and attitudes, with the aim of improving patient care. Copyright 2009 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Community Art Therapy Group for Adults with Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Aimee; Moss, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a community art therapy group for people living with chronic pain. Nine adults were offered 12 weekly group art therapy sessions that included art therapy activities such as guided imagery focusing on body scans followed by art responses and artistic expressions of the pain experience. This pilot group art therapy program is…

  10. Torturing personification of chronic pain among torture survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsur, Noga; Shahar, Golan; Defrin, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    , it was hypothesized that torture survivors personify chronic pain as a torturing sensation. It was further hypothesized that PTSD mediates the effect of past torture on torturing pain personification. Methods Fifty-nine Israeli ex-prisoners of war (ex-POWs), who experienced severe torture in captivity, and 44 matched...

  11. Kinesiophobia in relation to physical activity in chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbüken, İlkşan; Özgül, Bahar; Kuru Çolak, Tuğba; Aydoğdu, Onur; Sarı, Zübeyir; Yurdalan, Saadet Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Little research is available concerning physical activity and its determinants in people with chronic neck pain. To explore the relation between kinesiophobia and physical activity and gender effect on these relations in people with chronic neck pain. Ninety-nine subjects (34 men and 65 women) with chronic neck pain were participated in the study. Pain intensity was assessed with Visual Analog Scale and kinesiophobia degree was determined by using Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia. Level of physical activity was assessed with short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. There was no statistically correlation between neck pain intensity and kinesiophobia degree (p= 0.246, r= 0.123) and physical activity level (p= 0.432, r= -0.083). It was also found that kinesiophobia degree was not correlated to physical activity level (p= 0.148, r= -0.153). There was a negative correlation between kinesiophobia degree and physical activity level only for women, not for men (p= 0.011, r= -0.318). Our results showed that although people with chronic neck pain reported higher pain intensity and fear of movement, pain intensity and kinesiophobia degree did not associate to their physical activity levels. It can be speculated that high kinesiophobia degrees cause low physical activity levels for women, but not for men.

  12. The chronic pain in back and new methods of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Dolgova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available  Aim The study of the prevalence causes the formation of chronic vertebrogenic pain syndromes (СVPS, their clinical course, determining the optimal methods of treatment. Methods The observation of the 31 patients with chronic vertebrogenic pain syndrome was led. It is identified neuroimaging changes and leading clinical and neurological syndromes. An objective assessment of the presence of pain confirmed using a visual analog scale and the test for the assessment of pain and functional economic status in chronic backpain. All patients were devided into 2 groups.Results The duration of chronic vertebrogenic pain patients studied were: from 3 to 5 years in 11 (35 %, more than 10 years in 13 (42 %, more than 15 years – in 7 (23% patients. A significant duration of the pain syndrome was the reason for seeking care. Comparing the results of treatment in the two groups showed a significant benefit in the primary group, in which after 10 days the patients did not report pain and returned to work. In the control group revealed a statistically significant reduction of pain syndrome, the condition of patients required further rehabilitation.Conclusions It is identified the best effect with the use of modern methods of treatment of reflex muscle-toxic with Xeomin in comparison with traditional methods

  13. [Treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis by an endoscopic method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seicean, Andrada; Burtin, Pascal; Boyer, Jean; Pascu, Oliviu

    2002-06-01

    The epigastric pain is the most frequent manifestation in chronic pancreatitis. It is due to intraductal pancreatic pressure, presence of compressive pseudocysts and probably to neuroinflammatory process caused by alcohol. The aim of our study was to assess the influence of endoscopic treatment on pain in chronic pancreatitis and the correlation between residual pain after endoscopic treatment and pancreatic morphology. Forty-four patients from the Gastroenterology Department of Angers (France) with chronic pancreatitis were included in our retrospective clinical study. Thirty-seven patients underwent a diagnostic ERCP and only 28 needed an endoscopic treatment. The pain was evaluated semi-quantitatively before and after the endoscopic treatment. The mean follow-up was 28.6 months. Among the 28 patients with endoscopic treatment, 18 had a complete improvement of the pain, 4 an incomplete improvement and 6 had no improvement; these last were submitted to pancreatic surgery. The pain evolution had a good correlation with the reduction of Wirsung diameter; there was no correlation with ductal stenosis, residual lithiasis and pseudocysts presence. Alcohol consumption had no influence on the pain evolution. The endoscopic treatment of intraductal lithiasis and pseudocysts is a useful method for Wirsung decompression, improving the pain in chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Seniors and Chronic Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their own and 75-85 percent of the elderly in care facilities suffer from chronic pain. Yet, pain among older adults is largely undertreated, with serious health consequences, such as depression, anxiety, decreased mobility, social isolation, poor sleep, and related health risks. There are ...

  15. Chronic Post Inguinal Herniorraphy Pain: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    risk factors for chronic post herniorrhaphy groin pain at a tertiary urban hospital. Methods: A retrospective descriptive study using data retrieved from patient files and theatre logs was conducted. Only inguinal herniae patients 13 years and above were considered. Pain was self reported at least 3months to 2 years.

  16. Genitofemoral neuralgia: adding to the burden of chronic vulvar pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstraelen H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hans Verstraelen,1 Eline De Zutter,1 Martine De Muynck2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vulvovaginal Disease Clinic, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium Abstract: The vulva is a particularly common locus of chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics that occurs in women of any age, though most women with neuropathic type chronic vulvar pain will remain undiagnosed even following multiple physician visits. Here, we report on an exemplary case of a middle-aged woman who was referred to the Vulvovaginal Disease Clinic with debilitating vulvar burning and itching over the right labium majus that had been persisting for 2 years and was considered intractable. Careful history taking and clinical examination, followed by electrophysiological assessment through somatosensory evoked potentials was consistent with genitofemoral neuralgia, for which no obvious cause could be identified. Adequate pain relief was obtained with a serotonin–noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor and topical gabapentin cream. We briefly discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of genitofemoral neuralgia and provide a series of clues to guide clinicians in obtaining a presumptive diagnosis of specific neuropathic pain syndromes that may underlie chronic vulvar pain. We further aim to draw attention to the tremendous burden of chronic, unrecognized vulvar pain. Keywords: vulvar pain, genitofemoral nerve, neuropathic pain, vulvodynia, vulvar disease

  17. Prognosis of chronic or recurrent abdominal pain in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Marieke J.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Passchier, Ban; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    Background: Chronic abdominal pain (CAP) or recurrent abdominal pain is common in childhood and is rarely associated with organic disease. With modern diagnostic technology, new organic abnormalities are found in children with CAP. Thus far a causal relation between these abnormalities and CAP has

  18. Feldenkrais method empowers adults with chronic back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Judith Dianne; Williams, Anne M

    2014-01-01

    A phenomenological approach was used to explore the experiences of 11 adults attending Awareness Through Movement lessons in the Feldenkrais Method to manage chronic-episodic back pain. Semistructured interviews were analyzed. The results suggest improving self-efficacy through somatic education and awareness potentially offers a way forward given the back pain epidemic.

  19. Development of Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy for Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health concern that affects millions of people. There are no adequate long-term therapies for chronic pain sufferers, leading to significant cost for both society and the individual. The most commonly used therapy for chronic pain is the application of opioid analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but these drugs can lead to addiction and may cause side effects. Further studies of the mechanisms of chronic pain have opened the way for development of new treatment strategies, one of which is gene therapy. The key to gene therapy is selecting safe and highly efficient gene delivery systems that can deliver therapeutic genes to overexpress or suppress relevant targets in specific cell types. Here we review several promising viral vectors that could be applied in gene transfer for the treatment of chronic pain and further discuss the possible mechanisms of genes of interest that could be delivered with viral vectors for the treatment of chronic pain.

  20. The contribution of posttraumatic stress symptoms to chronic pain adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Párraga, Gema T; López-Martínez, Alicia E

    2014-09-01

    To examine whether there are differences between non-trauma-exposed, trauma-exposed without posttraumatic stress symptoms (PSS), and trauma-exposed with PSS chronic musculoskeletal pain patients in vulnerability, protective, and pain-adjustment variables; to test the interactive relationship between PSS and the vulnerability and protective psychological variables across pain adjustment in the group of trauma-exposed-patients. Seven hundred and fourteen patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain were assessed. Of these, 346 patients (244 women and 102 men) completed the study (117 non-trauma-exposed, 119 trauma-exposed without PSS, and 110 trauma-exposed with PSS). The instruments used were the Stressful Life Event Screening Questionnaire Revised, Davidson Trauma Scale, Anxiety Sensitivity Index, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale, Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire, Resilience Scale, Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, Pain Numerical Rating Scale, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Eight ANCOVAs showed that there were statistically significant differences in vulnerability, protection, and pain adjustment variables between the trauma-exposed with PSS patients and the other 2 groups. The moderated multiple regression analyses showed that PSS added a significantly incremental variance to pain intensity, emotional distress, and disability when interacting with vulnerability and protection variables. The current study supports the models of posttraumatic stress and chronic pain, such as the mutual maintenance and the shared vulnerability theories, providing an initial comprehensive framework for understanding the comorbidity of both disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Chronic gynaecological pain: an exploration of medical attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selfe, S A; Van Vugt, M; Stones, R W

    1998-08-01

    Women with chronic pelvic pain experience serious distress and lifestyle disruption. Confronted with a difficult condition to diagnose and treat effectively, doctors express a negative perception of this group of 'heartsink' patients. This study aimed to characterise medical attitudes towards the treatment of women with chronic pelvic pain. Tape recorded focus group discussions with gynaecologists, general practitioners and patients were transcribed and analysed using ethnographic software to identify themes. A postal questionnaire was sent to 300 British gynaecologists of which 145 were returned (48%). Principal components analysis identified five factors accounting for 32.4% of the variance, labelled 'efficiency', 'complexity', 'socio-cultural liberalism', 'pathology' and 'communication'. Scores for 'socio-cultural liberalism' were higher among gynaecologists in the younger age groups, women, and those giving their ethnic origin as Caucasian. Scores for 'pathology' were lower among younger gynaecologists. A sex difference just failed to reach statistical significance. Multiple linear regression confirmed significant independent relationships with scores for 'socio-cultural liberalism' and respondent sex, ethnicity and age group under 38 years.

  2. SDF1-CXCR4 Signaling Contributes to the Transition from Acute to Chronic Pain State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Sun, Wei; Luo, Wen-Jun; Yang, Yan; Yang, Fan; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Chen, Jun

    2017-05-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated the involvement of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF1, also known as CXCL12)-CXCR4 signaling in a variety of pain state. However, the underlying mechanisms of SDF1-CXCR4 signaling leading to the maintenance of chronic pain states are poorly understood. In the present study, we sought to explore the role of SDF1-CXCR4 signaling in the forming of neuroplasticity by applying a model of the transition from acute to chronic pain state, named as hyperalgesic priming. Utilizing intraplantar bee venom (BV) injection, we successfully established hyperalgesic priming state and found that peripheral treating with AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, or knocking down CXCR4 by intraganglionar CXCR4 small interfering RNA (siRNA) injection could prevent BV-induced primary mechanical hyperalgesia and hyperalgesic priming. Moreover, we showed that single intraplantar active SDF1 protein injection is sufficient to induce acute mechanical hyperalgesia and hyperalgesic priming through CXC4. Intraplantar coinjection of ERK inhibitor, U0126, and PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, as well as two protein translation inhibitors, temsirolimus and cordycepin, prevented the development of SDF1-induced acute mechanical hyperalgesia and hyperalgesic priming. Finally, on the models of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced chronic inflammatory pain and spared nerve injury (SNI)-induced chronic neuropathic pain, we observed that knock-down of CXCR4 could both prevent the development and reverse the maintenance of chronic pain state. In conclusion, our present data suggested that through regulating ERK and PI3K-AKT pathways-mediated protein translation SDF1-CXCR4 signaling mediates the transition from acute pain to chronic pain state and finally contributes to the development and maintenance of chronic pain.

  3. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for the treatment of chronic discogenic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaodong; Yang, Hong; Peng, Baogan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is one of the major causes of disability and thus has a major socioeconomic impact. Intervertebral disc degeneration is the main cause of chronic low back pain. Treatment for chronic discogenic low back pain has traditionally been limited to either conservative management or surgical fusion. If conservative treatment fails, then surgical fusion is commonly considered. Current treatments are limited to treat the symptoms and not the underlying biologic alterations of the disc. Human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUC-MSCs) contain stem cells and possess the ability to regenerate degenerative discs. Based on the results of previous in vitro and animal experiments, we conducted a preliminary study to test the feasibility and safety and to obtain an early indication for the therapeutic value of HUC-MSC transplantation in patients with chronic discogenic low back pain. This is the first study involving treatment of chronic low back pain using HUC-MSC transplantation. The study was performed at a spine center in China. Two patients with chronic discogenic low back pain were treated with HUC-MSC transplantation. An 11-point visual analog scale (VAS, 0-10) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, 0-100) were used to assess the back pain symptoms and the lumbar function, respectively. After transplantation, the pain and function improved immediately in the 2 patients. The VAS and ODI scores decreased obviously during a 2-year follow-up period. The shortcoming of this study is that it is a preliminary study with only 2 patients. The clinical outcomes indicated that HUC-MSC transplantation is a favorable alternative method for the treatment of chronic discogenic low back pain.

  4. The Transition of Acute Postoperative Pain to Chronic Pain: An Integrative Overview of Research on Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C Richard; Vierck, Charles J

    2017-04-01

    The nature of the transition from acute to chronic pain still eludes explanation, but chronic pain resulting from surgery provides a natural experiment that invites clinical epidemiological investigation and basic scientific inquiry into the mechanisms of this transition. The primary purpose of this article is to review current knowledge and hypotheses on the transition from acute to persistent postsurgical pain, summarizing literature on clinical epidemiological studies of persistent postsurgical pain development, as well as basic neurophysiological studies targeting mechanisms in the periphery, spinal cord, and brain. The second purpose of this article is to integrate theory, information, and causal reasoning in these areas. Conceptual mapping reveals 5 classes of hypotheses pertaining to pain. These propose that chronic pain results from: 1) persistent noxious signaling in the periphery; 2) enduring maladaptive neuroplastic changes at the spinal dorsal horn and/or higher central nervous system structures reflecting a multiplicity of factors, including peripherally released neurotrophic factors and interactions between neurons and microglia; 3) compromised inhibitory modulation of noxious signaling in medullary-spinal pathways; 4) descending facilitatory modulation; and 5) maladaptive brain remodeling in function, structure, and connectivity. The third purpose of this article is to identify barriers to progress and review opportunities for advancing the field. This review reveals a need for a concerted, strategic effort toward integrating clinical epidemiology, basic science research, and current theory about pain mechanisms to hasten progress toward understanding, managing, and preventing persistent postsurgical pain. The development of chronic pain after surgery is a major clinical problem that provides an opportunity to study the transition from acute to chronic pain at epidemiologic and basic science levels. Strategic, coordinated, multidisciplinary research

  5. Early Factors Associated with the Development of Chronic Pain in Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Daoust

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify factors, available at the time of trauma admission, associated with the development of chronic pain to allow testing of preventive approaches. Methods. In a retrospective observational cohort study, we included all patients ≥ 18 years old admitted for injury in 57 adult trauma centers in the province of Quebec (Canada between 2004 and 2014. Chronic pain was defined as follows: treated in a chronic pain clinic, diagnosed with chronic pain, or received at least 2 prescriptions of chronic pain medications 3 to 12 months postinjury. Results. A total of 95,134 patients were retained for analysis. Mean age was 59.8 years (±21.7, and 52% were men. The causes of trauma were falls (63% and motor vehicle accidents (22%. We identified 14,518 patients (15.3%; 95% CI: 15.1–15.5 who developed chronic pain. After controlling for confounding factors, the variables associated with chronic pain were spinal cord injury (OR = 3.9; 95% CI: 3.4–4.6, disc-vertebra trauma (OR = 1.6; 95% CI: 1.5–1.7, history of alcoholism (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2–1.7, history of anxiety (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2–1.5, history of depression (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 1.1–1.4, and being female (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 1.2–1.3. The area under the receiving operating characteristic curve derived from the model was 0.80. Conclusions. We identified risk factors present on hospital admission that can predict trauma patients who will develop chronic pain. These factors should be prospectively validated.

  6. Intramuscular pain modulatory substances before and after exercise in women with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, L; Gerdle, B; Ghafouri, B; Bäckryd, E; Olausson, P; Ghafouri, N; Larsson, B

    2015-09-01

    In peripheral tissue, several substances influence pain and pain modulation. Exercise has been found to decrease pain and improve function for chronic pain conditions, but how and why exercise produces beneficial effects remains unclear. This study investigates whether aspects of pain and concentrations of substances with algesic, analgesic and metabolic functions differ between women with chronic neck shoulder pain (CNSP) and healthy women (CON) and whether changes are found after an exercise intervention for CNSP. Forty-one women with CNSP and 24 CON subjects were included. The participants attended two microdialysis sessions with 4-6 months between the experiments. During this period, the CNSP subjects underwent an exercise intervention. Expression levels of substance P, beta-endorphin, cortisol, glutamate, lactate and pyruvate as well as pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds were analysed. At baseline, higher concentrations of glutamate and beta-endorphin and lower concentrations of cortisol in CNSP than CON were found. After exercise, decreased levels of substance P and possibly of glutamate, increased levels of beta-endorphin and cortisol as well as decreased pain intensity and increased pain pressure thresholds were found for CNSP. The findings at baseline indicated algesic and analgesic alterations in the painful trapezius muscles. The findings for CNSP after the exercise intervention, with changes in peripheral substances and decreased pain intensity and sensitivity, could reflect a long-term physiological effect of the exercise. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  7. Chronic pain, overweight, and obesity: findings from a community-based twin registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Lisa Johnson; Schur, Ellen; Noonan, Carolyn; Ahumada, Sandra; Buchwald, Dedra; Afari, Niloofar

    2010-07-01

    Chronic pain and obesity, and their associated impairments, are major health concerns. We estimated the association of overweight and obesity with 5 distinct pain conditions and 3 pain symptoms, and examined whether familial influences explained these relationships. We used data collected from 3,471 twins in the community-based University of Washington Twin Registry. Twins reported sociodemographic data, current height and weight, chronic pain diagnoses and symptoms, and lifetime depression. Overweight and obese were defined as body mass index of 25.0 to 29.9 kg/m(2) and >or= 30.0 kg/m(2), respectively. Generalized estimating equation regression models, adjusted for age, gender, depression, and familial/genetic factors, were used to examine the relationship between chronic pain, and overweight and obesity. Overall, overweight and obese twins were more likely to report low back pain, tension-type or migraine headache, fibromyalgia, abdominal pain, and chronic widespread pain than normal-weight twins after adjustment for age, gender, and depression. After further adjusting for familial influences, these associations were diminished. The mechanisms underlying these relationships are likely diverse and multifactorial, yet this study demonstrates that the associations can be partially explained by familial and sociodemographic factors, and depression. Future longitudinal research can help to determine causality and underlying mechanisms. This article reports on the familial contribution and the role of psychological factors in the relationship between chronic pain, and overweight and obesity. These findings can increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these 2 commonly comorbid sets of conditions.

  8. Slowed EEG rhythmicity in patients with chronic pancreatitis: evidence of abnormal cerebral pain processing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren Schou; Hansen, Tine Maria; Gravesen, Carina

    Intractable pain usually dominates the clinical presentation of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Slowing of electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythmicity has been associated with abnormal cortical pain processing in other chronic pain disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectral distribution...

  9. Chronic Pain: Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Chronic Pain Chronic Pain: Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of Contents ... enjoyable activities can lead to disability and despair. Diagnosis Pain is a very personal and subjective experience. There ...

  10. The nature and prevalence of chronic pain in homeless persons: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Rebecca; Ewing, Judith; Garrett, Alice; Harrison, E Katherine; Lwin, Kimberly Kt; Wheeler, Daniel W

    2013-01-01

    Homeless people are known to suffer disproportionately with health problems that reduce physical functioning and quality of life, and shorten life expectancy. They suffer from a wide range of diseases that are known to be painful, but little information is available about the nature and prevalence of chronic pain in this vulnerable group. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of chronic pain among homeless people, and to examine its location, effect on activities of daily living, and relationship with alcohol and drugs. We conducted face-to-face interviews with users of homeless shelters in four major cities in the United Kingdom, in the winters of 2009-11. Participants completed the Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form McGill Pain questionnaire, Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs, and detailed their intake of prescribed and unprescribed medications and alcohol. We also recorded each participant's reasons for homelessness, and whether they slept rough or in shelters. Of 168 shelter users approached, 150 (89.3%) participated: 93 participants (63%) reported experiencing pain lasting longer than three months; the mean duration of pain experienced was 82.2 months. The lower limbs were most frequently affected. Opioids appeared to afford a degree of analgesia for some, but whilst many reported symptoms suggestive of neuropathic pain, very few were taking anti-neuropathic drugs. The prevalence of chronic pain in the homeless appears to be substantially higher than the general population, is poorly controlled, and adversely affects general activity, walking and sleeping. It is hard to discern whether chronic pain is a cause or effect of homelessness, or both. Pain is a symptom, but in this challenging group it might not always be possible to treat the underlying cause. Exploring the diagnosis and treatment of neuropathic pain may offer a means of improving the quality of these vulnerable people's lives.

