WorldWideScience

Sample records for underlying atomic lattice

  1. Atomic lattice excitons: from condensates to crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantian, A; Daley, A J; Toermae, P; Zoller, P

    2007-01-01

    We discuss atomic lattice excitons (ALEs), bound particle-hole pairs formed by fermionic atoms in two bands of an optical lattice. Such a system provides a clean set-up, with tunable masses and interactions, to study fundamental properties of excitons including exciton condensation. We also find that for a large effective mass ratio between particles and holes, effective long-range interactions can mediate the formation of an exciton crystal, for which superfluidity is suppressed. Using a combination of mean-field treatments, bosonized theory based on a Born-Oppenheimer approximation, and one-dimensional (1D) numerical computation, we discuss the properties of ALEs under varying conditions, and discuss in particular their preparation and measurement

  2. Atomic lattice excitons: from condensates to crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantian, A [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Daley, A J [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Toermae, P [Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Zoller, P [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2007-11-15

    We discuss atomic lattice excitons (ALEs), bound particle-hole pairs formed by fermionic atoms in two bands of an optical lattice. Such a system provides a clean set-up, with tunable masses and interactions, to study fundamental properties of excitons including exciton condensation. We also find that for a large effective mass ratio between particles and holes, effective long-range interactions can mediate the formation of an exciton crystal, for which superfluidity is suppressed. Using a combination of mean-field treatments, bosonized theory based on a Born-Oppenheimer approximation, and one-dimensional (1D) numerical computation, we discuss the properties of ALEs under varying conditions, and discuss in particular their preparation and measurement.

  3. Optical lattice on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego, D.; Hofferberth, S.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2009-01-01

    Optical dipole traps and atom chips are two very powerful tools for the quantum manipulation of neutral atoms. We demonstrate that both methods can be combined by creating an optical lattice potential on an atom chip. A red-detuned laser beam is retroreflected using the atom chip surface as a high......-quality mirror, generating a vertical array of purely optical oblate traps. We transfer thermal atoms from the chip into the lattice and observe cooling into the two-dimensional regime. Using a chip-generated Bose-Einstein condensate, we demonstrate coherent Bloch oscillations in the lattice....

  4. Atom interferometry using a shaken optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, C. A.; Yu, Hoon; Kosloff, Ronnie; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2017-04-01

    We introduce shaken lattice interferometry with atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. By phase modulating (shaking) the lattice, we control the momentum state of the atoms. Through a sequence of shaking functions, the atoms undergo an interferometer sequence of splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Each shaking function in the sequence is optimized with a genetic algorithm to achieve the desired momentum state transitions. As with conventional atom interferometers, the sensitivity of the shaken lattice interferometer increases with interrogation time. The shaken lattice interferometer may also be optimized to sense signals of interest while rejecting others, such as the measurement of an ac inertial signal in the presence of an unwanted dc signal.

  5. Studies of atomic motion and atomic diagnostics in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondalski, John Paul

    2001-06-01

    We present a detailed theoretical and numerical study of polarization gradient cooling for alkali atoms with large ground state angular momenta (Fg >= 2) moving in a one dimensional (1D) lin⊥lin optical lattice in order to clarify the physical picture of laser cooling in steady- state. Using a basis of Wannier states we find that the semiclassical picture of laser cooling depends strongly on coherences between the Zeeman sublevels of the atomic ground state. We find that atoms with ground state angular momenta Fg = 2, tend to diffuse throughout the lattice, while atoms with higher ground state angular momentum tend to remain localized at specific lattice sites. In the far-off resonance case, the lattice is essentially dissipation free allowing for studies of quantum-state control. We examine the creation and manipulation of mesoscopic coherent superpositions of Cesium atoms in magneto-optical double-potential wells created by a far- off-resonance 1D lin-θ-lin lattice. A robust set of dynamically varied lattice parameters that lead to a tunneling situation. Tunneling oscillations computed numerically agree with experiment except for an observed decay in tunneling oscillations. We consider the addition of a time-periodic drive to the double-well system, for which certain parameters of the drive, it is possible to coherently suppress tunneling. When a small amount of noise is added to the system in the form of random periodic δ-function ``kicks'' the quantum interference is destroyed. However, increasing the strength of the noise appears to have a stabilizing effect on the coherent suppression of tunneling. High resolution spatial information about atomic samples trapped in optical lattices can be obtained directly without the use of external probe lasers which necessarily disturb the system and whose resolution is limited by the wavelength of the probe laser. We explore the use of first and second order same-time atomic spatial correlation functions as a

  6. Experiments on trapping ytterbium atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Min; Chen Ning; Zhang Xiao-Hang; Huang Liang-Yu; Yao Mao-Fei; Tian Jie; Gao Qi; Jiang Hai-Ling; Tang Hai-Yao; Xu Xin-Ye

    2013-01-01

    Experiments on trapping ytterbium atoms in various optical lattices are presented. After the two-stage cooling, first in a blue magneto—optical trap and then in a green magneto—optical trap, the ultracold 171 Yb atoms are successfully loaded into one-, two-, and three-dimensional optical lattices operating at the Stark-free wavelength, respectively. The temperature, number, and lifetime of cold 171 Yb atoms in one-dimensional lattice are measured. After optimization, the one-dimensional lattice with cold 171 Yb atoms is used for developing an ytterbium optical clock. (atomic and molecular physics)

  7. Atom optics simulator of lattice transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fangzhao; Meier, Eric; Gadway, Bryce

    2016-05-01

    We report on a novel scheme for studying lattice transport phenomena, based on the controlled momentum-space dynamics of ultracold atomic matter waves. In the effective tight binding models that can be simulated, we demonstrate that this technique allows for a local and time-dependent control over all system parameters, and additionally allows for single-site resolved detection of atomic populations. We demonstrate full control over site-to-site off-diagonal tunneling elements (amplitude and phase) and diagonal site-energies, through the observation of continuous time quantum walks, Bloch oscillations, and negative tunneling. These capabilities open up new prospects in the experimental study of disordered and topological systems.

  8. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-06-05

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  9. DFT computations of the lattice constant, stable atomic structure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the most stable atomic structure and lattice constant of Fullerenes (C60). FHI-aims DFT code was used to predict the stable structure and the computational lattice constant of C60. These were compared with known experimental structures and lattice constants of C60. The results obtained showed that ...

  10. Modularity, Atomicity and States in Archimedean Lattice Effect Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paseka, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Effect algebras are a generalization of many structures which arise in quantum physics and in mathematical economics. We show that, in every modular Archimedean atomic lattice effect algebra E that is not an orthomodular lattice there exists an (o)-continuous state ω on E, which is subadditive. Moreover, we show properties of finite and compact elements of such lattice effect algebras.

  11. Feedback control of atomic motion in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, N.V.; Dutta, S.K.; Raithel, G.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate a real-time feedback scheme to manipulate wave-packet oscillations of atoms in an optical lattice. The average position of the atoms in the lattice wells is measured continuously and nondestructively. A feedback loop processes the position signal and translates the lattice potential. Depending on the feedback loop characteristics, we find amplification, damping, or an entire alteration of the wave-packet oscillations. Our results are well supported by simulations

  12. Dynamics of Atomic Matter Waves in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Jeremy Brian

    Quantum gases in optical lattices allow for fundamental studies in atomic and condensed-matter physics and the exploration of novel effects. After a brief introduction to the fundamentals of quantum gas experiments in optical lattices, we discuss two recent experiments focusing on driven matter waves in a one-dimensional optical lattice. The first experiment uses a tilted bichromatic optical lattice to investigate the interplay of disorder and collisional interactions in the accelerated transport of a Bose-Einstein condensate. Here, a screening effect is observed, in which the interactions effectively cancel the damping of Bloch oscillations induced by a (quasi-)disordered potential. This effect can be understood through a modification of the underlying band structure by the interactions. The second experiment studies the dynamics of a weakly trapped condensate resonantly coupled to the orbitals of a strongly confining state-selective lattice. We observe momentum distributions that correspond to matter wave diffraction from a periodic structure; however, the diffractive dynamics remain strongly linked to the internal-state Rabi oscillations. In the regime investigated, which we call the nonadiabatic regime, no diffracting potential can be defined. We show how only for much stronger coupling, the internal and external dynamics decouple, transitioning from nonadiabatic diffraction to the well-studied Kapitza-Dirac diffraction. We further investigate prospects for realizing dissipative spin models in our ultracold atomic gas experiment. To this end, we develop and test in the laboratory several possible implementations of effective spins with differential coupling to a superfluid background and examine their viability for a realization of the spin-boson model.

  13. Resonant and Soliton Transport of Ultracold Atoms on Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbo, Chester Philipp

    In this thesis, we present a theoretical study of the dynamics of strongly interacting ultracold atoms in optical lattices. At ultracold temperatures, the dynamics cannot be described classically, but instead, must take into account quantum effects. Here, our focus is on transport and precision measurement. We use exact analysis of few-body systems and mean field analysis. For larger systems, we use a numerical approach called the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method which is considered an efficient computational tool for the quantum evolution of 1D systems. After introducing basic concepts, we treat the motional properties of particles in a tilted lattice in a regime where the inter-particle interactions are resonant with the linear potential. In this regime, the dynamics is described by an Ising model with a transverse field which is a basic system to study quantum magnetism and quantum phase transitions. We introduce analytical and numerical methods to draw a simple picture of the dynamics. This helps us to formulate a slinky-like transport scheme that provides full control of the motional direction of particles. After a study of transport on a tilted lattice, we treat the transport of nonlinear waves in strongly interacting systems. These nonlinear waves are called solitons, which are described as local perturbations of a medium that survive after collisions. We identify two species of classical soliton solutions in our system and study their stability under quantum evolution via DMRG. We shift focus from the dynamics related to transport and turn to precision measurements in optical lattice clocks. Here, we investigate one aspect of their limitations which is due to collisions of atoms loaded onto a single site. These collisions introduce a frequency shift in the clock measurement. We provide a microscopic description of the origin of this frequency shift. Our results have motivated improvement in the accuracy and precision of next generation

  14. Quantum degenerate atomic gases in controlled optical lattice potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemelke, Nathan D.

    2007-12-01

    Since the achievement of Bose Einstein condensation in cold atomic gases, mean-field treatments of the condensed phase have provided an excellent description for the static and dynamic properties observed in experiments. Recent experimental efforts have focused on studying deviations from mean-field behavior. I will describe work on two experiments which introduce controlled single particle degeneracies with time-dependent optical potentials, aiming to induce correlated motion and nontrivial statistics in the gas. In the first experiment, an optical lattice with locally rotating site potentials is produced to investigate fractional quantum Hall effects (FQHE) in rotating Bose gases. Here, the necessary gauge potential is provided by the rotating reference frame of the gas, which, in direct analogy to the electronic system, organizes single particle states into degenerate Landau levels. At low temperatures the repulsive interaction provided by elastic scattering is expected to produce ground states with structure nearly identical to those in the FQHE. I will discuss how these effects are made experimentally feasible by working at small particle numbers in the tight trapping potentials of an optical lattice, and present first results on the use of photoassociation to probe correlation in this system. In the second experiment, a vibrated optical lattice potential alters the single-particle dispersion underlying a condensed Bose gas and offers tailored phase-matching for nonlinear atom optical processes. I will demonstrate how this leads to parametric instability in the condensed gas, and draw analogy to an optical parametric oscillator operating above threshold.

  15. Modularity, Atomicity and States in Archimedean Lattice Effect Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Paseka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect algebras are a generalization of many structures which arise in quantum physics and in mathematical economics. We show that, in every modular Archimedean atomic lattice effect algebra E that is not an orthomodular lattice there exists an (o-continuous state ω on E, which is subadditive. Moreover, we show properties of finite and compact elements of such lattice effect algebras.

  16. Crystal lattice imaging of the silica and alumina faces of kaolinite using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Miller, Jan D

    2010-12-01

    The crystal lattice images of the two faces of kaolinite (the silica face and the alumina face) have been obtained using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. Lattice resolution images reveal the hexagonal surface lattice of these two faces of kaolinite. Analysis of the silica face of kaolinite showed that the hexagonal surface lattice ring of oxygen atoms had a periodicity of 0.50±0.04nm between neighboring oxygen atoms, which is in good agreement with the surface lattice structure of the mica basal plane. The center of the hexagonal ring of oxygen atoms is vacant. Analysis of the alumina face of kaolinite showed that the hexagonal surface lattice ring of hydroxyls surround a hydroxyl in the center of the ring. The atomic spacing between neighboring hydroxyls was determined as 0.36±0.04nm. Ordering of the kaolinite particles for examination of the silica and alumina surfaces was accomplished using different substrates, a procedure previously established. Crystal lattice imaging supports previous results and independently confirms that the two faces of kaolinite have been properly identified. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Manipulation of single neutral atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuanwei; Das Sarma, S.; Rolston, S. L.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze a scheme to manipulate quantum states of neutral atoms at individual sites of optical lattices using focused laser beams. Spatial distributions of focused laser intensities induce position-dependent energy shifts of hyperfine states, which, combined with microwave radiation, allow selective manipulation of quantum states of individual target atoms. We show that various errors in the manipulation process are suppressed below 10 -4 with properly chosen microwave pulse sequences and laser parameters. A similar idea is also applied to measure quantum states of single atoms in optical lattices

  18. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X

    2008-01-15

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr{sup 87} using the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr{sup 87} atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10{sup -15} and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10{sup -15} level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr{sup 88} by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10{sup -14}. (author)

  19. Strongly interacting atom lasers in three-dimensional optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Itay; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-10-29

    We show that the dynamical melting of a Mott insulator in a three-dimensional lattice leads to condensation at nonzero momenta, a phenomenon that can be used to generate strongly interacting atom lasers in optical lattices. For infinite on-site repulsion, the case considered here, the momenta at which bosons condense are determined analytically and found to have a simple dependence on the hopping amplitudes. The occupation of the condensates is shown to scale linearly with the total number of atoms in the initial Mott insulator. Our results are obtained by using a Gutzwiller-type mean-field approach, gauged against exact-diagonalization solutions of small systems.

  20. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X.; Le Targat, R.; Fouche, M.; Brusch, A.; Westergaard, Ph.G.; Lecallier, A.; Lodewyck, J.; Lemonde, P. [Observatoire de Paris, LNE-SYRTE, Systemes de Reference Temps Espace, 75 (France)

    2009-07-01

    Optical lattice clocks, which were first imagined in 2000, should allow one to achieve unprecedented performances in the domain of atomic clocks. We present here the Strontium lattice clock, developed at LNE-SYRTE. The principle, in particular trapping atoms in the Lamb-Dicke regime and the notion of magic wavelength, is first explained. We then present the results obtained for the {sup 87}Sr isotope, with a frequency accuracy of 2,6.10{sup -15}, and the {sup 88}Sr isotope, with. which we perform the first frequency measurement of an optical lattice clock with bosonic atoms. (authors)

  1. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, V Y F; Pijn, D R M; Schlatter, H; Torralbo-Campo, L; La Rooij, A L; Mulder, G B; Naber, J; Soudijn, M L; Tauschinsky, A; Abarbanel, C; Hadad, B; Golan, E; Folman, R; Spreeuw, R J C

    2014-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold (87)Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation.

  2. Non-equilibrium dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David

    This thesis describes experiments focused on investigating out-of-equilibrium phenomena in the Bose-Hubbard Model and exploring novel cooling techniques for ultracold gases in optical lattices. In the first experiment, we study quenches across the Mott-insulator-to-superfluid quantum phase transition in the 3D Bose-Hubbard Model. The quench is accomplished by continuously tuning the ratio of the Hubbard energies. We observe that the degree of excitation is proportional to the fraction of atoms that cross the phase boundary, and that the amount of excitations and energy produced during the quench have a power-law dependence on the quench rate. These phenomena suggest an excitation process analogous to the mechanism for defect generation in non-equilibrium classical phase transitions. This experiment constitutes the first observation of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism in a quantum quench. We have reported our findings in Ref. [1]. In a second experiment, published in Ref. [2], we investigate dissipation as a method for cooling a strongly interacting gas. We introduce dissipation via a bosonic reservoir to a strongly interacting bosonic gas in the Mott-insulator regime of a 3D spin-dependent optical lattice. The lattice atoms are excited to a higher energy band using laser-induced Bragg transitions. A weakly interacting superfluid comprised of atoms in a state that does not experience the lattice potential acts as a dissipative bath that interacts with the lattice atoms through collisions. We measure the resulting bath-induced decay using the atomic quasimomentum distribution, and we compare the decay rate with predictions from a weakly interacting model with no free parameters. A competing intrinsic decay mechanism arising from collisions between lattice atoms is also investigated. The presence of intrinsic decay can not be accommodated within a non-interacting framework and signals that strong interactions may play a central role in the lattice-atom dynamics. The

  3. Strongly-correlated ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Tung-Lam

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the theoretical study of strongly correlated quantum states of ultra-cold fermionic atoms trapped in optical lattices. This field has grown considerably in recent years, following the experimental progress made in cooling and controlling atomic gases, which has led to the observation of the first Bose-Einstein condensation (in 1995). The trapping of these gases in optical lattices has opened a new field of research at the interface between atomic physics and condensed matter physics. The observation of the transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator for bosonic atoms paved the way for the study of strongly correlated phases and quantum phase transitions in these systems. Very recently, the investigation of the Mott insulator state of fermionic atoms provides additional motivation to conduct such theoretical studies. This thesis can be divided broadly into two types of work: - On the one hand, we have proposed a new type of spectroscopy to measure single-particle correlators and associated physical observables in these strongly correlated states. - On the other hand, we have studied the ground state of the fermionic Hubbard model under different conditions (mass imbalance, population imbalance) by using analytical techniques and numerical simulations. In a collaboration with J. Dalibard and C. Salomon (LKB at the ENS Paris) and I. Carusotto (Trento, Italy), we have proposed and studied a novel spectroscopic method for the measurement and characterization of single particle excitations (in particular, the low energy excitations, namely the quasiparticles) in systems of cold fermionic atoms, with energy and momentum resolution. This type of spectroscopy is an analogue of angular-resolved photoemission in solid state physics (ARPES). We have shown, via simple models, that this method of measurement can characterize quasiparticles not only in the 'conventional' phases such as the weakly interacting gas in the lattice or in Fermi

  4. Permanent magnetic lattices for ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanbari, Saeed; Kieu, Tien D; Sidorov, Andrei; Hannaford, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We propose the use of periodic arrays of permanent magnetic films for producing magnetic lattices of microtraps for confining, manipulating and controlling small clouds of ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases. Using analytical expressions and numerical calculations we show that periodic arrays of magnetic films can produce one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) magnetic lattices with non-zero potential minima, allowing ultracold atoms to be trapped without losses due to spin flips. In particular, we show that two crossed layers of periodic arrays of parallel rectangular magnets plus bias fields, or a single layer of periodic arrays of square-shaped magnets with three different thicknesses plus bias fields, can produce 2D magnetic lattices of microtraps having non-zero potential minima and controllable trap depth. For arrays with micron-scale periodicity, the magnetic microtraps can have very large trap depths (∼0.5 mK for the realistic parameters chosen for the 2D lattice) and very tight confinement

  5. Microwave control of atomic motion in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Leonid; Karski, Michał; Choi, Jai-Min; Steffen, Andreas; Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Widera, Artur; Montano, Enrique; Lee, Jae Hoon; Rakreungdet, Worawarong; Jessen, Poul S

    2009-12-04

    We control the quantum mechanical motion of neutral atoms in an optical lattice by driving microwave transitions between spin states whose trapping potentials are spatially offset. Control of this offset with nanometer precision allows for adjustment of the coupling strength between different motional states, analogous to an adjustable effective Lamb-Dicke factor. This is used both for efficient one-dimensional sideband cooling of individual atoms to a vibrational ground state population of 97% and to drive coherent Rabi oscillation between arbitrary pairs of vibrational states. We further show that microwaves can drive well resolved transitions between motional states in maximally offset, shallow lattices, and thus in principle allow for coherent control of long-range quantum transport.

  6. Light-Mediated Collective Atomic Motion in an Optical Lattice Coupled to a Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vochezer, Aline; Kampschulte, Tobias; Hammerer, Klemens; Treutlein, Philipp

    2018-02-01

    We observe effects of collective atomic motion in a one-dimensional optical lattice coupled to an optomechanical system. In this hybrid atom-optomechanical system, the lattice light generates a coupling between the lattice atoms as well as between atoms and a micromechanical membrane oscillator. For large atom numbers we observe an instability in the coupled system, resulting in large-amplitude atom-membrane oscillations. We show that this behavior can be explained by light-mediated collective atomic motion in the lattice, which arises for large atom numbers, small atom-light detunings, and asymmetric pumping of the lattice, in agreement with previous theoretical work. The model connects the optomechanical instability to a phase delay in the global atomic backaction onto the lattice light, which we observe in a direct measurement.

  7. Matter-wave localization in disordered cold atom lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavish, Uri; Castin, Yvan

    2005-07-08

    We propose to observe Anderson localization of ultracold atoms in the presence of a random potential made of atoms of another species or spin state and trapped at the nodes of an optical lattice, with a filling factor less than unity. Such systems enable a nearly perfect experimental control of the disorder, while the possibility of modeling the scattering potentials by a set of pointlike ones allows an exact theoretical analysis. This is illustrated by a detailed analysis of the one-dimensional case.

  8. Two Remarks to Bifullness of Centers of Archimedean Atomic Lattice Effect Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kalina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lattice effect algebras generalize orthomodular lattices as well as MV-algebras. This means that within lattice effect algebras it is possible to model such effects as unsharpness (fuzziness and/or non-compatibility. The main problem is the existence of a state. There are lattice effect algebras with no state. For this reason we need some conditions that simplify checking the existence of a state. If we know that the center C(E of an atomic Archimedean lattice effect algebra E (which is again atomic is a bifull sublattice of E, then we are able to represent E as a subdirect product of lattice effect algebras Ei where the top element of each one of Ei is an atom of C(E. In this case it is enough if we find a state at least in one of Ei and we are able to extend this state to the whole lattice effect algebra E. In [8] an atomic lattice effect algebra E (in fact, an atomic orthomodular lattice with atomic center C(E was constructed, where C(E is not a bifull sublattice of E. In this paper we show that for atomic lattice effect algebras E (atomic orthomodular lattices neither completeness (and atomicity of C(E nor σ-completeness of E are sufficient conditions for C(E to be a bifull sublattice of E.

  9. Correlation functions of atomic nuclei in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, Zoltan [Department of Physics, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eoetvoes University, Budapest (Hungary); Juelich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Guenther, Jana; Toth, Balint; Varnhorst, Lukas [Department of Physics, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    To determine the mass of the atomic nuclei in lattice QCD one has to calculate the correlation function of suitable combinations of quark field operators. However the calculation of this correlation functions requires to evaluate a large number of Wick contractions which scales as the factorial of the number of nucleons in the system. We explore the possibilities to reduce the computational effort for such evaluations by exploiting certain symmetries of the systems. We discuss a recursive approach which respects these symmetries and may allow the determination of the correlation function in significantly less computer time.

  10. Atom-optics simulator of lattice transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Eric J.; An, Fangzhao Alex; Gadway, Bryce

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate a scheme for studying lattice transport phenomena, based on the controlled momentum-space dynamics of ultracold atomic matter waves. In the effective tight-binding models that can be simulated, we demonstrate that this technique allows for a local and time-dependent control over all system parameters, and additionally allows for single-site resolved detection of atomic populations. We demonstrate full control over site-to-site off-diagonal tunneling elements (amplitude and phase) and diagonal site energies, through the observation of continuous-time quantum walks, Bloch oscillations, and negative tunneling. These capabilities open up new prospects in the experimental study of disordered and topological systems.

  11. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Targat, R.

    2007-07-01

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10 -16 . It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 → J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S 0 → 3P 0 transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 μK. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope 87 Sr, at a level of a few 10 -15 . (author)

  12. Plasmon excitations in doped square-lattice atomic clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaxin; Yu, Ya-Bin

    2017-12-01

    Employing the tight-binding model, we theoretically study the properties of the plasmon excitations in doped square-lattice atomic clusters. The results show that the dopant atoms would blur the absorption spectra, and give rise to extra plasmon resonant peaks as reported in the literature; however, our calculated external-field induced oscillating charge density shows that no obvious evidences indicate the so-called local mode of plasmon appearing in two-dimensional-doped atomic clusters, but the dopants may change the symmetry of the charge distribution. Furthermore, we show that the disorder of the energy level due to dopant makes the absorption spectrum has a red- or blue-shift, which depends on the position of impurities; disorder of hopping due to dopant makes a blue- or red-shift, a larger (smaller) hopping gives a blue-shift (red-shift); and a larger (smaller) host-dopant and dopant-dopant intersite coulomb repulsion induces a blue-shift (red-shift).

  13. Supersolidity of lattice bosons immersed in strongly correlated Rydberg dressed atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; Geißler, Andreas; Hofstetter, Walter; Li, Weibin

    2018-02-01

    Recent experiments have illustrated that long-range two-body interactions can be induced by laser coupling atoms to highly excited Rydberg states. Stimulated by this achievement, we study the supersolidity of lattice bosons in an experimentally relevant situation. In our setup, we consider two-component atoms on a square lattice, where one species is weakly dressed to an electronically high-lying (Rydberg) state, generating a tunable, soft-core shape long-range interaction. Interactions between atoms of the second species and between the two species are characterized by local inter- and intraspecies interactions. Using a dynamical mean-field calculation, we find that interspecies on-site interactions can stabilize a pronounced region of supersolid phases. This is characterized by two distinctive types of supersolids, where the bare species forms supersolid phases that are immersed in strongly correlated quantum phases, i.e., a crystalline solid or supersolid of the dressed atoms. We show that the interspecies interaction leads to a rotonlike instability in the bare species and therefore is crucially important to the supersolid formation. We provide a detailed calculation of the interaction potential to show how our results can be explored under current experimental conditions.

  14. Trapping ultracold atoms in a sub-micron-period triangular magnetic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Tran, T.; Surendran, P.; Herrera, I.; Balcytis, A.; Nissen, D.; Albrecht, M.; Sidorov, A.; Hannaford, P.

    2017-07-01

    We report the trapping of ultracold 87Rb atoms in a 0.7-μ m-period two-dimensional triangular magnetic lattice on an atom chip. The magnetic lattice is created by a lithographically patterned magnetic Co/Pd multilayer film plus bias fields. Rubidium atoms in the |F =1 , mF=-1 > low-field seeking state are trapped at estimated distances down to about 100 nm from the chip surface and with calculated mean trapping frequencies up to about 800 kHz . The measured lifetimes of the atoms trapped in the magnetic lattice are in the range 0.4-1.7 ms , depending on distance from the chip surface. Model calculations suggest the trap lifetimes are currently limited mainly by losses due to one-dimensional thermal evaporation following loading of the atoms from the Z -wire trap into the very tight magnetic lattice traps, rather than by fundamental loss processes such as surface interactions, three-body recombination, or spin flips due to Johnson magnetic noise. The trapping of atoms in a 0.7 -μ m -period magnetic lattice represents a significant step toward using magnetic lattices for quantum tunneling experiments and to simulate condensed matter and many-body phenomena in nontrivial lattice geometries.

  15. Zitterbewegung with spin-orbit coupled ultracold atoms in a fluctuating optical lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Argonov, V. Yu.; Makarov, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of non-interacting ultracold atoms with artificial spin-orbit coupling is considered. Spin-orbit coupling is created using two moving optical lattices with orthogonal polarizations. Our main goal is to study influence of lattice noise on Rabi oscillations. Special attention is paid to the phenomenon of the Zitterbewegung being trembling motion caused by Rabi transitions between states with different velocities. Phase and amplitude fluctuations of lattices are modelled by means of the...

  16. Lattice Contraction Behavior due to Atomic Ordering in Alloy 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Young Suk

    2014-01-01

    A PWSCC (primary water stress corrosion cracking) mechanism based on an ordering reaction has been proposed. However, there has been little investigation on the effects of ordering reaction on the lattice variation due to the ordering reaction in Alloy 600. To understand the lattice variation due to the ordering reaction in Alloy 600 is important, since this is unavoidable process in nuclear reactor environment. A lattice variation with ordering treatment at 400 .deg. C in Alloy 600 was systematically investigated using neutron diffraction. The magnitude of lattice contraction due to the ordering reaction is lager when the cooling rate is faster from the disordering temperature. The ordering treatment causes anisotropic lattice contraction according to the crystallographic planes. The ratio of minimum to maximum lattice contraction in WQ Alloy 600 is about 2. The maximum lattice contraction occurs in (111) and (200) planes are similarly about 0.04% in WQ Alloy 600. This saturates after 2,000H at 400 .deg. C. The effect of ordering reaction should be considered in the assessment of integrity of primary boundary materials made of Alloy 600, since the ordering reaction is an unavoidable phenomenon in nuclear reactor environment

  17. Localization of cold atoms in state-dependent optical lattices via a Rabi Pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Birger; Dürr, Stephan; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2010-10-15

    We propose a novel realization of Anderson localization in nonequilibrium states of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A Rabi pulse transfers part of the population to a different internal state with infinite effective mass. These frozen atoms create a quantum superposition of different disorder potentials, localizing the mobile atoms. For weakly interacting mobile atoms, Anderson localization is obtained. The localization length increases with increasing disorder and decreasing interaction strength, contrary to the expectation for equilibrium localization.

  18. Localization of Cold Atoms in State-Dependent Optical Lattices via a Rabi Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstmann, Birger; Duerr, Stephan; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel realization of Anderson localization in nonequilibrium states of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A Rabi pulse transfers part of the population to a different internal state with infinite effective mass. These frozen atoms create a quantum superposition of different disorder potentials, localizing the mobile atoms. For weakly interacting mobile atoms, Anderson localization is obtained. The localization length increases with increasing disorder and decreasing interaction strength, contrary to the expectation for equilibrium localization.

  19. Radiation Pressure in a Rubidium Optical Lattice: An Atomic Analog to the Photorefractive Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibal, S.; Mennerat-Robilliard, C.; Larousserie, D.; Triche, C.; Courtois, J.; Grynberg, G.

    1997-01-01

    Probe gain in a rubidium optical lattice is observed when the probe and lattice beams have identical frequencies. This effect is shown to arise from the radiation pressure that shifts the atomic density distribution with respect to the optical potential. This effect is compared with two-beam coupling in photorefractive materials. The experimental results obtained by changing the parameters of the optical lattice (intensity, detuning, periodicity) are in reasonable agreement with numerical simulations based on the model case of a 1/2→3/2 atomic transition. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Chemical fate of a recoil atom as a function of the lattice conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeling, M.T.A.

    1980-01-01

    The author considers the fate of a recoil atom receiving a recoil as a result of a nuclear reaction, completely rupturing the bonds between the atom and its ligands, in the case of KMnO 4 - and KBrO 3 -crystal lattices. (Auth.)

  1. Production and manipulation of wave packets from ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Winter, Nils

    2013-01-01

    of the system. The modulation technique also allows for a controllable transfer (deexcitation) of atoms from such wave packets to a state bound by the lattice. Thus, it acts as a beam splitter for matter waves that can selectively address different bands, enabling the preparation of atoms in localized states...

  2. Stability of void lattices under irradiation: a kinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, P.; Martin, G.

    1975-01-01

    Voids are imbedded in a homogeneous medium where point defects are uniformly created and annihilated. As shown by a perturbation calculation, the proportion of the defects which are lost on the cavities goes through a maximum, when the voids are arranged on a translation lattice. If a void is displaced from its lattice site, its growth rate becomes anisotropic and is larger in the direction of the vacant site. The relative efficiency of BCC versus FCC void lattices for the capture of point defects is shown to depend on the relaxation length of the point defects in the surrounding medium. It is shown that the rate of energy dissipation in the crystal under irradiation is maximum when the voids are ordered on the appropriate lattice

  3. Restoring the lattice of Si-based atom probe reconstructions for enhanced information on dopant positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Moody, Michael P; Ceguerra, Anna V; Gault, Baptiste; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Ringer, Simon P

    2015-12-01

    The following manuscript presents a novel approach for creating lattice based models of Sb-doped Si directly from atom probe reconstructions for the purposes of improving information on dopant positioning and directly informing quantum mechanics based materials modeling approaches. Sophisticated crystallographic analysis techniques are used to detect latent crystal structure within the atom probe reconstructions with unprecedented accuracy. A distortion correction algorithm is then developed to precisely calibrate the detected crystal structure to the theoretically known diamond cubic lattice. The reconstructed atoms are then positioned on their most likely lattice positions. Simulations are then used to determine the accuracy of such an approach and show that improvements to short-range order measurements are possible for noise levels and detector efficiencies comparable with experimentally collected atom probe data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Restoring the lattice of Si-based atom probe reconstructions for enhanced information on dopant positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, Andrew J.; Moody, Michael P.; Ceguerra, Anna V.; Gault, Baptiste; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J.; Ringer, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    The following manuscript presents a novel approach for creating lattice based models of Sb-doped Si directly from atom probe reconstructions for the purposes of improving information on dopant positioning and directly informing quantum mechanics based materials modeling approaches. Sophisticated crystallographic analysis techniques are used to detect latent crystal structure within the atom probe reconstructions with unprecedented accuracy. A distortion correction algorithm is then developed to precisely calibrate the detected crystal structure to the theoretically known diamond cubic lattice. The reconstructed atoms are then positioned on their most likely lattice positions. Simulations are then used to determine the accuracy of such an approach and show that improvements to short-range order measurements are possible for noise levels and detector efficiencies comparable with experimentally collected atom probe data. - Highlights: • Atom probe crystallography techniques detect crystal structure within doped Si. • A crystallographic distortion correction algorithm is proposed. • A novel lattice rectification procedure, applicable to doped Si, is proposed. • Lattice rectification is found to improve measurements in short-range order.

  5. Restoring the lattice of Si-based atom probe reconstructions for enhanced information on dopant positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.breen@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Moody, Michael P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom); Ceguerra, Anna V. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom); Araullo-Peters, Vicente J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 (United States); Ringer, Simon P., E-mail: simon.ringer@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    The following manuscript presents a novel approach for creating lattice based models of Sb-doped Si directly from atom probe reconstructions for the purposes of improving information on dopant positioning and directly informing quantum mechanics based materials modeling approaches. Sophisticated crystallographic analysis techniques are used to detect latent crystal structure within the atom probe reconstructions with unprecedented accuracy. A distortion correction algorithm is then developed to precisely calibrate the detected crystal structure to the theoretically known diamond cubic lattice. The reconstructed atoms are then positioned on their most likely lattice positions. Simulations are then used to determine the accuracy of such an approach and show that improvements to short-range order measurements are possible for noise levels and detector efficiencies comparable with experimentally collected atom probe data. - Highlights: • Atom probe crystallography techniques detect crystal structure within doped Si. • A crystallographic distortion correction algorithm is proposed. • A novel lattice rectification procedure, applicable to doped Si, is proposed. • Lattice rectification is found to improve measurements in short-range order.

  6. Low-Entropy States of Neutral Atoms in Polarization-Synthesized Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robens, Carsten; Zopes, Jonathan; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Meschede, Dieter; Alberti, Andrea

    2017-02-10

    We create low-entropy states of neutral atoms by utilizing a conceptually new optical-lattice technique that relies on a high-precision, high-bandwidth synthesis of light polarization. Polarization-synthesized optical lattices provide two fully controllable optical lattice potentials, each of them confining only atoms in either one of the two long-lived hyperfine states. By employing one lattice as the storage register and the other one as the shift register, we provide a proof of concept using four atoms that selected regions of the periodic potential can be filled with one particle per site. We expect that our results can be scaled up to thousands of atoms by employing an atom-sorting algorithm with logarithmic complexity, which is enabled by polarization-synthesized optical lattices. Vibrational entropy is subsequently removed by sideband cooling methods. Our results pave the way for a bottom-up approach to creating ultralow-entropy states of a many-body system.

  7. Coherent Addressing of Individual Neutral Atoms in a 3D Optical Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xianli; Corcovilos, Theodore A; Kumar, Aishwarya; Weiss, David S

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate arbitrary coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a 5×5×5 array formed by an optical lattice. Addressing is accomplished using rapidly reconfigurable crossed laser beams to selectively ac Stark shift target atoms, so that only target atoms are resonant with state-changing microwaves. The effect of these targeted single qubit gates on the quantum information stored in nontargeted atoms is smaller than 3×10^{-3} in state fidelity. This is an important step along the path of converting the scalability promise of neutral atoms into reality.

  8. Emission Channeling Studies of the Lattice Site of Oversized Alkali Atoms Implanted in Metals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS340 \\\\ \\\\ As alkali atoms have the largest atomic radius of all elements, the determination of their lattice configuration following implantation into metals forms a critical test for the various models predicting the lattice site of implanted impurity atoms. The site determination of these large atoms will especially be a crucial check for the most recent model that relates the substitutional fraction of oversized elements to their solution enthalpy. Recent exploratory $^{213}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr $\\alpha$-emission channeling experiments at ISOLDE-CERN and hyperfine interaction measurements on Fr implanted in Fe gave an indication for anomalously large substitutional fractions. To investigate further the behaviour of Fr and other alkali atoms like Cs and Rb thoroughly, more on-line emission channeling experiments are needed. We propose a number of shifts for each element, where the temperature of the implanted metals will be varied between 50$^\\circ$ and 700$^\\circ$~K. Temperature dependent measurements wi...

  9. Lattice dynamics of solid xenon under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, J K; Ahuja, R; Li, S; Johansson, B

    2002-02-18

    We use density-functional perturbation theory to obtain the phonon spectrum of fcc xenon under pressure. Thermodynamic properties obtained within the quasiharmonic approximation are in fair to good agreement with experiment at zero pressure. The transition pressure from the fcc to hcp phase is predicted to occur at 5 GPa. The fcc structure is found to be dynamically stable up to a pressure of 100 GPa, beyond which the phonon modes at the X and L symmetry points soften. We attribute the observed sluggish kinetics of the fcc-hcp transition to the small energy difference between the phases as well as to the high dynamical stability of the fcc phase.

  10. Spin Accumulation of Spinor Atoms in Optical Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Jiang Zhanfeng

    2007-01-01

    We obtain an effective spin correlation Hamiltonian describing the interaction of light with a two-level atom, then we investigate the classical trajectory of the two-level atom system by numerical integration of the Heisenberg equation of motion. Our results show that the spin accumulation is a very popular phenomenon as long as the spin character cannot be ignored in the Hamiltonian. We propose experimental protocol to observe this new phenomenon in further experiments.

  11. Zitterbewegung with spin-orbit coupled ultracold atoms in a fluctuating optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argonov, V. Yu; Makarov, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of non-interacting ultracold atoms with artificial spin-orbit coupling is considered. Spin-orbit coupling is created using two moving optical lattices with orthogonal polarizations. Our main goal is to study influence of lattice noise on Rabi oscillations. Special attention is paid to the phenomenon of the Zitterbewegung being trembling motion caused by Rabi transitions between states with different velocities. Phase and amplitude fluctuations of lattices are modelled by means of the two-dimensional stochastic Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, also known as harmonic noise. In the the noiseless case the problem is solved analytically in terms of the momentum representation. It is shown that lattice noise significantly extends duration of the Zitterbewegung as compared to the noiseless case. This effect originates from noise-induced decoherence of Rabi oscillations.

  12. Effects of three-body atomic interaction and optical lattice on solitons ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We make use of a coordinate-free approach to implement Vakhitov–Kolokolov criterion for stability analysis in order to study the effects of three-body atomic recombination and lattice potential on the matter–wave bright solitons formed in Bose–Einstein condensates. We analytically demonstrate that. the critical number of ...

  13. Lattice location of dopant atoms: An N-body model calculation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    from the concerned channelling direction. Here we applied the superior N-body model to study the yield from bismuth in silicon. The finding that bismuth atom occupies a position close to the silicon substitutional site is new. The transverse displacement of the suggested lattice site from the channelling direction is consistent ...

  14. Lattice location of dopant atoms: An N-body model calculation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... The finding that bismuth atom occupies a position close to the silicon substitutional site is new. The transverse displacement of the suggested lattice site from the channelling direction is consistent with the experimental results. The above model is also applied to determine the location of ytterbium in silicon.

  15. Effects of three-body atomic interaction and optical lattice on solitons ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kolokolov criterion for stability analysis in order to study the effects of three-body atomic recombi- nation and lattice potential on the matter–wave bright solitons formed in Bose–Einstein condensates. We analytically demonstrate that (i) the critical ...

  16. Mechanical and electronic energy eigenstates of neutral Rb atoms in deep optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzner, Andreas; Koerber, Matthias; Morin, Olivier; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2015-05-01

    Optical lattices allow for tight three-dimensional confinement of neutral atoms in quasi-harmonic potentials and have become a standard tool in experimental quantum optics. Applications range from fundamental topics like metrology to applications in quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here we present an experimental characterization of the motional and internal energy eigenstates of optically trapped 87Rb atoms. We implement different spectroscopy techniques based on non-destructive hyperfine state detection using an optical cavity. Applying these techniques, we observe and explain a series of effects like the decoupling of the hyperfine spin due to a tensor lightshift and mechanical effects associated with a small non-orthogonality of the lattice axes. Furthermore, we succeed to exploit the latter for optical cooling of a single atom into the two-dimensional mechanical groundstate in an environment with restricted optical access.

  17. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of confined bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Stefan; Alet, Fabien; Troyer, Matthias; Batrouni, G. George

    2004-11-01

    We study properties of ultracold bosonic atoms in one-, two-, and three-dimensional optical lattices by large scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the Bose-Hubbard model in parabolic confining potentials. Our results indicate that local properties of the atoms can be accessed by probing the system’s response to local potential perturbations. Furthermore, we show how the formation of Mott insulating regions is reflected in the momentum distribution of the atoms, amenable to experimental detection. We disprove previous claims concerning the relevance of fine structure in the momentum distribution function. Furthermore, we discuss limitations of local density approximations for confined systems, and demonstrate the absence of quantum criticality due to the inhomogenous potential. Instead, we show that quantum critical behavior can be observed in flat confining potentials. Our results indicate that the experimental detection of the Mott transition in moderately sized optical lattices would be significantly eased in flat confinement potentials.

  18. Dynamics of Rydberg atom lattices in the presence of noise and dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdussalam, Wildan

    2017-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation concerns dynamics of Rydberg atom lattices in the presence of noise and dissipation. Rydberg atoms possess a number of exaggerated properties, such as a strong van der Waals interaction. The interplay of that interaction, coherent driving and decoherence leads to intriguing non-equilibrium phenomena. Here, we study the non-equilibrium physics of driven atom lattices in the presence of decoherence caused by either laser phase noise or strong decay. In the first case, we compare between global and local noise and explore their effect on the number of excitations and the full counting statistics. We find that both types of noise give rise to a characteristic distribution of the Rydberg excitation number. The main method employed is the Langevin equation but for the sake of efficiency in certain regimes, we use a Markovian master equation and Monte Carlo rate equations, respectively. In the second case, we consider dissipative systems with more general power-law interactions. We determine the phase diagram in the steady state and analyse its generation dynamics using Monte Carlo rate equations. In contrast to nearest-neighbour models, there is no transition to long-range-ordered phases for realistic interactions and resonant driving. Yet, for finite laser detunings, we show that Rydberg atom lattices can undergo a dissipative phase transition to a long-range-ordered antiferromagnetic phase. We identify the advantages of Monte Carlo rate equations over mean field predictions. Having studied the dynamics of Rydberg atom lattices, we study an application of the strong interactions in such systems for quantum information processing. We investigate the coherent exchange of a single photon between a superconducting microwave cavity and a lattice of strongly interacting Rydberg atoms in the presence of local electric field fluctuations plaguing the cavity surface. We show that despite the increased sensitivity of Rydberg states to

  19. Density-dependent hopping for ultracold atoms immersed in a Bose-Einstein-condensate vortex lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaviguri, R. H.; Comparin, T.; Di Liberto, M.; Caracanhas, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    Both mixtures of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and systems with atoms trapped in optical lattices have been intensely explored theoretically, mainly due to the exceptional developments on the experimental side. We investigate the properties of ultracold atomic impurities (bosons) immersed in a vortex lattice of a second Bose-condensed species. In contrast to the static optical-lattice configuration, the vortex lattice presents intrinsic dynamics given by its Tkachenko modes. These excitations induce additional correlations between the impurities, which consist of a long-range attractive potential and a density-dependent hopping, described here in the framework of an extended Bose-Hubbard model. We compute the quantum phase diagram of the impurity species through a Gutzwiller ansatz and through the mean-field approach, and separately identify the effects of the two additional terms, i.e., the shift and the deformation of the Mott-insulator lobes. The long-range attraction, in particular, induces the existence of a triple point in the phase diagram, in agreement with previous quantum Monte Carlo calculations [Chaviguri et al., Phys. Rev. A 95, 053639 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.053639].

  20. An adaptive immune optimization algorithm with dynamic lattice searching operation for fast optimization of atomic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xia; Wu, Genhua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A high efficient method for optimization of atomic clusters is developed. • Its performance is studied by optimizing Lennard-Jones clusters and Ag clusters. • The method is proved to be quite efficient. • A new Ag 61 cluster with stacking-fault face-centered cubic motif is found. - Abstract: Geometrical optimization of atomic clusters is performed by a development of adaptive immune optimization algorithm (AIOA) with dynamic lattice searching (DLS) operation (AIOA-DLS method). By a cycle of construction and searching of the dynamic lattice (DL), DLS algorithm rapidly makes the clusters more regular and greatly reduces the potential energy. DLS can thus be used as an operation acting on the new individuals after mutation operation in AIOA to improve the performance of the AIOA. The AIOA-DLS method combines the merit of evolutionary algorithm and idea of dynamic lattice. The performance of the proposed method is investigated in the optimization of Lennard-Jones clusters within 250 atoms and silver clusters described by many-body Gupta potential within 150 atoms. Results reported in the literature are reproduced, and the motif of Ag 61 cluster is found to be stacking-fault face-centered cubic, whose energy is lower than that of previously obtained icosahedron

  1. An adaptive immune optimization algorithm with dynamic lattice searching operation for fast optimization of atomic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xia, E-mail: xiawu@mail.nankai.edu.cn; Wu, Genhua

    2014-08-31

    Highlights: • A high efficient method for optimization of atomic clusters is developed. • Its performance is studied by optimizing Lennard-Jones clusters and Ag clusters. • The method is proved to be quite efficient. • A new Ag{sub 61} cluster with stacking-fault face-centered cubic motif is found. - Abstract: Geometrical optimization of atomic clusters is performed by a development of adaptive immune optimization algorithm (AIOA) with dynamic lattice searching (DLS) operation (AIOA-DLS method). By a cycle of construction and searching of the dynamic lattice (DL), DLS algorithm rapidly makes the clusters more regular and greatly reduces the potential energy. DLS can thus be used as an operation acting on the new individuals after mutation operation in AIOA to improve the performance of the AIOA. The AIOA-DLS method combines the merit of evolutionary algorithm and idea of dynamic lattice. The performance of the proposed method is investigated in the optimization of Lennard-Jones clusters within 250 atoms and silver clusters described by many-body Gupta potential within 150 atoms. Results reported in the literature are reproduced, and the motif of Ag{sub 61} cluster is found to be stacking-fault face-centered cubic, whose energy is lower than that of previously obtained icosahedron.

  2. Atomic collisions under extreme conditions in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    1987-01-01

    In space, atoms and molecules are often placed under the extreme conditions which are very difficult to be realized on Earth. For instance, extremely hot and dense plasmas are found in and around various stellar objects (e.g., neutron stars) on one hand and extremely cold and diffuse gases prevail in interstellar space on the other. There is so strong a magnetic field that electron clouds in atoms and molecules are distorted. The study of atomic collisions under the extreme conditions is not only helpful in understanding the astrophysical environment but also reveals new aspects of the physics of atoms and molecules. This paper is an invitation to the study. (References are not exhaustive but only provide a clue with which more details can be found.) (author)

  3. Quantized motion of Rydberg atoms in an amplitude-modulated lattice potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovsky, Vladimir; Moore, Kaitlin; Ramos, Andira; Georg, Georg

    2017-04-01

    We present a model description of the spectroscopic line shape of Rydberg transitions in an amplitude-modulated Rydberg-atom lattice taking into account the quantization of the center-of-mass motion. In our model, the wave function of both ground and excited states are subject to the periodic potentials that arise from the optical-lattice fields. In contrast to other spectroscopic scheme, in our work the coupling (the effective Rabi frequency) is also periodic as function of the translational coordinate, and it is perfectly phase-locked to the lattice trapping potential. By solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in momentum representation we obtain the spectrum of the excited-state population. The numerical results for the momentum components of the ground and excited wave functions are averaged over the thermal momentum distribution of the Rydberg atoms. The effect of the lattice parameters and the interaction strength on the line shape of the Rydberg transitions is discussed.

  4. Interaction of light with planar lattices of atoms: Reflection, transmission, and cooperative magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinetti, G.; Ruostekoski, J.

    2018-02-01

    We study strong, light-mediated, resonant dipole-dipole interactions in two-dimensional planar lattices of cold atoms. We provide a detailed analysis for the description of the dipolar point emitter lattice plane as a "superatom" whose response is similar to electromagnetically induced transparency but which exhibits an ultranarrow collective size-dependent subradiant resonance linewidth. The superatom model provides intuitively simple descriptions for the spectral response of the array, including the complete reflection, full transmission, narrow Fano resonances, and asymptotic expressions for the resonance linewidths of the collective eigenmodes. We propose a protocol to transfer almost the entire radiative excitation to a single correlated subradiant eigenmode in a lattice and show that the medium obtained by stacked lattice arrays can form a cooperative magnetometer. Such a magnetometer utilizes similar principles as magnetometers based on the electromagnetically induced transparency. The accuracy of the cooperative magnetometer, however, is not limited by the single-atom resonance linewidth but the much narrower collective linewidth that results from the strong dipole-dipole interactions.

