WorldWideScience

Sample records for underlying amyloid diseases

  1. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-amyloid treatments in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Mamta; Kim, Kye Y

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most challenging threats to the healthcare system in society. One of the main characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is formation of amyloid plaques from accumulation of amyloid beta peptide. The therapeutic agents that are currently available for AD including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEIs) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist are focused on improving the symptoms and do not revert the progression of the disease. This limitation coupled with the burgeoning increase in the prevalence of AD and resultant impact on healthcare economics calls for more substantial treatments for AD. According to the leading amyloid hypothesis, cleavage of amyloid precursor protein to release amyloid beta peptide is the critical event in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently treatment strategies have been focused on modifying the formation, clearance and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid beta peptide. This article reviews different therapeutic approaches that have been investigated to target amyloid beta ranging from secretase modulators, antiaggregation agents to amyloid immunotherapy. Authors review the different novel drugs which are in clinical trials.

  3. Energetics Underlying Twist Polymorphisms in Amyloid Fibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Periole, Xavier; Huber, Thomas; Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Aberg, Karina C; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Sakmar, Thomas P; Marrink, Siewert J

    2018-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are highly ordered protein aggregates associated with more than 40 human diseases. The exact conditions in which the fibrils are grown determine many types of reported fibril polymorphism, including different twist patterns. Twist-based polymorphs display unique mechanical properties

  4. Magnetic Fluids Have Ability to Decrease Amyloid Aggregation Associated with Amyloid-Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosova, Andrea; Koneracka, Martina; Siposova, Katarina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Daxnerova, Zuzana; Vavra, Ivo; Fabian, Martin; Kopcansky, Peter; Gazova, Zuzana

    2010-12-01

    At least twenty human proteins can fold abnormally to form pathological deposits that are associated with several amyloid-related diseases. We have investigated the effect of four magnetic fluids (MFs)—electrostatically stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MF1) and sterically stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles by sodium oleate (MF2, MF3 and MF4) with adsorbed BSA (MF2) or dextran (MF4)—on amyloid aggregation of two proteins, human insulin and chicken egg lysozyme. The morphology, particle size and size distribution of the prepared magnetic fluids were characterized. We have found that MFs are able to decrease amyloid aggregation of both studied proteins and the extent of depolymerization depended on the MF properties. The most effective reduction was observed for MF4 as 90% decrease of amyloids was detected for insulin and lysozyme amyloid aggregates. Our findings indicate that MFs have potential to be used for treatment of amyloid diseases.

  5. Calcium signaling and amyloid toxicity in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Stutzmann, Grace E

    2010-04-23

    Intracellular Ca(2+) signaling is fundamental to neuronal physiology and viability. Because of its ubiquitous roles, disruptions in Ca(2+) homeostasis are implicated in diverse disease processes and have become a major focus of study in multifactorial neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). A hallmark of AD is the excessive production of beta-amyloid (Abeta) and its massive accumulation in amyloid plaques. In this minireview, we highlight the pathogenic interactions between altered cellular Ca(2+) signaling and Abeta in its different aggregation states and how these elements coalesce to alter the course of the neurodegenerative disease. Ca(2+) and Abeta intersect at several functional levels and temporal stages of AD, thereby altering neurotransmitter receptor properties, disrupting membrane integrity, and initiating apoptotic signaling cascades. Notably, there are reciprocal interactions between Ca(2+) pathways and amyloid pathology; altered Ca(2+) signaling accelerates Abeta formation, whereas Abeta peptides, particularly in soluble oligomeric forms, induce Ca(2+) disruptions. A degenerative feed-forward cycle of toxic Abeta generation and Ca(2+) perturbations results, which in turn can spin off to accelerate more global neuropathological cascades, ultimately leading to synaptic breakdown, cell death, and devastating memory loss. Although no cause or cure is currently known, targeting Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis as an underlying and integral component of AD pathology may result in novel and effective treatments for AD.

  6. Amyloid cascade in Alzheimer's disease: Recent advances in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tarek; Shakeri, Arash; Rao, Praveen P N

    2016-05-04

    Alzheimer's disease is of major concern all over the world due to a number of factors including (i) an aging population (ii) increasing life span and (iii) lack of effective pharmacotherapy options. The past decade has seen intense research in discovering disease-modifying multitargeting small molecules as therapeutic options. The pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is attributed to a number of factors such as the cholinergic dysfunction, amyloid/tau toxicity and oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction. In recent years, targeting the amyloid cascade has emerged as an attractive strategy to discover novel neurotherapeutics. Formation of beta-amyloid species, with different degrees of solubility and neurotoxicity is associated with the gradual decline in cognition leading to dementia. The two commonly used approaches to prevent beta-amyloid accumulation in the brain include (i) development of beta-secretase inhibitors and (ii) designing direct inhibitors of beta-amyloid (self-induced) aggregation. This review highlights the amyloid cascade hypothesis and the key chemical features required to design small molecules that inhibit lower and higher order beta-amyloid aggregates. Several recent examples of small synthetic molecules with disease-modifying properties were considered and their molecular docking studies were conducted using either a dimer or steric-zipper assembly of beta-amyloid. These investigations provide a mechanistic understanding on the structural requirements needed to design novel small molecules with anti-amyloid aggregation properties. Significantly, this work also demonstrates that the structural requirements to prevent aggregation of various amyloid species differs considerably, which explains the fact that many small molecules do not exhibit similar inhibition profile toward diverse amyloid species such as dimers, trimers, tetramers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Beyond Amyloid - Widening the View on Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Christian; Ziegler, Christine

    2017-11-01

    For 25 years, the amyloid cascade hypothesis, based on the finding that mutations in the amyloid precursor protein are closely linked to familial forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), dominated the research on this disease. Recent failures of clinical anti-amyloidogenic trials, however, substantially support the reasoning (i) that the pathomechanisms that trigger familial AD, namely the generation, aggregation, and deposition of amyloid beta, cannot necessarily be extrapolated to sporadic cases and (ii) that amyloid beta represents a prominent histopathological feature in AD but not its exclusive causative factor. In autumn 2016, the Volkswagen Foundation hosted the Herrenhausen Symposium 'Beyond Amyloid - Widening the View on Alzheimer's Disease' in Hannover, Germany, to bring together current knowledge on cellular and molecular processes that contribute to AD pathogenesis independent of or alongside with the amyloid biochemistry. The following mini review series was authored by key speakers at the meeting, and highlights some of the mechanisms potentially involved in AD etiology that provide alternative viewpoints and mechanisms beyond the amyloid cascade hypothesis. This article is part of the series "Beyond Amyloid". © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Electrochemistry of Alzheimer disease amyloid beta peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiorcea-Paquim, Ana-Maria; Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2018-02-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a widespread form of dementia that is estimated to affect 44.4 million people worldwide. AD pathology is closely related to the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides in fibrils and plagues, the small oligomeric intermediate species formed during the Aβ peptides aggregation presenting the highest neurotoxicity. This review discusses the recent advances on the Aβ peptides electrochemical characterisation. The Aβ peptides oxidation at a glassy carbon electrode occurs in one or two steps, depending on the amino acid sequence, length and content. The first electron transfer reaction corresponds to the tyrosine Tyr10 amino acid residue oxidation, and the second to all three histidine (His6, His13 and His14) and one methionine (Met35) amino acid residues. The Aβ peptides aggregation and amyloid fibril formation is electrochemically detected via the electroactive amino acids oxidation peak currents decrease that occurs in a time dependent manner. The Aβ peptides redox behaviour is correlated with changes in the adsorption morphology from initially random coiled structures, corresponding to the Aβ peptide monomers in random coil or in α-helix conformations, to aggregates and protofibrils and two types of fibrils, corresponding to the Aβ peptides in a β-sheet configuration, observed by atomic force microscopy. Electrochemical studies of Aβ peptides aggregation, mediated by the interaction with metal ions, in particular zinc, copper, and iron, and different methodologies concerning the detection of Aβ peptide biomarkers of AD in biological fluids, using electrochemical biosensors, are also discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Amylin under examination. Fibrillogenic polypeptide of pancreatic amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Marszałek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In patients or animals affected by 2 type diabetes mellitus (diabetes mellitus type 2, DM2, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, NIDDM or pancreatic tumor disease e.g., insulinoma, some pathological deposits, called amyloid, are observed among cells of islets of Langerhans. Among other constituents, pancreatic deposits consist of an insoluble, fibrillar form of peptide neurohormone termed amylin, produced by pancreatic beta cells. It is thought that formation of fibrillar deposits of misfolded and aggregated peptide is highly toxic to beta cells and leads to cell dysfunction, cell loss, pancreas destruction and progress of the disease. This relatively small, 37-amino acid peptide constitutes a serious scientific, research and to some extent a medical problem. This article presents amylin as a fibrillating molecule which participates in formation of amyloid deposits in human and animal pancreas, Langerhans islets as a microenvironment of pancreatic amyloid formation, occurrence of amylin and amyloid in animals and humans, and physico-chemical requirements to meet to name amylin deposit as amyloid.

  10. Physiopathological modulators of amyloid aggregation and novel pharmacological approaches in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEFELICE FERNANDA G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological mechanisms underlying the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD are complex, as several factors likely contribute to the development of the disease. Therefore, it is not surprising that a number of different possible therapeutic approaches addressing distinct aspects of this disease are currently being investigated. Among these are ways to prevent amyloid aggregation and/or deposition, to prevent neuronal degeneration, and to increase brain neurotransmitter levels. Here, we discuss possible roles of endogenous modulators of Abeta aggregation in the physiopathology of AD and some of the strategies currently under consideration to interfere with brain levels of beta-amyloid, its aggregation and neurotoxicity.

  11. Detection of amyloid fibrils in Parkinson's disease using plasmonic chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jatish; Eraña, Hasier; López-Martínez, Elena; Claes, Nathalie; Martín, Víctor F; Solís, Diego M; Bals, Sara; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Castilla, Joaquín; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2018-03-27

    Amyloid fibrils, which are closely associated with various neurodegenerative diseases, are the final products in many protein aggregation pathways. The identification of fibrils at low concentration is, therefore, pivotal in disease diagnosis and development of therapeutic strategies. We report a methodology for the specific identification of amyloid fibrils using chiroptical effects in plasmonic nanoparticles. The formation of amyloid fibrils based on α-synuclein was probed using gold nanorods, which showed no apparent interaction with monomeric proteins but effective adsorption onto fibril structures via noncovalent interactions. The amyloid structure drives a helical nanorod arrangement, resulting in intense optical activity at the surface plasmon resonance wavelengths. This sensing technique was successfully applied to human brain homogenates of patients affected by Parkinson's disease, wherein protein fibrils related to the disease were identified through chiral signals from Au nanorods in the visible and near IR, whereas healthy brain samples did not exhibit any meaningful optical activity. The technique was additionally extended to the specific detection of infectious amyloids formed by prion proteins, thereby confirming the wide potential of the technique. The intense chiral response driven by strong dipolar coupling in helical Au nanorod arrangements allowed us to detect amyloid fibrils down to nanomolar concentrations.

  12. Microglia, neuroinflammation, and beta-amyloid protein in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhiyou; Hussain, M Delwar; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Compelling evidence from basic molecular biology has demonstrated the dual roles of microglia in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On one hand, microglia are involved in AD pathogenesis by releasing inflammatory mediators such as inflammatory cytokines, complement components, chemokines, and free radicals that are all known to contribute to beta-amyloid (Aβ) production and accumulation. On the other hand, microglia are also known to play a beneficial role in generating anti-Aβ antibodies and stimulating clearance of amyloid plaques. Aβ itself, an inducer of microglia activation and neuroinflammation, has been considered as an underlying and unifying factor in the development of AD. A vicious cycle of inflammation has been formed between Aβ accumulation, activated microglia, and microglial inflammatory mediators, which enhance Aβ deposition and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the vicious cycle seems to be a promising treatment to restrain further development of AD. With increasing research efforts on microglia in AD, intervention of microglia activation and neuroinflammation in AD may provide a potential target for AD therapy in spite of the provisional failure of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in clinical trials.

  13. Amyloid cascade hypothesis: Pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barage, Sagar H; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible, progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Various therapeutic approaches are being used to improve the cholinergic neurotransmission, but their role in AD pathogenesis is still unknown. Although, an increase in tau protein concentration in CSF has been described in AD, but several issues remains unclear. Extensive and accurate analysis of CSF could be helpful to define presence of tau proteins in physiological conditions, or released during the progression of neurodegenerative disease. The amyloid cascade hypothesis postulates that the neurodegeneration in AD caused by abnormal accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques in various areas of the brain. The amyloid hypothesis has continued to gain support over the last two decades, particularly from genetic studies. Therefore, current research progress in several areas of therapies shall provide an effective treatment to cure this devastating disease. This review critically evaluates general biochemical and physiological functions of Aβ directed therapeutics and their relevance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nasal administration of amyloid-beta peptide decreases cerebral amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner, H L; Lemere, C A; Maron, R

    2000-01-01

    Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease-implicated ......Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease...

  15. Alzheimer's disease: the amyloid hypothesis and the Inverse Warburg effect

    KAUST Repository

    Demetrius, Lloyd A.

    2015-01-14

    Epidemiological and biochemical studies show that the sporadic forms of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) are characterized by the following hallmarks: (a) An exponential increase with age; (b) Selective neuronal vulnerability; (c) Inverse cancer comorbidity. The present article appeals to these hallmarks to evaluate and contrast two competing models of AD: the amyloid hypothesis (a neuron-centric mechanism) and the Inverse Warburg hypothesis (a neuron-astrocytic mechanism). We show that these three hallmarks of AD conflict with the amyloid hypothesis, but are consistent with the Inverse Warburg hypothesis, a bioenergetic model which postulates that AD is the result of a cascade of three events—mitochondrial dysregulation, metabolic reprogramming (the Inverse Warburg effect), and natural selection. We also provide an explanation for the failures of the clinical trials based on amyloid immunization, and we propose a new class of therapeutic strategies consistent with the neuroenergetic selection model.

  16. Cognitive reserve and β-amyloid pathology in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Carolyn; Campbell, Meghan C; Flores, Hubert; Maiti, Baijayanta; Perlmutter, Joel S; Foster, Erin R

    2015-08-01

    Dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) is associated with abnormal accumulation of proteins, including β-amyloid, in cortical regions. High cognitive reserve capacity may protect cognition from β-amyloid and delay the onset of dementia. We tested the cognitive reserve theory in PD by determining whether educational attainment, a proxy for cognitive reserve, modifies the correlation between cortical β-amyloid accumulation and cognitive impairment. PD participants (N = 155) underwent MRI to quantify brain volume and [(11)C] PiB PET imaging to quantify fibrillar β-amyloid deposition. Mean cortical binding potentials (MCBP) were calculated for each participant, with higher scores indicating more fibrillar β-amyloid. Global cognitive function was assessed using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine whether education modified the relationship between MCBP and cognitive function after controlling for brain volume. MCBP interacted with educational attainment to predict scores on each of the cognitive outcome measures (ps ≤ 0.02). Post-hoc analysis revealed that the effect of MCBP on cognitive function changed once the level of education reached 16 years. For participants with less than 16 years of education (n = 68), higher MCBP correlated with worse cognitive function, with MCBP accounting for 8-30% of the variance in MMSE and CDR scores (ps ≤ 0.02). For participants with at least 16 years of education (n = 87), MCBP did not correlate with MMSE or CDR scores (R(2)s cognitive reserve theory in PD and suggest that education may protect PD patients' cognition against cortical β-amyloid pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid β40 Is Decreased in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Marcel M.; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Rikkert, Marcel Olde; van Domburg, Peter H. M. F.; Skehan, Maureen E.; Greenberg, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is caused by deposition of the amyloid β protein in the cerebral vasculature. In analogy to previous observations in Alzheimer disease, we hypothesized that analysis of amyloid β40 and β42 proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid might serve as a molecular biomarker. We observed strongly decreased cerebrospinal fluid amyloid β40 (p < 0.01 vs controls or Alzheimer disease) and amyloid β42 concentrations (p < 0.001 vs controls and p < 0.05 vs Alzheimer disease) in cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients. The combination of amyloid β42 and total tau discriminated cerebral amyloid angiopathy from controls, with an area under the receiver operator curve of 0.98. Our data are consistent with neuropathological evidence that amyloid β40 as well as amyloid β42 protein are selectively trapped in the cerebral vasculature from interstitial fluid drainage pathways that otherwise transport amyloid β proteins toward the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:19743453

  18. Neuroinflammation and β amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease: in vivo quantification with molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommet, C; Mondon, K; Camus, V; Ribeiro, M J; Beaufils, E; Arlicot, N; Corcia, P; Paccalin, M; Minier, F; Gosselin, T; Page, G; Guilloteau, D; Chalon, S

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Its relationship with underlying β amyloid deposition remains unclear. In vivo visualization of microglial activation has become possible with the development of molecular imaging ligands when used with positron emission tomography (PET). The translocator protein (TSPO) is upregulated during neuroinflammation. Consequently, targeting TSPO with radiolabeled ligands for PET is an attractive biomarker for neuroinflammation. A review of the research literature on PET imaging which studied in vivo neuroinflammation in AD subjects and its relationship with amyloid load was performed, including papers published between 2001 and 2012. Six studies were included using either [(11)C]PK-11195 or another non-TSPO radioligand that binds to the monoaminooxidase B. All the studies evaluated amyloid load with [(11)C]PIB. Microglial activation and astrocytosis are potentially early phenomena in AD. However, the individual levels of amyloid deposition and microglial activation were not correlated. Noninvasive in vivo molecular imaging to visualize neuroinflammation in AD may contribute to our understanding of the kinetics of neuroinflammation and its relationship to the hallmarks of the disease. Both are important for the development of future therapeutic modalities and for quantifying the efficacy of future disease-modifying treatments. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Evolutionary perspectives on amyloid and inflammatory features of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C E; Marchalonis, J J

    1996-01-01

    We propose that the amyloid deposits in senile plaques of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) result from ancient mechanisms in wound-healing and inflammatory processes that preceded the evolution of the inducible combinatorial immune responses characteristic of jawed vertebrates. AD plaques are unlike active plaques in MS, because antibodies, T-cells and, B cells are not conspicuous components of senile plaques or other loci of degeneration. However, senile plaques contain amyloids and other inflammatory proteins of ancient origin that appear to be made by local brain cells, including neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. We describe a highly conserved 16-mer found in pentrakins from mammals and from the horseshoe crab. The senile plaque thus provides a novel opportunity to study primitive features of complement-mediated inflammatory responses in the absence of immunoglobulins.