  11. Effects of Spinal Cord Stimulation on Pain Thresholds and Sensory Perceptions in Chronic Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shihab U; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Lucy; St Hillary, Kristin; Cohen, Abigail; Vo, Trang; Houghton, Mary; Mao, Jianren

    2015-07-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been in clinical use for nearly four decades. In earliest observations, researchers found a significant increase in pain threshold during SCS therapy without changes associated with touch, position, and vibration sensation. Subsequent studies yielded diverse results regarding how SCS impacts pain and other sensory thresholds. This pilot study uses quantitative sensory testing (QST) to objectively quantify the impact of SCS on warm sensation, heat pain threshold, and heat pain tolerance. Nineteen subjects with an indwelling SCS device for chronic pain were subjected to QST with heat stimuli. QST was performed on an area of pain covered with SCS-induced paresthesia and an area without pain and without paresthesia, while the SCS was turned off and on. The temperature at which the patient detected warm sensation, heat pain, and maximal tolerable heat pain was used to define the thresholds. We found that all three parameters, the detection of warm sensation, heat pain threshold, and heat pain tolerance, were increased during the period when SCS was on compared with when it was off. This increase was observed in both painful and non-painful sites. The observed pain relief during SCS therapy seems to be related to its impact on increased sensory threshold as detected in this study. The increased sensory threshold on areas without pain and without the presence of SCS coverage may indicate a central (spinal and/or supra-spinal) influence from SCS. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  12. The clinical characteristics of patients with chronic idiopathic anal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Weiming

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes and psychological distress in patients with chronic idiopathic anal pain. The study was conducted on patients referred to Hangzhou Third Hospital for chronic anal pain from January, 2010 to December, 2014. Patient demographics, clinical history, anorectal physiology, and radiological imaging data were recorded for all patients. The treatment outcome was noted for patients treated and followed up for more than 6 month at the present unit. Ninety-six patients with mean age of 45.1 years (range, 17-82 were studied. Seventy-one patients (74.0% had functional anorectal pain(FARP. The main complaints were dull, sharp, stabbing, or spasm pain. Among all patients, 34.3% reported that their pain radiated into other locations. Fifty-one patients (53.1% had bowel dysfunction, while 28.1% patients had urinary dysfunction. The common factors associated with pain relief were day time, lying down and warm water baths; the factors that contributed to aggravated pain were night time, defecation or sitting. 92.7% (89/96 of patients reported symptoms of psychological disturbance. FARP patients exhibited increased depression than non-FARP patients(P<0.05. In addition, female patients were more likely to have depression than male patients (P<0.05. The overall pain treatment success rate was 55.2% (53/96. The pain treatment outcome was better in non-FARP patients than in FARP patients(χ2=3.85, P<0.05. Conclusively, chronic idiopathic anal pain is a complex clinical symptom, involving pelvic floor muscles, the nervous system, endocrine system, and the patients’ psychological conditions. Further research is needed to improve diagnosis and treatment for patients with chronic idiopathic anal pain.

  13. Critical issues on opioids in chronic non-cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Sjøgren, Per; Bruera, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    -related quality of life (SF-36), use of the health care system, functional capabilities, satisfaction with medical pain treatment and regular or continuous use of medications. Participants reporting pain were divided into opioid and non-opioid users. The analyses were adjusted for age, gender, concomitant use...... of anxiolytics and antidepressants and pain intensity. Pain relief, quality of life and functional capacity among opioid users were compared with non-opioid users. Opioid usage was significantly associated with reporting of moderate/severe or very severe pain, poor self-rated health, not being engaged......The aim of the study was epidemiologically to evaluate the long-term effects of opioids on pain relief, quality of life and functional capacity in long-term/chronic non-cancer pain. The study was based on data from the 2000 Danish Health and Morbidity Survey. As part of a representative National...

  14. Empathic and nonempathic interaction in chronic pain couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Annmarie; Barterian, Justin A; Heller, Jaclyn B

    2008-10-01

    Empathy and empathic response are receiving greater attention in pain research as investigators acknowledge that other forms of interaction may impact the pain process. The purpose of this study was to examine validation and invalidation as forms of empathic and nonempathic responses in chronic pain couples. Participants were 92 couples in which at least one spouse reported chronic musculoskeletal pain. Each couple participated in 2 videotaped interactions about the ways in which the pain has impacted their lives together. Trained raters then coded interactions for each partner's use of validation and invalidation. Couples also completed surveys on spouse responses to pain, marital satisfaction, and perceived spousal support. Correlations demonstrated validation by spouses of persons with pain was associated with punishing, solicitous, and distracting spouse responses to pain, marital satisfaction, and perceived spousal support. In contrast, spouses' invalidation scores were correlated with punishing spouse responses. Exploratory factor analyses were then conducted to determine the extent to which spouses' responses to pain and spouse validation and invalidation loaded on similar factors. Validation and invalidation are more closely related to punishing spouse responses than to solicitous or distracting spouse responses. This work suggests that empathic and nonempathic communication are distinct from solicitous spouse responses. The findings have implications for theoretical and clinical work on social factors in pain.

  15. Treating Chronic Pain with SSRIs: What Do We Know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Patetsos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays a major role in both nociception and mood regulation. Alterations in the 5-hydroxytryptophan (5HT system have been reported in chronic pain patients. In recent years, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs have been suggested as an alternative treatment for chronic pain due to the fact that they are better tolerated presenting less secondary effects than other antidepressants such as tricyclic antidepressants. Although several clinical trials have been published, the effectiveness of SSRI as treatment for pain conditions is inconclusive. This review aims to summarise what is known, regarding the effectiveness of SSRI as a treatment for chronic pain conditions in adults. A total of 36 studies involving a total of 1898 participants were included in this review. Of the 36 trials included in the review, 2 used zimelidine as treatment, 3 used escitalopram, 4 used fluvoxamine, 4 used sertraline, 6 used citalopram, 8 used paroxetine, 9 used fluoxetine, and one used both citalopram and paroxetine. Because the trials included in this review are quite heterogeneous, only qualitative analyses were performed. SSRI seems to have an effect on most of chronic pain conditions; however, further clinical trials with good methodology leading to low risk of bias are needed in order to conclude once and for all the effect of this drug class as treatment for chronic pain conditions.

  16. Chronic pain: the burden of disease and treatment innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Monti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal conditions are the most frequent cause of chronic pain and affect around 1 in 5 adults in Europe. When chronic pain occurs, it becomes disease itself, with substantial clinical, social and economic impact. Effi cacy and tolerability problems are encountered with all therapeutic strategies available to treat musculoskeletal pain. This often limits effective analgesia and patients’ long term compliance, with the result that chronic pain is persistently underestimated and undertreated. Tapentadol is a novel, centrally acting analgesic that has been recently commercialized for the treatment of chronic pain. This new molecule, by combining two distinct mechanisms of action, μ-opioid receptor agonism (MOR and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition (NRI, introduces a new pharmacological class called MOR-NRI. Several studies demonstrated promising results in the management of both nociceptive and neuropathic pain and good tolerability profi le, particularly concerning side effects, compared to traditional opioids. This novel analgesic represents a possible therapeutic option also in the rheumatologic fi eld, particularly in the treatment of osteoarthritis and low back pain.

  17. Brain perfusion abnormality in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Tetsumi; Maruta, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Kumiko

    2007-06-01

    We performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain in 15 patients with chronic pain (males, 7; females, 8; average age 49.1 +/- 17.9 years) and identified the locus of cerebral blood flow reduction by a new analytical method (easy Z-score Imaging System: eZIS) to clarify the functional neuroanatomical basis of chronic pain. Of the 15 patients, 6 had backache, 2 neck pain, 2 gonalgia, and 5 pain at other sites, with an average Visual analog scale of pain (VAS) value of 6.1 +/- 1.9. In comparison with a information on a data base on physically unimpaired persons, the dorsolateral prefrontal area (both sides, right dominant), medial prefrontal area (both sides), dorsal aspect of the anterior cingulate gyrus nociceptive cortex (both sides) and the lateral part of the orbitofrontal cortex (right side) were found to have blood flow reduction in the group of patients with chronic pain. As for chronic pain and its correlation with clinical features such as a depressive state, anticipation anxiety, PTSD, and conversion hysteria, the mechanism in the brain that was suggested by this study should be followed-up by functional neuroimaging studies.

  18. Brain perfusion abnormality in patients with chronic pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Tetsumi; Maruta, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Kumiko

    2007-01-01

    We performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain in 15 patients with chronic pain (males, 7; females, 8; average age 49.1±17.9 years) and identified the locus of cerebral blood flow reduction by a new analytical method (easy Z-score Imaging System: eZIS) to clarify the functional neuroanatomical basis of chronic pain. Of the 15 patients, 6 had backache, 2 neck pain, 2 gonalgia, and 5 pain at other sites, with an average Visual analog scale of pain (VAS) value of 6.1±1.9. In comparison with a information on a data base on physically unimpaired persons, the dorsolateral prefrontal area (both sides, right dominant), medial prefrontal area (both sides), dorsal aspect of the anterior cingulate gyrus nociceptive cortex (both sides) and the lateral part of the orbitofrontal cortex (right side) were found to have blood flow reduction in the group of patients with chronic pain. As for chronic pain and its correlation with clinical features such as a depressive state, anticipation anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and conversion hysteria, the mechanism in the brain that was suggested by this study should be followed-up by functional neuroimaging studies. (author)

  19. Individual and dyadic coping in chronic pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burri A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Burri,1–3 Michèle Blank Gebre,4 Guy Bodenmann1 1Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Health and Rehabilitation Research Institute, Auckland University of Technology, 3Waitemata Pain Service, Department of Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, North Shore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand; 4Private Practice, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: The purpose of the current cross-sectional study was to test the associations between individual coping responses to pain, dyadic coping, and perceived social support, with a number of pain outcomes, including pain intensity, functional disability, and pain adjustment, in a sample of N = 43 patients suffering from chronic pain in Switzerland. In contrast to previous research, we were interested not only in specific pain coping but also in more general stress coping strategies and their potential influence on pain outcomes. Analyses were performed using correlation and regression analyses. “Praying and hoping” turned out to be an independent predictor of higher pain intensity and higher anxiety levels, whereas both “coping self-instructions” and “diverting attention” were associated with higher well-being, less feelings of helplessness, and less depression and anxiety. We further found a link between “focusing on and venting emotions” and “worse pain adjustment”. No significant relationship between dyadic coping and social support with any of our pain outcomes could be observed. Overall, our results indicate that individual coping strategies outweigh the effects of social support and dyadic coping on pain-related outcomes and pain adjustment. However, results need to be interpreted with caution given the small sample size. Keywords: individual coping, dyadic coping, social support, chronic pain

  20. Chronic low back pain: possibilities for prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Kamchatnov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is a very common syndrome that is associated with the extremely high rate of temporary disability and the development of chronic pain syndrome. In addition to structural changes in the locomotor system, psychological and social factors contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pain. Drug therapy for chronic LBP frequently gives rise to complications. A physician’s important task in this situation is to prevent pain chronization and to reduce the risk of side effects of treatment. One of the ways to solve this task is to use the vitamin B complex (milgamma along with analgesics and myorelaxants. The review considers the possible effects of combination therapy in patients with LBP and discusses whether it should be used.

  1. Validation of the Danish-language chronic pain acceptance questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, P; Højsted, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ, 20 items) measures patients' acceptance of chronic pain. This questionnaire has demonstrated good psychometric qualities and versions have been validated in several different languages. This study describes the validation of the Danish...... version of the CPAQ. METHODS: A total of 114 patients with chronic pain completed the questionnaire as well as other measures of pain, anxiety, depression, coping, and health-related quality of life. RESULTS: Internal consistency was satisfactory and the factorial analysis yielded a two-factor solution......, confirming the original structure of the questionnaire. CONCLUSION: The psychometric properties of the Danish version of the 20-item CPAQ were satisfactory, showing that the Danish version of CPAQ is valid and reliable....

  2. Acute and chronic pain management in fibromyalgia: updates on pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eric S

    2011-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a mysterious pain syndrome with progressive and widespread pain, explicit areas of tender points, stiffness, sleep disturbance, fatigue, and psychological distress without any obvious disease. FM is commonly perceived as a condition of central pain and sensory augmentation. There are documented functional abnormalities in pain and sensory processing in FM. Central sensitization and lack of descending analgesic activity are the 2 leading mechanisms that have been demonstrated by advance in both basic and clinical research. The pathogenesis of FM may also be attributed to the genetic polymorphisms involving serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and catecholaminergic systems. Any psychiatric disorders and psychosocial influences in FM may also affect the severity of pain. The various external stimuli or trigger such as infection, trauma, and stress may all contribute to proceed to presentation of FM. The recent launches of 3 US Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapy for FM namely pregabalin, duloxetine, and milnacipran have certainly raised the profile of optimal chronic pain management. However, appropriate evaluation and efficacious management of acute pain has not been as well publicized as chronic pain in FM. Acute pain or flare up caused by any trauma or surgery certainly may present a real challenge for patients with FM and their health care providers. Pre-emptive analgesia and pro-active treatment may offer the momentum for acute pain control based on model of central sensitization and pain in FM. This review article on FM appraises the modern practice of multimodal therapy focus on both acute and chronic pain management. Meanwhile, the evolving nonpharmacological approach is summarized and stressed as an essential component of integrated care in FM.

  3. Chronic inflammatory pain: new molecules & mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemen, H.L.D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Pain is an important self-protecting signal. The pain system detects and reacts to (withdrawal reflex) the presence of an acute potentially injurious stimulus such as heat, pressure, tissue damage or inflammation to avoid possible (further) tissue damage. However, after inflammation or tissue damage

  4. Systematic review of chronic pain in persons with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velvin, G; Bathen, T; Rand-Hendriksen, S; Geirdal, A Ø

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the literature on chronic pain in adults with Marfan syndrome (MFS), critically appraising and synthesizing relevant literature. A systematic review was conducted by searching the published literature databases using available medical, physical, psychological, social databases and other sources. All studies that addressed pain in MFS, published in peer-reviewed journals were assessed. Of 351 search results, 18 articles satisfied the eligibility criteria. All studies were cross-sectional and quantitative; no randomized controlled trials or intervention studies were found. Most studies had small sample sizes, low response rates and mainly dealt with other aspects of the diagnosis than pain. Only one article dealt mainly with pain. The research on chronic pain in MFS is limited in size and quality. Despite these limitations, studies describe that the prevalence of pain in patients with MFS is high, varying from 47 to 92% and affecting several anatomic sites. In addition, chronic pain limits daily function and few studies describe treatment options for pain in patients with MFS. Research is needed to obtain more evidence-based knowledge for developing more appropriate rehabilitation programs for people with MFS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Chronic pain and the adaptive significance of positive emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Anthony D; Zautra, Alex J; Reid, M Carrington

    2015-04-01

    The February-March 2014 special issue of the American Psychologist featured articles summarizing select contributions from the field of psychology to the assessment and treatment of chronic pain. The articles examined a range of psychosocial and family factors that influence individual adjustment and contribute to disparities in pain care. The reviews also considered the psychological correlates and neurophysiological mechanisms of specific pain treatments, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis, acceptance and commitment therapy, mindfulness, and meditation. Although a number of articles emphasized the role that negative states of mind play in pain outcomes, positive emotions were given only brief mention. Here, we provide a rationale for the inclusion of positive emotions in chronic pain research. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Prescription pain medications and chronic headache in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Glümer, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the present paper is to study which prescription pain medications are most commonly dispensed to people with chronic headache (CH), particularly those with medication-overuse headache (MOH). METHODS: This cross-sectional study analysed prescription pain medications dispensed...... medication per month (depending on the drug) were classified as having MOH. Associations between CH and other chronic pain conditions were analysed by logistic regression. RESULTS: Among those with CH (adjusted prevalence 3.3 %, CI 3.2-3.5 %), pain medications most commonly dispensed were paracetamol...... within 1 year to 68,518 respondents of a national health survey. Participants with headache ≥15 days per month for 3 months were classified as having CH. Those with CH and over-the-counter analgesic use ≥15 days per month or purchase of ≥20 or ≥30 defined daily doses (DDDs) of prescription pain...

  7. Adaptation to chronic benign pain in elderly adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra María Alvarado García

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study sought to comprehend and analyze the experience of living with chronic benign pain during aging from the perspective of the adaptation model by Callista Roy. Methodology. Ours was an exploratory descriptive study using for analysis tools from the theory based on criteria by Strauss and Corbin. The strategy involved in-depth interviews of 10 elderly adults residing in Medellín, Antioquia, and Chía, Cundinamarca (Colombia with chronic benign pain. Results. In elderly adults, behaviors were identified that were secondary to the presence of pain and which are consequence of the capacity to adapt to their experience, managing to modify the environment by using internal and external resources that permitted their controlling the pain-generating stimuli in the human beings adaptation means based on the Adaptation model by Callista Roy. Conclusion. Elderly adults respond effectively to their new secondary condition: presence of benign pain in all the means of adaptation.

  8. Adaptation to chronic benign pain in elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado García, Alejandra María; Salazar Maya, Ángela María

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to comprehend and analyze the experience of living with chronic benign pain during aging from the perspective of the adaptation model by Callista Roy. Ours was an exploratory descriptive study using for analysis tools from the theory based on criteria by Strauss and Corbin. The strategy involved in-depth interviews of 10 elderly adults residing in Medellín, Antioquia, and Chía, Cundinamarca (Colombia) with chronic benign pain. In elderly adults, behaviors were identified that were secondary to the presence of pain and which are consequence of the capacity to adapt to their experience, managing to modify the environment by using internal and external resources that permitted their controlling the pain-generating stimuli in the human beings adaptation means based on the Adaptation model by Callista Roy. Elderly adults respond effectively to their new secondary condition: presence of benign pain in all the means of adaptation.

  9. Cerebral Cortical Thickness in Chronic Pain Due to Knee Osteoarthritis: The Effect of Pain Duration and Pain Sensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza M Alshuft

    Full Text Available This study investigates associations between cortical thickness and pain duration, and central sensitization as markers of pain progression in painful knee osteoarthritis.Whole brain cortical thickness and pressure pain thresholds were assessed in 70 participants; 40 patients with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis (age = 66.1± 8.5 years, 21 females, mean duration of pain = 8.5 years, and 30 healthy controls (age = 62.7± 7.4, 17 females.Cortical thickness negatively correlated with pain duration mainly in fronto-temporal areas outside of classical pain processing areas (p<0.05, age-controlled, FDR corrected. Pain sensitivity was unrelated to cortical thickness. Patients showed lower cortical thickness in the right anterior insula (p<0.001, uncorrected with no changes surviving multiple test correction.With increasing number of years of suffering from chronic arthritis pain we found increasing cortical thinning in extended cerebral cortical regions beyond recognised pain-processing areas. While the mechanisms of cortical thinning remain to be elucidated, we show that pain progression indexed by central sensitization does not play a major role.

  10. The impact of experiential avoidance on the relations between illness representations, pain catastrophising and pain interference in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademas, Evangelos C; Karekla, Maria; Flouri, Magdalini; Vasiliou, Vasilis S; Kasinopoulos, Orestis; Papacostas, Savvas S

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of experiential avoidance (EA) on the indirect relationship of chronic pain patients' illness representations to pain interference, through pain catastrophising Design and main outcome measure: The sample consisted of 162 patients diagnosed with an arthritis-related or a musculoskeletal disorder. The effects of EA on the pathway between illness representations, pain catastrophising and pain interference were examined with PROCESS, a computational tool for SPSS Results: After controlling for patient and illness-related variables and pain severity, the 'illness representations-pain catastrophising-pain interference' pathway was interrupted at the higher levels of EA. The reason was that, at the high levels of EA, either the relation of illness representations to pain catastrophising or the relation of pain catastrophising to pain interference was not statistically significant. The findings indicate that EA is not a generalised negative response to highly aversive conditions, at least as far as the factors examined in this study are concerned. EA may rather reflect a coping reaction, the impact of which depends on its specific interactions with the other aspects of the self-regulation mechanism. At least in chronic pain, EA should become the focus of potential intervention only when its interaction with the illness-related self-regulation mechanism results in negative outcomes.

  11. Association of multiple chronic conditions and pain among older black and white adults with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara A. Baker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging is often associated with the challenge of navigating daily tasks with a painful chronic medical illness. Yet, there is concern of the number of older adults impacted with more than one chronic condition. Despite the increasing number of adults diagnosed with diabetes and comorbid chronic illnesses, there remains a lack of understanding in how multiple illnesses relate to experiences of pain. To assess the association between multiple chronic conditions and pain, this study aimed to identify clusters of chronic medical conditions and their association with pain among a sample of older Black and White adults diagnosed with diabetes. Methods Two hundred and thirty-six participants responded to a series of questions assessing pain frequency and severity, as well as health and social characteristics. A factor analysis was used to categorize clusters of medical conditions, and multiple regression models were used to examine predictors of pain. Results Seven of the assessed chronic medical conditions loaded on three factors, and accounted for 57.2% of the total variance, with heart disease (factor 1 accounting for 21.9%, musculoskeletal conditions (factor 2 for another 18.4%, and factor 3 (microvascular diseases accounting for a final 16.9% of the variability among the chronic medical conditions. Covariate-adjusted models showed that fewer years of education and higher scores on the microvascular and musculoskeletal conditions factors were associated with higher pain frequency, with the musculoskeletal conditions factor being the strongest predictor. Conclusions Findings from this study compliment existent literature underscoring the prevalence and importance of comorbid diagnoses in relation to pain. Examining health-related factors beyond a single disease diagnosis also provides an opportunity to explore underlying disease co-occurrences that may persist beyond organ system classifications.

  12. Overlapping mechanisms of stress-induced relapse to opioid use disorder and chronic pain: Clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udi E Ghitza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, a steeply growing number of persons with chronic non-cancer pain have been using opioid analgesics chronically to treat it, accompanied by a markedly increased prevalence of individuals with opioid-related misuse, opioid use disorders, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, admissions to drug treatment programs, and drug overdose deaths. This opioid misuse and overdose epidemic calls for well-designed randomized-controlled clinical trials into more skillful and appropriate pain management and for developing effective analgesics which have lower abuse liability and are protective against stress induced by chronic non-cancer pain. However, incomplete knowledge regarding effective approaches to treat various types of pain has been worsened by an under-appreciation of overlapping neurobiological mechanisms of stress, stress-induced relapse to opioid use, and chronic non-cancer pain in patients presenting for care for these conditions. This insufficient knowledge base has unfortunately encouraged common prescription of conveniently-available opioid pain-relieving drugs with abuse liability, as opposed to treating underlying problems using team-based multidisciplinary, patient-centered, collaborative-care approaches for addressing pain and co-occurring stress and risk for opioid use disorder. This paper reviews recent neurobiological findings regarding overlapping mechanisms of stress-induced relapse to opioid misuse and chronic non-cancer pain, and then discusses these in the context of key outstanding evidence gaps and clinical-treatment research directions which may be pursued to fill these gaps. Such research directions, if conducted through well-designed randomized controlled trials, may substantively inform clinical practice in general medical settings on how to effectively care for patients presenting with pain-related distress and these common co-occurring conditions.