  5. Self-consistent approach for Bose-condensed atoms in optical lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Yukalov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bose atoms in optical lattices are considered at low temperatures and weak interactions, when Bose-Einstein condensate is formed. A self-consistent approach, based on the use of a representative statistical ensemble, is employed, guaranteeing a gapless spectrum of collective excitations and the validity of conservation laws. In order to show that the approach is applicable to both weak and tight binding, the problem is treated in the Bloch as well as in the Wannier representations. Both these ways result in similar expressions that are compared for the self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogolubov approximation. A convenient general formula for the superfluid fraction of atoms in an optical lattice is derived.

  6. Nonlinear Sensing With Collective States of Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-02

    nonequilibrium ultracold atoms in optical lattices, Physical Review A, (01 2013): 13423. doi: Indubala I. Satija, Carlos L. Pando, Eite Tiesinga. Soliton ...causal, stable and self-consistent dynamics from 1/, Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical, (06 2012): 255002. doi: 10.1088/1751- 8113/45...particles in a quantized electromagnetic field: causal, stable, and self-consistent dynamics from 1/c expansion,” Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical, vol. 45, p. 255002, 2012.

  7. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices simulating quantum many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Ahufinger, Verònica

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computers, though not yet available on the market, will revolutionize the future of information processing. Quantum computers for special purposes like quantum simulators are already within reach. The physics of ultracold atoms, ions and molecules offer unprecedented possibilities of control of quantum many body systems and novel possibilities of applications to quantum information processing and quantum metrology. Particularly fascinating is the possibility of usingultracold atoms in lattices to simulate condensed matter or even high energy physics.This book provides a complete and co

  8. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-04-15

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  9. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  10. Atomic Fermi-Bose mixtures in inhomogeneous and random lattices: From Fermi glass to quantum spin glass and quantum percolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.; Kantian, A.; Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate strongly interacting atomic Fermi-Bose mixtures in inhomogeneous and random optical lattices. We derive an effective Hamiltonian for the system and discuss its low temperature physics. We demonstrate the possibility of controlling the interactions at local level in inhomogeneous but regular lattices. Such a control leads to the achievement of Fermi glass, quantum Fermi spin-glass, and quantum percolation regimes involving bare and/or composite fermions in random lattices

  11. Equilibrium vortex lattices of a binary rotating atomic Bose–Einstein condensate with unequal atomic masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Biao; Wang, Lin-Xue; Chen, Guang-Ping [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Han, Wei; Zhang, Shou-Gang [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China); Zhang, Xiao-Fei, E-mail: xfzhang@ntsc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China)

    2016-10-15

    We perform a detailed numerical study of the equilibrium ground-state structures of a binary rotating Bose–Einstein condensate with unequal atomic masses. Our results show that the ground-state distribution and its related vortex configurations are complex events that differ markedly depending strongly on the strength of rotation frequency, as well as on the ratio of atomic masses. We also discuss the structures and radii of the clouds, the number and the size of the core region of the vortices, as a function of the rotation frequency, and of the ratio of atomic masses, and the analytical results agree well with our numerical simulations. This work may open an alternate way in the quantum control of the binary rotating quantum gases with unequal atomic masses. - Highlights: • A binary quantum gases with unequal atomic masses is considered. • Effects of the ratio of atomic masses and rotation frequency are discussed in full parameter space. • The detailed information about both the cloud and vortices are also discussed.

  12. Lattice site occupation of insoluble impurity atoms in aluminium after implantation and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloska, M.K.

    1987-03-01

    Several elements, whose atoms are oversized and insoluble in aluminium, were implanted in aluminium single crystals at different temperatures. The substitutional fraction and the lattice site location were determined using the ion-channeling technique. The substitutional fractions obtained by in situ analyses are strongly dependent on the implantation temperature. At implantation and analysis temperatures below the temperature of stage III the substitutional fraction is significant larger than at temperatures above. With increasing heat of solution the substitutional fraction decreases for all implantation temperatures. The nonsubstitutional component consists of impurity atom-vacancy complexes. These complexes are formed in the cooling phase of the cascade. At temperatures above the temperature of stage III additional free mobile vacancies were captured by the impurity atoms. The capture radius is correlated with the heat of solution and the size mismatch energy. The results constitute for the first time an experimental confirmation of molecular dynamics calculations of cascade evolution. (orig./BHO)

  13. Tunable spin-orbit coupling for ultracold atoms in two-dimensional optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusdt, Fabian; Li, Tracy; Bloch, Immanuel; Demler, Eugene

    2017-06-01

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is at the heart of many exotic band structures and can give rise to many-body states with topological order. Here we present a general scheme based on a combination of microwave driving and lattice shaking for the realization of two-dimensional SOC with ultracold atoms in systems with inversion symmetry. We show that the strengths of Rashba and Dresselhaus SOC can be independently tuned in a spin-dependent square lattice. More generally, our method can be used to open gaps between different spin states without breaking time-reversal symmetry. We demonstrate that this allows for the realization of topological insulators with nontrivial spin textures closely related to the Kane-Mele model.

  14. Lattice-Assisted Spectroscopy: A Generalized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Ultracold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantian, A; Schollwöck, U; Giamarchi, T

    2015-10-16

    We propose a scheme to measure the frequency-resolved local particle and hole spectra of any optical lattice-confined system of correlated ultracold atoms that offers single-site addressing and imaging, which is now an experimental reality. Combining perturbation theory and time-dependent density matrix renormalization group simulations, we quantitatively test and validate this approach of lattice-assisted spectroscopy on several one-dimensional example systems, such as the superfluid and Mott insulator, with and without a parabolic trap, and finally on edge states of the bosonic Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. We highlight extensions of our basic scheme to obtain an even wider variety of interesting and important frequency resolved spectra.

  15. Molecule condensate production from an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate via Feshbach scattering in an optical lattice: Gap solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasgal, Richard S.; Menabde, G.; Band, Y. B.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for making a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of molecules from a BEC of atoms in a strongly confining two-dimensional optical lattice and a weak one-dimensional optical lattice in the third dimension. The stable solutions obtained for the order parameters take the form of a different type of gap soliton, with both atomic and molecular BECs, and also standard gap solitons with only a molecular BEC. The strongly confining dimensions of the lattice stabilize the BEC against inelastic energy transfer in atom-molecule collisions. The solitons with atoms and molecules may be obtained by starting with an atomic BEC, and gradually tuning the resonance by changing the external magnetic-field strength until the desired atom-molecule soliton is obtained. A gap soliton of a BEC of only molecules may be obtained nonadiabatically by starting from an atom-only gap soliton, far from a Feshbach resonance and adjusting the magnetic field to near Feshbach resonance. After a period of time in which the dimer field grows, change the magnetic field such that the detuning is large and negative and Feshbach effects wash out, turn off the optical lattice in phase with the atomic BEC, and turn on an optical lattice in phase with the molecules. The atoms disperse, leaving a gap soliton composed of a molecular BEC. Regarding instabilities in the dimension of the weak optical lattice, the solitons which are comprised of both atoms and molecules are sometimes stable and sometimes unstable--we present numerically obtained results. Gap solitons comprised of only molecules have the same stability properties as the standard gap solitons: stable from frequencies slightly below the middle of the band gap to the top, and unstable below that point. Instabilities are only weakly affected by the soliton velocities, and all instabilities are oscillatory

  16. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Multiple Bubbles Motion under Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deming Nie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion of multiple bubbles under gravity in two dimensions is numerically studied through the lattice Boltzmann method for the Eotvos number ranging from 1 to 12. Two kinds of initial arrangement are taken into account: vertical and horizontal arrangement. In both cases the effects of Eotvos number on the bubble coalescence and rising velocity are investigated. For the vertical arrangement, it has been found that the coalescence pattern is similar. The first coalescence always takes place between the two uppermost bubbles. And the last coalescence always takes place between the coalesced bubble and the bottommost bubble. For four bubbles in a horizontal arrangement, the outermost bubbles travel into the wake of the middle bubbles in all cases, which allows the bubbles to coalesce. The coalescence pattern is more complex for the case of eight bubbles, which strongly depends on the Eotvos number.

  17. Strained lattice with persistent atomic order in Pt3Fe2 intermetallic core-shell nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhudev, Sagar; Bugnet, Matthieu; Bock, Christina; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2013-07-23

    Fine-tuning nanocatalysts to enhance their catalytic activity and durability is crucial to commercialize proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The structural ordering and time evolution of ordered Pt3Fe2 intermetallic core-shell nanocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction that exhibit increased mass activity (228%) and an enhanced catalytic activity (155%) compared to Pt/C has been quantified using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. These catalysts were found to exhibit a static core-dynamic shell regime wherein, despite treating over 10,000 cycles, there is negligible decrease (9%) in catalytic activity and the ordered Pt3Fe2 core remained virtually intact while the Pt shell suffered a continuous enrichment. The existence of this regime was further confirmed by X-ray diffraction and the compositional analyses using energy-dispersive spectroscopy. With atomic-scale two-dimensional (2-D) surface relaxation mapping, we demonstrate that the Pt atoms on the surface are slightly relaxed with respect to bulk. The cycled nanocatalysts were found to exhibit a greater surface relaxation compared to noncycled catalysts. With 2-D lattice strain mapping, we show that the particle was about -3% strained with respect to pure Pt. While the observed enhancement in their activity is ascribed to such a strained lattice, our findings on the degradation kinetics establish that their extended catalytic durability is attributable to a sustained atomic order.

  18. Probabilistic Capacity Assessment of Lattice Transmission Towers under Strong Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eZhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Serving as one key component of the most important lifeline infrastructure system, transmission towers are vulnerable to multiple nature hazards including strong wind and could pose severe threats to the power system security with possible blackouts under extreme weather conditions, such as hurricanes, derechoes, or winter storms. For the security and resiliency of the power system, it is important to ensure the structural safety with enough capacity for all possible failure modes, such as structural stability. The study is to develop a probabilistic capacity assessment approach for transmission towers under strong wind loads. Due to the complicated structural details of lattice transmission towers, wind tunnel experiments are carried out to understand the complex interactions of wind and the lattice sections of transmission tower and drag coefficients and the dynamic amplification factor for different panels of the transmission tower are obtained. The wind profile is generated and the wind time histories are simulated as a summation of time-varying mean and fluctuating components. The capacity curve for the transmission towers is obtained from the incremental dynamic analysis (IDA method. To consider the stochastic nature of wind field, probabilistic capacity curves are generated by implementing IDA analysis for different wind yaw angles and different randomly generated wind speed time histories. After building the limit state functions based on the maximum allowable drift to height ratio, the probabilities of failure are obtained based on the meteorological data at a given site. As the transmission tower serves as the key nodes for the power network, the probabilistic capacity curves can be incorporated into the performance based design of the power transmission network.

  19. Effects of classical stochastic webs on the quantum dynamics of cold atomic gases in a moving optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, N.; Greenaway, M. T.; Fromhold, T. M.

    2017-11-01

    We introduce and investigate a system that uses temporal resonance-induced phase-space pathways to create strong coupling between an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and a traveling optical lattice potential. We show that these pathways thread both the classical and quantum phase space of the atom cloud, even when the optical lattice potential is arbitrarily weak. The topology of the pathways, which form weblike patterns, can by controlled by changing the amplitude and period of the optical lattice. In turn, this control can be used to increase and limit the BEC's center-of-mass kinetic energy to prespecified values. Surprisingly, the strength of the atom-lattice interaction and resulting BEC heating of the center-of-mass motion is enhanced by the repulsive interatomic interactions.

  20. Exploring topological double-Weyl semimetals with cold atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Xue-Ying; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Li, Zhi; Zhu, Shi-Liang

    2017-06-01

    We explore the topological properties of double-Weyl semimetals with cold atoms in optical lattices. We first propose a tight-binding model of simulating the double-Weyl semimetal with a pair of double-Weyl points by engineering the atomic hopping in a three-dimensional optical lattice. We show that the double-Weyl points with topological charges of ±2 behave as the sink and source of Berry flux in momentum space connecting by two Fermi arcs and they are stabilized by the C4 h point-group symmetry. By applying a realizable C4 breaking term, we find that each double-Weyl point splits into two single-Weyl points and obtain rich phase diagrams in the parameter space spanned by the strengths of an effective Zeeman term and the C4 breaking term, which contains a topological and a normal insulating phase and two topological Weyl semimetal phases with eight and four single-Weyl points, apart from the double-Weyl semimetal phase. Furthermore, we demonstrate with numerical simulations that (i) the mimicked double- and single-Weyl points can be detected by measuring the atomic transfer fractions after a Bloch oscillation; (ii) the Chern number of different quantum phases in the phase diagram can be extracted from the center shift of the hybrid Wannier functions, which can be directly measured with time-of-flight imaging; (iii) the band topology of the C4-symmetric Bloch Hamiltonian can be detected simply from measuring the spin polarization at the high-symmetry momentum points with a condensate in the optical lattice. The proposed system would provide a promising platform for elaborating the intrinsic exotic physics of double-Weyl semimetals and the related topological phase transitions.

  1. Cold-atom quantum simulator for SU(2) Yang-Mills lattice gauge theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2013-03-22

    Non-Abelian gauge theories play an important role in the standard model of particle physics, and unfold a partially unexplored world of exciting physical phenomena. In this Letter, we suggest a realization of a non-Abelian lattice gauge theory-SU(2) Yang-Mills in (1 + 1) dimensions, using ultracold atoms. Remarkably, and in contrast to previous proposals, in our model gauge invariance is a direct consequence of angular momentum conservation and thus is fundamental and robust. Our proposal may serve as well as a starting point for higher-dimensional realizations.

  2. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-01-01

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  3. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-07-04

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  4. Majorana modes and p-wave superfluids for fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, A.; Lang, N.; Kraus, C. V.; Möller, G.; Huber, S. D.; Büchler, H. P.

    2014-07-01

    The quest for realization of non-Abelian phases of matter, driven by their possible use in fault-tolerant topological quantum computing, has been spearheaded by recent developments in p-wave superconductors. The chiral px+ipy-wave superconductor in two-dimensions exhibiting Majorana modes provides the simplest phase supporting non-Abelian quasiparticles and can be seen as the blueprint of fractional topological order. Alternatively, Kitaev’s Majorana wire has emerged as an ideal toy model to understand Majorana modes. Here we present a way to make the transition from Kitaev's Majorana wires to two-dimensional p-wave superconductors in a system with cold atomic gases in an optical lattice. The main idea is based on an approach to generate p-wave interactions by coupling orbital degrees of freedom with strong s-wave interactions. We demonstrate how this design can induce Majorana modes at edge dislocations in the optical lattice, and we provide an experimentally feasible protocol for the observation of the non-Abelian statistics.

  5. Emerging bosons with three-body interactions from spin-1 atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazza, L.; Rizzi, M.; Cirac, J. I.; Lewenstein, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study two many-body systems of bosons interacting via an infinite three-body contact repulsion in a lattice: a pairs quasicondensate induced by correlated hopping and the discrete version of the Pfaffian wave function. We propose to experimentally realize systems characterized by such interaction by means of a proper spin-1 lattice Hamiltonian: spin degrees of freedom are locally mapped into occupation numbers of emerging bosons, in a fashion similar to spin-1/2 and hardcore bosons. Such a system can be realized with ultracold spin-1 atoms in a Mott insulator with a filling factor of 1. The high versatility of these setups allows us to engineer spin-hopping operators breaking the SU(2) symmetry, as needed to approximate interesting bosonic Hamiltonians with three-body hardcore constraint. For this purpose we combine bichromatic spin-independent superlattices and Raman transitions to induce a different hopping rate for each spin orientation. Finally, we illustrate how our setup could be used to experimentally realize the first setup, that is, the transition to a pairs quasicondensed phase of the emerging bosons. We also report on a route toward the realization of a discrete bosonic Pfaffian wave function and list some open problems for reaching this goal.

  6. Identifying the Minimum-Energy Atomic Configuration on a Lattice: Lamarckian Twist on Darwinian Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Avezac, M.; Zunger, A.

    2008-01-01

    We examine how the two different mechanisms proposed historically for biological evolution compare for the determination of crystal structures from random initial lattice configurations. The Darwinian theory of evolution contends that the genetic makeup inherited at birth is the one passed on during mating to new offspring, in which case evolution is a product of environmental pressure and chance. In addition to this mechanism, Lamarck surmised that individuals can also pass on traits acquired during their lifetime. Here we show that the minimum-energy configurations of a binary A{sub 1-x}B{sub x} alloy in the full 0 {le} x {le} 1 concentration range can be found much faster if the conventional Darwinian genetic progression--mating configurations and letting the lowest-energy (fittest) offspring survive--is allowed to experience Lamarckian-style fitness improvements during its lifetime. Such improvements consist of A {leftrightarrow} B transmutations of some atomic sites (not just atomic relaxations) guided by 'virtual-atom' energy gradients. This hybrid evolution is shown to provide an efficient solution to a generalized Ising Hamiltonian, illustrated here by finding the ground states of face-centered-cubic Au{sub 1-x}Pd{sub x} using a cluster-expansion functional fitted to first-principles total energies. The statistical rate of success of the search strategies and their practical applicability are rigorously documented in terms of average number of evaluations required to find the solution out of 400 independent evolutionary runs with different random seeds. We show that all exact ground states of a 12-atom supercell (2{sup 12} configurations) can be found within 330 total-energy evaluations, whereas a 36-atom supercell (2{sup 36} configurations) requires on average 39,000 evaluations. Thus, this problem cannot be currently addressed with confidence using costly energy functionals [e.g., density-functional theory (DFT) based] unless it is limited to

  7. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouza, Maksim, E-mail: mkouza@chem.uw.edu.pl; Kolinski, Andrzej [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszaw (Poland); Co, Nguyen Truong [Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, National University of HCM City, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet Street, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Institute for Computational Science and Technology, Quang Trung Software City, Tan Chanh Hiep Ward, District 12, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nguyen, Phuong H. [Laboratoire de Biochimie Theorique, UPR 9080 CNRS, IBPC, Universite Paris 7, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan, E-mail: masli@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  8. Nonequilibrium dynamics of optical-lattice-loaded Bose-Einstein-condensate atoms: Beyond the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Ana Maria; Hu, B.L.; Roura, Albert; Calzetta, Esteban; Clark, Charles W.

    2004-01-01

    In this work a two-particle irreducible (2PI) closed-time-path (CTP) effective action is used to describe the nonequilibrium dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate selectively loaded into every third site of a one-dimensional optical lattice. The motivation of this work is the recent experimental realization of this system. Patterned loading methods may be useful for quantum computing with trapped atoms. This system also serves to illustrate many basic issues in nonequilibrium quantum-field theory pertaining to the dynamics of quantum correlations and fluctuations which goes beyond the capability of a mean-field theory. By numerically evolving in time the initial-state configuration using the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian an exact quantum solution is available for this system in the case of few atoms and wells. One can also use it to test various approximate methods. Under the 2PI CTP scheme with this initial configuration, three different approximations are considered: (a) the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) approximation (b) the next-to-leading-order 1/N expansion of the 2PI effective action up to second order in the interaction strength, and (c) a second-order perturbative expansion in the interaction strength. We present detailed comparisons between these approximations and determine their range of validity by contrasting them with the exact many-body solution for a moderate number of atoms and wells. As a general feature we observe that because the second-order 2PI approximations include multiparticle scattering in a systematic way, they are able to capture damping effects exhibited in the exact solution, which a mean-field collisionless approach fails to produce. While the second-order approximations show a clear improvement over the HFB approximation, our numerical results show that they fail at late times, when interaction effects are significant

  9. Lattice distortion under an electric field in BaTiO3 piezoelectric single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazaki, Ryoko; Fu Desheng; Daimon, Masahiro; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Itoh, Mitsuru

    2009-01-01

    Lattice distortions under an electric field in a mono-domain of BaTiO 3 ferroelectric crystal have been detected with synchrotron x-ray radiation. The variation of the lattice constant with an electric field observed with high angle diffraction shows a linear response nature of the piezoelectric effect. When an electric field is applied along the spontaneous polarization direction, the c-axis of the lattice elongates and the a-axis of the lattice shrinks at a rate of d 33 = 149 ± 54 pm V -1 and d 31 = -82 ± 61 pm V -1 ; these represent the longitudinal and transverse piezoelectric coefficients of BaTiO 3 crystal, respectively. These results give an insight into the intrinsic piezoelectric response on the lattice scale in BaTiO 3 that has been widely used to explore high performance lead-free piezoelectric alloys.

  10. Atomic quantum simulation of the lattice gauge-Higgs model: Higgs couplings and emergence of exact local gauge symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2013-09-13

    Recently, the possibility of quantum simulation of dynamical gauge fields was pointed out by using a system of cold atoms trapped on each link in an optical lattice. However, to implement exact local gauge invariance, fine-tuning the interaction parameters among atoms is necessary. In the present Letter, we study the effect of violation of the U(1) local gauge invariance by relaxing the fine-tuning of the parameters and showing that a wide variety of cold atoms is still a faithful quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge-Higgs model containing a Higgs field sitting on sites. The clarification of the dynamics of this gauge-Higgs model sheds some light upon various unsolved problems, including the inflation process of the early Universe. We study the phase structure of this model by Monte Carlo simulation and also discuss the atomic characteristics of the Higgs phase in each simulator.

  11. Producing high-accuracy lattice models from protein atomic coordinates including side chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Martin; Saunders, Rhodri; Smith, Cameron; Backofen, Rolf; Deane, Charlotte M

    2012-01-01

    Lattice models are a common abstraction used in the study of protein structure, folding, and refinement. They are advantageous because the discretisation of space can make extensive protein evaluations computationally feasible. Various approaches to the protein chain lattice fitting problem have been suggested but only a single backbone-only tool is available currently. We introduce LatFit, a new tool to produce high-accuracy lattice protein models. It generates both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models in any user defined lattice. LatFit implements a new distance RMSD-optimisation fitting procedure in addition to the known coordinate RMSD method. We tested LatFit's accuracy and speed using a large nonredundant set of high resolution proteins (SCOP database) on three commonly used lattices: 3D cubic, face-centred cubic, and knight's walk. Fitting speed compared favourably to other methods and both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models show low deviation from the original data (~1.5 Å RMSD in the FCC lattice). To our knowledge this represents the first comprehensive study of lattice quality for on-lattice protein models including side chains while LatFit is the only available tool for such models.

  12. Application of Powder Diffraction Methods to the Analysis of the Atomic Structure of Nanocrystals: The Concept of the Apparent Lattice Parameter (ALP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Stelmakh, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Weber, H.-P.; Palosz, W.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of standard methods of elaboration of powder diffraction data for determination of the structure of nano-size crystallites is analysed. Based on our theoretical calculations of powder diffraction data we show, that the assumption of the infinite crystal lattice for nanocrystals smaller than 20 nm in size is not justified. Application of conventional tools developed for elaboration of powder diffraction data, like the Rietveld method, may lead to erroneous interpretation of the experimental results. An alternate evaluation of diffraction data of nanoparticles, based on the so-called 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) is introduced. We assume a model of nanocrystal having a grain core with well-defined crystal structure, surrounded by a surface shell with the atomic structure similar to that of the core but being under a strain (compressive or tensile). The two structural components, the core and the shell, form essentially a composite crystal with interfering, inseparable diffraction properties. Because the structure of such a nanocrystal is not uniform, it defies the basic definitions of an unambiguous crystallographic phase. Consequently, a set of lattice parameters used for characterization of simple crystal phases is insufficient for a proper description of the complex structure of nanocrystals. We developed a method of evaluation of powder diffraction data of nanocrystals, which refers to a core-shell model and is based on the 'apparent lattice parameter' methodology. For a given diffraction pattem, the alp values are calculated for every individual Bragg reflection. For nanocrystals the alp values depend on the diffraction vector Q. By modeling different a0tomic structures of nanocrystals and calculating theoretically corresponding diffraction patterns using the Debye functions we showed, that alp-Q plots show characteristic shapes which can be used for evaluation of the atomic structure of the core-shell system. We show, that using a simple

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation study of the influence of the lattice atom potential function upon atom ejection processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, D.E. Jr.; Webb, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been used to investigate the sensitivity of atom ejection processes from a single-crystal target to changes in the atom-atom potential function. Four functions, three constructed from the Gibson potentials with Anderman's attractive well, and a fouth specifically developed for this investigation, were investigated in the Cu/Ar/sup +/ system over a range of ion energies from 1.0 to 10.0 kev with the KSE-B ion-atom potential. Well depths and widths also were varied. The calculations were done at normal incidence on the fcc (111) crystal orientation. Computed values were compared with experimental data where they exist. Sputtering yields, multimer yield ratios, layer yield ratios, and the ejected atom energy distribution vary systematically with the parameters of the atom-atom potential function. Calculations also were done with the modified Moliere function. Yields and other properties fall exactly into the positions predicted from the Born-Mayer function analysis. Simultaneous analysis of the ejected atom energy distribution and the ion energy dependence of the sputtering yield curve provides information about the parameters of both the wall and well portions of the atom-atom potential function

  14. Intensity-modulated polarizabilities and magic trapping of alkali-metal and divalent atoms in infrared optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Turker; Derevianko, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Long range interactions between neutral Rydberg atoms has emerged as a potential means for implementing quantum logical gates. These experiments utilize hyperfine manifold of ground state atoms to act as a qubit basis, while exploiting the Rydberg blockade mechanism to mediate conditional quantum logic. The necessity for overcoming several sources of decoherence makes magic wavelength trapping in optical lattices an indispensable tool for gate experiments. The common wisdom is that atoms in Rydberg states see trapping potentials that are essentially that of a free electron, and can only be trapped at laser intensity minima. We show that although the polarizability of a Rydberg state is always negative, the optical potential can be both attractive or repulsive at long wavelengths (up to ~104 nm). This opens up the possibility of magic trapping Rydberg states with ground state atoms in optical lattices, thereby eliminating the necessity to turn off trapping fields during gate operations. Because the wavelengths are near the CO2 laser band, the photon scattering and the ensuing motional heating is also reduced compared to conventional traps near low lying resonances, alleviating an important source of decoherence. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. PHY-1212482.

  15. Frozen lattice and absorptive model for high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy: A comparison study in terms of integrated intensity and atomic column position measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alania, M; Lobato, I; Van Aert, S

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, both the frozen lattice (FL) and the absorptive potential (AP) approximation models are compared in terms of the integrated intensity and the precision with which atomic columns can be located from an image acquired using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The comparison is made for atoms of Cu, Ag, and Au. The integrated intensity is computed for both an isolated atomic column and an atomic column inside an FCC structure. The precision has been computed using the so-called Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB), which provides a theoretical lower bound on the variance with which parameters can be estimated. It is shown that the AP model results into accurate measurements for the integrated intensity only for small detector ranges under relatively low angles and for small thicknesses. In terms of the attainable precision, both methods show similar results indicating picometer range precision under realistic experimental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Realizing the Strongly Correlated d-Wave Mott-Insulator State in a Fermionic Cold-Atom Optical Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Michael R.; Zhang Chuanwei; Tewari, Sumanta; Sarma, S. Das

    2008-01-01

    We show that a new state of matter, the d-wave Mott-insulator state (d-Mott state) (introduced recently by [H. Yao, W. F. Tsai, and S. A. Kivelson, Phys. Rev. B 76, 161104 (2007)]), which is characterized by a nonzero expectation value of a local plaquette operator embedded in an insulating state, can be engineered using ultracold atomic fermions in two-dimensional double-well optical lattices. We characterize and analyze the parameter regime where the d-Mott state is stable. We predict the testable signatures of the state in the time-of-flight measurements

  17. Hubbard Model for Atomic Impurities Bound by the Vortex Lattice of a Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T H; Yuan, Y; Bao, W; Clark, S R; Foot, C; Jaksch, D

    2016-06-17

    We investigate cold bosonic impurity atoms trapped in a vortex lattice formed by condensed bosons of another species. We describe the dynamics of the impurities by a bosonic Hubbard model containing occupation-dependent parameters to capture the effects of strong impurity-impurity interactions. These include both a repulsive direct interaction and an attractive effective interaction mediated by the Bose-Einstein condensate. The occupation dependence of these two competing interactions drastically affects the Hubbard model phase diagram, including causing the disappearance of some Mott lobes.

  18. Neutron scattering studies of the lattice expansion in a ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2 under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, D A; Huxley, A D; Ritz, R; Pfleiderer, C; Keller, T

    2011-01-01

    We report high-resolution measurements of the lattice constants of UGe 2 under pressure probed by a novel technique which utilises Larmor precession of polarised neutrons and surpasses the resolution of conventional scattering methods by two orders of magnitude. We confirm the presence of sharp anomalies in the lattice parameters at both the Curie and crossover temperatures at ambient pressure. We find that for pressure of 9.3 kbar the anomaly at the Curie temperature shifts to lower temperature in agreement with the known phase diagram. At 9.3 kbar, the pressure corresponding to an onset of superconductivity, the lattice expansion at the ferromagnetic transition is much stronger than at ambient pressure. The results indicate a complex evolution of the electronic structure of UGe 2 with pressure and suggest that magneto-elastic coupling is strengthened at the pressures at which superconductivity appears; magneto-elastic coupling therefore may play an important role in stabilising superconductivity.

  19. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks; Horloge a reseau optique au strontium: une 2. generation d'horloges a atomes froids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Targat, R

    2007-07-15

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10{sup -16}. It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 {yields} J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S{sub 0} {yields} 3P{sub 0} transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 {mu}K. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope {sup 87}Sr, at a level of a few 10{sup -15}. (author)

  20. Direct observation of chiral currents and magnetic reflection in atomic flux lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fangzhao Alex; Meier, Eric J; Gadway, Bryce

    2017-04-01

    The prospect of studying topological matter with the precision and control of atomic physics has driven the development of many techniques for engineering artificial magnetic fields and spin-orbit interactions. Recently, the idea of introducing nontrivial topology through the use of internal (or external) atomic states as effective "synthetic dimensions" has garnered attraction for its versatility and possible immunity from heating. We engineer tunable gauge fields through the local control of tunneling phases in an effective two-dimensional manifold of discrete atomic momentum states. We demonstrate the ability to create homogeneous gauge fields of arbitrary value, directly imaging the site-resolved dynamics of induced chiral currents. Furthermore, we engineer the first inhomogeneous artificial gauge fields for cold atoms, observing the magnetic reflection of atoms incident upon a step-like variation of an artificial vector potential. These results open new possibilities for the study of topological phases and localization phenomena in atomic gases.

  1. Quantum dynamics of atoms in a resonator-generated optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschler, C.; Ritsch, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We investigate the quantum motion of coherently driven ultracold atoms in the field of a damped high-Q optical cavity mode. The laser field is chosen far detuned from the atomic transition but close to a cavity resonance, so that spontaneous emission is strongly suppressed but a coherent field builds up in the resonator by stimulated scattering. On one hand the shape of the atomic wave function determines the field dynamics via the magnitude of the scattering and the effective refractive index the atoms create for the mode. The mode intensity on the other hand determines the optical dipole force on the atoms.The system shows rich atom-field dynamics including self organization, self-trapping, cooling or heating. In the limit of deep trapping we are able to derive a system of closed, coupled equations for a finite set of atomic expectation values and the field. This allows us to determine the self-consistent ground state of the system as well as the eigenfrequencies and damping rates for excitations. To treat several atoms in more detail we introduce the Bose-Hubbard model. This allows us to investigate several aspects of the quantum motion of the atoms inside the cavity. (author)

  2. Atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene under pulsed microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Zhenping; Zhu Xiulin; Zhou Nianchen; Zhu Jian; Zhang Zhengbiao

    2005-01-01

    A homogeneous solution atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (RATRP) of styrene (St) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) were successfully carried out under pulsed microwave irradiation (PMI), using 1-bromo-1-phenylethane (1-PEBr)/CuCl/N,N,N',N'',N''-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDETA) as an initiating system at 85 deg. C and 2,2'-azo-bis-isobutyrontrile (AIBN)/CuCl 2 /PMDETA as an initiating system at 95 deg. C, respectively. The polymerization rates under PMI were greatly increased in comparison with those under identical conventional heating (CH)

  3. Metal-insulator-superconductor transition of spin-3/2 atoms on optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Theja N.

    2018-01-01

    We use a slave-rotor approach within a mean-field theory to study the competition of metallic, Mott-insulating, and superconducting phases of spin-3/2 fermions subjected to a periodic optical lattice potential. In addition to the metallic, the Mott-insulating, and the superconducting phases that are associated with the gauge symmetry breaking of the spinon field, we identify an emerging superconducting phase that breaks both roton and spinon field gauge symmetries. This superconducting phase emerges as a result of the competition between spin-0 singlet and spin-2 quintet interaction channels naturally available for spin-3/2 systems. The two superconducting phases can be distinguished from each other by quasiparticle weight. We further discuss the properties of these phases for both two-dimensional square and three-dimensional cubic lattices at zero and finite temperatures.

  4. Lattice strain development in Inconel-690 under bi-axial compression and tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Rebecca Midori

    Nuclear reactor steam generator tubes, manufactured from Nickel alloys such as Inconel 690 (INC690), are potentially susceptible to failure by Stress Corrosion Cracking where crack initiation may be exacerbated by internal stress fields. A more comprehensive understanding of this potential failure mechanism was gained via an exploration of a model of INC690.s behaviour under Constrained loading conditions in compression and tension. An Elasto-Plastic Self-Consistent (EPSC) model was used to predict the lattice stresses and strains resulting from Constrained loading in INC690 for four crystallographic planes. The internal strain fields generated under such conditions were shown to be markedly different from those developed under Uniaxial loading. Finite Element Modeling was used to design tensile and compression samples as well as a testing rig that would allow the application of a compressive load along one axis of the specimen with simultaneous constraint along another and free-deformation along the third. Lattice strain measurements were done for both compressive and tensile loading using Time-Of-Flight neutron diffraction. The predicted and experimental values showed reasonable agreement; mainly in terms of crystallographic plane interaction and behaviour. Iterative computer modeling was used to achieve a more realistic depiction of the lattice strains developed. This research allowed for an extension on the Uniaxial findings by examining the material's behaviour under more complex loading that better approximates steam generator tube operating conditions.

  5. Lattice Dynamics Study of Phonon Instability and Thermal Properties of Type-I Clathrate K₈Si46 under High Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Zhao Yi; Ge, Ni Na; Li, Zhi Guo

    2016-07-25

    For a further understanding of the phase transitions mechanism in type-I silicon clathrates K₈Si 46 , ab initio self-consistent electronic calculations combined with linear-response method have been performed to investigate the vibrational properties of alkali metal K atoms encapsulated type-I silicon-clathrate under pressure within the framework of density functional perturbation theory. Our lattice dynamics simulation results showed that the pressure induced phase transition of K₈Si 46 was believed to be driven by the phonon instability of the calthrate lattice. Analysis of the evolution of the partial phonon density of state with pressure, a legible dynamic picture for both guest K atoms and host lattice, was given. In addition, based on phonon calculations and combined with quasi-harmonic approximation, the specific heat of K₈Si 46 was derived, which agreed very well with experimental results. Also, other important thermal properties including the thermal expansion coefficients and Grüneisen parameters of K₈Si 46 under different temperature and pressure were also predicted.

  6. Resonantly enhanced tunneling and transport of ultracold atoms on tilted optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubbo, Chester P.; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Peden, Brandon M.; Holland, Murray J.; Rey, Ana Maria [JILA (NIST and University of Colorado) and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the resonantly enhanced tunneling dynamics of ultracold bosons loaded on a tilted one-dimensional optical lattice, which can be used to simulate a chain of Ising spins and associated quantum phase transitions. The center-of-mass motion after a sudden tilt both at commensurate and incommensurate fillings is obtained via analytic, time-dependent exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization-group methods. We identify a maximum in the amplitude of the center-of-mass oscillations at the quantum critical point of the effective spin system. For the dynamics of incommensurate systems, which cannot be mapped to a spin model, we develop an analytical approach in which the time evolution is obtained by projecting onto resonant families of small clusters. We compare the results of this approach at low fillings to the exact time evolution and find good agreement even at filling factors as large as 2/3. Using this projection onto small clusters, we propose a controllable transport scheme applicable in the context of Atomtronic devices on optical lattices (''slinky scheme'').

  7. Resonantly enhanced tunneling and transport of ultracold atoms on tilted optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubbo, Chester P.; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Peden, Brandon M.; Holland, Murray J.; Rey, Ana Maria

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the resonantly enhanced tunneling dynamics of ultracold bosons loaded on a tilted one-dimensional optical lattice, which can be used to simulate a chain of Ising spins and associated quantum phase transitions. The center-of-mass motion after a sudden tilt both at commensurate and incommensurate fillings is obtained via analytic, time-dependent exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization-group methods. We identify a maximum in the amplitude of the center-of-mass oscillations at the quantum critical point of the effective spin system. For the dynamics of incommensurate systems, which cannot be mapped to a spin model, we develop an analytical approach in which the time evolution is obtained by projecting onto resonant families of small clusters. We compare the results of this approach at low fillings to the exact time evolution and find good agreement even at filling factors as large as 2/3. Using this projection onto small clusters, we propose a controllable transport scheme applicable in the context of Atomtronic devices on optical lattices (''slinky scheme'').

  8. Resonantly enhanced tunneling and transport of ultracold atoms on tilted optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbo, Chester P.; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Peden, Brandon M.; Holland, Murray J.; Rey, Ana Maria

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the resonantly enhanced tunneling dynamics of ultracold bosons loaded on a tilted one-dimensional optical lattice, which can be used to simulate a chain of Ising spins and associated quantum phase transitions. The center-of-mass motion after a sudden tilt both at commensurate and incommensurate fillings is obtained via analytic, time-dependent exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization-group methods. We identify a maximum in the amplitude of the center-of-mass oscillations at the quantum critical point of the effective spin system. For the dynamics of incommensurate systems, which cannot be mapped to a spin model, we develop an analytical approach in which the time evolution is obtained by projecting onto resonant families of small clusters. We compare the results of this approach at low fillings to the exact time evolution and find good agreement even at filling factors as large as 2/3. Using this projection onto small clusters, we propose a controllable transport scheme applicable in the context of Atomtronic devices on optical lattices (“slinky scheme”).

  9. Modulational Instability and Quantum Discrete Breather States of Cold Bosonic Atoms in a Zig-Zag Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xia; Xie, Jiayu; Wu, Tianle; Tang, Bing

    2018-04-01

    A theoretical study on modulational instability and quantum discrete breather states in a system of cold bosonic atoms in zig-zag optical lattices is presented in this work. The time-dependent Hartree approximation is employed to deal with the multiple body problem. By means of a linear stability analysis, we analytically study the modulational instability, and estimate existence conditions of the bright stationary localized solutions for different values of the second-neighbor hopping constant. On the other hand, we get analytical bright stationary localized solutions, and analyze the influence of the second-neighbor hopping on their existence conditions. The predictions of the modulational instability analysis are shown to be reliable. Using these stationary localized single-boson wave functions, the quantum breather states corresponding to the system with different types of nonlinearities are constructed.

  10. Lattice location of dopant atoms: An N-body model calculation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The channelling and scattering yields of 1 MeV α-particles in the (100),. (110) and (111) directions of silicon implanted with bismuth and ytterbium have been simulated using N-body model. The close encounter yield from dopant atoms in silicon is determined from the flux density, using the Bontemps and ...

  11. Lattice location of dopant atoms: An N-body model calculation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The close encounter yield from dopant atoms in silicon is determined from the flux density, using the Bontemps and Fontenille method. All previous works reported in literature so far have been done with computer programmes using a statistical analytical expression or by a binary collision model or a continuum model.

  12. Neutron diffraction study of anisotropy of crystal lattice compression in high-Tc superconductors under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronin, V.; Mirmelstein, A.; Karkin, A.; Teplykh, A.; Goshchitskii, B.; Ivanov, A.; Smirnov, L.

    1996-01-01

    Pressure-induced structural changes in irradiated Y Ba 2 Cu 3 O x (x=6.95) and unirradiated (x = 6.91, 6.54, 6.39) samples have been measured by neutron powder diffraction under high pressure. T c has been measured for irradiated superconductors under pressure and the value of dT c /dP is found to be high(1.5 K/kbar). The increase in T c is associated with charge transfer between the Cu O 2 planes and Cu O chains which is reflected by anisotropy of crystal lattice compression

  13. First in-situ lattice strains measurements under load at VULCAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Ke; Skorpenske, Harley David; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Wang, Xun-Li; Cakmak, Ercan

    2011-01-01

    The engineering materials diffractometer, VULCAN, at the Spallation Neutron Source began commissioning on June 26, 2009. This instrument is designed for materials science and engineering studies. In situ lattice strain measurements of a model metallic material under monotonic tensile load have been performed on VULCAN. The tensile load was applied under two different strain rates, and neutron diffraction measurements were carried out in both high-intensity and high-resolution modes. These experiments demonstrated VULCAN's in situ study capability of deformation behaviors even during the early phases of commissioning.

  14. Irradiation-induced displacement of Ag atoms from lattice sites in an Al-0.2% Mg-0.1% Ag crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, M.L.; Howe, L.M.; Quenneville, A.F.

    1976-01-01

    In irradiated alloys of Al containing approximately 0.1 at% Ag, the backscattering - channelling method shows that Al-Ag dumbells are created by the trapping of Al interstitial atoms at Ag solute atoms. The present results demonstrate that the addition of 0.2 at% Mg to such irradiated alloys retards not only the formation of Al-Ag dumbells during annealing from 30 to 100 K but also their annihilation during annealing from 180 to 240 K. Al interstitials are released from Mg traps at 100 to 160 K, causing further trapping at Ag atoms. Approximately 70% of the Ag atoms return to lattice sites at approximately 200 K (stage III) (compared with 100% in the Al-0.1% Ag alloys) and the remainder return to lattice sites at approximately 260 K. These results favour migration of Al-Ag dumbells rather than vacancies during stage III annealing. (author)

  15. Ion beam focusing by the atomic chains of a crystal lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulga, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    A study is made of the focusing of a parallel ion beam by a pair of close packed atomic chains of a crystal. The focal length of this system has been calculated to the approximation of continuous potential of chain in the general form and also for a number of specific potentials of ion-atom interactions. Ar ion beam focusing by a Cu chain pair is discusssed in detail. For this case, the focal length has been calculated as a function of ion energy using the method of computer simulation of ion trajectories in the chain field. The calculations were made on the basis of the Born-Mayer potential with various constants. A pronounced dependence of focal length on the constant in this potential has been found. (author)

  16. Computer simulation of interstitial atom loop with vacancies in gamma-iron lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubov, S.I.; Doronina, V.I.; Kaipetskaya, E.N.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of vacanies and a dislocation loop has been investigated by the mashine stimulation method. The calculations have been performed by the variation method using the Jonson pair potential for gamma-iron. The interaction of a vacancy and a loop of interstitial atoms in the form of a regular hexagon has been investigated. The results obtained are compared with calculations in the elastic approximation

  17. Lattice-dynamical estimation of atomic thermal parameters for silicates: Forsterite. alpha. -Mg sub 2 SiO sub 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilati, T.; Bianchi, R. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy). Centro per lo Studio delle Relazioni tra Struttura e Reattivita' Chimica); Gramaccioli, C.M. (Milan Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze della Terra)

    1990-06-01

    As an example of extending harmonic lattice-dynamical procedures to silicates, the atomic thermal parameters for forsterite Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, an important constituent of earth's crust, have been calculated on this basis. For this purpose, Iishi's rigid-ion model was used, with slight modifications. Although such potentials were derived exclusively from fitting IR and Raman-active frequencies, the reproduction of the phonon-dispersion curves is good, and the calculation of thermodynamic functions such as entropy provides values which are near to calorimetric estimates. The calculated atomic thermal parameters are in good agreement with the experimental values reported by most authors. The calculations at various temperatures show the effect of zero-point motion very clearly: its contribution to temperature factors is about half of the total at room temperature. Bond-length corrections for thermal libration can be applied using the general-case formula: these amount to 0.003 A for the Si-O bonds at room temperature. Although the thermal parameters in the SiO{sub 4} group fit a rigid-body model, the correction obtained using the Schomaker-Trueblood procedure gives a significantly different result: this is essentially due to the weak librational character of the motion of silicate groups in the structure. (orig.).

  18. Lattice-dynamical estimation of atomic thermal parameters for silicates: Forsterite α-Mg2SiO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilati, T.; Bianchi, R.; Gramaccioli, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    As an example of extending harmonic lattice-dynamical procedures to silicates, the atomic thermal parameters for forsterite Mg 2 SiO 4 , an important constituent of earth's crust, have been calculated on this basis. For this purpose, Iishi's rigid-ion model was used, with slight modifications. Although such potentials were derived exclusively from fitting IR and Raman-active frequencies, the reproduction of the phonon-dispersion curves is good, and the calculation of thermodynamic functions such as entropy provides values which are near to calorimetric estimates. The calculated atomic thermal parameters are in good agreement with the experimental values reported by most authors. The calculations at various temperatures show the effect of zero-point motion very clearly: its contribution to temperature factors is about half of the total at room temperature. Bond-length corrections for thermal libration can be applied using the general-case formula: these amount to 0.003 A for the Si-O bonds at room temperature. Although the thermal parameters in the SiO 4 group fit a rigid-body model, the correction obtained using the Schomaker-Trueblood procedure gives a significantly different result: this is essentially due to the weak librational character of the motion of silicate groups in the structure. (orig.)

  19. Emergence of Zeolite Analogs and other Microporous Crystals in an Atomic Lattice Model of Silica and Related Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lin; Auerbach, Scott M; Monson, Peter A

    2012-03-15

    The potential of tailored nanopores to transform technologies such as drug delivery, biofuel production, and optical-electronic devices depends on fundamental knowledge of the self-assembly of ordered nanoporous solids. Atomic-level geometries of critical nuclei that lead to such solids have remained hidden in the nanoscale blind spot between local (5 nm) probes of structure. Heroic efforts at molecular simulation of nanopore formation have provided massive libraries of hypothetical structures; (1-5) however, to date no statistical simulation has generated a crystallization pathway from random initial condition to ordered nanoporous solid, until now. In this work, we show that a recently developed atomic lattice model of silica and related materials can form ordered nanoporous solids with a rich variety of structures including known chalcogenides, zeolite analogs, and layered materials. We find that whereas canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the model consistently produce the amorphous solids studied in our previous work, parallel tempering Monte Carlo gives rise to ordered nanoporous solids. The utility of parallel tempering highlights the existence of barriers between amorphous and crystalline phases of our model. Moreover, the self-assembly or nanoporous crystalline phases in the model open the door to detailed understanding of nanopore nucleation.

  20. Possible in-lattice confinement fusion (LCF). Dynamic application of atomic and nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawarasaki, Yuuki

    1995-01-01

    New scheme of a nuclear fusion reactor system is proposed, the basic concept of which comes from ingenious combination of hitherto developed techniques and verified facts; 1) so-called cold fusion (CF), 2) plasma of both magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF), and 3) accelerator-based D-T(D) neutron source. Details of the LCF reactor physics require dynamics of atomic data as well as nuclear data; interaction of ions with matters in solid and the problems of radiation damage. (author)

  1. Dynamically controlled two-color photonic band gaps via balanced four-wave mixing in one-dimensional cold atomic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Yang, Liu; Wang, Xiao-Chang; Cui, Cui-Li; Zhang, Yan; Wu, Jin-Hui

    2013-12-01

    We study an ensemble of cold atoms driven to the four-level double-Λ configuration and trapped in the one-dimensional optical lattices for achieving dynamically controlled photonic band gaps (PBGs) via the balanced four-wave mixing interaction. Numerical results show that a pair of PBGs characterized by high platforms of probe reflectivities and reduced density of photonic states are established, simultaneously, on both probe transitions in one symmetric driving scheme. Such two-color PBGs can be easily manipulated in position and width by modulating, e.g., the balanced Rabi frequencies of two coupling fields and the Gaussian widths of atomic density distributions, to change the equal probe detunings fulfilling both Bragg conditions. Each two-color PBG as predicted in the coherent atomic lattices may be explored to attain robust light entanglement, even for single-probe photons, via an efficient frequency conversion during the nonlinearly correlated reflection.

  2. Measurement of deforming mode of lattice truss structures under impact loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao H.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Lattice truss structures, which are used as a core material in sandwich panels, were widely investigated experimentally and theoretically. However, explanation of the deforming mechanism using reliable experimental results is almost rarely reported, particularly for the dynamic deforming mechanism. The present work aimed at the measurement of the deforming mode of lattice truss structures. Indeed, quasi-static and Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB tests have been performed on the tetrahedral truss cores structures made of Aluminum 3003-O. Global values such as crushing forces and displacements between the loading platens are obtained. However, in order to understand the deforming mechanism and to explain the observed impact strength enhancement observed in the experiments, images of the truss core element during the tests are recorded. A method based on the edge detection algorithm is developed and applied to these images. The deforming profiles of one beam are extracted and it allows for calculating the length of beam. It is found that these lengths diminish to a critical value (due to compression and remain constant afterwards (because of significant bending. The comparison between quasi-static and impact tests shows that the beam were much more compressed under impact loading, which could be understood as the lateral inertia effect in dynamic bucking. Therefore, the impact strength enhancement of tetrahedral truss core sandwich panel can be explained by the delayed buckling of beam under impact (more compression reached, together with the strain hardening of base material.