  20. Amyloid imaging in prodromal Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossenkoppele, R.; van Berckel, B.N.M.; Prins, N.D.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with mild cognitive impairment are at an increased risk of progression to Alzheimer's disease. However, not all patients with mild cognitive impairment progress, and it is difficult to accurately identify those patients who are in the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease. In a recent

  1. Serum amyloid A protein in amyloidosis, rheumatic, and neoplastic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, M.D.; Cohen, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    Serum levels of amyloid protein A (SAA) have been shown to be elevated in different types of amyloidosis and in rheumatic diseases by radioimmunoassay using 125 iodine labeled AA and anti-AA. SAA levels were elevated in both primary and secondary amyloidosis, but there were highly significant differences between these levels. In heredofamilial amyloid, SAA levels were within normal limits. While the mean SAA level was elevated in persons over 70 years, the fact that some persons in this age group had normal levels suggested that marked elevation after age 70 may be due to occult inflammatory or neoplastic disease. High SAA levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis correlated, in most cases, with physician evaluation of disease activity and Westergren ESR. SAA levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were lower than those in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and most patients with degenerative joint disease had normal levels. Very high levels of SAA were found in patients with neoplastic diseases. Patients with carcinoma of the lung and bowel had much higher levels than patients with carcinoma of the breast. Determination of SAA levels may be of value in evaluating different forms of systemic amyloidosis, assessing the activity of rheumatic disease, and screening for occult inflammatory or neoplastic disease

  2. Ten Challenges of the Amyloid Hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    of the major paradigm in the field, the amyloid hypothesis, are sharply formulated. These challenges together show that new approaches are necessary that address data heterogeneity, increase focus on the proteome level, use available human patient data more actively, account for the aging phenotype......The inability to effectively halt or cure Alzheimer's disease (AD), exacerbated by the recent failures of high-profile clinical trials, emphasizes the urgent need to understand the complex biochemistry of this major neurodegenerative disease. In this paper, ten central, current challenges...

  3. Protective properties of lysozyme on β-amyloid pathology: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmfors, Linda; Boman, Andrea; Civitelli, Livia; Nath, Sangeeta; Sandin, Linnea; Janefjord, Camilla; McCann, Heather; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Halliday, Glenda; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2015-11-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by signs of neuroinflammation. Lysozyme is a major player in the innate immune system and has recently been shown to prevent the aggregation of amyloid-β1-40 in vitro. In this study we found that patients with Alzheimer disease have increased lysozyme levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and lysozyme co-localized with amyloid-β in plaques. In Drosophila neuronal co-expression of lysozyme and amyloid-β1-42 reduced the formation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β species, prolonged survival and improved the activity of amyloid-β1-42 transgenic flies. This suggests that lysozyme levels rise in Alzheimer disease as a compensatory response to amyloid-β increases and aggregation. In support of this, in vitro aggregation assays revealed that lysozyme associates with amyloid-β1-42 and alters its aggregation pathway to counteract the formation of toxic amyloid-β species. Overall, these studies establish a protective role for lysozyme against amyloid-β associated toxicities and identify increased lysozyme in patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, lysozyme has potential as a new biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. The role of stable α-synuclein oligomers in the molecular events underlying amyloid formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Nikolai; Nielsen, Søren Bang; Buell, Alexander K.

    2014-01-01

    α-synuclein (αSN), whose aggregation is strongly implicated in the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The two types of oligomers are both formed under conditions where amyloid fibril formation is observed but differ in molecular weight by an order of magnitude. Both possess a degree of β......, either as precursors of fibrils or as species involved in the fibril elongation process or instead if they are associated with an aggregation process that is distinct from that generating mature fibrils. Here we describe and characterize in detail two well-defined oligomeric species formed by the protein...

  5. Disrupting beta-amyloid aggregation for Alzheimer disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, L D; Soto, C

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a devastating degenerative disorder for which there is no cure or effective treatment. Although the etiology of Alzheimer's disease is not fully understood, compelling evidence indicates that deposition of aggregates composed by a misfolded form of the amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) is the central event in the disease pathogenesis. Therefore, an attractive therapeutic strategy is to prevent or reverse Abeta misfolding and aggregation. Diverse strategies have been described to identify inhibitors of this process, including screening of libraries of small molecules chemical compounds, rational design of synthetic peptides, assessment of natural Abeta-binding proteins and stimulation of the immune system by vaccination. In this article we describe these different approaches, their principles and their potential strengths and weaknesses. Overall the available data suggest that the development of drugs to interfere with Abeta misfolding and aggregation is a feasible target that hold great promise for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Ten Challenges of the Amyloid Hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    The inability to effectively halt or cure Alzheimer's disease (AD), exacerbated by the recent failures of high-profile clinical trials, emphasizes the urgent need to understand the complex biochemistry of this major neurodegenerative disease. In this paper, ten central, current challenges of the major paradigm in the field, the amyloid hypothesis, are sharply formulated. These challenges together show that new approaches are necessary that address data heterogeneity, increase focus on the proteome level, use available human patient data more actively, account for the aging phenotype as a background model of the disease, unify our understanding of the interplay between genetic and non-genetic risk factors, and combine into one framework both the familial and sporadic forms of the disease.

  7. Why are Functional Amyloids Non-Toxic in Humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Jackson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids were first identified in association with amyloidoses, human diseases in which proteins and peptides misfold into amyloid fibrils. Subsequent studies have identified an array of functional amyloid fibrils that perform physiological roles in humans. Given the potential for the production of toxic species in amyloid assembly reactions, it is remarkable that cells can produce these functional amyloids without suffering any obvious ill effect. Although the precise mechanisms are unclear, there are a number of ways in which amyloid toxicity may be prevented. These include regulating the level of the amyloidogenic peptides and proteins, minimising the production of prefibrillar oligomers in amyloid assembly reactions, sequestrating amyloids within membrane bound organelles, controlling amyloid assembly by other molecules, and disassembling the fibrils under physiological conditions. Crucially, a better understanding of how toxicity is avoided in the production of functional amyloids may provide insights into the prevention of amyloid toxicity in amyloidoses.

  8. Altered β-Amyloid Precursor Protein Isoforms in Mexican Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. J. Sánchez-González

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP isoforms ratio as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s Disease and to assess its relationship with demographic and genetic variables of the disease.

  9. Amyloid Load in Fat Tissue Reflects Disease Severity and Predicts Survival in Amyloidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gameren, Ingrid I.; Hazenberg, Bouke P. C.; Bijzet, Johan; Haagsma, Elizabeth B.; Vellenga, Edo; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Jager, Pieter L.; Van Rijswijk, Martin H.

    Objective. The severity of systemic amyloidosis is thought to be related to the extent of amyloid deposition. We studied whether amyloid load in fat tissue reflects disease severity and predicts survival. Methods. We studied all consecutive patients with systemic amyloidosis seen between January

  10. Microbiosensor for Alzheimer's disease diagnostics: detection of amyloid beta biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Piatyszek, Rudolph; Cirrito, John R; Wu, Ze-Zhi; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects about 35.6 million people worldwide, and if current trends continue with no medical advancement, one in 85 people will be affected by 2050. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop a cost-effective, easy to use, sensor platform to diagnose and study AD. The measurement of peptide amyloid beta (Aβ) found in CSF has been assessed as an avenue to diagnose and study the disease. The quantification of the ratio of Aβ1-40/42 (or Aβ ratio) has been established as a reliable test to diagnose AD through human clinical trials. Therefore, we have developed a multiplexed, implantable immunosensor to detect amyloid beta (Aβ) isoforms using triple barrel carbon fiber microelectrodes as the sensor platform. Antibodies act as the biorecognition element of the sensor and selectively capture and bind Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 to the electrode surface. Electrochemistry was used to measure the intrinsic oxidation signal of Aβ at 0.65 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), originating from a single tyrosine residue found at position 10 in its amino acid sequence. Using the proposed immunosensor Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 could be specifically detected in CSF from mice within a detection range of 20-50 nM and 20-140 nM respectively. The immunosensor enables real-time, highly sensitive detection of Aβ and opens up the possibilities for diagnostic ex vivo applications and research-based in vivo studies. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. The Pattern of Brain Amyloid Load in Posterior Cortical Atrophy Using 18F-AV45: Is Amyloid the Principal Actor in the Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Beaufils

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is characterized by progressive higher-order visuoperceptual dysfunction and praxis declines. This syndrome is related to a number of underlying diseases, including, in most cases, Alzheimer's disease (AD. The aim of this study was to compare the amyloid load with 18F-AV45 positron emission tomography (PET between PCA and AD subjects. Methods: We performed 18F-AV45 PET, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarker analysis and a neuropsychological assessment in 11 PCA patients and 12 AD patients. Results: The global and regional 18F-AV45 uptake was similar in the PCA and AD groups. No significant correlation was observed between global 18F-AV45 uptake and CSF biomarkers or between regional 18F-AV45 uptake and cognitive and affective symptoms. Conclusion: This 18F-AV45 PET amyloid imaging study showed no specific regional pattern of cortical 18F-AV45 binding in PCA patients. These results confirm that a distinct clinical phenotype in amnestic AD and PCA is not related to amyloid distribution.

  12. The Pattern of Brain Amyloid Load in Posterior Cortical Atrophy Using (18)F-AV45: Is Amyloid the Principal Actor in the Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, Emilie; Ribeiro, Maria Joao; Vierron, Emilie; Vercouillie, Johnny; Dufour-Rainfray, Diane; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Camus, Vincent; Mondon, Karl; Guilloteau, Denis; Hommet, Caroline

    2014-09-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is characterized by progressive higher-order visuoperceptual dysfunction and praxis declines. This syndrome is related to a number of underlying diseases, including, in most cases, Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of this study was to compare the amyloid load with (18)F-AV45 positron emission tomography (PET) between PCA and AD subjects. We performed (18)F-AV45 PET, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker analysis and a neuropsychological assessment in 11 PCA patients and 12 AD patients. The global and regional (18)F-AV45 uptake was similar in the PCA and AD groups. No significant correlation was observed between global (18)F-AV45 uptake and CSF biomarkers or between regional (18)F-AV45 uptake and cognitive and affective symptoms. This (18)F-AV45 PET amyloid imaging study showed no specific regional pattern of cortical (18)F-AV45 binding in PCA patients. These results confirm that a distinct clinical phenotype in amnestic AD and PCA is not related to amyloid distribution.

  13. Aggregation of model amyloid insulin protein in crowding environments and under ac-electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhongli; Jing, Benxin; Murray, Brian; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Zhu, Y.

    2013-03-01

    In vitro experiments have been widely used to characterize the misfolding/unfolding pathway characteristic of amylodogenic proteins. Conversion from natively folded amyloidogenic proteins to oligomers via nucleation is the accepted path to fibril formation upon heating over a certain lag time period. In this work, we investigate the effect of crowing environment and external electric fields on the pathway and kinetics of insulin, a well-established amyloid model protein by single fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. With added co-solutes, such as glycerol and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), to mimic the cellular crowding environments, we have observed that the lag time can be significantly prolonged. The lag time increases with increasing co-solute concentration, yet showing little dependence on solution viscosity. Conversely, applied ac-electric fields can considerably shorten the lag timewhen a critical ac-voltage is exceeded. The strong dependence of lag time on ac-frequency over a narrow range of 500 Hz-5 kHz indicates the effect of ac-electroosmosis on the diffusion controlled process of insulin nucleation. Yet, no conformational structure is detected with insulin under applied ac-fields, suggesting the equivalence of ac-polarization to the conventional thermal activation process for insulin aggregation. These finding suggest that at least the aggregation kinetics of insulin can be altered by local solution condition or external stimuli, which gives new insight to the treatment of amyloid related diseases.

  14. Brain Aging and Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease: A Matter of Increased Amyloid or Reduced Energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecocci, Patrizia; Baroni, Marta; Senin, Umberto; Boccardi, Virginia

    2018-03-16

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents the most common form of dementia in old age subjects, and despite decades of studies, the underlying etiopathogenetic mechanisms remain unsolved. The definition of AD has changed over the past years, offering an ever more detailed definition of pre-morbid and pre-clinical status, but without a similar strong emphasis on the role of aging as the main risk factor. In fact, while early-onset AD is a clear consequence of gene mutations, late-onset AD is more likely due to a gradual accumulation of age-related damages. The pathogenetic amyloid cascade hypothesis has been recently questioned due to multiple clinical failures. Furthermore, several studies reported that cognitively normal elderly have a high amyloid deposition in the brain comparable to the levels observed in old age subjects with AD. This suggests that amyloid accumulation enters into the normal process of aging and what really triggers neuronal death and clinical manifestation in late-onset AD still needs further explanation. In this context, 'normal brain aging' and AD might represent a different pathway of successful or failed capability to adapt brain structures and cerebral functions. Cellular senescence and age-related changes affecting the brain may be considered as biologic manifestations of increasing entropy. Bioenergetic deficits due to mitochondrial dysfunction may lead to progressive neuronal death and clinical expression of dementia. So, increased amyloid in the brain of old age subjects may represent the downstream event expression of a biological system that is cooling down because of its exhaustion and not the core causative factor of late-onset dementia.

  15. Differences between amyloid-β aggregation in solution and on the membrane: Insights towards elucidation of the mechanistic details of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Samuel A.; Walsh, Patrick; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    The association of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide with cellular membranes is hypothesized to be the underlying phenomenon of neurotoxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. Misfolding of proteins and peptides, as is the case with Aβ, follows a progression from a monomeric state, through intermediates, ending at long, unbranched amyloid fibers. This tutorial review offers a perspective into the association of toxic Aβ structures with membrane as well as details into membrane-associated mechanisms of toxicity. PMID:24464312

  16. Differences between amyloid-β aggregation in solution and on the membrane: insights into elucidation of the mechanistic details of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Samuel A; Walsh, Patrick; Brender, Jeffrey R; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-10-07

    The association of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide with cellular membranes is hypothesized to be the underlying phenomenon of neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease. Misfolding of proteins and peptides, as is the case with Aβ, follows a progression from a monomeric state, through intermediates, ending at long, unbranched amyloid fibers. This tutorial review offers a perspective on the association of toxic Aβ structures with membranes as well as details of membrane-associated mechanisms of toxicity.