  13. Chronic intraoral pain--assessment of diagnostic methods and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigg, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The overall goal of this thesis was to broaden our knowledge of chronic intraoral pain. The research questions were: What methods can be used to differentiate inflammatory, odontogenic tooth pain from pain that presents as toothache but is non-odontogenic in origin? What is the prognosis of chronic tooth pain of non-odontogenic origin, and which factors affect the prognosis? Atypical odontalgia (AO) is a relatively rare but severe and chronic pain condition affecting the dentoalveolar region. Recent research indicates that the origin is peripheral nerve damage: neuropathic pain. The condition presents as tooth pain and is challenging to dentists because it is difficult to distinguish from ordinary toothache due to inflammation or infection. AO is of interest to the pain community because it shares many characteristics with other chronic pain conditions, and pain perpetuation mechanisms are likely to be similar. An AO diagnosis is made after a comprehensive examination and assessment of patients' self-reported characteristics: the pain history. Traditional dental diagnostic methods do not appear to suffice, since many patients report repeated care-seeking and numerous treatment efforts with little or no pain relief. Developing methods that are useful in the clinical setting is a prerequisite for a correct diagnosis and adequate treatment decisions. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is used to assess sensory function on skin when nerve damage or disease is suspected. A variety of stimuli has been used to examine the perception of, for example, touch, temperature (painful and non-painful), vibration, pinprick pain, and pressure pain. To detect sensory abnormalities and nerve damage in the oral cavity, the same methods may be possible to use. Study I examined properties of thermal thresholds in and around the mouth in 30 pain-free subjects: the influence of measurement location and stimulation area size on threshold levels, and time variability of thresholds

  14. Does muscle morphology change in chronic neck pain patients? - A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pauw, R; Coppieters, I; Kregel, J; De Meulemeester, K; Danneels, L; Cagnie, B

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is a common disabling worldwide health problem with a high socio-economic burden. Changes underlying the transition to, or the maintenance of a chronic state are still barely understood. Increasing evidence suggests that morphological muscle changes, including changes in cross-sectional area (CSA) or fatty infiltration, play a role in chronic neck pain. However, a structured overview of the current evidence of morphological changes is lacking. To systematically review the morphological muscle changes in patients with chronic neck pain, including those with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) and chronic idiopathic neck pain. A systematic review using the PRISMA-guidelines. Fourteen of 395 papers were included after extensive screening. Most studies were of moderate methodological quality. A higher CSA was found in all flexor muscles in both patients with WAD and patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain, except for the deeper flexor muscles in patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain. The cervical extensor muscles show an increased CSA at the highest cervical segments in patients with WAD, while most studies in patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain report a decreased CSA in all extensor muscles. Fatty infiltration, which could be accountable for an increased CSA, of both cervical extensors and flexors seems to occur only in patients with WAD. Some evidence is available for changes in muscle morphology, however more high quality prospective and cross-sectional research is needed to confirm these changes and to identify potential underlying causes that need yet to be discovered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Depressed Mood Differentially Mediates the Relationship between Pain Intensity and Pain Disability Depending on Pain Duration: A Moderated Mediation Analysis in Chronic Pain Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Probst, Thomas; Neumeier, Susanne; Altmeppen, J?rgen; Angerer, Michael; Loew, Thomas; Pieh, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that pain is associated with disability and that depressed mood mediates the relationship between pain and disability. The question of whether duration of pain moderates these effects was addressed in this cross-sectional study with 356 chronic pain patients. A simple mediation model replicated the notion that depressed mood explains a significant proportion of the relationship between pain and disability (in the study at hand: 12%). A moderated mediation model revealed tha...

  16. Neurodegenerative properties of chronic pain: cognitive decline in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijtje L A Jongsma

    Full Text Available Chronic pain has been associated with impaired cognitive function. We examined cognitive performance in patients with severe chronic pancreatitis pain. We explored the following factors for their contribution to observed cognitive deficits: pain duration, comorbidity (depression, sleep disturbance, use of opioids, and premorbid alcohol abuse. The cognitive profiles of 16 patients with severe pain due to chronic pancreatitis were determined using an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Data from three cognitive domains (psychomotor performance, memory, executive functions were compared to data from healthy controls matched for age, gender and education. Multivariate multilevel analysis of the data showed decreased test scores in patients with chronic pancreatitis pain in different cognitive domains. Psychomotor performance and executive functions showed the most prominent decline. Interestingly, pain duration appeared to be the strongest predictor for observed cognitive decline. Depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, opioid use and history of alcohol abuse provided additional explanations for the observed cognitive decline in some of the tests, but to a lesser extent than pain duration. The negative effect of pain duration on cognitive performance is compatible with the theory of neurodegenerative properties of chronic pain. Therefore, early and effective therapeutic interventions might reduce or prevent decline in cognitive performance, thereby improving outcomes and quality of life in these patients.

  17. Towards a neurobiological understanding of pain in chronic pancreatitis: mechanisms and implications for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren S. Olesen

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion:. Chronic pancreatitis is associated with abnormal processing of pain at the peripheral and central level of the pain system. This neurobiological understanding of pain has important clinical implications for treatment and prevention of pain chronification.

  18. Neuropsychological assessment of chronic non-malignant pain patients treated in a multidisciplinary pain centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgren, Per; Christrup, Lona Louring; Petersen, Morten Aa

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of pain, sedation, pain medications and socio-demographics on cognitive functioning in chronic non-malignant pain patients. Chronic non-malignant pain patients (N=91) treated in a multidisciplinary pain centre were compared with age and sex...... with a combination of long-term oral opioids and antidepressants and/or anticonvulsants. Assessments comprised pain (PVAS) and sedation (SVAS), Continuous Reaction Time (CRT) testing for sustained attention, Finger Tapping Test (FTT) testing for psychomotor speed, Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT) testing...... for information processing and working memory and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). CRT and FTT were impaired in the total patient sample. Treatment with opioids was associated with poorer performance of PASAT. High scores of PVAS and SVAS were associated with poor performance of PASAT and CRT, respectively...

  19. Novel Therapeutic Approaches to the Treatment of Chronic Abdominal Visceral Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Patrizi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic abdominal visceral pain (CAVP has a significant clinical impact and represents one of the most frequent and debilitating disorders in the general population. It also leads to a significant economic burden due to workdays lost, reduced productivity, and long-term use of medications with their associated side effects. Despite the availability of several therapeutic options, the management of patients with CAVP is often inadequate, resulting in frustration for both patients and physicians. This may in part be explained by the lack of understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic pain; in contrast with acute pain in which the pathophysiology is relatively well known and has several satisfactory therapeutic options. Recently, the development of tools for brain investigation, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, has provided new insights on the pathophysiology of chronic pain. These new data have shown that plastic changes in the central and peripheral nervous system might play an important role in the maintenance of chronic pain. Therefore, approaches aimed at the modulation of the nervous system, rather than the ones interfering with the inflammatory pathways, may be more effective for chronic pain treatment. We propose that noninvasive central nervous system stimulation, with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, might be a novel therapeutic option for CAVP. This paper will present an overview of the pathophysiology and the available therapies for CAVP, focusing on the recent advances in the treatment of this pathology.

  20. Mindfulness for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiggi-Hernandez, José G; Woo, Jean; Hamm, Megan; Greco, Carol M; Weiner, Debra K; Morone, Natalia E

    2017-08-16

    Mindfulness is a nonpharmacologic mind-body therapy that has been shown to be effective in older adults with chronic low back pain (cLBP). There are few first-person accounts in the literature that describe the older adult experience and perspective while learning mindfulness and meditation to treat pain. The objective of this study was to investigate dominant themes present in the experiences of older adults applying mindfulness and meditation to cope with cLBP. Qualitative analysis of four focus groups. Twenty-five adults age 65 years or older who had completed an eight-week mindfulness program. The focus groups met for a comprehensive discussion session about their experience with mindfulness and meditation. The audio for each session was recorded, and the discussions were transcribed. Codebook development, qualitative coding, and thematic analysis were performed. The coders each coded all four transcripts, following which they met to adjudicate all coding differences until they were in complete agreement on coding. Several key themes were brought up by older adults utilizing mindfulness as a means of coping with pain, which included overcoming fear of pain ("Before [learning mindfulness], I used to dread pain"), pain awareness ("You're focusing more on being aware than the pain; now that's what helps me"), and pain significance ("It becomes insignificant"). The themes identify several ways mindfulness impacts older adults with cLBP, including decreased negative emotions related to chronic pain such as fear of pain, a different perspective or change in awareness about pain, and reducing the significance of pain. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Alexithymia and chronic pain: the role of negative affectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Seiko; Jensen, Mark P; Arimura, Tatsuyuki; Obata, Tetsuji; Anno, Kozo; Iwaki, Rie; Kubo, Chiharu; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Hosoi, Masako

    2013-04-01

    Alexithymia has been shown to be associated with key pain-related variables in persons with chronic pain from western countries, but the generalizability of these findings across cultures has not been examined adequately. Also, there remain questions regarding the importance of alexithymia to patient functioning over and above the effects of the general negative affectivity. Alexithymia, pain intensity, pain interference, depression, anxiety, and pain catastrophizing were measured in 128 Japanese patients with chronic pain. Because of the low internal consistency coefficients for 2 of the alexithymia scales (measuring difficulty describing feelings and externally oriented feelings) in our sample, we limited our analyses to a scale assessing difficulty identifying feelings and the total alexithymia scale score. Although the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale total and the Difficulty Identifying Feelings scale scores were not significantly associated with pain intensity, these scales were associated with pain interference, catastrophizing, and negative affectivity in our sample. However, these associations became nonsignificant when measures of negative affectivity were controlled. The findings support the cross-cultural generalizability of significant associations between alexithymia and both pain interference and catastrophizing. However, whether (1) alexithymia influences patient functioning indirectly by its effects on negative affect or (2) the univariate associations found between alexithymia and measures of patient functioning are a byproduct of both being influenced by negative affect needs to be tested using longitudinal and experimental research.

  2. Circulating Omentin-1 and Chronic Painful Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Jennifer B; Sanders, Anne E; Wilder, Rebecca S; Essick, Greg K; Slade, Gary D; Hartung, Jane E; Nackley, Andrea G

    To investigate the relationship between omentin-1 levels and painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD). In a case-control design, chronic painful TMD cases (n = 90) and TMD-free controls (n = 54) were selected from participants in the multisite OPPERA study (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment). Painful TMD case status was determined by examination using established Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD). Levels of omentin-1 in stored blood plasma samples were measured by using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Binary logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence limits (CLs) for the association between omentin-1 and painful TMD. Models were adjusted for study site, age, sex, and body mass index. The unadjusted association between omentin-1 and chronic painful TMD was statistically nonsignificant (P = .072). Following adjustment for covariates, odds of TMD pain decreased 36% per standard deviation increase in circulating omentin-1 (adjusted OR = 0.64; 95% CL: 0.43, 0.96; P = .031). Circulating levels of omentin-1 were significantly lower in painful TMD cases than controls, suggesting that TMD pain is mediated by inflammatory pathways.

  3. Diagnostic uncertainty and recall bias in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbic, Danijela; Pincus, Tamar

    2014-08-01

    Patients' beliefs about the origin of their pain and their cognitive processing of pain-related information have both been shown to be associated with poorer prognosis in low back pain (LBP), but the relationship between specific beliefs and specific cognitive processes is not known. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between diagnostic uncertainty and recall bias in 2 groups of chronic LBP patients, those who were certain about their diagnosis and those who believed that their pain was due to an undiagnosed problem. Patients (N=68) endorsed and subsequently recalled pain, illness, depression, and neutral stimuli. They also provided measures of pain, diagnostic status, mood, and disability. Both groups exhibited a recall bias for pain stimuli, but only the group with diagnostic uncertainty also displayed a recall bias for illness-related stimuli. This bias remained after controlling for depression and disability. Sensitivity analyses using grouping by diagnosis/explanation received supported these findings. Higher levels of depression and disability were found in the group with diagnostic uncertainty, but levels of pain intensity did not differ between the groups. Although the methodology does not provide information on causality, the results provide evidence for a relationship between diagnostic uncertainty and recall bias for negative health-related stimuli in chronic LBP patients. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. School Self-Concept in Adolescents With Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Deirdre E; Gray, Laura S; Iversen, Christina N; Kim, Susan

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated school self-efficacy and sense of school membership (collectively "school self-concept") as potential influences on impaired school function among adolescents with chronic pain, including comparison of adolescents with primary pain to those with disease-based pain and pain-free peers. In all, 264 adolescents (12-17 years old) with primary pain conditions, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or no pain completed measures of functional disability, school functioning, pain characteristics, and school self-concept, the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for School Situations (SEQ-SS), and Psychological Sense of School Membership (PSSM). Both the SEQ-SS and PSSM demonstrated reliability and some validity, with the SEQ-SS more strongly supported. As a group, adolescents with primary pain conditions reported poorer school self-concept. School self-efficacy, but not school belongingness, predicted school functioning later in the school year. School self-concept, especially as assessed with the SEQ-SS, is relevant and important to assess when addressing school functioning in youth with chronic pain. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Central hypersensitivity in chronic musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curatolo, Michele; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Clinical research has consistently detected alteration in central pain processing leading to hypersensitivity. Most methods used in humans are reliable and have face validity to detect widespread central hypersensitivity. However, construct validity is difficult to investigate due to lack of gold...... standards. Reference values in the pain-free population have been generated, but need replication. Research on pain biomarkers that reflect specific central hypersensitivity processes is warranted. Few studies have analyzed the prognostic value of central hypersensitivity. Most medications acting at central...... level and some non-pharmacological approaches, including psychological interventions, are likely to attenuate central hypersensitivity....

  6. Emotional Status, Perceived Control of Pain, and Pain Coping Strategies in Episodic and Chronic Cluster Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Valade

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Cluster headache (CH is a chronic syndrome characterized by excruciatingly painful attacks occurring with circadian and circannual periodicity. The objectives of the present study were, in CH patients, to determine by principal component analysis the factor structure of two instruments commonly used in clinics to evaluate pain locus of control (Cancer Locus of Control Scale–CLCS and coping strategies (Coping Strategies Questionnaire–CSQ, to examine the relationship between internal pain controllability and emotional distress, and to compare psychosocial distress and coping strategies between two subsets of patients with episodic or chronic CH. Results indicate, for CLCS, a 3-factor structure (internal controllability, medical controllability, religious controllability noticeably different in CH patients from the structure reported in patients with other painful pathologies and, for CSQ, a 5-factor structure of CSQ which did not markedly diverge from the classical structure. Perceived internal controllability of pain was strongly correlated with study measures of depression (HAD depression/anhedonia subscale, Beck Depression Inventory. Comparison between subsets of patients with episodic or chronic CH of emotional status, pain locus of control, perceived social support and coping strategies did not reveal significant differences apart for the Reinterpreting pain sensations strategy which was more often used by episodic CH patients. Observed tendencies for increased anxiety and perceived social support in patients with episodic CH, and for increased depression and more frequent use of the Ignoring pain sensations strategy in patients with chronic CH, warrant confirmation in larger groups of patients.

  7. Nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines correlate with pain intensity in chronic pain patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, A.; Zacharowski, K.; Boehm, O.; Stevens, M. [=Markus F.; Lipfert, P.; von Giesen, H.-J.; Wolf, A.; Freynhagen, R.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Inflammatory cytokines as well as nitric oxide (NO) play a key role in the pathogenesis of persistent and exaggerated pain states. To document this, we investigated whether a range of cytokines and NO were detectable in the plasma of chronic pain patients and whether cytokine and NO

  8. Epidemiology of chronic pain in the office of a pain specialist neurologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen dos Santos Ferreira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective The objective of the present report was to describe the working experience of a pain specialist neurologist after concluding a medical residency program on neurology, area of concentration pain. Method A retrospective study was conducted for one year in the office of a pain specialist neurologist. Patients older than 18 years with chronic pain according to the criteria of the International Association for the Study of Pain, were included. Demographic data, chronic pain data and the treatments instituted were investigated. Results A total of 241 medical records were reviewed, mean patient age was 52.4 years and 79 (66.9% were women, and the mean score on a numeric pain scale was 8.69. The diagnoses were headaches (74.6%, neuropathic pain (17% and ostheomuscular pain (8.2%. We did not detect cancer pain. Patients received medication and procedures of anesthetic blockade. Conclusion This data can guide new medical residency programs on Neurology, area of concentration pain, to plan activities and studies.

  9. Fear-Avoidance Beliefs and Parental Responses to Pain in Adolescents with Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fear-avoidance model of chronic pain posits that fear of pain is associated with fear and avoidance of activity, which can lead to deconditioning and persistence of pain and disability. Despite being well supported in adults, little is known about the role of fear-avoidance beliefs regarding physical activity in children. Research has shown that parental protectiveness contributes to activity limitations in children; however, no studies have examined relationships between protectiveness, and fear and avoidance.

  10. Locus of control in active physical therapy treatment for non-specific chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Apolinário de Souza Batista

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction The health locus of control is defined as the perception of individuals in relation to whom they believe to be responsible for their health condition, including low back pain.Objective To identify whether individuals suffering from chronic low back pain in active physical therapy treatment believe they are responsible for their own condition.Material and methods Cross-sectional study involving 28 patients under active physical therapy treatment for non-specific chronic low back pain. Sociodemographic data and low back characteristics — including disability and pain severity — were collected. The Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC scale was used to assess the health locus of control.Results Participants undergoing active low back pain treatment presented a mean (SD of 26 points (11.40 in a 0–100 point scale for disability and 6.39 points (2.24 on a 0–10 scale for pain. In relation to the health locus of control, the means (SD for internal, external and chance subscales were, respectively: 29.32 (3.98, 24.75 (3.58, and 13.71 (6.67. 82.1% of the participants presented higher rates for internal locus of control.Conclusion Patients undergoing active treatment for chronic low back pain believe they are responsible for their own condition. Further longitudinal studies may determine whether active treatments affect the beliefs of low back pain patients.

  11. Managing chronic pain in survivors of torture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amris, Kirstine; Williams, Amanda C de C

    2015-01-01

    All generalist and specialist clinicians are likely to encounter torture survivors among refugees and asylum seekers. A minority of people survive torture and a smaller minority reach a developed country; those who do tend to be the more resilient and resourceful. They have many health, social and welfare problems; persistent pain in the musculoskeletal system is one of the most common. There is little specific evidence on pain in survivors of torture; the guidelines on interdisciplinary specialist management are applicable. Most of the literature on refugee survivors of torture has an exclusive focus on psychological disorders, with particularly poor understanding of pain problems. This article summarizes the current status of assessment and treatment of pain problems in the torture survivor.

  12. Antidepressants: Another Weapon Against Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... same dosages useful for treating pain. Venlafaxine can cause drowsiness, insomnia or elevated blood pressure, and may worsen heart problems. Duloxetine can cause side effects, such as drowsiness, insomnia, nausea, dry ...

  13. [Consequences of chronic pain in childhood and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Matos, Rocío; Gil-García, Eugenia; Barrientos-Trigo, Sergio; Molina, Esther; Porcel-Gálvez, Ana María

    2018-02-13

    Our aim was to examine and map the consequences of chronic pain in children and adolescents. A scoping review was carried out in the international databases (PubMed, SCOPUS, WOS and CINAHL, Cochrane Library) and gray literature. We included documents that addressed psychosocial aspects that influence chronic pain, published in English between 2010 and 2016. We excluded the documents that dealt with pharmacological treatments, chronic pain derived from surgical interventions or where there was no access to full text. 34 of the 716 documents reviewed were included. Studies show that pain is associated with high rates of functional disability, sleep disorders and spectrum depression-anxiety. Young people experience higher rates of victimization and stigmatization, contributing to social isolation, difficulty in meeting academic demands and less opportunity to consume illegal substances. With respect to the family, chronic pain has been associated with poorer family functioning and considerable investment of economic resources. This Scoping Review shows that functional capacity, sleep, personal development, peer support and family functioning are interesting lines in published works. However, gaps in knowledge are detected in areas such as risk behaviours, the consequences that pain can cause in adulthood and gender inequalities. Copyright © 2018 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Laparoscopy in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in chronic pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Shalini; Gupta, Priyanka; Gupta, Bindiya; Kaur, Iqbal R; Goel, Neerja

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of genital tuberculosis in women with idiopathic chronic pelvic pain on laparoscopy, correlate laparoscopic findings with microbiological and histological diagnosis of tuberculosis and assess the response to anti tubercular treatment (ATT) in these cases. In a prospective cohort study, fifty women with idiopathic chronic pelvic pain were enrolled. Diagnostic laparoscopy was done in all women and fluid from pouch of Douglas and/or saline washings were sent for acid fast bacilli (AFB) smear, conventional and rapid culture and DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for diagnosis of genital TB. The results of these tests were analyzed and agreement with laparoscopy was assessed using Kappa statistics. Pain scores using visual analogue scale were compared before and after treatment. Pelvic pathology was present in 44 (88%) women of idiopathic chronic pelvic pain, with a 34% prevalence rate of genital tuberculosis. Pelvic inflammation was associated with positive peritoneal fluid PCR (n=4) and AFB culture (n=3). Acid fast bacilli PCR had substantial agreement (kappa statistics=0.716) with visual findings at laparoscopy. There was a significant reduction in pain scores after treatment. Genital tuberculosis contributes to one-third cases of chronic pelvic pain. Pelvic inflammation is an early feature of genital TB and peritoneal fluid PCR has the best co-relation with laparoscopic findings of genital tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. TelePain: Primary care chronic pain management through weekly didactic and case‐based telementoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Flynn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a significant problem among military personnel and a priority of the military health system. The U.S. Army Surgeon General's Pain Management Task Force recommends using telehealth capabilities to enhance pain management. This article describes the development and evaluation of a telehealth intervention (TelePain designed to improve access to pain specialist consultation in the military health system. The study uses a wait-list cluster controlled clinical trial to test: 1 effectiveness of the intervention, and 2 interviews to assess barriers and facilitators of the intervention implementation. The intervention involves a didactic presentation based on the Joint Pain Education Curriculum followed by patient case presentations and multi-disciplinary discussion via videoconference by clinicians working in the military health system. A panel of pain specialists representing pain medicine, internal medicine, anesthesiology, rehabilitation medicine, psychiatry, addiction medicine, health psychology, pharmacology, nursing, and complementary and integrative pain management provide pain management recommendations for each patient case. We use the Pain Assessment Screening Tool and Outcomes Registry (PASTOR to measure patient outcomes, including pain, sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. This article reports some of the challenges and lessons learned during early implementation of the TelePain intervention. Weekly telephone meetings among the multisite research team were instrumental in problem solving, identifying problem areas, and developing solutions. Solutions for recruitment challenges included additional outreach and networking to military health providers, both building on existing relationships and new relationships.