  3. Influence of tool shape on lattice rearrangement under loading conditions reproducing friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S., E-mail: ivkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Konovalenko, Igor S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Metal behavior under loading conditions that reproduce friction stir welding was studied on the atomic scale. Calculations were conducted based on molecular dynamics simulation with potentials calculated within the embedded atom method. The loading of the interface between two crystallites, whose structure corresponded to aluminum alloy 2024, was simulated by the motion of a cone-shaped tool along the interface with constant angular and translational velocities. The motion of the rotating tool causes fracture of the workpiece crystal structure with subsequent mixing of surface atoms of the interfacing crystallites. It is shown that the resistance force acting on the moving tool from the workpiece and the process of structural defect formation in the workpiece depend on the tool shape.

  4. Nature of the Insulating Ground State of the Two-Dimensional Sn Atom Lattice on SiC(0001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Seho; Lee, Hunpyo; Choi, Jin-Ho; Cho, Jun-Hyung

    2016-07-28

    Semiconductor surfaces with narrow surface bands provide unique playgrounds to search for Mott-insulating state. Recently, a combined experimental and theoretical study of the two-dimensional (2D) Sn atom lattice on a wide-gap SiC(0001) substrate proposed a Mott-type insulator driven by strong on-site Coulomb repulsion U within a single-band Hubbard model. However, our systematic density-functional theory (DFT) study with local, semilocal, and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals shows that the Sn dangling-bond state largely hybridizes with the substrate Si 3p and C 2p states to split into three surface bands due to the crystal field. Such a hybridization gives rise to the stabilization of the antiferromagnetic order via superexchange interactions. The band gap and the density of states predicted by the hybrid DFT calculation agree well with photoemission data. Our findings not only suggest that the Sn/SiC(0001) system can be represented as a Slater-type insulator driven by long-range magnetism, but also have an implication that taking into account long-range interactions beyond the on-site interaction would be of importance for properly describing the insulating nature of Sn/SiC(0001).

  5. Optical lattices: Orbital dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Liu, W. Vincent

    2011-02-01

    Emulating condensed-matter physics with ground-state atoms trapped in optical lattices has come a long way. But excite the atoms into higher orbital states, and a whole new world of exotic states appears.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann Study on Seawall-Break Flows under the Influence of Breach and Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Qiu-Ying; Zhang, Wen-Huan; Wang, Yi-Hang; Chen, Wen-Wen

    2017-10-01

    In the process of storm surge, the seawater often overflows and even destroys the seawall. The buildings near the shore are usually inundated by the seawater through the breach. However, at present, there is little study focusing on the effects of buildings and breach on the seawall-break flows. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with nine velocities in two dimensions (D2Q9) for the shallow water equations is adopted to simulate the seawall-break flows. The flow patterns and water depth distributions for the seawall-break flows under various densities, layouts and shapes of buildings and different breach discharges, sizes and locations are investigated. It is found that when buildings with a high enough density are perpendicular to the main flow direction, an obvious backwater phenomenon appears near buildings while this phenomenon does not occur when buildings with the same density are parallel to the main flow direction. Moreover, it is observed that the occurrence of backwater phenomenon is independent of the building shape. As to the effects of breach on the seawall-break flows, it is found that only when the breach discharge is large enough or the breach size is small enough, the effects of asymmetric distribution of buildings on the seawall-break flows become important. The breach location only changes the flow pattern in the upstream area of the first building that seawater meets, but has little impact on the global water depth distribution. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11502124, the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province under Grant No. LQ16A020001, the Scientific Research Fund of Zhejiang Provincial Education Department under Grant No. Y201533808, the Natural Science Foundation of Ningbo under Grant No. 2016A610075, and is sponsored by K.C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University.

  7. Effect of radiation-induced lattice defects in silicon single crystals on the characteristic states of an intersticial muonium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsov, S.G.; Getalov, A.L.; Gordeev, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    It is observed experimentally that radiation defects affect normal and anomalous muonium in silicon differently. It is shown that the mobilities of these two states of muonium in the lattice of the specimen differ considerably

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of phase transitions and lattice dynamics in an atom-phonon model for spin transition compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apetrei, Alin Marian; Enachescu, Cristian; Tanasa, Radu; Stoleriu, Laurentiu; Stancu, Alexandru

    2010-01-01

    We apply here the Monte Carlo Metropolis method to a known atom-phonon coupling model for 1D spin transition compounds (STC). These inorganic molecular systems can switch under thermal or optical excitation, between two states in thermodynamical competition, i.e. high spin (HS) and low spin (LS). In the model, the ST units (molecules) are linked by springs, whose elastic constants depend on the spin states of the neighboring atoms, and can only have three possible values. Several previous analytical papers considered a unique average value for the elastic constants (mean-field approximation) and obtained phase diagrams and thermal hysteresis loops. Recently, Monte Carlo simulation papers, taking into account all three values of the elastic constants, obtained thermal hysteresis loops, but no phase diagrams. Employing Monte Carlo simulation, in this work we obtain the phase diagram at T=0 K, which is fully consistent with earlier analytical work; however it is more complex. The main difference is the existence of two supplementary critical curves that mark a hysteresis zone in the phase diagram. This explains the pressure hysteresis curves at low temperature observed experimentally and predicts a 'chemical' hysteresis in STC at very low temperatures. The formation and the dynamics of the domains are also discussed.

  9. Damage evaluation in graphene underlying atomic layer deposition dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaohui; Reckinger, Nicolas; Poncelet, Olivier; Louette, Pierre; Ureña, Ferran; Idrissi, Hosni; Turner, Stuart; Cabosart, Damien; Colomer, Jean-François; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit; Francis, Laurent A.

    2015-08-01

    Based on micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we study the structural damage incurred in monolayer (1L) and few-layer (FL) graphene subjected to atomic-layer deposition of HfO2 and Al2O3 upon different oxygen plasma power levels. We evaluate the damage level and the influence of the HfO2 thickness on graphene. The results indicate that in the case of Al2O3/graphene, whether 1L or FL graphene is strongly damaged under our process conditions. For the case of HfO2/graphene, μRS analysis clearly shows that FL graphene is less disordered than 1L graphene. In addition, the damage levels in FL graphene decrease with the number of layers. Moreover, the FL graphene damage is inversely proportional to the thickness of HfO2 film. Particularly, the bottom layer of twisted bilayer (t-2L) has the salient features of 1L graphene. Therefore, FL graphene allows for controlling/limiting the degree of defect during the PE-ALD HfO2 of dielectrics and could be a good starting material for building field effect transistors, sensors, touch screens and solar cells. Besides, the formation of Hf-C bonds may favor growing high-quality and uniform-coverage dielectric. HfO2 could be a suitable high-K gate dielectric with a scaling capability down to sub-5-nm for graphene-based transistors.

  10. Band-edge electronic structure of β-In2S3: the role of s or p orbitals of atoms at different lattice positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zongyan; Cao, Yuechan; Yi, Juan; He, Xijia; Ma, Chenshuo; Qiu, Jianbei

    2012-04-23

    As a promising solar-energy material, the electronic structure and optical properties of Beta phase indium sulfide (β-In(2)S(3)) are still not thoroughly understood. This paper devotes to solve these issues using density functional theory calculations. β-In(2)S(3) is found to be an indirect band gap semiconductor. The roles of its atoms at different lattice positions are not exactly identical because of the unique crystal structure. Additonally, a significant phenomenon of optical anisotropy was observed near the absorption edge. Owing to the low coordination numbers of the In3 and S2 atoms, the corresponding In3-5s states and S2-3p states are crucial for the composition of the band-edge electronic structure, leading to special optical properties and excellent optoelectronic performances. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Large-scale grid-enabled lattice Boltzmann simulations of complex fluid flow in porous media and under shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, Jens; Venturoli, Maddalena; Coveney, Peter V

    2004-08-15

    Well-designed lattice Boltzmann codes exploit the essentially embarrassingly parallel features of the algorithm and so can be run with considerable efficiency on modern supercomputers. Such scalable codes permit us to simulate the behaviour of increasingly large quantities of complex condensed matter systems. In the present paper, we present some preliminary results on the large-scale three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann simulation of binary immiscible fluid flows through a porous medium, derived from digitized X-ray micro-tomographic data of Bentheimer sandstone, and from the study of the same fluids under shear. Simulations on such scales can benefit considerably from the use of computational steering, and we describe our implementation of steering within the lattice Boltzmann code, called LB3D, making use of the RealityGrid steering library. Our large-scale simulations benefit from the new concept of capability computing, designed to prioritize the execution of big jobs on major supercomputing resources. The advent of persistent computational grids promises to provide an optimal environment in which to deploy these mesoscale simulation methods, which can exploit the distributed nature of computer, visualization and storage resources to reach scientific results rapidly; we discuss our work on the grid-enablement of lattice Boltzmann methods in this context. Copyright 2004 The Royal Society

  12. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  13. Characterization of projection lattices of Hilbert spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szambien, H.H.

    1986-09-01

    The classical lattices of projections of Hilbert spaces over the real, the complex or the quaternion number field are characterized among the totality of irreducible, complete, orthomodular, atomic lattices satisfying the covering property. To this end, so-called paratopological lattices are introduced, i.e, lattices carrying a topology that renders the lattice operations restrictedly continuous.

  14. Tight-binding electrons on triangular and kagome lattices under staggered modulated magnetic fields: quantum Hall effects and Hofstadter butterflies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Juan; Wang Yifei; Gong Changde, E-mail: yfwang_nju@hotmail.com [Center for Statistical and Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, and Department of Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China)

    2011-04-20

    We consider the tight-binding models of electrons on a two-dimensional triangular lattice and kagome lattice under staggered modulated magnetic fields. Such fields have two components: a uniform-flux part with strength {phi}, and a staggered-flux part with strength {Delta}{phi}. Various properties of the Hall conductances and Hofstadter butterflies are studied. When {phi} is fixed, variation of {Delta}{phi} leads to the quantum Hall transitions and Chern numbers of Landau subbands being redistributed between neighboring pairs. The energy spectra with nonzero {Delta}{phi}s have similar fractal structures but quite different energy gaps compared with the original Hofstadter butterflies of {Delta}{phi} = 0. Moreover, the fan-like structure of Landau levels in the low magnetic field region is also modified appreciably by {Delta}{phi}.

  15. Scalar Aharonov–Bohm Phase in Ramsey Atom Interferometry under Time-Varying Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Morinaga

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In a Ramsey atom interferometer excited by two electromagnetic fields, if atoms are under a time-varying scalar potential during the interrogation time, the phase of the Ramsey fringes shifts owing to the scalar Aharonov–Bohm effect. The phase shift was precisely examined using a Ramsey atom interferometer with a two-photon Raman transition under the second-order Zeeman potential, and a formula for the phase shift was derived. Using the derived formula, the frequency shift due to the scalar Aharonov–Bohm effect in the frequency standards utilizing the Ramsey atom interferometer was discussed.

  16. Change of Energy of the Cubic Subnanocluster of Iron Under Influence of Interstitial and Substitutional Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedolya, Anatoliy V; Bondarenko, Natalya V

    2016-12-01

    Energy change of an iron face-centred cubic subnanocluster was evaluated using molecular mechanics method depending on the position of a carbon interstitial atom and substitutional atoms of nickel. Calculations of all possible positions of impurity atoms show that the energy change of the system are discrete and at certain positions of the atoms are close to continuous.In terms of energy, when all impurity atoms are on the same edge of an atomic cluster, their positions are more advantageous. The presence of nickel atoms on the edge of a cubic cluster resulted in decrease of potential barrier for a carbon atom and decrease in energy in the whole cluster. A similar drift of a carbon atom from central octahedral interstitial site to the surface in the direction occurred under the influence of surface factors.Such configuration corresponds to decreasing symmetry and increasing the number of possible energy states of a subnanocluster, and it corresponds to the condition of spontaneous crystallization process in an isolated system.Taking into account accidental positions of the nickel atom in the iron cluster, such behaviour of the carbon atom can explain the mechanism of growth of a new phase and formation of new clusters in the presence of other kind of atoms because of surface influence.

  17. The elasticity anisotropy in the basal atomic planes of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 associated with auxetic elastic properties of the hydrogen sub-lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harutyunyan, Valeri S.; Abrahamyan, Aren A.; Aivazyan, Ashot P.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: To the out-of-plane strain ε x induced in the (0 0 0 1) atomic planes of Mg(OH) 2 , the contributions of constituent octahedral layers ε x (1) and interlayers ε x (2) are of opposite sign. Highlights: ► Elasticity anisotropy of rare earth metal hydroxides is theoretically analyzed. ► Elastic anisotropy within (0 0 0 1) atomic planes is studied from energy consideration. ► The out-of-plane Poisson’s ratios of octahedral layers and interlayers are of opposite sign. ► Auxeticity of the hydrogen sublattice (interlayers) results from weak interlayer bonding. ► The obtained expression for the in-plane Young’s modulus results in useful conclusions. - Abstract: Within the framework of the Hook’s generalized law and using the experimental data for characteristic crystallographic parameters and stiffness constants available from literature, the individual elastic properties of constituent octahedral layers and interlayers of the (0 0 0 1) atomic planes in the Mg(OH) 2 and Ca(OH) 2 crystal lattices are theoretically quantified from intermolecular interaction energy. It is shown that, under uniaxial type of deformation applied along the (0 0 0 1) basal planes, in the “load-deformation response” the octahedral layers and interlayers exhibit the positive and negative Poisson’s ratio, respectively. Manifestation of such a type strong elastic anisotropy in the basal atomic planes and auxetic elastic behavior of the hydrogen sub-lattice (interlayers) upon applied uniaxial load result from a large difference in the strength of bonding within octahedral layers and interlayers. The intermolecular binding energy is contributed both by “hydroxyl–hydroxyl” and “metal atom–hydroxyl” dispersion interactions, whereas the Young’s modulus in the direction parallel to a (0 0 0 1) plane is practically contributed only by the former interaction. For this Young’s modulus, an approximate analytical expression is derived, which is

  18. Multi-band scattering of two atoms in a one-dimensional lattice with on-site interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Seth; Giannakeas, Panagiotis; Mehta, Nirav

    2017-04-01

    We examine a system of two-particles confined to a one-dimensional lattice described by a multi-band Hubbard model with on-site interactions. Asymptotically the two particles are relegated to remain in bands that are energetically accessible. However, when the particles occupy the same state, they can virtually scatter into bands that are energetically closed. We incorporate this virtual scattering by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for the reactance matrix (K-matrix) using a lattice Green's operator. The resulting formula for the K-matrix for open band scattering bears a striking similarity to that which arrises from channel closing formulas in standard multi-channel scattering theory. We then apply this formula for two-body scattering in the lowest and first excited bands within a two band approximation. Within this approximation, virtual scattering into closed bands can create scattering resonances in the presence of bound states attached to closed bands in analogy to Feshbach or confinement induced resonances. This work was partially funded by Grants from the NSF and a the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  19. Simulation of inhomogeneous distributions of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice via a massively parallel implementation of nonequilibrium strong-coupling perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Andreas; Mikelsons, Karlis; Krishnamurthy, H R; Freericks, James K

    2014-02-01

    We present a nonequilibrium strong-coupling approach to inhomogeneous systems of ultracold atoms in optical lattices. We demonstrate its application to the Mott-insulating phase of a two-dimensional Fermi-Hubbard model in the presence of a trap potential. Since the theory is formulated self-consistently, the numerical implementation relies on a massively parallel evaluation of the self-energy and the Green's function at each lattice site, employing thousands of CPUs. While the computation of the self-energy is straightforward to parallelize, the evaluation of the Green's function requires the inversion of a large sparse 10(d) × 10(d) matrix, with d > 6. As a crucial ingredient, our solution heavily relies on the smallness of the hopping as compared to the interaction strength and yields a widely scalable realization of a rapidly converging iterative algorithm which evaluates all elements of the Green's function. Results are validated by comparing with the homogeneous case via the local-density approximation. These calculations also show that the local-density approximation is valid in nonequilibrium setups without mass transport.

  20. Local structure and lattice dynamics study of low dimensional materials using atomic pair distribution function and high energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chenyang

    Structure and dynamics lie at the heart of the materials science. A detailed knowledge of both subjects would be foundational in understanding the materials' properties and predicting their potential applications. However, the task becomes increasingly dicult as the particle size is reduced to the nanometer scale. For nanostructured materials their laboratory x-ray scattering patterns are overlapped and broadened, making structure determination impossible. Atomic pair distribution function technique based on either synchrotron x-ray or neutron scattering data is known as the tool of choice for probing local structures. However, to solve the "structure problem" in low-dimensional materials with PDF is still challenging. For example for 2D materials of interest in this thesis the crystallographic modeling approach often yields unphysical thermal factors along stacking direction where new chemical intuitions about their actual structures and new modeling methodology/program are needed. Beyond this, lattice dynamical investigations on nanosized particles are extremely dicult. Laboratory tools such as Raman and infra-red only probe phonons at Brillouin zone center. Although in literature there are a great number of theoretical studies of their vibrational properties based on either empirical force elds or density functional theory, various approximations made in theories make the theoretical predictions less reliable. Also, there lacks the direct experiment result to validate the theory against. In this thesis, we studied the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of technologically relevant low-dimensional materials through synchrotron based x-ray PDF and high energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HERIX) techniques. By collecting PDF data and employing advanced modeling program such as DiPy-CMI, we successfully determined the atomic structures of (i) emerging Ti3C2, Nb4C3 MXenes (transition metal carbides and/or nitrides) that are promising for energy storage

  1. Disordering of two-dimensional oxyxgen lattices on Mo(011) initiated by electron transitions in oxygen and molybdenum atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasimovich, I.N.; Klimenko, E.V.; Naumovets, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of electron-induced disordering (EID) of the submonolayer film of heavier adsorbate-oxygen is reported. The investigation of energy dependence of the effective cross section of this process, which points to the fact that EID can be initiated by the electron transitions not only in adatoms, but in the substrate, is also presented. When irradiating by electrons, the sample surface cooled up to 77 K, intensity of diffraction reflects of the (2x2) and (6x2) structures decreases rather quickly, but the reflects of more dense (6x1) lattice do not practically attenuate. The conclusions are made that the knowledge of physical factors, determining the probability of radiation defect formation in an adfilm, gives the possibility either to avoid disordering, if it is undesirable, or to use it to control the surface properties

  2. Fractional quantum Hall effect in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafezi, M.; Demler, E.; Lukin, M. D.; Soerensen, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze a recently proposed method to create fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states of atoms confined in optical lattices [A. Soerensen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 086803 (2005)]. Extending the previous work, we investigate conditions under which the FQH effect can be achieved for bosons on a lattice with an effective magnetic field and finite on-site interaction. Furthermore, we characterize the ground state in such systems by calculating Chern numbers which can provide direct signatures of topological order and explore regimes where the characterization in terms of wave-function overlap fails. We also discuss various issues which are relevant for the practical realization of such FQH states with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice, including the presence of a long-range dipole interaction which can improve the energy gap and stabilize the ground state. We also investigate a detection technique based on Bragg spectroscopy to probe these systems in an experimental realization

  3. Quantum phases in optical lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickerscheid, Dennis Brian Martin

    2006-01-01

    An important new development in the field of ultracold atomic gases is the study of the properties of these gases in a so-called optical lattice. An optical lattice is a periodic trapping potential for the atoms that is formed by the interference pattern of a few laser beams. A reason for the

  4. Nanosheet Array-Like Palladium-Catalysts Pdx/rGO@CoAl-LDH via Lattice Atomic-Confined in Situ Reduction for Highly Efficient Heck Coupling Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanna; Dou, Liguang; Zhang, Hui

    2017-11-08

    A series of novel nanosheet array-like catalysts Pd x /rGO@CoAl-LDH (x = 0.0098-1.9, refers to Pd loading in wt % on ICP, rGO: reduced graphene oxide, LDH: layered double hydroxide) were first prepared via a simple and green lattice atomic-confined in situ reduction of oxidative Pd precursors by the evenly atomic-dispersed reductive Co 2+ sites on LDH layers of a nanohybrid rGO@CoAl-LDH with hexagonal LDH nanoplates (∼73 × 7 nm) interdigitated vertical to the surfaces of rGO layer in both sides, fabricated through a simple citric acid-assisted aqueous-phase coprecipitation method. The as-obtained Pd catalysts possess clean Pd nanoclusters (NCs) with tunable sizes in 1.3-1.8 nm on varied Pd loadings. All the Pd x /rGO@CoAl-LDH catalysts show excellent activities for the Heck reaction, and the Pd 0.0098 /rGO@CoAl-LDH with the ultrafine Pd NCs of 1.3 ± 0.2 nm yields a maximum turnover frequency of 160 000 h -1 over a heterogeneous catalyst so far. The excellent activities can be attributed to the ultrasmall Pd NCs with high dispersion and clean Pd surfaces, increased electron transfer capacity and surface area, and remarkable Pd-CoAl-LDH-rGO three-phase synergistic effect of the present unique nanosheet array-like Pd NCs catalysts. Moreover, the catalyst Pd 0.33 /rGO@CoAl-LDH shows a broad range of substrate applicability and can be reused more than five runs without obvious loss of activity, giving the present catalysts long-term stability. These findings make the rGO@CoAl-LDH hybrid prepared by a facile and scalable synthesis route a universal green platform to support other noble or nonprecious metal NCs via lattice atomic-confined in situ reduction strategy to construct more desired heterogeneous catalysts.

  5. Vortex lattices in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokic, V.; Davidovic, D.; Dobrosavljevic-Grujic, L.

    1995-01-01

    We study vortex lattices in a superconductor--normal-metal superlattice in a parallel magnetic field. Distorted lattices, resulting from the shear deformations along the layers, are found to be unstable. Under field variation, nonequilibrium configurations undergo an infinite sequence of continuous transitions, typical for soft lattices. The equilibrium vortex arrangement is always a lattice of isocell triangles, without shear

  6. InSb heterostructure nanowires: MOVPE growth under extreme lattice mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroff, Philippe; Messing, Maria E; Mattias Borg, B; Dick, Kimberly A; Deppert, Knut; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2009-12-09

    We demonstrate the growth of InSb-based nanowire heterostructures by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy and use it to integrate InSb on extremely lattice-mismatched III-V nanowire templates made of InAs, InP, and GaAs. Influence of temperature, V/III ratio, and diameter are investigated in order to investigate the growth rate and morphology. The range of growth temperatures used for InSb nanowire growth is very similar to that used for planar growth due to the nature of the precursor decomposition. This makes optimization of growth parameters very important, and more difficult than for most other nanowire III-V materials. Analysis of the InSb nanowire epitaxial quality when grown on InAs, InP, and GaAs, along with InSb segment and particle compositions are reported. This successful direct integration of InSb nanowires, on nanowire templates with unprecedented strain levels show great promise for fabrication of vertical InSb devices.

  7. Studying the effect of stress relaxation and creep on lattice strain evolution of stainless steel under tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Clausen, B.; Tomé, C.N.; Wu, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    Due to relatively long associated count times, in situ strain measurements using neutron diffraction requires periodic interruption of the test to collect the diffraction data by holding either the stress or the strain constant. As a consequence, stress relaxation or strain creep induced by the interrupts is inevitable, especially at loads which are close to the flow stress of the material. An in situ neutron diffraction technique, which consists in performing the diffraction measurements using continuous event-mode data collection while conducting the mechanical loading monotonically with a very slow loading rate, is proposed here to avoid the effects associated with interrupts. The lattice strains in stainless steel under uniaxial tension are measured using the three techniques, and the experimental results are compared to study the effect of stress relaxation and strain creep on the lattice strain measurements. The experimental results are simulated using both the elastic viscoplastic self-consistent (EVPSC) model and the elastic plastic self-consistent (EPSC) model. Both the EVPSC and EPSC models give reasonable predictions for all the three tests, with EVPSC having the added advantage over EPSC that it allows us to address the relaxation and creep effects in the interrupted tests

  8. Activation of surface lattice oxygen in single-atom Pt/CeO 2 for low-temperature CO oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Lei; Mei, Donghai; Xiong, Haifeng; Peng, Bo; Ren, Zhibo; Pereira Hernandez, Xavier I.; DelaRiva, Andrew; Wang, Meng; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kovarik, Libor; Datye, Abhaya K.; Wang, Yong

    2017-12-14

    While single-atom catalysts can provide high catalytic activity and selectivity, application in industrial catalysts demands long term performance and the ability to regenerate the catalysts. We have investigated the factors that lead to improved catalytic activity of a Pt/CeO2 catalyst for low temperature CO oxidation. Single-atom Pt/CeO2 becomes active for CO oxidation under lean condition only at elevated temperatures, because CO is strongly bound to ionic Pt sites. Reducing the catalyst, even under mild conditions, leads to onset of CO oxidation activity even at room temperature. This high activity state involves the transformation of mononuclear Pt species to sub-nanometer sized Pt particles. Under oxidizing conditions, the Pt can be restored to its stable, single-atom state. The key to facile regeneration is the ability to create mobile Pt species and suitable trapping sites on the support, making this a prototypical catalyst system for industrial application of single-atom catalysis.

  9. Application of Powder Diffraction Methods to the Analysis of Short- and Long-Range Atomic Order in Nanocrystalline Diamond and SiC: The Concept of the Apparent Lattice Parameter (alp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Stelmakh, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Weber, H.-P.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Two methods of the analysis of powder diffraction patterns of diamond and SiC nanocrystals are presented: (a) examination of changes of the lattice parameters with diffraction vector Q ('apparent lattice parameter', alp) which refers to Bragg scattering, and (b), examination of changes of inter-atomic distances based on the analysis of the atomic Pair Distribution Function, PDF. Application of these methods was studied based on the theoretical diffraction patterns computed for models of nanocrystals having (i) a perfect crystal lattice, and (ii), a core-shell structure, i.e. constituting a two-phase system. The models are defined by the lattice parameter of the grain core, thickness of the surface shell, and the magnitude and distribution of the strain field in the shell. X-ray and neutron experimental diffraction data of nanocrystalline SiC and diamond powders of the grain diameter from 4 nm up to micrometers were used. The effects of the internal pressure and strain at the grain surface on the structure are discussed based on the experimentally determined dependence of the alp values on the Q-vector, and changes of the interatomic distances with the grain size determined experimentally by the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) analysis. The experimental results lend a strong support to the concept of a two-phase, core and the surface shell structure of nanocrystalline diamond and SiC.

  10. Generalized isothermic lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doliwa, Adam

    2007-01-01

    We study multi-dimensional quadrilateral lattices satisfying simultaneously two integrable constraints: a quadratic constraint and the projective Moutard constraint. When the lattice is two dimensional and the quadric under consideration is the Moebius sphere one obtains, after the stereographic projection, the discrete isothermic surfaces defined by Bobenko and Pinkall by an algebraic constraint imposed on the (complex) cross-ratio of the circular lattice. We derive the analogous condition for our generalized isothermic lattices using Steiner's projective structure of conics, and we present basic geometric constructions which encode integrability of the lattice. In particular, we introduce the Darboux transformation of the generalized isothermic lattice and we derive the corresponding Bianchi permutability principle. Finally, we study two-dimensional generalized isothermic lattices, in particular geometry of their initial boundary value problem

  11. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Lattice Boltzmann simulation of behaviour of particles moving in blood vessels under the rolling massage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hou-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Cai-Feng; Li, Hua-Bing

    2009-07-01

    The rolling massage is one of the most important manipulations in Chinese massage, which is expected to eliminate many diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage on a pair of particles moving in blood vessels under rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulated results show that the motion of each particle is considerably modified by the rolling massage, and it depends on the relative rolling velocity, the rolling depth, and the distance between particle position and rolling position. Both particles' translational average velocities increase almost linearly as the rolling velocity increases, and obey the same law. The increment of the average relative angular velocity for the leading particle is smaller than that of the trailing one. The result is helpful for understanding the mechanism of the massage and to further develop the rolling techniques.

  12. Three-dimensional morphologies of inclined equiaxed dendrites growing under forced convection by phase-field-lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakane, Shinji; Takaki, Tomohiro; Ohno, Munekazu; Shibuta, Yasushi; Shimokawabe, Takashi; Aoki, Takayuki

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional growth morphologies of equiaxed dendrites growing under forced convection, with their preferred growth direction inclined from the flow direction, were investigated by performing large-scale phase-field lattice Boltzmann simulations on a graphical-processing-unit supercomputer. The tip velocities of the dendrite arms with their preferred growth directions inclined toward the upstream and downstream directions increased and decreased, respectively, as a result of forced convection. In addition, the tip velocities decreased monotonically as the angle between the preferred growth direction and the upstream direction increased. Here, the degree of acceleration of the upstream tips was larger than the degree of deceleration of the downstream tips. The angles between the actual tip growth directions and the preferred growth direction of the dendrite arms exhibited a characteristic change with two local maxima and two local minima.

  13. Control and Transfer of Entanglement between Two Atoms Driven by Classical Fields under Dressed-State Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qing-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Xu, Juan; Yan, Qiu-Rong; Liu, Ye; Chen, An

    2016-06-01

    We have studied the dynamics and transfer of the entanglement of the two identical atoms simultaneously interacting with vacuum field by employing the dressed-state representation. The two atoms are driven by classical fields. The influence of the initial entanglement degree of two atoms, the coupling strength between the atom and the classical field and the detuning between the atomic transition frequency and the frequency of classical field on the entanglement and atomic linear entropy is discussed. The initial entanglement of the two atoms can be transferred into the entanglement between the atom and cavity field when the dissipation is neglected. The maximally entangled state between the atoms and cavity field can be obtained under some certain conditions. The time of disentanglement of two atoms can be controlled and manipulated by adjusting the detuning and classical driving fields. Moreover, the larger the cavity decay rate is, the more quickly the entanglement of the two atoms decays. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11247213, 61368002, 11304010, 11264030, 61168001, China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2013M531558, Jiangxi Postdoctoral Research Project under Grant No. 2013KY33, the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province under Grant No. 20142BAB217001, the Foundation for Young Scientists of Jiangxi Province (Jinggang Star) under Grant No. 20122BCB23002, the Research Foundation of the Education Department of Jiangxi Province under Grant Nos. GJJ13051, GJJ13057, and the Graduate Innovation Special Fund of Nanchang University under Grant No. cx2015137

  14. Lattice QCD on fine lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Stefan [DESY (Germany). Neumann Inst. for Computing

    2016-11-01

    These configurations are currently in use in many on-going projects carried out by researchers throughout Europe. In particular this data will serve as an essential input into the computation of the coupling constant of QCD, where some of the simulations are still on-going. But also projects computing the masses of hadrons and investigating their structure are underway as well as activities in the physics of heavy quarks. As this initial project of gauge field generation has been successful, it is worthwhile to extend the currently available ensembles with further points in parameter space. These will allow to further study and control systematic effects like the ones introduced by the finite volume, the non-physical quark masses and the finite lattice spacing. In particular certain compromises have still been made in the region where pion masses and lattice spacing are both small. This is because physical pion masses require larger lattices to keep the effects of the finite volume under control. At light pion masses, a precise control of the continuum extrapolation is therefore difficult, but certainly a main goal of future simulations. To reach this goal, algorithmic developments as well as faster hardware will be needed.

  15. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D. E.; Jiang, L.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kimble, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated ‘impurity’ atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a ‘strong coupling’ regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a single cavity quantum. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  16. The effects of degeneracy of the carrier ensemble on the energy loss rate and the high field mobility characteristics under the conditions of low lattice temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, A.; Das, B.; Middya, T.R.; Bhattacharya, D.P.

    2017-01-01

    The rate of loss of energy of the non-equilibrium electrons to the acoustic mode lattice vibration in a degenerate semiconductor is obtained under the condition, when the lattice temperature is low enough, so that the traditional approximations like the elastic nature of the electron-phonon collisions and the truncation of the phonon distribution to the equipartition law are not valid any more. Using the results of the energy loss rate, the non-ohmic mobility is then calculated. Evaluating the loss rate and the non-ohmic mobility in degenerate samples of Si and Ge we find that significant changes in both the characteristics have been effected compared to that in the non-degenerate samples, in the regime of lower energy and for relatively lower fields. The effected changes are more significant the lower the lattice temperature is.

  17. Topological Control on the Structural Relaxation of Atomic Networks under Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchy, Mathieu; Wang, Mengyi; Yu, Yingtian; Wang, Bu; Krishnan, N. M. Anoop; Masoero, Enrico; Ulm, Franz-Joseph; Pellenq, Roland

    2017-07-01

    Upon loading, atomic networks can feature delayed irreversible relaxation. However, the effect of composition and structure on relaxation remains poorly understood. Herein, relying on accelerated molecular dynamics simulations and topological constraint theory, we investigate the relationship between atomic topology and stress-induced structural relaxation, by taking the example of creep deformations in calcium silicate hydrates (C - S - H ), the binding phase of concrete. Under constant shear stress, C - S - H is found to feature delayed logarithmic shear deformations. We demonstrate that the propensity for relaxation is minimum for isostatic atomic networks, which are characterized by the simultaneous absence of floppy internal modes of relaxation and eigenstress. This suggests that topological nanoengineering could lead to the discovery of nonaging materials.

  18. Shaken Lattice Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2015-05-01

    This work introduces a method to perform interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Starting at t = 0 with atoms in the ground state of a lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , we show that it is possible to transform from one atomic wavefunction to another by a prescribed shaking of the lattice, i.e., by an appropriately tailored time-dependent phase shift ϕ(t) . In particular, the standard interferometer sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination can be achieved via a set of phase modulation operations {ϕj(t) } . Each ϕj(t) is determined using a learning algorithm, and the split-step method calculates the wavefunction dynamics. We have numerically demonstrated an interferometer in which the shaken wavefunctions match the target states to better than 1 % . We carried out learning using a genetic algorithm and optimal control techniques. The atoms remain trapped in the lattice throughout the full interferometer sequence. Thus, the approach may be suitable for use in an dynamic environment. In addition to the general principles, we discuss aspects of the experimental implementation. Supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Northrop Grumman.

  19. Licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Act in comparison to those under the Federal Pollution Control Act. [Federal Republic of Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herkommer, E.; Wolleschlaeger, M.

    1981-07-01

    Since there is the possibility in uranium enrichment plants of major quantities of gaseous fluorine compounds being released, it is necessary in the Federal Republic of Germany to consider for such plants not only a permit under the Atomic Energy Act, but also a permit under the Federal Pollution Control Act. Under Sec. 8, Subsec. 2, such permit is included in the permit under the Atomic Energy Act, but the licensing authority under the Atomic Energy Act must take its decision in agreement with the state authority responsible for pollution control.

  20. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of Te-doped Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} under visible light irradiation: Effective separation of photogenerated carriers resulted from inhomogeneous lattice distortion and improved electron capturing ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shuguang, E-mail: csustcsg@yahoo.com; Li, Yuhan; Wu, Zixu; Wu, Baoxin; Li, Haibin; Li, Fujin

    2017-05-15

    Te-doped Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} photocatalyst was hydrothermally synthesized, and nonmetal atoms Te were homogeneously incorporated into Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} lattice with the substitution of Te{sup 4+} to Mo{sup 6+}. With increasing Te-doping concentration in Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}, no detectable band-gap narrowing but more and more severe inhomogeneous lattice distortions were determined. The activity of Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} photocatalyst was evaluated through methylene blue degradation under visible light irradiation (λ>410 nm) and was greatly enhanced by Te-doping. When Te-doped Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} was synthesized at Te/Mo molar ratio of 7.5%, a maximum first-order rate constant of methylene blue degradation was obtained. The inhomogeneous lattice distortion generated an internal dipole moment, and the holes generated with the substitution of Te{sup 4+} to Mo{sup 6+} acted as the capturing centers of photogenerated electrons, thus the effective separation of photogenerated carriers was facilitated to result in a relatively high concentration of holes on the surface of Te-doped Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} to be favorable for the efficient methylene blue degradation. - Graphical abstract: With the substitution of Te{sup 4+} to Mo{sup 6+}, effective separation of photogenerated carriers resulted from inhomogeneous lattice distortion and improved electron capturing ability is achieved to be responsible for enhanced photocatalytic activity of Te-doped Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}. - Highlights: • Nonmetal Te is incorporated into Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} with the substitution of Te{sup 4+} to Mo{sup 6+}. • Revealing inhomogeneous lattice distortion and improved electron capturing ability. • Effective separation of photogenerated carriers in Te-doped Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} is achieved. • The mechanism of methylene blue degradation over Te-doped Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} is proposed.

  1. Conical diffraction in honeycomb lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablowitz, Mark J.; Nixon, Sean D.; Zhu Yi

    2009-01-01

    Conical diffraction in honeycomb lattices is analyzed. This phenomenon arises in nonlinear Schroedinger equations with honeycomb lattice potentials. In the tight-binding approximation the wave envelope is governed by a nonlinear classical Dirac equation. Numerical simulations show that the Dirac equation and the lattice equation have the same conical diffraction properties. Similar conical diffraction occurs in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. The Dirac system reveals the underlying mechanism for the existence of conical diffraction in honeycomb lattices.

  2. Lattice sums then and now

    CERN Document Server

    Borwein, J M; McPhedran, R C

    2013-01-01

    The study of lattice sums began when early investigators wanted to go from mechanical properties of crystals to the properties of the atoms and ions from which they were built (the literature of Madelung's constant). A parallel literature was built around the optical properties of regular lattices of atoms (initiated by Lord Rayleigh, Lorentz and Lorenz). For over a century many famous scientists and mathematicians have delved into the properties of lattices, sometimes unwittingly duplicating the work of their predecessors. Here, at last, is a comprehensive overview of the substantial body of

  3. On rings generating supernilpotent and special atoms | France ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We study prime rings which generate supernilpotent (respectively special) atoms, that is, atoms of the lattice of all supernilpotent (respectively special) radicals. A prime ring A is called a **-ring if the smallest special class containing A is closed under semiprime homomorphic images of A. A semiprime ring A whose every ...

  4. A Molecular Dynamics of Cold Neutral Atoms Captured by Carbon Nanotube Under Electric Field and Thermal Effect as a Selective Atoms Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elson C; Neto, Abel F G; Maneschy, Carlos E; Chen, James; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Neto, A M J C

    2015-05-01

    Here we analyzed several physical behaviors through computational simulation of systems consisting of a zig-zag type carbon nanotube and relaxed cold atoms (Rb, Au, Si and Ar). These atoms were chosen due to their different chemical properties. The atoms individually were relaxed on the outside of the nanotube during the simulations. Each system was found under the influence of a uniform electric field parallel to the carbon nanotube and under the thermal effect of the initial temperature at the simulations. Because of the electric field, the cold atoms orbited the carbon nanotube while increasing the initial temperature allowed the variation of the radius of the orbiting atoms. We calculated the following quantities: kinetic energy, potential energy and total energy and in situ temperature, molar entropy variation and average radius of the orbit of the atoms. Our data suggest that only the action of electric field is enough to generate the attractive potential and this system could be used as a selected atoms sensor.

  5. Hofstadter butterfly evolution in the space of two-dimensional Bravais lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, F.; Oktel, M. Ö.

    2017-06-01

    The self-similar energy spectrum of a particle in a periodic potential under a magnetic field, known as the Hofstadter butterfly, is determined by the lattice geometry as well as the external field. Recent realizations of artificial gauge fields and adjustable optical lattices in cold-atom experiments necessitate the consideration of these self-similar spectra for the most general two-dimensional lattice. In a previous work [F. Yılmaz et al., Phys. Rev. A 91, 063628 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.063628], we investigated the evolution of the spectrum for an experimentally realized lattice which was tuned by changing the unit-cell structure but keeping the square Bravais lattice fixed. We now consider all possible Bravais lattices in two dimensions and investigate the structure of the Hofstadter butterfly as the lattice is deformed between lattices with different point-symmetry groups. We model the optical lattice with a sinusoidal real-space potential and obtain the tight-binding model for any lattice geometry by calculating the Wannier functions. We introduce the magnetic field via Peierls substitution and numerically calculate the energy spectrum. The transition between the two most symmetric lattices, i.e., the triangular and the square lattices, displays the importance of bipartite symmetry featuring deformation as well as closing of some of the major energy gaps. The transitions from the square to rectangular lattice and from the triangular to centered rectangular lattices are analyzed in terms of coupling of one-dimensional chains. We calculate the Chern numbers of the major gaps and Chern number transfer between bands during the transitions. We use gap Chern numbers to identify distinct topological regions in the space of Bravais lattices.

  6. Cold collisions in dissipative optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piilo, J; Suominen, K-A

    2005-01-01

    The invention of laser cooling methods for neutral atoms allows optical and magnetic trapping of cold atomic clouds in the temperature regime below 1 mK. In the past, light-assisted cold collisions between laser cooled atoms have been widely studied in magneto-optical atom traps (MOTs). We describe here theoretical studies of dynamical interactions, specifically cold collisions, between atoms trapped in near-resonant, dissipative optical lattices. The extension of collision studies to the regime of optical lattices introduces several complicating factors. For the lattice studies, one has to account for the internal substates of atoms, position-dependent matter-light coupling, and position-dependent couplings between the atoms, in addition to the spontaneous decay of electronically excited atomic states. The developed one-dimensional quantum-mechanical model combines atomic cooling and collision dynamics in a single framework. The model is based on Monte Carlo wavefunction simulations and is applied when the lattice-creating lasers have frequencies both below (red-detuned lattice) and above (blue-detuned lattice) the atomic resonance frequency. It turns out that the radiative heating mechanism affects the dynamics of atomic cloud in a red-detuned lattice in a way that is not directly expected from the MOT studies. The optical lattice and position-dependent light-matter coupling introduces selectivity of collision partners. The atoms which are most mobile and energetic are strongly favoured to participate in collisions, and are more often ejected from the lattice, than the slow ones in the laser parameter region selected for study. Consequently, the atoms remaining in the lattice have a smaller average kinetic energy per atom than in the case of non-interacting atoms. For blue-detuned lattices, we study how optical shielding emerges as a natural part of the lattice and look for ways to optimize the effect. We find that the cooling and shielding dynamics do not mix

  7. Spin dynamics of an individual Cr atom in a semiconductor quantum dot under optical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A. [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, 305-8573 Tsukuba (Japan); Utsumi, H.; Kuroda, S. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, 305-8573 Tsukuba (Japan); Boukari, H.; Besombes, L., E-mail: lucien.besombes@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-08-01

    We studied the spin dynamics of a Cr atom incorporated in a II-VI semiconductor quantum dot using photon correlation techniques. We used recently developed singly Cr-doped CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots to access the spin of an individual magnetic atom. Auto-correlation of the photons emitted by the quantum dot under continuous wave optical excitation reveals fluctuations of the localized spin with a timescale in the 10 ns range. Cross-correlation gives quantitative transfer time between Cr spin states. A calculation of the time dependence of the spin levels population in Cr-doped quantum dots shows that the observed spin dynamics is dominated by the exciton-Cr interaction. These measurements also provide a lower bound in the 20 ns range for the intrinsic Cr spin relaxation time.

  8. Lattice vibrations in α-boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, W.

    1976-01-01

    α-rhombohedral boron is the simplest boron modification, with only 12 atoms per unit cell. The boron atoms are arranged in B 12 icosahedra, which are centered at the lattice points of a primitive rhombohedral lattice. The icosahedra are slightly deformed, as the five-fold symmetry of the ideal icosahedron is incompatible with any crystal structure. The lattice dynamics of α-boron are discussed in terms of the model developed by Weber and Thorpe. (Auth.)

  9. Void lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderton, L.T.; Johnson, E.; Wohlenberg, T.

    1976-01-01

    Void lattices in metals apparently owe their stability to elastically anisotropic interactions. An ordered array of voids on the anion sublattice in fluorite does not fit so neatly into this scheme of things. Crowdions may play a part in the formation of the void lattice, and stability may derive from other sources. (Auth.)

  10. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  11. Numerical atomic scale simulations of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, E.

    2006-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a model of point defect (vacancies and interstitials) diffusion whose aim is to simulate by kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters observed experimentally in irradiated FeCuNiMnSi model alloys and in pressure vessel steels. Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between point defects and the different solute atoms. Each of these solute atoms establishes an attractive bond with the vacancy. As for Mn, which is the element which has the weakest bond with the vacancy, it establishes more favourable bonds with interstitials. Binding energies, migration energies as well as other atomic scale properties, determined by ab initio calculations, have led to a parameter set for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimised on thermal ageing experiments realised on the FeCu binary alloy and on complex alloys, described in the literature. The vacancy diffusion thermal annealing simulations show that when a vacancy is available, all the solutes migrate and form clusters, in agreement with the observed experimental tendencies. Secondly, to simulate the microstructural evolution under irradiation, we have introduced interstitials in the KMC code. Their presence leads to a more efficient transport of Mn. The first simulations of electron and neutron irradiations show that the model results are globally qualitatively coherent with the experimentally observed tendencies. (author)

  12. Single-atom-resolved fluorescence imaging of an atomic Mott insulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob; Weitenberg, Christof; Andres, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    in situ images of a quantum fluid in which each underlying quantum particle is detected. Here we report fluorescence imaging of strongly interacting bosonic Mott insulators in an optical lattice with single-atom and single-site resolution. From our images, we fully reconstruct the atom distribution...... the high-entropy rings separating them, even though their width is of the order of just a single lattice site. Furthermore, we show how a Mott insulator melts with increasing temperature, owing to a proliferation of local defects. The ability to resolve individual lattice sites directly opens up new...... avenues for the manipulation, analysis and applications of strongly interacting quantum gases on a lattice. For example, one could introduce local perturbations or access regions of high entropy, a crucial requirement for the implementation of novel cooling schemes 3 ....

  13. Energy spectra of primary knock-on atoms under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, M.R.; Marian, J.; Sublet, J.-Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Materials subjected to neutron irradiation will suffer from a build-up of damage caused by the displacement cascades initiated by nuclear reactions. Previously, the main “measure” of this damage accumulation has been through the displacements per atom (dpa) index, which has known limitations. This paper describes a rigorous methodology to calculate the primary atomic recoil events (often called the primary knock-on atoms or PKAs) that lead to cascade damage events as a function of energy and recoiling species. A new processing code SPECTRA-PKA combines a neutron irradiation spectrum with nuclear recoil data obtained from the latest nuclear data libraries to produce PKA spectra for any material composition. Via examples of fusion relevant materials, it is shown that these PKA spectra can be complex, involving many different recoiling species, potentially differing in both proton and neutron number from the original target nuclei, including high energy recoils of light emitted particles such as α-particles and protons. The variations in PKA spectra as a function of time, neutron field, and material are explored. The application of PKA spectra to the quantification of radiation damage is exemplified using two approaches: the binary collision approximation and stochastic cluster dynamics, and the results from these different models are discussed and compared. - Highlights: • Recoil cross-section matrices under neutron irradiation are generated. • Primary knock-on atoms (PKA) spectra are calculated for fusion relevant materials. • Variation in PKA spectra due to changes in geometry are considered. • Inventory simulations to consider time-evolution in PKA spectra. • Damage quantification using damage functions from different approximations.

  14. Lattice dynamical calculations for bcc caesium chloride | Taura ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a lattice dynamical calculation of Caesium Chloride (CsCl) whose atoms form a bcc lattice having one type of atom at the cube centre and the other type on the corners of the cube. Dispersion curves, density of state, and lattice specific heat of bcc Caesium Chloride were computed. The code used in the ...

  15. Lattice strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorn, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of studying non-perturbative effects in string theory using a world sheet lattice is discussed. The light-cone lattice string model of Giles and Thorn is studied numerically to assess the accuracy of ''coarse lattice'' approximations. For free strings a 5 by 15 lattice seems sufficient to obtain better than 10% accuracy for the bosonic string tachyon mass squared. In addition a crude lattice model simulating string like interactions is studied to find out how easily a coarse lattice calculation can pick out effects such as bound states which would qualitatively alter the spectrum of the free theory. The role of the critical dimension in obtaining a finite continuum limit is discussed. Instead of the ''gaussian'' lattice model one could use one of the vertex models, whose continuum limit is the same as a gaussian model on a torus of any radius. Indeed, any critical 2 dimensional statistical system will have a stringy continuum limit in the absence of string interactions. 8 refs., 1 fig. , 9 tabs

  16. Temperature dependence of electron spin-lattice relaxation of radiation-produced silver atoms in polycrystalline aqueous and glassy organic matrices. Importance of relaxation by tunneling modes in disordered matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Kevan, L.