  17. Disaggregation of amyloid plaque in brain of Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice with daily subcutaneous administration of a tetravalent bispecific antibody that targets the transferrin receptor and the Abeta amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbria, Rachita K; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Boado, Ruben J; Pardridge, William M

    2013-09-03

    Anti-amyloid antibodies (AAA) are under development as new therapeutics that disaggregate the amyloid plaque in brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the AAAs are large molecule drugs that do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in the absence of BBB disruption. In the present study, an AAA was re-engineered for receptor-mediated transport across the BBB via the endogenous BBB transferrin receptor (TfR). A single chain Fv (ScFv) antibody form of an AAA was fused to the carboxyl terminus of each heavy chain of a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the mouse TfR, and this produced a tetravalent bispecific antibody designated the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein. Unlike a conventional AAA, which has a plasma half-time of weeks, the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein is cleared from plasma in mice with a mean residence time of about 3 h. Therefore, a novel protocol was developed for the treatment of one year old presenilin (PS)-1/amyloid precursor protein (APP) AD double transgenic PSAPP mice, which were administered daily subcutaneous (sc) injections of 5 mg/kg of the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein for 12 consecutive weeks. At the end of the treatment, brain amyloid plaques were quantified with confocal microscopy using both Thioflavin-S staining and immunostaining with the 6E10 antibody against Abeta amyloid fibrils. Fusion protein treatment caused a 57% and 61% reduction in amyloid plaque in the cortex and hippocampus, respectively. No increase in plasma immunoreactive Abeta amyloid peptide, and no cerebral microhemorrhage, was observed. Chronic daily sc treatment of the mice with the fusion protein caused no immune reactions and only a low titer antidrug antibody response. In conclusion, re-engineering AAAs for receptor-mediated BBB transport allows for reduction in brain amyloid plaque without cerebral microhemorrhage following daily sc treatment for 12 weeks.

  18. [Development of anti-Alzheimer's disease drug based on beta-amyloid hypothesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2010-04-01

    Currently, there are five anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs approved. These are tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine. The mechanism of the first four drugs is acetylcholinesterase inhibition, while memantine is an NMDA-receptor antagonist. However, these drugs do not cure Alzheimer's, but are only symptomatic treatments. Therefore, a cure for Alzheimer's disease is truly needed. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by cognitive deficits. The cause of the disease is not well understood, but research indicates that the aggregation of beta-amyloid is the fundamental cause. This theory suggests that beta-amyloid aggregation causes neurotoxicity. Therefore, development of the next anti-Alzheimer's disease drug is based on the beta-amyloid theory. We are now studying natural products, such as mulberry leaf extracts and curcumin derivatives, as potential cure for Alzheimer's disease. In this report, we describe some data about these natural products and derivatives.

  19. Amyloid precursor protein and endosomal-lysosomal dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease: inseparable partners in a multifactorial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Ralph A

    2017-07-01

    Abnormalities of the endosomal-lysosomal network (ELN) are a signature feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These include the earliest known cytopathology that is specific to AD and that affects endosomes and induces the progressive failure of lysosomes, each of which are directly linked by distinct mechanisms to neurodegeneration. The origins of ELN dysfunction and β-amyloidogenesis closely overlap, which reflects their common genetic basis, the established early involvement of endosomes and lysosomes in amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and clearance, and the pathologic effect of certain APP metabolites on ELN functions. Genes that promote β-amyloidogenesis in AD (APP, PSEN1/2, and APOE4) have primary effects on ELN function. The importance of primary ELN dysfunction to pathogenesis is underscored by the mutations in more than 35 ELN-related genes that, thus far, are known to cause familial neurodegenerative diseases even though different pathogenic proteins may be involved. In this article, I discuss growing evidence that implicates AD gene-driven ELN disruptions as not only the antecedent pathobiology that underlies β-amyloidogenesis but also as the essential partner with APP and its metabolites that drive the development of AD, including tauopathy, synaptic dysfunction, and neurodegeneration. The striking amelioration of diverse deficits in animal AD models by remediating ELN dysfunction further supports a need to integrate APP and ELN relationships, including the role of amyloid-β, into a broader conceptual framework of how AD arises, progresses, and may be effectively therapeutically targeted.-Nixon, R. A. Amyloid precursor protein and endosomal-lysosomal dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease: inseparable partners in a multifactorial disease. © FASEB.

  20. Multimodal PET Imaging of Amyloid and Tau Pathology in Alzheimer Disease and Non-Alzheimer Disease Dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chenjie; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2017-07-01

    Biomarkers of the molecular pathology underpinning dementia syndromes are increasingly recognized as crucial for diagnosis and development of disease-modifying treatments. Amyloid PET imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic assessment of Alzheimer disease. Its use has also deepened understanding of the role of amyloid pathology in Lewy body disorders and aging. Tau PET imaging is an imaging biomarker that will likely play an important role in the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment in dementias. Using tau PET imaging to examine how tau pathology relates to amyloid and other markers of neurodegeneration will serve to better understand the pathophysiologic cascade that leads to dementia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nasal administration of amyloid-beta peptide decreases cerebral amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner, H L; Lemere, C A; Maron, R

    2000-01-01

    Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease-implicated ......Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease......-implicated proteins can induce antigen-specific anti-inflammatory immune responses in mucosal lymphoid tissue which then act systemically. We hypothesized that chronic mucosal administration of Abeta peptide might induce an anti-inflammatory process in AD brain tissue that could beneficially affect...... Abeta plaque burden and Abeta42 levels in mice treated intranasally with Abeta peptide versus controls treated with myelin basic protein or left untreated. This lower Abeta burden was associated with decreased local microglial and astrocytic activation, decreased neuritic dystrophy, serum anti...

  2. Heterogeneous Association of Alzheimer's Disease-Linked Amyloid-β and Amyloid-β Protein Precursor with Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willén, Katarina; Sroka, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Reisuke H; Gouras, Gunnar K

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increasingly viewed as a disease of synapses. Loss of synapses correlates better with cognitive decline than amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the hallmark neuropathological lesions of AD. Soluble forms of amyloid-β (Aβ) have emerged as mediators of synapse dysfunction. Aβ binds to, accumulates, and aggregates in synapses. However, the anatomical and neurotransmitter specificity of Aβ and the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in AD remain poorly understood. In addition, the relative roles of Aβ and AβPP in the development of AD, at pre- versus post-synaptic compartments and axons versus dendrites, respectively, remain unclear. Here we use immunogold electron microscopy and confocal microscopy to provide evidence for heterogeneity in the localization of Aβ/AβPP. We demonstrate that Aβ binds to a subset of synapses in cultured neurons, with preferential binding to glutamatergic compared to GABAergic neurons. We also highlight the challenge of defining pre- versus post-synaptic localization of this binding by confocal microscopy. Further, endogenous Aβ42 accumulates in both glutamatergic and GABAergic AβPP/PS1 transgenic primary neurons, but at varying levels. Moreover, upon knock-out of presenilin 1 or inhibition of γ-secretase AβPP C-terminal fragments accumulate both pre- and post-synaptically; however earlier pre-synaptically, consistent with a higher rate of AβPP processing in axons. A better understanding of the synaptic and anatomical selectivity of Aβ/AβPP in AD can be important for the development of more effective new therapies for this major disease of aging.

  3. Heterogeneous Association of Alzheimer’s Disease-Linked Amyloid-β and Amyloid-β Protein Precursor with Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willén, Katarina; Sroka, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Reisuke H.; Gouras, Gunnar K.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is increasingly viewed as a disease of synapses. Loss of synapses correlates better with cognitive decline than amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the hallmark neuropathological lesions of AD. Soluble forms of amyloid-β (Aβ) have emerged as mediators of synapse dysfunction. Aβ binds to, accumulates, and aggregates in synapses. However, the anatomical and neurotransmitter specificity of Aβ and the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in AD remain poorly understood. In addition, the relative roles of Aβ and AβPP in the development of AD, at pre- versus post-synaptic compartments and axons versus dendrites, respectively, remain unclear. Here we use immunogold electron microscopy and confocal microscopy to provide evidence for heterogeneity in the localization of Aβ/AβPP. We demonstrate that Aβ binds to a subset of synapses in cultured neurons, with preferential binding to glutamatergic compared to GABAergic neurons. We also highlight the challenge of defining pre- versus post-synaptic localization of this binding by confocal microscopy. Further, endogenous Aβ42 accumulates in both glutamatergic and GABAergic AβPP/PS1 transgenic primary neurons, but at varying levels. Moreover, upon knock-out of presenilin 1 or inhibition of γ-secretase AβPP C-terminal fragments accumulate both pre- and post-synaptically; however earlier pre-synaptically, consistent with a higher rate of AβPP processing in axons. A better understanding of the synaptic and anatomical selectivity of Aβ/AβPP in AD can be important for the development of more effective new therapies for this major disease of aging. PMID:28869466

  4. Inhibitory Activities of Antioxidant Flavonoids from Tamarix gallica on Amyloid Aggregation Related to Alzheimer's and Type 2 Diabetes Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hmidene, Asma; Hanaki, Mizuho; Murakami, Kazuma; Irie, Kazuhiro; Isoda, Hiroko; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    The prevention of amyloid aggregation is promising for the treatment of age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Ten antioxidant flavonoids isolated from the medicinal halophyte Tamarix gallica were tested for their amyloid aggregation inhibition potential. Glucuronosylated flavonoids show relatively strong inhibitory activity of Amyloid β (Aβ) and human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) aggregation compared to their aglycone analogs. Structure-activity relationship of the flavonoids suggests that the catechol moiety is important for amyloid aggregation inhibition, while the methylation of the carboxyl group in the glucuronide moiety and of the hydroxyl group in the aglycone flavonoids decreased it.

  5. Amyloid polymorphisms constitute distinct clouds of conformational variants in different etiological subtypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jay; Mahler, Jasmin; Beschorner, Natalie; Kaeser, Stephan A; Häsler, Lisa M; Baumann, Frank; Nyström, Sofie; Portelius, Erik; Blennow, Kaj; Lashley, Tammaryn; Fox, Nick C; Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Glatzel, Markus; Oblak, Adrian L; Ghetti, Bernardino; Nilsson, K Peter R; Hammarström, Per; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2017-12-05

    The molecular architecture of amyloids formed in vivo can be interrogated using luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs), a unique class of amyloid dyes. When bound to amyloid, LCOs yield fluorescence emission spectra that reflect the 3D structure of the protein aggregates. Given that synthetic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) has been shown to adopt distinct structural conformations with different biological activities, we asked whether Aβ can assume structurally and functionally distinct conformations within the brain. To this end, we analyzed the LCO-stained cores of β-amyloid plaques in postmortem tissue sections from frontal, temporal, and occipital neocortices in 40 cases of familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) or sporadic (idiopathic) AD (sAD). The spectral attributes of LCO-bound plaques varied markedly in the brain, but the mean spectral properties of the amyloid cores were generally similar in all three cortical regions of individual patients. Remarkably, the LCO amyloid spectra differed significantly among some of the familial and sAD subtypes, and between typical patients with sAD and those with posterior cortical atrophy AD. Neither the amount of Aβ nor its protease resistance correlated with LCO spectral properties. LCO spectral amyloid phenotypes could be partially conveyed to Aβ plaques induced by experimental transmission in a mouse model. These findings indicate that polymorphic Aβ-amyloid deposits within the brain cluster as clouds of conformational variants in different AD cases. Heterogeneity in the molecular architecture of pathogenic Aβ among individuals and in etiologically distinct subtypes of AD justifies further studies to assess putative links between Aβ conformation and clinical phenotype.

  6. Localization and Trafficking of Amyloid-β Protein Precursor and Secretases: Impact on Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinho, Paula; Pliássova, Anna; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects almost 35 million people worldwide. One of the neuropathological features of AD is the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques, which are mainly composed of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. These peptides derive from the amyloidogenic proteolytic processing of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), through the sequential action of β- and γ-secretases. However, AβPP can also be cleaved by a non-amyloidogenic pathway, involving an α-secretase, and in this case the Aβ formation is precluded. The production of Aβ and of other AβPP catabolites depends on the spatial and temporal co-localization of AβPP with α- or β-secretases and γ-secretase, which traffic through the secretory pathway in a highly regulated manner. Disturbances on AβPP and secretases intracellular trafficking and, consequently, in their localization may affect dynamic interactions between these proteins with consequences in the AD pathogenesis. In this article, we critically review the recent knowledge about the trafficking and co-localization of AβPP and related secretases in the brain under physiological and AD conditions. A particular focus is given to data concerning the distribution of AβPP and secretases in different types of synapses relatively to other neuronal or glial localizations. Furthermore, we discuss some possible signals that govern the dynamic encounter of AβPP with each group of secretases, such as AβPP mutations, estrogen deprivation, chronic stress, metabolic impairment, and alterations in sleep pattern-associated with aging. The knowledge of key signals that are responsible for the shifting of AβPP processing away from α-secretases and toward the β-secretases might be useful to develop AD therapeutic strategies.

  7. Role of gut microbiota and nutrients in amyloid formation and pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistollato, Francesca; Sumalla Cano, Sandra; Elio, Iñaki; Masias Vergara, Manuel; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota might be associated with the onset of certain human pathologies, such as Alzheimer disease, a neurodegenerative syndrome associated with cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β fibrils. It has been shown that bacteria populating the gut microbiota can release significant amounts of amyloids and lipopolysaccharides, which might play a role in the modulation of signaling pathways and the production of proinflammatory cytokines related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Additionally, nutrients have been shown to affect the composition of the gut microbiota as well as the formation and aggregation of cerebral amyloid-β. This suggests that modulating the gut microbiome and amyloidogenesis through specific nutritional interventions might prove to be an effective strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of Alzheimer disease. This review examines the possible role of the gut in the dissemination of amyloids, the role of the gut microbiota in the regulation of the gut-brain axis, the potential amyloidogenic properties of gut bacteria, and the possible impact of nutrients on modulation of microbiota composition and amyloid formation in relation to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Absence of beta-amyloid in cortical cataracts of donors with and without Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Ralph; Rosandić, Jurja; Montenegro, Gustavo A; Lobato, Elvira; Tresserra, Francisco; Barraquer, Rafael I; Vrensen, Gijs F J M

    2013-01-01

    Eye lenses from human donors with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD) were studied to evaluate the presence of amyloid in cortical cataract. We obtained 39 lenses from 21 postmortem donors with AD and 15 lenses from age-matched controls provided by the Banco de Ojos para Tratamientos de la Ceguera (Barcelona, Spain). For 17 donors, AD was clinically diagnosed by general physicians and for 4 donors the AD diagnosis was neuropathologically confirmed. Of the 21 donors with AD, 6 had pronounced bilateral cortical lens opacities and 15 only minor or no cortical opacities. As controls, 7 donors with pronounced cortical opacities and 8 donors with almost transparent lenses were selected. All lenses were photographed in a dark field stereomicroscope. Histological sections were analyzed using a standard and a more sensitive Congo red protocol, thioflavin staining and beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry. Brain tissue from two donors, one with cerebral amyloid angiopathy and another with advanced AD-related changes and one cornea with lattice dystrophy were used as positive controls for the staining techniques. Thioflavin, standard and modified Congo red staining were positive in the control brain tissues and in the dystrophic cornea. Beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry was positive in the brain tissues but not in the cornea sample. Lenses from control and AD donors were, without exception, negative after Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid immunohistochemical staining. The results of the positive control tissues correspond well with known observations in AD, amyloid angiopathy and corneas with lattice dystrophy. The absence of staining in AD and control lenses with the techniques employed lead us to conclude that there is no beta-amyloid in lenses from donors with AD or in control cortical cataracts. The inconsistency with previous studies of Goldstein et al. (2003) and Moncaster et al. (2010), both of which demonstrated positive Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid

  9. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Su

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network (DIAN, an autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted.

  10. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cash, Lisa A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Klunk, William E.; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Fox, Nick C.; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S.; Weiner, Michael W.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  11. Monitoring disease progression in mild cognitive impairment: Associations between atrophy patterns, cognition, APOE and amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Falahati

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Longitudinal changes in the SI reflect structural brain changes and can identify MCI patients at risk of progression to AD. Disease-related brain structural changes are influenced independently by APOE genotype and amyloid pathology. The SI has the potential to be used as a sensitive tool to predict future dementia, monitor disease progression as well as an outcome measure for clinical trials.