  16. Return to work with chronic pain: employers' and employees' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, E; Wainwright, D; Keogh, E; Eccleston, C

    2013-10-01

    The sickness certification and return to work (RTW) of people with chronic pain are important health and economic issues for employees, employers, taxpayers and the UK government. The 'fit note' and a national educational programme promoting RTW were introduced in 2010 to curb rising rates of sickness absence. To investigate employers' and employees' experiences of managing RTW when someone has taken sick leave for chronic pain and to explore the perceived efficacy of the fit note. A qualitative study, comprising semi-structured interviews with employers who had managed sick leave cases and employees who had experienced sick leave for chronic pain. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and the data analysed using constructivist grounded theory principles. Five themes were elicited. Firstly, frequent enquiry after health status was seen as intrusive by some employees but part of good practice by employers and acknowledging this difference was useful. Secondly, being able to trust employees due to their performance track record was helpful for employers when dealing with complex chronic pain conditions. Thirdly, feeling valued increased employees' motivation to RTW. Fourthly, guidelines about maintaining contact with absent employees were useful if used flexibly. Finally, both parties valued the fit note for its positive language, interrogative format and biomedical authority. The fit note was perceived to be helpful if used in combination with other strategies for managing sick leave and RTW for people with chronic pain. These strategies may be applicable to other fluctuating, long-term conditions with medically unexplained elements.

  17. Attachment and Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa J. Donnelly

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although attachment theory is not new, its theoretical implications for the pediatric chronic pain context have not been thoroughly considered, and the empirical implications and potential clinical applications are worth exploring. The attachment framework broadly focuses on interactions between a child’s developing self-regulatory systems and their caregiver’s responses. These interactions are believed to create a template for how individuals will relate to others in the future, and may help account for normative and pathological patterns of emotions and behavior throughout life. This review outlines relevant aspects of the attachment framework to the pediatric chronic pain context. The theoretical and empirical literature is reviewed regarding the potential role of attachment-based constructs such as vulnerability and maintaining factors of pediatric chronic pain. The nature and targets of attachment-based pediatric interventions are considered, with particular focus on relevance for the pediatric chronic pain context. The potential role of attachment style in the transition from acute to chronic pain is considered, with further research directions outlined.

  18. Effect of chronic pain on fentanyl self-administration in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie L Wade

    Full Text Available The development of opioid addiction in subjects with established chronic pain is an area that is poorly understood. It is critically important to clearly understand the neurobiology associated with propensity toward conversion to addiction under conditions of chronic pain. To pose the question whether the presence of chronic pain influences motivation to self-administer opioids for reward, we applied a combination of rodent models of chronic mechanical hyperalgesia and opioid self-administration. We studied fentanyl self-administration in mice under three conditions that induce chronic mechanical hyperalgesia: inflammation, peripheral nerve injury, and repeated chemotherapeutic injections. Responding for fentanyl was compared among these conditions and their respective standard controls (naïve condition, vehicle injection or sham surgery. Acquisition of fentanyl self-administration behavior was reduced or absent in all three conditions of chronic hyperalgesia relative to control mice with normal sensory thresholds. To control for potential impairment in ability to learn the lever-pressing behavior or perform the associated motor tasks, all three groups were evaluated for acquisition of food-maintained responding. In contrast to the opioid, chronic hyperalgesia did not interfere with the reinforcing effect of food. These studies indicate that the establishment of chronic hyperalgesia is associated with reduced or ablated motivation to seek opioid reward in mice.

  19. Voltage gated sodium and calcium channel blockers for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Wahida; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2013-12-17

    The inflammatory response is a natural response of the body that occurs immediately following tissue damage, which may be due to injury, infection or disease. The acute inflammatory response is an essential mechanism that promotes healing and a key aspect is the ensuing pain, which warns the subject to protect the site of injury. Thus, it is common to see a zone of primary sensitization as well as consequential central sensitization that generally, is maintained by a peripheral drive from the zone of tissue injury. Inflammation associated with chronic pain states, such as rheumatoid and osteoarthritis, cancer and migraine etc. is deleterious to health and often debilitating for the patient. Thus there is a large unmet clinical need. The mechanisms underlying both acute and chronic inflammatory pain are extensive and complex, involving a diversity of cell types, receptors and proteins. Among these the contribution of voltage gated sodium and calcium channels on peripheral nociceptors is critical for nociceptive transmission beyond the peripheral transducers and changes in their distribution, accumulation, clustering and functional activities have been linked to both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The latter has been the main area for trials and use of drugs that modulate ion channels such as carbamazepine and gabapentin, but given the large peripheral drive that follows tissue damage, there is a clear rationale for blocking voltage gated sodium and calcium channels in these pain states. It has been hypothesized that pain of inflammatory origin may evolve into a condition that resembles neuropathic pain, but mixed pains such as low back pain and cancer pain often include elements of both pain states. This review considers the therapeutic potential for sodium and calcium channel blockers for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain states. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanisms Mediating Vibration-induced Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Analyzed in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Dina, Olayinka A.; Joseph, Elizabeth K.; Levine, Jon D.; Green, Paul G.

    2009-01-01

    While occupational exposure to vibration is a common cause of acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, eliminating exposure produces limited symptomatic improvement, and re-exposure precipitates rapid recurrence or exacerbation. To evaluate mechanisms underlying these pain syndromes, we have developed a model in the rat, in which exposure to vibration (60–80 Hz) induces, in skeletal muscle, both acute mechanical hyperalgesia as well as long-term changes characterized by enhanced hyperalgesia t...

  1. Outcomes of acupuncture for chronic pain in urban primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, M Diane; Kligler, Benjamin; Fletcher, Jason; Biryukov, Francesca; Casalaina, William; Anderson, Belinda; Blank, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe outcomes of the Acupuncture to Decrease Disparities in Outcomes of Pain Treatment (ADDOPT) trial, testing acupuncture as an adjunct to usual treatment for chronic pain in urban health centers. We conducted a quasi-experimental trial. Primary care patients (>21 years old) with chronic pain caused by osteoarthritis or neck or back pain at 4 hospital-owned safety net health centers in the Bronx, New York, received weekly acupuncture treatments provided by supervised acupuncture students for up to 14 weeks. Pain and functional status were assessed during a 6-week run-in period before acupuncture, during treatment, and after treatment. Of 495 referred patients, 226 (47%) initiated acupuncture. Back pain was the most common referring diagnosis (59.5%) followed by osteoarthritis (16.3%). Patients were older (mean age, 54.3 years), mostly insured by Medicaid (60.4%), often receiving disability (38.3%), and often in poor or fair overall health (46.7%). They had high baseline levels of pain (mean severity per the Brief Pain Inventory, 6.8; mean days with pain, 12.3 of 14). The mean number of treatments was 9.7 (standard deviation, 7.3). Pain severity improved from baseline (6.8 vs. 5.6 at 12 weeks and 5.5 at 24 weeks), as did physical well-being (31.8 vs. 35.7 at 12 weeks and 35.3 at 24 weeks). Using hierarchical linear modeling methods, reduction in pain severity between baseline and the treatment phase was significant (P acupuncture was associated with short-term improvements in pain and quality of life.

  2. Chronic pain patients' treatment preferences: a discrete-choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Axel C; Junker, Uwe; Juhnke, Christin; Stemmler, Edgar; Kohlmann, Thomas; Leverkus, Friedhelm; Nübling, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to identify, document, and weight attributes of a pain medication that are relevant from the perspective of patients with chronic pain. Within the sub-population of patients suffering from "chronic neuropathic pain", three groups were analyzed in depth: patients with neuropathic back pain, patients with painful diabetic polyneuropathy, and patients suffering from pain due to post-herpetic neuralgia. The central question was: "On which features do patients base their assessment of pain medications and which features are most useful in the process of evaluating and selecting possible therapies?" A detailed literature review, focus groups with patients, and face-to-face interviews with widely recognized experts for pain treatment were conducted to identify relevant treatment attributes of a pain medication. A pre-test was conducted to verify the structure of relevant and dominant attributes using factor analyses by evaluating the most frequently mentioned representatives of each factor. The Discrete-Choice Experiment (DCE) used a survey based on self-reported patient data including socio-demographics and specific parameters concerning pain treatment. Furthermore, the neuropathic pain component was determined in all patients based on their scoring in the painDETECT(®) questionnaire. For statistical data analysis of the DCE, a random effect logit model was used and coefficients were presented. A total of 1,324 German patients participated in the survey, of whom 44 % suffered from neuropathic back pain (including mixed pain syndrome), 10 % complained about diabetic polyneuropathy, and 4 % reported pain due to post-herpetic neuralgia. A total of 36 single quality aspects of pain treatment, detected in the qualitative survey, were grouped in 7 dimensions by factor analysis. These 7 dimensions were used as attributes for the DCE. The DCE model resulted in the following ranking of relevant attributes for treatment decision: "no character

  3. Neuroplasticity Underlying the Comorbidity of Pain and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Doan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pain induces depressed mood, and chronic pain is known to cause depression. Depression, meanwhile, can also adversely affect pain behaviors ranging from symptomology to treatment response. Pain and depression independently induce long-term plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS. Comorbid conditions, however, have distinct patterns of neural activation. We performed a review of the changes in neural circuitry and molecular signaling pathways that may underlie this complex relationship between pain and depression. We also discussed some of the current and future therapies that are based on this understanding of the CNS plasticity that occurs with pain and depression.

  4. Acupuncture Therapy in a Group Setting for Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligler, Benjamin; Nielsen, Arya; Kohrherr, Corinne; Schmid, Tracy; Waltermaurer, Eve; Perez, Elidania; Merrell, Woodson

    2018-02-01

    This project was designed to test the feasibility and effectiveness of acupuncture therapy given in a group setting for chronic pain. Nonrandomized, repeated measures quasi-experimental trial. Care was delivered in a primary care clinic waiting area after clinic hours. Included were primary care patients (≥18 years old) with chronic pain of the neck, back, shoulder, or osteoarthritis of any site of at least three months' duration. Subjects received eight weekly acupuncture therapy sessions in a group setting. Acupuncture therapy included a combination of palpation, acupuncture needling, Tui na, Gua sha, and auricular treatment. Baseline pain levels were established in a two- to four-week run-in; assessment of the intervention impact on pain intensity, mood, and functional status were made at the end of the treatment period (eight weeks) and 16 weeks after completion of intervention (24 weeks). Of the total 113 participants recruited for the trial, 96 completed the 24-week protocol. We found a statistically and clinically significant decrease in pain severity, pain interference, and depression in our study population. There were no serious adverse events. Acupuncture therapy offered in the group setting was effective in reducing pain severity, pain interference, and depression in patients with chronic neck, back, or shoulder pain or osteoarthritis. Benefit persisted through the 24-week measure despite no additional treatment. This finding has potentially important implications for improving access to effective acupuncture treatment for patients with limited financial resources. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Treatment Preferences for CAM in Children with Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CAM therapies have become increasingly popular in pediatric populations. Yet, little is known about children's preferences for CAM. This study examined treatment preferences in chronic pediatric pain patients offered a choice of CAM therapies for their pain. Participants were 129 children (94 girls (mean age = 14.5 years ± 2.4; range = 8–18 years presenting at a multidisciplinary, tertiary clinic specializing in pediatric chronic pain. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationships between CAM treatment preferences and patient's sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, as well as their self-reported level of functioning. Over 60% of patients elected to try at least one CAM approach for pain. The most popular CAM therapies were biofeedback, yoga and hypnosis; the least popular were art therapy and energy healing, with craniosacral, acupuncture and massage being intermediate. Patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia (80% were the most likely to try CAM versus those with other pain diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, pain duration emerged as a significant predictor of CAM preferences. For mind-based approaches (i.e. hypnosis, biofeedback and art therapy, pain duration and limitations in family activities were both significant predictors. When given a choice of CAM therapies, this sample of children with chronic pain, irrespective of pain diagnosis, preferred non-invasive approaches that enhanced relaxation and increased somatic control. Longer duration of pain and greater impairment in functioning, particularly during family activities increased the likelihood that such patients agreed to engage in CAM treatments, especially those that were categorized as mind-based modalities.

  6. Treatment Preferences for CAM in children with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jennie C I; Meldrum, Marcia; Kim, Su C; Jacob, Margaret C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2007-09-01

    CAM therapies have become increasingly popular in pediatric populations. Yet, little is known about children's preferences for CAM. This study examined treatment preferences in chronic pediatric pain patients offered a choice of CAM therapies for their pain. Participants were 129 children (94 girls) (mean age = 14.5 years +/- 2.4; range = 8-18 years) presenting at a multidisciplinary, tertiary clinic specializing in pediatric chronic pain. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationships between CAM treatment preferences and patient's sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, as well as their self-reported level of functioning. Over 60% of patients elected to try at least one CAM approach for pain. The most popular CAM therapies were biofeedback, yoga and hypnosis; the least popular were art therapy and energy healing, with craniosacral, acupuncture and massage being intermediate. Patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia (80%) were the most likely to try CAM versus those with other pain diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, pain duration emerged as a significant predictor of CAM preferences. For mind-based approaches (i.e. hypnosis, biofeedback and art therapy), pain duration and limitations in family activities were both significant predictors. When given a choice of CAM therapies, this sample of children with chronic pain, irrespective of pain diagnosis, preferred non-invasive approaches that enhanced relaxation and increased somatic control. Longer duration of pain and greater impairment in functioning, particularly during family activities increased the likelihood that such patients agreed to engage in CAM treatments, especially those that were categorized as mind-based modalities.

  7. From Opiophobia to Overprescribing: A Critical Scoping Review of Medical Education Training for Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Fiona; Bremner, Samantha; Oosenbrug, Eric; Durant, Steve; McCartney, Colin J; Katz, Joel

    2017-08-01

    Chronic pain is a significant health problem strongly associated with a wide range of physical and mental health problems, including addiction. The widespread prevalence of pain and the increasing rate of opioid prescriptions have led to a focus on how physicians are educated about chronic pain. This critical scoping review describes the current literature in this important area, identifying gaps and suggesting avenues for further research starting from patients' standpoint. A search of the ERIC, MEDLINE, and Social Sciences Abstracts databases, as well as 10 journals related to medical education, was conducted to identify studies of the training of medical students, residents, and fellows in chronic noncancer pain. The database and hand-searches identified 545 articles; of these, 39 articles met inclusion criteria and underwent full review. Findings were classified into four inter-related themes. We found that managing chronic pain has been described as stressful by trainees, but few studies have investigated implications for their well-being or ability to provide empathetic care. Even fewer studies have investigated how educational strategies impact patient care. We also note that the literature generally focuses on opioids and gives less attention to education in nonpharmacological approaches as well as nonopioid medications. The findings highlight significant discrepancies between the prevalence of chronic pain in society and the low priority assigned to educating future physicians about the complexities of pain and the social context of those afflicted. This suggests the need for better pain education as well as attention to the "hidden curriculum." © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original

  8. Psychosocial and demographic correlates of employment vs disability status in a national community sample of adults with chronic pain: toward a psychology of pain presenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoly, Paul; Ruehlman, Linda S; Okun, Morris A

    2013-11-01

    Although chronic pain is a source of work-related disability, relatively little research has addressed the psychological factors that differentiate individuals in chronic pain who leave the workforce from those who remain on the job despite their pain. The present study examined a small set of attitudinal and coping-related factors as potential correlates of pain-related disability vs continued part- or full-time employment over and above the role of well-known risk factors. A large sample of adult men and women with chronic pain drawn from across the United States (N = 1,293) by means of random digit dialing was subdivided into two groups: working (N = 859) and on disability (N = 434). Both groups were interviewed (by telephone) to complete a set of instruments (called the Profile of Chronic Pain: Extended Assessment battery) measuring pain attitudes and coping methods. Logistic regression analysis revealed that continued employment status was inversely related to pain severity and was positively related to higher education and being Hispanic. After controlling for severity and demographic factors, belief in a medical cure and catastrophizing tendencies were significant inverse predictors, and task persistence was a positive predictor of continued employment. Results revealed both demographic and attitudinal predictors of continued employment and highlight the value of harnessing insights from the psychology of work engagement to better understand the processes underlying pain presenteeism. Interventions designed to keep persons with pain in the active work force should build upon and extend the present findings. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  10. Chronic low back pain patients with accompanying leg pain : The relationship between pain extent and pain intensity, disability and health status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Maarten R.; van der Wurff, Peter; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2013-01-01

    Accompanying leg pain is commonly observed in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and is assumed to be an indicator for the disorder severity. However, it is still unknown whether it is possible to estimate a patient's functional status by the extent of leg pain present. In a post

  11. Classification and identification of opioid addiction in chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Nielsen, Per Rotbøll; Guldstrand, Sally Kendall

    2010-01-01

    Addiction is a feared consequence of long-term opioid treatment of chronic pain patients. The ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnostic addiction criteria may not be appropriate in these patients. Therefore Portenoy's criteria (PC) were launched. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of addiction......, to investigate whether PC were applicable and to compare these criteria with the ICD-10 criteria. The study was cross-sectional and included 253 patients with chronic pain at a tertiary pain centre. Patients were screened for addiction by a physician and a nurse. The addiction prevalence was 14.4% according...... treated pain patients and seems to be more sensitive and specific than ICD-10 criteria....

  12. Surgical management of chronic pain after inguinal hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, E; Kehlet, H

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain after inguinal hernia repair is an adverse outcome that affects about 12 per cent of patients. Principles of treatment have not been defined. This review examines neurectomy and mesh or staple removal as possible treatments. METHOD: A literature search was carried out using...... the Medline and Ovid databases. Keywords were 'pain; chronic', 'herniorrhaphy; inguinal', 'neurectomy' and similar words. Article references were cross-checked for additional references. Articles were reviewed for data on surgical treatment of chronic pain after hernia repair. RESULTS: Neurectomy...... of the ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, genitofemoral or lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was described in 14 papers. Overall, a favourable outcome was reported. However, the methodological quality was poor in all studies in respect of preoperative diagnostic criteria and treatment, intraoperative success in identifying...

  13. Effects of coping statements on experimental pain in chronic pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Roditi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Roditi, Michael E Robinson, Nola LitwinsDepartment of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: The present study measured the effects of catastrophizing self-statements and positive coping self-statements on cold pressor-induced pain. Participants were 58 adult chronic pain patients with current facial pain. It was hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to a decrease in pain endurance whereas positive coping would lead to an increase in pain endurance. It was also hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to an increase in peak pain intensity whereas positive coping would lead to a decrease in peak pain intensity. At pretest, participants submerged their nondominant hand in the cold pressor. Pain sensitivity ranges (PSR were subsequently determined by calculating the difference between tolerance and threshold times. Ratings of peak pain intensity were measured using a pressure sensitive bladder/transducer. Participants underwent random assignment to either a catastrophizing group or a positive coping self-statement group. ANCOVA results revealed that on average, participants employing catastrophizing statements as a coping strategy experienced significantly lower PSR (M = 35.53, SD = 39.71 compared to participants employing positive coping self-statements (M = 73.70, SD = 86.14 when controlling for pretest PSR. Group assignment had no significant influence on peak pain intensity ratings. Thus, our results reveal that manipulation of coping causes changes in pain endurance.Keywords: catastrophizing, coping, expectation, pain sensitivity

  14. Central Hyperexcitability in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Conceptual Breakthrough with Multiple Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lidbeck

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations of dysfunctional pain processing in the central nervous system have contributed much knowledge about the development of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Many common chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes - including regional myofascial pain syndromes, whiplash pain syndromes, refractory work-related neck-shoulder pain, certain types of chronic low back pain, fibromyalgia and others - may essentially be explained by abnormalities in central pain modulation. The growing awareness of dysfunctional central pain modulation may be a conceptual breakthrough leading to a better understanding of common chronic pain disorders. A new paradigm will have multiple clinical implications, including re-evaluation of clinical practice routines and rehabilitation methods, and will focus on controversial issues of medicolegal concern. The concept of dysfunctional central pain processing will also necessitate a mechanism-based classification of pain for the selection of individual treatment and rehabilitation programs for subgroups of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain due to different pathophysiological mechanisms.

  15. A motivational therapeutic assessment improves pain, mood, and relationship satisfaction in couples with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa Renee; Cano, Annmarie; Wurm, Lee H

    2013-05-01

    The current study tested whether a therapeutic assessment improved pain and well-being in couples facing chronic pain. Couples (N = 47) in which 1 spouse had chronic pain completed surveys about pain, mood, marital satisfaction, and empathy, followed by an interview and an assessment session to which they were randomly assigned: a tailored assessment of their marriage and pain coping that incorporated motivational interviewing strategies, or a control condition that included education about the gate control theory of pain. Multilevel modeling revealed that couples in the motivational assessment group experienced significant decreases in pain severity and negative mood, and increases in marital satisfaction and positive mood from baseline to postassessment, relative to the education control group. All participants experienced increases in empathy toward their partner except for spouses in the control group, who experienced declines in spousal empathy. The motivational assessment and control groups did not experience differential change in any of the variables at 1-month follow-up. Moderators of improvement were also explored, including age, race, gender, education, pain duration, spouse pain status, and marriage duration. The results provide preliminary evidence for the short-term benefits of a brief motivational assessment to improve psychosocial functioning in both patients and spouses. This article presents preliminary evidence in support of a brief therapeutic psychosocial assessment for couples with chronic pain. Assessments such as this may potentially help patients and their spouses feel more optimistic about pain treatment and increase the likelihood of entering treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Disentangling the Sleep-Pain Relationship in Pediatric Chronic Pain: The Mediating Role of Internalizing Mental Health Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pavlova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pediatric chronic pain often emerges in adolescence and cooccurs with internalizing mental health issues and sleep impairments. Emerging evidence suggests that sleep problems may precede the onset of chronic pain as well as anxiety and depression. Studies conducted in pediatric populations with pain-related chronic illnesses suggest that internalizing mental health symptoms may mediate the sleep-pain relationship; however, this has not been examined in youth with primary pain disorders. Objective. To examine whether anxiety and depressive symptoms mediated relationships between sleep quality and pain outcomes among youth with chronic pain. Methods. Participants included 147 youth (66.7% female aged 8–18 years who were referred to a tertiary-level chronic pain program. At intake, the youth completed psychometrically sound measures of sleep quality, pain intensity, pain interference, and anxiety and depressive symptoms. Results. As hypothesized, poor sleep quality was associated with increased pain intensity and pain interference, and anxiety and depressive symptoms mediated these sleep-pain relationships. Discussion. For youth with chronic pain, poor sleep quality may worsen pain through alterations in mood and anxiety; however, prospective research using objective measures is needed. Future research should examine whether targeting sleep and internalizing mental health symptoms in treatments improve pain outcomes in these youth.