    1978-01-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation of trapped silver atoms in polycrystalline ice matrices and in methanol, ethanol, propylene carbonate, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran organic glasses has been directly studied as a function of temperature by the saturation-recovery method. Below 40 K the dominant electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanism involves modulation of the electron nuclear dipolar interaction with nuclei in the radical's environment by tunneling of those nuclei between two nearly equal energy configurations. This relaxation mechanism occurs with high efficiency, has a characteristic linear temperature dependence, and is typically found in highly disordered matrices. The efficiency of this relaxation mechanism seems to decrease with decreasing polarity of the matrix. Deuteration experiments show that the tunneling nuclei are protons and in methanol it is shown that the methyl protons have more tunneling modes available than the hydroxyl protons. In polycrystalline ice matrices silver atoms can be stabilized with two different orientations of surrounding water molecules; the efficiency of the tunneling relaxation reflects this difference. From these and previous results on tunneling relaxation of trapped electrons in glassy matrices it appears that tunneling relaxation may be used to distinguish models with different geometrical configurations and to determine the relative rigidity of such configurations around trapped radicals in disordered solids. (author)

  17. Part-construction licenses and preliminary licenses issued within the licensing procedure under atomic energy law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmann, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    The author elaborates a delimitation in terms of law of various licenses available under atomic energy law within the licensing procedure for nuclear installations, such as the part-construction license, preliminary license and preliminary approval of the overall concept, preliminary conceptual approval and conceptual license, preliminary conceptual approval subject to subsequent examinations and decisions, preliminary site ruling and site approval, advance permits and subsequent partial licenses. Such a delimitation becomes particularly significant in case of the plant conceptual design or the site being the subject under review, and the definitions stated also have considerable impact on administrative court proceedings. In this review the author tries to bear in mind the various interests of all parties involved in the licensing procedure. (HSCH) [de

  18. Formation mechanism of Ti3SiC2 from a TiC lattice: An electron microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chien-Chong; Huang, Tsung-Yen; Wu, Hong-Ze

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Titanium silicon carbide (Ti 3 SiC 2 , TSC) crystals with terraced morphology were prepared. ► FESEM shows the TSC plate was formed by the precipitation and nucleation from melt. ► HRTEM shows the coexisting of TSC, TiC, twined TiC, and other intermediate stacking patterns. ► Formation mechanism based on atom substitution and relocation was proposed. - Abstract: Titanium silicon carbide (Ti 3 SiC 2 , TSC) crystals with terraced morphology were prepared by heating a powder mixture consisting of Ti, Ti 5 Si 3 and carbon nanotube (CNT). A sample containing an under-grown TSC crystal was analyzed by the HRTEM, showing various stacking patterns coexisted, including TSC, TiC, twined TiC, other intermediate stacking patterns, etc. A formation mechanism is proposed for the formation of TSC from a TiC lattice. The essential of the formation mechanism contains two steps: atom substitution and atom relocation. Atom substitution includes formation of carbon vacancy and insertion of Si atoms into the TiC lattice, and atom relocation involves position adjustments of C, Si and Ti atoms triggered by the atom substitution. It is illustrated that several atom substitutions and relocations on a starting TSC lattice result in a lattice pattern similar to the lattice observed in the HRTEM images. Lattice spacing values on the HRTEM images were also measured and analyzed, where the reduction of the standard deviation of the lattice spacing along a spatial direction confirmed the crystal growth path from the starting TiC to the product TSC.

  19. Thermal characterization of nanoscale phononic crystals using supercell lattice dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce L. Davis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a phononic crystal can in principle be realized at the nanoscale whenever the conditions for coherent phonon transport exist. Under such conditions, the dispersion characteristics of both the constitutive material lattice (defined by a primitive cell and the phononic crystal lattice (defined by a supercell contribute to the value of the thermal conductivity. It is therefore necessary in this emerging class of phononic materials to treat the lattice dynamics at both periodicity levels. Here we demonstrate the utility of using supercell lattice dynamics to investigate the thermal transport behavior of three-dimensional nanoscale phononic crystals formed from silicon and cubic voids of vacuum. The periodicity of the voids follows a simple cubic arrangement with a lattice constant that is around an order of magnitude larger than that of the bulk crystalline silicon primitive cell. We consider an atomic-scale supercell which incorporates all the details of the silicon atomic locations and the void geometry. For this supercell, we compute the phonon band structure and subsequently predict the thermal conductivity following the Callaway-Holland model. Our findings dictate that for an analysis based on supercell lattice dynamics to be representative of the properties of the underlying lattice model, a minimum supercell size is needed along with a minimum wave vector sampling resolution. Below these minimum values, a thermal conductivity prediction of a bulk material based on a supercell will not adequately recover the value obtained based on a primitive cell. Furthermore, our results show that for the relatively small voids and void spacings we consider (where boundary scattering is dominant, dispersion at the phononic crystal unit cell level plays a noticeable role in determining the thermal conductivity.

  20. Coherent scattering of an atom in the field of a standing wave under conditions of initial quantum correlation of subsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trubilko, A. I., E-mail: trubilko.andrey@gmail.com [St. Petersburg University of State Fire Service of the Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    Coherent scattering of a two-level atom in the field of a quantized standing wave of a micromaser is considered under conditions of initial quantum correlation between the atom and the field. Such a correlation can be produced by a broadband parametric source. The interaction leading to scattering of the atom from the nonuniform field occurs in the dispersion limit or in the wing of the absorption line of the atom. Apart from the quantized field, the atom simultaneously interacts with two classical counterpropagating waves with different frequencies, which are acting in the plane perpendicular to the atom’s propagation velocity and to the wavevector of the standing wave. Joint action of the quantized field and two classical waves induces effective two-photon and Raman resonance interaction on the working transition. The effective Hamiltonian of the interaction is derived using the unitary transformation method developed for a moving atom. A strong effect is detected, which makes it possible to distinguish the correlated initial state of the atom and the field in the scattering of atom from the state of independent systems. For all three waves, scattering is not observed when systems with quantum correlation are prepared using a high-intensity parametric source. Conversely, when the atom interacts only with the nonuniform field of the standing wave, scattering is not observed in the case of the initial factorized state.

  1. Mass loss of shuttle space suit orthofabric under simulated ionospheric atomic oxygen bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Many polymeric materials used for thermal protection and insulation on spacecraft degrade significantly under prolonged bombardment by ionospheric atomic oxygen. The covering fabric of the multilayered shuttle space suit is composed of a loose weave of GORE-TEX fibers, Nomex and Kevlar-29, which are all polymeric materials. The complete evaluation of suit fabric degradation from ionospheric atomic oxygen is of importance in reevaluating suit lifetime and inspection procedures. The mass loss and visible physical changes of each test sample was determined. Kapton control samples and data from previous asher and flight tests were used to scale the results to reflect ionospheric conditions at about 220 km altitude. It is predicted that the orthofabric loses mass in the ionosphere at a rate of about 66% of the original orthofabric mass/yr. The outer layer of the two-layer orthofabric test samples shows few easily visible signs of degradation, even when observed at 440X. It is concluded that the orthofabric could suffer significant loss of performance after much less than a year of total exposure time, while the degradation might be undetectable in post flight visual examinations of space suits.

  2. Stress distribution and lattice distortions in Nb3Sn multifilament wires under uniaxial tensile loading at 4.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuerlein, C; Flükiger, R; Kadar, J; Bordini, B; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L; Di Michiel, M; Buta, F; Seeber, B; Senatore, C; Siegrist, T; Besara, T

    2014-01-01

    The lattice parameter changes in three types of Nb 3 Sn superconducting wires during uniaxial stress–strain measurements at 4.2 K have been measured by high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The nearly-stress-free Nb 3 Sn lattice parameter has been determined using extracted filaments, and the elastic strain in the axial and transverse wire directions in the different wire phases has been calculated. The mechanical properties of the PIT and RRP wire are mainly determined by the properties of Nb 3 Sn and unreacted Nb. This is in contrast to the bronze route wire, where the matrix can carry substantial loads. In straight wires the axial Nb 3 Sn pre-strain is strongest in the bronze route wire, its value being smaller in the PIT and RRP wires. A strong reduction of the non-Cu elastic modulus of about 30% is observed during cool-down from ambient temperature to 4.2 K. The Nb 3 Sn Poisson ratio at 4.2 K measured in the untwisted bronze route wire is 0.35. The present study also shows that the process route has a strong influence on the Nb 3 Sn texture. (paper)

  3. Atomic structure of Pt nanoclusters supported by graphene/Ir(111) and reversible transformation under CO exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Dirk; Blanc, Nils; Coraux, Johann; Renaud, Gilles; Runte, Sven; Gerber, Timm; Busse, Carsten; Michely, Thomas; Feibelman, Peter J.; Hejral, Uta; Stierle, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the atomic structure of graphene/Ir(111) supported platinum clusters with on average fewer than 40 atoms by means of surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD), grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS), and normal incidence x-ray standing waves (NIXSW) measurements, in comparison with density functional theory calculations (DFT). GISAXS revealed that the clusters with 1.3 nm diameter form a regular array with domain sizes of 90 nm. SXRD shows that the 1-2 monolayer high, (111) oriented Pt nanoparticles grow epitaxially on the graphene support. From the combined analysis of the SXRD and NIXSW data, a three-dimensional (3D) structural model of the clusters and the graphene support can be deduced which is in line with the DFT results. For the clusters grown in ultrahigh vacuum the lattice parameter is reduced by (4.6 ±0.1 )% compared to bulk platinum. The graphene layer undergoes a strong Pt adsorption induced buckling, caused by a rehybridization of the carbon atoms below the cluster. In situ observation of the Pt clusters in CO and O2 environments revealed a reversible change of the clusters' strain state while successively dosing CO at room temperature and O2 at 575 K, pointing to a CO oxidation activity of the Pt clusters.

  4. Exact Lattice Supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catterall, Simon; Kaplan, David B.; Unsal, Mithat

    2009-03-31

    We provide an introduction to recent lattice formulations of supersymmetric theories which are invariant under one or more real supersymmetries at nonzero lattice spacing. These include the especially interesting case of N = 4 SYM in four dimensions. We discuss approaches based both on twisted supersymmetry and orbifold-deconstruction techniques and show their equivalence in the case of gauge theories. The presence of an exact supersymmetry reduces and in some cases eliminates the need for fine tuning to achieve a continuum limit invariant under the full supersymmetry of the target theory. We discuss open problems.

  5. Lattice gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boghosian, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    In recent years an important class of cellular automata known as lattice gases have been successfully used to model a variety of physical systems, traditionally modeled by partial differential equations. The 2-D and 3-D Navier Stokes equations for single-phase and multiphase flow, Burgers' equation, and various types of diffusion equations are all examples. The first section of this chapter is meant to be a survey of the different ideas and techniques used in this simulations. In the second section, using lattice gases for the diffusion equation and for Burgers' equation as examples, the discrete Chapman-Enskog method is demonstrated. Beginning with rules governing particle motion on a lattice, the lattice Boltzmann equation is derived, and the Chapman-Enskog method is used to derive hydrodynamical equations for the conserved quantities. The approximations used at each step are discussed in detail. The intent is to provide an introduction to the Chapman-Enskog analysis for simple lattice gases in order to prepare the reader to better understand that for the (generally more complicated) models proposed for the simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. 29 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Ab initio LCAO study of the atomic, electronic and magnetic structures and the lattice dynamics of triclinic CuWO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmin, A.; Kalinko, A.; Evarestov, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    The electronic, structural and phonon properties of antiferromagnetic triclinic CuWO 4 have been studied using the first-principles spin-polarized linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) calculations based on the hybrid exchange–correlation density functional (DFT)/Hartree–Fock (HF) scheme. In addition, the local atomic structure around both Cu and W atoms has been probed using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We show that, by using the hybrid DFT–HF functional, one can accurately and simultaneously describe the atomic structure (the unit cell parameters and the atomic fractional coordinates), the band gap and the phonon frequencies. In agreement with our EXAFS results, the LCAO calculations reproduce a strong distortion of both the CuO 6 and the WO 6 octahedra, which occur due to the first-order and second-order Jahn–Teller effects, respectively. We found that the HF admixture of 13–16%, which is implemented in the PBE0–13% and WCGGA–PBE-16% functionals, produces the best result for CuWO 4 . The calculated properties agree well with the available experimental data provided by diffraction, optical, X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies.

  7. Lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Modern lattice gauge theory calculations are making it possible for lattice QCD to play an increasingly important role in the quantitative investigation of the Standard Model. The fact that QCD is strongly coupled at large distances has required the development of nonperturbative methods and large-scale computer simulations to solve the theory. The development of successful numerical methods for QCD calculations puts us in a good position to be ready for the possible discovery of new strongly coupled forces beyond the Standard Model in the era of the Large Hadron Collider. (author)

  8. Operator lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The finite-element method enables us to convert the operator differential equations of a quantum field theory into operator difference equations. These difference equations are consistent with the requirements of quantum mechanics and they do not exhibit fermion doubling, a problem that frequently plagues lattice treatments of fermions. Guage invariance can also be incorporated into the difference equations. On a finite lattice the operator difference equations can be solved in closed form. For the case of the Schwinger model the anomaly is computed and results in excellent agreement are obtained with the known continuum value

  9. Lattice topology dictates photon statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakci, H Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F; Saleh, Bahaa E A

    2017-08-21

    Propagation of coherent light through a disordered network is accompanied by randomization and possible conversion into thermal light. Here, we show that network topology plays a decisive role in determining the statistics of the emerging field if the underlying lattice is endowed with chiral symmetry. In such lattices, eigenmode pairs come in skew-symmetric pairs with oppositely signed eigenvalues. By examining one-dimensional arrays of randomly coupled waveguides arranged on linear and ring topologies, we are led to a remarkable prediction: the field circularity and the photon statistics in ring lattices are dictated by its parity while the same quantities are insensitive to the parity of a linear lattice. For a ring lattice, adding or subtracting a single lattice site can switch the photon statistics from super-thermal to sub-thermal, or vice versa. This behavior is understood by examining the real and imaginary fields on a lattice exhibiting chiral symmetry, which form two strands that interleave along the lattice sites. These strands can be fully braided around an even-sited ring lattice thereby producing super-thermal photon statistics, while an odd-sited lattice is incommensurate with such an arrangement and the statistics become sub-thermal.

  10. Atomic-resolution neutron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cser, L.; Toeroek, Gy.; Krexner, G.

    2001-01-01

    Atomic-resolution neutron holography can be realised by two different schemes. In the frame of the first approach a point-like source of slow neutrons is produced inside the investigated crystal. Due to the extremely large value of the incoherent-scattering cross-section of the proton, hydrogen atoms imbedded in a metal single-crystal lattice may serve as point-like sources when the sample is irradiated by a monochromatic beam of slow neutrons. The second approach utilizes the registration of the interference between the incident and scattered waves by means of a point-like detector inserted in the lattice of the crystal under investigation. In addition, neutron-induced electron holography is considered. The feasibility of these ideas is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Atomic and electronic structure transformations of silver nanoparticles under rapid cooling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, I.; Rojas, J.; Landauro, C. V.; Torres, J.

    2009-02-01

    The structural evolution and dynamics of silver nanodrops Ag2869 (4.4 nm in diameter) under rapid cooling conditions have been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and electronic density of state calculations. The interaction of silver atoms is modelled by a tight-binding semiempirical interatomic potential proposed by Cleri and Rosato. The pair correlation functions and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural transition in the process of solidification. It is shown that Ag nanoparticles evolve into different nanostructures under different cooling processes. At a cooling rate of 1.5625 × 1013 K s-1 the nanoparticles preserve an amorphous-like structure containing a large amount of 1551 and 1541 pairs which correspond to icosahedral symmetry. For a lower cooling rate (1.5625 × 1012 K s-1), the nanoparticles transform into a crystal-like structure consisting mainly of 1421 and 1422 pairs which correspond to the face centred cubic and hexagonal close packed structures, respectively. The variations of the electronic density of states for the differently cooled nanoparticles are small, but in correspondence with the structural changes.

  12. Atomic and electronic structure transformations of silver nanoparticles under rapid cooling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobato, I; Rojas, J; Landauro, C V; Torres, J

    2009-01-01

    The structural evolution and dynamics of silver nanodrops Ag 2869 (4.4 nm in diameter) under rapid cooling conditions have been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and electronic density of state calculations. The interaction of silver atoms is modelled by a tight-binding semiempirical interatomic potential proposed by Cleri and Rosato. The pair correlation functions and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural transition in the process of solidification. It is shown that Ag nanoparticles evolve into different nanostructures under different cooling processes. At a cooling rate of 1.5625 x 10 13 K s -1 the nanoparticles preserve an amorphous-like structure containing a large amount of 1551 and 1541 pairs which correspond to icosahedral symmetry. For a lower cooling rate (1.5625 x 10 12 K s -1 ), the nanoparticles transform into a crystal-like structure consisting mainly of 1421 and 1422 pairs which correspond to the face centred cubic and hexagonal close packed structures, respectively. The variations of the electronic density of states for the differently cooled nanoparticles are small, but in correspondence with the structural changes.

  13. Atomic and electronic structure transformations of silver nanoparticles under rapid cooling conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, I; Rojas, J [Instituto Peruano de EnergIa Nuclear, Avenida Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Landauro, C V; Torres, J [Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, P.O. box 14-0149, Lima 14 (Peru)], E-mail: jrojast@unmsm.edu.pe

    2009-02-04

    The structural evolution and dynamics of silver nanodrops Ag{sub 2869} (4.4 nm in diameter) under rapid cooling conditions have been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and electronic density of state calculations. The interaction of silver atoms is modelled by a tight-binding semiempirical interatomic potential proposed by Cleri and Rosato. The pair correlation functions and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural transition in the process of solidification. It is shown that Ag nanoparticles evolve into different nanostructures under different cooling processes. At a cooling rate of 1.5625 x 10{sup 13} K s{sup -1} the nanoparticles preserve an amorphous-like structure containing a large amount of 1551 and 1541 pairs which correspond to icosahedral symmetry. For a lower cooling rate (1.5625 x 10{sup 12} K s{sup -1}), the nanoparticles transform into a crystal-like structure consisting mainly of 1421 and 1422 pairs which correspond to the face centred cubic and hexagonal close packed structures, respectively. The variations of the electronic density of states for the differently cooled nanoparticles are small, but in correspondence with the structural changes.

  14. Bosons on the Kagome lattice with artificial gauge fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Alexandru; Girvin, S. M.; Le Hur, Karyn

    2013-03-01

    We investigate bosons on the Kagome lattice subject to artificial gauge fields such that no net flux is applied on a unit cell. This allows for example the existence of quantized and non-quantized anomalous Hall effects on the Kagome lattice. If two layers or two-component bosons are introduced, the topological phase is robust to inter-species interactions of moderate strength. We study the conditions under which the total density degree of freedom undergoes a Mott transition, while the pseudo-spin, or charge difference between layers, is in a superfluid phase with topological properties. Similar results can be obtained for two-component bosons on the honeycomb lattice. Such systems could work as a template for the realization of interacting topological phases in cold atom or cavity QED systems.

  15. Compactly Generated de Morgan Lattices, Basic Algebras and Effect Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paseka, Jan; Riečanová, Zdenka

    2010-12-01

    We prove that a de Morgan lattice is compactly generated if and only if its order topology is compatible with a uniformity on L generated by some separating function family on L. Moreover, if L is complete then L is (o)-topological. Further, if a basic algebra L (hence lattice with sectional antitone involutions) is compactly generated then L is atomic. Thus all non-atomic Boolean algebras as well as non-atomic lattice effect algebras (including non-atomic MV-algebras and orthomodular lattices) are not compactly generated.

  16. The effect of thermal vibrations of lattice atoms on the scattering of low energetic ions (2-10keV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelsema, B.; Boers, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to the study of solid state surfaces by analyzing the scattering behavior of low energetic noble gas ions is given. Attention is paid to thermal vibrations of the surface atoms. The scattering of Ar and Kr ions on a Cu monocrystal is discussed as an example

  17. Artificial Atoms: from Quantum Physics to Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this workshop is to survey the most recent advances of technologies enabling single atom- and artificial atom-based devices. These include the assembly of artificial molecular structures with magnetic dipole and optical interactions between engineered atoms embedded in solid-state lattices. The ability to control single atoms in diamond or similar solids under ambient operating conditions opens new perspectives for technologies based on nanoelectronics and nanophotonics. The scope of the workshop is extended towards the physics of strong coupling between atoms and radiation field modes. Beyond the traditional atom-cavity systems, artificial dipoles coupled to microwave radiation in circuit quantum electrodynamics is considered. All these technologies mutually influence each other in developing novel devices for sensing at the quantum level and for quantum information processing.

  18. Abelian gauge potentials on cubic lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burrello, M.; Lepori, L.; Paganelli, S.

    2017-01-01

    fields in a system of ultracold atoms in optical lattices. After reviewing two of the main experimental schemes for the physical realization of synthetic gauge potentials in ultracold setups, we study cubic lattice tight-bindingmodels with commensurate flux.We finally discuss applications of gauge...

  19. An atomic beam source for fast loading of a magneto-optical trap under high vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, P.D.; Hilliard, Andrew; Grünzweig, T.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a directional atomic beam created using an alkali metal dispenser and a nozzle. By applying a high current (15 A) pulse to the dispenser at room temperature we can rapidly heat it to a temperature at which it starts dispensing, avoiding the need for preheating. The atomic beam produced...... is capable of loading 90 of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) in less than 7 s while maintaining a low vacuum pressure of 10 -11 Torr. The transverse velocity components of the atomic beam are measured to be within typical capture velocities of a rubidium MOT. Finally, we show that the atomic beam can be turned...

  20. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of phase separation under dynamic temperature and shear: Coupling effects of shear convection and thermal diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heping, Wang; Xingguo, Geng; Xiaoguang, Li; Duyang, Zang

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an exploration of the separation behavior and pattern formation in a shear binary fluid with dynamic temperature after slow cooling via coupled lattice Boltzmann method. The phase separation procedure can be divided into three different stages: spinodal decomposition, domain growth, and domain stretch. The effect of thermal diffusion was observed to be more significant than that of shear convection in the spinodal decomposition stage, while the opposite was observed in the domain growth stage. The slow cooling temperature field significantly prolonged the spinodal decomposition stage, and decreased the separated domain size in domain growth stage. The phase behavior and pattern formation from the disordered state into the coexistence state after slow cooling was investigated during the domain stretch stage. Two typical length scales were obtained according to the equilibrium of two phases, where the number of layers in the corresponding domains was controllable by adjusting the Prandtl number for systems of different scales. The manner in which various viscosities and thermal diffusivities influence the morphologies and kinetic characterizations of the materials was also demonstrated: numerical results indicated that decrease in viscosity can cause increase in the growth exponents of separation fronts and velocity of domain growth, as well as increase in thermal diffusion.

  1. Lattice dynamics of strontium tungstate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    earth atom). Using these models we could calculate [7,10–12] high pressure and temperature phase diagrams as well as thermodynamic properties for ASiO4, RPO4 and RVO4 in the ambient pressure as well as high pressure phases. Now in order to validate the lattice dynamical model developed for SrWO4 we have ...

  2. Lattice dynamics of lithium oxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India. E-mail: knp@apsara.barc.ernet.in ... stants and equation of state have also been calculated which are in good agreement with the available ... Li2O crystallizes in the anti-fluorite structure with a face-centered cubic lattice and belongs to ...

  3. Summary history of domestic uranium procurement under US Atomic Energy Commission contracts. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrethsen, H. Jr.; McGinley, F.E.

    1982-09-01

    During the period 1947 through 1970, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) fostered the rapid development and expansion of the domestic uranium mining and milling industry by providing a market for uranium. Some thirty-two mills were constructed during that period to produce U 3 O 8 concentrates for sale to the AEC. In addition, there were various pilot plants, concentrators, upgraders, heap leach, and solution mining facilities that operated during the period. The purpose of this report is to compile a short narrative history of the AEC's uranium concentrate procurement program and to describe briefly each of the operations that produced uranium for sale to the AEC. Contractual arrangements are described and data are given on quantities of U 3 O 8 purchased and prices paid. Similar data are included for V 2 O 5 , where applicable. Mill and other plant operating data were also compiled from old AEC records. These latter data were provided by the companies, as a contractual requirement, during the period of operation under AEC contracts. Additionally, an effort was made to determine the present status of each facility by reference to other recently published reports. No sites were visited nor were the individual reports reviewed by the companies, many of which no longer exist. The authors relied almost entirely on published information for descriptions of facilities and milling processes utilized

  4. Femtosecond quantum fluid dynamics of helium atom under an intense laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, B.K.

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive, nonperturbative, time-dependent quantum mechanical (TDQM) approach is proposed for studying the dynamics of a helium atom under an intense, ultrashort (femtoseconds) laser pulse. The method combines quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) and density functional theory. It solves a single generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation of motion (EOM), involving time and three space variables, which is obtained from two QFD equations, namely, a continuity equation and an Euler-type equation. A highly accurate finite difference scheme along with a stability analysis is presented for numerically solving the EOM. Starting from the ground-state Hartree-Fock density for He at t = 0, the EOM yields the time-dependent (TD) electron density, effective potential surface, difference density, difference effective potential, ground-state probability, left-angle r right-angle, magnetic susceptibility, polarizability, flux, etc. By a Fourier transformation of the TD dipole moment along the linearly polarized-field direction, the power and rate spectra for photoemission are calculated. eleven mechanistic routes for photoemission are identified, which include high harmonic generation as well as many other spectral transitions involving ionized, singly excited, doubly excited (autoionizing), and continuum He states, based on the evolution of the system up to a particular time. Intimate connections between photoionization and photoemission are clearly observed through computer visualizations. Apart from being consistent with current experimental and theoretical results, the present results offer certain predictions on spectral transitions which are open to experimental verification

  5. Experience of remote under water handling operations at Tarapur Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Each Refuelling outage of Tarapur Atomic Power Station Reactors involves a great deal of remote underwater handling operations using special remote handling tools, working deep down in the reactor vessel under about sixty feet of water and in the narrow confines of highly radioactive core. The remote underwater handling operations include incore and out of core sipping operations, fuel reloading or shuffling, uncoupling of control rod drives, replacement and shuffling of control blades, replacement of local power range monitors, spent fuel shipment in casks, retrieval of fallen or displaced fuel top guide spacers, orifices and their installation, underwater CCTV inspection of reactor internals, core verification, channelling and dechannelling of fuel bundles, inspection of fuel bundles and channels, unbolting and removal of old racks, installation of high density racks, removal and reinstallation of fuel support plugs and guide tubes, underwater cutting of irradiated hardware material and their disposal, fuel reconstitution, removal and reinstallation of system dryer separator etc.. The paper describes in brief the salient experience of remote underwater handling operations at TAPS especially the unusual problems faced and solved, by using special tools, employing specific techniques and by repeated efforts, patience, ingenuity and skills. (author). 10 figs

  6. Lattice Vibrations in Chlorobenzenes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, P. A.; Kjems, Jørgen; White, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lattice vibrational dispersion curves for the ``intermolecular'' modes in the triclinic, one molecule per unit cell β phase of p‐C6D4Cl2 and p‐C6H4Cl2 have been obtained by inelastic neutron scattering. The deuterated sample was investigated at 295 and at 90°K and a linear extrapolation to 0°K...... was applied in order to correct for anharmonic effects. Calculations based on the atom‐atom model for van der Waals' interaction and on general potential parameters for the aromatic compounds agree reasonably well with the experimental observations. There is no substantial improvement in fit obtained either...

  7. Protection of business and industrial secrets under the Atomic Energy Act and the relevant ordinances governing licensing and supervisory procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, R.

    1988-01-01

    The article deals with problems concerning the protection of secret information in licensing and supervisory procedures under the Atomic Energy Act and the relevant ordinances. The extent of the secret protection of business and industrial secrets is regulated differently for both procedures. These legal provisions have to be interpreted with due consideration for third party interests in information. (WG) [de

  8. Population inversion of two atoms under the phase decoherence in the multiphoton process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dongxia; Sa Chuerfu; Mu Qier

    2011-01-01

    By means of the quantum theory, the population inversion of two atoms in the system of two two-level atoms coupled to a light field in the Binomial Optical Field are investigated in the presence of phase decoherence in the multiphoton Tavis-Cumming Model. The influences of the phase decoherence coefficient, the parameters η of the binomial optical field, the maximum number of photons and the number of the transitional photons on the properties of the population inversion of two atoms have been discussed. The results show that the phase decoherence reduced the oscillation amplitude of the population inversion of two atoms and destroyed the atomic quantum characteristic. Changing the number of the transitional photons, evolved cycle and evolved intensity the population inversion of two atoms can be changed. The phenomena of collapse and revival disappear as photon number increase. When the binomial optical state changes from a coherent state to a Fock state, the oscillation frequency of the atomic population reduces gradually, the phenomena of collapse and revival vanishes gradually. (authors)

  9. Formation of Cu, Ag and Au nanofiims under the influence of hydrogen atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhavzharov E. L.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their electrical properties, thin metallic films are widely used in modern micro- and nanoelectronics. These properties allow solving fundamental problems of surface and solid state physics. Up-to-date methods of producing thin films involve high vacuum or multi-stage processes, which calls for complicated equipment. The authors propose an alternative method of producing thin metallic films using atomic hydrogen. Exothermal reaction of atoms recombination in a molecule (about 4.5 eV / recombination act initiated on the solid surface by atomic hydrogen may stimulate local heating, spraying and surface atoms transfer. We investigated the process of atomic hydrogen treatment of Cu, Ag and Au metal films, obtained by thermal vacuum evaporation. There are two methods of obtaining nanofilms using atomic hydrogen treatment: sputtering and vapor-phase epitaxy. In the first method, a film is formed by reducing the thickness of the starting film. This method allows obtaining a film as thick as the monolayer. In the second method, a nanofilm is formed by deposition of metal atoms from the vapor phase. This method allows obtaining a film thickness from monolayer to ~10 nm. These methods allow creating nanofilms with controlled parameters and metal thickness. Such films would be technologically pure and have good adhesion.

  10. THE NANOSTRUCTURE OF ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANES UNDER BLOOD INTOXICATION: AN ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sergunova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effects of toxins on nanostructure of blood cells are one of the key problems of biophysics and medicine. Erythrocyte morphology and membrane structure are recognized as the main parameters of blood quality. Therefore, analysis of membrane defects under toxin effects seems an urgent issue. Aim: To identify characteristic features and patterns of changes in membrane nanostructure under hemin intoxication and during extended storage of erythrocyte suspension. Materials and methods: The study was done in vitro in human whole blood with addition of hemin, аnd in erythrocyte suspension with a CPD blood preservative stored at 4 °С for 30 days. The nanostructure of erythrocyte membrane was assessed by atomic force microscopy. Results: Characteristic size of space periods between “granules” was from 120 to 200 nm. “Granule” numbers within a topological defect varied from 4 to 5 and to several dozens. Such domains arose virtually on all cells in erythrocyte suspension, as well as after hemin addition to the blood. An increase in hemin intoxication and an increase in a storage time were associated by increases in echinocyte numbers that subsequently transformed into spherical echinocytes. Both under hemin and during the storage of erythrocyte suspension for 9 to 12 days, a specific abnormality in nanostructure of erythrocyte membrane was observed: structural clusters, i.e., domains with granular structure, were formed. Conclusion: The experiments showed that both hemin and oxidative processes in the blood can specifically affect the nanostructure of erythrocyte membranes with formation of domains on their surface. The specific size of granular structures in the domains is from 100 to 200 nm that coincides with a  specific size of spectrin matrix. These results can be used in basic and applied medicine, in blood transfusion, for the analysis of a toxin effects in the human body. The biophysical mechanisms of domain

  11. Spin-orbital quantum liquid on the honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corboz, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    The symmetric Kugel-Khomskii can be seen as a minimal model describing the interactions between spin and orbital degrees of freedom in transition-metal oxides with orbital degeneracy, and it is equivalent to the SU(4) Heisenberg model of four-color fermionic atoms. We present simulation results for this model on various two-dimensional lattices obtained with infinite projected-entangled pair states (iPEPS), an efficient variational tensor-network ansatz for two dimensional wave functions in the thermodynamic limit. This approach can be seen as a two-dimensional generalization of matrix product states - the underlying ansatz of the density matrix renormalization group method. We find a rich variety of exotic phases: while on the square and checkerboard lattices the ground state exhibits dimer-Néel order and plaquette order, respectively, quantum fluctuations on the honeycomb lattice destroy any order, giving rise to a spin-orbital liquid. Our results are supported from flavor-wave theory and exact diagonalization. Furthermore, the properties of the spin-orbital liquid state on the honeycomb lattice are accurately accounted for by a projected variational wave-function based on the pi-flux state of fermions on the honeycomb lattice at 1/4-filling. In that state, correlations are algebraic because of the presence of a Dirac point at the Fermi level, suggesting that the ground state is an algebraic spin-orbital liquid. This model provides a good starting point to understand the recently discovered spin-orbital liquid behavior of Ba3CuSb2O9. The present results also suggest to choose optical lattices with honeycomb geometry in the search for quantum liquids in ultra-cold four-color fermionic atoms. We acknowledge the financial support from the Swiss National Science Foundation.

  12. Coherent collisional spin dynamics in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widera, Artur; Gerbier, Fabrice; Fölling, Simon; Gericke, Tatjana; Mandel, Olaf; Bloch, Immanuel

    2005-11-04

    We report on the observation of coherent, purely collisionally driven spin dynamics of neutral atoms in an optical lattice. For high lattice depths, atom pairs confined to the same lattice site show weakly damped Rabi-type oscillations between two-particle Zeeman states of equal magnetization, induced by spin-changing collisions. Moreover, measurement of the oscillation frequency allows for precise determination of the spin-changing collisional coupling strengths, which are directly related to fundamental scattering lengths describing interatomic collisions at ultracold temperatures.

  13. Elastic lattice in an incommensurate background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, R.; Chudnovsky, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    We study a harmonic triangular lattice, which relaxes in the presence of an incommensurate short-wavelength potential. Monte Carlo simulations reveal that the elastic lattice exhibits only short-ranged translational correlations, despite the absence of defects in either lattice. Extended orientational order, however, persists in the presence of the background. Translational correlation lengths exhibit approximate power-law dependence upon cooling rate and background strength. Our results may be relevant to Wigner crystals, atomic monolayers on crystals surfaces, and flux-line and magnetic bubble lattices

  14. Deuterium-hydrogen isotopic exchange in water molecules adsorbed on Teflon under atomic-molecular hydrogen beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grankin, V.P.; Savinkov, N.A.; Styrov, V.V.; Tyurin, Yu.I.

    1994-01-01

    Processes of deuterium-hydrogen exchange in the course of interaction between hydrogen molecular beam and H+H 2 atomic-molecular beam with adsorbed water molecules from D 2 O, HDO, H 2 O on Teflon have been studied. Desorption of the above molecules into vacuum, as well as their desorption under conditions of molecular and atomic-molecular hydrogen beam effect on Teflon surface have been investigated experimentally. Relative probabilities of hydrogen isotopes desorption from Teflon surface have been defined, relative probabilities and cross sections of diverse reactions of isotopic exchange have been found. 2 refs.; 3 figs

  15. RHIC lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Claus, J.; Courant, E.D.; Hahn, H.; Parzen, G.

    1985-01-01

    An antisymmetric lattice for the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory is presented, which has been designed to have (1) and energy range from 7 GeV/amu up to 100 GeV/amu; (2) a good tunability of β and betatron tune; (3) freedom in the choice of crossing angle between beams; and (4) capability of operating unequal species, for example, proton on gold. Suppression of structure resonances is achieved by a proper choice of the phase advances across the insertion and the arc cells. 8 refs., 7 figs

  16. Geometry of lattice field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honan, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Using some tools of algebraic topology, a general formalism for lattice field theory is presented. The lattice is taken to be a simplicial complex that is also a manifold and is referred to as a simplicial manifold. The fields on this lattice are cochains, that are called lattice forms to emphasize the connections with differential forms in the continuum. This connection provides a new bridge between lattice and continuum field theory. A metric can be put onto this simplicial manifold by assigning lengths to every link or I-simplex of the lattice. Regge calculus is a way of defining general relativity on this lattice. A geometric discussion of Regge calculus is presented. The Regge action, which is a discrete form of the Hilbert action, is derived from the Hilbert action using distribution valued forms. This is a new derivation that emphasizes the underlying geometry. Kramers-Wannier duality in statistical mechanics is discussed in this general setting. Nonlinear field theories, which include gauge theories and nonlinear sigma models are discussed in the continuum and then are put onto a lattice. The main new result here is the generalization to curved spacetime, which consists of making the theory compatible with Regge calculus

  17. Kondo length in bosonic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Domenico; Sodano, Pasquale; Trombettoni, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the fact that the low-energy properties of the Kondo model can be effectively simulated in spin chains, we study the realization of the effect with bond impurities in ultracold bosonic lattices at half filling. After presenting a discussion of the effective theory and of the mapping of the bosonic chain onto a lattice spin Hamiltonian, we provide estimates for the Kondo length as a function of the parameters of the bosonic model. We point out that the Kondo length can be extracted from the integrated real-space correlation functions, which are experimentally accessible quantities in experiments with cold atoms.

  18. Coupled electronic and atomic effects on defect evolution in silicon carbide under ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanwen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xue, Haizhou [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zarkadoula, Eva [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sachan, Ritesh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Army Research Office, Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ostrouchov, Christopher [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Liu, Peng [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Shandong Univ., Jinan (China); Wang, Xue -lin [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China); Zhang, Shuo [Lanzhou Univ., Gansu Province (China); Wang, Tie Shan [Lanzhou Univ., Gansu Province (China); Weber, William J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Understanding energy dissipation processes in electronic/atomic subsystems and subsequent non-equilibrium defect evolution is a long-standing challenge in materials science. In the intermediate energy regime, energetic particles simultaneously deposit a significant amount of energy to both electronic and atomic subsystems of silicon carbide (SiC). Here we show that defect evolution in SiC closely depends on the electronic-to-nuclear energy loss ratio (Se/Sn), nuclear stopping powers (dE/dxnucl), electronic stopping powers (dE/dxele), and the temporal and spatial coupling of electronic and atomic subsystem for energy dissipation. The integrated experiments and simulations reveal that: (1) increasing Se/Sn slows damage accumulation; (2) the transient temperatures during the ionization-induced thermal spike increase with dE/dxele, which causes efficient damage annealing along the ion trajectory; and (3) for more condensed displacement damage within the thermal spike, damage production is suppressed due to the coupled electronic and atomic dynamics. Ionization effects are expected to be more significant in materials with covalent/ionic bonding involving predominantly well-localized electrons. Here, insights into the complex electronic and atomic correlations may pave the way to better control and predict SiC response to extreme energy deposition

  19. Epitaxy: Programmable Atom Equivalents Versus Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Mary X.; Seo, Soyoung E.; Gabrys, Paul A. [Department; Fleischman, Dagny [Thomas; Lee, Byeongdu [X-ray Science; Kim, Youngeun; Atwater, Harry A. [Thomas; Macfarlane, Robert J. [Department; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2016-12-05

    The programmability of DNA makes it an attractive structure-directing ligand for the assembly of nanoparticle superlattices in a manner that mimics many aspects of atomic crystallization. However, the synthesis of multilayer single crystals of defined size remains a challenge. Though previous studies considered lattice mismatch as the major limiting factor for multilayer assembly, thin film growth depends on many interlinked variables. Here, a more comprehensive approach is taken to study fundamental elements, such as the growth temperature and the thermodynamics of interfacial energetics, to achieve epitaxial growth of nanoparticle thin films. Under optimized equilibrium conditions, single crystal, multilayer thin films can be synthesized over 500 × 500 μm2 areas on lithographically patterned templates. Importantly, these superlattices follow the same patterns of crystal growth demonstrated in thin film atomic deposition, allowing for these processes to be understood in the context of well-studied atomic epitaxy, and potentially enabling a nanoscale model to study fundamental crystallization processes.

  20. Close-coupling formalism for electron/positron-atom systems and underlying scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelbovics, A.T.; Berge, L.

    1996-01-01

    The close-coupling method for electron/positron-atom scattering promises to give a complete description of the scattering process provided the space of target states is properly spanned. This paper will discuss the structure of the equations, emphasizing questions of stability associated with the expansions over sets of target states. For electron-atom scattering, the character of the solution is discussed and a simple example is given to illustrate the non-convergence of the half-shell T-matrix. This lack of convergence can be fixed by application of the symmetrisation boundary condition, leading to new forms of the equations. For positron atom scattering, the standard equations yield convergent half-shell T-matrices for all but the largest calculations. 17 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  1. Lattice stabilities, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of Al3Tm and Al3Lu intermetallics under high pressure from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu-Dong, Zhang; Wei, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    The effects of high pressure on lattice stability, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of L12 structure Al3Tm and Al3Lu are studied by first-principles calculations within the VASP code. The phonon dispersion curves and density of phonon states are calculated by using the PHONONPY code. Our results agree well with the available experimental and theoretical values. The vibrational properties indicate that Al3Tm and Al3Lu keep their dynamical stabilities in L12 structure up to 100 GPa. The elastic properties and Debye temperatures for Al3Tm and Al3Lu increase with the increase of pressure. The mechanical anisotropic properties are discussed by using anisotropic indices AG, AU, AZ, and the three-dimensional (3D) curved surface of Young’s modulus. The calculated results show that Al3Tm and Al3Lu are both isotropic at 0 GPa and anisotropic under high pressure. In the present work, the sound velocities in different directions for Al3Tm and Al3Lu are also predicted under high pressure. We also calculate the thermodynamic properties and provide the relationships between thermal parameters and temperature/pressure. These results can provide theoretical support for further experimental work and industrial applications. Project supported by the Scientific Technology Plan of the Educational Department of Liaoning Province and Liaoning Innovative Research Team in University, China (Grant No. LT2014004) and the Program for the Young Teacher Cultivation Fund of Shenyang University of Technology, China (Grant No. 005612).

  2. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Physical mechanisms underlying the selective removal of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurovich, Boris A.; Prikhod'ko, Kirill E.

    2009-02-01

    This paper reviews the current understanding of the selective removal of atoms (SRA), a technique that uses ion irradiation to controllably change the chemical composition and properties of polyatomic materials. The main effects involved and the possible mechanisms that govern the process are discussed. It is shown that SRA holds great promise for manufacturing functional nanoelements.

  3. Polynomial pseudosupersymmetry underlying a two-level atom in an external electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsonov, B.F.; Shamshutdinova, V.V.; Gitman, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    Chains of transformations introduced previously were studied in order to obtain electric fields with a time-dependent frequency for which the equation of motion of a two-level atom in the presence of these fields can be solved exactly. It is shown that a polynomial pseudosupersymmetry may be associated to such chains

  4. Toward A Neutral Mercury Optical Lattice Clock: Determination of the Magic Wavelength for the Ultraviolet clock Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejri, Sinda

    2012-01-01

    A lattice clock combines the advantages of ion and neutral atom based clocks, namely the recoil and first order Doppler free spectroscopy allowed by the Lamb-Dicke regime. This lattice light field shifts the energy levels of the clock transition. However a wavelength can be found where the light-shift of the clock states cancelled to first order. In this thesis, we present the latest advances in optical lattice clock with mercury atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the current performances of different optical clock are currently under development, we focus on the concept of optical lattice clock and the features of the mercury that make him an excellent candidate for the realization of an optical lattice clock achievement the uncertainty of the level of 10 -17 . The second part is devoted to the characterization of the mercury MOT, using a sensitive detection system, which allowed us to evaluate the temperature of different isotopes present in the MOT and have a good evidence of sub-Doppler cooling for the fermionic isotopes. The third part of this these, present the experimental aspects of the implementation and the development of the laser source required for trapping mercury atoms operating near the predicted magic wavelength. Finally, we report on the Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of the 1S0 →3 P0 clock transition in the 199 Hg atoms confined in lattice trap. With use of the ultra-stable laser system, linked to LNE-SYRTE primary frequency reference, we have determined the center frequency of the transition for a range of lattice wavelengths and different lattice depths. Analyzing these measurement, we have carried out the first experimental determination of the magic wavelength, which is the crucial step towards achieving a highly accurate frequency standard using mercury. (author)

  5. Atom Efficient Preparation of Zinc Selenates for the Synthesis of Selenol Esters under “On Water” Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Sancineto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe here an atom efficient procedure to prepare selenol esters in good to excellent yields by reacting [(PhSe2Zn] or [(PhSe2Zn]TMEDA with acyl chlorides under “on water” conditions. The method is applicable to a series of aromatic and aliphatic acyl chlorides and tolerates the presence of other functionalities in the starting material.

  6. Mapping cation diffusion through lattice defects in epitaxial oxide thin films on the water-soluble buffer layer Sr3Al2O6 using atomic resolution electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, David J.; Lu, Di; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of oxide thin films have led to the discovery of novel functionalities that are not accessible in bulk structures. However, their physical properties are vulnerable to the presence of crystal defects, which can give rise to structural, chemical, and electronic modifications. These issues are central to optimizing the opportunities to create freestanding oxide films using the recently developed buffer layer Sr3Al2O6, which is soluble in room temperature water. To evaluate the general possibility to create atomic scale freestanding oxide heterostructures, it is critical to understand the formation, structure, and role of defects as this buffer layer is employed. Here, using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy, we reveal cation segregation and diffusion along crystal defects that form during growth of an oxide multilayer structure on the Sr3Al2O6 buffer layer. We demonstrate that mass transport of film material can occur either through open dislocation core channels or site-specifically in the crystal lattice, causing local variations in stoichiometry. However, by reducing the thermal driving force for diffusion during growth, we suppress the role of extended defects as cation segregation sites, thereby retaining the inherent properties of the overlaying film.

  7. Mapping cation diffusion through lattice defects in epitaxial oxide thin films on the water-soluble buffer layer Sr3Al2O6 using atomic resolution electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Baek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the synthesis of oxide thin films have led to the discovery of novel functionalities that are not accessible in bulk structures. However, their physical properties are vulnerable to the presence of crystal defects, which can give rise to structural, chemical, and electronic modifications. These issues are central to optimizing the opportunities to create freestanding oxide films using the recently developed buffer layer Sr3Al2O6, which is soluble in room temperature water. To evaluate the general possibility to create atomic scale freestanding oxide heterostructures, it is critical to understand the formation, structure, and role of defects as this buffer layer is employed. Here, using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy, we reveal cation segregation and diffusion along crystal defects that form during growth of an oxide multilayer structure on the Sr3Al2O6 buffer layer. We demonstrate that mass transport of film material can occur either through open dislocation core channels or site-specifically in the crystal lattice, causing local variations in stoichiometry. However, by reducing the thermal driving force for diffusion during growth, we suppress the role of extended defects as cation segregation sites, thereby retaining the inherent properties of the overlaying film.

  8. Preparing a highly degenerate Fermi gas in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J. R.; Huckans, J. H.; Stites, R. W.; Hazlett, E. L.; O'Hara, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to prepare fermionic atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice at unprecedentedly low temperatures and uniform filling factors. The process involves adiabatic loading of degenerate atoms into multiple energy bands of an optical lattice followed by a filtering stage whereby atoms from all but the lowest band are removed. Of critical importance is the use of a nonharmonic trapping potential to provide external confinement for the atoms. For realistic experimental parameters, this procedure will produce a Fermi gas in a lattice with a reduced temperature T/T F ∼0.003 and an entropy per particle of s∼0.02 k B .

  9. Optical ferris wheel for ultracold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Franke-Arnold, S.; Leach, J.; Padgett, M.J.; Lembessis, V.E.; Ellinas, D.; Wright, A.J.; Girkin, J.M.; Ohberg, P.; Arnold, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a versatile optical ring lattice suitable for trapping cold and quantum degenerate atomic samples. We demonstrate the realisation of intensity patterns from pairs of Laguerre-Gauss (exp(iℓθ)) modes with different l indices. These patterns can be rotated by introducing a frequency shift between the modes. We can generate bright ring lattices for trapping atoms in red-detuned light, and dark ring lattices suitable for trapping atoms with minimal heating in the optical vortices of blu...

  10. Congruence amalgamation of lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Grätzer, G; Wehrung, F; Gr\\"{a}tzer, George; Lakser, Harry; Wehrung, Friedrich

    2000-01-01

    J. Tuma proved an interesting "congruence amalgamation" result. We are generalizing and providing an alternate proof for it. We then provide applications of this result: --A.P. Huhn proved that every distributive algebraic lattice $D$ with at most $\\aleph\\_1$ compact elements can be represented as the congruence lattice of a lattice $L$. We show that $L$ can be constructed as a locally finite relatively complemented lattice with zero. --We find a large class of lattices, the $\\omega$-congruence-finite lattices, that contains all locally finite countable lattices, in which every lattice has a relatively complemented congruence-preserving extension.

  11. LATTICE: an interactive lattice computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.

    1976-10-01

    LATTICE is a computer code which enables an interactive user to calculate the functions of a synchrotron lattice. This program satisfies the requirements at LBL for a simple interactive lattice program by borrowing ideas from both TRANSPORT and SYNCH. A fitting routine is included

  12. The lattice dynamics of imidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, K.H.

    1983-05-01

    The lattice dynamics of imidazole have been investigated. To this end dispersion curves have been determined at 10 K by inelastic coherent neutron scattering. RAMAN measurements have been done to investigate identical gamma - point modes. The combination of extinction rules for RAMAN - and neutron scattering leads to the symmetry assignment of identical gamma - point modes. The experiment yields a force constant of the streching vibration of the hydrogen bond of 0.33 mdyn/A. A force model has been developed to describe the intermolecular atom - atom Interactions in imidazole. (orig./BHO)

  13. Lattices for the lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikatamarla, Shyam S; Karlin, Iliya V

    2009-04-01

    A recently introduced theory of higher-order lattice Boltzmann models [Chikatamarla and Karlin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 190601 (2006)] is elaborated in detail. A general theory of the construction of lattice Boltzmann models as an approximation to the Boltzmann equation is presented. New lattices are found in all three dimensions and are classified according to their accuracy (degree of approximation of the Boltzmann equation). The numerical stability of these lattices is argued based on the entropy principle. The efficiency and accuracy of many new lattices are demonstrated via simulations in all three dimensions.