  12. Disease Transmission by Misfolded Prion-Protein Isoforms, Prion-Like Amyloids, Functional Amyloids and the Central Dogma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L. Daus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1982, the term “prions” (proteinaceous infectious particles was coined to specify a new principle of infection. A misfolded isoform of a cellular protein has been described as the causative agent of a fatal neurodegenerative disease. At the beginning of prion research scientists assumed that the infectious agent causing transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE was a virus, but some unconventional properties of these pathogens were difficult to bring in line with the prevailing viral model. The discovery that prions (obviously devoid of any coding nucleic acid can store and transmit information similarly to DNA was initially even denoted as being “heretical” but is nowadays mainly accepted by the scientific community. This review describes, from a historical point of view, how the “protein-only hypothesis” expands the Central Dogma. Definition of both, the prion principle and the Central Dogma, have been essential steps to understand information storage and transfer within and among cells and organisms. Furthermore, the current understanding of the infectivity of prion-proteins after misfolding is summarized succinctly. Finally, prion-like amyloids and functional amyloids, as found in yeast and bacteria, will be discussed.

  13. Disease Transmission by Misfolded Prion-Protein Isoforms, Prion-Like Amyloids, Functional Amyloids and the Central Dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daus, Martin L

    2016-01-04

    In 1982, the term "prions" (proteinaceous infectious particles) was coined to specify a new principle of infection. A misfolded isoform of a cellular protein has been described as the causative agent of a fatal neurodegenerative disease. At the beginning of prion research scientists assumed that the infectious agent causing transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) was a virus, but some unconventional properties of these pathogens were difficult to bring in line with the prevailing viral model. The discovery that prions (obviously devoid of any coding nucleic acid) can store and transmit information similarly to DNA was initially even denoted as being "heretical" but is nowadays mainly accepted by the scientific community. This review describes, from a historical point of view, how the "protein-only hypothesis" expands the Central Dogma. Definition of both, the prion principle and the Central Dogma, have been essential steps to understand information storage and transfer within and among cells and organisms. Furthermore, the current understanding of the infectivity of prion-proteins after misfolding is summarized succinctly. Finally, prion-like amyloids and functional amyloids, as found in yeast and bacteria, will be discussed.

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid Beta and Tau Concentrations Are Not Modulated by 16 Weeks of Moderate- to High-Intensity Physical Exercise in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Steen; Portelius, Erik; Siersma, Volkert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical exercise may have some effect on cognition in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the underlying biochemical effects are unclear. Animal studies have shown that amyloid beta (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, can be altered with high levels of physical...... of Life, Physical Health and Functional Ability in Alzheimer's Disease: The Effect of Physical Exercise (ADEX) study we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid samples for Aβ species, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) species. We also assessed the patients...

  15. In situ hybridization of nucleus basalis neurons shows increased β-amyloid mRNA in Alzheimer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.L.; Golde, T.E.; Usiak, M.F.; Younkin, L.H.; Younkin, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    To determine which cells within the brain produce β-amyloid mRNA and to assess expression of the β-amyloid gene in Alzheimer disease, the authors analyzed brain tissue from Alzheimer and control patients by in situ hybridization. The results demonstrate that β-amyloid mRNA is produced by neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert and cerebral cortex and that nuclues basalis perikarya from Alzheimer patients consistently hybridize more β-amyloid probe than those from controls. These observations support the hypothesis that increased expression of the β-amyloid gene plays an important role in the deposition of amyloid in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease

  16. Primary amyloid heart disease presenting as hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, L.T.; Raybuck, B.D.; Robinowitz, M.; Brinker, J.A.; Oetgen, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the unusual presentation of a patient with primary cardiac amyloidosis. Initial clinical symptoms and hemodynamic studies, including Technetium-99m-pyrophosphate scintigraphy, suggested hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, but endomyocardial biopsy revealed diffuse amyloid infiltration. Only two other cases of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction due to cardiac amyloidosis have been reported. The false-negative technetium-99m-pyrophosphate scintigram in this patient argues for the use of endomyocardial biopsy to aid in the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  17. Clinically different stages of Alzheimer's disease associated by amyloid deposition with [11C]-PIB PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatashita, Shizuo; Yamasaki, Hidetomo

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether [11C]-PIB PET detects underlying amyloid deposition at clinically different stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and preclinical dementia. The Japanese cohort of 214 subjects underwent cognitive testing and 60-min dynamic [11C]-PIB PET. [11C]-PIB data were acquired from 35-60 min after injection. Regions of interest were defined on co-registered MRI. Distribution volume ratios (DVR) of PIB retention were determined using Logan graphical analysis. All 56 patients with AD showed a robust increase in PIB retention in cortical areas (typical PIB AD-pattern). A mean DVR value in 11 patients with moderate AD (CDR: 2.1 ± 0.4) showed significantly higher PIB retention (2.38 ± 0.42, p PIB PET imaging. Further, the cortical amyloid deposition could be detected at preclinical stage of AD.

  18. Preclinical studies of potential amyloid binding PET/SPECT ligands in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svedberg, Marie M.; Rahman, Obaidur; Hall, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Visualizing the neuropathological hallmarks amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer's disease in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography will be of great value in diagnosing the individual patient and will also help in our understanding of the disease. The successful introduction of [ 11 C]PIB as a PET tracer for the amyloid plaques less than 10 years ago started an intensive research, and numerous new compounds for use in molecular imaging of the amyloid plaques have been developed. The candidates are based on dyes like thioflavin T, Congo red and chrysamine G, but also on other types such as benzoxazoles, curcumin and stilbenes. In the present review, we present methods of the radiochemistry and preclinical evaluation as well as the main properties of some of these compounds.

  19. Interactions of laminin with the amyloid ß peptide: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive neuronal cell loss is observed in Alzheimer's disease. Laminin immunoreactivity colocalizes with senile plaques, the characteristic extracellular histopathological lesions of Alzheimer brain, which consist of the amyloid ß (Aß peptide polymerized into amyloid fibrils. These lesions have neurotoxic effects and have been proposed to be a main cause of neurodegeneration. In order to understand the pathological significance of the interaction between laminin and amyloid, we investigated the effect of laminin on amyloid structure and toxicity. We found that laminin interacts with the Aß1-40 peptide, blocking fibril formation and even inducing depolymerization of preformed fibrils. Protofilaments known to be intermediate species of Aß fibril formation were also detected as intermediate species of laminin-induced Aß fibril depolymerization. Moreover, laminin-amyloid interactions inhibited the toxic effects on rat primary hippocampal neurons. As a whole, our results indicate a putative anti-amyloidogenic role of laminin which may be of biological and therapeutic interest for controlling amyloidosis, such as those observed in cerebral angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Emerging drugs to reduce abnormal β-amyloid protein in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panza, Francesco; Seripa, Davide; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Imbimbo, Bruno P; Lozupone, Madia; Leo, Antonio; Sardone, Rodolfo; Gagliardi, Gaetano; Lofano, Lucia; Creanza, Bianca C; Bisceglia, Paola; Daniele, Antonio; Bellomo, Antonello; Greco, Antonio; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2016-12-01

    Currently available drugs against Alzheimer's disease (AD) target cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmissions without affecting the underlying disease process. Putative disease-modifying drugs are in development and target β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide and tau protein, the principal neurophatological hallmarks of the disease. Areas covered: Phase III clinical studies of emerging anti-Aβ drugs for the treatment of AD were searched in US and EU clinical trial registries and in the medical literature until May 2016. Expert opinion: Drugs in Phase III clinical development for AD include one inhibitor of the β-secretase cleaving enzyme (BACE) (verubecestat), three anti-Aβ monoclonal antibodies (solanezumab, gantenerumab, and aducanumab), an inhibitor of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) (azeliragon) and the combination of cromolyn sodium and ibuprofen (ALZT-OP1). These drugs are mainly being tested in subjects during early phases of AD or in subjects at preclinical stage of familial AD or even in asymptomatic subjects at high risk of developing AD. The hope is to intervene in the disease process when it is not too late. However, previous clinical failures with anti-Aβ drugs and the lack of fully understanding of the pathophysiological role of Aβ in the development of AD, put the new drugs at substantial risk of failure.

  1. Reduction of Alzheimer's disease beta-amyloid pathology in the absence of gut microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Harach, T.; Marungruang, N.; Dutilleul, N.; Cheatham, V.; Coy, K. D. Mc; Neher, J. J.; Jucker, M.; Fåk, F.; T.; Lasser; Bolmont, T.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in the western world, however there is no cure available for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Despite clinical and experimental evidence implicating the intestinal microbiota in a number of brain disorders, its impact on Alzheimer's disease is not known. We generated a germ-free mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and discovered a drastic reduction of cerebral Ab amyloid pathology when compared to control Alzheimer's disease a...

  2. Associations between white matter microstructure and amyloid burden in preclinical Alzheimer's disease: A multimodal imaging investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie M. Racine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some cognitively healthy individuals develop brain amyloid accumulation, suggestive of incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD, but the effect of amyloid on other potentially informative imaging modalities, such as Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI, in characterizing brain changes in preclinical AD requires further exploration. In this study, a sample (N = 139, mean age 60.6, range 46 to 71 from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (WRAP, a cohort enriched for AD risk factors, was recruited for a multimodal imaging investigation that included DTI and [C-11]Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB positron emission tomography (PET. Participants were grouped as amyloid positive (Aβ+, amyloid indeterminate (Aβi, or amyloid negative (Aβ− based on the amount and pattern of amyloid deposition. Regional voxel-wise analyses of four DTI metrics, fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD, axial diffusivity (Da, and radial diffusivity (Dr, were performed based on amyloid grouping. Three regions of interest (ROIs, the cingulum adjacent to the corpus callosum, hippocampal cingulum, and lateral fornix, were selected based on their involvement in the early stages of AD. Voxel-wise analysis revealed higher FA among Aβ+ compared to Aβ− in all three ROIs and in Aβi compared to Aβ− in the cingulum adjacent to the corpus callosum. Follow-up exploratory whole-brain analyses were consistent with the ROI findings, revealing multiple regions where higher FA was associated with greater amyloid. Lower fronto-lateral gray matter MD was associated with higher amyloid burden. Further investigation showed a negative correlation between MD and PiB signal, suggesting that Aβ accumulation impairs diffusion. Interestingly, these findings in a largely presymptomatic sample are in contradistinction to relationships reported in the literature in symptomatic disease stages of Mild Cognitive Impairment and AD, which usually show higher MD and lower FA. Together with

  3. Alzheimer’s disease: How metal ions define β-amyloid function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is increasingly recognized to be linked to the function and status of metal ions, and recently, the amyloid hypothesis has been strongly intertwined with the metal ion hypothesis; in fact, these two hypotheses fit well together and are not mutually contradictory. This review...

  4. Neuroinflammation and Complexes of 17 beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase type 10-Amyloid beta in Alzheimer's Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištofíková, Z.; Řípová, D.; Bartoš, A.; Bocková, Markéta; Hegnerová, Kateřina; Říčný, J.; Čechová, L.; Vrajová, M.; Homola, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2013), s. 165-173 ISSN 1567-2050 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11225 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Amyloid beta * mitochondrial enzyme * Alzheimer 's disease Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.796, year: 2013

  5. Alzheimer’s disease: the Amyloid hypothesis and the Inverse Warburg effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd eDemetrius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and biochemical studies show that the sporadic forms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD are characterized by the following hallmarks : (a An exponential increase with age ; (b Selective neuronal vulnerability ; (c Inverse cancer comorbidity. The present article appeals to these hallmarks to evaluate and contrast two competing models of AD : the amyloid hypothesis (a neuron-centric mechanism and the Inverse Warburg hypothesis (a neuron-astrocytic mechanism. We show that these three hallmarks of AD conflict with the amyloid hypothesis, but are consistent with the Inverse Warburg hypothesis, a bioenergetic model which postulates that AD is the result of a cascade of three events – mitochondrial dysregulation, metabolic reprogramming (the Inverse Warburg effect, and natural selection. We also provide an explanation for the failures of the clinical trials based on amyloid immunization, and we propose a new class of therapeutic strategies consistent with the neuroenergetic selection model.

  6. Genesis of mammalian prions: from non-infectious amyloid fibrils to a transmissible prion disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natallia Makarava

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The transmissible agent of prion disease consists of a prion protein in its abnormal, β-sheet rich state (PrP(Sc, which is capable of replicating itself according to the template-assisted mechanism. This mechanism postulates that the folding pattern of a newly recruited polypeptide chain accurately reproduces that of a PrP(Sc template. Here we report that authentic PrP(Sc and transmissible prion disease can be generated de novo in wild type animals by recombinant PrP (rPrP amyloid fibrils, which are structurally different from PrP(Sc and lack any detectable PrP(Sc particles. When induced by rPrP fibrils, a long silent stage that involved two serial passages preceded development of the clinical disease. Once emerged, the prion disease was characterized by unique clinical, neuropathological, and biochemical features. The long silent stage to the disease was accompanied by significant transformation in neuropathological properties and biochemical features of the proteinase K-resistant PrP material (PrPres before authentic PrP(Sc evolved. The current work illustrates that transmissible prion diseases can be induced by PrP structures different from that of authentic PrP(Sc and suggests that a new mechanism different from the classical templating exists. This new mechanism designated as "deformed templating" postulates that a change in the PrP folding pattern from the one present in rPrP fibrils to an alternative specific for PrP(Sc can occur. The current work provides important new insight into the mechanisms underlying genesis of the transmissible protein states and has numerous implications for understanding the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Silymarin effect on amyloid-β plaque accumulation and gene expression of APP in an Alzheimer’s disease rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Azarfar, Katia; Dezfulian, Mehrooz; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2014-01-01

    Background The deposition of amyloid peptides is associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These amyloid peptides are derived from the amyloid protein precursor (APP). Silymarin, a standardized extract of milk thistle, which is currently used in liver diseases, may be effective in the inhibition of amyloid formation. However, its effect has not been assessed on APP expression. Results In this study, first, the effect of silymarin was examined on the passive avoidance learning in a rat model o...

  8. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid Beta in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Adi Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya; Quesada, Kandi; Boles, Annette; Reddy, Arubala P

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice ‘Curcumin’ against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-arthritis, pro-healing and boosting memory cognitive functions. In the last decade, several groups have designed and synthesized curcumin and its derivatives and extensively tested using cell and mouse models of AD. Recent research on amyloid-β and curcumin has revealed that curcumin prevents amyloid-β aggregation and crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB), reach brain cells and protect neurons from various toxic insults of aging and amyloid-β in humans. Recent research has also reported that curcumin ameliorates cognitive decline and improves synaptic functions in mouse models of AD. Further, recent groups have initiated studies on elderly individuals and patients with AD and the outcome of these studies is currently being assessed. This article highlights the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD. This article also critically assesses the current limitations of curcumin’s bioavailability and urgent need for new formulation to increase its brain levels to treat patients with AD. PMID:29332042

  9. Tackling amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease with A2V variants of Amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Colombo, Laura; Rossi, Alessandro; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Virgilio, Tommaso; Palamara, Luisa; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Campagnani, Ilaria; Costanza, Massimo; Pedotti, Rosetta; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2016-02-11

    We developed a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) exploiting the properties of a natural variant of Amyloid-β (Aβ) carrying the A2V substitution, which protects heterozygous carriers from AD by its ability to interact with wild-type Aβ, hindering conformational changes and assembly thereof. As prototypic compound we designed a six-mer mutated peptide (Aβ1-6A2V), linked to the HIV-related TAT protein, which is widely used for brain delivery and cell membrane penetration of drugs. The resulting molecule [Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D)] revealed strong anti-amyloidogenic effects in vitro and protected human neuroblastoma cells from Aβ toxicity. Preclinical studies in AD mouse models showed that short-term treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) inhibits Aβ aggregation and cerebral amyloid deposition, but a long treatment schedule unexpectedly increases amyloid burden, although preventing cognitive deterioration. Our data support the view that the AβA2V-based strategy can be successfully used for the development of treatments for AD, as suggested by the natural protection against the disease in human A2V heterozygous carriers. The undesirable outcome of the prolonged treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) was likely due to the TAT intrinsic attitude to increase Aβ production, avidly bind amyloid and boost its seeding activity, warning against the use of the TAT carrier in the design of AD therapeutics.