  17. Treatment of chronic pain in dentistry using anticonvulsants

    OpenAIRE

    DOURADO, Daniele Coelho; GONÇALVES, Edielson Felipe e Silva; MELO FILHO, Reinan de Oliveira; POLTRONIERI, Luana Ceccagno; DOURADO, Viviane Coelho; FRIGO, Lúcio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pain can be characterized as a sensorial and emotional experience in an unpleasant and personal way. It is usually associated with real tissue damage and may be caused by the involvement of chemical and physical agents or by subjective and psychological aspects. This study aimed to review the literature regarding the use of anticonvulsants in the treatment of chronic pain, the most used drugs, the efficacy of each one of them, the pros and cons of their use and the pathologies associ...

  18. Towards a neurobiological understanding of pain in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren S; Krauss, Theresa; Demir, Ihsan Ekin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a disease characterized by inflammation of the pancreas resulting in replacement of the normal functioning parenchyma by fibrotic connective tissue. This process leads to progressively impairment of exocrine and endocrine function and many patients develop......: Pathophysiological changes in the peripheral (pancreatic gland) and central nervous system characterize the pain syndrome associated with CP; involved mechanisms can be broken down to 3 main branches: (1) peripheral sensitization, (2) pancreatic neuropathy, and (3) neuroplastic changes in the central pain pathways...

  19. Acupuncture for Chronic Pain in Japan: A Review

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    Kazunori Itoh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many Japanese reports of acupuncture and moxibustion for chronic pain are not listed in medical databases such as Medline. Therefore, they are not easily accessible to researchers outside of Japan. To complement existing reviews of acupuncture and moxibustion for chronic pain and to provide more detailed discussion and analysis, we did a literature search using ‘Igaku Chuo Zasshi Wed’ (Japana Centra Revuo Medicina and ‘Citation Information by National Institute of Information’ covering the period 1978–2006. Original articles and case reports of acupuncture and moxibustion treatment of chronic pain were included. Animal studies, surveys, and news articles were excluded. Two independent reviewers extracted data from located articles in a pre-defined structured way, and assessed the likelihood of causality in each case. We located 57 papers written in Japanese (20 full papers, 37 case reports. Conditions examined were headache (12 trials, chronic low back pain (9 trials, rheumatoid arthritis (8 trials, temporomandibular dysfunction (8 trials, katakori (8 trials and others (12 trials. While 23 were described as clinical control trials (CCTs, 11 employed a quasi-random method. Applying the 5-point Jadad quality assessment scoring system, the mean score was 1.5 ± 1.3 (SD. Eleven (52% of the CCTs were conducted to determine a more effective procedure for acupuncture; these compared a certain type of acupuncture with another type of acupuncture or specific additional points. In particular, the trigger point acupuncture was widely used to treat chronic low back pain in Japan. Many reports of chronic pain treatment by acupuncture and moxibustion are listed in Japanese databases. From the data, we conclude that there is limited evidence that acupuncture is more effective than no treatment, and inconclusive evidence that trigger point acupuncture is more effective than placebo, sham acupuncture or standard care.

  20. Benzodiazepine use in patients with chronic pain in an interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham JL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Julie L Cunningham,1 Julia R Craner,2,3 Michele M Evans,2 W Michael Hooten4 1Department of Pharmacy, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Spectrum Health System, Grand Rapids, MI, 4Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, and Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA Objectives: In the context of widespread opioid use, increased emphasis has been placed on the potentially deleterious effects of concurrent benzodiazepine (BZD and opioid use. Although use of opioids in chronic pain has been a major focus, BZD use is equally concerning. Thus, the primary aim of this study was to determine the associations between BZD and opioid use in adults with chronic pain upon admission to an outpatient interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation (IPR program.Methods: The study cohort involved 847 consecutive patients admitted to a 3-week outpatient IPR program from January 2013 through December 2014. Study variables included baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and the pain severity subscale of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory.Results: Upon admission, 248 (29% patients were taking BZDs. Patients using BZDs were significantly more likely to use opioids and to be female. Additionally, patients using BZDs had significantly greater depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity scores. In univariable logistic regression analysis, opioid use, female sex, and greater scores of depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity were significantly associated with BZD use. In multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, pain duration, opioid use, depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity, only female sex and greater depression scores were significantly associated with

  1. IL-17 is not essential for inflammation and chronic pelvic pain development in an experimental model of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motrich, Ruben D; Breser, María L; Sánchez, Leonardo R; Godoy, Gloria J; Prinz, Immo; Rivero, Virginia E

    2016-03-01

    Pain and inflammation in the absence of infection are hallmarks in chronic prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) patients. The etiology of CP/CPPS is unclear, and autoimmunity has been proposed as a cause. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) models have long been used for studying CP/CPPS. Herein, we studied prostate inflammation induction and chronic pelvic pain development in EAP using IL-12p40-KO, IL-4-KO, IL-17-KO, and wild-type (C57BL/6) mice. Prostate antigen (PAg) immunization in C57BL/6 mice induced specific Th1 and Th17 immune responses and severe prostate inflammation and cell infiltration, mainly composed of CD4 T cells and macrophages. Moreover, chronic pelvic pain was evidenced by increased allodynia responses. In immunized IL-17-KO mice, the presence of a prominent PAg-specific Th1 immune response caused similar prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. Furthermore, markedly high PAg-specific Th1 immune responses, exacerbated prostate inflammation, and chronic pelvic pain were detected in immunized IL-4-KO mice. Conversely, immunized IL-12p40-KO mice developed PAg-specific Th2 immune responses, characterized by high IL-4 secretion and neither infiltration nor damage in the prostate. As observed in wild-type control animals, IL12p40-KO mice did not evidence tactile allodynia responses. Our results suggest that, as in patients, chronic pelvic pain is a consequence of prostate inflammation. After PAg immunization, a Th1-associated immune response develops and induces prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. The absence of Th1 or Th2 cytokines, respectively, diminishes or enhances EAP susceptibility. In addition, IL-17 showed not to be essential for pathology induction and chronic pelvic pain development.

  2. Acupuncture for chronic pain: an update and critical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Changshik; Buchheit, Thomas E; Park, Jongbae J

    2017-10-01

    Acupuncture is now recommended for several chronic pain conditions. Despite supportive evidence of its effectiveness, this ancient approach is often misunderstood, and may still be underused in mainstream practice. A critical review on its effectiveness and practice integration, and mechanisms of action is essential to the medical community that is continuing to seek nonopioid therapies for chronic pain. Mounting evidence supports the effectiveness of acupuncture to treat chronic low back, neck, shoulder, and knee pain, as well as headaches. Additional data are emerging that support the use of acupuncture as an adjunct or alternative to opioids, and in perioperative settings. Findings related to its mechanisms of action include transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 activation in the periphery, microglial suppression in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, and regulation of cytokines and other key inflammatory factors in the spinal cord. Incremental integration of acupuncture into pain medicine practices and training programmes continues to grow. Acupuncture is effective, safe, and cost-effective for treating several chronic pain conditions when performed by well-trained healthcare professionals. Further studies on its use as an adjunct or alternative to opioids, and in perioperative settings are needed.

  3. Acupuncture therapy for chronic lower back pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigkilidas, Dionysios

    2010-10-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common condition affecting a significant proportion of the population and has large economic implications on the society. Acupuncture has grown in popularity as an alternative therapy for chronic low back pain. Recent National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines on low back pain offer a course of acupuncture as a baseline treatment option according to patient preference. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate if this treatment option is justified in view of recent evidence available on the efficacy of acupuncture. Studies included were identified by a PubMed search for relevant, randomised, controlled trials on the 23 July 2009. A systematic review was performed. Fifteen randomised controlled trials were identified. Of these, four met the eligibility criteria and were critically appraised. These trials suggest acupuncture can be superior to usual care in treating chronic low back pain, especially, when patients have positive expectations about acupuncture. NICE guidelines of a course of acupuncture, offered according to patient preference as a treatment option for chronic low back pain, are justified.

  4. Developments in managing severe chronic pain: role of oxycodone-naloxone extended release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Guido; Fanelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a highly disabling condition, which can significantly reduce patients' quality of life. Prevalence of moderate and severe chronic pain is high in the general population, and it increases significantly in patients with advanced cancer and older than 65 years. Guidelines for the management of chronic pain recommend opioids for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain in patients whose pain is not responsive to initial therapies with paracetamol and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Despite their analgesic efficacy being well recognized, adverse events can affect daily functioning and patient quality of life. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) occurs in 40% of opioid-treated patients. Laxatives are the most common drugs used to prevent and treat OIC. Laxatives do not address the underlying mechanisms of OIC; for this reason, they are not really effective in OIC treatment. Naloxone is an opioid receptor antagonist with low systemic bioavailability. When administered orally, naloxone antagonizes the opioid receptors in the gut wall, while its extensive first-pass hepatic metabolism ensures the lack of antagonist influence on the central-mediated analgesic effect of the opioids. A prolonged-release formulation consisting of oxycodone and naloxone in a 2:1 ratio was developed trying to reduce the incidence of OIC maintaining the analgesic effect compared with use of the sole oxycodone. This review includes evidence related to use of oxycodone and naloxone in the long-term management of chronic non-cancer pain and OIC.

  5. Developments in managing severe chronic pain: role of oxycodone–naloxone extended release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Guido; Fanelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a highly disabling condition, which can significantly reduce patients’ quality of life. Prevalence of moderate and severe chronic pain is high in the general population, and it increases significantly in patients with advanced cancer and older than 65 years. Guidelines for the management of chronic pain recommend opioids for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain in patients whose pain is not responsive to initial therapies with paracetamol and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Despite their analgesic efficacy being well recognized, adverse events can affect daily functioning and patient quality of life. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) occurs in 40% of opioid-treated patients. Laxatives are the most common drugs used to prevent and treat OIC. Laxatives do not address the underlying mechanisms of OIC; for this reason, they are not really effective in OIC treatment. Naloxone is an opioid receptor antagonist with low systemic bioavailability. When administered orally, naloxone antagonizes the opioid receptors in the gut wall, while its extensive first-pass hepatic metabolism ensures the lack of antagonist influence on the central-mediated analgesic effect of the opioids. A prolonged-release formulation consisting of oxycodone and naloxone in a 2:1 ratio was developed trying to reduce the incidence of OIC maintaining the analgesic effect compared with use of the sole oxycodone. This review includes evidence related to use of oxycodone and naloxone in the long-term management of chronic non-cancer pain and OIC. PMID:26229442

  6. Traumatization and chronic pain: a further model of interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egloff N

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Niklaus Egloff,1 Anna Hirschi,2 Roland von Känel1 1Department of General Internal Medicine, Division of Psychosomatic Medicine, Inselspital, University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland; 2Outpatient Clinic for Victims of Torture and War, Swiss Red Cross, Bern-Wabern, Switzerland Abstract: Up to 80% of patients with severe posttraumatic stress disorder are suffering from “unexplained” chronic pain. Theories about the links between traumatization and chronic pain have become the subject of increased interest over the last several years. We will give a short summary about the existing interaction models that emphasize particularly psychological and behavioral aspects of this interaction. After a synopsis of the most important psychoneurobiological mechanisms of pain in the context of traumatization, we introduce the hypermnesia–hyperarousal model, which focuses on two psychoneurobiological aspects of the physiology of learning. This hypothesis provides an answer to the hitherto open question about the origin of pain persistence and pain sensitization following a traumatic event and also provides a straightforward explanatory model for educational purposes. Keywords: posttraumatic stress disorder, chronic pain, hypermnesia, hypersensitivity, traumatization

  7. People With Chronic Neck Pain Walk With a Stiffer Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falla, Deborah; Gizzi, Leonardo; Parsa, Hesam; Dieterich, Angela; Petzke, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, case-control design. Objective To evaluate spine kinematics and gait characteristics in people with nonspecific chronic neck pain. Background People with chronic neck pain present with a number of sensorimotor and biomechanical alterations, yet little is known about the influence of neck pain on gait and motions of the spine during gait. Methods People with chronic nonspecific neck pain and age- and sex-matched asymptomatic controls walked on a treadmill at 3 different speeds (self-selected, 3 km/h, and 5 km/h), either with their head in a neutral position or rotated 30°. Tridimensional motion capture was employed to quantify body kinematics. Neck and trunk rotations were derived from the difference between the transverse plane component of the head and thorax and thorax and pelvis angles to provide an indication of neck and trunk rotation during gait. Results Overall, the patient group showed shorter stride length compared to the control group (Pneck pain showed smaller trunk rotations (Pneck pain walk with reduced trunk rotation, especially when challenged by walking with their head positioned in rotation. Reduced rotation of the trunk during gait may have long-term consequences on spinal health. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(4):268-277. Epub 3 Feb 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.6768.

  8. Testing the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide in Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Keith G; Heenan, Adam; Kowal, John; Henderson, Peter R; McWilliams, Lachlan A; Castillo, Dyana

    2017-08-01

    The interpersonal theory of suicide offers a conceptual framework for understanding suicidal ideation (SI) that may be applicable to individuals with chronic pain. The theory emphasizes the importance of 2 interpersonal constructs as precursors to SI: perceived burdensomeness (the belief that one has become a burden to others) and thwarted belongingness (a lack of social integration or connection). Our objective was to test the interpersonal theory of suicide in people with chronic pain. Hierarchical regression analysis was used in a cross-sectional study of 282 patients of an interdisciplinary pain clinic. The Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation was the criterion measure of SI, and independent variables included both general and pain-specific predictors. After adjusting for other known or putative risk factors related to pain and mental health, perceived burdensomeness significantly predicted SI, whereas thwarted belongingness did not. As expected according to theory, the interaction between perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness was also significant; perceived burdensomeness was a strong predictor of SI at high levels of thwarted belongingness, but only marginally at low levels. Other independent predictors were male sex, number of prior suicide attempts, and hopelessness. These findings are in line with some, but not all, of the major predictions of the interpersonal theory of suicide. In general, however, they support the relevance of the theory for individuals with chronic pain.

  9. The effect of neuroscience education on pain, disability, anxiety, and stress in chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Diener, Ina; Butler, David S; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of neuroscience education (NE) for pain, disability, anxiety, and stress in chronic musculoskeletal (MSK) pain. Systematic searches were conducted on Biomed Central, BMJ.com, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, NLM Central Gateway, OVID, ProQuest (Digital Dissertations), PsycInfo, PubMed/Medline, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Secondary searching (PEARLing) was undertaken, whereby reference lists of the selected articles were reviewed for additional references not identified in the primary search. All experimental studies including randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized clinical trials, and case series evaluating the effect of NE on pain, disability, anxiety, and stress for chronic MSK pain were considered for inclusion. Additional limitations: studies published in English, published within the last 10 years, and patients older than 18 years. No limitations were set on specific outcome measures of pain, disability, anxiety, and stress. Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) approach. Methodological quality was assessed by 2 reviewers using the Critical Review Form-Quantitative Studies. This review includes 8 studies comprising 6 high-quality RCTs, 1 pseudo-RCT, and 1 comparative study involving 401 subjects. Most articles were of good quality, with no studies rated as poor or fair. Heterogeneity across the studies with respect to participants, interventions evaluated, and outcome measures used prevented meta-analyses. Narrative synthesis of results, based on effect size, established compelling evidence that NE may be effective in reducing pain ratings, increasing function, addressing catastrophization, and improving movement in chronic MSK pain. For chronic MSK pain disorders, there is compelling evidence that an educational strategy addressing neurophysiology and neurobiology of pain can have a positive effect on pain, disability, catastrophization, and

  10. Chronic vulvar pain from a physical therapy perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dee

    2010-01-01

    When assessing women with chronic vulvar pain, women's health physical therapists search for comorbid mechanical components (including musculoskeletal, fascial, and visceral) and other disorders that may contribute to or be caused by chronic vulvar pain (CVP). Pelvic floor hypertonicity is a key perpetuating factor for CVP. Comprehensive physical therapy evaluation and suggested physical therapy interventions are described. Anatomy of the pelvis, common evaluative findings, and specifics for pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation are presented. Normalization of pelvic floor muscle function contributes to the reduction of CVP. Successful treatment includes the identification and treatment of co-existing physical abnormalities throughout the trunk and pelvis. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Sciatic hernia as a cause of chronic pelvic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De los Ríos, José F; Calle, Gustavo; Castañeda, Juan D; Serna, Eduardo A; Vásquez, Ricardo A; Arango, Adriana M; López, Claudia C

    2013-04-01

    Sciatic hernia constitutes the scarcest group of hernias of pelvic floor; however, they should be considered in the origin of chronic pelvic pain. The proper diagnosis of sciatic hernias has allowed to surgeons treating successfully patients with acute or chronic pelvic pain, with intestinal or ureteral obstruction and with urinary or gluteus sepsis. It has to be considered as differential diagnosis before the finding of a congenital or acquired gluteus mass. Laparoscopist gynecologist should know the existence of this defect, to be familiar with its aspect in laparoscopic view and to know the laparoscopic treatment of this disease.

  12. Perspectives on physiotherapy guidelines for chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Berger

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of chronic low back pain presents a world widedilemma to patients, physiotherapists and clinicians. There is scant evidence for prevention and treatment however it is now acknowledged that the use of  physiotherapy in a multidimensional context has proved the more appropriate model as a vital component of the collaborative approach required for effective pain management. The following article reviews the current literature, evaluates and combines the guidelines that have been proposed from various international studies to provide a practical approach to the management of chronic back pain. This approach recognizes a broad biopsychosocial model of health and the positive role of activity in health and healing with emphasis on function, rather than impairment. Therefore the development of a patient-centred rehabilitative approach has emerged that emphasizes the restoration of normal movement and function with the addition of physical modalities where appropriate. Recent advances in neurophysiology, the modulation of pain and its perception and the fact that biological systems are known to be greatly affected by electrical treatment provide a clearer rationale for the use of physical agents for rehabilitation of patients with pain and relateddisability. The modalities used in conjunction with active exercises include thermal, massage, electrical stimulation, traction, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (Tens, myofascial release, dry needling, mobilization and acupuncture. An algorithm is provided with the intention of developing protocols for breaking the pain cycle in both nociceptive and neuropathic pain states and in reducing inflammation which is a component of both peripheral and central sensitization. Pain rehabilitation is a useful and cost-effective approach to chronic pain management and makes patients’ responsible partners in their own progress. It encourages planning, pacing of activities and activity related

  13. Opioid addiction, diversion, and abuse in chronic and cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kata, Vijay; Novitch, Matthew B; Jones, Mark R; Anyama, Best O; Helander, Erik M; Kaye, Alan D

    2018-02-19

    The primary cause of overdose death in the United States is related to pharmaceutical opioids. A few particular populations that struggle with adverse outcomes related to opioid abuse are those in palliative care, those with chronic pain, and those receiving pain treatments secondary to cancer or chemotherapy. There have been massive efforts to decrease the use of opioid abuse in patient care in a gestalt manner, but palliative care provides unique challenges in applying these reduction tactics used by other specialties. We explore behavioral interventions, provider education, alternative pain management techniques, postmarketing surveillance, and abuse-deterrent formulas as emerging methods to counteract opioid abuse in these populations.

  14. Chronic pain in the setting of Parkinson's disease and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, W M; Read, S

    1997-10-01

    A 65-year-old woman with chronic pain was admitted to the hospital for severe recurrent major depression complicating Parkinson's disease (PD). Pain complaints were closely related to the fluctuating motor syndrome of PD. Specifically, pain was experienced in conjunction with hypomobility, and, as a result, she self-medicated with extra carbidopa/levodopa. A regimen of tramadol and cyclobenzaprine, along with sustained-release carbidopa/levodopa for PD and buproprion for her depression resulted in sustained symptomatic and functional improvement. Craving for, and self-medication with, supplemental carbidopa/levodopa ceased. Theoretical support for synergism among dopamine and opioid neurotransmitter systems can be found in recent literature.

  15. Effective chronic low back pain and knee pain treatment with acupuncture in geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çevik, Cemal; Anil, Afitap; İşeri, Sevgin Özlem

    2015-01-01

    The most common disease of the older age group in Turkey is degenerative articular disease and pain associated with the disease. Analgesics and physical therapy are preferred treatment for geriatric chronic pain but suffering from multiple medical and nutritional problems in old ages can limit treatment options with analgesics due to an increased risk of adverse effects and drug interactions. We aim to show the effect of acupuncture on back-pain and knee-pain treatment of elderly people. The study includes 34 patients, 24 female and 8 male. The mean age was 69.0417 ± 8.95 years for females and 73.12 ± 8.95.24 years for males. Every two days for a total of 10 sessions acupuncture treatment to Yintang, Ht 7 (Shenmen), LI 4 (Hegu), Ki 3 (Taixi) and Ki 6 were found to significantly reduce pain scores of patients. Mean back pain scores (8.8696 ± 1.546) and mean knee pain scores (9.1304 ± 1.4239) of patients were reduced significantly to 2.1739 ± 1.466 and 1.455 ± 0.7; ptreatment. These are important results as they give rationale to use acupuncture treatment widely in chronic low back pain and knee pain in the geriatric group of patients to reduce the side effects of polypharmacy in elderly.