  14. Synthesizing lattice structures in phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Lingzhen; Marthaler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In one dimensional systems, it is possible to create periodic structures in phase space through driving, which is called phase space crystals (Guo et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 205303). This is possible even if for particles trapped in a potential without periodicity. In this paper we discuss ultracold atoms in a driven optical lattice, which is a realization of such a phase space crystals. The corresponding lattice structure in phase space is complex and contains rich physics. A phase space lattice differs fundamentally from a lattice in real space, because its coordinate system, i.e., phase space, has a noncommutative geometry, which naturally provides an artificial gauge (magnetic) field. We study the behavior of the quasienergy band structure and investigate the dissipative dynamics. Synthesizing lattice structures in phase space provides a new platform to simulate the condensed matter phenomena and study the intriguing phenomena of driven systems far away from equilibrium. (paper)

  15. Vortex-Peierls States in Optical Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkov, A.A.; Demler, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    We show that vortices, induced in cold atom superfluids in optical lattices, may order in a novel vortex-Peierls ground state. In such a state vortices do not form a simple lattice but arrange themselves in clusters, within which the vortices are partially delocalized, tunneling between classically degenerate configurations. We demonstrate that this exotic quantum many-body state is selected by an order-from-disorder mechanism for a special combination of the vortex filling and lattice geometry that has a macroscopic number of classically degenerate ground states

  16. Stability investigation of a high number density Pt1/Fe2O3single-atom catalyst under different gas environments by HAADF-STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Sibin; Wang, Rongming; Liu, Jingyue

    2018-05-18

    Catalysis by supported single metal atoms has demonstrated tremendous potential for practical applications due to their unique catalytic properties. Unless they are strongly anchored to the support surfaces, supported single atoms, however, are thermodynamically unstable, which poses a major obstacle for broad applications of single-atom catalysts (SACs). In order to develop strategies to improve the stability of SACs, we need to understand the intrinsic nature of the sintering processes of supported single metal atoms, especially under various gas environments that are relevant to important catalytic reactions. We report on the synthesis of high number density Pt 1 /Fe 2 O 3 SACs using a facial strong adsorption method and the study of the mobility of these supported Pt single atoms at 250 °C under various gas environments that are relevant to CO oxidation, water-gas shift, and hydrogenation reactions. Under the oxidative gas environment, Fe 2 O 3 supported Pt single atoms are stable even at high temperatures. The presence of either CO or H 2 molecules in the gas environment, however, facilitates the movement of the Pt atoms. The strong interaction between CO and Pt weakens the binding between the Pt atoms and the support, facilitating the movement of the Pt single atoms. The dissociation of H 2 molecules on the Pt atoms and their subsequent interaction with the oxygen species of the support surfaces dislodge the surface oxygen anchored Pt atoms, resulting in the formation of Pt clusters. The addition of H 2 O molecules to the CO or H 2 significantly accelerates the sintering of the Fe 2 O 3 supported Pt single atoms. An anchoring-site determined sintering mechanism is further proposed, which is related to the metal-support interaction.

  17. Ejection of fast recoil atoms from solids under ion bombardment (medium-energy ion scattering by solid surfaces: Pt. 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonoy, A.I.; Mashkova, E.S.; Molchanov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is the third part of our review surface scattering. Part I, which was devoted to the scattering of ions by the surfaces of disordered solids, was published in 1972; Part II, concerning scattering by crystal surfaces, was published in 1974. Since the publication of these reviews the material contained in them has become obsolete in many respects. A more recent account of the status of the problem has been given in a number of studies, including the book by E.S. Mashkova and V.A. Molchanov, Medium-Energy Ion Scattering by Solid Surfaces (Atomizdat, Moscow, 1980), than extended version of which was published by North-Holland in 1985. We note, however, that at the time these reviews were written the study of fast recoil atoms had not been carried out systematically; the problem was studied only as a by-product of surface scattering and sputtering. For this reason, in the above-mentioned works and in other reviews the data relating to recoil atoms were considered only occasionally. In recent years there have appeared a number of works - theoretical, experimental and computer -specially devoted to the study of the ejection of recoil atoms under ion bombardment. A number of interesting effects, which are due to the crystal structure of the target, have been discovered. It therefore, appeared desirable to us to systematize the available material and to present it as Part III of our continuing review. (author)

  18. Topological phases of shaken quantum Ising lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Lorenzo, Samuel; Porras, Diego; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    The quantum compass model consists of a two-dimensional square spin lattice where the orientation of the spin–spin interactions depends on the spatial direction of the bonds. It has remarkable symmetry properties and the ground state shows topological degeneracy. The implementation of the quantum compass model in quantum simulation setups like ultracold atoms and trapped ions is far from trivial, since spin interactions in those systems typically are independent of the spatial direction. Ising spin interactions, on the contrary, can be induced and controlled in atomic setups with state-of-the art experimental techniques. In this work, we show how the quantum compass model on a rectangular lattice can be simulated by the use of the photon-assisted tunneling induced by periodic drivings on a quantum Ising spin model. We describe a procedure to adiabatically prepare one of the doubly degenerate ground states of this model by adiabatically ramping down a transverse magnetic field, with surprising differences depending on the parity of the lattice size. Exact diagonalizations confirm the validity of this approach for small lattices. Specific implementations of this scheme are presented with ultracold atoms in optical lattices in the Mott insulator regime, as well as with Rydberg atoms. (paper)

  19. Magnetic phase transition in coupled spin-lattice systems: A replica-exchange Wang-Landau study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Dilina; Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2016-10-01

    Coupled, dynamical spin-lattice models provide a unique test ground for simulations investigating the finite-temperature magnetic properties of materials under the direct influence of the lattice vibrations. These models are constructed by combining a coordinate-dependent interatomic potential with a Heisenberg-like spin Hamiltonian, facilitating the treatment of both the atomic coordinates and the spins as explicit phase variables. Using a model parameterized for bcc iron, we study the magnetic phase transition in these complex systems via the recently introduced, massively parallel replica-exchange Wang-Landau Monte Carlo method. Comparison with the results obtained from rigid lattice (spin-only) simulations shows that the transition temperature as well as the amplitude of the peak in the specific heat curve is marginally affected by the lattice vibrations. Moreover, the results were found to be sensitive to the particular choice of interatomic potential.

  20. Magnetic atom lattices for quantum information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    Simply put, a quantum computer aims at solving computational problems using genuine quantum mechanical effects. An important feature is that a quantum computer can simulate the behavior of any other quantum mechanical system. Furthermore, quantum devices are predicted to enable secure communication

  1. Mechanism of fast lattice diffusion of hydrogen in palladium: Interplay of quantum fluctuations and lattice strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimizuka, Hajime; Ogata, Shigenobu; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanism of the nanostructure-mediated high diffusivity of H in Pd is of recent scientific interest and also crucial for industrial applications. Here, we present a decisive scenario explaining the emergence of the fast lattice-diffusion mode of interstitial H in face-centered cubic Pd, based on the quantum mechanical natures of both electrons and nuclei under finite strains. Ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics was applied to predict the temperature- and strain-dependent free energy profiles for H migration in Pd over a temperature range of 150-600 K and under hydrostatic tensile strains of 0.0%-2.4%; such strain conditions are likely to occur in real systems, especially around the elastic fields induced by nanostructured defects. The simulated results revealed that, for preferential H location at octahedral sites, as in unstrained Pd, the activation barrier for H migration (Q ) was drastically increased with decreasing temperature owing to nuclear quantum effects. In contrast, as tetrahedral sites increased in stability with lattice expansion, nuclear quantum effects became less prominent and ceased impeding H migration. This implies that the nature of the diffusion mechanism gradually changes from quantum- to classical-like as the strain is increased. For H atoms in Pd at the hydrostatic strain of ˜2.4 % , we determined that the mechanism promoted fast lattice diffusion (Q =0.11 eV) of approximately 20 times the rate of conventional H diffusion (Q =0.23 eV) in unstrained Pd at a room temperature of 300 K.

  2. The licensing procedure under the Atomic Energy Act - an instrument out of tune

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, H.

    1981-01-01

    While it was possible until 1970 to license and build nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany on the basis of the Atomic Energy Act subject to stringent safety criteria more or less as quickly as in other industrialized countries, the situation became much more insecure in the seventies, as a result of the use of nuclear power more and more turning into a political issue. As a consequence, the time required for licensing and building a nuclear power plant increased from formerly five to at present ten years, which has created major losses to the German economy to this day. Tese losses are composed of the interest burden, price increases, additional conditions imposed by public authorities, and costs associated with purchases of electricity from outside sources in those cases where plants were completed late. For an average size electricity utility, these losses amount to several billion deutschmarks. The increasingly longer licensing procedures and the growing number of conditions imposed during the construction period no longer reflected the provisions necessary to ensure safety and reliability of the plant, but fostered intentions to incorporate even those conditions and criteria which might one day be raised, in a stage in which there was often no clear view of further developments. In this way, technical details were finalized at an unnecessarily early date and, very often, superfluous safety margins became necessary. (orig.) [de

  3. The role and limitation of judicial control in the licensing procedure under the Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the problems of the judiciary with decision-finding in proceedings where large and complicated technical installations are involved, presenting proposals aiming at more clearly defining and probably restricting judicial control. According to the author, a feasible step towards limiting the controlling competence of the judiciary is to more precisely define the factual characteristic 'state of the art in science and technology' which, in pursuance with sect. 7, sub-sect. 2 of the Atomic Energy Act is taken as a criterion to evaluate the efficiency of precautionary measures to prevent damage emanating from the erection and operation of nuclear installations. As the legislature explicitly wants the judiciary to use this characteristic, the judiciary has to have recourse to evaluation factors that do not belong to the science of jurisprudence. It is not the function of the judiciary to verify whether the 'state of the art' is based on appropriate principles. This adoption guarantees the 'best possible risk prevention and protection against hazards', as required by the Federal Constitutional Court. (orig./HSCH) [de

  4. Ultracold Molecules in Optical Lattices: Efficient Production and Application to Molecular Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-03

    Martin, M. M. Boyd, and J. Ye. Rabi spectroscopy and excitation inhomogeneity in a one-dimensional optical lattice clock. Phys. Rev. A, 80:052703, 2009...can fully control the molecules’ internal and external quantum states, as in state-of-the-art atomic lattice clocks. Using the quantized molecular...spectra in an optical lattice , we devised a new lattice thermometry method that is advantageous for many lattice experiments, including clocks and

  5. Surface-Initiated Graft Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate from Chitin Nanofiber Macroinitiator under Dispersion Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Endo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface-initiated graft atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP of methyl methacrylate (MMA from self-assembled chitin nanofibers (CNFs was performed under dispersion conditions. Self-assembled CNFs were initially prepared by regeneration from a chitin ion gel with 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide using methanol; the product was then converted into the chitin nanofiber macroinitiator by reaction with α-bromoisobutyryl bromide in a dispersion containing N,N-dimethylformamide. Surface-initiated graft ATRP of MMA from the initiating sites on the CNFs was subsequently carried out under dispersion conditions, followed by filtration to obtain the CNF-graft-polyMMA film. Analysis of the product confirmed the occurrence of the graft ATRP on the surface of the CNFs.

  6. Towards Corrected and Completed Atomic Site Occupancy Analysis of Superalloys Using Atom Probe Tomography Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    Advanced Atom Probe Tomography (APT) techniques have been developed and applied to the atomic-scale characterization of multi-component...analysis approaches for solute distribution/segregation analysis, atom probe crystallography, and lattice rectification and has demonstrated potential...materials design, where Integrated Computational Materials engineering (ICME) can be enabled by real world 3D atomic resolution data via atom probe microscopy.

  7. Optical ferris wheel for ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, S.; Leach, J.; Padgett, M. J.; Lembessis, V. E.; Ellinas, D.; Wright, A. J.; Girkin, J. M.; Ohberg, P.; Arnold, A. S.

    2007-07-01

    We propose a versatile optical ring lattice suitable for trapping cold and quantum degenerate atomic samples. We demonstrate the realisation of intensity patterns from pairs of Laguerre-Gauss (exp(iℓө) modes with different ℓ indices. These patterns can be rotated by introducing a frequency shift between the modes. We can generate bright ring lattices for trapping atoms in red-detuned light, and dark ring lattices suitable for trapping atoms with minimal heating in the optical vortices of blue-detuned light. The lattice sites can be joined to form a uniform ring trap, making it ideal for studying persistent currents and the Mott insulator transition in a ring geometry.

  8. Working Group Report: Lattice Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, T.; et al.,

    2013-10-22

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  9. Atomic scale modelling of Al and Ni(1 1 1) surface erosion under cluster impact

    CERN Document Server

    Zhurkin, E E

    2003-01-01

    We have studied sputtering of Al and Ni(1 1 1) surfaces under impact of Al sub N and Ni sub N clusters (1=13. The pronounced microcraters are formed in the impact region above a threshold cluster size of around N=13. As a sensitivity study, we show that interaction with electronic subsystem of the target has a strong influence on secondary emission, but almost does not affect the features of surface microstructure of irradiated target.

  10. Atomic Covalent Functionalization of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus Although graphene’s physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp2 bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene’s electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (~1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Towards this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  11. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  12. Lattice dynamics of ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reports the lattice dynamical study of the UGe2 using a lattice dynamical model theory based on pairwise interactions under the framework of the shell model. The calculated phonon dispersion curves and phonon density of states are in good agreement with the measured data.

  13. Designs, groups and lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Bachoc, Christine

    2005-01-01

    We study the Grassmannian 4-designs contained in lattices, in connection with the local property of the Rankin constant. We prove that the sequence of Barnes-Wall lattices contain Grassmannian 6-designs.

  14. Residuation in orthomodular lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chajda Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We show that every idempotent weakly divisible residuated lattice satisfying the double negation law can be transformed into an orthomodular lattice. The converse holds if adjointness is replaced by conditional adjointness. Moreover, we show that every positive right residuated lattice satisfying the double negation law and two further simple identities can be converted into an orthomodular lattice. In this case, also the converse statement is true and the corresponence is nearly one-to-one.

  15. Lattice dynamics of α boron and of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vast, N.

    1999-01-01

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of α boron and of B 4 C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In α boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B 4 C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  16. Atom probe tomography of the evolution of the nanostructure of oxide dispersion strengthened steels under ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, N. N.; Rogozhkin, S. V.; Bogachev, A. A.; Korchuganova, O. A.; Nikitin, A. A.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Kozodaev, M. A.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Fedin, P. A.; Chalykh, B. B.; Lindau, R.; Hoffmann, Ya.; Möslang, A.; Vladimirov, P.

    2017-09-01

    The atom probe tomography of the nanostructure evolution in ODS1 Eurofer, ODS 13.5Cr, and ODS 13.5Cr-0.3Ti steels under heavy ion irradiation at 300 and 573 K is performed. The samples were irradiated by 5.6 MeV Fe2+ ions and 4.8 MeV Ti2+ ions to a fluence of 1015 cm-2. It is shown that the number of nanoclusters increases by a factor of 2-3 after irradiation. The chemical composition of the clusters in the steels changes after irradiation at 300 K, whereas the chemical composition of the clusters in the 13.5Cr-0.3Ti ODS steel remains the same after irradiation at 573 K.

  17. Atomic force microscopy study of TiO2 sol-gel films thermally treated under NH3 atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapalis, C.; Todorova, N.; Anastasescu, M.; Anastasescu, C.; Stoica, M.; Gartner, M.; Zaharescu, M.; Stoica, T.

    2009-01-01

    Multilayered TiO 2 films were obtained by sol-gel and dipping deposition on quartz substrate followed by thermal treatment under NH 3 atmosphere. In an attempt to understand the close relationship between microstructural characteristics and the synthesis parameters, a systematic research of the structure and the morphology of NH 3 modified TiO 2 sol-gel films by XRD and Atomic Force Microscopy is reported. The surface morphology has been evaluated in terms of grains size, fractal dimension and surface roughness. For each surface, it was found a self-similar behavior (with mean fractal dimension in the range of 2.67-3.00) related to an optimum morphology favorable to maintain a nano-size distribution of the grains. The root mean square (RMS) roughness of the samples was found to be in the range of 0.72-6.02 nm.

  18. Infinite resistive lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, D; van Steenwijk, F.J.

    The resistance between two arbitrary nodes in an infinite square lattice of:identical resistors is calculated, The method is generalized to infinite triangular and hexagonal lattices in two dimensions, and also to infinite cubic and hypercubic lattices in three and more dimensions. (C) 1999 American

  19. Renormalization transformation of periodic and aperiodic lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macia, Enrique; Rodriguez-Oliveros, Rogelio

    2006-01-01

    In this work we introduce a similarity transformation acting on transfer matrices describing the propagation of elementary excitations through either periodic or Fibonacci lattices. The proposed transformation can act at two different scale lengths. At the atomic scale the transformation allows one to express the systems' global transfer matrix in terms of an equivalent on-site model one. Correlation effects among different hopping terms are described by a series of local phase factors in that case. When acting on larger scale lengths, corresponding to short segments of the original lattice, the similarity transformation can be properly regarded as describing an effective renormalization of the chain. The nature of the resulting renormalized lattice significantly depends on the kind of order (i.e., periodic or quasiperiodic) of the original lattice, expressing a delicate balance between chemical complexity and topological order as a consequence of the renormalization process

  20. Lattice Waves, Spin Waves, and Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1962-03-01

    Use of neutron inelastic scattering to study the forces between atoms in solids is treated. One-phonon processes and lattice vibrations are discussed, and experiments that verified the existence of the quantum of lattice vibrations, the phonon, are reviewed. Dispersion curves, phonon frequencies and absorption, and models for dispersion calculations are discussed. Experiments on the crystal dynamics of metals are examined. Dispersion curves are presented and analyzed; theory of lattice dynamics is considered; effects of Fermi surfaces on dispersion curves; electron-phonon interactions, electronic structure influence on lattice vibrations, and phonon lifetimes are explored. The dispersion relation of spin waves in crystals and experiments in which dispersion curves for spin waves in Co-Fe alloy and magnons in magnetite were obtained and the reality of the magnon was demonstrated are discussed. (D.C.W)

  1. Antiferromagnetic noise correlations in optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, Georg Morten; Syljuåsen, F. T.; Pedersen, K. G. L.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze how noise correlations probed by time-of-flight experiments reveal antiferromagnetic (AF) correlations of fermionic atoms in two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical lattices. Combining analytical and quantum Monte Carlo calculations using experimentally realistic parameters, we s...

  2. Shaking the entropy out of a lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    C. Tichy, Malte; Mølmer, Klaus; F. Sherson, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    , for which we implement a protocol that circumvents the constraints of unitarity. The preparation of large regions with precisely one atom per lattice site is discussed for both bosons and fermions. The resulting low-entropy Mott-insulating states may serve as high-fidelity register states for quantum...

  3. Geometry and dynamics in Hamiltonian lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rink, B.W.

    2003-01-01

    E. Fermi, J. Pasta and S. Ulam introduced the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam lattice in the 1950s as a classical mechanical model for a mono-atomic crystal or a one-dimensional continuum. The model consisted of a discrete number of equal point masses that interact with their nearest neighbours only. On the basis

  4. Equations Holding in Hilbert Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayet, René

    2006-07-01

    We produce and study several sequences of equations, in the language of orthomodular lattices, which hold in the ortholattice of closed subspaces of any classical Hilbert space, but not in all orthomodular lattices. Most of these equations hold in any orthomodular lattice admitting a strong set of states whose values are in a real Hilbert space. For some of these equations, we give conditions under which they hold in the ortholattice of closed subspaces of a generalised Hilbert space. These conditions are relative to the dimension of the Hilbert space and to the characteristic of its division ring of scalars. In some cases, we show that these equations cannot be deduced from the already known equations, and we study their mutual independence. To conclude, we suggest a new method for obtaining such equations, using the tensorial product.

  5. First-principles study of structural, elastic, electronic, lattice dynamic and optical properties of XN (X=Ga, Al and B) compounds under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatmi, M; Ghebouli, B; Ghebouli, M A; Hieba, Z K

    2011-01-01

    We have applied the pseudo-potential plane wave method to study the structural, elastic, electronic, lattice dynamic and optical properties of GaN and AlN in the wurtzite lattice and BN with zinc-blende structure. We have found that all elastic constants depend strongly on hydrostatic pressure, except for C 44 in wurtzite AlN and GaN that shows a weaker dependence. AlN and GaN present a direct band gap Γ-Γ, whereas BN has an indirect band gap Γ-X. The indirect Γ-K band gap in AlN occurs at about 35 GPa. The top of the valence bands reflects the p electronic character for all structures. There is a gap between optical and acoustic modes only for wurtzite phases AlN and GaN. All peaks in the imaginary part of the dielectric function for the wurtzite lattice GaN and AlN move towards lower energies, while those in the zinc-blende BN structure shift towards higher energies with increasing pressure. The decrease of the static dielectric constant and static refractive index in zinc-blende BN is weaker and it can be explained by its higher elastic constants.

  6. Magnetism of a relaxed single atom vacancy in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunyi; Hu, Yonghong; Xue, Li; Sun, Tieyu; Wang, Yu

    2018-04-01

    It has been suggested in literature that defects in graphene (e.g. absorbed atoms and vacancies) may induce magnetizations due to unpaired electrons. The nature of magnetism, i.e. ferromagnetic or anti-ferromagnetic, is dependent on a number of structural factors including locations of magnetic moments and lattice symmetry. In the present work we investigated the influence of a relaxed single atom vacancy in garphnene on magnetization which were obtained under different pinning boundary conditions, aiming to achieve a better understanding of the magnetic behaviors of graphene. Through first principles calculations, we found that major spin polarizations occur on atoms that deviate slightly from their original lattice positions, and pinning boundaries could also affect the relaxed positions of atoms and determine which atom(s) would become the main source(s) of total spin polarizations and magnetic moments. When the pinning boundary condition is free, a special non-magnetic and semi-conductive structure may be obtained, suggesting that magnetization should more readily occur under pinning boundary conditions.

  7. Secondary electron emission of thin carbon foils under the impact of hydrogen atoms, ions and molecular ions, under energies within the MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidovic, Z.

    1997-06-01

    This work focuses on the study of the emission statistics of secondary electrons from thin carbon foils bombarded with H 0 , H 2 + and H 3 + projectiles in the 0.25-2.2 MeV energy range. The phenomenon of secondary electron emission from solids under the impact of swift ions is mainly due to inelastic interactions with target electrons. The phenomenological and theoretical descriptions, as well as a summary of the main theoretical models are the subject of the first chapter. The experimental set-up used to measure event by event the electron emission of the two faces of a thin carbon foil traversed by an energetic projectile is described in the chapter two. In this chapter are also presented the method and algorithms used to process experimental spectra in order to obtain the statistical distribution of the emitted electrons. Chapter three presents the measurements of secondary electron emission induced by H atoms passing through thin carbon foils. The secondary electron yields are studied in correlation with the emergent projectile charge state. We show the peculiar role of the projectile electron, whether it remains or not bound to the incident proton. The fourth chapter is dedicated to the secondary electron emission induced by H 2 + and H 3 + polyatomic ions. The results are interpreted in terms of collective effects in the interactions of these ions with solids. The role of the proximity of the protons, molecular ion fragments, upon the amplitude of these collective effects is evidenced from the study of the statistics of forward emission. These experiences allowed us to shed light on various aspects of atom and polyatomic ion inter-actions with solid surfaces. (author)

  8. Mean ergodic operators and reflexive Fréchet lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonet, J.; De Pagter, B.; Ricker, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Connections between (positive) mean ergodic operators acting in Banach lattices and properties of the underlying lattice itself are well understood (see the works of Emel'yanov, Wolff and Zaharopol). For Fréchet lattices (or more general locally convex solid Riesz spaces) there is virtually no

  9. The critical point of quantum chromodynamics through lattice and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This talk discusses methods of extending lattice computations at finite temperature into regions of finite chemical potential, and the conditions under which such results from the lattice may be compared to experiments. Such comparisons away from a critical point are absolutely essential for quantitative use of lattice ...

  10. [Efficacy of bFGF atomization inhalation on postoperative sore throat following oral and maxillofacial surgery under general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Jiang, Yin-Hua; Xiao, Jian; Li, Xiao-Kun

    2016-08-01

    To observe the effect of recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) atomization inhalation on postoperative sore throat following oral and maxillofacial operation under general anethesia. Forty patients in whom oral and maxillofacial operation trachea was removed under general anesthesia were randomly divided into treatment and control groups; the treatment group received bFGF 35000IU + normal saline 20 mL, compression inhalation, day 1, every 20min, continued for 3 d; the control group was given normal saline 5 mL + dexamethasone 5 mg + gentamicin 80000 U + chymotrypsin 4000 U, compression inhalation, twice a day, every 20 min, continued for 3 d. Occurrence of postoperative sore throat 12 h after operation was recorded and visual analog scale (VAS) of sore throat (swallowing) 12,24,48,72 h after operation was measured. SPSS l4.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. The incidence of sore throat in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the control group (Poral and maxillofacial surgery after endotracheal intubation.

  11. Exhaustive generation of orthomodular lattices with exactly one nonquantum state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavičić, Mladen

    2009-12-01

    We propose a kind of reverse Kochen-Specker theorem that amounts to generating orthomodular lattices with exactly one state that do not admit properties of the Hilbert space. We apply MMP algorithms to obtain smallest orthomodular lattices with 35 atoms and 35 blocks (35-35) and all other ones up to 38-38. We find out that all but one of them admit exactly one state and discover several other properties of them. Previously known such orthomodular lattices have 44 atoms and 44 blocks or more. We present some of them in our notation.

  12. Long-Lived Feshbach Molecules in a Three-Dimensional Optical Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhammer, G.; Winkler, K.; Lang, F.; Schmid, S.; Denschlag, J. Hecker; Grimm, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have created and trapped a pure sample of 87 Rb 2 Feshbach molecules in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Compared to previous experiments without a lattice, we find dramatic improvements such as long lifetimes of up to 700 ms and a near unit efficiency for converting tightly confined atom pairs into molecules. The lattice shields the trapped molecules from collisions and, thus, overcomes the problem of inelastic decay by vibrational quenching. Furthermore, we have developed an advanced purification scheme that removes residual atoms, resulting in a lattice in which individual sites are either empty or filled with a single molecule in the vibrational ground state of the lattice

  13. Lattice gravity near the continuum limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, G.; Friedberg, R.; Lee, T.D.; Ren, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    We prove that the lattice gravity always approaches the usual continuum limit when the link length l -> 0, provided that certain general boundary conditions are satisfied. This result holds for any lattice, regular or irregular. Furthermore, for a given lattice, the deviation from its continuum limit can be expressed as a power series in l 2 . General formulas for such a perturbative calculation are given, together with a number of illustrative examples, including the graviton propagator. The lattice gravity satisfies all the invariance properties of Einstein's theory of general relativity. In addition, it is symmetric under a new class of transformations that are absent in the usual continuum theory. The possibility that the lattice theory (with a nonzero l) may be more fundamental is discussed. (orig.)

  14. Lattice Mismatch in Crystalline Nanoparticle Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrys, Paul A; Seo, Soyoung E; Wang, Mary X; Oh, EunBi; Macfarlane, Robert J; Mirkin, Chad A

    2018-01-10

    For atomic thin films, lattice mismatch during heteroepitaxy leads to an accumulation of strain energy, generally causing the films to irreversibly deform and generate defects. In contrast, more elastically malleable building blocks should be better able to accommodate this mismatch and the resulting strain. Herein, that hypothesis is tested by utilizing DNA-modified nanoparticles as "soft," programmable atom equivalents to grow a heteroepitaxial colloidal thin film. Calculations of interaction potentials, small-angle X-ray scattering data, and electron microscopy images show that the oligomer corona surrounding a particle core can deform and rearrange to store elastic strain up to ±7.7% lattice mismatch, substantially exceeding the ±1% mismatch tolerated by atomic thin films. Importantly, these DNA-coated particles dissipate strain both elastically through a gradual and coherent relaxation/broadening of the mismatched lattice parameter and plastically (irreversibly) through the formation of dislocations or vacancies. These data also suggest that the DNA cannot be extended as readily as compressed, and thus the thin films exhibit distinctly different relaxation behavior in the positive and negative lattice mismatch regimes. These observations provide a more general understanding of how utilizing rigid building blocks coated with soft compressible polymeric materials can be used to control nano- and microstructure.

  15. Lattice dynamics in solid oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobashi, K.; Klein, M.L.; Chandrasekharan, V.

    1979-01-01

    Lattice dynamical calculations for the bulk α, β, and γ phases of solid O 2 and for the monolayer α and β phases have been made in the harmonic approximation. In the α and β phases, atom-atom 6-12 potentials are employed. In the γ phase, effective potentials are used between molecular centers and only the translational lattice vibrations are calculated. It is found that Laufer and Leroi's potential parameters give two k=O frequencies at 42.7 and 43.6 cm -1 in the bulk α-O 2 , and at 40.7 cm -1 for the degenerate k=0 modes in the β phase. The observed Raman lines for α-O 2 at 43 and 79 cm -1 , which are both known to exhibit isotope shifts, are thus tentatively assigned to an accidentally degenerate line and a two-phonon band, respectively, In view of the possible contribution from anharmonic effects, the agreement of the calculation with experiment (48-51 cm -1 ) in β-O 2 may be better than it seems. For the bulk γ-O 2 , a discrepancy is observed between the calculated elastic constants and those derived from Brillouin scattering experiments. This discrepancy may be due to the neglect of translation-rotation coupling. In the monolayer O 2 , Raman active modes at 28.3 and 40.6 cm -1 for the α phase, and 31.9 cm -1 for the β phase are predicted

  16. Jamming within Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth-Nice, Prairie; Graves, Amy

    Numerical methods are used in two dimensions to find the minimum energy configuration of soft bidisperse spheres, in the presence of lattices of fixed, pointlike particles. The lattice provides a supporting structure for the jammed configuration, resulting in changes in the jamming threshold. The excess coordination number and other properties of interest near jamming are calculated as a function of the lattice structure and number density. Acknowledgement is made to the donors of the Petrolium Research Fund, administered by the American Chemical Society.

  17. Metaharmonic Lattice Point Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Freeden, Willi

    2011-01-01

    Metaharmonic Lattice Point Theory covers interrelated methods and tools of spherically oriented geomathematics and periodically reflected analytic number theory. The book establishes multi-dimensional Euler and Poisson summation formulas corresponding to elliptic operators for the adaptive determination and calculation of formulas and identities of weighted lattice point numbers, in particular the non-uniform distribution of lattice points. The author explains how to obtain multi-dimensional generalizations of the Euler summation formula by interpreting classical Bernoulli polynomials as Green

  18. Microstructural evolution of Fe−22%Cr model alloy under thermal ageing and ion irradiation conditions studied by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korchuganova, Olesya A., E-mail: KorchuganovaOA@gmail.com [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics of National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Thuvander, Mattias [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96, Göteborg (Sweden); Aleev, Andrey A.; Rogozhkin, Sergey V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics of National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Boll, Torben [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96, Göteborg (Sweden); Kulevoy, Timur V. [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics of National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Nanostructure evolution during ion irradiation of two thermally aged binary Fee22Cr alloys has been investigated using atom probe tomography. Specimens aged at 500 °C for 50 and 200 h were irradiated by 5.6 MeV Fe ions at room temperature up to fluences of 0.3 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} and 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The effect of irradiation on the material nanostructure was examined at a depth of 1 μm from the irradiated surface. The analysis of Cr radial concentration functions reveals that dense α′-phase precipitates in the 200 h aged alloy become diffuse and thereby larger when subjected to irradiation. On the other hand, less Cr-enriched precipitates in the alloy aged for 50 h are less affected. The CreCr pair correlation function analysis shows that matrix inhomogeneity decreases under irradiation. Irradiation leads to a decrease in the number density of diffuse clusters, whereas in the case of well-developed precipitates it remains unchanged.

  19. Microstructural evolution of Fe−22%Cr model alloy under thermal ageing and ion irradiation conditions studied by atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchuganova, Olesya A.; Thuvander, Mattias; Aleev, Andrey A.; Rogozhkin, Sergey V.; Boll, Torben; Kulevoy, Timur V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructure evolution during ion irradiation of two thermally aged binary Fee22Cr alloys has been investigated using atom probe tomography. Specimens aged at 500 °C for 50 and 200 h were irradiated by 5.6 MeV Fe ions at room temperature up to fluences of 0.3 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 and 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 . The effect of irradiation on the material nanostructure was examined at a depth of 1 μm from the irradiated surface. The analysis of Cr radial concentration functions reveals that dense α′-phase precipitates in the 200 h aged alloy become diffuse and thereby larger when subjected to irradiation. On the other hand, less Cr-enriched precipitates in the alloy aged for 50 h are less affected. The CreCr pair correlation function analysis shows that matrix inhomogeneity decreases under irradiation. Irradiation leads to a decrease in the number density of diffuse clusters, whereas in the case of well-developed precipitates it remains unchanged.

  20. Microstructural evolution of Fesbnd 22%Cr model alloy under thermal ageing and ion irradiation conditions studied by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchuganova, Olesya A.; Thuvander, Mattias; Aleev, Andrey A.; Rogozhkin, Sergey V.; Boll, Torben; Kulevoy, Timur V.

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructure evolution during ion irradiation of two thermally aged binary Fee22Cr alloys has been investigated using atom probe tomography. Specimens aged at 500 °C for 50 and 200 h were irradiated by 5.6 MeV Fe ions at room temperature up to fluences of 0.3 × 1015 ions/cm2 and 1 × 1015 ions/cm2. The effect of irradiation on the material nanostructure was examined at a depth of 1 μm from the irradiated surface. The analysis of Cr radial concentration functions reveals that dense α‧-phase precipitates in the 200 h aged alloy become diffuse and thereby larger when subjected to irradiation. On the other hand, less Cr-enriched precipitates in the alloy aged for 50 h are less affected. The CreCr pair correlation function analysis shows that matrix inhomogeneity decreases under irradiation. Irradiation leads to a decrease in the number density of diffuse clusters, whereas in the case of well-developed precipitates it remains unchanged.

  1. Measures of nonclassicality for a two-level atom interacting with power-law potential field under decoherence effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, S.; Berrada, K.; Alkhateeb, Sadah A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a useful quantum system to perform different tasks of quantum information and computational technologies. We explore the required optimal conditions for this system that are feasible with real experimental realization. We present an active way to control the variation of some measures of nonclassicality considering the time-dependent coupling and photon transition effects under a model that closely describes a realistic experimental scenario. We investigate qualitatively the quantum measures for a two-level atom system interacting with a quantum field initially defined in a coherent state in the framework of power-law potentials (PLPCSs). We study the nonlocal correlation in the whole system state using the negativity as a measure of entanglement in terms of the exponent parameter, number of photon transition, and phase damping effect. The influences of the different physical parameters on the statistical properties and purity of the field are also demonstrated during the time evolution. The results indicate that the preservation and enhancement of entanglement greatly benefit from the combination of the choice of the physical parameters. Finally, we explore an interesting relationship between the different quantum measures of non-classicality during the time evolution in the absence and presence of time-dependent coupling effect.

  2. Rationalizing the role of structural motif and underlying electronic structure in the finite temperature behavior of atomic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susan, Anju; Joshi, Kavita

    2014-01-01

    Melting in finite size systems is an interesting but complex phenomenon. Many factors affect melting and owing to their interdependencies it is a challenging task to rationalize their roles in the phase transition. In this work, we demonstrate how structural motif of the ground state influences melting transition in small clusters. Here, we report a case with clusters of aluminum and gallium having same number of atoms, valence electrons, and similar structural motif of the ground state but drastically different melting temperatures. We have employed Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics to simulate the solid-like to liquid-like transition in these clusters. Our simulations have reproduced the experimental trends fairly well. Further, the detailed analysis of isomers has brought out the role of the ground state structure and underlying electronic structure in the finite temperature behavior of these clusters. For both clusters, isomers accessible before cluster melts have striking similarities and does have strong influence of the structural motif of the ground state. Further, the shape of the heat capacity curve is similar in both the cases but the transition is more spread over for Al 36 which is consistent with the observed isomerization pattern. Our simulations also suggest a way to characterize transition region on the basis of accessibility of the ground state at a specific temperature

  3. Lattice dynamical appraisal of the anisotropic Debye-Waller factors in graphite lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haridasan, T.M.; Sathyamurthy, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Debye-Waller factors in graphite for the atomic motions within the basal plane and also across the basal planes have been calculated using the various lattice dynamical models available to date and a critical comparison is made with the existing experimental data from X ray and neutron scattering studies. The present study reveals the need for further investigation on the nature of atomic motion across the basal planes. (author). 15 refs, 1 tab

  4. Fuel lattice design using heuristics and new strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J. J.; Castillo M, J. A.; Torres V, M.; Perusquia del Cueto, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Pelta, D. A. [ETS Ingenieria Informatica y Telecomunicaciones, Universidad de Granada, Daniel Saucedo Aranda s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Campos S, Y., E-mail: juanjose.ortiz@inin.gob.m [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    This work show some results of the fuel lattice design in BWRs when some allocation pin rod rules are not taking into account. Heuristics techniques like Path Re linking and Greedy to design fuel lattices were used. The scope of this work is to search about how do classical rules in design fuel lattices affect the heuristics techniques results and the fuel lattice quality. The fuel lattices quality is measured by Power Peaking Factor and Infinite Multiplication Factor at the beginning of the fuel lattice life. CASMO-4 code to calculate these parameters was used. The analyzed rules are the following: pin rods with lowest uranium enrichment are only allocated in the fuel lattice corner, and pin rods with gadolinium cannot allocated in the fuel lattice edge. Fuel lattices with and without gadolinium in the main diagonal were studied. Some fuel lattices were simulated in an equilibrium cycle fuel reload, using Simulate-3 to verify their performance. So, the effective multiplication factor and thermal limits can be verified. The obtained results show a good performance in some fuel lattices designed, even thought, the knowing rules were not implemented. A fuel lattice performance and fuel lattice design characteristics analysis was made. To the realized tests, a dell workstation was used, under Li nux platform. (Author)

  5. Fuel lattice design using heuristics and new strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz S, J. J.; Castillo M, J. A.; Torres V, M.; Perusquia del Cueto, R.; Pelta, D. A.; Campos S, Y.

    2010-10-01

    This work show some results of the fuel lattice design in BWRs when some allocation pin rod rules are not taking into account. Heuristics techniques like Path Re linking and Greedy to design fuel lattices were used. The scope of this work is to search about how do classical rules in design fuel lattices affect the heuristics techniques results and the fuel lattice quality. The fuel lattices quality is measured by Power Peaking Factor and Infinite Multiplication Factor at the beginning of the fuel lattice life. CASMO-4 code to calculate these parameters was used. The analyzed rules are the following: pin rods with lowest uranium enrichment are only allocated in the fuel lattice corner, and pin rods with gadolinium cannot allocated in the fuel lattice edge. Fuel lattices with and without gadolinium in the main diagonal were studied. Some fuel lattices were simulated in an equilibrium cycle fuel reload, using Simulate-3 to verify their performance. So, the effective multiplication factor and thermal limits can be verified. The obtained results show a good performance in some fuel lattices designed, even thought, the knowing rules were not implemented. A fuel lattice performance and fuel lattice design characteristics analysis was made. To the realized tests, a dell workstation was used, under Li nux platform. (Author)

  6. Lattice-Algebraic Morphology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGuire, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    ... invariance present in concrete morphology theories. The other, developed by Banon and Barrera, analyzes general mappings between complete lattices and develops morphological decomposition formulas for such mappings...

  7. Twisted mass lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindler, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2007-07-15

    I review the theoretical foundations, properties as well as the simulation results obtained so far of a variant of the Wilson lattice QCD formulation: Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. Emphasis is put on the discretization errors and on the effects of these discretization errors on the phase structure for Wilson-like fermions in the chiral limit. The possibility to use in lattice simulations different lattice actions for sea and valence quarks to ease the renormalization patterns of phenomenologically relevant local operators, is also discussed. (orig.)

  8. Lattice degeneracies of fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raszillier, H.

    1983-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the minimal degeneracies of geometric (Kaehler) fermions on all the lattices of maximal symmetries in n = 1, ..., 4 dimensions. We also determine the isolated orbits of the maximal symmetry groups, which are related to the minimal numbers of ''naive'' fermions on the reciprocals of these lattices. It turns out that on the self-reciprocal lattices the minimal numbers of naive fermions are equal to the minimal numbers of degrees of freedom of geometric fermions. The description we give relies on the close connection of the maximal lattice symmetry groups with (affine) Weyl groups of root systems of (semi-) simple Lie algebras. (orig.)

  9. Lattice location of helium in uranium dioxide single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido, F.; Nowicki, L. E-mail: lech.nowicki@fuw.edu.pl; Sattonnay, G.; Sauvage, T.; Thome, L

    2004-06-01

    Lattice location of {sup 3}He atoms implanted into UO{sub 2} single crystals was performed by means of the channeling technique combined with nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). The {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He reaction was used. The experimental angular scans show that helium atoms occupy octahedral interstitial positions.

  10. (AJST) ANTIPHASE PHENOMENA IN 2D ISING SQUARE LATTICE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    especially in the binary alloys that are moreover described by the Ising model. INTRODUCTION. Crystal structures are described with the help of the. Bravais lattices that classify them in systems according to the arrangement of atoms in the elementary cell. Nevertheless, the arrangement of atoms in most crystals is different ...

  11. Few quantum particles on one dimensional lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiente Cifuentes, Manuel

    2010-06-18

    There is currently a great interest in the physics of degenerate quantum gases and low-energy few-body scattering due to the recent experimental advances in manipulation of ultracold atoms by light. In particular, almost perfect periodic potentials, called optical lattices, can be generated. The lattice spacing is fixed by the wavelength of the laser field employed and the angle betwen the pair of laser beams; the lattice depth, defining the magnitude of the different band gaps, is tunable within a large interval of values. This flexibility permits the exploration of different regimes, ranging from the ''free-electron'' picture, modified by the effective mass for shallow optical lattices, to the tight-binding regime of a very deep periodic potential. In the latter case, effective single-band theories, widely used in condensed matter physics, can be implemented with unprecedent accuracy. The tunability of the lattice depth is nowadays complemented by the use of magnetic Feshbach resonances which, at very low temperatures, can vary the relevant atom-atom scattering properties at will. Moreover, optical lattices loaded with gases of effectively reduced dimensionality are experimentally accessible. This is especially important for one spatial dimension, since most of the exactly solvable models in many-body quantum mechanics deal with particles on a line; therefore, experiments with one-dimensional gases serve as a testing ground for many old and new theories which were regarded as purely academic not so long ago. The physics of few quantum particles on a one-dimensional lattice is the topic of this thesis. Most of the results are obtained in the tight-binding approximation, which is amenable to exact numerical or analytical treatment. For the two-body problem, theoretical methods for calculating the stationary scattering and bound states are developed. These are used to obtain, in closed form, the two-particle solutions of both the Hubbard and

  12. Few quantum particles on one dimensional lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiente Cifuentes, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    There is currently a great interest in the physics of degenerate quantum gases and low-energy few-body scattering due to the recent experimental advances in manipulation of ultracold atoms by light. In particular, almost perfect periodic potentials, called optical lattices, can be generated. The lattice spacing is fixed by the wavelength of the laser field employed and the angle betwen the pair of laser beams; the lattice depth, defining the magnitude of the different band gaps, is tunable within a large interval of values. This flexibility permits the exploration of different regimes, ranging from the ''free-electron'' picture, modified by the effective mass for shallow optical lattices, to the tight-binding regime of a very deep periodic potential. In the latter case, effective single-band theories, widely used in condensed matter physics, can be implemented with unprecedent accuracy. The tunability of the lattice depth is nowadays complemented by the use of magnetic Feshbach resonances which, at very low temperatures, can vary the relevant atom-atom scattering properties at will. Moreover, optical lattices loaded with gases of effectively reduced dimensionality are experimentally accessible. This is especially important for one spatial dimension, since most of the exactly solvable models in many-body quantum mechanics deal with particles on a line; therefore, experiments with one-dimensional gases serve as a testing ground for many old and new theories which were regarded as purely academic not so long ago. The physics of few quantum particles on a one-dimensional lattice is the topic of this thesis. Most of the results are obtained in the tight-binding approximation, which is amenable to exact numerical or analytical treatment. For the two-body problem, theoretical methods for calculating the stationary scattering and bound states are developed. These are used to obtain, in closed form, the two-particle solutions of both the Hubbard and extended Hubbard models

  13. Noise suppression in an atomic system under the action of a field in a squeezed coherent state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelman, A. I.; Mironov, V. A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of a quantized electromagnetic field in a squeezed coherent state with a three-level Λ-atom is studied numerically by the quantum Monte Carlo method and analytically by the Heisenberg-Langevin method in the regime of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The possibility of noise suppression in the atomic system through the quantum properties of squeezed light is considered in detail; the characteristics of the atomic system responsible for the relaxation processes and noise in the EIT band have been found. Further applications of the Monte Carlo method and the developed numerical code to the study of more complex systems are discussed.

  14. Nuclear lattice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epelbaum E.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We review recent progress on nuclear lattice simulations using chiral effective field theory. We discuss lattice results for dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order, three-body forces at next-to-next-toleading order, isospin-breaking and Coulomb effects, and the binding energy of light nuclei.

  15. A classical simulation of nonlinear Jaynes-Cummings and Rabi models in photonic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lara, B. M.; Soto-Eguibar, Francisco; Cárdenas, Alejandro Zárate; Moya-Cessa, H. M.

    2013-05-01

    The interaction of a two-level atom with a single-mode quantized field is one of the simplest models in quantum optics. Under the rotating wave approximation, it is known as the Jaynes-Cummings model and without it as the Rabi model. Real-world realizations of the Jaynes-Cummings model include cavity, ion trap and circuit quantum electrodynamics. The Rabi model can be realized in circuit quantum electrodynamics. As soon as nonlinear couplings are introduced, feasible experimental realizations in quantum systems are drastically reduced. We propose a set of two photonic lattices that classically simulates the interaction of a single two-level system with a quantized field under field nonlinearities and nonlinear couplings as long as the quantum optics model conserves parity. We describe how to reconstruct the mean value of quantum optics measurements, such as photon number and atomic energy excitation, from the intensity and from the field, such as von Neumann entropy and fidelity, at the output of the photonic lattices. We discuss how typical initial states involving coherent or displaced Fock fields can be engineered from recently discussed Glauber-Fock lattices. As an example, the Buck-Sukumar model, where the coupling depends on the intensity of the field, is classically simulated for separable and entangled initial states.

  16. Kinetics of elementary steps in the reactions of atomic bromine with isoprene and 1,3-butadiene under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Patrick L; Sohn, Yoon S; Nicovich, J Michael; McKee, Michael L; Wine, Paul H

    2012-06-21

    Laser flash photolysis of CF(2)Br(2) has been coupled with time-resolved detection of atomic bromine by resonance fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the gas-phase kinetics of early elementary steps in the Br-initiated oxidations of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, Iso) and 1,3-butadiene (Bu) under atmospheric conditions. At T ≥ 526 K, measured rate coefficients for Br + isoprene are independent of pressure, suggesting that hydrogen transfer (1a) is the dominant reaction pathway. The following Arrhenius expression adequately describes all kinetic data at 526 K ≤ T ≤ 673 K: k(1a)(T) = (1.22 ± 0.57) × 10(-11) exp[(-2100 ± 280)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (uncertainties are 2σ and represent precision of the Arrhenius parameters). At 271 K ≤ T ≤ 357 K, kinetic evidence for the reversible addition reactions Br + Iso ↔ Br-Iso (k(1b), k(-1b)) and Br + Bu ↔ Br-Bu (k(3b), k(-3b)) is observed. Analysis of the approach to equilibrium data allows the temperature- and pressure-dependent rate coefficients k(1b), k(-1b), k(3b), and k(-3b) to be evaluated. At atmospheric pressure, addition of Br to each conjugated diene occurs with a near-gas-kinetic rate coefficient. Equilibrium constants for the addition/dissociation reactions are obtained from k(1b)/k(-1b) and k(3b)/k(-3b), respectively. Combining the experimental equilibrium data with electronic structure calculations allows both second- and third-law analyses of thermochemistry to be carried out. The following thermochemical parameters for the addition reactions 1b and 3b at 0 and 298 K are obtained (units are kJ mol(-1) for Δ(r)H and J mol(-1) K(-1) for Δ(r)S; uncertainties are accuracy estimates at the 95% confidence level): Δ(r)H(0)(1b) = -66.6 ± 7.1, Δ(r)H(298)(1b) = -67.5 ± 6.6, and Δ(r)S(298)(3b) = -93 ± 16; Δ(r)H(0)(3b) = -62.4 ± 9.0, Δ(r)H(298)(3b) = -64.5 ± 8.5, and Δ(r)S(298)(3b) = -94 ± 20. Examination of the effect of added O(2) on Br kinetics under conditions where reversible

  17. A lattice hierarchy and its continuous limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Engui

    2008-01-01

    By introducing a discrete spectral problem, we derive a lattice hierarchy which is integrable in Liouville's sense and possesses a multi-Hamiltonian structure. It is show that the discrete spectral problem converges to the well-known AKNS spectral problem under a certain continuous limit. In particular, we construct a sequence of equations in the lattice hierarchy which approximates the AKNS hierarchy as a continuous limit

  18. On singularities of lattice varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Himadri

    2013-01-01

    Toric varieties associated with distributive lattices arise as a fibre of a flat degeneration of a Schubert variety in a minuscule. The singular locus of these varieties has been studied by various authors. In this article we prove that the number of diamonds incident on a lattice point $\\a$ in a product of chain lattices is more than or equal to the codimension of the lattice. Using this we also show that the lattice varieties associated with product of chain lattices is smooth.