  10. Tackling amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer’s disease with A2V variants of Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Colombo, Laura; Rossi, Alessandro; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Virgilio, Tommaso; Palamara, Luisa; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Campagnani, Ilaria; Costanza, Massimo; Pedotti, Rosetta; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) exploiting the properties of a natural variant of Amyloid-β (Aβ) carrying the A2V substitution, which protects heterozygous carriers from AD by its ability to interact with wild-type Aβ, hindering conformational changes and assembly thereof. As prototypic compound we designed a six-mer mutated peptide (Aβ1-6A2V), linked to the HIV-related TAT protein, which is widely used for brain delivery and cell membrane penetration of drugs. The resulting molecule [Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D)] revealed strong anti-amyloidogenic effects in vitro and protected human neuroblastoma cells from Aβ toxicity. Preclinical studies in AD mouse models showed that short-term treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) inhibits Aβ aggregation and cerebral amyloid deposition, but a long treatment schedule unexpectedly increases amyloid burden, although preventing cognitive deterioration. Our data support the view that the AβA2V-based strategy can be successfully used for the development of treatments for AD, as suggested by the natural protection against the disease in human A2V heterozygous carriers. The undesirable outcome of the prolonged treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) was likely due to the TAT intrinsic attitude to increase Aβ production, avidly bind amyloid and boost its seeding activity, warning against the use of the TAT carrier in the design of AD therapeutics. PMID:26864599

  11. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid Beta in Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Adi Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice ‘Curcumin’ against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effe...

  12. Stable Size Distribution of Amyloid Plaques Over the Course of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Mielke, Matthew L.; Muzitansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-β plaques are a key pathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD), but whether plaque sizes increase or stabilize over the course of AD is unknown. We measured the size distribution of total immunoreactive (10D5-positive) and dense-core (Thioflavine-S-positive) plaques in the temporal neocortex of a large group of AD and plaque-bearing age-matched non-demented subjects to test the hypothesis that amyloid plaques continue to grow along with the progression of the disease. The size of amyloid-β (10D5)-positive plaques did not differ between groups whereas dense-core plaques from the AD group were slightly larger than those in the non-demented group (~25%–30%, p = 0.01). Within the AD group, dense-core plaque size did not independently correlate with duration of clinical disease (from 4 to 21 years, p = 0.68), whereas 10D5-positive plaque size correlated negatively with disease duration (p = 0.01). By contrast, an earlier age of symptom onset strongly predicted a larger postmortem plaque size; this effect was independent of disease duration and the presence of the APOEε4 allele (p = 0.0001). We conclude that plaques vary in size among patients, with larger size distributions correlating with an earlier age of onset, but plaques do not substantially increase in size over the clinical course of the disease. PMID:22805771

  13. Functional Amyloids in Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewetson, Aveline; Do, Hoa Quynh; Myers, Caitlyn; Muthusubramanian, Archana; Sutton, Roger Bryan; Wylie, Benjamin J; Cornwall, Gail A

    2017-06-29

    Amyloids are traditionally considered pathological protein aggregates that play causative roles in neurodegenerative disease, diabetes and prionopathies. However, increasing evidence indicates that in many biological systems nonpathological amyloids are formed for functional purposes. In this review, we will specifically describe amyloids that carry out biological roles in sexual reproduction including the processes of gametogenesis, germline specification, sperm maturation and fertilization. Several of these functional amyloids are evolutionarily conserved across several taxa, including human, emphasizing the critical role amyloids perform in reproduction. Evidence will also be presented suggesting that, if altered, some functional amyloids may become pathological.

  14. Iron Biochemistry is Correlated with Amyloid Plaque Morphology in an Established Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, Neil D; Everett, James; Collingwood, Joanna F; Dobson, Jon; van der Laan, Gerrit; Gallagher, Joseph J; Wang, Jian; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2017-10-19

    A signature characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is aggregation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) fibrils in the brain. Nevertheless, the links between Aβ and AD pathology remain incompletely understood. It has been proposed that neurotoxicity arising from aggregation of the Aβ 1-42 peptide can in part be explained by metal ion binding interactions. Using advanced X-ray microscopy techniques at sub-micron resolution, we investigated relationships between iron biochemistry and AD pathology in intact cortex from an established mouse model over-producing Aβ. We found a direct correlation of amyloid plaque morphology with iron, and evidence for the formation of an iron-amyloid complex. We also show that iron biomineral deposits in the cortical tissue contain the mineral magnetite, and provide evidence that Aβ-induced chemical reduction of iron could occur in vivo. Our observations point to the specific role of iron in amyloid deposition and AD pathology, and may impact development of iron-modifying therapeutics for AD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Amyloid PET imaging in Alzheimer's disease: a comparison of three radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, S.M.; Jagust, W.J. [University of California, Berkeley, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Life Sciences Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Thomas, B.A. [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Thurfjell, L. [GE Healthcare, Uppsala (Sweden); Schmidt, M. [Janssen Pharmaceutica, NV, Beerse (Belgium); Margolin, R. [Janssen Alzheimer Immunotherapy, South San Francisco, CA (United States); Mintun, M.; Pontecorvo, M. [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Baker, S.L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Life Sciences Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Collaboration: The Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2014-07-15

    The increasing use of amyloid PET in Alzheimer's disease research and clinical trials has motivated efforts to standardize methodology. We compared retention of the {sup 11}C radiotracer Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) and that of two {sup 18}F amyloid radiotracers (florbetapir and flutemetamol) using two study populations. We also examined the feasibility of converting between tracer-specific measures, using PiB as the common link between the two {sup 18}F tracers. One group of 40 subjects underwent PiB and flutemetamol imaging sessions and a separate group of 32 subjects underwent PiB and florbetapir imaging sessions. We compared cortical and white matter retention for each {sup 18}F tracer relative to that of PiB, as well as retention in several reference regions and image analysis methods. Correlations between tracer pairs were used to convert tracer-specific threshold values for amyloid positivity between tracers. Cortical retention for each pair of tracers was strongly correlated regardless of reference region (PiB-flutemetamol, ρ = 0.84-0.99; PiB-florbetapir, ρ = 0.83-0.97) and analysis method (ρ = 0.90-0.99). Compared to PiB, flutemetamol had higher white matter retention, while florbetapir had lower cortical retention. Two previously established independent thresholds for amyloid positivity were highly consistent when values were converted between tracer pairs. Despite differing white and grey matter retention characteristics, cortical retention for each {sup 18}F tracer was highly correlated with that of PiB, enabling conversion of thresholds across tracer measurement scales with a high level of internal consistency. Standardization of analysis methods and measurement scales may facilitate the comparison of amyloid PET data obtained using different tracers. (orig.)

  16. Antibody-based PET imaging of amyloid beta in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sehlin, Dag; Fang, Xiaotian T.; Cato, Linda; Antoni, Gunnar; Lannfelt, Lars; Syvänen, Stina

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their specificity and high-affinity binding, monoclonal antibodies have potential as positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands and are currently used to image various targets in peripheral organs. However, in the central nervous system, antibody uptake is limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here we present a PET ligand to be used for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment effects in Alzheimer's disease. The amyloid beta (A beta) antibody mAb158 is radiolabelled and conjuga...

  17. Differential regulation of amyloid-β-protein mRNA expression within hippocampal neuronal subpopulations in Alzheimer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, G.A.; Lewis, D.A.; Bahmanyar, S.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Young, W.G.; Morrison, J.H.; Wilson, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have mapped the neuroanatomical distribution of amyloid-β-protein mRNA within neuronal subpopulations of the hippocampal formation in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), normal aged human, and patients with Alzheimer disease. Amyloid-β-protein mRNA appears to be expressed in all hippocampal neurons, but at different levels of abundance. In the central nervous system of monkey and normal aged human, image analysis shows that neurons of the dentate gyrus and cornu Ammonis fields contain a 2.5-times-greater hybridization signal than is present in neurons of the subiculum and entorhinal cortex. In contrast, in the Alzheimer disease hippocampal formation, the levels of amyloid-β-protein mRNA in the cornu Ammonis field 3 and parasubiculum are equivalent. These findings suggest that within certain neuronal subpopulations cell type-specific regulation of amyloid-β-protein gene expression may be altered in Alzheimer disease

  18. Role of amyloid peptides in vascular dysfunction and platelet dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria eCanobbio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common neurodegenerative cause of dementia in the elderly. AD is accompanied by the accumulation of amyloid peptides in the brain parenchyma and in the cerebral vessels. The sporadic form of the AD accounts for about 95% of all cases. It is characterized by a late onset, typically after the age of 65, with a complex and still poorly understood aetiology. Several observations point towards a central role of cerebrovascular dysfunction in the onset of sporadic AD. According to the vascular hypothesis, AD may be initiated by vascular dysfunctions that precede and promote the neurodegenerative process. In accordance to this, AD patients show increased hemorragic or ischemic stroke risks. It is now clear that multiple bidirectional connections exist between AD and cerebrovascular disease, and in this new scenario, the effect of amyloid peptides on vascular cells and blood platelets appear to be central to AD. In this review we analyse the effect of amyloid peptides on vascular function and platelet activation and its contribution to the cerebrovascular pathology associated with AD and the progression of this disease.

  19. Oxidative stress and the amyloid beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cheignon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In particular, it is linked to the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, an age-related neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Histopathological hallmarks of AD are intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular formation of senile plaques composed of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ in aggregated form along with metal-ions such as copper, iron or zinc. Redox active metal ions, as for example copper, can catalyze the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS when bound to the amyloid-β (Aβ. The ROS thus produced, in particular the hydroxyl radical which is the most reactive one, may contribute to oxidative damage on both the Aβ peptide itself and on surrounding molecule (proteins, lipids, …. This review highlights the existing link between oxidative stress and AD, and the consequences towards the Aβ peptide and surrounding molecules in terms of oxidative damage. In addition, the implication of metal ions in AD, their interaction with the Aβ peptide and redox properties leading to ROS production are discussed, along with both in vitro and in vivo oxidation of the Aβ peptide, at the molecular level. Keywords: Oxidative stress, Amyloid beta peptide, Metal-ions, Reactive oxygen species, Oxidative damages

  20. Ten Challenges of the Amyloid Hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    The inability to effectively halt or cure Alzheimer's disease (AD), exacerbated by the recent failures of high-profile clinical trials, emphasizes the urgent need to understand the complex biochemistry of this major neurodegenerative disease. In this paper, ten central, current challenges...... as a background model of the disease, unify our understanding of the interplay between genetic and non-genetic risk factors, and combine into one framework both the familial and sporadic forms of the disease....

  1. Heterologous amyloid seeding: revisiting the role of acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létitia Jean

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases associated with abnormal protein folding and ordered aggregation require an initial trigger which may be infectious, inherited, post-inflammatory or idiopathic. Proteolytic cleavage to generate vulnerable precursors, such as amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta production via beta and gamma secretases in Alzheimer's Disease (AD, is one such trigger, but the proteolytic removal of these fragments is also aetiologically important. The levels of Abeta in the central nervous system are regulated by several catabolic proteases, including insulysin (IDE and neprilysin (NEP. The known association of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE with pathological aggregates in AD together with its ability to increase Abeta fibrilization prompted us to search for proteolytic triggers that could enhance this process. The hAChE C-terminal domain (T40, AChE(575-614 is an exposed amphiphilic alpha-helix involved in enzyme oligomerisation, but it also contains a conformational switch region (CSR with high propensity for conversion to non-native (hidden beta-strand, a property associated with amyloidogenicity. A synthetic peptide (AChE(586-599 encompassing the CSR region shares homology with Abeta and forms beta-sheet amyloid fibrils. We investigated the influence of IDE and NEP proteolysis on the formation and degradation of relevant hAChE beta-sheet species. By combining reverse-phase HPLC and mass spectrometry, we established that the enzyme digestion profiles on T40 versus AChE(586-599, or versus Abeta, differed. Moreover, IDE digestion of T40 triggered the conformational switch from alpha- to beta-structures, resulting in surfactant CSR species that self-assembled into amyloid fibril precursors (oligomers. Crucially, these CSR species significantly increased Abeta fibril formation both by seeding the energetically unfavorable formation of amyloid nuclei and by enhancing the rate of amyloid elongation. Hence, these results may offer an explanation

  2. Characterization of Mn(II) ion binding to the amyloid-β peptide in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Cecilia; Kulkarni, Yashraj S; Abelein, Axel; Jarvet, Jüri; Liao, Qinghua; Strodel, Birgit; Olsson, Lisa; Luo, Jinghui; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Sholts, Sabrina B; Roos, Per M; Kamerlin, Shina C L; Gräslund, Astrid; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S

    2016-12-01

    Growing evidence links neurodegenerative diseases to metal exposure. Aberrant metal ion concentrations have been noted in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, yet the role of metals in AD pathogenesis remains unresolved. A major factor in AD pathogenesis is considered to be aggregation of and amyloid formation by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Previous studies have shown that Aβ displays specific binding to Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions, and such binding has been shown to modulate Aβ aggregation. Here, we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to show that Mn(II) ions also bind to the N-terminal part of the Aβ(1-40) peptide, with a weak binding affinity in the milli- to micromolar range. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, solid state atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular modeling suggest that the weak binding of Mn(II) to Aβ may not have a large effect on the peptide's aggregation into amyloid fibrils. However, identification of an additional metal ion displaying Aβ binding reveals more complex AD metal chemistry than has been previously considered in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Telomere shortening reduces Alzheimer's disease amyloid pathology in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Scheffold, Annika; Heinrich, Annette; Begus-Nahrmann, Yvonne; Langkopf, Britta Heike; Hoelter, Sabine M.; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela M.; Liss, Birgit; Wurst, Wolfgang; Lie, Dieter Chichung; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Biber, Knut; Rudolph, Karl Lenhard

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder of the elderly and advancing age is the major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease development. Telomere shortening represents one of the molecular causes of ageing that limits the proliferative capacity of cells, including neural stem cells.

  4. Toluidine blue O modifies hippocampal amyloid pathology in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Melike; Biberoglu, Kevser; Onder, Seda; Akbulut, K Gonca; Tacal, Ozden

    2018-03-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that toluidine blue O (TBO), a phenothiazine dye, shows inhibitory effects on both cholinesterases and amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) cellular model. In the present study, we aimed to determine the effects of TBO (in a purity of 85%) on amyloid and tau pathologies in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). Beginning at 7.5 (mild pathology) or 13 (severe pathology) months of age, 3xTg-AD mice were treated intraperitoneally with 4 mg/kg TBO or vehicle daily for 30 days. TBO treatment significantly reduced the levels of insoluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 in the hippocampi of mild and severe pathology groups compared to vehicle-treated counterparts. When the levels of full-length amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) were assessed in 3xTg-AD mice at late pathological stage, no significant changes were observed after TBO treatment. Similarly, TBO did not recover hyperphosphorylation of tau at residues Thr181 and Ser202/Thr205 significantly in soluble and insoluble hippocampal fractions of 3xTg-AD mice. Taken together, the current study is the first in vivo report, to our knowledge, demonstrating that TBO mitigates amyloid pathology in 3xTg-AD mice with no apparent change on tau phosphorylation. Overall, the preliminary data presented here support the possible use of TBO as a disease-modifying drug for AD treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetite-Amyloid-β deteriorates activity and functional organization in an in vitro model for Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Sara; Tahirbegi, Islam Bogachan; Mir, Mònica; Samitier, Josep; Soriano, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    The understanding of the key mechanisms behind human brain deterioration in Alzheimer’ disease (AD) is a highly active field of research. The most widespread hypothesis considers a cascade of events initiated by amyloid-β peptide fibrils that ultimately lead to the formation of the lethal amyloid plaques. Recent studies have shown that other agents, in particular magnetite, can also play a pivotal role. To shed light on the action of magnetite and amyloid-β in the deterioration of neuronal circuits, we investigated their capacity to alter spontaneous activity patterns in cultured neuronal networks. Using a versatile experimental platform that allows the parallel monitoring of several cultures, the activity in controls was compared with the one in cultures dosed with magnetite, amyloid-β and magnetite-amyloid-β complex. A prominent degradation in spontaneous activity was observed solely when amyloid-β and magnetite acted together. Our work suggests that magnetite nanoparticles have a more prominent role in AD than previously thought, and may bring new insights in the understanding of the damaging action of magnetite-amyloid-β complex. Our experimental system also offers new interesting perspectives to explore key biochemical players in neurological disorders through a controlled, model system manner.