  16. Cognitive Bahavioral Therapy In The Chronic Pain Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GULCIN BABAOGLU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a complex experience that is influenced by neurological processes and psychosocial factors and important health problem that affects the individual, society, and work force, leading to reduced quality of life and physical activity and impaired social relations. Many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in reducing the severity and frequency of pain, improving pain-induced negative mood, and improving quality of life. The patient's cognitive coping, cognitive restructuring, problem solving and relaxation skills are improved with CBT. Considering the biopsychosocial pain model and other literature information, chronic pain management should be organized in a multidisciplinary approach. [JCBPR 2017; 6(3.000: 133-140

  17. Tapentadol extended release for the management of chronic neck pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeci, Domenico; Coluzzi, Flaminia

    2017-01-01

    Background The role of opioids in the management of chronic neck pain is still poorly investigated. No data are available on tapentadol extended release (ER). In this article, we present 54 patients with moderate-to-severe chronic neck pain treated with tapentadol ER. Patients and methods Patients received tapentadol ER 100 mg/day; dosage was then adjusted according to clinical needs. The following parameters were recorded: pain; Douleur Neuropathique 4 score; Neck Disability Index score; range of motion; pain-associated sleep interference; quality of life (Short Form [36] Health Survey); Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC); Clinician GIC; opioid-related adverse effects; and need for other analgesics. Results A total of 44 of 54 patients completed the 12-week observation. Tapentadol ER daily doses increased from 100 mg/day to a mean (standard deviation) dosage of 204.5 (102.8) mg/day at the final evaluation. Mean pain intensity at movement significantly decreased from baseline (8.1 [1.1]) to all time points (PNeck Disability Index scores from 55.6 (18.6) at baseline to 19.7 (20.9) at the final evaluation (Pneck range of motion in all three planes of motion, particularly in lateral flexion. Quality of life significantly improved in all Short Form (36) Health Survey subscales (Pneck pain, including opioid-naïve subjects. Patients can expect a decrease in pain, an improvement in neck function, and a decrease in neuropathic symptoms. PMID:28280384

  18. Chronic shoulder pain: part I. Evaluation and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Kelton M; Stevenson, J Herbert; Czarnecki, Gregory R; Dorfman, Justin

    2008-02-15

    Shoulder pain is defined as chronic when it has been present for longer than six months. Common conditions that can result in chronic shoulder pain include rotator cuff disorders, adhesive capsulitis, shoulder instability, and shoulder arthritis. Rotator cuff disorders include tendinopathy, partial tears, and complete tears. A clinical decision rule that is helpful in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears includes pain with overhead activity, weakness on empty can and external rotation tests, and a positive impingement sign. Adhesive capsulitis can be associated with diabetes and thyroid disorders. Clinical presentation includes diffuse shoulder pain with restricted passive range of motion on examination. Acromioclavicular osteoarthritis presents with superior shoulder pain, acromioclavicular joint tenderness, and a painful cross-body adduction test. In patients who are older than 50 years, glenohumeral osteoarthritis usually presents as gradual pain and loss of motion. In patients younger than 40 years, glenohumeral instability generally presents with a history of dislocation or subluxation events. Positive apprehension and relocation are consistent with the diagnosis. Imaging studies, indicated when diagnosis remains unclear or management would be altered, include plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and computed tomography scans. Plain radiographs may help diagnose massive rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, and shoulder arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are preferred for rotator cuff disorders. For shoulder instability, magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram is preferred over magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Chronic Pain in the Locomotor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Most pains from the locomotor system arise due to involuntary, chronic tensions in the muscles or other tissues. When the patient is motivated, the pain is easily cured in most of the cases by using the tools of consciousness-based medicine, primarily therapeutic touch, conversation, and coaching the patient in a positive philosophy of life. The pains are often caused by “blockages” that may cause problems other than just pain. Often it turns out that the blocked areas develop actual physical damage over time: a slipped disk in the back, articular degeneration, or osteoarthritis when the cartilage is affected, can often be explained in this way. Apparently, the exact areas where the blockage is situated cause cellular problems, disrupting cellular order. The holistic process theory of healing and the related quality of life theories state that return to the natural state of being is possible, whenever the person gets the resources needed for existential healing. The resources needed are “holding” in the dimensions of awareness, respect, care, acknowledgment, and acceptance with support and processing in the dimensions of feeling, understanding, and letting go of negative attitudes and beliefs. The preconditions for holistic healing are trust and the intention for the healing to take place. Case stories of holistic treatment of patients with chronic back pain, low back pain, muscle problems, knee pain, and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis are discussed with exercises relevant for patients with these conditions in the holistic clinic.

  20. Juvenile fibromyalgia in an adolescent patient with sickle cell disease presenting with chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprakash, Stalin; Fishman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile fibromyalgia in children with sickle cell disease has not been reported in the literature. We report an adolescent patient with sickle cell whose pain symptoms progressed from having recurrent acute sickle cell pain crisis episodes to a chronic pain syndrome over several years. He was eventually diagnosed with juvenile fibromyalgia based on the clinical history and myofascial tender points and his pain symptoms responded better to multidisciplinary strategies for chronic fibromyalgia pain. Chronic pain in sickle cell disease is an area of poor research, and in addition there is inconsistency in the definition of chronic pain in sickle cell disease. Central sensitisation to pain is shown to occur after recurrent painful stimuli in a genetically vulnerable individual. In a chronic pain condition such as fibromyalgia central sensitisation is thought to play a key role. Fibromyalgia should be considered as one of the main differential diagnosis in any sickle cell patient with chronic pain. PMID:26430233

  1. Juvenile fibromyalgia in an adolescent patient with sickle cell disease presenting with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprakash, Stalin; Fishman, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Juvenile fibromyalgia in children with sickle cell disease has not been reported in the literature. We report an adolescent patient with sickle cell whose pain symptoms progressed from having recurrent acute sickle cell pain crisis episodes to a chronic pain syndrome over several years. He was eventually diagnosed with juvenile fibromyalgia based on the clinical history and myofascial tender points and his pain symptoms responded better to multidisciplinary strategies for chronic fibromyalgia pain. Chronic pain in sickle cell disease is an area of poor research, and in addition there is inconsistency in the definition of chronic pain in sickle cell disease. Central sensitisation to pain is shown to occur after recurrent painful stimuli in a genetically vulnerable individual. In a chronic pain condition such as fibromyalgia central sensitisation is thought to play a key role. Fibromyalgia should be considered as one of the main differential diagnosis in any sickle cell patient with chronic pain. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Why harmless sensations might hurt in individuals with chronic pain: About heightened prediction and perception of pain in the mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Hechler

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In individuals with chronic pain harmless bodily sensations can elicit anticipatory fear of pain resulting in maladaptive responses such as taking pain medication. Here, we aim to broaden the perspective taking into account recent evidence that suggests that interoceptive perception is largely a construction of beliefs, which are based on past experience and that are kept in check by the actual state of the body. Taking a Bayesian perspective, we propose that individuals with chronic pain display a heightened prediction of pain (prior probability p(pain, which results in heightened pain perception (posterior probability p(pain|sensation due to an assumed link between pain and a harmless bodily sensation (p(sensation│pain. This pain perception emerges because their mind infers pain as the most likely cause for the sensation. When confronted with a mismatch between predicted pain and a (harmless bodily sensation, individuals with chronic pain try to minimize the mismatch most likely by active inference of pain or by an attentional shift. The active inference results in activities that produce a stronger sensation that will match with the prediction, allowing subsequent perceptual inference of pain. Here, we depict heightened pain perception in individuals with chronic pain by reformulating and extending the assumptions of the interoceptive predictive coding model from a Bayesian perspective. The review concludes with a research agenda and clinical considerations.

  3. Differences in sensory processing between chronic cervical zygapophysial joint pain patients with and without cervicogenic headache

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chua Hai Liang, N.; Suijlekom, H.A. van; Vissers, K.C.P.; Arendt-Nielsen, L.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is not known why some patients with underlying chronic nociceptive sources in the neck develop cervicogenic headache (CEH) and why others do not. This quantitative sensory testing (QST) study systematically explores the differences in sensory pain processing in 17 CEH patients with

  4. Acute and Chronic Low Back Pain: Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D.; Craig, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    Divided 90 chronic low back pain patients into those who demonstrated signs that were congruent or incongruent with underlying anatomical and physiological principles. Low socioeconomic status, compensation claims, use of opiate analgesics, greater disability, catastrophizing cognitions, stronger emotionality, and passive coping were more…

  5. A new aspect of chronic pain as a lifestyle-related disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiko Senba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise has been established as a low-cost, safe, and effective way to manage chronic intractable pain. We investigated the underlying mechanisms of exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH using a mouse model of neuropathic pain (NPP. Epigenetic changes in activated microglia and maintained GABA synthesis in the spinal dorsal horn may contribute to EIH. Voluntary exercise (VE, a strong reward for animals, also induced EIH, which may be due in part to the activation of dopamine (DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA. VE increases the expression of pCREB in dopaminergic neurons in the VTA, which would enhance dopamine production, and thereby contributes to the activation of the mesolimbic reward system in NPP model mice. We demonstrated that neurons in the laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, a major input source of rewarding stimuli to the VTA, were activated by exercise.Chronic pain is at least partly attributed to sedentary and inactive lifestyle as indicated by the Fear-avoidance model. Therefore, chronic pain could be recognized as a lifestyle-related disease. Physical activity/inactivity may be determined by genetic/epigenetic and neural factors encoded in our brain. The hypothalamus and reward system is closely related in the axis of food intake, energy metabolism and physical activity. Understanding the interactions between the mesolimbic DA system and the hypothalamus that sense and regulate energy balance is thus of significant importance. For example, proopiomelanocortin neurons and melanocortin 4 receptors may play a role in connecting these two systems. Therefore, in a certain sense, chronic pain and obesity may share common behavioral and neural pathology, i.e. physical inactivity, as a result of inactivation of the mesolimbic DA system. Exercise and increasing physical activity in daily life may be important in treating and preventing chronic pain, a life-style related disease. Keywords: Exercise

  6. Most Relevant Neuropathic Pain Treatment and Chronic Low Back Pain Management Guidelines: A Change Pain Latin America Advisory Panel Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amescua-Garcia, Cesar; Colimon, Frantz; Guerrero, Carlos; Jreige Iskandar, Aziza; Berenguel Cook, Maria; Bonilla, Patricia; Campos Kraychete, Durval; Delgado Barrera, William; Alberto Flores Cantisani, Jose; Hernandez-Castro, John Jairo; Lara-Solares, Argelia; Perez Hernandez, Concepcion; Rico, Maria Antonieta; Del Rocio Guillen Nunez, Maria; Sempertegui Gallegos, Manuel; Garcia, Joao Batista Santos

    2018-03-01

    Chronic pain conditions profoundly affect the daily living of a significant number of people and are a major economic and social burden, particularly in developing countries. The Change Pain Latin America (CPLA) advisory panel aimed to identify the most appropriate guidelines for the treatment of neuropathic pain (NP) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) for use across Latin America. Published systematic reviews or practice guidelines were identified by a systematic search of PubMed, the Guidelines Clearinghouse, and Google. Articles were screened by an independent reviewer, and potential candidate guidelines were selected for more in-depth review. A shortlist of suitable guidelines was selected and critically evaluated by the CPLA advisory panel. Searches identified 674 and 604 guideline articles for NP and CLBP, respectively. Of these, 14 guidelines were shortlisted for consensus consideration, with the following final selections made: "Recommendations for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain from the Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group in 2015-pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis."Diagnosis and treatment of low back pain: A joint clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society" (2007). The selected guidelines were endorsed by all members of the CPLA advisory board as the best fit for use across Latin America. In addition, regional considerations were discussed and recorded. We have included this expert local insight and advice to enhance the implementation of each guideline across all Latin American countries.

  7. Insomnia in a chronic musculoskeletal pain with disability population is independent of pain and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asih, Sali; Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Brede, Emily; Gatchel, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Insomnia is frequently experienced by patients suffering from chronic musculoskeletal disorders but is often seen as simply a symptom of pain or depression and not as an independent disorder. Compared with those who experience only chronic pain, patients with both chronic pain and insomnia report higher pain intensity, more depressive symptoms, and greater distress. However, insomnia has not yet been systematically studied in a chronic musculoskeletal pain with disability population. This study assessed the prevalence and severity of patient-reported insomnia, as well as the relationship among insomnia, pain intensity, and depressive symptoms, in a chronic musculoskeletal pain with disability population. This was a retrospective study of prospectively captured data. A consecutive cohort of 326 chronic musculoskeletal pain with disability patients (85% with spinal injuries) entered a functional restoration treatment program. All patients signed a consent form to participate in this protocol. Insomnia was assessed with the Insomnia Severity Index, a validated patient-report measure of insomnia symptoms. Four patient groups were formed: no clinically significant insomnia (score, 0-7); subthreshold insomnia (score, 8-14); moderate clinical insomnia (score, 15-21); and severe clinical insomnia (score, 22-28). Three patterns of sleep disturbance were also evaluated: early, middle, and late insomnia. Additional validated psychosocial patient-reported data were collected, including the Pain Visual Analog Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Oswestry Disability Index, and the Pain Disability Questionnaire. Patients completed a standard psychosocial assessment battery on admission to the functional restoration program. The program included a quantitatively directed exercise process in conjunction with a multimodal disability management approach. The four insomnia groups were compared on demographic and psychosocial variables. The shared variances among insomnia

  8. Internet interventions for chronic pain including headache: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Buhrman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health problem and behavioral based treatments have been shown to be effective. However, the availability of these kinds of treatments is scarce and internet-based treatments have been shown to be promising in this area. The objective of the present systematic review is to evaluate internet-based interventions for persons with chronic pain. The specific aims are to do an updated review with a broad inclusion of different chronic pain diagnoses and to assess disability and pain and also measures of catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. A systematic search identified 891 studies and 22 trials were selected as eligible for review. Two of the selected trials included children/youth and five included individuals with chronic headache and/or migraine. The most frequently measured domain reflected in the primary outcomes was interference/disability, followed by catastrophizing. Result across the studies showed a number of beneficial effects. Twelve trials reported significant effects on disability/interference outcomes and pain intensity. Positive effects were also found on psychological variable such as catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. Several studies (n = 12 were assessed to have an unclear level of risk bias. The attrition levels ranged from 4% to 54% where the headache trials had the highest drop-out levels. However, findings suggest that internet-based treatments based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT are efficacious measured with different outcome variables. Results are in line with trials in clinical settings. Meta-analytic statistics were calculated for interference/disability, pain intensity, catastrophizing and mood ratings. Results showed that the effect size for interference/disability was Hedge's g = −0.39, for pain intensity Hedge's g = −0.33, for catastrophizing Hedge's g = −0.49 and for mood variables (depression Hedge's g = −0.26.

  9. Medication use among pediatric patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes at initial pain clinic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W Guite, Jessica; Sherry, David D; Jarvis, Esther W; O Lewen, Margaret; Khan, Sarosh; Wickham Kraemer, Francis

    2018-01-01

    To characterize medication use by adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes before an initial multidisciplinary clinic visit. A cross-sectional sample of 120 adolescents and parents reported on standardized assessment measures, with medication use data extracted from the medical chart and categorized. On average, 3.2 medications were reported; 70% used more than one pain-specific medication including opioids (17%), nonopioids (31%), psychotropics/neuropathics (45%) and other medications (13%). Adolescents with complex regional pain syndrome consistently reported greatest use of opioid, psychotropic/neuropathic and other pain medications. A regression model explained 17% of the variance in pain medication use. Nonpain medication use and disability contributed unique variance - pain duration and intensity did not. Greater attention to factors contributing to prescriptive practices, medication use and long-term outcomes is warranted.

  10. Pain, power and patience--a narrative study of general practitioners' relations with chronic pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansson, Mia Hemborg; Brorsson, Annika; Wachtler, Caroline; Troein, Margareta

    2011-05-15

    Chronic pain patients are common in general practice. In this study "chronic pain" is defined as diffuse musculoskeletal pain not due to inflammatory diseases or cancer. Effective patient-physician relations improve treatment results. The relationship between doctors and chronic pain patients is often dysfunctional. Consultation training for physicians and medical students can improve the professional ability to build effective relations, but this demands a thorough understanding of the problems in the relation. Several studies have defined the issues that frequently cause problems, but few have described the process. The aim of this study was to understand and illustrate what GPs' experience in contact with chronic pain patients and what works and does not work in these consultations. Our theoretical perspective is constructivist, based upon the relativist view that individuals construct realities to understand and navigate the world. Five Swedish General Practitioners (GPs), two male and three female, were interviewed and asked to tell a story about a difficult encounter with a chronic pain patient. Tapes of the interviews were transcribed and analysed using narrative analysis. Three GPs told narratives suited for our analytic tools and these were included in the final results. Each narrative highlights a certain dilemma and a strategy. The dilemmas were: power game; good intentions that fail when a patient is persuaded against her own conviction; persuasion of the unwilling; transferred tiredness; distrust and dissociation from the patient. Professional strategies of listening, encouraging and teamwork were central to handling difficult situations. The narratives show that GP's consultations with chronic pain patients sometimes are characterized by conflicts and difficult situations. They are facilitated by methods such as active listening and teamwork, but still may remain hard to handle. This has not before been studied among Swedish GPs. Narratives based on

  11. A meta-ethnography of patients' experiences of chronic pelvic pain: struggling to construct chronic pelvic pain as 'real'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toye, Francine; Seers, Kate; Barker, Karen

    2014-12-01

    To review systematically and integrate the findings of qualitative research to increase our understanding of patients' experiences of chronic pelvic pain. Chronic pelvic pain is a prevalent pain condition with a high disease burden for men and women. Its multifactorial nature makes it challenging for clinicians and patients. Synthesis of qualitative research using meta-ethnography. Five electronic bibliographic databases from inception until March 2014 supplemented by citation tracking. Of 488 papers retrieved, 32 met the review aim. Central to meta-ethnography is identifying 'concepts' and developing a conceptual model through constant comparison. Concepts are the primary data of meta-ethnography. Two team members read each paper to identify and collaboratively describe the concepts. We next compared concepts across studies and organized them into categories with shared meaning. Finally, we developed a conceptual model, or line of argument, to explain the conceptual categories. Our findings incorporate the following categories into a conceptual model: relentless and overwhelming pain; threat to self; unpredictability, struggle to construct pain as normal or pathological; a culture of secrecy; validation by diagnosis; ambiguous experience of health care; elevation of experiential knowledge and embodiment of knowledge through a community. The innovation of our model is to demonstrate, for the first time, the central struggle to construct 'pathological' vs. 'normal' chronic pelvic pain, a struggle that is exacerbated by a culture of secrecy. More research is needed to explore men's experience and to compare this with women's experience. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Multidimensional Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Pain: Introduction to the ACTTION-American Pain Society Pain Taxonomy (AAPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Robert H; Bruehl, Stephen; Fillingim, Roger B; Loeser, John D; Terman, Gregory W; Turk, Dennis C

    2016-09-01

    A variety of approaches have been used to develop diagnostic criteria for chronic pain. The published evidence of the reliability and validity of existing diagnostic criteria is limited, and these criteria have typically not been used in clinical practice. The availability of a widely accepted, consistently applied, and evidence-based taxonomy of diagnostic criteria would improve the quality of clinical research on chronic pain and would be of great value in clinical practice. To address the need for evidence-based diagnostic criteria for the major chronic pain conditions, the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTTION) public-private partnership with the US Food and Drug Administration and the American Pain Society (APS) have collaborated on the development of the ACTTION-APS Pain Taxonomy (AAPT). AAPT provides a multidimensional framework that is applied systematically in the development of diagnostic criteria. This article (1) describes the background and rationale for AAPT; (2) presents the AAPT taxonomy and the specific conditions for which diagnostic criteria have been developed (to be published separately); (3) briefly reviews the 5 dimensions that constitute the AAPT multidimensional framework and describes the 7 accompanying articles that discuss these dimensions and other important issues involving AAPT; and (4) provides an overview of next steps, specifically, the general processes by which the initial set of diagnostic criteria (for which the evidence base has been drawn from the literature, systematic reviews, and secondary analyses of existing databases) will undergo additional assessments of reliability and validity. To address the need for evidence-based diagnostic criteria for the major chronic pain conditions, the AAPT provides a multidimensional framework that is applied systematically in the development of diagnostic criteria. The long-term objective of AAPT is to advance

  13. Pregabalin and placebo responders show different effects on central pain processing in chronic pancreatitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwense SA

    2015-07-01

    -generating study provides the first evidence that pain relief with pregabalin is associated with anti-hyperalgesic effects and increased endogenous inhibitory modulation. No such effects were observed in patients experiencing pain relief with the placebo treatment. The mechanisms underlying analgesic response to placebo vs drug treatments are different and, together with their interactions, deserve further study.Keywords: chronic pancreatitis, pregabalin, placebo, chronic pain treatment, quantitative sensory testing, central sensitization

  14. Effects of a Pain Catastrophizing Induction on Sensory Testing in Women with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, John A.; Johnson, Kevin A.

    2017-01-01

    Pain catastrophizing, a pattern of negative cognitive-emotional responses to actual or anticipated pain, maintains chronic pain and undermines response to treatments. Currently, precisely how pain catastrophizing influences pain processing is not well understood. In experimental settings, pain catastrophizing has been associated with amplified pain processing. This study sought to clarify pain processing mechanisms via experimental induction of pain catastrophizing. Forty women with chronic low back pain were assigned in blocks to an experimental condition, either a psychologist-led 10-minute pain catastrophizing induction or a control (10-minute rest period). All participants underwent a baseline round of several quantitative sensory testing (QST) tasks, followed by the pain catastrophizing induction or the rest period, and then a second round of the same QST tasks. The catastrophizing induction appeared to increase state pain catastrophizing levels. Changes in QST pain were detected for two of the QST tasks administered, weighted pin pain and mechanical allodynia. Although there is a need to replicate our preliminary results with a larger sample, study findings suggest a potential relationship between induced pain catastrophizing and central sensitization of pain. Clarification of the mechanisms through which catastrophizing affects pain modulatory systems may yield useful clinical insights into the treatment of chronic pain. PMID:28348505

  15. Self-management of chronic low back pain and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    Chronic low back pain and osteoarthritis are two musculoskeletal problems that are highly prevalent in the general population, are frequently episodic and persistent, and are associated with high costs to society, both direct and indirect. This epidemiological picture provides the background that justifies the use of self-management strategies in managing these problems. For this Review, relevant systematic reviews were included that related to effectiveness; other study designs were included that addressed other aspects of the topic. The accepted definition of self-management includes liaison between health professionals and individuals with these problems, as well as independent health-promotion activities. Independent self-management strategies, such as exercise and self-medication, are practiced by individuals in the general population. Consistent evidence shows that self-management programs for osteoarthritis are effective in addressing pain and function, but effect sizes are small and might be clinically negligible. Educational programs for patients with back pain are effective in an occupational setting and if combined with an exercise program. Exercise is an effective strategy in the management of both chronic low back pain and osteoarthritis, although it is unclear what the optimum exercise is. Exercise, supported by advice and education, should be at the core of self-management strategies for chronic low back pain and osteoarthritis.