  19. MD simulation of atomic displacements in metals and metallic bilayers under low energy ion bombardment at 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornich, G.V.; Betz, G.; Bazhin, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    MD simulations of 100 eV Ar ion bombardment of (1 0 0) Ni and Al as well as Al/Ni bilayer crystals at 300 K have been performed and compared to previous calculations at 0 K. The Al/Ni bilayer crystal consisted of one Al layer on a (1 0 0) Ni substrate. Sputtering yields for Ni and Al/Ni show no temperature dependence, while for Al a pronounced increase with temperature was observed. The contributions of different mechanisms to the production of surface and bulk defects are discussed. The mean square displacement (MSD) of atoms is in all cases larger at 300 K as compared to 0 K. The larger MSD at 300 K is mainly due to an increase in lateral (perpendicular to the ion beam) motion of displaced atoms. Similar the number of atomic jumps, in which an atom leaves its original Wigner-Seitz cell, increases in all cases with temperature. For the pure elements the production of bulk vacancies and interstitials decreases with temperature, but the number of surface vacancies and ad-atoms increases with temperature. For the bilayer system practically no temperature dependence for defects was observed

  20. Lattice mismatch modeling of aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dongwon; Roy, Shibayan; Watkins, Thomas R.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-10-01

    We present a theoretical framework to accurately predict the lattice mismatch between the fcc matrix and precipitates in the multi-component aluminum alloys as a function of temperature and composition. We use a computational thermodynamic approach to model the lattice parameters of the multi-component fcc solid solution and θ'-Al2Cu precipitate phase. Better agreement between the predicted lattice parameters of fcc aluminum in five commercial alloys (206, 319, 356, A356, and A356 + 0.5Cu) and experimental data from the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXD) has been obtained when simulating supersaturated rather than equilibrium solid solutions. We use the thermal expansion coefficient of thermodynamically stable θ-Al2Cu to describe temperature-dependent lattice parameters of meta-stable θ' and to show good agreement with the SXD data. Both coherent and semi-coherent interface mismatches between the fcc aluminum matrix and θ' in Al-Cu alloys are presented as a function of temperature. Our calculation results show that the concentration of solute atoms, particularly Cu, in the matrix greatly affects the lattice mismatch

  1. Mesoscopic quantum coherence in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycock; Alsing; Deutsch; Grondalski; Jessen

    2000-10-16

    We observe the quantum coherent dynamics of atomic spinor wave packets in the double-well potentials of a far-off-resonance optical lattice. With appropriate initial conditions the system Rabi oscillates between the left and right localized states of the ground doublet, and at certain times the wave packet corresponds to a coherent superposition of these mesoscopically distinct quantum states. The atom/optical double-well potential is a flexible and powerful system for further study of quantum coherence, quantum control, and the quantum/classical transition.

  2. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Takeda, Shoichi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼10 4 times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO 4 tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy

  3. Finite size effects on the helical edge states on the Lieb lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rui; Zhou Bin

    2016-01-01

    For a two-dimensional Lieb lattice, that is, a line-centered square lattice, the inclusion of the intrinsic spin–orbit (ISO) coupling opens a topologically nontrivial gap, and gives rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect characterized by two pairs of gapless helical edge states within the bulk gap. Generally, due to the finite size effect in QSH systems, the edge states on the two sides of a strip of finite width can couple together to open a gap in the spectrum. In this paper, we investigate the finite size effect of helical edge states on the Lieb lattice with ISO coupling under three different kinds of boundary conditions, i.e., the straight, bearded and asymmetry edges. The spectrum and wave function of edge modes are derived analytically for a tight-binding model on the Lieb lattice. For a strip Lieb lattice with two straight edges, the ISO coupling induces the Dirac-like bulk states to localize at the edges to become the helical edge states with the same Dirac-like spectrum. Moreover, it is found that in the case with two straight edges the gapless Dirac-like spectrum remains unchanged with decreasing the width of the strip Lieb lattice, and no gap is opened in the edge band. It is concluded that the finite size effect of QSH states is absent in the case with the straight edges. However, in the other two cases with the bearded and asymmetry edges, the energy gap induced by the finite size effect is still opened with decreasing the width of the strip. It is also proposed that the edge band dispersion can be controlled by applying an on-site potential energy on the outermost atoms. (paper)

  4. Root lattices and quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baake, M.; Joseph, D.; Kramer, P.; Schlottmann, M.

    1990-10-01

    It is shown that root lattices and their reciprocals might serve as the right pool for the construction of quasicrystalline structure models. All noncrystallographic symmetries observed so far are covered in minimal embedding with maximal symmetry.

  5. Angles in hyperbolic lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Morten S.; Södergren, Carl Anders

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that the angles in a lattice acting on hyperbolic n -space become equidistributed. In this paper we determine a formula for the pair correlation density for angles in such hyperbolic lattices. Using this formula we determine, among other things, the asymptotic behavior of the den......It is well known that the angles in a lattice acting on hyperbolic n -space become equidistributed. In this paper we determine a formula for the pair correlation density for angles in such hyperbolic lattices. Using this formula we determine, among other things, the asymptotic behavior...... of the density function in both the small and large variable limits. This extends earlier results by Boca, Pasol, Popa and Zaharescu and Kelmer and Kontorovich in dimension 2 to general dimension n . Our proofs use the decay of matrix coefficients together with a number of careful estimates, and lead...

  6. MEETING: Lattice 88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, Paul

    1989-01-01

    The forty-year dream of understanding the properties of the strongly interacting particles from first principles is now approaching reality. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD - the field theory of the quark and gluon constituents of strongly interacting particles) was initially handicapped by the severe limitations of the conventional (perturbation) approach in this picture, but Ken Wilson's inventions of lattice gauge theory and renormalization group methods opened new doors, making calculations of masses and other particle properties possible. Lattice gauge theory became a major industry around 1980, when Monte Carlo methods were introduced, and the first prototype calculations yielded qualitatively reasonable results. The promising developments over the past year were highlighted at the 1988 Symposium on Lattice Field Theory - Lattice 88 - held at Fermilab

  7. Lie n-derivations on 7 -subspace lattice algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tice algebra, or briefly, JSL algebra. Note that a JSL algebra may not be prime. It also should be mentioned that both atomic Boolean subspace lattices and pentagon subspace lattices are 7 .... there exists some P ∈ JL(K) such that A = P AP and B = PBP. So JL(K) is a local matrix algebra. Note that K ∧ K− = {0} and K ∨ K.

  8. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  9. Permutohedral Lattice CNNs

    OpenAIRE

    Kiefel, Martin; Jampani, Varun; Gehler, Peter V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a convolutional layer that is able to process sparse input features. As an example, for image recognition problems this allows an efficient filtering of signals that do not lie on a dense grid (like pixel position), but of more general features (such as color values). The presented algorithm makes use of the permutohedral lattice data structure. The permutohedral lattice was introduced to efficiently implement a bilateral filter, a commonly used image processing operation....

  10. Tunable gauge potential for spinless particles in driven lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonet, J.; Struck, J.; Weinberg, M.; Ölschläger, C.; Hauke, P.; Eckardt, A.; Lewenstein, M.; Sengstock, K.; Windpassinger, P.

    2013-08-01

    We present a universal method to create a tunable, artificial vector gauge potential for neutral particles trapped in an optical lattice. A suitable periodic shaking of the lattice allows to engineer a Peierls phase for the hopping parameters. This scheme thus allows one to address the atomic internal degrees of freedom independently. We experimentally demonstrate the realisation of such artificial potentials in a 1D lattice, which generate ground state superfluids at arbitrary non-zero quasimomentum [4]. This scheme offers fascinating possibilities to emulate synthetic magnetic fields in 2D lattices. In a triangular lattice, continuously tunable staggered fluxes are realised. Spontaneous symmetry breaking has recently been observed for a π-flux [23]. With the presented scheme, we are now able to study the influence of a small symmetry breaking perturbation.

  11. A molecular dynamics study on the role of localised lattice distortions in the formation of Ni-Zr metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delogu, F.

    2003-01-01

    The formation of Ni-Zr binary metallic glasses resulting from the introduction of localised crystalline lattice distortions is investigated by means of constant-temperature, constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulations. Substitutional solid solutions of various composition were created by inserting substitutional atoms into a pure lattice. The insertion of Zr atoms into the regular Ni lattice determined its volume expansion, while the insertion of Ni atoms into the Zr lattice induced a volume contraction. Local lattice distortions are associated with substitutional atoms due to the size mismatch between Ni and Zr. The radial distribution functions, the rms atomic displacement and the static order parameter are used to characterise the response of the system to the insertion of substitutional atoms. The gradual loss of crystalline long-range order is accompanied by a large elastic softening. It appears that the static order parameter represents the fundamental quantity to characterise the elastic behaviour of both Ni- and Zr-based solid solutions

  12. Electronic structure of disordered binary alloys with short range correlation in Bethe lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, I.F.

    1987-01-01

    The determination of the electronic structure of a disordered material along the tight-binding model when applied to a Bethe lattice. The diagonal as well as off-diagonal disorder, are considered. The coordination number on the Bethe is fixed lattice to four (Z=4) that occurs in most compound semiconductors. The main proposal was to study the conditions under which a relatively simple model of a disordered material, i.e, a binary alloy, could account for the basic properties of transport or more specifically for the electronic states in such systems. By using a parametrization of the pair probability the behaviour of the electronic density of states (DOS) for different values of the short range order parameter, σ, which makes possible to treat the segregated, random and alternating cases, was analysed. In solving the problem via the Green function technique in the Wannier representation a linear chain of atoms was considered and using the solution of such a 1-D system the problem of the Bethe lattice which is constructed using such renormalized chains as elements, was solved. The results indicate that the obtained DOS are strongly dependent on the correlation assumed for the occupancy in the lattice. (author) [pt

  13. Copper precipitation in iron: a comparison between metropolis Monte Carlo and lattice kinetic Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Khrushcheva, O; Malerba, L; Becquart, C S; Domain, C; Hou, M

    2003-01-01

    Several variants are possible in the suite of programs forming multiscale predictive tools to estimate the yield strength increase caused by irradiation in RPV steels. For instance, at the atomic scale, both the Metropolis and the lattice kinetic Monte Carlo methods (MMC and LKMC respectively) allow predicting copper precipitation under irradiation conditions. Since these methods are based on different physical models, the present contribution discusses their consistency on the basis of a realistic case study. A cascade debris in iron containing 0.2% of copper was modelled by molecular dynamics with the DYMOKA code, which is part of the REVE suite. We use this debris as input for both the MMC and the LKMC simulations. Thermal motion and lattice relaxation can be avoided in the MMC, making the model closer to the LKMC (LMMC method). The predictions and the complementarity of the three methods for modelling the same phenomenon are then discussed.

  14. Vortices of a rotating two-component dipolar Bose–Einstein condensate in an optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Xue [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710600 (China); Dong, Biao; Chen, Guang-Ping [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710600 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Han, Wei; Zhang, Shou-Gang [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710600 (China); Shi, Yu-Ren, E-mail: shiyr@nwnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Zhang, Xiao-Fei, E-mail: xfzhang@ntsc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710600 (China)

    2016-01-28

    We consider a two-component Bose–Einstein condensate, which consists of both dipolar and scalar bosonic atoms, in a confinement that is composed of a harmonic oscillator and an underlying optical lattice set rotation. When the dipoles are polarized along the symmetry axis of the harmonic potential, the ground-state density distributions of such a system are investigated as a function of the relative strength between the dipolar and contact interactions, and of the rotation frequency. Our results show that the number of vortices and its related vortex structures of such a system depend strongly on such system parameters. The special two-component system considered here opens up alternate ways for exploring the rich physics of dipolar quantum gases. - Highlights: • Only one component possesses dipole moment. • Spin-dependent optical lattices support exotic vortex structures. • Both the dipole–dipole interaction and rotation frequency are discussed in detail.

  15. Dimensional crossover in Bragg scattering from an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slama, S.; Cube, C. von; Ludewig, A.; Kohler, M.; Zimmermann, C.; Courteille, Ph.W.

    2005-01-01

    We study Bragg scattering at one-dimensional (1D) optical lattices. Cold atoms are confined by the optical dipole force at the antinodes of a standing wave generated inside a laser-driven high-finesse cavity. The atoms arrange themselves into a chain of pancake-shaped layers located at the antinodes of the standing wave. Laser light incident on this chain is partially Bragg reflected. We observe an angular dependence of this Bragg reflection which is different from what is known from crystalline solids. In solids, the scattering layers can be taken to be infinitely spread (three-dimensional limit). This is not generally true for an optical lattice consistent of a 1D linear chain of pointlike scattering sites. By an explicit structure factor calculation, we derive a generalized Bragg condition, which is valid in the intermediate regime. This enables us to determine the aspect ratio of the atomic lattice from the angular dependance of the Bragg scattered light

  16. Nonlinear lattice structures based on families of complex nondiffracting beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Patrick; Boguslawski, Martin; Denz, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    We present a new concept for the generation of optical lattice waves. For all four families of nondiffracting beams, we are able to realize corresponding nondiffracting intensity patterns in a single setup. The potential of our approach is shown by demonstrating the optical induction of complex photonic discrete, Bessel, Mathieu and Weber lattices in a nonlinear photorefractive medium. However, our technique itself is very general and can be transferred to optical lattices in other fields such as atom optics or cold gases in order to add such complex optical potentials as a new concept to these areas as well. (paper)

  17. Topographic and electronic contrast of the graphene moir´e on Ir(111) probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.; Hämäläinen, K.; Sainio, K.; Lahtinen, J.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.; Liljeroth, P.

    2011-01-01

    Epitaxial graphene grown on transition-metal surfaces typically exhibits a moir´e pattern due to the lattice mismatch between graphene and the underlying metal surface. We use both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the electronic and topographic contrast

  18. Resonance fluorescence microscopy via three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta; Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Das, Nityananda; Mahapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A scheme is proposed to realize three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a driven two-level atomic system via resonance fluorescence. The field arrangement for the atom localization involves the application of three mutually orthogonal standing-wave fields and an additional traveling-wave coupling field. We have shown the efficacy of such field arrangement in tuning the spatially modulated resonance in all directions. Under different parametric conditions, the 3D localization patterns originate with various shapes such as sphere, sheets, disk, bowling pin, snake flute, flower vase. High-precision localization is achieved when the radiation field detuning equals twice the combined Rabi frequencies of the standing-wave fields. Application of a traveling-wave field of suitable amplitude at optimum radiation field detuning under symmetric standing-wave configuration leads to 100% detection probability even in sub-wavelength domain. Asymmetric field configuration is also taken into consideration to exhibit atom localization with appreciable precision compared to that of the symmetric case. The momentum distribution of the localized atoms is found to follow the Heisenberg uncertainty principle under the validity of Raman-Nath approximation. The proposed field configuration is suitable for application in the study of atom localization in an optical lattice arrangement.

  19. The role of diffusion measurements in the study of crystal lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidson, G.V.

    1965-07-01

    Measurements of atomic mobility in solids are frequently of direct interest to those concerned with the design, development and utilization of materials in engineering. Increasing attention, however, is currently devoted to an under standing of such properties in terms of the occurrence and nature of point and line defects in the crystals. This paper reviews some recent diffusion studies conducted at C.R,N.L. that provide, in addition to data of interest in nuclear technology, a means of gaining some insight into the more fundamental nature of the lattice defects occurring in the materials. The systems discussed are (i) self diffusion in the high temperature phase of pure zirconium (ii) solute diffusion in lead and (iii) interdiffusion of aluminum and zirconium The unusual and at present incompletely understood results described in (i) are briefly reviewed. Evidence is given to suggest that diffusion occurs either through a dense dislocation network produced as a result of a martensitic phase transformation, or, alternatively, by excess vacancies introduced into the crystal by impurities. In (ii) the extraordinarily rapid diffusion of noble metal solutes in high purity lead single crystals will be discussed n terms of the state of solution of the solute atoms. It will be shown that their diffusion behaviour can be understood by assuming that a fraction f i of the dissolved solute atoms occupy interstitial sites, The measured diffusion coefficient D m is related to the interstitial diffusion coefficient by D m = f i D i . In (iii) the formation and rapid growth of single intermetallic compound ZrAl 3 in the diffusion zone formed between pure zirconium and pure aluminum is described and the diffusion mechanism is interpreted in terms of the structure of the compound lattice. The results indicate that ZrAl 3 forms a defect lattice, leading to the relatively rapid migration of aluminum atoms. (author)

  20. On the hierarchical lattices approximation of Bravais lattices: Specific heat and correlation length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.

    1984-01-01

    Certain types of real-space renormalization groups (which essentially approximate Bravais lattices through hierarchical ones) do not preserve standard thermodynamic convexity properties. It is pointed out that this serious defect is not intrinsic to any real-space renormalization. It can be avoided if form-invariance (under uniform translation of the energy scale) of the equation connecting the Bravais lattice (which is intended to study) to the hierarchical one (which approximates it) is demanded. In addition to that expressions for the critical exponentes ν and α corresponding to hierarchical lattices are analysed; these are consistent with Melrose recent analysis of the fractal intrinsic dimensionality. (Author) [pt

  1. Local covering optimality of lattices: Leech lattice versus root lattice $E_8$

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Schuermann; F. Vallentin (Frank)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe show that the Leech lattice gives a sphere covering which is locally least dense among lattice coverings. We show that a similar result is false for the root lattice $E_8$. For this we construct a less dense covering lattice whose Delone subdivision has a common refinement with the

  2. Plasma screening effects on the energies of hydrogen atom under the influence of velocity-dependent potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahar, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    In order to examine the plasma screening and velocity-dependent potential effects on the hydrogen atom, the Schrödinger equation including a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb and velocity-dependent potential is solved numerically in the framework asymptotic iteration method. The more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential is used to model Debye and quantum plasma for the specific values of the parameters in its structure. However, in order to examine effects of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasma, the isotropic form factor of velocity-dependent potential is given as harmonic oscillator type, ρ(r)=ρ o r 2 . Then, the energies of s and p states are calculated numerically without any approximation. In order to investigate thoroughly plasma screening effects and contribution of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom, the corresponding calculations are carried out by using different values of parameters of more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential and isotropic dependence, results of which are discussed

  3. Vortex lattices in superconducting niobium and skyrmion lattices in chiral MnSi. An investigation by neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlbauer, Sebastian C.

    2009-12-10

    In this thesis, we present a comprehensive small angle neutron scattering study of the vortex lattice (VL) in an ultra-pure Nb single crystal sample, characterized by a residual resistivity ratio of {proportional_to} 10{sup 4}. We systematically investigate the morphology of vortex structures with the magnetic field applied along a four-fold left angle 100 right angle axis. We succeed to deconvolute the general morphology of the VL and its orientation to three dominant mechanisms: First, non-local contributions, second, the transition between open and closed Fermi surface sheets and, third, the intermediate mixed state (IMS) between the Meissner and the Shubnikov phase. We present first time microscopic measurements of the intrinsic bulk VL tilt modulus c{sub 44} by means of time resolved stroboscopic small angle neutron scattering in combination with a tailored magnetic field setup. In our study we find that the VL in Nb responds to an external force - in the form of a changed magnetic field - with an exponential relaxation. As expected, the relaxation process shows increasing VL stiffness with increasing magnetic field and reduced damping with increasing temperature. Besides this general trend, we observe a dramatic changeover of the relaxation process associated with the non-trivial VL morphology in the IMS and the crossover from attractive to repulsive vortex-vortex interaction. Furthermore we use small angle neutron scattering to establish the existence of a skyrmion lattice in the A-phase of MnSi. Due to a parallel alignment of the magnetic field with respect to the neutron beam, we are able to resolve the complete magnetic structure of the A-phase: The structure in the A-phase, reminiscent of a vortex lattice, consists of topological knots of the magnetization with particle-like properties, arranged in a regular six-fold lattice. The orientation of this lattice is strictly driven by the orientation of the applied magnetic field, regardless of the underlying

  4. Vortex lattices in superconducting niobium and skyrmion lattices in chiral MnSi. An investigation by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, Sebastian C.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we present a comprehensive small angle neutron scattering study of the vortex lattice (VL) in an ultra-pure Nb single crystal sample, characterized by a residual resistivity ratio of ∝ 10 4 . We systematically investigate the morphology of vortex structures with the magnetic field applied along a four-fold left angle 100 right angle axis. We succeed to deconvolute the general morphology of the VL and its orientation to three dominant mechanisms: First, non-local contributions, second, the transition between open and closed Fermi surface sheets and, third, the intermediate mixed state (IMS) between the Meissner and the Shubnikov phase. We present first time microscopic measurements of the intrinsic bulk VL tilt modulus c 44 by means of time resolved stroboscopic small angle neutron scattering in combination with a tailored magnetic field setup. In our study we find that the VL in Nb responds to an external force - in the form of a changed magnetic field - with an exponential relaxation. As expected, the relaxation process shows increasing VL stiffness with increasing magnetic field and reduced damping with increasing temperature. Besides this general trend, we observe a dramatic changeover of the relaxation process associated with the non-trivial VL morphology in the IMS and the crossover from attractive to repulsive vortex-vortex interaction. Furthermore we use small angle neutron scattering to establish the existence of a skyrmion lattice in the A-phase of MnSi. Due to a parallel alignment of the magnetic field with respect to the neutron beam, we are able to resolve the complete magnetic structure of the A-phase: The structure in the A-phase, reminiscent of a vortex lattice, consists of topological knots of the magnetization with particle-like properties, arranged in a regular six-fold lattice. The orientation of this lattice is strictly driven by the orientation of the applied magnetic field, regardless of the underlying crystal symmetry. The

  5. Hofstadter butterflies in nonlinear Harper lattices, and their optical realizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manela, Ofer; Segev, Mordechai [Department of Physics and Solid State Institute, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Christodoulides, Demetrios N [College of Optics/CREOL, University of Central Florida, FL 32816-2700 (United States); Kip, Detlef, E-mail: msegev@tx.technion.ac.i [Department of Electrical Engineering, Helmut Schmidt University, 22043 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    The ubiquitous Hofstadter butterfly describes a variety of systems characterized by incommensurable periodicities, ranging from Bloch electrons in magnetic fields and the quantum Hall effect to cold atoms in optical lattices and more. Here, we introduce nonlinearity into the underlying (Harper) model and study the nonlinear spectra and the corresponding extended eigenmodes of nonlinear quasiperiodic systems. We show that the spectra of the nonlinear eigenmodes form deformed versions of the Hofstadter butterfly and demonstrate that the modes can be classified into two families: nonlinear modes that are a 'continuation' of the linear modes of the system and new nonlinear modes that have no counterparts in the linear spectrum. Finally, we propose an optical realization of the linear and nonlinear Harper models in transversely modulated waveguide arrays, where these Hofstadter butterflies can be observed. This work is relevant to a variety of other branches of physics beyond optics, such as disorder-induced localization in ultracold bosonic gases, localization transition processes in disordered lattices, and more.

  6. Laser guiding of cold atoms in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasishin, A V; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Shuvaev, V A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of using photonic crystals with a lattice defect for the laser guiding of cold atoms is analysed. We have found a configuration of a photonic-crystal lattice and a defect ensuring the distribution of a potential in the defect mode of the photonic crystal allowing the guiding of cold atoms along the defect due to the dipole force acting on atoms. Based on quantitative estimates, we have demonstrated that photonic crystals with a lattice defect permit the guiding of atoms with much higher transverse temperatures and a much higher transverse localisation degree than in the case of hollow-core fibres. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. Lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, N E

    1979-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is the most important of all clinically distinct entities that effect the peripheral fundus and are related to retinal detachment. The purpose of this review is to survey the extensive literature, to evaluate the many diverse opinions on this subject, and to correlate and summarize all the known facts regarding this disease entity. The disease is fully defined and described, both clinically and histologically. Some aspects of the disease are still poorly understood, and some remain controversial, especially in the area of management. For this reason, the indications for treatment are discussed under eight subsections, with a view toward providing practical guidelines for recommendations in management.

  8. Energy distributions of atoms sputtered from alkali halides by 540 eV electrons, Ch.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overeijnder, H.; Szymonski, M.; Haring, A.; Vries, A.E. de

    1978-01-01

    The emission of halogen and alkali atoms, occurring under bombardment of alkali halides with electrons has been investigated. The electron energy was 540 eV and the temperature of the target was varied between room temperature and 400 0 C. The energy distribution of the emitted neutral particles was measured with a time of flight method. It was found that either diffusing interstitial halogen atoms or moving holes dominate the sputtering process above 200 0 C. Below 150 0 C alkali halides with lattice parameters s/d >= 0.33 show emission of non-thermal halogen atoms. s is the interionic space between two halogen ions in a direction and d is the diameter of a halogen atom. In general the energy distribution of the alkali and halogen atoms is thermal above 200 0 C, but not Maxwellian. (Auth.)

  9. A study on the in-reactor behavior of centrifugally atomized U3Si dispersion fuel irradiated up to high burn-up under normal power condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Lee, C. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, D. G.; Kim, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    In order to localize the nuclear fuels for HANARO, centrifugally atomized and mechanically comminuted U 3 Si mini-element fuels were fabricated and irradiated up to high burn-up under normal power condition in HANARO reactor. The average interaction thickness in atomized U 3 Si dispersion fuel meat was observed as about 8 μm. It was almost same thickness and more uniform comparing to that of comminuted U 3 Si dispersion fuel meats. The interaction thickness of U 3 Si dispersion fuel meats were generally assumed acceptable in the fuel performance point of view. The U 3 Si fuel particles were examined containing a relatively fine and uniform fission gas bubble distribution without any indications of unstable and rapid breakway swelling, irrespective of powdering methods

  10. Atomic kinetic Monte Carlo model based on ab initio data: Simulation of microstructural evolution under irradiation of dilute Fe-CuNiMnSi alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, E.; Becquart, C.S.; Domain, C.

    2007-01-01

    The embrittlement of pressure vessel steels under radiation has been long ago correlated with the presence of Cu solutes. Other solutes such as Ni, Mn and Si are now suspected to contribute also to the embrittlement. The interactions of these solutes with radiation induced point defects thus need to be characterized properly in order to understand the elementary mechanisms behind the formation of the clusters formed upon radiation. Ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory have been performed to determine the interactions of point defects with solute atoms in dilute FeX alloys (X = Cu, Mn, Ni or Si) in order to build a database used to parameterise an atomic kinetic Monte Carlo model. Some results of irradiation damage in dilute Fe-CuNiMnSi alloys obtained with this model are presented

  11. Atomic kinetic Monte Carlo model based on ab initio data: Simulation of microstructural evolution under irradiation of dilute Fe CuNiMnSi alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, E.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2007-02-01

    The embrittlement of pressure vessel steels under radiation has been long ago correlated with the presence of Cu solutes. Other solutes such as Ni, Mn and Si are now suspected to contribute also to the embrittlement. The interactions of these solutes with radiation induced point defects thus need to be characterized properly in order to understand the elementary mechanisms behind the formation of the clusters formed upon radiation. Ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory have been performed to determine the interactions of point defects with solute atoms in dilute FeX alloys (X = Cu, Mn, Ni or Si) in order to build a database used to parameterise an atomic kinetic Monte Carlo model. Some results of irradiation damage in dilute Fe-CuNiMnSi alloys obtained with this model are presented.

  12. Simulation of coherent interactions between Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robicheaux, F.; Hernandez, J.V.; Topcu, T.; Noordam, L.D.

    2004-01-01

    The results of a theoretical investigation of the coherent interaction between many Rydberg atoms are reported. The atoms are assumed to move very little during the time range we investigate. We describe the basic interaction between atoms and show that (contrary to previous theoretical studies) the interaction between the atoms can be coherent. The band structure for a perfect lattice of atoms and the density of states for an amorphous distribution of atoms are presented. We also give results for when the atoms are roughly positioned in a lattice. Finally, we performed detailed calculations to understand when the Rydberg interactions are too strong for an essential states type of approximation. The relevance of our results to previous measurements in a Rydberg gas and to possible future experiments is discussed

  13. Graphene antidot lattice waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    We introduce graphene antidot lattice waveguides: nanostructured graphene where a region of pristine graphene is sandwiched between regions of graphene antidot lattices. The band gaps in the surrounding antidot lattices enable localized states to emerge in the central waveguide region. We model...... the waveguides via a position-dependent mass term in the Dirac approximation of graphene and arrive at analytical results for the dispersion relation and spinor eigenstates of the localized waveguide modes. To include atomistic details we also use a tight-binding model, which is in excellent agreement...... with the analytical results. The waveguides resemble graphene nanoribbons, but without the particular properties of ribbons that emerge due to the details of the edge. We show that electrons can be guided through kinks without additional resistance and that transport through the waveguides is robust against...

  14. Clock spectroscopy of interacting bosons in deep optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouganne, R.; Bosch Aguilera, M.; Dareau, A.; Soave, E.; Beugnon, J.; Gerbier, F.

    2017-11-01

    We report on high-resolution optical spectroscopy of interacting bosonic 174Yb atoms in deep optical lattices with negligible tunneling. We prepare Mott insulator phases with singly- and doubly-occupied isolated sites and probe the atoms using an ultra-narrow ‘clock’ transition. Atoms in singly-occupied sites undergo long-lived Rabi oscillations. Atoms in doubly-occupied sites are strongly affected by interatomic interactions, and we measure their inelastic decay rates and energy shifts. We deduce from these measurements all relevant collisional parameters involving both clock states, in particular the intra- and inter-state scattering lengths.

  15. Differential electron emission in the ionization of Ne and Xe atoms under fast bare carbon ion impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Shubhadeep; Monti, J. M.; Tachino, C. A.; Rivarola, R. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2015-06-01

    Measurement of the energy and angular distributions of the double differential cross section (DDCS) of electron emission from Ne and Xe atoms in collision with 5 MeV u-1 bare carbon ions is reported. This study aimed to investigate the electron emission processes in the case of multi-electronic systems. In general, several clear differences between the electron emission spectra of Ne and Xe are found, which indicate the influence of the increasing number of electrons. For instance, the sharp peak due to the binary nature of collision is almost absent in the case of Xe, unlike Ne, which could be understood due to the increasing contribution from the strongly bound inner shell (such as 4d) electrons for the Xe atom. The forward-backward angular asymmetry has also been derived from the angular distributions. For Xe, the qualitative behaviour of the asymmetry parameter is seen to be quite different since it reveals structures due to Auger contributions. It is, in general, different and much lower than that for Ne, which shows the smooth behaviour that one finds for other lighter atoms like He. The single differential and total cross sections are also derived. The theoretical calculations based on the prior form of the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation have been provided for both the targets. Overall, it gives a very good agreement with the energy and the angular distributions of DDCS for Ne. For Xe, the agreement is not as good as for Ne. We also provide a detailed discussion on the DDCS obtained from different sub-shell ionization, estimated in this framework.

  16. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom–atom and atom–wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom–atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0−3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  17. Reduction of the Differential Light Shift by the Spatial Periodicity in an Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xu-Guang; Xu, Xia; Chen, Xu-Zong; Zhou, Xiao-Ji

    2013-10-01

    We study the spatial periodicity effects on the differential light shift of noninteracting atoms in an optical lattice. Through the Rabi-spectrum approach, when the wavelength of the optical lattice is not magic, a reduction to the differential light shift is expected. The reduction results from the Bloch bands induced by the quantized motion in the periodic potential. Taking the microwave transition of rubidium atoms as an example, this reduction at some wavelengths can reach one order of magnitude, compared to the data without considering the spatial profile of the optical lattice. When the atomic temperature is considered, the differential light shift increases or decreases with temperature, depending on the wavelength of the lattice. Our results should be beneficial for microwave optical lattice clock and precision measurements.

  18. Visualization of atomic structure using AFM: theoretical description

    OpenAIRE

    Gallyamov, M. O.; Yaminsky, I. V.

    2011-01-01

    We suggest simple model of image formation in atomic force microscope (AFM) taking into account contact deformations of probe and sample during scanning. The model explains the possibility of AFM visualization of regular atomic or molecular structure when probe-sample contact area is greater than an area per atom or molecule in surface lattice. (This is usually the case when lattice to be studied has subnanometer unit cell parameters and AFM investigations are carried out in air in contact mo...

  19. Systematic Effects in Atomic Fountain Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibble, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    We describe recent advances in the accuracies of atomic fountain clocks. New rigorous treatments of the previously large systematic uncertainties, distributed cavity phase, microwave lensing, and background gas collisions, enabled these advances. We also discuss background gas collisions of optical lattice and ion clocks and derive the smooth transition of the microwave lensing frequency shift to photon recoil shifts for large atomic wave packets.

  20. Atomic displacements in bcc dilute alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present here a systematic investigation of the atomic displacements in bcc transition metal (TM) dilute alloys. We have calculated the atomic displacements in bcc (V, Cr, Fe, Nb, Mo, Ta and W) transition metals (TMs) due to 3d, 4d and 5d TMs at the substitutional site using the Kanzaki lattice static method. Wills and ...

  1. Atomic displacements in bcc dilute alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We present here a systematic investigation of the atomic displacements in bcc transition metal (TM) dilute alloys. We have calculated the atomic displacements in bcc. (V, Cr, Fe, Nb, Mo, Ta and W) transition metals (TMs) due to 3d, 4d and 5d TMs at the substitutional site using the Kanzaki lattice static method.

  2. Determination of atomic-scale chemical composition at semiconductor heteroepitaxial interfaces by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, C; Ma, Y J

    2018-03-01

    The determination of atomic structures and further quantitative information such as chemical compositions at atomic scale for semiconductor defects or heteroepitaxial interfaces can provide direct evidence to understand their formation, modification, and/or effects on the properties of semiconductor films. The commonly used method, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), suffers from difficulty in acquiring images that correctly show the crystal structure at atomic resolution, because of the limitation in microscope resolution or deviation from the Scherzer-defocus conditions. In this study, an image processing method, image deconvolution, was used to achieve atomic-resolution (∼1.0 Å) structure images of small lattice-mismatch (∼1.0%) AlN/6H-SiC (0001) and large lattice-mismatch (∼8.5%) AlSb/GaAs (001) heteroepitaxial interfaces using simulated HRTEM images of a conventional 300-kV field-emission-gun transmission electron microscope under non-Scherzer-defocus conditions. Then, atomic-scale chemical compositions at the interface were determined for the atomic intermixing and Lomer dislocation with an atomic step by analyzing the deconvoluted image contrast. Furthermore, the effect of dynamical scattering on contrast analysis was also evaluated for differently weighted atomic columns in the compositions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lattice Multiverse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, S. Gill

    2010-01-01

    Will the cosmological multiverse, when described mathematically, have easily stated properties that are impossible to prove or disprove using mathematical physics? We explore this question by constructing lattice multiverses which exhibit such behavior even though they are much simpler mathematically than any likely cosmological multiverse.

  4. Gravitinos on the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maturana, G.; Vanden Doel, C.P. (California Univ., Santa Cruz (USA). Physics Dept.)

    1983-04-07

    We study spin 3/2 fields on the lattice. Species doubling is found to be totally curable with an analogue of Wilson's method and partially with an analogue of the Kogut-Susskind formalism. Only the latter preserves local supersymmetry but describes at least four species.

  5. Elastic lattice polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baiesi, M.; Barkema, G.T.; Carlon, E.

    2010-01-01

    We study a model of “elastic” lattice polymer in which a fixed number of monomers m is hosted by a self-avoiding walk with fluctuating length l. We show that the stored length density m 1− l /m scales asymptotically for large m as m= 1− /m+. . . , where is the polymer entropic exponent, so that can

  6. Quarks, gluons and lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krojts, M.

    1987-01-01

    The book by the known american physicist-theoretist M.Kreuts represents the first monography in world literature, where a new perspective direction in elementary particle physics and quantum field theory - lattice formulation of gauge theories is stated systematically. Practically all main ideas of this direction are given. Material is stated in systematic and understandable form

  7. Lattices for antiproton rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autin, B.

    1984-01-01

    After a description of the constraints imposed by the cooling of Antiprotons on the lattice of the rings, the reasons which motivate the shape and the structure of these machines are surveyed. Linear and non-linear beam optics properties are treated with a special amplification to the Antiproton Accumulator. (orig.)

  8. lattice gauge theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    activities in non-perturbative QCD. Keywords. Deflation; overlap operator; GPU; CUDA. PACS Nos 11.15.Ha; 12.38.-t. 1. Introduction. The lattice gauge theory subgroup of the working group in non-perturbative QCD consisted of Mridupavan Deka, Sourendu Gupta, N D Hari Dass, Rajarshi Roy, Sayantan Sharma and.

  9. Noetherian and Artinian Lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Keskin Tütüncü

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is proved that if L is a complete modular lattice which is compactly generated, then Rad(L/0 is Artinian if, and only if for every small element a of L, the sublattice a/0 is Artinian if, and only if L satisfies DCC on small elements.

  10. Decidability in Orthomodular Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyčko, Marek; Navara, Mirko

    2005-12-01

    We discuss the possibility of automatic simplification of formulas in orthomodular lattices. We describe the principles of a program which decides the validity of equalities and inequalities, as well as implications between them and other important relations significant in quantum mechanics.

  11. Quantum scattering theory on the momentum lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubtsova, O. A.; Pomerantsev, V. N.; Kukulin, V. I.

    2009-01-01

    A new approach based on the wave-packet continuum discretization method recently developed by the present authors for solving quantum-mechanical scattering problems for atomic and nuclear scattering processes and few-body physics is described. The formalism uses the complete continuum discretization scheme in terms of the momentum stationary wave-packet basis, which leads to formulation of the scattering problem on a lattice in the momentum space. The solution of the few-body scattering problem can be found in the approach from linear matrix equations with nonsingular matrix elements, averaged on energy over lattice cells. The developed approach is illustrated by the solution of numerous two- and three-body scattering problems with local and nonlocal potentials below and well above the three-body breakup threshold.

  12. Light storage in an optically thick atomic ensemble under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency and four-wave mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Nathaniel B.; Novikova, Irina; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2011-01-01

    We study the modification of a traditional electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) stored-light technique that includes both EIT and four-wave mixing (FWM) in an ensemble of hot Rb atoms. The standard treatment of light storage involves the coherent and reversible mapping of one photonic mode onto a collective spin coherence. It has been shown that unwanted, competing processes such as four-wave mixing are enhanced by EIT and can significantly modify the signal optical pulse propagation. We present theoretical and experimental evidence to indicate that, while a Stokes field is indeed detected upon retrieval of the signal field, any information originally encoded in a seeded Stokes field is not independently preserved during the storage process. We present a simple model that describes the propagation dynamics of the fields and the impact of FWM on the spin wave.

  13. Smeared quantum lattices exhibiting PT -symmetry with positive P

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Znojil, Miloslav; Geyer, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, 2-3 (2013), s. 111-123 ISSN 0015-8208 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/11/1433 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : cryptohermiticity * quantum lattices * unphysical and physical inner products Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 1.233, year: 2013

  14. Study of low-z coatings for JET under exposure to electrons, laser radiation and atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasz, A.A.; Davis, J.W.; Auciello, O.; Stangeby, P.C.

    1986-02-01

    In an attempt to lower radiation losses due to metal plasma impurities in the JET fusion device, the use of low-Z wall coatings has been proposed (Si, TiC, SiC, TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and MgAl 2 O 4 on Inconel 600). This report presents experimental results obtained by exposing these samples to electron, laser radiation and atomic hydrogen impact. The studies performed include measurements of (i) gases evolved due to low energy (300 eV) electron bombardment, (ii) inherent gas content in the near-surface region, and (iii) retained deuterium subsequent to exposure sub-eV D 0 . Also described is the Laser Release Analysis technique which has been developed to enable us to perform the last two sets of measurements. Electron impact desorption rates for hydrogen and methane due to electron bombardment span the range 10 -1 to 10 -3 H 2 /e - and 10 -2 to -4 CH 4 /e - . Following normal system bakeout at 500 K for 24h, the major species released by laser heating were found to be H 2 and CO, with levels up to ∼7x10 16 H/cm 2 and ∼4x10 16 CO/cm 2 . A similar concentration of argon was found for the TiC coating produced by sputter ion plating. Further heating of the samples to 800-900K for 1h resulted in a reduction of hydrogen and CO release levels by about an order of magnitude. Subsequent to the 800-900 K heating procedure, the samples were exposed to sub-eV D 0 atoms to fluences of ∼2x10 19 D 0 /cm 2 , and deuterium retention levels were measured to be of the order of 10 14 - 10 16 D/cm 2 for the various coatings. Implications of these results for JET's first-wall tritium inventory are discussed. 23 refs

  15. The behavior of various chemical forms of nickel in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry under different chemical modification approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalewska, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Various organic and inorganic Ni forms were investigated using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Experiments without chemical modification showed a wide range of characteristic mass values for Ni (from 6.7 to 29 pg) and the importance of interaction with graphite. With the aim of achieving signal unification of organic Ni forms, different ways of chemical modification were tested. Some rules that govern the behavior of Ni were found and confirmed a significant role of the organic component of the analyte molecule in the analytical process. The application of air as an internal furnace gas in the pyrolysis phase and the Pd modifier injected with the sample solution improved the signal of porphyrins, while the application of iodine and methyltrioctylammonium chloride was required for organic compounds containing oxygen-bound Ni atoms. The Ni signal was strongly diminished when an aqueous solution containing hydrochloric acid was measured with the Pd modifier injected over the sample. Using the developed analytical methods, the range of characteristic mass values for various Ni forms totally dissolved in organic or aqueous solution was 6.5–7.9 pg. - Highlights: ► Some rules that govern behavior of organic Ni forms during GFAAS analysis were found. ► Interaction with graphite can significantly influence evaporation of porphyrins. ► Determination of Ni in form of porphyrins needs Pd organic modifier and air ashing. ► Determination of Ni in O-bound organic compounds needs pretreatment with I2+MTOACl. ► Chemical modification for GFAAS determination of Ni in HCl-containing solution.

  16. Lattice dynamics of ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Moreno, S.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, P.; Munoz, A. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental II, MALTA Consolider Team, Instituto de Materiales y Nanotecnologia Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna 38205, Tenerife (Spain); Romero, A.H. [CINVESTAV-Queretaro Libramiento Norponiente No 2000 Real de Juriquilla 76230 Queretaro, Qro (Mexico); Manjon, F.J. [Instituto de Diseno para la Fabricacion y Produccion Automatizada, MALTA Consolider Team, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Errandonea, D. [Fundacion General de la Universidad de Valencia ICMUV, MALTA Consolider Team, Edificio de Investigacion, C/Dr. Moliner 50, Burjassot, 46100 Valencia (Spain); Rusu, E.; Ursaki, V.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, 2028 Chisinau (Moldova)

    2011-01-15

    In this work we present a first-principles density functional study of the vibrational properties of ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} as function of hydrostatic pressure. Based on our previous structural characterization of these two compounds under pressure, herewith, we report the pressure dependence on both systems of the vibrational modes for the cubic spinel structure, for the CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-type structure (Pnma) in ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and for marokite (Pbcm) ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Additionally we report a second order phase transition in ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} from the marokite towards the CaTi{sub 2}O{sub 4}-type structure (Cmcm), for which we also calculate the pressure dependence of the vibrational modes at the {gamma} point. Our calculations are complemented with Raman scattering measurements up to 12 GPa that show a good overall agreement between our calculated and measured mode frequencies. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Differential and total excitation cross sections in the collision of protons with He atoms at intermediate and high energies under a three body formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Fathi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  A three-body model is devised to study differential and total cross sections for the excitation of helium atom under impact of energetic protons. The actual process is a four body one but in the present model the process is simplified into a three-body one. In this model, an electron of helium atom is assumed to be inactive and only one electron of the atom is active. Therefore, the active electron is assumed to be in an atomic state with a potential of the nucleus, T, being screened by the inactive electron, e, and, thus, an effective charge of Ze. As a result, the ground state, 11S, or the excited states, 21S and 21P, wave function of the active electron is deduced from similar hydrogenic wave functions assuming effective charge, Ze for the combined nucleus (T+e. In this three-body model, the Faddeev-Watson-Lovelace formalism for excitation channel is used to calculate the transition amplitude. In the first order approximation, electronic and nuclear interaction is assumed in the collision to be A(1e= and A(1n=, respectively. Here, A(1, Txy, |i> and |f> are the first order transition amplitude, the transition matrix for the interaction between particles x and y, the initial state and the final state, respectively. The transition matrix for the first order electronic interaction implemented into A(1e is approximated as the corresponding two-body interaction, Vxy. In order to calculate first order nuclear amplitude A(1n, the near-the-shell form of transition matrix TPT is used. Calculations are performed in the energy range of 50 keV up to 1MeV. The results are then compared with those of theoretical and experimental works in the literature.

  18. Orthomodular Lattices Generated by Graphs of Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cegła, W.; Florek, J.

    2005-10-01

    In a subset where ℝ is the real line and is an arbitrary topological space, an orthogonality relation is constructed from a family of graphs of continuous functions from connected subsets of ℝ to . It is shown that under two conditions on this family a complete lattice of double orthoclosed sets is orthomodular.

  19. Two Dimensional Super QCD on a Lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catterall, Simon [Syracuse U.; Veernala, Aarti [Fermilab

    2017-10-04

    We construct a lattice theory with one exact supersymmetry which consists of fields transforming in both the adjoint and fundamental representations of a U(Nc) gauge group. In addition to gluons and gluinos, the theory contains Nf flavors of fermion in the fundamental representation along with their scalar partners and is invariant under a global U(Nf) flavor symmetry. The lattice action contains an additional Fayet-Iliopoulos term which can be used to generate a scalar potential. We perform numerical simulations that corroborate the theoretical expectation that supersymmetry is spontaneously broken for Nf

  20. Topology in dynamical lattice QCD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Florian

    2012-08-20

    Lattice simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field theory which describes the interaction between quarks and gluons, have reached a point were contact to experimental data can be made. The underlying mechanisms, like chiral symmetry breaking or the confinement of quarks, are however still not understood. This thesis focuses on topological structures in the QCD vacuum. Those are not only mathematically interesting but also closely related to chiral symmetry and confinement. We consider methods to identify these objects in lattice QCD simulations. Based on this, we explore the structures resulting from different discretizations and investigate the effect of a very strong electromagnetic field on the QCD vacuum.

  1. Self-organization of voids, gas bubbles and dislocation patterns under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinko, V.I.; Turkin, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the present paper three examples of self-organization in solids under irradiation are considered on the basis of original mechanisms, namely, the ordering of voids in void lattices under high temperature irradiation, the alignment of gas bubbles in bubble lattices under low-temperature gas atom implantation, and the formation of superdislocations (one-dimensional pile-ups of dislocation loops) and other dislocation patterns in the regimes of medium and high temperature irradiation. The ordering of cavities (i.e.voids or gas bubbles) is shown to arise due to a dissipative interaction between cavities induced by the interstitial dislocation loop absorption and punching, respectively, which represent anisotropic mechanisms of atomic transport. The dislocation patterning is shown to be driven by the dependence of dislocation bias for absorption of self-interstitial atoms on the dislocation arrangement. (author). 57 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs

  2. Multipolar Polarizabilities and Hyperpolarizabilities in the Sr Optical Lattice Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsev, S. G.; Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2018-02-01

    We address the problem of the lattice Stark shifts in the Sr clock caused by the multipolar M 1 and E 2 atom-field interactions and by the term nonlinear in lattice intensity and determined by the hyperpolarizability. We develop an approach to calculate hyperpolarizabilities for atoms and ions based on a solution of the inhomogeneous equation which allows us to effectively and accurately carry out complete summations over intermediate states. We apply our method to the calculation of the hyperpolarizabilities for the clock states in Sr. We also carry out an accurate calculation of the multipolar polarizabilities for these states at the magic frequency. Understanding these Stark shifts in optical lattice clocks is crucial for further improvement of the clock accuracy.

  3. Hyperpolarizability and Operational Magic Wavelength in an Optical Lattice Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. C.; Phillips, N. B.; Beloy, K.; McGrew, W. F.; Schioppo, M.; Fasano, R. J.; Milani, G.; Zhang, X.; Hinkley, N.; Leopardi, H.; Yoon, T. H.; Nicolodi, D.; Fortier, T. M.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    Optical clocks benefit from tight atomic confinement enabling extended interrogation times as well as Doppler- and recoil-free operation. However, these benefits come at the cost of frequency shifts that, if not properly controlled, may degrade clock accuracy. Numerous theoretical studies have predicted optical lattice clock frequency shifts that scale nonlinearly with trap depth. To experimentally observe and constrain these shifts in an 171Yb optical lattice clock, we construct a lattice enhancement cavity that exaggerates the light shifts. We observe an atomic temperature that is proportional to the optical trap depth, fundamentally altering the scaling of trap-induced light shifts and simplifying their parametrization. We identify an "operational" magic wavelength where frequency shifts are insensitive to changes in trap depth. These measurements and scaling analysis constitute an essential systematic characterization for clock operation at the 10-18 level and beyond.

  4. Basis reduction for layered lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torreão Dassen, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    We develop the theory of layered Euclidean spaces and layered lattices. We present algorithms to compute both Gram-Schmidt and reduced bases in this generalized setting. A layered lattice can be seen as lattices where certain directions have infinite weight. It can also be

  5. Basis reduction for layered lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L. Torreão Dassen (Erwin)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractWe develop the theory of layered Euclidean spaces and layered lattices. With this new theory certain problems that usually are solved by using classical lattices with a "weighting" gain a new, more natural form. Using the layered lattice basis reduction algorithms introduced here these

  6. Electronic structure and lattice properties of metastable III-(N,V) semiconductor systems; Elektronische Struktur und Kristallgittereigenschaften von metastabilen III-(N,V)-Halbleitersystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guengerich, M.

    2007-12-18

    This thesis gives an overview of these influences for Ga-V semiconductors (V=P,As,Sb). Lattice vibrations of the ternary alloys Ga(N,P), Ga(N,As) und Ga(N,Sb) are studied and analyzed with respect to the local binding of the N atoms in the host lattices. For the first time, pressure coefficients of the extended host phonons as well as of the N local vibrational modes in Ga(N,As) und Ga(N,P) are determined by Raman spectroscopy under hydrostatic pressure. The relationship between the force constant of the Ga-N bond and the bond length is determined. A central aspect of the thesis is the concentration dependence of optical transitions in Ga(N,P) and Ga(N,As), studied by spectroscopic methods. The impurity levels in both materials are determined by the spatial statistics of the N atoms. (orig.)