  6. Probing amyloid protein aggregation with optical superresolution methods: from the test tube to models of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Clemens F; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S

    2016-10-01

    The misfolding and self-assembly of intrinsically disordered proteins into insoluble amyloid structures are central to many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Optical imaging of this self-assembly process in vitro and in cells is revolutionizing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind these devastating conditions. In contrast to conventional biophysical methods, optical imaging and, in particular, optical superresolution imaging, permits the dynamic investigation of the molecular self-assembly process in vitro and in cells, at molecular-level resolution. In this article, current state-of-the-art imaging methods are reviewed and discussed in the context of research into neurodegeneration.

  7. Amyloid-beta immunotherapy: the hope for Alzheimer disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Lopera, Francisco

    2016-12-30

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia of adult-onset, characterized by progressive impairment in cognition and memory. There is no cure for the disease and the current treatments are only symptomatic. Drug discovery is an expensive and time-consuming process; in the last decade no new drugs have been found for AD despite the efforts of the scientific community and pharmaceutical companies. The Aβ immunotherapy is one of the most promising approaches to modify the course of AD. This therapeutic strategy uses synthetic peptides or monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to decrease the Aβ load in the brain and slow the progression of the disease. Therefore, this article will discuss the main aspects of AD neuropathogenesis, the classical pharmacologic treatment, as well as the active and passive immunization describing drug prototypes evaluated in different clinical trials.

  8. A Becn1 mutation mediates hyperactive autophagic sequestration of amyloid oligomers and improved cognition in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altea Rocchi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of the autophagy pathway has been observed during the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by abnormal deposition of extracellular and intracellular amyloid β (Aβ peptides. Yet the role of autophagy in Aβ production and AD progression is complex. To study whether increased basal autophagy plays a beneficial role in Aβ clearance and cognitive improvement, we developed a novel genetic model to hyperactivate autophagy in vivo. We found that knock-in of a point mutation F121A in the essential autophagy gene Beclin 1/Becn1 in mice significantly reduces the interaction of BECN1 with its inhibitor BCL2, and thus leads to constitutively active autophagy even under non-autophagy-inducing conditions in multiple tissues, including brain. Becn1F121A-mediated autophagy hyperactivation significantly decreases amyloid accumulation, prevents cognitive decline, and restores survival in AD mouse models. Using an immunoisolation method, we found biochemically that Aβ oligomers are autophagic substrates and sequestered inside autophagosomes in the brain of autophagy-hyperactive AD mice. In addition to genetic activation of autophagy by Becn1 gain-of-function, we also found that ML246, a small-molecule autophagy inducer, as well as voluntary exercise, a physiological autophagy inducer, exert similar Becn1-dependent protective effects on Aβ removal and memory in AD mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that genetically disrupting BECN1-BCL2 binding hyperactivates autophagy in vivo, which sequestrates amyloid oligomers and prevents AD progression. The study establishes new approaches to activate autophagy in the brain, and reveals the important function of Becn1-mediated autophagy hyperactivation in the prevention of AD.

  9. Impact of peripheral myeloid cells on amyloid-β pathology in Alzheimer's disease-like mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Stefan; Miller, Kelly R; Drost, Natalia; Handrick, Susann; Mathur, Vidhu; Luo, Jian; Wegner, Anja; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Heppner, Frank L

    2015-10-19

    Although central nervous system-resident microglia are believed to be ineffective at phagocytosing and clearing amyloid-β (Aβ), a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), it has been suggested that peripheral myeloid cells constitute a heterogeneous cell population with greater Aβ-clearing capabilities. Here, we demonstrate that the conditional ablation of resident microglia in CD11b-HSVTK (TK) mice is followed by a rapid repopulation of the brain by peripherally derived myeloid cells. We used this system to directly assess the ability of peripheral macrophages to reduce Aβ plaque pathology and therefore depleted and replaced the pool of resident microglia with peripherally derived myeloid cells in Aβ-carrying APPPS1 mice crossed to TK mice (APPPS1;TK). Despite a nearly complete exchange of resident microglia with peripheral myeloid cells, there was no significant change in Aβ burden or APP processing in APPPS1;TK mice. Importantly, however, newly recruited peripheral myeloid cells failed to cluster around Aβ deposits. Even additional anti-Aβ antibody treatment aimed at engaging myeloid cells with amyloid plaques neither directed peripherally derived myeloid cells to amyloid plaques nor altered Aβ burden. These data demonstrate that mere recruitment of peripheral myeloid cells to the brain is insufficient in substantially clearing Aβ burden and suggest that specific additional triggers appear to be required to exploit the full potential of myeloid cell-based therapies for AD. © 2015 Prokop et al.

  10. Structural heterogeneity in familial Alzheimer's disease mutants of amyloid-beta peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Yim, Janghyun; Ham, Sihyun

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive deposition of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides in brain parenchyma and cerebral blood vessels. Several pathogenic familial mutations of Aβ peptides have been identified that exhibit enhanced neurotoxicity and aggregative ability. However, knowledge of the structural characteristics of those Aβ mutants is still limited. Here, we report multiple all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type 42-residue Aβ peptide (Aβ42) and its Flemish (A21G), Arctic (E22G), Dutch (E22Q), Italian (E22K), and Iowa (D23N) familial mutants in explicit water. After validating our simulations by comparison with available experimental data, we examined common/different features in the secondary and tertiary structures of the wild-type and five familial mutants of Aβ42. We found that Aβ42 peptides display quite heterogeneous secondary and tertiary structure ensembles. Such structural heterogeneity in the monomeric state would facilitate interconversions between various secondary structures during the formation of a β-sheet-rich amyloid fibril, and may also serve as a structural basis of the amyloid polymorphism.

  11. Differential Relationships of Reactive Astrocytes and Microglia to Fibrillar Amyloid Deposits in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Muzikansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    While it is clear that astrocytes and microglia cluster around dense-core amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD), whether they are primarily attracted to amyloid deposits or are just reacting to plaque-associated neuritic damage remains elusive. We postulate that astrocytes and microglia may differentially respond to fibrillar amyloid β (Aβ). Therefore, we quantified the size distribution of dense-core Thioflavin-S (ThioS)-positive plaques in the temporal neocortex of 40 AD patients and the microglial and astrocyte responses in their vicinity (≤50 μm), and performed correlations between both measures. As expected, both astrocytes and microglia were clearly spatially associated with ThioS-positive plaques (p = 0.0001, ≤50 μm vs. >50 μm from their edge), but their relationship to ThioS-positive plaque size differed; larger ThioS-positive plaques were associated with more surrounding activated microglia (p = 0.0026), but this effect was not observed with reactive astrocytes. Microglial response to dense-core plaques appears to be proportional to their size, which we postulate reflects a chemotactic effect of Aβ. By contrast, plaque-associated astrocytic response does not correlate with plaque size and seems to parallel the behavior of plaque-associated neuritic damage. PMID:23656989

  12. Amyloid and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2018-03-01

    Extracellular amyloid deposition defines a range of amyloidosis and amyloid-related disease. Addition to primary and secondary amyloidosis, amyloid-related disease can be observed in different tissue/organ that sharing the common pathogenesis based on the formation of amyloid deposition. Currently, both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with certainly only based on the autopsy results, by which amyloidosis of the associative tissue/organ is observed. Intriguingly, since it demonstrated that amyloid deposits trigger inflammatory reaction through the activation of cascaded immune response, wherein several lines of evidence implies a protective role of amyloid in preventing autoimmunity. Furthermore, attempts for preventing amyloid formation and/or removing amyloid deposits from the brain have caused meningoencephalitis and consequent deaths among the subjects. Hence, it is important to note that amyloid positively participates in maintaining immune homeostasis and contributes to irreversible inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the interactive relationship between amyloid and the immune system, discussing the potential functional roles of amyloid in immune tolerance and homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-Amyloid-?-Mediated Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Brains

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, Daniel; Cooke, Michael J.; Wang, Yuanfei; Green, David; Fraser, Paul E.; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated imaging of amyloid β (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) offers a promising strategy to detect and monitor specific Aβ species, such as oligomers, that have important pathological and therapeutic relevance. The major current limitation of antibodies as a diagnostic and imaging device is poor blood-brain-barrier permeability. A classical anti-Aβ antibody, 6E10, is modified with 10 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a positron emitting isotope, Copper-64 (t(½) = 12.7 h), and intra...

  14. The Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease: A Reevaluation of the “Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Armstrong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The most influential theory to explain the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD has been the “Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis” (ACH first formulated in 1992. The ACH proposes that the deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ is the initial pathological event in AD leading to the formation of senile plaques (SPs and then to neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs death of neurons, and ultimately dementia. This paper examines two questions regarding the ACH: (1 is there a relationship between the pathogenesis of SPs and NFTs, and (2 what is the relationship of these lesions to disease pathogenesis? These questions are examined in relation to studies of the morphology and molecular determinants of SPs and NFTs, the effects of gene mutation, degeneration induced by head injury, the effects of experimentally induced brain lesions, transgenic studies, and the degeneration of anatomical pathways. It was concluded that SPs and NFTs develop independently and may be the products rather than the causes of neurodegeneration in AD. A modification to the ACH is proposed which may better explain the pathogenesis of AD, especially of late-onset cases of the disease.

  15. Oligonol improves memory and cognition under an amyloid β(25-35)-induced Alzheimer's mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Young; Maeda, Takahiro; Fujii, Hajime; Yokozawa, Takako; Kim, Hyun Young; Cho, Eun Ju; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age-dependent progressive neurodegenerative disorder that results in impairments of memory and cognitive function. It is hypothesized that oligonol has ameliorative effects on memory impairment and reduced cognitive functions in mice with Alzheimer's disease induced by amyloid β(25-35) (Aβ(25-35)) injection. The protective effect of an oligonol against Aβ(25-35)-induced memory impairment was investigated in an in vivo Alzheimer's mouse model. The aggregation of Aβ25-35 was induced by incubation at 37°C for 3 days before injection into mice brains (5 nmol/mouse), and then oligonol was orally administered at 100 and 200 mg/kg of body weight for 2 weeks. Memory and cognition were observed in T-maze, object recognition, and Morris water maze tests. The group injected with Aβ(25-35) showed impairments in both recognition and memory. However, novel object recognition and new route awareness abilities were dose dependently improved by the oral administration of oligonol. In addition, the results of the Morris water maze test indicated that oligonol exerted protective activity against cognitive impairment induced by Aβ(25-35). Furthermore, nitric oxide formation and lipid peroxidation were significantly elevated by Aβ(25-35), whereas oligonol treatment significantly decreased nitric oxide formation and lipid peroxidation in the brain, liver, and kidneys. The present results suggest that oligonol improves Aβ(25-35)-induced memory deficit and cognition impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanisms of U87 astrocytoma cell uptake and trafficking of monomeric versus protofibril Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Li

    Full Text Available A significant hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is the formation of senile plaques in the brain due to the unbalanced levels of amyloid-beta (Aβ. However, although how Aβ is produced from amyloid precursor proteins is well understood, little is known regarding the clearance and metabolism of various Aβ aggregates from the brain. Similarly, little is known regarding how astrocytes internalize and degrade Aβ, although astrocytes are known to play an important role in plaque maintenance and Aβ clearance. The objective of this study is to investigate the cellular mechanisms that mediate the internalization of soluble monomeric versus oligomeric Aβ by astrocytes. We used a combination of laser confocal microscopy and genetic and pharmacological experiments to dissect the internalization of sAβ42 and oAβ42 and their postendocytic transport by U87 human brain astrocytoma cell line. Both Aβ42 species were internalized by U87 cells through fluid phase macropinocytosis, which required dynamin 2. Depleting LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1 decreased sAβ42 uptake more significantly than that of oAβ42. We finally show that both Aβ42 species were rapidly transported to lysosomes through an endolytic pathway and subjected to proteolysis after internalization, which had no significant toxic effects to the U87 cells under relatively low concentrations. We propose that macropinocytic sAβ42 and oAβ42 uptake and their subsequent proteolytic degradation in astroglial cells is a significant mechanism underlying Aβ clearance from the extracellular milieu. Understanding the molecular events involved in astrocytic Aβ internalization may identify potential therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Recent Development of Bifunctional Small Molecules to Study Metal-Amyloid-β Species in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Braymer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease related to the deposition of aggregated amyloid-β (Aβ peptides in the brain. It has been proposed that metal ion dyshomeostasis and miscompartmentalization contribute to AD progression, especially as metal ions (e.g., Cu(II and Zn(II found in Aβ plaques of the diseased brain can bind to Aβ and be linked to aggregation and neurotoxicity. The role of metal ions in AD pathogenesis, however, is uncertain. To accelerate understanding in this area and contribute to therapeutic development, recent efforts to devise suitable chemical reagents that can target metal ions associated with Aβ have been made using rational structure-based design that combines two functions (metal chelation and Aβ interaction in the same molecule. This paper presents bifunctional compounds developed by two different design strategies (linkage or incorporation and discusses progress in their applications as chemical tools and/or potential therapeutics.

  18. NGP 555, a γ-Secretase Modulator, Lowers the Amyloid Biomarker, Aβ42,in Cerebrospinal Fluid while Preventing Alzheimer's Disease Cognitive Decline in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounnas, Maria Z; Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Nowakowski, Dan W; Herz, Joachim; Comer, William T

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is defined by the progressive accumulation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain which precedes cognitive decline by years. Using amyloid biomarkers, chemical modeling, mouse behavioral models, and drug development techniques we investigate the properties of NGP 555, a clinical-stage γ-secretase modulator. NGP 555 shifts amyloid peptide production to the smaller, non-aggregating forms of amyloid. Our preclinical studies show beneficial effects on amyloid biomarkers, pathology, and cognition. NGP 555 has successfully completed chemistry, pharmacology, toxicity, metabolism, and safety studies. Abundant data support Aβ 42 as a target for prophylactic or early-stage intervention therapies in AD. The γ-secretase modulator, NGP 555 is being actively developed in human clinical trials for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease with the overall aim to achieve an appropriate balance of potency/efficacy on reducing the toxic forms of amyloid versus safety.

  19. Detection of amyloid in Alzheimer's disease with positron emission tomography using [11C]AZD2184

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyberg, Svante; Cselenyi, Zsolt; Julin, Per; Olsson, Hans; Svensson, Samuel; Eriksdotter Joenhagen, Maria; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Halldin, Christer; Andersson, Jan; Varnaes, Katarina; Farde, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for detection of Aβ amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not ideal for quantification. To improve the signal to noise ratio we have developed the radioligand [ 11 C]AZD2184 and report here the first clinical evaluation. Eight AD patients and four younger control subjects underwent 93-min PET measurements with [ 11 C]AZD2184. A ratio approach using the cerebellum as reference region was applied to determine binding parameters. Brain uptake of [ 11 C]AZD2184 peaked within 1 min at 3-4% of injected radioactivity. AD patients had high radioactivity in cortical regions while controls had uniformly low radioactivity uptake. Specific binding peaked within 30 min at which time standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) ranged between 1.19 and 2.57. [ 11 C]AZD2184 is a promising radioligand for detailed mapping of Aβ amyloid depositions in Alzheimer's disease, due to low non-specific binding, high signal to background ratio and reversible binding as evident from early peak equilibrium. (orig.)

  20. β-Amyloid and the Pathomechanisms of Alzheimer’s Disease: A Comprehensive View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botond Penke

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein dyshomeostasis is the common mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Aging is the key risk factor, as the capacity of the proteostasis network declines during aging. Different cellular stress conditions result in the up-regulation of the neurotrophic, neuroprotective amyloid precursor protein (APP. Enzymatic processing of APP may result in formation of toxic Aβ aggregates (β-amyloids. Protein folding is the basis of life and death. Intracellular Aβ affects the function of subcellular organelles by disturbing the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria cross-talk and causing severe Ca2+-dysregulation and lipid dyshomeostasis. The extensive and complex network of proteostasis declines during aging and is not able to maintain the balance between production and disposal of proteins. The effectivity of cellular pathways that safeguard cells against proteotoxic stress (molecular chaperones, aggresomes, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, autophagy declines with age. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion causes dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, and thus the Aβ-clearance from brain-to-blood decreases. Microglia-mediated clearance of Aβ also declines, Aβ accumulates in the brain and causes neuroinflammation. Recognition of the above mentioned complex pathogenesis pathway resulted in novel drug targets in AD research.