  16. Military Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Is Better Pain Management the Answer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy A. McGeary

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic musculoskeletal pain, such as low back pain, often appears in the presence of psychiatric comorbidities (e.g., depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, especially among U.S. military service members serving in the post-9/11 combat era. Although there has been much speculation about how to best address pain/trauma psychiatric symptom comorbidities, there are little available data to guide practice. The present study sought to examine how pre-treatment depression and PTSD influence outcomes in a functional restoration pain management program using secondary analysis of data from the Department of Defense-funded Functional and Orthopedic Rehabilitation Treatment (FORT trial. Twenty-eight FORT completers were analyzed using a general linear model exploring how well depression and PTSD symptoms predict post-treatment pain (Visual Analog Scale (VAS pain rating, disability (Oswestry Disability Index; Million Visual Analog Scale, and functional capacity (Floor-to-Waist and Waist-to-Eye Level progressive isoinertial lifting evaluation scores in a sample of active duty military members with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depression or PTSD symptoms. Analysis revealed that pre-treatment depression and PTSD symptoms did not significantly predict rehabilitation outcomes from program completers. Implications of these findings for future research on trauma-related pain comorbidities are discussed.

  17. The prevalence of chronic postmastectomy pain syndrome in female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nerve (lateral cutaneous branch of T2), during operative procedures on the breast and/or axilla.6. Chronic pain can have wide-ranging effects on health, functioning and quality of life. Studies4,7,13 conducted previously show a significant number of postmastectomy breast cancer survivors (ranging from 20% to 40% in these ...

  18. Conceptual and practical issues in the management of chronic pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    cycle, most often depression, is neglected in favour of an undue focus on the physical component ... The pathophysiology, and the boundaries of such diagnostic cate- gories as fibromyalgia and the myofascial syndrome are not clear, yet are frequently invoked to account for chronic pain. (The term fibromyalgia entered the.

  19. Prognostic factors for persistence of chronic abdominal pain in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, M.J.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.A.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Y.; Passchier, J.; Berger, M.Y.

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to identify prognostic factors for the persistence of chronic abdominal pain (CAP) in children. Materials and Methods: For this systematic review, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched up to June 2008 for prospective follow-up studies of pediatric CAP as

  20. Is chronic groin pain a Bermuda triangle of sports medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šebečić, Božidar; Japjec, Mladen; Janković, Saša; Vencel Čuljak; Dojčinović, Bojan; Starešinić, Mario

    2014-12-01

    Chronic groin pain is one the most complex conditions encountered in the field of sports medicine. Conservative treatment is long lasting and the result of treatment is often uncer- tain and symptom recurrences are common, which can be very frustrating for both the patient and the physician. The complex etiology and uncertainties during treatment of chronic groin pain is the reason why some authors call it the Bermuda Triangle of sports medicine. In our prospective, 7-year study, 114 athletes with chronic groin pain resistant to conservative therapy were treated surgically. In 109 athletes with sports hernia, we performed nerve neurolysis along with resection of the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve and we also reinforced the posterior wall of inguinal canal using a modified Shouldice technique. In 26 athletes that had concomitant adductor tendinosis and in 5 athletes with isolated tendinosis we performed tenotomy. Eighty-one of 83 patients with isolated sports hernia returned to sports within a mean of 4.4 (range, 3-16) weeks. Thirty-one athletes with adductor tenotomy returned to sports activity within a mean of 11.8 (range, 10-15) weeks. If carefully diagnosed using detailed history taking, physical examination and correct imaging techniques, chronic groin pain can be treated very successfully and quickly, so it need not be a Bermuda Triangle of sports medicine.

  1. Calcifying supracoracoid bursitis as a cause of chronic shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mens, J; van der Korst, J K

    1984-01-01

    A case of chronic shoulder pain is reported with marked limitation of both active and passive elevations and a normal range of motion of the glenohumeral joint. X-ray examination demonstrated cloudy calcification in the coracoclavicular region, presumably indicating calcifying supracoracoid bursitis. Images PMID:6497468

  2. Trauma and dissociation in conversion disorder and chronic pelvic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, P.; Roelofs, K.; Moene, F.C.; Kuyk, J.; Nijenhuis, E.R.S.; Hoogduin, C.A.L.; Dyck, R. van

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to: a) assess the link between sexual and/or physical abuse and dissociation in conversion disorder and chronic pelvic pain patients; and b) assess whether this effect is independent of level of general psychopathology. Method: This report examines data from

  3. Prevalence of fibromyalgia syndrome in diabetics with chronic pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS), an increasingly recognized disorder with heightened response to pressure, characterized by Chronic Widespread Pain (CWP), for which no other cause can be identified. Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is the most common metabolic endocrinopathy. It is estimated that more than 50% of ...

  4. Disability and Borderline Personality Disorder in Chronic Pain Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy A Sansone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Few studies have examined the relationship between disability and borderline personality symptomatology, and, among those that have, findings have been inconsistent. In the present study, the relationship between medical disability and borderline personality symptomatology was examined in a sample of chronic pain patients.

  5. Patterns of chronic inflammation in extensively treated patients with arachnoiditis and chronic intractable pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilello, John A; Tennant, Forest S

    2017-01-01

    To use biomarkers to gain insight into and gauge the residual (post-treatment) level of inflammation in two groups of intensively treated patients with severe chronic pain. Three study groups were analyzed, and included: (i) patients (n = 90) with chronic intractable pain (CIP), (ii) patients (n = 26) with chronic pain and MRI-documented arachnoiditis (ARC) and (iii) normal subjects without a diagnosis of chronic pain (n = 86). We determined and compared the serum concentrations of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (A1AT), Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor receptor type 2 (sTNFR2) in each of the patient populations studied. Patients treated for ARC or CIP had higher serum levels of A1AT and MPO than normal untreated subjects without a diagnosis of chronic pain. ARC patients had an A1AT mean serum concentration of 167.9 ± 41.9 mg/dL as compared to 148.9 ± 35.2 mg/dL for normal subjects (p = 0.023). CIP patients had the highest mean serum A1AT level 183.6 ± 39.2 mg/dL with p values of pain, sites of neuroinflammation elaborate MPO and other inflammatory factors which may not be completely cleared from the system despite extensive and complex treatment regimens.

  6. Treatment of chronic recurrent abdominal pain: laparoscopy or hypnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, Offer; Shaoul, Ron; Mogilner, Jorge

    2009-02-01

    Functional chronic recurrent abdominal pain (FCRAP) is long lasting, intermittent, or constant pain affecting 15-30% of children ages 4-18 and presents a diagnostic and treatment challenge to the physician. The predictive value of diagnostic tests is questionable, and studies of the treatment of chronic abdominal pain show inconclusive evidence regarding diet regimens as well as medical and surgical treatments. However, there is evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy may be useful in improving pain and disability outcome. Increasing the understanding of the neural-pain pathways and research in cognitive modulation of pain led to the application of behavioral strategies in children with FCRAP with variable success. However, the use of hypnotherapy in children with recurrent abdominal pain is not common. During the last 3 years, we have implemented hypnosis as the preferred treatment for patients with FCRAP. In the current study, we aimed to summarize our experience with hypnosis for the treatment of FCRAP in children. Twenty patients who met the criteria for FCRAP were candidates for hypnosis. Hypnosis or imagery was offered to the families, of whom 3 refused. Seventeen patients underwent just one single session of hypnosis. A possible nonorganic etiology for the abdominal pain was revealed in all cases. In 14 adolescents, all clinical symptoms resolved. Hypnosis was not effective in 3 cases, in whom secondary gain was probably responsible for their symptoms. No side effects have been noted during and after the study. Follow-up was available for a period of 4-24 months. Although effective in the management of acute pain and distress in pediatric cancer patients, the use of hypnotherapy in children with FCRAP is not a common practice. The current study highly supports the use of hypnosis as a part of the biobehavioral approach for this dilemma.

  7. Duloxetine treatment adherence across mental health and chronic pain conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Able SL

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stephen L Able,1 Zhanglin Cui,2, Wei Shen2 1Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Global Statistical Sciences, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Purpose: This study applied a uniform methodology for measuring and comparing duloxetine adherence in the treatment of multiple chronic medical conditions. Materials and methods: Study patients 18–64 years of age initiating duloxetine therapy during 2008 were identified from a large managed care database. The study was restricted to patients with continuous health plan eligibility for 12 months pre- and post-duloxetine initiation. Study patients had ≥1 medical claim with an inpatient or outpatient diagnosis of one (and only one of the following conditions: major depressive disorder (MDD; generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; fibromyalgia, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain; or chronic musculoskeletal pain, as established in studies in patients with osteoarthritis and chronic lower back pain (CLBP. Patients initiating duloxetine who had two or more of the six studied conditions were not included in this study, thereby avoiding the need to differentiate between primary and secondary diagnoses from the claims records. Adherence rate was defined as the percentage of patients with a 365-day medication possession ratio ≥0.8. Results: A total of 20,490 patients initiated duloxetine treatment during 2008 with a diagnosis of one of the studied conditions during the study period. The adherence rate in our sample was 34.6% and was highest among patients with MDD (37.3% and lowest for patients with CLBP (29.9%. In general, adherence among patients with MDD and GAD was greater than among those with a chronic pain condition. Conclusion: Adherence among newly initiated duloxetine patients varied modestly across the medical conditions for which it was used. After adjusting for potential confounders, differences between the mental conditions (MDD and GAD and the chronic

  8. Altered motor control patterns in whiplash and chronic neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseljen Ottar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent whiplash associated disorders (WAD have been associated with alterations in kinesthetic sense and motor control. The evidence is however inconclusive, particularly for differences between WAD patients and patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain. The aim of this study was to investigate motor control deficits in WAD compared to chronic non-traumatic neck pain and healthy controls in relation to cervical range of motion (ROM, conjunct motion, joint position error and ROM-variability. Methods Participants (n = 173 were recruited to three groups: 59 patients with persistent WAD, 57 patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain and 57 asymptomatic volunteers. A 3D motion tracking system (Fastrak was used to record maximal range of motion in the three cardinal planes of the cervical spine (sagittal, frontal and horizontal, and concurrent motion in the two associated cardinal planes relative to each primary plane were used to express conjunct motion. Joint position error was registered as the difference in head positions before and after cervical rotations. Results Reduced conjunct motion was found for WAD and chronic neck pain patients compared to asymptomatic subjects. This was most evident during cervical rotation. Reduced conjunct motion was not explained by current pain or by range of motion in the primary plane. Total conjunct motion during primary rotation was 13.9° (95% CI; 12.2–15.6 for the WAD group, 17.9° (95% CI; 16.1–19.6 for the chronic neck pain group and 25.9° (95% CI; 23.7–28.1 for the asymptomatic group. As expected, maximal cervical range of motion was significantly reduced among the WAD patients compared to both control groups. No group differences were found in maximal ROM-variability or joint position error. Conclusion Altered movement patterns in the cervical spine were found for both pain groups, indicating changes in motor control strategies. The changes were not related to a

  9. [Working women with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez-Hernández, Cecilia Andrea; Contreras-Estrada, Mónica Isabel; Soltero-Avelar, Ruben

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze the experience of working women suffering from chronic musculoskeletal pain, using a qualitative design with a phenomenological approach. The technique drew on in-depth interviews with five working women that presented to the orthopedics and neurosurgery departments of a hospital in Guadalajara, Mexico, with a complaint of musculoskeletal pain for more than six months. The study showed that the women felt rejection, segregation, discrimination, lack of support at the workplace, and feelings of frustration and powerlessness related to their health condition. The women also perceived as a barrier the lack of efficiency in disability proceedings and job reintegration or relocation. Financial and family responsibilities were their main reason for continuing to work despite their chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  10. Incidence and implications of alexithymia in chronic pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchlove, R F; Cohen, K R; Braha, R E; Demers-Desrosiers, L A

    1985-04-01

    Alexithymia is a clinical phenomenon that has been found to occur with some frequency in psychosomatic disorders. Its prevalence in psychosomatic patients suggests that it could be observed in chronic pain patients as well. The present study examines the incidence of alexithymia in chronic pain patients as assessed by the Archetypal Test with Nine Elements (AT9). Patients' scores on the AT9 (SAT9) were examined in conjunction with McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) data, MMPI subscale scores, and patient data. There were no significant relationships found between SAT9, MMPI, and MPQ scores. These observations are examined with reference to the nature of the assessment instruments used. Implications of these observations for theory and therapy are discussed.

  11. Ecological system influences in the treatment of pediatric chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Deirdre E; Engle, Lisa B; Feinstein, Amanda B; Sieberg, Christine B; Sparling, Penny; Cohen, Lindsey L; Conroy, Caitlin; Driesman, Dana; Masuda, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Family, school and the peer network each shape the chronic pain experience of the individual child, and each of these contexts also represents a domain of functioning often impaired by chronic pain. The goal of the present article is to summarize what is known about these bidirectional influences between children with pain and the social systems that surround them. Case reports that illustrate these complex, transactional forces and their ultimate impact on the child's pain-related functioning are included. A case involving siblings participating in an intensive interdisciplinary program for functional restoration and pain rehabilitation highlights how parents change through this treatment approach and how this change is vital to the child's outcomes. Another case involving a child undergoing intensive interdisciplinary treatment illustrates how school avoidance can be treated in the context of pain rehabilitation, resulting in successful return to the regular school environment. Finally, an acceptance and commitment therapy-focused group intervention for children with sickle cell disease and their parents demonstrates the benefits of peer contact as an element of the therapeutic intervention.

  12. Ecological System Influences in the Treatment of Pediatric Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre E Logan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Family, school and the peer network each shape the chronic pain experience of the individual child, and each of these contexts also represents a domain of functioning often impaired by chronic pain. The goal of the present article is to summarize what is known about these bidirectional influences between children with pain and the social systems that surround them. Case reports that illustrate these complex, transactional forces and their ultimate impact on the child’s pain-related functioning are included. A case involving siblings participating in an intensive interdisciplinary program for functional restoration and pain rehabilitation highlights how parents change through this treatment approach and how this change is vital to the child’s outcomes. Another case involving a child undergoing intensive interdisciplinary treatment illustrates how school avoidance can be treated in the context of pain rehabilitation, resulting in successful return to the regular school environment. Finally, an acceptance and commitment therapy-focused group intervention for children with sickle cell disease and their parents demonstrates the benefits of peer contact as an element of the therapeutic intervention.

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Chronic Pain in Internal Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Holistic medicine seems to be efficient in the treatment of chronic pain in internal organs, especially when the pain has no known cause. It is quite surprising that while chronic pain can be one of the toughest challenges in the biomedical clinic, it is often one of the simplest things to alleviate in the holistic clinic. These pains are regarded as being caused by repressed emotions and are explained as psychosomatic reactions. Using holistic medicine, the patients can often be cured of their suffering when they assume responsibility for the repressed feelings. The holistic process theory of healing states that the return to the natural (pain free state of being is possible whenever the person obtains the resources needed for existential healing. This shift is explained by the related quality of life and life mission theories. The resources needed are “holding” or genuine care in the dimensions of awareness, respect, care, acknowledgment, and acceptance with support and processing in the dimensions of feeling, understanding, and letting go of negative attitudes and beliefs. The preconditions for the holistic healing to take place are “love” and trust. Obtaining the full trust of the patient, therefore, seems to be the biggest challenge of holistic medicine, especially when dealing with a patient in pain.

  14. Tapentadol extended release for the management of chronic neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billeci D

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Domenico Billeci,1 Flaminia Coluzzi2 1Division of Neurosurgery, Ca’Foncello Hospital, University of Padova, Treviso, 2Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Unit of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine, and Pain Therapy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy Background: The role of opioids in the management of chronic neck pain is still poorly investigated. No data are available on tapentadol extended release (ER. In this article, we present 54 patients with moderate-to-severe chronic neck pain treated with tapentadol ER. Patients and methods: Patients received tapentadol ER 100 mg/day; dosage was then adjusted according to clinical needs. The following parameters were recorded: pain; Douleur Neuropathique 4 score; Neck Disability Index score; range of motion; pain-associated sleep interference; quality of life (Short Form [36] Health Survey; Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC; Clinician GIC; opioid-related adverse effects; and need for other analgesics. Results: A total of 44 of 54 patients completed the 12-week observation. Tapentadol ER daily doses increased from 100 mg/day to a mean (standard deviation dosage of 204.5 (102.8 mg/day at the final evaluation. Mean pain intensity at movement significantly decreased from baseline (8.1 [1.1] to all time points (P<0.01. At baseline, 70% of patients presented a positive neuropathic component. This percentage dropped to 23% after 12 weeks. Tapentadol improved Neck Disability Index scores from 55.6 (18.6 at baseline to 19.7 (20.9 at the final evaluation (P<0.01. Tapentadol significantly improved neck range of motion in all three planes of motion, particularly in lateral flexion. Quality of life significantly improved in all Short Form (36 Health Survey subscales (P<0.01 and in both physical and mental status (P<0.01. Based on PGIC results, approximately 90% of patients rated their overall condition as much/very much

  15. Gait Kinematics in Individuals with Acute and Chronic Patellofemoral Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Aaron; Ferber, Reed; Saunders, Natalie; Osis, Sean; Bonacci, Jason

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to identify the discriminating kinematic gait characteristics between individuals with acute and chronic patellofemoral pain (PFP) and healthy controls. Ninety-eight runners with PFP (39 male, 59 female) and 98 healthy control runners (38 male, 60 female) ran on a treadmill at a self-selected speed while three-dimensional lower limb kinematic data were collected. Runners with PFP were split into acute (n = 25) and chronic (n = 73) subgroups on the basis of whether they had been experiencing pain for less or greater than 3 months, respectively. Principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis were used to determine the combination of kinematic gait characteristics that optimally separated individuals with acute PFP and chronic PFP and healthy controls. Compared with controls, both the acute and chronic PFP subgroups exhibited greater knee flexion across stance and greater ankle dorsiflexion during early stance. The acute PFP subgroup demonstrated greater transverse plane hip motion across stance compared with healthy controls. In contrast, the chronic PFP subgroup demonstrated greater frontal plane hip motion, greater knee abduction, and reduced ankle eversion/greater ankle inversion across stance when compared with healthy controls. This study identified characteristics that discriminated between individuals with acute and chronic PFP when compared with healthy controls. Certain discriminating characteristics were shared between both the acute and chronic subgroups when compared with healthy controls, whereas others were specific to the duration of PFP.

  16. Effective physical treatment for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, C G

    2004-01-01

    It is now feasible to adopt an evidence-based approach when providing physical treatment for patients with chronic LBP. A summary of the efficacy of a range of physical treatments is provided in Table 1. The evidence-based primary care options are exercise, laser, massage, and spinal manipulation; however, the latter three have small or transient effects that limit their value as therapies for chronic LBP. In contrast, exercise produces large reductions in pain and disability, a feature that suggests that exercise should play a major role in the management of chronic LBP. Physical treatments, such as acupuncture, backschool, hydrotherapy, lumbar supports, magnets, TENS, traction, ultrasound, Pilates therapy, Feldenkrais therapy, Alexander technique, and craniosacral therapy are either of unknown value or ineffective and so should not be considered. Outside of primary care, multidisciplinary treatment or functional restoration is effective; however, the high cost probably means that these programs should be reserved for patients who do not respond to cheaper treatment options for chronic LBP. Although there are now effective treatment options for chronic LBP, it needs to be acknowledged that the problem of chronic LBP is far from solved. Though treatments can provide marked improvements in the patient's condition, the available evidence suggests that the typical chronic LBP patient is left with some residual pain and disability. Developing new, more powerful treatments and refining the current group of known effective treatments is the challenge for the future.

  17. The relationship between chronic illness, chronic pain, and socioeconomic factors in the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Owen; Miner, James; Rockswold, Erik; Biros, Michelle

    2011-03-01

    The study aimed to determine the prevalence of chronic illness and chronic pain in emergency department (ED) patients across demographic backgrounds. This was a cross-sectional study at an urban, level I trauma center with 98,000 annual visits. This was a prospective sample of adult patients presenting to the ED during a randomized distribution of daily 8-hour periods between June 4 and August 26, 2007. Prevalence of chronic illness was compared to subject demographics using logistic regression, and prevalence of chronic pain was compared using ordinal logistic regression. Six thousand nine hundred sixty-one patients presented during the data collection periods; 3882 were eligible, and 3132 (82%) were enrolled (51.7% male; age, 41.1 ± 15.8 years; range, 18-98 years). Chronic illness was reported in 36.3% of patients and chronic pain in 34.9% of patients. Chronic illness was associated with homelessness (odds ratio [OR], 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-2.61), family income less than $25,000 (OR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.60-3.22), and lack of access to primary care facilities (OR, 2.68; 95% CI, 2.25-3.21). Chronic pain was associated with homelessness (OR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.79-3.64), family income less than $25,000 (OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.91-3.39), and lack of access to primary care facilities (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.26-1.70). Patient housing situation, family income, and perceived access to primary care medical facilities were associated with higher self-reported rates of chronic illness and chronic pain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multiple 60-Minute Massages per Week Offer Relief for Chronic Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minute Massages per Week Offer Relief for Chronic Neck Pain Share: © Bob Stockfield Courtesy: National Center for Complementary ... fewer or shorter sessions for people with chronic neck pain, suggesting that several hour-long massages per week ...

  19. International guidelines for prevention and management of post-operative chronic pain following inguinal hernia surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfieri, S; Amid, P K; Campanelli, G

    2011-01-01

    To provide uniform terminology and definition of post-herniorrhaphy groin chronic pain. To give guidelines to the scientific community concerning the prevention and the treatment of chronic groin and testicular pain....