  7. Incommensurate lattice modulations in Potassium Vanadate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan; Banerjee, Arnab; Mark, Lumsden; Cao, Huibo; Kim, Jong-Woo; Hoffman, Christina; Wang, Xiaoping

    Potassium Vanadate (K2V3O8) is an S = 1/2 2D square lattice antiferromagnet that shows spin reorientation indicating a strong coupling between the magnetism and its dielectric properties with a promise of rich physics that promises multiferroicity. These tangible physical properties are strongly tied through a spin-lattice coupling to the underlying lattice and superlattice behavior. It has a superlattice (SL) onsetting below Tc = 115 K with an approximate [3 x 3 x 2] modulation. Here we present our recent experiments at TOPAZ beamline at SNS which for the first time proves conclusively that the lattice modulations are incommensurate, with an in-plane Q of 0.315. We will also show our attempts to refine the data using JANA which requires a redefinition of the lattice, as well as the temperature and Q dependence of the superlattice modulation measured using neutrons at HFIR and synchrotron x-rays at APS. Our results are not only relevant for the ongoing search of multifunctional behavior in K2V3O8 but also generally for the superlattice modulations observed in a large family of fresnoites. Work performed at ORNL and ANL is supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of User Facilities Division.

  8. Hafnium implanted in iron 1. Lattice location and annealing behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, J.M.G.J.; Pleiter, F; Smulders, P.J M

    1993-01-01

    Perturbed angular correlation, Rutherford backscattering and channelling experiments were conducted to study the lattice location and annealing behaviour of 110 keV hafnium ions implanted into iron single crystals. It was found that a fraction of 11-25% of the implanted hafnium atoms are located at

  9. Lattice dynamical investigations on Zn diffusion in zinc oxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ek (q, λ) exp (iq·r), (9) where e is the polarization vector. Phonon frequencies of the host lattice are calculated from the modified rigid ion model and the Green's functions are also obtained (Maradudin et al 1971), which are essential for the calculations of the displacements of the diffusing and other atoms and also the jump ...

  10. Participation of the public in licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Act and the Federal Emission Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hett, F.T.

    1994-01-01

    Section 7 of the Atomic Energy Act (AtG), section 4 of the Federal Emission Control Act (BImSchG), the Nuclear Installations Licensing Ordinance (AtVfV), and the Ninth Ordinance on the Implementation of the BImSchG (Principles of the licensing procedure) require participation of the public in the procedure before administrative provisions or decisions are issued. The book presents the legally prescribed steps at which participation of the public is mandatory, for the simple case (only one license on the agenda), and for the multi-stage licensing procedure: preliminary negotiations / filling of applications for a license and filing of documents / public announcement of projects / access to files / objections / preclusion of delayed objections / public hearing and other expert discussions / termination of procedure, decision-making by the authorities / decisions on subdivision of procedure into defined stages / modification of the procedure. The analysis of the functions of participation of the public examines the following goals: information / representation of interests / reconciliation of interests / legitimation / control / protection of rights / support. Finally, the book explains the principles of the Constitution demanding participation of the public: human dignity / democracy / rule of law / anticipated effects of the right to have recourse to the courts / civil rights. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Survey of the authorities competent for licensing and supervision in the field of radiation protection under the terms of the Atomic Energy Act (As of January 1980)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Contents: 1. Portfolio of the Federal Minister of Defence. 2. Handling of other radioactive substances, equipment for the generation of ionizing radiation and activities in installations owned by third parties: 2.1 Licensing authorities; 2.2 competent authorities for the acception and documentation of notifications required under sections 4, sub-section 1, 17 sub-section 1, of the Radiation Protection Ordinance; 2.3 authorities competent for the registration of radiation records; 2.4 supervisory authorities. 3. Carriage of radioactive substances: 3.1 Federal authorities responsible for licensing and supervisions; 3.2 Land authorities responsible for licensing; 3.3 Land authorities responsible for supervision. 4. Permits concerning the design of equipment. 5. Import and export of radioactive substances: 5.1 Licensing authorities; 5.2 supervisory authorities. 6. Competent authorities in accordance with section 63 sub-section 3 paragraph 1 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance (monitoring stations) and according to the provisions of Land legislation. 7. Licensing and supervisory authorities for the treatment, processing or any other use of nuclear fuels under section 9 of the Atomic Energy Act. 8. Competences of the Laender in the implementation of the Atomic Energy Act and the Radiation Protection Ordinance. (orig.) [de

  12. Simulation of the microstructural evolution under irradiation of dilute Fe-CuNiMnSi alloys by atomic kinetic monte Carlo model based on ab initio data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, E.; Domain, C.; Vincent, E.; Becquart, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The embrittlement and the hardening of pressure vessel steels under radiation has been correlated with the presence solutes such as Cu, Ni, Mn and Si. Indeed it has been observed that under irradiation, these solutes tend to gather to form more or less dilute clusters. The interactions of these solutes with radiation induced point defects thus need to be characterised properly in order to understand the elementary mechanisms behind the formation of these clusters. Ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory have been performed to determine the interactions of point defects (vacancies as well as interstitials) with solute atoms in dilute FeX alloys (X Cu, Mn, Ni or Si) in order to build a database used to parameterize an atomic kinetic Monte Carlo model. The model has been applied to simulate thermal ageing as well as irradiation conditions in dilute Fe-CuNiMnSi alloys. Results obtained with this model will be presented. (authors)

  13. An alternative lattice field theory formulation inspired by lattice supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Adda, Alessandro; Kawamoto, Noboru; Saito, Jun

    2017-12-01

    We propose an unconventional formulation of lattice field theories which is quite general, although originally motivated by the quest of exact lattice supersymmetry. Two long standing problems have a solution in this context: 1) Each degree of freedom on the lattice corresponds to 2 d degrees of freedom in the continuum, but all these doublers have (in the case of fermions) the same chirality and can be either identified, thus removing the degeneracy, or, in some theories with extended supersymmetry, identified with different members of the same supermultiplet. 2) The derivative operator, defined on the lattice as a suitable periodic function of the lattice momentum, is an addittive and conserved quantity, thus assuring that the Leibniz rule is satisfied. This implies that the product of two fields on the lattice is replaced by a non-local "star product" which is however in general non-associative. Associativity of the "star product" poses strong restrictions on the form of the lattice derivative operator (which becomes the inverse Gudermannian function of the lattice momentum) and has the consequence that the degrees of freedom of the lattice theory and of the continuum theory are in one-to-one correspondence, so that the two theories are eventually equivalent. We can show that the non-local star product of the fields effectively turns into a local one in the continuum limit. Regularization of the ultraviolet divergences on the lattice is not associated to the lattice spacing, which does not act as a regulator, but may be obtained by a one parameter deformation of the lattice derivative, thus preserving the lattice structure even in the limit of infinite momentum cutoff. However this regularization breaks gauge invariance and a gauge invariant regularization within the lattice formulation is still lacking.

  14. Single-spin addressing in an atomic Mott insulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitenberg, Christof; Endres, Manuel; Sherson, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    directly monitored the tunnelling quantum dynamics of single atoms in the lattice prepared along a single line, and observed that our addressing scheme leaves the atoms in the motional ground state. The results should enable studies of entropy transport and the quantum dynamics of spin impurities...... and quantum spin dynamics. Here we demonstrate how such control can be implemented at the most fundamental level of a single spin at a specific site of an optical lattice. Using a tightly focused laser beam together with a microwave field, we were able to flip the spin of individual atoms in a Mott insulator...... with sub-diffraction-limited resolution, well below the lattice spacing. The Mott insulator provided us with a large two-dimensional array of perfectly arranged atoms, in which we created arbitrary spin patterns by sequentially addressing selected lattice sites after freezing out the atom distribution. We...

  15. Optimal control of Rydberg lattice gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; van Bijnen, Rick; Pohl, Thomas; Montangero, Simone; Calarco, Tommaso

    2017-09-01

    We present optimal control protocols to prepare different many-body quantum states of Rydberg atoms in optical lattices. Specifically, we show how to prepare highly ordered many-body ground states, GHZ states as well as some superposition of symmetric excitation number Fock states, that inherit the translational symmetry from the Hamiltonian, within sufficiently short excitation times minimising detrimental decoherence effects. For the GHZ states, we propose a two-step detection protocol to experimentally verify the optimised preparation of the target state based only on standard measurement techniques. Realistic experimental constraints and imperfections are taken into account by our optimisation procedure making it applicable to ongoing experiments.

  16. Optimal control of Rydberg lattice gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cui, Jian; Bijnen, Rick van; Pohl, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    the translational symmetry from the Hamiltonian, within sufficiently short excitation times minimising detrimental decoherence effects. For the GHZ states, we propose a two-step detection protocol to experimentally verify the optimised preparation of the target state based only on standard measurement techniques....... Realistic experimental constraints and imperfections are taken into account by our optimisation procedure making it applicable to ongoing experiments.......We present optimal control protocols to prepare different many-body quantum states of Rydberg atoms in optical lattices. Specifically, we show how to prepare highly ordered many-body ground states, GHZ states as well as some superposition of symmetric excitation number Fock states, that inherit...

  17. Electronic properties of disordered graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Shengjun; Roldán, Rafael; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Regular nanoscale perforations in graphene (graphene antidot lattices, GALs) are known to lead to a gap in the energy spectrum, thereby paving a possible way towards many applications. This theoretical prediction relies on a perfect placement of identical perforations, a situation not likely...... for solving the time-dependent Schro¨dinger equation in a tight-binding representation of the graphene sheet [Yuan et al., Phys. Rev. B 82, 115448 (2010)], which allows us to consider GALs consisting of 6400 × 6400 carbon atoms. The central conclusion for all kinds of disorder is that the gaps found...

  18. New Forms of Matter in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    precise computer -generated hologram design,” Applied Optics, vol. 53, no. 27, pp G84-G94, 20 September 2014. 18. J. Schachenmayer, L. Pollet, M...B.S. `Diagrammatic lambda -series for extremely correlated Fermi Liquids’ arXiv :1410.5174 5. L. H. Haddad, K. M. O’Hara, and L. D. Carr, “Nonlinear...matrix renormalization group methods, we were able to compute the relaxation dynamics of bosonic atoms moving in 1D on a lattice after spontaneous

  19. Lattice QCD for cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsanyi, Sz.; Kampert, K.H.; Fodor, Z.; Forschungszentrum Juelich; Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest

    2016-06-01

    We present a full result for the equation of state (EoS) in 2+1+1 (up/down, strange and charm quarks are present) flavour lattice QCD. We extend this analysis and give the equation of state in 2+1+1+1 flavour QCD. In order to describe the evolution of the universe from temperatures several hundreds of GeV to the MeV scale we also include the known effects of the electroweak theory and give the effective degree of freedoms. As another application of lattice QCD we calculate the topological susceptibility (χ) up to the few GeV temperature region. These two results, EoS and χ, can be used to predict the dark matter axion's mass in the post-inflation scenario and/or give the relationship between the axion's mass and the universal axionic angle, which acts as a initial condition of our universe.

  20. Datagrids for lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechner, O. [Zentralinstitut fuer Angewandte Mathematik ZAM, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Ernst, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Jansen, K. [John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC/DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Lippert, Th. [Zentralinstitut fuer Angewandte Mathematik ZAM, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Melkumyan, D. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Orth, B. [Zentralinstitut fuer Angewandte Mathematik ZAM, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Pleiter, D. [John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC/DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany)]. E-mail: dirk.pleiter@desy.de; Stueben, H. [Konrad-Zuse-Institut fuer Informationstechnik ZIB, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Wegner, P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Wollny, S. [Konrad-Zuse-Institut fuer Informationstechnik ZIB, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-04-01

    As the need for computing resources to carry out numerical simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) formulated on a lattice has increased significantly, efficient use of the generated data has become a major concern. To improve on this, groups plan to share their configurations on a worldwide level within the International Lattice DataGrid (ILDG). Doing so requires standardized description of the configurations, standards on binary file formats and common middleware interfaces. We describe the requirements and problems, and discuss solutions. Furthermore, an overview is given on the implementation of the LatFor DataGrid [http://www-zeuthen.desy.de/latfor/ldg], a France/German/Italian grid that will be one of the regional grids within the ILDG grid-of-grids concept.

  1. Introduction to lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.

    1998-12-31

    The goal of the lectures on lattice QCD (LQCD) is to provide an overview of both the technical issues and the progress made so far in obtaining phenomenologically useful numbers. The lectures consist of three parts. The author`s charter is to provide an introduction to LQCD and outline the scope of LQCD calculations. In the second set of lectures, Guido Martinelli will discuss the progress they have made so far in obtaining results, and their impact on Standard Model phenomenology. Finally, Martin Luescher will discuss the topical subjects of chiral symmetry, improved formulation of lattice QCD, and the impact these improvements will have on the quality of results expected from the next generation of simulations.

  2. Varieties of lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Jipsen, Peter

    1992-01-01

    The study of lattice varieties is a field that has experienced rapid growth in the last 30 years, but many of the interesting and deep results discovered in that period have so far only appeared in research papers. The aim of this monograph is to present the main results about modular and nonmodular varieties, equational bases and the amalgamation property in a uniform way. The first chapter covers preliminaries that make the material accessible to anyone who has had an introductory course in universal algebra. Each subsequent chapter begins with a short historical introduction which sites the original references and then presents the results with complete proofs (in nearly all cases). Numerous diagrams illustrate the beauty of lattice theory and aid in the visualization of many proofs. An extensive index and bibliography also make the monograph a useful reference work.

  3. Lattices of dielectric resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Trubin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the analytical theory of complex systems composed of a large number of high-Q dielectric resonators. Spherical and cylindrical dielectric resonators with inferior and also whispering gallery oscillations allocated in various lattices are considered. A new approach to S-matrix parameter calculations based on perturbation theory of Maxwell equations, developed for a number of high-Q dielectric bodies, is introduced. All physical relationships are obtained in analytical form and are suitable for further computations. Essential attention is given to a new unified formalism of the description of scattering processes. The general scattering task for coupled eigen oscillations of the whole system of dielectric resonators is described. The equations for the  expansion coefficients are explained in an applicable way. The temporal Green functions for the dielectric resonator are presented. The scattering process of short pulses in dielectric filter structures, dielectric antennas  and lattices of d...

  4. Nondestructive fluorescent state detection of single neutral atom qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Michael J; Hamley, Christopher D; Shih, Chung-Yu; Chapman, Michael S

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate nondestructive (lossless) fluorescent state detection of individual neutral atom qubits trapped in an optical lattice. The hyperfine state of the atom is measured with a 95% accuracy and an atom loss rate of 1%. Individual atoms are initialized and detected over 100 times before being lost from the trap, representing a 100-fold improvement in data collection rates over previous experiments. Microwave Rabi oscillations are observed with repeated measurements of one and the same single atom. © 2011 American Physical Society

  5. Light water lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    The panel was attended by prominent physicists from most of the well-known laboratories in the field of light-water lattices, who exchanged the latest information on the status of work in their countries and discussed both the theoretical and the experimental aspects of the subjects. The supporting papers covered most problems, including criticality, resonance absorption, thermal utilization, spectrum calculations and the physics of plutonium bearing systems. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Computing: Lattice work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, Ken

    1990-01-01

    One of the major recent developments in particle theory has been the use of very high performance computers to obtain approximate numerical solutions of quantum field theories by formulating them on a finite space-time lattice. The great virtue of this new technique is that it avoids the straitjacket of perturbation theory and can thus attack new, but very fundamental problems, such as the calculation of hadron masses in quark-gluon field theory (quantum chromodynamics - QCD)

  7. Automated lattice data generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyar Venkitesh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of generating ensembles of gauge configurations (and measuring various observables over them can be tedious and error-prone when done “by hand”. In practice, most of this procedure can be automated with the use of a workflow manager. We discuss how this automation can be accomplished using Taxi, a minimal Python-based workflow manager built for generating lattice data. We present a case study demonstrating this technology.

  8. Transport of atoms in a quantum conveyor belt

    OpenAIRE

    Browaeys, A.; Haeffner, H.; McKenzie, C.; Rolston, S. L.; Helmerson, K.; Phillips, W. D.

    2005-01-01

    11 pages, 9 figures; International audience; We have performed experiments using a 3D-Bose-Einstein condensate of sodium atoms in a 1D optical lattice to explore some unusual properties of band-structure. In particular, we investigate the loading of a condensate into a moving lattice and find non-intuitive behavior. We also revisit the behavior of atoms, prepared in a single quasimomentum state, in an accelerating lattice. We generalize this study to a cloud whose atoms have a large quasimome...

  9. Robots and lattice automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The book gives a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art research and engineering in theory and application of Lattice Automata in design and control of autonomous Robots. Automata and robots share the same notional meaning. Automata (originated from the latinization of the Greek word “αυτόματον”) as self-operating autonomous machines invented from ancient years can be easily considered the first steps of robotic-like efforts. Automata are mathematical models of Robots and also they are integral parts of robotic control systems. A Lattice Automaton is a regular array or a collective of finite state machines, or automata. The Automata update their states by the same rules depending on states of their immediate neighbours. In the context of this book, Lattice Automata are used in developing modular reconfigurable robotic systems, path planning and map exploration for robots, as robot controllers, synchronisation of robot collectives, robot vision, parallel robotic actuators. All chapters are...

  10. Dielectric lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1983-06-01

    Dielectric lattice gauge theory models are introduced. They involve variables PHI(b)epsilong that are attached to the links b = (x+esub(μ),x) of the lattice and take their values in the linear space g which consists of real linear combinations of matrices in the gauge group G. The polar decomposition PHI(b)=U(b)osub(μ)(x) specifies an ordinary lattice gauge field U(b) and a kind of dielectric field epsilonsub(ij)proportionalosub(i)osub(j)sup(*)deltasub(ij). A gauge invariant positive semidefinite kinetic term for the PHI-field is found, and it is shown how to incorporate Wilson fermions in a way which preserves Osterwalder Schrader positivity. Theories with G = SU(2) and without matter fields are studied in some detail. It is proved that confinement holds, in the sense that Wilson loop expectation values show an area law decay, if the Euclidean action has certain qualitative features which imply that PHI = 0 (i.e. dielectric field identical 0) is the unique maximum of the action. (orig.)

  11. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  12. Characterization of carbon contamination under ion and hot atom bombardment in a tin-plasma extreme ultraviolet light source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolgov, A.; Lopaev, D.; Lee, Christopher James; Zoethout, E.; Medvedev, Viacheslav; Yakushev, O.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Molecular contamination of a grazing incidence collector for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography was experimentally studied. A carbon film was found to have grown under irradiation from a pulsed tin plasma discharge. Our studies show that the film is chemically inert and has characteristics that

  13. Nuclear collision induced lattice swelling and refractive-index modification in ion-irradiated yttrium orthoaluminate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Huang, Q.; Qiao, M.; Liu, P.; Wang, X. L.

    2017-10-01

    This work reports the study of lattice damage behavior in yttrium orthoaluminate (YAlO3) crystal irradiated with medium-energy (6.0 MeV) and relatively high-energy (20.0 MeV) Si ions through complementary characterization techniques including Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results clearly demonstrate that under Si-ion irradiation over the energy range from a few MeV up to tens of MeV, the nuclear energy loss (elastic collisions between injected ions and target atoms) along ion trajectory would play a dominant role in lattice damage and swelling, which leads to the decrease of refractive index in the nuclear energy deposition region and the waveguide formation in YAlO3 crystal. By contrast, the electronic energy loss (ionization and electronic excitation) over the corresponding ion energy range would not produce obvious lattice damage, and therefore could not significantly modify the refractive index in YAlO3 crystal. Utilizing optical-coupling measurements and iWKB-procedure simulation, the modified refractive-index profile in ion irradiation region has been reconstructed, and the obtained corresponding relationship between the refractive-index profile and SRIM-simulated dpa profile further confirms the nuclear-energy-loss induced lattice swelling and refractive-index decrease behaviors in ion-irradiated YAlO3 crystal, consisting with the microstructure characterization results.

  14. Breatherlike excitations in discrete lattices with noise and nonlinear damping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri B.; Johansson, Magnus

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the stability of highly localized, ''breatherlike,'' excitations in discrete nonlinear lattices under the influence of thermal fluctuations. The particular model considered is the discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation in the regime of high nonlinearity, where temperature effects...

  15. Construction and performance of fully numerical optimum atomic basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Björn; Freysoldt, Christoph; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2011-08-01

    We propose a method for constructing small atomic basis sets that optimally mimic the Kohn-Sham wave functions of an underlying plane-wave calculation. The key quantity of the optimization procedure is the spillage: the relative amount of the occupied Hilbert-space norm lost in the projection onto the atomic basis. To ensure full flexibility in the radial shape, we represent the basis functions by radial momentum-space spline functions. With our approach we reach spillages in the order of 10-4 when using minimal basis sets. Band structure calculations on top of a self-consistent linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals (LCAO) run reproduce the occupied part of the band structure within a few tens meV. However, minimal basis sets are not flexible enough for obtaining material properties such as the lattice constant and the bulk modulus but require basis sets with f orbitals. Basis sets generated for Si, GaN, Al, and NaCl reach a spillage of ˜10-5 and reproduce lattice constants and bulk moduli within 0.03% and 5%, respectively.

  16. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Brower; Norman Christ; Michael Creutz; Paul Mackenzie; John Negele; Claudio Rebbi; David Richards; Stephen Sharpe; Robert Sugar

    2006-01-01

    This is the final report of Department of Energy SciDAC Grant ''National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory''. It describes the software developed under this grant, which enables the effective use of a wide variety of supercomputers for the study of lattice quantum chromodynamics (lattice QCD). It also describes the research on and development of commodity clusters optimized for the study of QCD. Finally, it provides some high lights of research enabled by the infrastructure created under this grant, as well as a full list of the papers resulting from research that made use of this infrastructure

  17. Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Optical Lattice Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael L.; Koller, Andrew P.; Li, Shuming; Zhang, Xibo; Cooper, Nigel R.; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of optical lattice clocks operated with fermionic alkaline-earth atoms to study spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in interacting many-body systems. The SOC emerges naturally during the clock interrogation, when atoms are allowed to tunnel and accumulate a phase set by the ratio of the "magic" lattice wavelength to the clock transition wavelength. We demonstrate how standard protocols such as Rabi and Ramsey spectroscopy that take advantage of the sub-Hertz resolution of state-of-the-art clock lasers can perform momentum-resolved band tomography and determine SOC-induced s -wave collisions in nuclear-spin-polarized fermions. With the use of a second counterpropagating clock beam, we propose a method for engineering controlled atomic transport and study how it is modified by p - and s -wave interactions. The proposed spectroscopic probes provide clean and well-resolved signatures at current clock operating temperatures.

  18. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Richard C.

    2014-04-15

    SciDAC-2 Project The Secret Life of Quarks: National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, from March 15, 2011 through March 14, 2012. The objective of this project is to construct the software needed to study quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interactions of sub-atomic physics, and other strongly coupled gauge field theories anticipated to be of importance in the energy regime made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It builds upon the successful efforts of the SciDAC-1 project National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, in which a QCD Applications Programming Interface (QCD API) was developed that enables lattice gauge theorists to make effective use of a wide variety of massively parallel computers. This project serves the entire USQCD Collaboration, which consists of nearly all the high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States engaged in the numerical study of QCD and related strongly interacting quantum field theories. All software developed in it is publicly available, and can be downloaded from a link on the USQCD Collaboration web site, or directly from the github repositories with entrance linke http://usqcd-software.github.io

  19. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A M; Marchant, N G; Parker, N G; O’Dell, D H J

    2017-01-01

    The experimental realization of quantum-degenerate Bose gases made of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has created a new type of fluid, known as a quantum ferrofluid, which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to rotate through vortices with quantized circulation. In quantum ferrofluids the long-range dipolar interactions add new ingredients by inducing magnetostriction and instabilities, and also affect the structural properties of vortices and vortex lattices. Here we give a review of the theory of vortices in dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. We cover single vortex solutions, including structure, energy and stability, vortex pairs, including interactions and dynamics, and also vortex lattices. Our discussion is founded on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross–Pitaevskii equation, ranging from analytic treatments based on the Thomas–Fermi (hydrodynamic) and variational approaches to full numerical simulations. Routes for generating vortices in dipolar condensates are discussed, with particular attention paid to rotating condensates, where surface instabilities drive the nucleation of vortices, and lead to the emergence of rich and varied vortex lattice structures. We also present an outlook, including potential extensions to degenerate Fermi gases, quantum Hall physics, toroidal systems and the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition. (topical review)

  20. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Marchant, N. G.; O'Dell, D. H. J.; Parker, N. G.

    2017-03-01

    The experimental realization of quantum-degenerate Bose gases made of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has created a new type of fluid, known as a quantum ferrofluid, which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to rotate through vortices with quantized circulation. In quantum ferrofluids the long-range dipolar interactions add new ingredients by inducing magnetostriction and instabilities, and also affect the structural properties of vortices and vortex lattices. Here we give a review of the theory of vortices in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. We cover single vortex solutions, including structure, energy and stability, vortex pairs, including interactions and dynamics, and also vortex lattices. Our discussion is founded on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross-Pitaevskii equation, ranging from analytic treatments based on the Thomas-Fermi (hydrodynamic) and variational approaches to full numerical simulations. Routes for generating vortices in dipolar condensates are discussed, with particular attention paid to rotating condensates, where surface instabilities drive the nucleation of vortices, and lead to the emergence of rich and varied vortex lattice structures. We also present an outlook, including potential extensions to degenerate Fermi gases, quantum Hall physics, toroidal systems and the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition.

  1. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  2. Position detection and observation of a conducting filament hidden under a top electrode in a Ta₂O₅-based atomic switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Alpana; Wang, Qi; Itoh, Yaomi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Boodhoo, Liam; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Aono, Masakazu

    2015-04-10

    Resistive random access memories (ReRAMs) are promising next-generation memory devices. Observation of the conductive filaments formed in ReRAMs is essential in understanding their operating mechanisms and their expected ultimate performance. Finding the position of the conductive filament is the key process in the preparation of samples for cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. Here, we propose a method for locating the position of conductive filaments hidden under top electrodes. Atomic force microscopy imaging with a conductive tip detects the current flowing through a conductive filament from the bottom electrode, which reaches its maximum at a position that is above the conductive filament. This is achieved by properly biasing a top electrode, a bottom electrode and the conductive tip. This technique was applied to Cu/Ta2O5/Pt atomic switches, revealing the formation of a single Cu filament in a device, although the device had a large area of 5 × 5 μm(2). Change in filament size was clearly observed depending on the compliance current used in the set process. It was also found from the TEM observation that the cross-sectional shape of the formed filament varies considerably, which is attributable to different Cu nuclei growth mechanisms.

  3. Optical bistability and multistability in a three-level Δ-type atomic system under the nonresonant condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai-Xi, Chen; Zhi-Ping, Wang; De-Hai, Chen; Yan-Qiu, Xu

    2009-01-01

    Under a nonresonant condition, we theoretically investigate hybrid absorptive-dispersive optical bistability and multistability behaviours in a three-level Δ-type system by using a microwave field to drive a hyperfine transition between two upper excited states inside a unidirectional ring cavity. We find that the optical bistability and multistability behaviours can be controlled by adjusting the intensity of the microwave field or the intensity of the coherent coupling field. Furthermore, our studies show an interesting phenomenon of the transition from the optical bistability to the optical multistability only by changing the negative detuning of the coupling field into the positive detuning of the coupling field. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  4. On the scope of the Federal Government to issue orders in plan approval procedures under para. 9b of the Atomic Energy Act as provided by article 85 section 3 of the Basic Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ossenbuehl, F.

    1991-01-01

    Under Paragraph 9b of the Atomic Energy Act the Lower Saxonian Minister of the Environment has the competence for the plan approval procedure concerning the final disposal site Konrad. The plan approval procedure under atomic energy law is a unitary administrative procedure which makes further administrative procedures and administrative decisions superfluous on the strength of its unitary character and without impingement on constitutional law. In conducting the plan approval procedure the Lower Saxonican Minister of the Environment is acting within the framework of Laender administration on behalf of the Federation. To this extent he is subject to the orders of the Federal Minister of the Enviroment under Article 85 Section 3 of The Basic Law with respect to the formation of the procedure and procedural decisions as well as decisions on the merits pending. The concentrating effect of the plan approval procedure under atomic energy law also extends to permits under water law. (orig./HSCH) [de

  5. Fourier synthesis of asymmetrical optical potentials for atoms; Fourier-Synthese von asymmetrischen optischen Potentialen fuer Atome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritt, G.

    2007-07-13

    In this work a dissipationless asymmetrical optical potential for cold atoms was produced. In a first step a new type of optical lattice was generated, whose spatial periodicity only corresponds to a quarter of the wavelength of the light used for the generation. This corresponds to the half of the periodicity of a conventional optical lattice, which is formed by the light of the same wavelength. The generation of this new type of optical lattice was reached by the use of two degenerated raman transitions. Virtual processes occur, in which four photons are involved. In conventional optical lattices however virtual two-photon processes occur. By spatially superimposing this optical lattice with a conventional optical lattice an asymmetrical optical potential could be formed. By diffraction of a Bose Einstein condensate of rubidium atoms at the transient activated asymmetrical potential the asymmetrical structure was proven. (orig.)

  6. Dimers on two types of lattices on the Klein bottle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fuliang; Zhang, Lianzhu

    2012-12-01

    The problem of enumerating close-packed dimers, or perfect matchings, on two types of lattices (the so-called 8.8.4 and 8.8.6 lattices) embedded on the Klein bottle is considered, and we obtain the explicit expression of the number of close-packed dimers and entropy. Our results imply that 8.8.4 lattices have the same entropy under three different boundary conditions (cylindrical, toroidal and Klein bottle) and 8.8.6 lattices have the same property. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  7. Study of Gd lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidovsky, I.; Kereszturi, A.

    1991-11-01

    The results of experiments and calculations on Gd lattices are presented, and a comparison of experimental and calculational data is given. This latter can be divided into four groups. The first belongs to the comparison of criticality parameters, the second group is related with the comparison of 2D distributions, the third one relates the comparison of intra-macrocell distributions, whereas the fourth group is devoted for the comparison of spectral parameters. For comparison, the computer code RFIT based on strict statistical criteria has been used. The calculated and measured results agree, in most cases, sufficiently. (R.P.) 11 refs.; 13 figs.; 9 tabs

  8. Lattice of quantum predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieschner, Michael

    1993-10-01

    What is the structure of reality? Physics is supposed to answer this question, but a purely empiristic view is not sufficient to explain its ability to do so. Quantum mechanics has forced us to think more deeply about what a physical theory is. There are preconditions every physical theory must fulfill. It has to contain, e.g., rules for empirically testable predictions. Those preconditions give physics a structure that is “a priori” in the Kantian sense. An example is given how the lattice structure of quantum mechanics can be understood along these lines.

  9. Ordered sets and lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Drashkovicheva, Kh; Igoshin, V I; Katrinyak, T; Kolibiar, M

    1989-01-01

    This book is another publication in the recent surveys of ordered sets and lattices. The papers, which might be characterized as "reviews of reviews," are based on articles reviewed in the Referativnyibreve Zhurnal: Matematika from 1978 to 1982. For the sake of completeness, the authors also attempted to integrate information from other relevant articles from that period. The bibliography of each paper provides references to the reviews in RZhMat and Mathematical Reviews where one can seek more detailed information. Specifically excluded from consideration in this volume were such topics as al

  10. Lattice cell burnup calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1977-01-01

    Accurate burnup prediction is a key item for design and operation of a power reactor. It should supply information on isotopic changes at each point in the reactor core and the consequences of these changes on the reactivity, power distribution, kinetic characters, control rod patterns, fuel cycles and operating strategy. A basic stage in the burnup prediction is the lattice cell burnup calculation. This series of lectures attempts to give a review of the general principles and calculational methods developed and applied in this area of burnup physics

  11. Quantum Phase Transition in the Finite Jaynes-Cummings Lattice Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-09-01

    Phase transitions are commonly held to occur only in the thermodynamical limit of a large number of system components. Here, we exemplify at the hand of the exactly solvable Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model and its generalization to finite JC lattices that finite component systems of coupled spins and bosons may exhibit quantum phase transitions (QPTs). For the JC model we find a continuous symmetry-breaking QPT, a photonic condensate with a macroscopic occupation as the ground state, and a Goldstone mode as a low-energy excitation. For the two site JC lattice we show analytically that it undergoes a Mott-insulator to superfluid QPT. We identify as the underlying principle of the emergence of finite system QPTs the combination of increasing atomic energy and increasing interaction strength between the atom and the bosonic mode, which allows for the exploration of an increasingly large portion of the infinite dimensional Hilbert space of the bosonic mode. This suggests that finite system phase transitions will be present in a broad range of physical systems.

  12. Natural uranium lattice in heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Y.; Koechlin, J.C.; Moreau, J.; Naudet, R.

    1959-01-01

    A group of Laplacian determinations have been made under critical running conditions in a heavy water pile specially constructed to this end using either complete lattices or samples of lattices employing a two-zone method. The experimental equipment is briefly described: it has been devised to allow rapid modifications of the charge. The methods of measurement employed are also summarily described one operates either by flux charts in the case of lattices which are then used as references, or by progressive replacement of the bars by concentric rings and measurements of the reactivity. In this case, one attempts to obtain the difference between the material laplacian of the central unknown lattice and that of the reference lattice. The method has been specially develop ped to give precision. Results of Laplacian measurements for all these lattice types are presented, allowing the construction of a set of curves as a function of the separation. Various other effects have also been measured: the equivalent reactivity of a mm of water - anisotropy - temperature effect, etc. However in this first attack on the problem, the measurement of a large variety of Laplacian has been carried out, rather than careful measurements in particular cases. It is in this spirit that the interpretation of the results has been made. As a large number of very complex phenomena still escape the possibilities of the calculation, it is considered that a certain number of adjustments are necessary; now these can only give the desired efficiency in forecasting results if they refer to a sufficiently great number of experimental data. It is necessary then to connect the measurements closely on with the other whilst, at the same time, subdividing them according to logically deduced formulae. The principal source of trouble has been that of coherence. The rules governing the calculations employed in the interpretation of the data are given. In the first instance simple formula are used: first of

  13. Band and Correlated Insulators of Cold Fermions in a Mesoscopic Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrat, Martin; Grišins, Pjotrs; Husmann, Dominik; Häusler, Samuel; Corman, Laura; Giamarchi, Thierry; Brantut, Jean-Philippe; Esslinger, Tilman

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the transport properties of neutral, fermionic atoms passing through a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. The lattice is realized by projecting individually controlled, thin optical barriers on top of a ballistic conductor. Building an increasingly longer lattice, one site after another, we observe and characterize the emergence of a band insulating phase, demonstrating control over quantum-coherent transport. We explore the influence of atom-atom interactions and show that the insulating state persists as contact interactions are tuned from moderately to strongly attractive. Using bosonization and classical Monte Carlo simulations, we analyze such a model of interacting fermions and find good qualitative agreement with the data. The robustness of the insulating state supports the existence of a Luther-Emery liquid in the one-dimensional wire. Our work realizes a tunable, site-controlled lattice Fermi gas strongly coupled to reservoirs, which is an ideal test bed for nonequilibrium many-body physics.

  14. Dependence of hydrogen-induced lattice defects and hydrogen embrittlement of cold-drawn pearlitic steels on hydrogen trap state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshida, Tomoki; Takai, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the hydrogen state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility and hydrogen-induced lattice defects were evaluated for cold-drawn pearlitic steel that absorbed hydrogen in two trapping states. Firstly, tensile tests were carried out under various conditions to evaluate hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. The results showed that peak 2 hydrogen, desorbed at temperatures above 200 °C as determined by thermal desorption analysis (TDA), had no significant effect on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. In contrast, hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased in the presence of peak 1 hydrogen, desorbed from room temperature to 200 °C as determined by TDA, at temperatures higher than −30 °C, at lower strain rates and with higher hydrogen content. Next, the same effects on hydrogen-induced lattice defects were also evaluated by TDA using hydrogen as a probe. Peak 2 hydrogen showed no significant effect on either hydrogen-induced lattice defects or hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. It was found that hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed under the conditions where hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased. This relationship indicates that hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility was higher under the conditions where the formation of hydrogen-induced lattice defects tended to be enhanced. Since hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed by the interaction between hydrogen and strain were annihilated by annealing at a temperature of 200 °C, they were presumably vacancies or vacancy clusters. One of the common atomic-level changes that occur in cold-drawn pearlitic steel showing higher hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility is the formation of vacancies and vacancy clusters

  15. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  16. Extreme lattices: symmetries and decorrelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreanov, A.; Scardicchio, A.; Torquato, S.

    2016-11-01

    We study statistical and structural properties of extreme lattices, which are the local minima in the density landscape of lattice sphere packings in d-dimensional Euclidean space {{{R}}d} . Specifically, we ascertain statistics of the densities and kissing numbers as well as the numbers of distinct symmetries of the packings for dimensions 8 through 13 using the stochastic Voronoi algorithm. The extreme lattices in a fixed dimension of space d (d≥slant 8 ) are dominated by typical lattices that have similar packing properties, such as packing densities and kissing numbers, while the best and the worst packers are in the long tails of the distribution of the extreme lattices. We also study the validity of the recently proposed decorrelation principle, which has important implications for sphere packings in general. The degree to which extreme-lattice packings decorrelate as well as how decorrelation is related to the packing density and symmetry of the lattices as the space dimension increases is also investigated. We find that the extreme lattices decorrelate with increasing dimension, while the least symmetric lattices decorrelate faster.

  17. Mechanical cloak design by direct lattice transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bückmann, Tiemo; Kadic, Muamer; Schittny, Robert; Wegener, Martin

    2015-04-21

    Spatial coordinate transformations have helped simplifying mathematical issues and solving complex boundary-value problems in physics for decades already. More recently, material-parameter transformations have also become an intuitive and powerful engineering tool for designing inhomogeneous and anisotropic material distributions that perform wanted functions, e.g., invisibility cloaking. A necessary mathematical prerequisite for this approach to work is that the underlying equations are form invariant with respect to general coordinate transformations. Unfortunately, this condition is not fulfilled in elastic-solid mechanics for materials that can be described by ordinary elasticity tensors. Here, we introduce a different and simpler approach. We directly transform the lattice points of a 2D discrete lattice composed of a single constituent material, while keeping the properties of the elements connecting the lattice points the same. After showing that the approach works in various areas, we focus on elastic-solid mechanics. As a demanding example, we cloak a void in an effective elastic material with respect to static uniaxial compression. Corresponding numerical calculations and experiments on polymer structures made by 3D printing are presented. The cloaking quality is quantified by comparing the average relative SD of the strain vectors outside of the cloaked void with respect to the homogeneous reference lattice. Theory and experiment agree and exhibit very good cloaking performance.

  18. Scattering processes and resonances from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Young, Ross D.

    2018-04-01

    The vast majority of hadrons observed in nature are not stable under the strong interaction; rather they are resonances whose existence is deduced from enhancements in the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes. The study of hadron resonances offers a window into the workings of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) in the low-energy nonperturbative region, and in addition many probes of the limits of the electroweak sector of the standard model consider processes which feature hadron resonances. From a theoretical standpoint, this is a challenging field: the same dynamics that binds quarks and gluons into hadron resonances also controls their decay into lighter hadrons, so a complete approach to QCD is required. Presently, lattice QCD is the only available tool that provides the required nonperturbative evaluation of hadron observables. This article reviews progress in the study of few-hadron reactions in which resonances and bound states appear using lattice QCD techniques. The leading approach is described that takes advantage of the periodic finite spatial volume used in lattice QCD calculations to extract scattering amplitudes from the discrete spectrum of QCD eigenstates in a box. An explanation is given of how from explicit lattice QCD calculations one can rigorously garner information about a variety of resonance properties, including their masses, widths, decay couplings, and form factors. The challenges which currently limit the field are discussed along with the steps being taken to resolve them.

  19. Gap solitons in Rabi lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaopin; Malomed, Boris A

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a two-component one-dimensional system, which is based on two nonlinear Schrödinger or Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs) with spatially periodic modulation of linear coupling ("Rabi lattice") and self-repulsive nonlinearity. The system may be realized in a binary Bose-Einstein condensate, whose components are resonantly coupled by a standing optical wave, as well as in terms of the bimodal light propagation in periodically twisted waveguides. The system supports various types of gap solitons (GSs), which are constructed, and their stability is investigated, in the first two finite bandgaps of the underlying spectrum. These include on- and off-site-centered solitons (the GSs of the off-site type are additionally categorized as spatially even and odd ones), which may be symmetric or antisymmetric, with respect to the coupled components. The GSs are chiefly stable in the first finite bandgap and unstable in the second one. In addition to that, there are narrow regions near the right edge of the first bandgap, and in the second one, which feature intricate alternation of stability and instability. Unstable solitons evolve into robust breathers or spatially confined turbulent modes. On-site-centered GSs are also considered in a version of the system that is made asymmetric by the Zeeman effect, or by birefringence of the optical waveguide. A region of alternate stability is found in the latter case too. In the limit of strong asymmetry, GSs are obtained in a semianalytical approximation, which reduces two coupled GPEs to a single one with an effective lattice potential.

  20. Gap solitons in Rabi lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaopin; Malomed, Boris A.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a two-component one-dimensional system, which is based on two nonlinear Schrödinger or Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs) with spatially periodic modulation of linear coupling ("Rabi lattice") and self-repulsive nonlinearity. The system may be realized in a binary Bose-Einstein condensate, whose components are resonantly coupled by a standing optical wave, as well as in terms of the bimodal light propagation in periodically twisted waveguides. The system supports various types of gap solitons (GSs), which are constructed, and their stability is investigated, in the first two finite bandgaps of the underlying spectrum. These include on- and off-site-centered solitons (the GSs of the off-site type are additionally categorized as spatially even and odd ones), which may be symmetric or antisymmetric, with respect to the coupled components. The GSs are chiefly stable in the first finite bandgap and unstable in the second one. In addition to that, there are narrow regions near the right edge of the first bandgap, and in the second one, which feature intricate alternation of stability and instability. Unstable solitons evolve into robust breathers or spatially confined turbulent modes. On-site-centered GSs are also considered in a version of the system that is made asymmetric by the Zeeman effect, or by birefringence of the optical waveguide. A region of alternate stability is found in the latter case too. In the limit of strong asymmetry, GSs are obtained in a semianalytical approximation, which reduces two coupled GPEs to a single one with an effective lattice potential.

  1. Elimination of spurious lattice fermion solutions and noncompact lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.D.

    1997-09-22

    It is well known that the Dirac equation on a discrete hyper-cubic lattice in D dimension has 2{sup D} degenerate solutions. The usual method of removing these spurious solutions encounters difficulties with chiral symmetry when the lattice spacing l {ne} 0, as exemplified by the persistent problem of the pion mass. On the other hand, we recall that in any crystal in nature, all the electrons do move in a lattice and satisfy the Dirac equation; yet there is not a single physical result that has ever been entangled with a spurious fermion solution. Therefore it should not be difficult to eliminate these unphysical elements. On a discrete lattice, particle hop from point to point, whereas in a real crystal the lattice structure in embedded in a continuum and electrons move continuously from lattice cell to lattice cell. In a discrete system, the lattice functions are defined only on individual points (or links as in the case of gauge fields). However, in a crystal the electron state vector is represented by the Bloch wave functions which are continuous functions in {rvec {gamma}}, and herein lies one of the essential differences.

  2. A note on completeness of bounded lattices postulated in some axiomatics of the mathematical foundations of quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    In an axiomatic study of quantum theory Jauch postulated the completeness of the lattice underlying a quantum logic. The theory of Baer semigroup is utilized to specify quite generally the completeness of the lattice. (author)

  3. Oscillations of void lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhiezer, A.I.; Davydov, L.N.; Spol'nik, Z.A.

    1976-01-01

    Oscillations of a nonideal crystal are studied, in which macroscopic defects (pores) form a hyperlattice. It is shown that alongside with acoustic and optical phonons (relative to the hyperlattice), in such a crystal oscillations of the third type are possible which are a hydridization of sound oscillations of atoms and surface oscillations of a pore. Oscillation spectra of all three types were obtained

  4. Effect of magnetism and atomic order on static atomic displacements in the Invar alloy Fe-27 at.% Pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sax, C. R.; Schönfeld, B.; Ruban, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    Fe-27 at.% Pt was aged at 1123 K and quenched to room temperature (RT) to set up a state of thermal equilibrium. The local atomic arrangement was studied by diffuse x-ray scattering above (at 427 K) and below (at RT) the Curie temperature as well as at RT under a saturating magnetic field. The separated short-range order scattering remained unchanged for all three states, with maxima at 100 positions. Effective pair interaction parameters determined by the inverse Monte Carlo method gave an order-disorder transition temperature of about 1088 K, close to direct experimental findings. The species-dependent static atomic displacements for the first two shells show large differences, with a strong increase in magnitude from the state at 427 K over RT to the state under saturating magnetic field. This outcome is in agreement with an increase in atomic volume of Fe with increasing local magnetic moment. Electronic-structure calculations closely reproduce the values for the static atomic displacements in the ferromagnetic state, and predict their dependence on the atomic configuration. They also reveal a strong dependence of the magnetic exchange interactions in Fe-Pt on the atomic configuration state and lattice parameter. In particular, the increase of the Curie temperature in a random state relative to that in the ordered one is demonstrated to be related to the corresponding change of the magnetic exchange interactions due to the different local atomic chemical environment. There exists a similar strong concentration dependence of the chemical interactions as in the case of magnetic exchange interactions. Theoretical effective interactions for Fe-27 at.% Pt alloy are in good agreement with experimental results, and they also reproduce well the L1 2-A1 transition temperature.

  5. Entire solutions for bistable lattice differential equations with obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, Aaron; Vleck, E S Van

    2018-01-01

    The authors consider scalar lattice differential equations posed on square lattices in two space dimensions. Under certain natural conditions they show that wave-like solutions exist when obstacles (characterized by "holes") are present in the lattice. Their work generalizes to the discrete spatial setting the results obtained in Berestycki, Hamel, and Matuno (2009) for the propagation of waves around obstacles in continuous spatial domains. The analysis hinges upon the development of sub and super-solutions for a class of discrete bistable reaction-diffusion problems and on a generalization of a classical result due to Aronson and Weinberger that concerns the spreading of localized disturbances.

  6. Self-organized critical behavior in pinned flux lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla, O.; Nori, F.

    1991-01-01

    We study the response of pinned fluxed lattices, under small perturbations in the driving force, below and close to the pinning-depinning transition. For driving Lorentz forces below F c (the depinning force at which the whole flux lattice slides), the system has instabilities against small force increases, with a power-law distribution characteristic of self-organized criticality. Specifically, D(d)∼d -1,3 , where d is the displacement of a flux line after a very small force increase. We also study the initial stages of the motion of the lattice once the driving force overcomes the pinning forces

  7. Lattices, supersymmetry and Kaehler fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that a graded extension of the space group of a (generalised) simple cubic lattice exists in any space dimension, D. The fermionic variables which arise admit a Kaehlerian interpretation. Each graded space group is a subgroup of a graded extension of the appropriate Euclidean group, E(D). The relevance of this to the construction of lattice theories is discussed. (author)

  8. Fast simulation of lattice systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, H.; Kaznelson, E.; Hansen, Frank

    1983-01-01

    A new computer system with an entirely new processor design is described and demonstrated on a very small trial lattice. The new computer simulates systems of differential equations of the order of 104 times faster than present day computers and we describe how the machine can be applied to lattice...

  9. Lattice gauge theory: Present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1993-09-01

    Lattice gauge theory is our primary tool for the study of non- perturbative phenomena in hadronic physics. In addition to giving quantitative information on confinement, the approach is yielding first principles calculations of hadronic spectra and matrix elements. After years of confusion, there has been significant recent progress in understanding issues of chiral symmetry on the lattice

  10. Constraint percolation on hyperbolic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jorge H.; Schwarz, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    Hyperbolic lattices interpolate between finite-dimensional lattices and Bethe lattices, and they are interesting in their own right, with ordinary percolation exhibiting not one but two phase transitions. We study four constraint percolation models—k -core percolation (for k =1 ,2 ,3 ) and force-balance percolation—on several tessellations of the hyperbolic plane. By comparing these four different models, our numerical data suggest that all of the k -core models, even for k =3 , exhibit behavior similar to ordinary percolation, while the force-balance percolation transition is discontinuous. We also provide proof, for some hyperbolic lattices, of the existence of a critical probability that is less than unity for the force-balance model, so that we can place our interpretation of the numerical data for this model on a more rigorous footing. Finally, we discuss improved numerical methods for determining the two critical probabilities on the hyperbolic lattice for the k -core percolation models.

  11. Lattice quantum chromodynamics practical essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Knechtli, Francesco; Peardon, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the techniques central to lattice quantum chromodynamics, including modern developments. The book has four chapters. The first chapter explains the formulation of quarks and gluons on a Euclidean lattice. The second chapter introduces Monte Carlo methods and details the numerical algorithms to simulate lattice gauge fields. Chapter three explains the mathematical and numerical techniques needed to study quark fields and the computation of quark propagators. The fourth chapter is devoted to the physical observables constructed from lattice fields and explains how to measure them in simulations. The book is aimed at enabling graduate students who are new to the field to carry out explicitly the first steps and prepare them for research in lattice QCD.

  12. Kondo Lattices and the Mott Metal-Insulator Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozières, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    In Kondo lattices with one magnetic impurity at every lattice site, few electrons must quench many spins. This old “exhaustion” issue has been pending for years: it now appears it does not arise: the coherence temperature at which a singlet ground state emerges is the Kondo temperature itself. We survey the evolution of that problem. We then argue that such a lattice Kondo effect governs the Mott transition from a paramagnetic metal to an incoherent spin disordered insulator. It explains the appearance of a narrow resonance in the middle of a large preformed gap. Our naive arguments can be extended to an orbitally degenerate situation: they provide a qualitative understanding of the effect discovered numerically by Capone et al. [Science 296 (2002) 2364], namely the appearance of s-wave superconductivity near the Mott transition when the atomic ground state is a singlet with no residual degeneracy.