  1. Multi-potent Natural Scaffolds Targeting Amyloid Cascade: In Search of Alzheimer's Disease Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandipan

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) once considered a rare disorder emerges as a major health concern in recent times. The disease pathogenesis is very complex and yet to be understood completely. However, "Amyloid Cascade" is the central event in disease pathogenesis. Several proteins of the amyloid cascade are currently being considered as potential targets for AD therapeutics discovery. Many potential compounds are in clinical trials, but till now there is no known cure for the disease. Recent years have witnessed remarkable research interest in the search of novel concepts in drug designing for AD. Multi-targeted ligand design is a paradigm shift in conventional drug discovery. In this process rather than designing ligands targeting a single receptor, novel ligands have been designed/ synthesized that can simultaneously target many pathways involved in disease pathogenesis. Here, recent developments in computational drug designing protocols to identify multi-targeted ligand for AD have been discussed. Therapeutic potential of different multi-potent compounds also has been discussed briefly. Prime emphasis has been given to multi-potent ligand from natural resources. Polyphenols are an interesting group of compounds which show efficacy against a wide range of disease and have the property to exhibit multi-potency. Several groups attempted to identify novel multi-potent phytochemicals for AD therapy. Multi-potency of several polyphenols or compounds synthesized using the poly-phenolic scaffolds have been briefly discussed here. However, the multi-targeted drug designing for AD is still in early stages, more advancement in drug designing method/algorithm developments is urgently required to discover more efficient compounds for AD therapeutics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. A Novel Truncated Form of Serum Amyloid A in Kawasaki Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Whitin

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD is an acute vasculitis in children that can cause coronary artery abnormalities. Its diagnosis is challenging, and many cytokines, chemokines, acute phase reactants, and growth factors have failed evaluation as specific biomarkers to distinguish KD from other febrile illnesses. We performed protein profiling, comparing plasma from children with KD with febrile control (FC subjects to determine if there were specific proteins or peptides that could distinguish the two clinical states.Plasma from three independent cohorts from the blood of 68 KD and 61 FC subjects was fractionated by anion exchange chromatography, followed by surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization (SELDI mass spectrometry of the fractions. The mass spectra of KD and FC plasma samples were analyzed for peaks that were statistically significantly different.A mass spectrometry peak with a mass of 7,860 Da had high intensity in acute KD subjects compared to subacute KD (p = 0.0003 and FC (p = 7.9 x 10-10 subjects. We identified this peak as a novel truncated form of serum amyloid A with N-terminal at Lys-34 of the circulating form and validated its identity using a hybrid mass spectrum immunoassay technique. The truncated form of serum amyloid A was present in plasma of KD subjects when blood was collected in tubes containing protease inhibitors. This peak disappeared when the patients were examined after their symptoms resolved. Intensities of this peptide did not correlate with KD-associated laboratory values or with other mass spectrum peaks from the plasma of these KD subjects.Using SELDI mass spectrometry, we have discovered a novel truncated form of serum amyloid A that is elevated in the plasma of KD when compared with FC subjects. Future studies will evaluate its relevance as a diagnostic biomarker and its potential role in the pathophysiology of KD.

  3. [Amyloid goiter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrívó, A; Péter, I; Bánkúti, B; Péley, G; Baska, F; Besznyák, I

    1999-03-21

    Amyloid goitre is at an extremely rare occurrence. Authors review the origin of disease and its symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The disease may be due to either primary or secondary systemic or local amyloidosis. Diagnosis may be made even before surgery on anamnestic data, on very rapid growth of thyroid glands, on diffuse appearance, on other symptoms of systemic amyloidosis, on findings of iconographic procedures and on detection of amyloid in aspirates. Final diagnosis is based on histology. Surgical therapy is aiming at avoidance of the existing and the threatening consequences of expanding mass. The outcome is independent from thyroid surgery, it is related to other manifestations of amyloidosis. Concerning with the present case the chronic superior vena cava syndrome and chylous pleural effusion as first described symptoms and asymptomatic hyperthyroxinaemia is emphasised. Neither other organ involvement, nor primary amyloidogenous molecula was found during the 18 months follow up, so patient has secondary and localised amyloidosis.

  4. Paired Measurements of Paraoxonase 1 and Serum Amyloid A as Useful Disease Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Kotani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraoxonase 1 (PON1 and serum amyloid A (SAA are proteins carried by high-density lipoprotein (HDL particles. Among the HDL-associated protein molecules, SAA, an inflammation-related marker, and PON1, an antioxidant marker, tend to change in relatively clear opposite directions in physiological situations. In clinical chemistry, paired measurements of both markers may provide useful information to understand dysfunctional HDL in diseases with inflammation and oxidative stress conditions. Actually, limited clinical studies have suggested that the combined use of PON1 and SAA may be a tool for observing the pathophysiology of some disease entities. From the findings of experimental studies, PON1 appears to be cooperatively regulated by inflammation- and oxidative stress-related molecules linked with SAA regulation in humans. More studies remain to be performed to ascertain the value of paired measurements of both promising markers in clinical practice.

  5. Impairment of the nerve growth factor pathway driving amyloid accumulation in cholinergic neurons: the incipit of the Alzheimer′s disease story?

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    Viviana Triaca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current idea behind brain pathology is that disease is initiated by mild disturbances of common physiological processes. Overtime, the disruption of the neuronal homeostasis will determine irreversible degeneration and neuronal apoptosis. This could be also true in the case of nerve growth factor (NGF alterations in sporadic Alzheimer′s disease (AD, an age-related pathology characterized by cholinergic loss, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In fact, the pathway activated by NGF, a key neurotrophin for the metabolism of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN, is one of the first homeostatic systems affected in prodromal AD. NGF signaling dysfunctions have been thought for decades to occur in AD late stages, as a mere consequence of amyloid-driven disruption of the retrograde axonal transport of neurotrophins to BFCN. Nowadays, a wealth of knowledge is potentially opening a new scenario: NGF signaling impairment occurs at the onset of AD and correlates better than amyloid load with cognitive decline. The recent acceleration in the characterization of anatomical, functional and molecular profiles of early AD is aimed at maximizing the efficacy of existing treatments and setting novel therapies. Accordingly, the elucidation of the molecular events underlying APP metabolism regulation by the NGF pathway in the septo-hippocampal system is crucial for the identification of new target molecules to slow and eventually halt mild cognitive impairment (MCI and its progression toward AD.

  6. Lipid peroxidation and Alzheimer’s disease: Key role of Amyloid

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    Kontush Anatol

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased lipid peroxidation and elevated oxidative stress represent well-established characteristics of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Amyloid-β (Aβ peptide, a major component of amyloid plaques, can strongly influence oxidative processes. In aggregated form, Aβ has prooxidative properties, whereas in monomeric form it functions as an antioxidant. The antioxidative properties of monomeric Aβ are related to its ability to chelate transition metal ions, which are potent catalysts of oxidation. Aβ possesses an amphiphilic structure, associates with lipoproteins in vivo and may therefore function as a preventive antioxidant which protects lipoproteins from oxidation by transition metal ions. Increased production of Aβ in response to elevated oxidative stress has been documented in a number of in vitro studies, implying that production of monomeric Aβ as a lipoprotein antioxidant can be abnormally increased in response to elevated oxidative stress in aging. Subsequent accumulation of Aβ-metal aggregates, production of reactive oxygen species and toxic action to neuronal cells may represent a gain-of-function transformation and form temporal sequence of events in the development of AD.

  7. Microspectroscopy (μFTIR) reveals co-localization of lipid oxidation and amyloid plaques in human Alzheimer disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseny-Cases, Núria; Klementieva, Oxana; Cotte, Marine; Ferrer, Isidre; Cladera, Josep

    2014-12-16

    Amyloid peptides are the main component of one of the characteristic pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD): senile plaques. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, amyloid peptides may play a central role in the sequence of events that leads to neurodegeneration. However, there are other factors, such as oxidative stress, that may be crucial for the development of the disease. In the present paper, we show that it is possible, by using Fourier tranform infrared (FTIR) microscopy, to co-localize amyloid deposits and lipid peroxidation in tissue slides from patients affected by Alzheimer's disease. Plaques and lipids can be analyzed in the same sample, making use of the characteristic infrared bands for peptide aggregation and lipid oxidation. The results show that, in samples from patients diagnosed with AD, the plaques and their immediate surroundings are always characterized by the presence of oxidized lipids. As for samples from non-AD individuals, those without amyloid plaques show a lower level of lipid oxidation than AD individuals. However, it is known that plaques can be detected in the brains of some non-AD individuals. Our results show that, in such cases, the lipid in the plaques and their surroundings display oxidation levels that are similar to those of tissues with no plaques. These results point to lipid oxidation as a possible key factor in the path that goes from showing the typical neurophatological hallmarks to suffering from dementia. In this process, the oxidative power of the amyloid peptide, possibly in the form of nonfibrillar aggregates, could play a central role.

  8. Astrocytic Gap Junctional Communication is Reduced in Amyloid-β-Treated Cultured Astrocytes, but not in Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mice

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    Nancy F Cruz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is characterized by accumulation of amyloid deposits in brain, progressive cognitive deficits and reduced glucose utilization. Many consequences of the disease are attributed to neuronal dysfunction, but roles of astrocytes in its pathogenesis are not well understood. Astrocytes are extensively coupled via gap junctions, and abnormal trafficking of metabolites and signalling molecules within astrocytic syncytia could alter functional interactions among cells comprising the neurovascular unit. To evaluate the influence of amyloid-β on astrocyte gap junctional communication, cultured astrocytes were treated with monomerized amyloid-β1-40 (1 μmol/l for intervals ranging from 2 h to 5 days, and the areas labelled by test compounds were determined by impaling a single astrocyte with a micropipette and diffusion of material into coupled cells. Amyloid-β-treated astrocytes had rapid, sustained 50-70% reductions in the area labelled by Lucifer Yellow, anionic Alexa Fluor® dyes and energy-related compounds, 6-NBDG (a fluorescent glucose analogue, NADH and NADPH. Amyloid-β treatment also caused a transient increase in oxidative stress. In striking contrast with these results, spreading of Lucifer Yellow within astrocytic networks in brain slices from three regions of 8.5-14-month-old control and transgenic Alzheimer's model mice was variable, labelling 10-2000 cells; there were no statistically significant differences in the number of dye-labelled cells among the groups or with age. Thus amyloid-induced dysfunction of gap junctional communication in cultured astrocytes does not reflect the maintenance of dye transfer through astrocytic syncytial networks in transgenic mice; the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is not appropriately represented by the cell culture system.

  9. Astrocytic gap junctional communication is reduced in amyloid-β-treated cultured astrocytes, but not in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Nancy F; Ball, Kelly K; Dienel, Gerald A

    2010-08-17

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by accumulation of amyloid deposits in brain, progressive cognitive deficits and reduced glucose utilization. Many consequences of the disease are attributed to neuronal dysfunction, but roles of astrocytes in its pathogenesis are not well understood. Astrocytes are extensively coupled via gap junctions, and abnormal trafficking of metabolites and signalling molecules within astrocytic syncytia could alter functional interactions among cells comprising the neurovascular unit. To evaluate the influence of amyloid-beta on astrocyte gap junctional communication, cultured astrocytes were treated with monomerized amyloid-β(1-40) (1 μmol/l) for intervals ranging from 2 h to 5 days, and the areas labelled by test compounds were determined by impaling a single astrocyte with a micropipette and diffusion of material into coupled cells. Amyloid-β-treated astrocytes had rapid, sustained 50-70% reductions in the area labelled by Lucifer Yellow, anionic Alexa Fluor® dyes and energy-related compounds, 6-NBDG (a fluorescent glucose analogue), NADH and NADPH. Amyloid-β treatment also caused a transient increase in oxidative stress. In striking contrast with these results, spreading of Lucifer Yellow within astrocytic networks in brain slices from three regions of 8.5-14-month-old control and transgenic Alzheimer's model mice was variable, labelling 10-2000 cells; there were no statistically significant differences in the number of dye-labelled cells among the groups or with age. Thus amyloid-induced dysfunction of gap junctional communication in cultured astrocytes does not reflect the maintenance of dye transfer through astrocytic syncytial networks in transgenic mice; the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is not appropriately represented by the cell culture system.

  10. Prevalence of the apolipoprotein E ε4 allele in amyloid β positive subjects across the spectrum of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Groot, Colin; Jansen, Willemijn J

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but its prevalence is unclear because earlier studies did not require biomarker evidence of amyloid β (Aβ) pathology. METHODS: We included 3451 Aβ+ subjects (853 AD-type dementia, 1810 mild cog...

  11. Levels of alpha- and beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, K; Fastbom, J; Blomberg, M

    2000-01-01

    Alternative cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) results in generation and secretion of both soluble APP (sAPP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta). Abeta is the main component of the amyloid depositions in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using Western blotting, we compared...... the levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP, beta-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 13 sporadic AD patients and 13 healthy controls. Our findings show significant amounts of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP in CSF. There was no statistically significant difference...... in the levels of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP between AD patients and controls. The levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP were, however, found to be significantly lower in the AD patients than in the controls....

  12. Mechanism underlying the effects of doxepin on β-amyloid -induced memory impairment in rats

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    Jimei Bu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: In previous studies, researchers observed that doxepin could improve cognitive processes and has protective effectson the central nervous system. Thus, this study was designed to analyze the effects of doxepin on β-amyloid (Aβ-induced memory impairment and neuronal toxicity in ratand to explore the underlying mechanism. Materials and Methods: Rats were treated with Aβ1-42 and doxepin was injected to validate its effects on cognitive function. The Morris water maze test was performed to detect memory function.  Aβ1-42-treated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line was also used to detect the effects of doxepin and to explore the underlying mechanism. Western blotting analysis was used to detect the protein expression levels of PSD-95, synapsin 1, p-AKT and p-mTOR in rats. Results: After treated with 1 mg/kg of doxepin, Aβ1-42-treated rats showed markedly lower escape latency and higher platform-finding strategy score. Low doses of doxepin significantly reversed the effects of Aβ1-42 on the protein expression levels of PSD-95, synapsin 1, p-AKT and p-mTOR in rats.   In vitro experiment showed the consistent results. Besides, PI3K inhibitor (LY294002 treatment could markedly reversed the effects of doxepin on Aβ1-42-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that doxepin could protect against the Aβ1-42-induced memory impairment in rats. The protective effect of doxepin was associated with the enhancement of PSD-95 and synapsin 1 expression via PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway.

  13. Generation of amyloid-β is reduced by the interaction of calreticulin with amyloid precursor protein, presenilin and nicastrin.

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    Nina Stemmer

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein by γ-secretase and the ensuing generation of amyloid-β is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the identification of amyloid precursor protein binding proteins involved in regulating processing of amyloid precursor protein by the γ-secretase complex is essential for understanding the mechanisms underlying the molecular pathology of the disease. We identified calreticulin as novel amyloid precursor protein interaction partner that binds to the γ-secretase cleavage site within amyloid precursor protein and showed that this Ca(2+- and N-glycan-independent interaction is mediated by amino acids 330-344 in the C-terminal C-domain of calreticulin. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that calreticulin is not only associated with amyloid precursor protein but also with the γ-secretase complex members presenilin and nicastrin. Calreticulin was detected at the cell surface by surface biotinylation of cells overexpressing amyloid precursor protein and was co-localized by immunostaining with amyloid precursor protein and presenilin at the cell surface of hippocampal neurons. The P-domain of calreticulin located between the N-terminal N-domain and the C-domain interacts with presenilin, the catalytic subunit of the γ-secretase complex. The P- and C-domains also interact with nicastrin, another functionally important subunit of this complex. Transfection of amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells with full-length calreticulin leads to a decrease in amyloid-β42 levels in culture supernatants, while transfection with the P-domain increases amyloid-β40 levels. Similarly, application of the recombinant P- or C-domains and of a synthetic calreticulin peptide comprising amino acid 330-344 to amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells result in elevated amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels, respectively. These findings indicate that the interaction of

  14. The effect of amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism on cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriaanse, Sofie M. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van Dijk, Koene R.A. [Harvard University, Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Ossenkoppele, Rik; Tolboom, Nelleke; Zwan, Marissa D.; Barkhof, Frederik; Berckel, Bart N.M. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reuter, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Yaqub, Maqsood; Boellaard, Ronald; Windhorst, Albert D.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    The present multimodal neuroimaging study examined whether amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism are related to cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and healthy elderly controls. Structural MRI scans of eleven AD patients and ten controls were available at baseline and follow-up (mean interval 2.5 years). Change in brain structure over time was defined as percent change of cortical volume within seven a-priori defined regions that typically show the strongest structural loss in AD. In addition, two PET scans were performed at baseline: [{sup 11}C]PIB to assess amyloid-β plaque load and [{sup 18}F]FDG to assess glucose metabolism. [{sup 11}C]PIB binding and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake were measured in the precuneus, a region in which both amyloid deposition and glucose hypometabolism occur early in the course of AD. While amyloid-β plaque load at baseline was not related to cortical volume loss over time in either group, glucose metabolism within the group of AD patients was significantly related to volume loss over time (rho = 0.56, p < 0.05). The present study shows that in a group of AD patients amyloid-β plaque load as measured by [{sup 11}C]PIB behaves as a trait marker (i.e., all AD patients showed elevated levels of amyloid, not related to subsequent disease course), whilst hypometabolism as measured by [{sup 18}F]FDG changed over time indicating that it could serve as a state marker that is predictive of neurodegeneration. (orig.)