  20. Comorbid Chronic Pain and Depression: Patient Perspectives on Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternke, Elizabeth A; Abrahamson, Kathleen; Bair, Matthew J

    2016-12-01

    Clinician empathy is a well-documented component of effective patient/provider communication. Evidence surrounding the association between patient perspectives on clinician empathy and perception of pain management is currently limited, particularly among patients with chronic pain and depression. The aim of this study was to analyze patients' perspectives on the emergent theme of empathy and describe how patients construct their experiences and expectations surrounding empathic interactions. A secondary analysis of focus group data was designed using grounded theory methodology. Veterans Affairs (VA) and University Primary Care Clinics. Respondents with chronic pain and comorbid depression (N = 18) were 27 to 84 years old (mean 54.8 years), 61% women, 22% black, and 74% white. Study participants highly valued empathy and two types of empathic interactions: empathic listening and empathic action. Patients who provided examples of empathic interactions claimed that others understood, valued, and cared for them. In contrast, patients who perceived a lack of empathy and empathic interactions felt frustrated and uncared for by others (including their physicians) physically and emotionally. Patients with chronic pain and depression claimed that empathy helped them feel understood, believed, taken seriously, and that their needs were met. In demonstrating empathy and engaging in empathic interactions with patients, providers relate better to patients, better understand their life experience, and provide patient-centered care that is meaningful for patients, providers, and the health care systems within which they interact. Future research is needed to purposefully study the effects of empathic interactions on outcomes for patients with chronic pain and comorbid depression. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of Biomodulator in treating chronic pain and reducing medications pain and reducing medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    disability; mental and physical health related quality of life (HrQoL); social support and social conflict . Sample: Convenience sample of 75 SMs...quality, disability; mental and physical health related quality of life (HrQoL); social support and social conflict . Sample: Convenience sample of... intractable pain and post-traumatic pain.5 To date, no rigorous studies were found that demonstrate its efficacy in the treatment of chronic LBP

  2. Dynamic Changes in Nociception and Pain Perception After Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Neuropathic Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biurrun Manresa, José A; Sörensen, Jan; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gerdle, Björn

    2015-12-01

    Patients with an implanted spinal cord stimulation (SCS) system for pain management present an opportunity to study dynamic changes in the pain system in a situation where patients are not stimulated (ie, experiencing severe pain) compared with a situation in which patients have just been stimulated (ie, pain free or greatly reduced pain). The aims of this study were (1) to determine if there are differences in nociceptive withdrawal reflex thresholds (NWR-T) and electrical pain thresholds (EP-T) before and after SCS; and (2) to establish if these differences are related to psychological factors associated with chronic pain. Seventeen volunteers with chronic neuropathic pain participated in the experiment. Electrical stimuli were applied to assess the NWR-T and the EP-T. In addition, psychological factors (ie, pain characteristics, depression, anxiety, and disability indexes) were also recorded. The NWR-T and EP-T were assessed with the SCS system off (at least 8 h before the experiment), and then reassessed 1 hour after the SCS system was turned on. Ongoing pain intensity ratings decreased (P=0.018), whereas the NWR-T increased (P=0.028) after the SCS was turned on, whereas no significant difference was found for EP-T (P=0.324). Psychological factors were significant predictors for EP-T but not for NWR-T. The results of this study suggest that pain relief after SCS is partially mediated by a decrease in the excitability of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord.

  3. A Virtual Reality Game for Chronic Pain Management: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Weina; Choo, Amber; Gromala, Diane; Shaw, Chris; Squire, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Although Virtual Reality (VR) applications have been shown to reduce many forms of acute pain, such research of VR applications and their effects on chronic pain is still at its infancy. In this study, we designed a VR game Cryoslide, and examined its analgesic effect on chronic pain patients, its end users, in a clinical setting. In this randomized, controlled crossover clinical study of 20 chronic pain patients, Cryoslide significantly reduced perceived pain compared to the baseline and the control group. The results demonstrate that Cryoslide can be effectively used as an analgesic intervention for chronic pain management to lessen pain intensity during short-term symptom spikes.

  4. Influence of worldview on health care choices among persons with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Tina; Baldwin, Carol M; Schwartz, Gary E

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this research was to examine relationships between the Pepperian worldviews of people with chronic pain and the health care choices that they make. A convenience sample survey was done. University Medical Center Pain Clinic, Tucson, Arizona. Men and women patients (n = 96) with nonmalignant chronic pain. World Hypothesis Scale; Health Care Choice List. Findings indicate that the combination of age and formistic worldview are statistically significant predictors of conventional health care choices by participants in this study. Older patients and persons with a predominantly formistic worldview were less likely to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a choice among this sample with chronic nonmalignant pain. Borderline significant associations were noted between persons with formistic or mechanistic worldviews and conventional health care choices, and persons with contextualistic, organismic, or equal scores in two worldview categories and CAM health care choices. Although rates of CAM use did not significantly differ from conventional choices, the prevalence rate for CAM use was high (55.2%) based on national findings. Results of this study provide a link to understanding how underlying philosophies can contribute to the reasons people with chronic pain make health care decisions. Further exploration of worldviews might very well contribute to best practices for consumer health care by engaging in communication styles and belief systems consistent with consumers' personal schemas.

  5. The Prevalence of Fibromyalgia in Other Chronic Pain Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad B. Yunus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Central sensitivity syndromes (CSS include fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS, irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular disorder, restless legs syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and other similar chronic painful conditions that are based on central sensitization (CS. CSS are mutually associated. In this paper, prevalence of FMS among other members of CSS has been described. An important recent recognition is an increased prevalence of FMS in other chronic pain conditions with structural pathology, for example, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Diagnosis and proper management of FMS among these diseases are of crucial importance so that unwarranted use of such medications as corticosteroids can be avoided, since FMS often occurs when RA or SLE is relatively mild.

  6. Assessment and management of chronic pain in patients with stable total hip arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Classen, Tim; Zaps, Daniela; Landgraeber, Stefan; Li, Xinning; Jäger, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most successful operations that can restore function and relieve pain. Although a majority of the patients achieve significant pain relief after THA, there are a number of patients that develop chronic pain for unknown reasons. A literature search was performed looking for chronic pain after total hip arthroplasty and stable THA. Major causes of chronic pain include aseptic loosening or infection. However, there is a subset of patients with a stable ...

  7. Developments in managing severe chronic pain: role of oxycodone–naloxone extended release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanelli G

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Guido Fanelli,1 Andrea Fanelli2 1Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, University of Parma, Parma, 2Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Policlinico S Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Chronic pain is a highly disabling condition, which can significantly reduce patients’ quality of life. Prevalence of moderate and severe chronic pain is high in the general population, and it increases significantly in patients with advanced cancer and older than 65 years. Guidelines for the management of chronic pain recommend opioids for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain in patients whose pain is not responsive to initial therapies with paracetamol and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Despite their analgesic efficacy being well recognized, adverse events can affect daily functioning and patient quality of life. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC occurs in 40% of opioid-treated patients. Laxatives are the most common drugs used to prevent and treat OIC. Laxatives do not address the underlying mechanisms of OIC; for this reason, they are not really effective in OIC treatment. Naloxone is an opioid receptor antagonist with low systemic bioavailability. When administered orally, naloxone antagonizes the opioid receptors in the gut wall, while its extensive first-pass hepatic metabolism ensures the lack of antagonist influence on the central-mediated analgesic effect of the opioids. A prolonged-release formulation consisting of oxycodone and naloxone in a 2:1 ratio was developed trying to reduce the incidence of OIC maintaining the analgesic effect compared with use of the sole oxycodone. This review includes evidence related to use of oxycodone and naloxone in the long-term management of chronic non-cancer pain and OIC. Keywords: chronic pain, opioid-induced constipation, opioids, oxycodone–naloxone

  8. Longitudinal trial of a smartphone pain application for chronic pain patients: Predictors of compliance and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Robert N; Mei, Anna; Ross, Edgar L

    2018-02-01

    Introduction This study was designed to determine the feasibility, tolerability, safety and efficacy of a smartphone pain application (app) among chronic pain patients over a six-month trial. The app was designed for both Android and iPhone devices and enabled users with chronic pain to assess, monitor, and communicate their status to their providers. Methods We recruited 90 chronic pain patients to use the pain app. All subjects completed baseline measures and were asked to record their progress every day. All participants were supplied an activity monitor. Results Average age of the participants was 46.7 years (range 18-79), 64.4% were female and 31.1% reported multiple pain sites. Satisfaction was rated at three and six months. The app was found to be easily introduced and well tolerated. In general, those who used the app more often were more satisfied with the program ( p app diminished with time. Greater use of the app and frequent daily assessment entries were found to be related to an overall improvement in mood. However, contrary to our hypotheses, frequent use of the app did not have a positive effect on pain or activity. Those who were more satisfied with the app reported more pain-related disability and were less active than those who were less satisfied with the app. No safety issues were encountered. Discussion Strategies to make the program more engaging and to improve motivation to use the app would be important in the future development and use of a smartphone pain app.

  9. A population-based cohort study on chronic pain: the role of opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgren, Per; Grønbæk, Morten; Peuckmann, Vera Irina

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were 2-fold: (1) to investigate the consequences of opioid use in individuals with chronic pain in the Danish population, and (2) to investigate the development of and recovery from chronic pain from 2000 to 2005.......The aims of this study were 2-fold: (1) to investigate the consequences of opioid use in individuals with chronic pain in the Danish population, and (2) to investigate the development of and recovery from chronic pain from 2000 to 2005....

  10. International guidelines for prevention and management of post-operative chronic pain following inguinal hernia surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfieri, S; Amid, P K; Campanelli, G

    2011-01-01

    To provide uniform terminology and definition of post-herniorrhaphy groin chronic pain. To give guidelines to the scientific community concerning the prevention and the treatment of chronic groin and testicular pain.......To provide uniform terminology and definition of post-herniorrhaphy groin chronic pain. To give guidelines to the scientific community concerning the prevention and the treatment of chronic groin and testicular pain....

  11. Perspectives on physiotherapy guidelines for chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Berger

    2007-01-01

    disability. The modalities used in conjunction with active exercises include thermal, massage, electrical stimulation, traction, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (Tens, myofascial release, dry needling, mobilization and acupuncture. An algorithm is provided with the intention of developing protocols for breaking the pain cycle in both nociceptive and neuropathic pain states and in reducing inflammation which is a component of both peripheral and central sensitization. Pain rehabilitation is a useful and cost-effective approach to chronic pain management and makes patients’ responsible partners in their own progress. It encourages planning, pacing of activities and activity related goal setting into a clear and goal-oriented context that provides the patient with control and improved quality of life.

  12. Changes of brain microstructure in patients with painful chronic pancreatitis assessed by diffusion tensor imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Olesen, Søren Schou; Gram, Mikkel

    Objective In patients with painful chronic pancreatitis (CP) there is increasing evidence of abnormal pain processing in the central nervous system. Using magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion tensor imaging, brain microstructure in areas involved in processing of visceral pain was characterised...

  13. Attitude of medical practitioners to chronic pain management at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Balarabe

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Adequate rather than absolute pain relief or moderate pain relief is the main goal of chronic pain management among medical practitioners. Many clinicians demonstrated negative attitude regarding use of opiates.

  14. Reliability of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory and stability of the MPI classification system in chronic back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verra, M.L.; Angst, F.; Staal, J.B.; Brioschi, R.; Lehmann, S.; Aeschlimann, A.; de Bie, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This cross validation study examined the reliability of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI) and the stability of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory Classification System of the empirically derived subgroup classification obtained by cluster analysis in chronic

  15. The contribution of previous episodes of pain, pain intensity, physical impairment, and pain-related fear to disability in patients with chronic mechanical neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra-Hernández, Manuel; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida M; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I; Cleland, Joshua A; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2012-12-01

    The influence of physical and psychosocial variables on self-rated disability in patients with chronic mechanical neck pain has not been fully determined. This study examined the relationship of pain, physical impairment, and pain-related fear to disability in individuals with chronic mechanical neck pain. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Ninety-seven (n = 97) subjects (28 men, 69 women; mean age, 39.3 yrs) with chronic mechanical neck pain were prospectively recruited. Demographic information, duration of pain symptoms, pain intensity, pain-related fear, and cervical range of motion were collected on all subjects. Self-reported disability was measured with the Neck Disability Index. Correlation and regression analyses were performed to determine the association among the variables and to determine the proportions of explained variance in disability. Significant positive correlations existed between disability and previous history of neck pain (r = 0.45; P pain intensity (r = 0.32, P = 0.01), and disability and kinesiophobia (r = 0.23, P = 0.02). In addition, a significant negative correlation existed between disability and cervical extension range of motion (r = -0.18, P = 0.04). Stepwise regression analyses revealed that previous neck pain episodes, intensity of neck pain, kinesiophobia, and cervical extension range of motion were significant predictors of disability (r = 0.400; r adjusted = 0.372; F = 14.64; P neck pain, pain intensity, pain-related fear, and cervical extension range of motion explained 37.2% of the variability of self-report disability. Future longitudinal studies will help to determine the clinical implications of these findings.

  16. Testing a model of pain appraisal and coping in children with chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lynn S; Smith, Craig A; Garber, Judy; Claar, Robyn Lewis

    2005-07-01

    This prospective study of children with recurrent abdominal pain (N=133; ages 8--15 years) used path analysis to examine relations among dispositional pain beliefs and coping styles, cognitions and behavior related to a specific pain episode, and short- and long-term outcomes. Children believing they could not reduce or accept pain appraised their episode-specific coping ability as low and reported passive coping behavior. Dispositional passive coping had direct effects on both episode-specific passive coping and long-term symptoms and disability. Accommodative coping (acceptance and self-encouragement) was associated with reduced episode-specific distress, which itself predicted reduced depressive symptoms 3 months later. Results suggest that coping-skill interventions for children with chronic pain should target reductions in passive coping and consider the potential benefits of accommodative coping strategies.

  17. Pain coping in injured workers with chronic pain: what's unique about workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Leah A; Carroll, Linda J; Voaklander, Donald C; Gross, Douglas P; Beach, Jeremy R

    2012-01-01

    Pain caused by a work injury is a complex phenomenon comprising multiple factors, e.g. age, gender, prior health status, occupation, job demands, and severity of injury. Little research has focused on injured workers with chronic pain. This study investigates injured workers' pain coping. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used to measure coping strategies of injured workers in a work rehabilitation program. Differences in coping strategies by demographics, injury-related variables, pain, disability, and depression were measured. n = 479. The coping strategy with the highest mean score was "coping self statements" (Mean = 19.4, SD = 7.6), followed by "praying/hoping" (Mean = 18.2, SD = 9.7), and "catastrophizing" (Mean = 17.5, SD = 8.0). Statistical differences for coping strategies were noted between gender, marital status, depression levels, self-perceived disability levels, and pain (p cope with pain. In conditions in which there may be a perceived lack of control (high pain intensity, high self-perceived disability, and high self rated depression), there were significantly higher amounts of both "catastrophizing" and "praying and hoping". Therefore, workers with high pain and high self-perceived disability are more likely catastrophize their pain, leading to poor recovery outcomes.

  18. Research design considerations for chronic pain prevention clinical trials: IMMPACT recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewandter, Jennifer S.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Turk, Dennis C.; Farrar, John T.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Gilron, Ian; Markman, John D.; Oaklander, Anne Louise; Polydefkis, Michael J.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Robinson, James P.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Ziegler, Dan; Ashburn, Michael A.; Burke, Laurie B.; Cowan, Penney; George, Steven Z.; Goli, Veeraindar; Graff, Ole X.; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W.; Katz, Joel; Kehlet, Henrik; Kitt, Rachel A.; Kopecky, Ernest A.; Malamut, Richard; McDermott, Michael P.; Palmer, Pamela; Rappaport, Bob A.; Rauschkolb, Christine; Steigerwald, Ilona; Tobias, Jeffrey; Walco, Gary A.

    2018-01-01

    Although certain risk factors can identify individuals who are most likely to develop chronic pain, few interventions to prevent chronic pain have been identified. To facilitate the identification of preventive interventions, an IMMPACT meeting was convened to discuss research design considerations for clinical trials investigating the prevention of chronic pain. We present general design considerations for prevention trials in populations that are at relatively high risk for developing chronic pain. Specific design considerations included subject identification, timing and duration of treatment, outcomes, timing of assessment, and adjusting for risk factors in the analyses. We provide a detailed examination of 4 models of chronic pain prevention (i.e., chronic post-surgical pain, postherpetic neuralgia, chronic low back pain, and painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy). The issues discussed can, in many instances, be extrapolated to other chronic pain conditions. These examples were selected because they are representative models of primary and secondary prevention, reflect persistent pain resulting from multiple insults (i.e., surgery, viral infection, injury, and toxic/noxious element exposure), and are chronically painful conditions that are treated with a range of interventions. Improvements in the design of chronic pain prevention trials could improve assay sensitivity and thus accelerate the identification of efficacious interventions. Such interventions would have the potential to reduce the prevalence of chronic pain in the population. Additionally, standardization of outcomes in prevention clinical trials will facilitate meta-analyses and systematic reviews and improve detection of preventive strategies emerging from clinical trials. PMID:25887465

  19. Research design considerations for chronic pain prevention clinical trials: IMMPACT recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C; Farrar, John T; Fillingim, Roger B; Gilron, Ian; Markman, John D; Oaklander, Anne Louise; Polydefkis, Michael J; Raja, Srinivasa N; Robinson, James P; Woolf, Clifford J; Ziegler, Dan; Ashburn, Michael A; Burke, Laurie B; Cowan, Penney; George, Steven Z; Goli, Veeraindar; Graff, Ole X; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Katz, Joel; Kehlet, Henrik; Kitt, Rachel A; Kopecky, Ernest A; Malamut, Richard; McDermott, Michael P; Palmer, Pamela; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Steigerwald, Ilona; Tobias, Jeffrey; Walco, Gary A

    2015-07-01

    Although certain risk factors can identify individuals who are most likely to develop chronic pain, few interventions to prevent chronic pain have been identified. To facilitate the identification of preventive interventions, an IMMPACT meeting was convened to discuss research design considerations for clinical trials investigating the prevention of chronic pain. We present general design considerations for prevention trials in populations that are at relatively high risk for developing chronic pain. Specific design considerations included subject identification, timing and duration of treatment, outcomes, timing of assessment, and adjusting for risk factors in the analyses. We provide a detailed examination of 4 models of chronic pain prevention (ie, chronic postsurgical pain, postherpetic neuralgia, chronic low back pain, and painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy). The issues discussed can, in many instances, be extrapolated to other chronic pain conditions. These examples were selected because they are representative models of primary and secondary prevention, reflect persistent pain resulting from multiple insults (ie, surgery, viral infection, injury, and toxic or noxious element exposure), and are chronically painful conditions that are treated with a range of interventions. Improvements in the design of chronic pain prevention trials could improve assay sensitivity and thus accelerate the identification of efficacious interventions. Such interventions would have the potential to reduce the prevalence of chronic pain in the population. Additionally, standardization of outcomes in prevention clinical trials will facilitate meta-analyses and systematic reviews and improve detection of preventive strategies emerging from clinical trials.

  20. Mindfulness and Chronic Headache/Migraine: Mechanisms Explored through the Fear-Avoidance Model of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komandur, Biyanka; Martin, Paul R; Bandarian-Balooch, Siavash

    2017-12-21

    (1) To replicate a study by Schutze, Rees, Preece, and Schutze (2010) on a headache sample, rather than a heterogeneous chronic pain sample, investigating whether level of mindfulness predicts key components in the fear-avoidance model of chronic pain (pain intensity, negative affect, pain catastrophizing, pain-related fear, pain hypervigilance, and functional disability); (2) to investigate the relationships between level of mindfulness and headache/migraine pain intensity, frequency, and duration. Participants were 217 self-reported chronic headache/migraine sufferers (51 male, 166 female), aged between 18 and 65 years. Participants completed an online survey measuring demographics, mindfulness, the key components of the fear-avoidance model, and headache pain intensity, duration, and frequency. Mindfulness had significant negative correlations (P<0.05) with all variables except headache pain intensity and headache frequency. Mindfulness significantly predicted negative affect, pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, pain hypervigilance, and headache duration (P<0.05). Mindfulness remained a significant predictor of negative affect and pain hypervigilance after controlling for other key components and background characteristics (P<0.05). Mindfulness did not moderate the relationship between pain intensity and pain catastrophizing (P=0.204). Findings suggest that mindfulness may be integrated into the fear-avoidance model of chronic pain for chronic headache/migraine sufferers. Directions for future research are discussed.

  1. Social problem solving in chronic pain: An integrative model of coping predicts mental health in chronic pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suso-Ribera, Carlos; Camacho-Guerrero, Laura; McCracken, Lance M; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Gallardo-Pujol, David

    2016-06-01

    Despite several models of coping have been proposed in chronic pain, research is not integrative and has not yet identified a reliable set of beneficial coping strategies. We intend to offer a comprehensive view of coping using the social problem-solving model. Participants were 369 chronic pain patients (63.78% women; mean age 58.89 years; standard deviation = 15.12 years). Correlation analyses and the structural equation model for mental health revealed potentially beneficial and harmful problem-solving components. This integrative perspective on general coping could be used to promote changes in the way patients deal with stressful conditions other than pain. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Pain intensity, disability and depression in individuals with chronic back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia de Oliveira Sakamoto Silva Garbi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to measure the pain intensity, identify the disability and depression levels in people with chronic back pain and to correlate these variables. A cross-sectional, descriptive and exploratory study was undertaken at the Pain Treatment Clinic of the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto Hospital das Clínicas, between February and June 2012, after receiving approval from the Ethics Committee at the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing.METHOD: sixty subjects with chronic back pain participated. The instruments used were: the 11-point Numerical Category Scale, the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. To analyze the data, the arithmetic means, standard deviations and Spearman's correlation coefficient were calculated.RESULTS: the findings show that the participants presented high pain, disability and depression levels. The correlation between pain intensity and disability and between pain intensity and depression was positive and weak and, between disability and depression, positive and moderate.CONCLUSION: the study variables showed moderate and weak indices and the mutual correlations were positive.

  3. A psychometric evaluation of the Pain Response Preference Questionnaire in a chronic <