  13. Degenerate Fermi gas in a combined harmonic-lattice potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakie, P. B.; Bezett, A.; Buonsante, P.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we derive an analytic approximation to the density of states for atoms in a combined optical lattice and harmonic trap potential as used in current experiments with quantum degenerate gases. We compare this analytic density of states to numerical solutions and demonstrate its validity regime. Our work explicitly considers the role of higher bands and when they are important in quantitative analysis of this system. Applying our density of states to a degenerate Fermi gas, we consider how adiabatic loading from a harmonic trap into the combined harmonic-lattice potential affects the degeneracy temperature. Our results suggest that occupation of excited bands during loading should lead to more favorable conditions for realizing degenerate Fermi gases in optical lattices

  14. Expansion of Bose-Hubbard Mott insulators in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jreissaty, Mark; Carrasquilla, Juan; Rigol, Marcos [Department of Physics, Georgetown University, Washington DC 20057 (United States); Wolf, F. Alexander [Department of Physics, Georgetown University, Washington DC 20057 (United States); Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Augsburg University, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    We study the expansion of bosonic Mott insulators in the presence of an optical lattice after switching off a confining potential. We use the Gutzwiller mean-field approximation and consider two different setups. In the first one, the expansion is restricted to one direction. We show that this leads to the emergence of two condensates with well-defined momenta, and argue that such a construct can be used to create atom lasers in optical lattices. In the second setup, we study Mott insulators that are allowed to expand in all directions in the lattice. In this case, a simple condensate is seen to develop within the mean-field approximation. However, its constituent bosons are found to populate many nonzero momentum modes. An analytic understanding of both phenomena in terms of the exact dispersion relation in the hard-core limit is presented.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of Cu/Au thin films under temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qibin, E-mail: qibinli@cqu.edu.cn [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Heterogeneous Material Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Peng, Xianghe [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Peng, Tiefeng, E-mail: pengtiefeng@cqu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Tang, Qizhong [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Zhang, Xiaomin [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Heterogeneous Material Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Huang, Cheng [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: Heat transportation in the thin films. - Highlights: • The coherent lattice interface is found at thin films after annealing. • The vacancies are observed clearly in the deposit thin films. • The defect and component will influence the energy transportation in the coatings. • The vacancies and lattice mismatch can enlarge the mobility of atoms. • The phonon transportation in thin films has no apparent rule. - Abstract: Three modulation period thin films, 1.8 nm Cu/3.6 nm Au, 2.7 nm Cu/2.7 nm Au and 3.6 nm Cu/1.8 nm Au, are obtained from deposition method and ideal modeling based on lattice constant, to examine their structures and thermophysical characteristics under temperature gradient. The coherent lattice interface is found both at deposit and ideal thin films after annealing. Also, the vacancies are observed clearly in the deposit thin films. The defect and component of thin films will influence the energy transportation in the coatings. The vacancies and lattice mismatch can enlarge the mobility of atoms and result in the failure of coating under the thermal stress. The power spectrum of atoms’ movement has no apparent rule for phonon transportation in thin films. The results are helpful to reveal the micro-mechanism and provide reasonable basis for the failure of metallic coatings.

  16. Atomic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed

  17. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  18. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  19. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  20. Rabi Spectroscopy and Excitation Inhomogeneity in a 1D Optical Lattice Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Blatt, S.; Thomsen, J. W.; Campbell, G. K.; Ludlow, A. D.; Swallows, M. D.; Martin, M. J.; Boyd, M. M.; Ye, Jun

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the influence of atomic motion on precision Rabi spectroscopy of ultracold fermionic atoms confined in a deep, one dimensional (1D) optical lattice. We analyze the spectral components of longitudinal sideband spectra and present a model to extract information about the transverse motion and sample temperature from their structure. Rabi spectroscopy of the clock transition itself is also influenced by atomic motion in the weakly confined transverse directions of the optical latt...

  1. Lattice dynamics of {alpha} boron and of boron carbide; Proprietes vibrationnelles du bore {alpha} et du carbure de bore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vast, N

    1999-07-01

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of {alpha} boron and of B{sub 4}C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In {alpha} boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B{sub 4}C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  2. First-passage kinetic Monte Carlo on lattices: Hydrogen transport in lattices with traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Toussaint, U.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Schmid, K.

    2015-08-01

    A new algorithm for the diffusion in 2D and 3D discrete simple cubic lattices based on a recently proposed technique, Green-functions or first-passage kinetic Monte Carlo has been developed. It is based on the solutions of appropriately chosen Greens functions, which propagate the diffusing atoms over long distances in one step (superhops). The speed-up of the new approach over standard kinetic Monte Carlo techniques can be orders of magnitude, depending on the problem. Using this new algorithm we simulated recent hydrogen isotope exchange experiments in recrystallized tungsten at 320 K, initially loaded with deuterium. It was found that the observed depth profiles can only be explained with 'active' traps, i.e. traps capable of exchanging atoms with activation energies significantly lower than the actual trap energy. Such a mechanism has so far not been considered in the modeling of hydrogen transport.

  3. Ytterbium optical lattice clock with 10-18 level characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nathaniel; Sherman, Jeff; Beloy, Kyle; Hinkley, Nathan; Schioppo, Marco; Oates, Chris; Ludlow, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    A recent comparison of two ytterbium-based optical lattice clocks at NIST demonstrated record stability of 1 . 6 parts in 1018 after 25,000s averaging. We report on measurements of the two primary systematic effects that shift the ultra-narrow clock transition, towards a reduction of the clock uncertainty to the 10-18 level. Uncertainty stemming from the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift is largely due to imprecise knowledge of the thermal environment surrounding the atoms. We detail the construction and operation of an in-vacuum, thermally-regulated radiation shield, which permits laser cooling and trapping while enabling an absolute temperature measurement with mK precision. Additionally, while operation of the optical lattice at the magic wavelength (λm) cancels the scalar Stark shift (since both clock states shift equally), higher-order vector and two-photon hyperpolarizability shifts remain. To evaluate these effects, as well as the polarizability away from λm, we implement a lattice buildup cavity around the atoms. The resulting twenty-fold enhancement of the lattice intensity provides a significant lever arm for precise measurement of these effects.

  4. Spin-Lattice Coupling and Superconductivity in Fe Pnictides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Egami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider strong spin-lattice and spin-phonon coupling in iron pnictides and discuss its implications on superconductivity. Strong magneto-volume effect in iron compounds has long been known as the Invar effect. Fe pnictides also exhibit this effect, reflected in particular on the dependence of the magnetic moment on the atomic volume of Fe defined by the positions of the nearest neighbor atoms. Through the phenomenological Landau theory, developed on the basis of the calculations by the density functional theory (DFT and the experimental results, we quantify the strength of the spin-lattice interaction as it relates to the Stoner criterion for the onset of magnetism. We suggest that the coupling between electrons and phonons through the spin channel may be sufficiently strong to be an important part of the superconductivity mechanism in Fe pnictides.

  5. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2014-01-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity. (papers)

  6. The Origins of Lattice Gauge Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    The main focus of this talk is an anecdotal account of the history underlying my 1974 article entitled 'Confinement of Quarks.' In preparing this talk, I will draw on a historical interview conducted by the project for History of Recent Science and Technology at the Dibner Institute for the History of Science and Technology at MIT, and on a theory of invention proposed by Peter Drucker in his book 'Innovation and Entrepreneurship.' I will explain this theory; no background is needed. The account will start with related work in the 1960's. I will end the talk with a plea for lattice gauge researchers to be alert for unexpected scalar or vector colored particles that are invisible to experimentalists yet could start to spoil the agreement of computations with experiment. Note: In association with the Symposium ' 'Lattice 2004,' June 21 to June 26, 2004.

  7. Spectral functions from anisotropic lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, G.; Allton, C.; Amato, A.; Evans, W.; Giudice, P.; Harris, T.; Kelly, A.; Kim, S. Y.; Lombardo, M. P.; Praki, K.; Ryan, S. M.; Skullerud, J.-I.

    2016-12-01

    The FASTSUM collaboration has been carrying out lattice simulations of QCD for temperatures ranging from one third to twice the crossover temperature, investigating the transition region, as well as the properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma. In this contribution we concentrate on quarkonium correlators and spectral functions. We work in a fixed scale scheme and use anisotropic lattices which help achieving the desirable fine resolution in the temporal direction, thus facilitating the (ill posed) integral transform from imaginary time to frequency space. We contrast and compare results for the correlators obtained with different methods, and different temporal spacings. We observe robust features of the results, confirming the sequential dissociation scenario, but also quantitative differences indicating that the methods' systematic errors are not yet under full control. We briefly outline future steps towards accurate results for the spectral functions and their associated statistical and systematic errors.

  8. Quiver gauge theories and integrable lattice models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Junya

    2015-01-01

    We discuss connections between certain classes of supersymmetric quiver gauge theories and integrable lattice models from the point of view of topological quantum field theories (TQFTs). The relevant classes include 4d N=1 theories known as brane box and brane tilling models, 3d N=2 and 2d N=(2,2) theories obtained from them by compactification, and 2d N=(0,2) theories closely related to these theories. We argue that their supersymmetric indices carry structures of TQFTs equipped with line operators, and as a consequence, are equal to the partition functions of lattice models. The integrability of these models follows from the existence of extra dimension in the TQFTs, which emerges after the theories are embedded in M-theory. The Yang-Baxter equation expresses the invariance of supersymmetric indices under Seiberg duality and its lower-dimensional analogs.

  9. Quantum gauge theory simulation with ultracold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Zamora, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The study of ultracold atoms constitutes one of the hottest areas of atomic, molecular, and optical physics and quantum optics. The experimental and theoretical achievements in the last three decades in the control and manipulation of quantum matter at macroscopic scales lead to the so called third quantum revolution. Concretely, the recent advances in the studies of ultracold gases in optical lattices are particularly impressive. The very precise control of the diverse parameters of the ultr...

  10. Introduction to lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.

    1987-01-01

    The lattice formulation of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) can be exploited in many ways. We can derive the lattice Feynman rules and carry out weak coupling perturbation expansions. The lattice then serves as a manifestly gauge invariant regularization scheme, albeit one that is more complicated than standard continuum schemes. Strong coupling expansions: these give us useful qualitative information, but unfortunately no hard numbers. The lattice theory is amenable to numerical simulations by which one calculates the long distance properties of a strongly interacting theory from first principles. The observables are measured as a function of the bare coupling g and a gauge invariant cut-off ≅ 1/α, where α is the lattice spacing. The continuum (physical) behavior is recovered in the limit α → 0, at which point the lattice artifacts go to zero. This is the more powerful use of lattice formulation, so in these lectures the author focuses on setting up the theory for the purpose of numerical simulations to get hard numbers. The numerical techniques used in Lattice Gauge Theories have their roots in statistical mechanics, so it is important to develop an intuition for the interconnection between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics. This will be the emphasis of the first lecture. In the second lecture, the author reviews the essential ingredients of formulating QCD on the lattice and discusses scaling and the continuum limit. In the last lecture the author summarizes the status of some of the main results. He also mentions the bottlenecks and possible directions for research. 88 refs

  11. Report of the Federal Government concerning feasible measures for expediting the procedure under Atomic Energy Law for licensing installations of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The measures mentioned in the report aim at shortening and expediting of the licensing procedure for installations of supply and waste disposal of nuclear power stations (e.g. manufacturing plants for fuel elements, reprocessing plants). At the same time improved conditions are created for reducing impediments of investment. After coordination with the authorities of the Laender the Federal Government proposes a set of measures accelerating the procedure. Primarily the set contains: - improved coordination of all authorities participating in the procedure, as for instance by a harmonized plan of the course of the whole project at the beginning of the licensing procedure under atomic energy law, - more precise information on the part of the authorities on the documents to be submitted by applicants, - information concerning safety requirements for the individual installations, to be required by the authorities at the beginning of the procedure, and not during the course of the procedure, because otherwise among others a long-term planning of the project by the applicant is made more difficult. (orig./HSCH) [de

  12. Abundant Acceptor Emission from Nitrogen-Doped ZnO Films Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition under Oxygen-Rich Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guziewicz, E; Przezdziecka, E; Snigurenko, D; Jarosz, D; Witkowski, B S; Dluzewski, P; Paszkowicz, W

    2017-08-09

    Nitrogen-doped and undoped ZnO films were grown by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) under oxygen-rich conditions. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectra reveal a dominant donor-related emission at 3.36 eV and characteristic acceptor-related emissions at 3.302 and 3.318 eV. Annealing at 800 °C in oxygen atmosphere leads to conversion of conductivity from n- to p-type, which is reflected in photoluminescence spectra. Annealing does not increase any acceptor-related emission in the undoped sample, while in the ZnO:N it leads to a considerable enhancement of the photoluminescence at 3.302 eV. The high resolution cathodoluminescence cross-section images show different spatial distribution of the donor-related and the acceptor-related emissions, which complementarily contribute to the overall luminescence of the annealed ZnO:N material. Similar area of both emissions indicates that the acceptor luminescence comes neither from the grain boundaries nor from stacking faults. Moreover, in ZnO:N the acceptor-emission regions are located along the columns of growth, which shows a perspective to achieve a ZnO:N material with homogeneous acceptor conductivity at least at the micrometer scale.

  13. Analysis of nanomechanical properties of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes under the influence of lytic factors in an in vitro model using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarska-Rodak, Małgorzata; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Skrzypiec, Krzysztof; Chmielewski, Tomasz; Mendyk, Ewaryst; Tylewska-Wierzbanowska, Stanisława

    2015-11-12

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an experimental technique which recently has been used in biology, microbiology, and medicine to investigate the topography of surfaces and in the evaluation of mechanical properties of cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the complement system and specific anti-Borrelia antibodies in in vitro conditions on the modification of nanomechanical features of B. burgdorferi B31 cells. In order to assess the influence of the complement system and anti-Borrelia antibodies on B. burgdorferi s.s. B31 spirochetes, the bacteria were incubated together with plasma of identified status. The samples were applied on the surface of mica disks. Young's modulus and adhesive forces were analyzed with a NanoScope V, MultiMode 8 AFM microscope (Bruker) by the PeakForce QNM technique in air using NanoScope Analysis 1.40 software (Bruker). The average value of flexibility of spirochetes' surface expressed by Young's modulus was 10185.32 MPa, whereas the adhesion force was 3.68 nN. AFM is a modern tool with a broad spectrum of observational and measurement abilities. Young's modulus and the adhesion force can be treated as parameters in the evaluation of intensity and changes which take place in pathogenic microorganisms under the influence of various lytic factors. The visualization of the changes in association with nanomechanical features provides a realistic portrayal of the lytic abilities of the elements of the innate and adaptive human immune system.

  14. The dissociation and recombination rates of CH4through the Ni(111) surface: The effect of lattice motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenji; Zhao, Yi

    2017-07-28

    Methane dissociation is a prototypical system for the study of surface reaction dynamics. The dissociation and recombination rates of CH 4 through the Ni(111) surface are calculated by using the quantum instanton method with an analytical potential energy surface. The Ni(111) lattice is treated rigidly, classically, and quantum mechanically so as to reveal the effect of lattice motion. The results demonstrate that it is the lateral displacements rather than the upward and downward movements of the surface nickel atoms that affect the rates a lot. Compared with the rigid lattice, the classical relaxation of the lattice can increase the rates by lowering the free energy barriers. For instance, at 300 K, the dissociation and recombination rates with the classical lattice exceed the ones with the rigid lattice by 6 and 10 orders of magnitude, respectively. Compared with the classical lattice, the quantum delocalization rather than the zero-point energy of the Ni atoms further enhances the rates by widening the reaction path. For instance, the dissociation rate with the quantum lattice is about 10 times larger than that with the classical lattice at 300 K. On the rigid lattice, due to the zero-point energy difference between CH 4 and CD 4 , the kinetic isotope effects are larger than 1 for the dissociation process, while they are smaller than 1 for the recombination process. The increasing kinetic isotope effect with decreasing temperature demonstrates that the quantum tunneling effect is remarkable for the dissociation process.

  15. From Lattice Boltzmann to hydrodynamics in dissipative relativistic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbana, Alessandro; Mendoza, Miller; Succi, Sauro; Tripiccione, Raffaele

    2017-11-01

    Relativistic fluid dynamics is currently applied to several fields of modern physics, covering many physical scales, from astrophysics, to atomic scales (e.g. in the study of effective 2D systems such as graphene) and further down to subnuclear scales (e.g. quark-gluon plasmas). This talk focuses on recent progress in the largely debated connection between kinetic transport coefficients and macroscopic hydrodynamic parameters in dissipative relativistic fluid dynamics. We use a new relativistic Lattice Boltzmann method (RLBM), able to handle from ultra-relativistic to almost non-relativistic flows, and obtain strong evidence that the Chapman-Enskog expansion provides the correct pathway from kinetic theory to hydrodynamics. This analysis confirms recently obtained theoretical results, which can be used to obtain accurate calibrations for RLBM methods applied to realistic physics systems in the relativistic regime. Using this calibration methodology, RLBM methods are able to deliver improved physical accuracy in the simulation of the physical systems described above. European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Grant Agreement No. 642069.

  16. Stability of matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk. Golam; Roy, S. K.; Talukdar, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider localized states of both single- and two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) confined in a potential resulting from the superposition of linear and nonlinear optical lattices and make use of Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion to investigate the effect of nonlinear lattice on the stability of the soliton solutions in the linear optical lattice (LOL). For the single-component case we show that a weak nonlinear lattice has very little effect on the stability of such solitons while sufficiently strong nonlinear optical lattice (NOL) squeezes them to produce narrow bound states. For two-component condensates we find that when the strength of the NOL (γ1) is less than that of the LOL (V0) a relatively weak intra-atomic interaction (IAI) has little effect on the stability of the component solitons. This is true for both attractive and repulsive IAI. A strong attractive IAI, however, squeezes the BEC solitons while a similar repulsive IAI makes the component solitons wider. For γ1 > V0, only a strong attractive IAI squeezes the BEC solitons but the squeezing effect is less prominent than that found for γ1 < V0. We make useful checks on the results of our semianalytical stability analysis by solving the appropriate Gross-Pitaevskii equations numerically.

  17. Hamiltonian lattice field theory: Computer calculations using variational methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zako, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    I develop a variational method for systematic numerical computation of physical quantities -- bound state energies and scattering amplitudes -- in quantum field theory. An infinite-volume, continuum theory is approximated by a theory on a finite spatial lattice, which is amenable to numerical computation. I present an algorithm for computing approximate energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory and for bounding the resulting errors. I also show how to select basis states and choose variational parameters in order to minimize errors. The algorithm is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz principle and Kato's generalizations of Temple's formula. The algorithm could be adapted to systems such as atoms and molecules. I show how to compute Green's functions from energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory, and relate these to physical (renormalized) coupling constants, bound state energies and Green's functions. Thus one can compute approximate physical quantities in a lattice theory that approximates a quantum field theory with specified physical coupling constants. I discuss the errors in both approximations. In principle, the errors can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the size of the lattice, decreasing the lattice spacing and computing sufficiently long. Unfortunately, I do not understand the infinite-volume and continuum limits well enough to quantify errors due to the lattice approximation. Thus the method is currently incomplete. I apply the method to real scalar field theories using a Fock basis of free particle states. All needed quantities can be calculated efficiently with this basis. The generalization to more complicated theories is straightforward. I describe a computer implementation of the method and present numerical results for simple quantum mechanical systems

  18. Hamiltonian lattice field theory: Computer calculations using variational methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zako, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A variational method is developed for systematic numerical computation of physical quantities-bound state energies and scattering amplitudes-in quantum field theory. An infinite-volume, continuum theory is approximated by a theory on a finite spatial lattice, which is amenable to numerical computation. An algorithm is presented for computing approximate energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory and for bounding the resulting errors. It is shown how to select basis states and choose variational parameters in order to minimize errors. The algorithm is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz principle and Kato's generalizations of Temple's formula. The algorithm could be adapted to systems such as atoms and molecules. It is shown how to compute Green's functions from energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory, and relate these to physical (renormalized) coupling constants, bound state energies and Green's functions. Thus one can compute approximate physical quantities in a lattice theory that approximates a quantum field theory with specified physical coupling constants. The author discusses the errors in both approximations. In principle, the errors can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the size of the lattice, decreasing the lattice spacing and computing sufficiently long. Unfortunately, the author does not understand the infinite-volume and continuum limits well enough to quantify errors due to the lattice approximation. Thus the method is currently incomplete. The method is applied to real scalar field theories using a Fock basis of free particle states. All needed quantities can be calculated efficiently with this basis. The generalization to more complicated theories is straightforward. The author describes a computer implementation of the method and present numerical results for simple quantum mechanical systems

  19. Lattice Methods for Quantum Chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    DeGrand, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation of lattice-regulated QCD has become an important source of information about strong interactions. In the last few years there has been an explosion of techniques for performing ever more accurate studies on the properties of strongly interacting particles. Lattice predictions directly impact many areas of particle and nuclear physics theory and phenomenology. This book provides a thorough introduction to the specialized techniques needed to carry out numerical simulations of QCD: a description of lattice discretizations of fermions and gauge fields, methods for actually do

  20. Localized structures in Kagome lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Avadh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bishop, Alan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Law, K J H [UNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS; Kevrekidis, P G [UNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of gap vortices and multi-pole gap solitons in a Kagome lattice with a defocusing nonlinearity both in a discrete case and in a continuum one with periodic external modulation. In particular, predictions are made based on expansion around a simple and analytically tractable anti-continuum (zero coupling) limit. These predictions are then confirmed for a continuum model of an optically-induced Kagome lattice in a photorefractive crystal obtained by a continuous transformation of a honeycomb lattice.

  1. Lattice position and thermal stability of diluted As in Ge

    CERN Document Server

    Decoster, S; Cottenier, S; Correia, JG; Mendonça, T; Amorim, LM; Pereira, LMC; Vantomme, A

    2012-01-01

    We present a lattice location study of the n-type dopant arsenic after ion implantation into germanium. By means of electron emission channeling experiments, we have observed that the implanted As atoms substitute the Ge host atoms. However, in contrast to several implanted metal impurities in Ge, no significant fraction of As is found on interstitial sites. The substitutional As impurities are found to be thermally stable up to 600°C. After 700°C annealing a strong reduction of emission channeling effects was observed, in full accordance with the expected diffusion-induced broadening of the As profile.

  2. Laser Controlled Tunneling in a Vertical Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, Q.; Tackmann, G.; Wang, X.; Pelle, B.; Pelisson, S.; Wolf, P.; Dos Santos, F. Pereira

    2011-05-01

    Raman laser pulses are used to induce coherent tunneling between neighboring sites of a vertical 1D optical lattice. Such tunneling occurs when the detuning of a probe laser from the atomic transition frequency matches multiples of the Bloch frequency, allowing for a spectroscopic control of the coupling between Wannier-Stark (WS) states. In particular, we prepare coherent superpositions of WS states of adjacent sites, and investigate the coherence time of these superpositions by realizing a spatial interferometer. This scheme provides a powerful tool for coherent manipulation of external degrees of freedom of cold atoms, which is a key issue for quantum information processing.

  3. Lattice location study of implanted In in Ge

    CERN Document Server

    Decoster, S; Wahl, U; Correia, J G; Vantomme, A

    2009-01-01

    We report on emission channeling experiments to determine the lattice location and the thermal stability of implanted $^{111}$In atoms in Ge. The majority of the In atoms was found on the substitutional site, which is a thermally stable site at least up to 500 °C. We also found strong indication that directly after implantation, a fraction of the implanted $^{111}$In atoms occupies the bond-centered BC site. This fraction disappears after annealing at 300 °C. From comparison with ab initio calculations, electrical studies, and perturbed angular correlation experiments, the In atoms on the BC site can be related to In-vacancy and In-self-interstitial defect complexes. The activation energy for dissociation of this BC related defect was found to be below 1.6 eV.

  4. Theoretical atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This expanded and updated well-established textbook contains an advanced presentation of quantum mechanics adapted to the requirements of modern atomic physics. It includes topics of current interest such as semiclassical theory, chaos, atom optics and Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases. In order to facilitate the consolidation of the material covered, various problems are included, together with complete solutions. The emphasis on theory enables the reader to appreciate the fundamental assumptions underlying standard theoretical constructs and to embark on independent research projects. The fourth edition of Theoretical Atomic Physics contains an updated treatment of the sections involving scattering theory and near-threshold phenomena manifest in the behaviour of cold atoms (and molecules). Special attention is given to the quantization of weakly bound states just below the continuum threshold and to low-energy scattering and quantum reflection just above. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamen...

  5. Spontaneous Formation of Anti-ferromagnetic Vortex Lattice in a Fast Rotating BEC with Dipole Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shijie; Feng Shiping; Wen Yuchuan; Yu Yue

    2007-01-01

    When a Bose-Einstein condensate is set to rotate, superfluid vortices will be formed, which finally condense into a vortex lattice as the rotation frequency further increases. We show that the dipole-dipole interactions renormalize the short-range interaction strength and result in a distinction between interactions of parallel-polarized atoms and interactions of antiparallel-polarized atoms. This effect may lead to a spontaneous breakdown of the rapidly rotating Bose condensate into a novel anti-ferromagnetic-like vortex lattice. The upward-polarized Bose condensate forms a vortex lattice, which is staggered against a downward-polarized vortex lattice. A phase diagram related to the coupling strength is obtained.

  6. Lattice anharmonicity and thermal properties of strongly correlated Fe1- x Co x Si alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povzner, A. A.; Nogovitsyna, T. A.; Filanovich, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependences of the thermal and elastic properties of strongly correlated metal alloys Fe1- x Co x Si ( x = 0.1, 0.3, 0.5) with different atomic chiralities have been calculated in the framework of the self-consistent thermodynamic model taking into account the influence of lattice anharmonicity. The lattice contributions to the heat capacity and thermal expansion coefficient of the alloys have been determined using the experimental data. It has been demonstrated that the invar effect in the thermal expansion of the lattice observed in the magnetically ordered region of Fe0.7Co0.3Si and Fe0.5Co0.5Si is not related to the lattice anharmonicity, even though its appearance correlates with variations in the atomic chirality.

  7. Phonon modes in a disordered lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, B.K.; Roy, G.K.; Sinha, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    A simple cubic lattice, in which a small fraction of sites are replaced at random by atoms of a different kind and the resulting vibrational excitations are studied. Both the mass and force constant disorders are considered. The equation of motion of the Green function is developed following Matsubara and Yonezawa neglecting shear modes; the resulting expression for dispersion relation is summed up following Keneyashi and Jones to the lowest order in concentration. The results are obtained analytically and are found to be exact upto the linear term in concentration. Expressions have been obtained for the renormalised energies and the damping of the long wavelength phonon modes. In the special case of simple disorder, the results are compared with those of Langer. (K.B.)

  8. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 2 3 Po, 2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 2 3 Po level of helium-like krypton

  9. Application of WIMSD-4 for ''MARIA'' reactor lattice calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.

    1993-12-01

    A general description of the WIMSD-4 lattice code is given with the emphasis on available geometrical models. The difficulties encountered while modelling reactor lattices with the tubular type fuel elements are explained. Then the analysis of code options allowing to overcome these difficulties is carried out. Eventually, recommendations of options and input parameters for calculations of MARIA reactor lattice with satisfactory accuracy are given. During the work a set of modifications had to be introduced leading to a new code version called WIMS-S. Another version, under the name WIMS-T has been developed to allow for burnup calculations of the MARIA reactor lattice with improved resonance approach. (author). 14 refs, 6 figs, 10 tabs

  10. Ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN with surface defect region under 60Co gamma or MeV electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruixiang; Li, Lei; Fang, Xin; Xie, Ziang; Li, Shuti; Song, Weidong; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Jicai; Huang, Zengli; Li, Qiangjie; Xu, Wanjing; Fu, Engang; Qin, G. G.

    2018-01-01

    Generally, the diffusion and gettering of impurities in GaN needs high temperature. Calculated with the ambient-temperature extrapolation value of the high temperature diffusivity of Pt atoms in GaN reported in literature, the time required for Pt atoms diffusing 1 nm in GaN at ambient temperature is about 19 years. Therefore, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN can hardly be observed. In this work, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN is reported for the first time. It is demonstrated by use of secondary ion mass spectroscopy that in the condition of introducing a defect region on the GaN film surface by plasma, and subsequently, irradiated by 60Co gamma-ray or 3 MeV electrons, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN can be detected. It is more obvious with larger irradiation dose and higher plasma power. With a similar surface defect region, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN stimulated by 3 MeV electron irradiation is more marked than that stimulated by gamma irradiation. The physical mechanism of ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in a GaN film with a surface defect region stimulated by gamma or MeV electron irradiation is discussed.

  11. Cluster-Bethe-Lattice study of a planar antiferromagnet: Rb2NiF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, G.A.C. de la; Silva, C.E.T.G. da

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the Cluster-Bethe-Lattice method is presented for a planar antiferromagnet for which the hamiltonian parameters are known and the one-magnon density of states may be computed exactly. All the square clusters of 1 to 121 atoms are studied both connected to and isolated from the Bethe lattices. It is shown that, even for the largest cluster treated, the approximation is still far from the exact result. It is discussed the limitations of the method [pt

  12. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGrand, T. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and {alpha}{sub s} (M{sub z}), and B-{anti B} mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs.

  13. Lattice Studies of Hyperon Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, David G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    I describe recent progress at studying the spectrum of hadrons containing the strange quark through lattice QCD calculations. I emphasise in particular the richness of the spectrum revealed by lattice studies, with a spectrum of states at least as rich as that of the quark model. I conclude by prospects for future calculations, including in particular the determination of the decay amplitudes for the excited states.

  14. Harmonic oscillator on a lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ader, J.P.; Bonnier, B.; Hontebeyrie, M.; Meyers, C.

    1983-01-01

    The continuum limit of the ground state energy for the harmonic oscillator with discrete time is derived for all possible choices of the lattice derivative. The occurrence of unphysical values is shown to arise whenever the lattice laplacian is not strictly positive on its Brillouin zone. These undesirable limits can either be finite and arbitrary (multiple spectrum) or infinite (overlapping sublattices with multiple spectrum). (orig.)

  15. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrand, T.

    1997-01-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and α s (M z ), and B-anti B mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs

  16. Time-reversal-symmetry breaking in circuit-QED-based photon lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jens; Houck, Andrew A.; Hur, Karyn Le; Girvin, S. M.

    2010-10-01

    Breaking time-reversal symmetry is a prerequisite for accessing certain interesting many-body states such as fractional quantum Hall states. For polaritons, charge neutrality prevents magnetic fields from providing a direct symmetry-breaking mechanism and, similar to the situation in ultracold atomic gases, an effective magnetic field has to be synthesized. We show that in the circuit-QED architecture, this can be achieved by inserting simple superconducting circuits into the resonator junctions. In the presence of such coupling elements, constant parallel magnetic and electric fields suffice to break time-reversal symmetry. We support these theoretical predictions with numerical simulations for realistic sample parameters, specify general conditions under which time reversal is broken, and discuss the application to chiral Fock-state transfer, an on-chip circulator, and tunable band structure for the Kagome lattice.

  17. Soft-landing deposition of radioactive probe atoms on surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurens, C.R; Rosu, M.F; Pleiter, F; Niesen, L

    1999-01-01

    We present a method to deposit a wide range of radioactive probe atoms on surfaces, without introducing lattice damage or contaminating the surface with other elements or isotopes. In this method, the probe atoms are mass-separated using an isotope separa-tor, decelerated to 5 eV, and directly

  18. Atomic displacements due to interstitial hydrogen in Cu and Pd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The density functional theory (DFT) is used to study the atomic interac- tions in transition metal-based interstitial alloys. The strain field is calculated in the discrete lattice model using Kanzaki method. The total energy and hence atomic forces between interstitial hydrogen and transition metal hosts are calculated ...

  19. Multiplexed infrared plasmonic surface lattice resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutha, Rithvik R.; Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Sharp, Christina; Wing, Waylin J.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate that arrays of flat gold nanodisks with rectangular lattices can support a tunable hybrid frequency gap formed by the surface lattice resonances in the substrate ((+1, 0)sub) and the superstrate ((-1, 0)sup). For a certain polarization, rotation of the arrays reduces this gap, forming a band crossing (degenerate state) wherein both surface lattice resonances happen around a single wavelength (˜1300 nm). This highlights a situation wherein hybridization of the Rayleigh anomaly with localized surface plasmon resonances with different multipolar natures happens around the same wavelength. We demonstrate that for a different polarization of the incident light the arrays support the formation of a photonic-plasmonic state at about 1650 nm. Our results show that as the projection of the wave vector of the incident light on the planes of the nanodisk arrays increases, within a given wavelength range, the (+1, 0) mode of this state becomes amplified. Under this condition, this mode can undergo a significant blue shift without broadening, while its amplitude increases.

  20. A noise-immune cavity-assisted non-destructive detection for an optical lattice clock in the quantum regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, G.; Bookjans, E.; Eismann, U.; Bilicki, S.; Le Targat, R.; Lodewyck, J.

    2017-08-01

    We present and implement a non-destructive detection scheme for the transition probability readout of an optical lattice clock. The scheme relies on a differential heterodyne measurement of the dispersive properties of lattice-trapped atoms enhanced by a high finesse cavity. By design, this scheme offers a 1st order rejection of the technical noise sources, an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio, and an homogeneous atom-cavity coupling. We theoretically show that this scheme is optimal with respect to the photon shot noise limit. We experimentally realise this detection scheme in an operational strontium optical lattice clock. The resolution is on the order of a few atoms with a photon scattering rate low enough to keep the atoms trapped after detection. This scheme opens the door to various different interrogations protocols, which reduce the frequency instability, including atom recycling, zero-dead time clocks with a fast repetition rate, and sub quantum projection noise frequency stability.

  1. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  2. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  3. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backenstoss, G.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of exotic atoms are presented. The improved quality of accelerator facilities and experimental techniques leads to a more precise determination of data. This opens new fields in nuclear and particle physics to which exotic atoms may contribute valuable knowledge. (author)

  4. Trapping and stabilization of hydrogen atoms in intracrystalline voids. Defected calcium fluorides and Y zeolite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iton, L.E.; Turkevich, J.

    1978-01-01

    Using EPR spectroscopy, it has been established that H. atoms are absorbed from the gas phase when CaF 2 powder is exposed to H 2 gas in which a microwave discharge is sustained, being trapped in sites that provide unusual thermal stability. The disposition of the trapped atoms is determined by the occluded water content of the CaF 2 . For ultrapure CaF 2 , atoms are trapped in interstitial sites having A 0 = 1463 MHz; for increasing water content, two types of trapped H. atoms are discriminated, with preferential trapping in void sites (external to the regular fluorite lattice) that are associated with the H 2 O impurity. Characterization of these ''extra-lattice'' H. (and D.) atoms is presented, and their EPR parameters and behavior are discussed in detail. Failure to effect H.-D. atom exchange with D 2 gas suggests that atoms are not stabilized on the CaF 2 surface. H. atoms are trapped exclusively in ''extra-lattice'' sites when the water-containing CaF 2 is γ irradiated at 77 or 298 K indicating that the scission product atoms do not escape from the precursor void region into the regular lattice. It is concluded that the thermal stability of the ''extra-lattice'' atoms, like that of the interstitial atoms, is determined ultimately by the high activation energy for diffusion of the H. atom through the CaF 2 lattice. For comparison, results obtained from H. atoms trapped in γ-irradiated rare earth ion-exchanged Y zeolites are presented and discussed also; these ''surface'' trapped atoms do not exhibit great thermalstability. Distinctions in the H. atom formation mechanisms between the fluorides and the zeolites were deduced from the accompanying paramagnetic species formed. The intracavity electric fields in the Y zeolites have been estimated from the H. atoms hfsc contractions, and are found to be very high, about 1 V/A

  5. Crossover between integer and fractional vortex lattices in coherently coupled two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Cipriani, Mattia; Nitta, Muneto

    2013-01-01

    We study effects of the internal coherent (Rabi) coupling in vortex lattices in two-component BECs under rotation. We find how the vortex lattices without the Rabi coupling known before are connected to the Abrikosov lattice of integer vortices with increasing the Rabi coupling. We find that 1) for small Rabi couplings, fractional vortices in triangular or square lattice for small or large inter-component coupling constitute hexamers or tetramers, namely multi-dimer bound states made of six o...

  6. Homomorphisms of complete distributive lattices | Pultr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of analogous results on algebraic universality of categories based on finitary distributive (0, 1)-lattices is included to motivate further questions about categories based on complete distributive lattices. Keywords: complete distributive lattice, complete lattice homomorphism, frame, Heyting algebra, continuous map, ...

  7. Sound waves and dynamics of superfluid Fermi gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Aixia; Xue Jukui

    2009-01-01

    The sound waves, the stability of Bloch waves, the Bloch oscillation, and the self-trapping phenomenon in interacting two-component Fermi gases throughout the BEC-BCS crossover in one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) optical lattices are discussed in detail. Within the hydrodynamical theory and by using the perturbative and tight-binding approximation, sound speed in both weak and tight 1D, 2D, 3D optical lattices, and the criteria for occurrences of instability of Bloch waves and self-trapping of Fermi gases along the whole BEC-BCS crossover in tight 1D, 2D, 3D optical lattices are obtained analytically. The results show that the sound speed, the criteria for occurrences of instability of Bloch waves and self-trapping, and the destruction of Bloch oscillation are modified dramatically by the lattice parameters (lattice dimension and lattice strength), the atom density or atom number, and the atom interaction.

  8. Structure and lattice dynamics in non-centrosymmetric borates; Struktur und Gitterdynamik in azentrischen Boraten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, W.D.R.

    2007-04-23

    This thesis deals with a study of structural and lattice dynamical properties of some noncentrosymmetric borates with outstanding non-linear optical properties. The focus was on the compound bismuth triborate (BiB{sub 3}O{sub 6}). The structure of the tetraborates MB{sub 4}O{sub 7} (M=Pb,Sr,Ba) was also investigated. The structural investigations in bismuth triborate include powder and single crystal diffraction experiments on X-ray and neutron sources. The crystal structure was under examination in the temperature range from 100 K to room temperature and the lattice constants in the temperature range from 20 K to 800 K. The lattice constants show a nearly linear dependency from temperature. Our observations are in good agreement with investigations of the thermal expansion, which shows a strong anisotropy within the layer-like structure of bismuth triborate. Within the borate layers, along the polar axis a strong positive and in the orthogonal direction a negative thermal expansion is observed. This effect can be explained by a zig-zag effect within the borate layers. The lone electron pair at the bismuth atom is discussed to be possibly the origin of the temperature dependency of the coordination environment of the bismuth atom. The influence of the lone electron pair on the crystal structure is raising by lowering the temperature. At the bismuth atom distinct anharmonic effects are observed, where the maximum points along the direction of the polar axis and therefore along the direction of the lone electron pair. The phonon dispersion of bismuth triborate has been investigated by inelastic neutron scattering. The low symmetry of the crystal structure depicts to be a special challenge. The dispersion was observed along the three reciprocal lattice constants. Along the polar axis the dispersion could be characterized to a maximum energy of 20 THz. The low energy acoustic branch along the polar axis shows a softening at the zone boundary. In the orthogonal

  9. Cluster-Bethe-lattice treatment of the interstitial boron centre in irradiated gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinert, P. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronenphysik)

    1984-08-01

    The radiation-induced interstitial defect B(1) in GaAs is theoretically analysed by a cluster-Bethe lattice treatment. Theoretical results obtained for a B-Ga dumbbell in gallium arsenide agree quite well with experimental data. The dumbbell coupling is about three times stiffer than the bonds between host-lattice atoms. The separation of the dumbbell atoms amounts to one lattice constant. Due to the isotopy of gallium atoms all B(1) bands should exhibit a double-peak structure with a small frequency split of about 1, 0.1, and 0.4 cm/sup -1/ for the A/sub 1/, B/sub 1/, and B/sub 2/ modes, respectively. A resolution of these splittings would supply additional evidence for the B(1) defect model discussed here.

  10. Engineering Ising-XY spin-models in a triangular lattice using tunable artificial gauge fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, J.; Weinberg, M.; Ölschläger, C.; Windpassinger, P.; Simonet, J.; Sengstock, K.; Höppner, R.; Hauke, P.; Eckardt, A.; Lewenstein, M.; Mathey, L.

    2013-11-01

    Magnetism plays a key role in modern science and technology, but still many open questions arise from the interplay of magnetic many-body interactions. Deeper insight into complex magnetic behaviour and the nature of magnetic phase transitions can be obtained from, for example, model systems of coupled XY and Ising spins. Here, we report on the experimental realization of such a coupled system with ultracold atoms in triangular optical lattices. This is accomplished by imposing an artificial gauge field on the neutral atoms, which acts on them as a magnetic field does on charged particles. As a result, the atoms show persistent circular currents, the direction of which provides an Ising variable. On this, the tunable staggered gauge field, generated by a periodic driving of the lattice, acts as a longitudinal field. Further, the superfluid ground state presents strong analogies with the paradigm example of the fully frustrated XY model on a triangular lattice.

  11. Phonons and elasticity in critically coordinated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubensky, T C; Kane, C L; Mao, Xiaoming; Sun, Kai; Souslov, A

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of vibrational excitations and elasticity is based upon analysis of frames consisting of sites connected by bonds occupied by central-force springs, the stability of which depends on the average number of neighbors per site z. When z  <  z c   ≈  2d, where d is the spatial dimension, frames are unstable with respect to internal deformations. This pedagogical review focuses on the properties of frames with z at or near z c , which model systems like randomly packed spheres near jamming and network glasses. Using an index theorem, N 0   −N S   =  dN  −N B relating the number of sites, N, and number of bonds, N B , to the number, N 0 , of modes of zero energy and the number, N S , of states of self stress, in which springs can be under positive or negative tension while forces on sites remain zero, it explores the properties of periodic square, kagome, and related lattices for which z  =  z c and the relation between states of self stress and zero modes in periodic lattices to the surface zero modes of finite free lattices (with free boundary conditions). It shows how modifications to the periodic kagome lattice can eliminate all but trivial translational zero modes and create topologically distinct classes, analogous to those of topological insulators, with protected zero modes at free boundaries and at interfaces between different topological classes. (review article)

  12. Noise and driving induced Brownian heat current in the Frenkel-Kontorova lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chongyang; Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Wang, Chaojie; Jia, Youjian

    2018-02-01

    We investigate Brownian heat current induced by noise and driving in the heat conduction of Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) lattices, whose two ends contact respectively with two baths with temporally. Our numerical results indicate that thermal current of the system versus environmental reference temperature exhibits two peaks in symmetric cases, i.e., thermal SR. In asymmetric cases, the phenomenon also takes place, depending on on-site potentials of the atoms exerted on by the periodic signal, but disappears for harmonic lattices. Moreover, its intrinsic physical mechanism is analyzed in detail. The above results play important roles in controlling thermal current of nonlinear lattices.

  13. Analysis of nanomechanical properties of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes under the influence of lytic factors in an in vitro model using atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Tokarska-Rodak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atomic force microscopy (AFM is an experimental technique which recently has been used in biology, microbiology, and medicine to investigate the topography of surfaces and in the evaluation of mechanical properties of cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the complement system and specific anti-Borrelia antibodies in in vitro conditions on the modification of nanomechanical features of B. burgdorferi B31 cells. Material and methods: In order to assess the influence of the complement system and anti-Borrelia antibodies on B. burgdorferi s.s. B31 spirochetes, the bacteria were incubated together with plasma of identified status. The samples were applied on the surface of mica disks. Young’s modulus and adhesive forces were analyzed with a NanoScope V, MultiMode 8 AFM microscope (Bruker by the PeakForce QNM technique in air using NanoScope Analysis 1.40 software (Bruker.Results/Conclusion: The average value of flexibility of spirochetes’ surface expressed by Young’s modulus was 10185.32 MPa, whereas the adhesion force was 3.68 nN. AFM is a modern tool with a broad spectrum of observational and measurement abilities. Young’s modulus and the adhesion force can be treated as parameters in the evaluation of intensity and changes which take place in pathogenic microorganisms under the influence of various lytic factors. The visualization of the changes in association with nanomechanical features provides a realistic portrayal of the lytic abilities of the elements of the innate and adaptive human immune system.

  14. Lattice gauge theory using parallel processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.; Chou, K.C.; Zichichi, A.

    1987-01-01

    The book's contents include: Lattice Gauge Theory Lectures: Introduction and Current Fermion Simulations; Monte Carlo Algorithms for Lattice Gauge Theory; Specialized Computers for Lattice Gauge Theory; Lattice Gauge Theory at Finite Temperature: A Monte Carlo Study; Computational Method - An Elementary Introduction to the Langevin Equation, Present Status of Numerical Quantum Chromodynamics; Random Lattice Field Theory; The GF11 Processor and Compiler; and The APE Computer and First Physics Results; Columbia Supercomputer Project: Parallel Supercomputer for Lattice QCD; Statistical and Systematic Errors in Numerical Simulations; Monte Carlo Simulation for LGT and Programming Techniques on the Columbia Supercomputer; Food for Thought: Five Lectures on Lattice Gauge Theory

  15. Finding New Thermoelectric Compounds Using Crystallographic Data: Atomic Displacement Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakoumakos, B.C.; Mandrus, D.G.; Sales, B.C.; Sharp, J.W.

    1999-08-29

    A new structure-property relationship is discussed which links atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) and the lattice thermal conductivity of clathrate-like compounds. For many clathrate-like compounds, in which one of the atom types is weakly bound and ''rattles'' within its atomic cage, room temperature ADP information can be used to estimate the room temperature lattice thermal conductivity, the vibration frequency of the ''rattler'', and the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Neutron data and X-ray crystallography data, reported in the literature, are used to apply this analysis to several promising classes of thermoelectric materials.

  16. Finding New Thermoelectric Compounds Using Crystallographic Data: Atomic Displacement Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakoumakos, B.C.; Mandrus, D.G.; Sales, B.C.; Sharp, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    A new structure-property relationship is discussed which links atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) and the lattice thermal conductivity of clathrate-like compounds. For many clathrate-like compounds, in which one of the atom types is weakly bound and ''rattles'' within its atomic cage, room temperature ADP information can be used to estimate the room temperature lattice thermal conductivity, the vibration frequency of the ''rattler'', and the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Neutron data and X-ray crystallography data, reported in the literature, are used to apply this analysis to several promising classes of thermoelectric materials

  17. Strontium Optical Lattice Clock: In Quest of the Ultimate Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westergaard, Ph.G.

    2010-10-01

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the Sr optical lattice clock experiment at LNESYRTE, Observatoire de Paris. After having described the general principles for optical lattice clocks and the operation of the clock in question, the emphasis is put on the features that have been added to the experiment since 2007. The most important new elements are an ultra-stable reference cavity for the clock laser, the development of a non-destructive detection technique, and the construction of a second Sr lattice clock. The ultra-stable cavity is constructed from a ULE spacer and fused silica mirrors and has shown a thermal noise floor at 6.5 * 10 -16 , placing it among the best in the world. The non-destructive detection is effectuated by a phase measurement of a weak probe beam that traverses the atoms placed in one arm of a Mach-Zender interferometer. The non-destructive aspect enables a recycling of the atoms from cycle to cycle which consequently increases the duty cycle, allowing for an increase of the stability of the clock. With these new tools the frequency stability is expected to be 2.2 * 10 -16 /√τ for an optimized sequence. The most recent comparisons between the two Sr clocks reach an accuracy level of 10 -16 after about 1000 s, and this way we have been able to characterize lattice related frequency shifts with an unprecedented accuracy. The measurements ensure a control of lattice related effects at the 10 -18 level even for trap depths as large as 50E r . (authors)

  18. Study on distributed generation algorithm of variable precision concept lattice based on ontology heterogeneous database

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, Qingrong; ZHU, Changfeng

    2017-06-01

    Integration of distributed heterogeneous data sources is the key issues under the big data applications. In this paper the strategy of variable precision is introduced to the concept lattice, and the one-to-one mapping mode of variable precision concept lattice and ontology concept lattice is constructed to produce the local ontology by constructing the variable precision concept lattice for each subsystem, and the distributed generation algorithm of variable precision concept lattice based on ontology heterogeneous database is proposed to draw support from the special relationship between concept lattice and ontology construction. Finally, based on the standard of main concept lattice of the existing heterogeneous database generated, a case study has been carried out in order to testify the feasibility and validity of this algorithm, and the differences between the main concept lattice and the standard concept lattice are compared. Analysis results show that this algorithm above-mentioned can automatically process the construction process of distributed concept lattice under the heterogeneous data sources.

  19. Embedded Lattice and Properties of Gram Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futa Yuichi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize in Mizar [14] the definition of embedding of lattice and its properties. We formally define an inner product on an embedded module. We also formalize properties of Gram matrix. We formally prove that an inverse of Gram matrix for a rational lattice exists. Lattice of Z-module is necessary for lattice problems, LLL (Lenstra, Lenstra and Lov´asz base reduction algorithm [16] and cryptographic systems with lattice [17].

  20. Superradiators created atom by atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschede, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    High radiation rates are usually associated with macroscopic lasers. Laser radiation is “coherent”—its amplitude and phase are well-defined—but its generation requires energy inputs to overcome loss. Excited atoms spontaneously emit in a random and incoherent fashion, and for N such atoms, the emission rate simply increases as N. However, if these atoms are in close proximity and coherently coupled by a radiation field, this microscopic ensemble acts as a single emitter whose emission rate increases as N2 and becomes “superradiant,” to use Dicke's terminology (1). On page 662 of this issue, Kim et al. (2) show the buildup of coherent light fields through collective emission from atomic radiators injected one by one into a resonator field. There is only one atom ever in the cavity, but the emission is still collective and superradiant. These results suggest another route toward thresholdless lasing.