  15. Detection of amyloid plaques targeted by bifunctional USPIO in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice using magnetic resonance microimaging.

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    Youssef Zaim Wadghiri

    Full Text Available Amyloid plaques are a key pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The detection of amyloid plaques in the brain is important for the diagnosis of AD, as well as for following potential amyloid targeting therapeutic interventions. Our group has developed several contrast agents to detect amyloid plaques in vivo using magnetic resonance microimaging (µMRI in AD transgenic mice, where we used mannitol to enhance blood brain barrier (BBB permeability. In the present study, we used bifunctional ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO nanoparticles, chemically coupled with Aβ1-42 peptide to image amyloid plaque deposition in the mouse brain. We coupled the nanoparticles to polyethylene glycol (PEG in order to improve BBB permeability. These USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 nanoparticles were injected intravenously in AD model transgenic mice followed by initial in vivo and subsequent ex vivo μMRI. A 3D gradient multi-echo sequence was used for imaging with a 100 µm isotropic resolution. The amyloid plaques detected by T2*-weighted μMRI were confirmed with matched histological sections. The region of interest-based quantitative measurement of T2* values obtained from the in vivo μMRI showed contrast injected AD Tg mice had significantly reduced T2* values compared to wild-type mice. In addition, the ex vivo scans were examined with voxel-based analysis (VBA using statistical parametric mapping (SPM for comparison of USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic and USPIO alone injected AD transgenic mice. The regional differences seen by VBA in the USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic correlated with the amyloid plaque distribution histologically. Our results indicate that USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 can be used for amyloid plaque detection in vivo by intravenous injection without the need to co-inject an agent which increases permeability of the BBB. This technique could aid the development of novel amyloid targeting drugs by allowing therapeutic effects

  16. Curcumin mediates presenilin-1 activity to reduce β-amyloid production in a model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhang; Hongmei, Zhang; Lu, Si; Yu, Li

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin has been reported to inhibit the generation of Aβ, but the underlying mechanisms by which this occurs remain unknown. Aβ is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The amyloid hypothesis argues that aggregates of Aβ trigger a complex pathological cascade that leads to neurodegeneration. Aβ is generated by the processing of APP (amyloid precursor protein) by β- and γ-secretases. Presenilin 1 (PS1) is central to γ-secretase activity and is a substrate for GSK-3β, both of which are implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of curcumin on the generation of Aβ in cultured neuroblastoma cells and on the in vitro expression of PS1 and GSK-3β. To stimulate Aβ production, a plasmid expressing APP was transfected into human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The transfected cells were then treated with curcumin at 0-20 μM for 24 h or with 5 μM curcumin for 0-48 h, and the extracellular levels of Aβ(40/42) were determined by ELISA. The levels of PS1 and GSK-3β mRNA were measured by RT-PCR, and the expression of the PS1 and GSK-3β proteins (including the phosphorylated form of GSK-3β, p-GSK-3β-Ser9) were evaluated by western blotting. Curcumin treatment was found to markedly reduce the production of Aβ(40/42). Treatment with curcumin also decreased both PS1 and GSK-3β mRNA and protein levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, curcumin increased the inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3β protein at Ser9. Therefore, we propose that curcumin decreases Aβ production by inhibiting GSK-3β-mediated PS1 activation.

  17. Antibody-based PET imaging of amyloid beta in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlin, Dag; Fang, Xiaotian T; Cato, Linda; Antoni, Gunnar; Lannfelt, Lars; Syvänen, Stina

    2016-02-19

    Owing to their specificity and high-affinity binding, monoclonal antibodies have potential as positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands and are currently used to image various targets in peripheral organs. However, in the central nervous system, antibody uptake is limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here we present a PET ligand to be used for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment effects in Alzheimer's disease. The amyloid β (Aβ) antibody mAb158 is radiolabelled and conjugated to a transferrin receptor antibody to enable receptor-mediated transcytosis across the BBB. PET imaging of two different mouse models with Aβ pathology clearly visualize Aβ in the brain. The PET signal increases with age and correlates closely with brain Aβ levels. Thus, we demonstrate that antibody-based PET ligands can be successfully used for brain imaging.

  18. GULP1/CED-6 ameliorates amyloid-β toxicity in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivien Chiu, Wai Yin; Koon, Alex Chun; Ki Ngo, Jacky Chi; Edwin Chan, Ho Yin; Lau, Kwok-Fai

    2017-11-21

    Amyloidogenic processing of APP by β- and γ-secretases leads to the generation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), and the accumulation of Aβ in senile plaques is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Understanding the mechanisms of APP processing is therefore paramount. Increasing evidence suggests that APP intracellular domain (AICD) interacting proteins influence APP processing. In this study, we characterized the overexpression of AICD interactor GULP1 in a Drosophila AD model expressing human BACE and APP695. Transgenic GULP1 significantly lowered the levels of both Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 without decreasing the BACE and APP695 levels. Overexpression of GULP1 also reduced APP/BACE-mediated retinal degeneration, rescued motor dysfunction and extended longevity of the flies. Our results indicate that GULP1 regulate APP processing and reduce neurotoxicity in a Drosophila AD model.

  19. Near-infrared fluorescent probes for imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hongjuan; Lou, Kaiyan; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    One of the early pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques in the brain. There has been a tremendous interest in the development of Aβ plaques imaging probes for early diagnosis of AD in the past decades. Optical imaging, particularly near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, has emerged as a safe, low cost, real-time, and widely available technique, providing an attractive approach for in vivo detection of Aβ plaques among many different imaging techniques. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art development of NIRF Aβ probes and their in vitro and in vivo applications with special focus on design strategies and optical, binding, and brain-kinetic properties.

  20. Link between Aluminum and the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease: The Integration of the Aluminum and Amyloid Cascade Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Whilst being environmentally abundant, aluminum is not essential for life. On the contrary, aluminum is a widely recognized neurotoxin that inhibits more than 200 biologically important functions and causes various adverse effects in plants, animals, and humans. The relationship between aluminum exposure and neurodegenerative diseases, including dialysis encephalopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism dementia in the Kii Peninsula and Guam, and Alzheimer's disease (AD has been suggested. In particular, the link between aluminum and Alzheimer's disease has been the subject of scientific debate for several decades. However, the complex characteristics of aluminum bioavailability make it difficult to evaluate its toxicity and therefore, the relationship remains to be established. Mounting evidence has suggested that significance of oligomerization of β-amyloid protein and neurotoxicity in the molecular mechanism of AD pathogenesis. Aluminum may play crucial roles as a cross-linker in β-amyloid oligomerization. Here, we review the detailed characteristics of aluminum neurotoxicity based on our own studies and the recent literatures. Our aim is to revisit the link between aluminum and AD and to integrate aluminum and amyloid cascade hypotheses in the context of β-amyloid oligomerization and the interactions with other metals.

  1. Sphingolipid metabolism correlates with cerebrospinal fluid Beta amyloid levels in Alzheimer's disease.

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    Alfred N Fonteh

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer's disease (AD is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but

  2. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  3. Amyloid-clearing proteins and their epigenetic regulation as a therapeutic target in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia N Nalivaeva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal elevation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ levels in the brain is the primary trigger for neuronal cell death specific to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. It is now evident that Aβ levels in the brain are manipulable due to a dynamic equilibrium between its production from the amyloid precursor protein (APP and removal by amyloid clearance proteins. Clearance can be either enzymic or non-enzymic (binding/transport proteins. Intriguingly several of the main amyloid-degrading enzymes (ADEs are members of the M13 peptidase family (neprilysin (NEP, NEP2 and the endothelin converting enzymes (ECE-1 and -2. A distinct metallopeptidase, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE, also contributes to Aβ degradation in the brain. The ADE family currently embraces more than 20 members, both membrane-bound and soluble, and of differing cellular locations. NEP plays an important role in brain function terminating neuropeptide signals. Its decrease in specific brain areas with age or after hypoxia, ischaemia or stroke contribute significantly to the development of AD pathology. The recently discovered mechanism of epigenetic regulation of NEP (and other genes by the APP intracellular domain (AICD and its dependence on the cell type and APP isoform expression suggest possibilities for selective manipulation of NEP gene expression in neuronal cells. We have also observed that another amyloid-clearing protein, namely transthyretin (TTR, is also regulated in the neuronal cell by a mechanism similar to NEP. Dependence of amyloid clearance proteins on histone deacetylases and the ability of HDAC inhibitors to up-regulate their expression in the brain opens new avenues for developing preventive strategies in AD.

  4. Soluble beta-amyloid precursor protein is related to disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Petra Steinacker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biomarkers of disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS could support the identification of beneficial drugs in clinical trials. We aimed to test whether soluble fragments of beta-amyloid precursor protein (sAPPα and sAPPß correlated with clinical subtypes of ALS and were of prognostic value. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cross-sectional study including patients with ALS (N = 68 with clinical follow-up data over 6 months, Parkinson's disease (PD, N = 20, and age-matched controls (N = 40, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of sAPPα a, sAPPß and neurofilaments (NfH(SMI35 were measured by multiplex assay, Progranulin by ELISA. CSF sAPPα and sAPPß levels were lower in ALS with a rapidly-progressive disease course (p = 0.03, and p = 0.02 and with longer disease duration (p = 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively. CSF NfH(SMI35 was elevated in ALS compared to PD and controls, with highest concentrations found in patients with rapid disease progression (p<0.01. High CSF NfH(SMI3 was linked to low CSF sAPPα and sAPPß (p = 0.001, and p = 0.007, respectively. The ratios CSF NfH(SMI35/CSF sAPPα,-ß were elevated in patients with fast progression of disease (p = 0.002 each. CSF Progranulin decreased with ongoing disease (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new CSF candidate markers associated with progression of disease in ALS. The data suggest that a deficiency of cellular neuroprotective mechanisms (decrease of sAPP is linked to progressive neuro-axonal damage (increase of NfH(SMI35 and to progression of disease.

  5. Amyloid- and FDG-PET in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Correlation with pathological prion protein in neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Guerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Cabrera-Martín, María Nieves; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Romeral, María; Mayo, Diego; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Carreras, José Luis; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-05-04

    The role of positron emission tomography (PET) in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is less defined than in other neurodegenerative diseases. We studied the correlation between the uptake of 18 F-florbetaben and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose with pathological prion protein deposition in histopathology in a case. A patient with 80 y old with a rapid neurological deterioration with a confirmed diagnosis of CJD was studied. PET and MRI studies were performed between 13-20 d before the death. A region of interest analysis was performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping. MRI showed atrophy with no other alterations. FDG-PET showed extensive areas of hypometabolism including left frontoparietal lobes as well as bilateral thalamus. Correlation between uptake of 18 F-florbetaben and pathological prion protein deposition was r = 0.786 (p < 0.05). Otherwise, correlation between uptake of 18 F-FDG and pathological prion protein was r = 0.357 (p = 0.385). Immunohistochemistry with β-amyloid did not show amyloid deposition or neuritic plaques. Our study supports the use of FDG-PET in the assessment of CJD. FDG-PET may be especially useful in cases of suspected CJD and negative MRI. Furthermore, this case report provides more evidence about the behavioral of amyloid tracers, and the possibility of a low-affinity binding to other non-amyloid proteins, such as the pathological prion protein, is discussed.

  6. Cellular and substrate adhesion molecules (integrins) and their ligands in cerebral amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Zhan, S. S.; Kamphorst, W.; van der Valk, P.; Rozemuller, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Integrins belonging to different subfamilies can be identified immunohistochemically in cerebral amyloid plaques. Monoclonal antibodies against the VLA family beta 1-integrins show staining of the corona of classical amyloid plaques for beta 1, alpha 3 and alpha 6. Immunostaining reveal also the

  7. Evidence that a synthetic amyloid-ß oligomer-binding peptide (ABP) targets amyloid-ß deposits in transgenic mouse brain and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Ito, Shingo; Atkinson, Trevor; Gaudet, Chantal; Ménard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Whitfield, James

    2014-03-14

    The synthetic ~5 kDa ABP (amyloid-ß binding peptide) consists of a region of the 228 kDa human pericentrioloar material-1 (PCM-1) protein that selectively and avidly binds in vitro Aβ1-42 oligomers, believed to be key co-drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not monomers (Chakravarthy et al., (2013) [3]). ABP also prevents Aß1-42 from triggering the apoptotic death of cultured human SHSY5Y neuroblasts, likely by sequestering Aß oligomers, suggesting that it might be a potential AD therapeutic. Here we support this possibility by showing that ABP also recognizes and binds Aβ1-42 aggregates in sections of cortices and hippocampi from brains of AD transgenic mice and human AD patients. More importantly, ABP targets Aβ1-42 aggregates when microinjected into the hippocampi of the brains of live AD transgenic mice. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-beta plaque deposition by deep brain impedance profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béduer, Amélie; Joris, Pierre; Mosser, Sébastien; Fraering, Patrick C.; Renaud, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease in elderly people. Toxic brain amyloid-beta (Aß) aggregates and ensuing cell death are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we investigated if we could monitor the presence of these aggregates by performing in situ electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in AD model mice brains. Approach. In this study, electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed post-mortem in APPPS1 transgenic mice brains. This transgenic model is commonly used to study amyloidogenesis, a pathological hallmark of AD. We used flexible probes with embedded micrometric electrodes array to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting senile plaques composed of Aß peptides by localized impedance measurements. Main results. We particularly focused on deep brain structures, such as the hippocampus. Ex vivo experiments using brains from young and old APPPS1 mice lead us to show that impedance measurements clearly correlate with the percentage of Aβ plaque load in the brain tissues. We could monitor the effects of aging in the AD APPPS1 mice model. Significance. We demonstrated that a localized electrical impedance measurement constitutes a valuable technique to monitor the presence of Aβ-plaques, which is complementary with existing imaging techniques. This method does not require prior Aβ staining, precluding the risk of variations in tissue uptake of dyes or tracers, and consequently ensuring reproducible data collection.

  9. Inclusions of R6/2 Mice Are Not Amyloid and Differ Structurally from Those of Huntington Disease Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, William; Sandt, Christophe; Nondier, Isabelle; Djian, Philippe; Hoffner, Guylaine

    2017-05-16

    R6/2 mice contain an N-terminal fragment of human huntingtin with an expanded polyQ and develop a neurological disease resembling Huntington disease. Although the brain of R6/2 mice contains numerous inclusions, there is very little neuronal death. In that respect, R6/2 mice differ from patients with Huntington disease whose striatum and cerebral cortex develop inclusions associated with extensive neuronal loss. We have previously demonstrated using synchrotron-based infrared microspectroscopy that the striatum and the cortex of patients with Huntington disease contained inclusions specifically enriched in amyloid β-sheets. We had concluded that the presence of an amyloid motif conferred toxicity to the inclusions. We demonstrate here by synchrotron based infrared microspectroscopy in transmission and attenuated total reflectance mode that the inclusions of R6/2 mice possess no detectable amyloid and are composed of proteins whose structure is not distinguishable from that of the surrounding soluble proteins. The difference in structure between the inclusions of patients affected by Huntington disease and those of R6/2 mice might explain why the former but not the latter cause neuronal death.

  10. Tau, Amyloid Beta and Deep Brain Stimulation: Aiming to Restore Cognitive Deficit in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Rodríguez, Siddhartha; Perry, George; Pena-Ortega, Fernando; Williams, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a great advance in the data that supports the two current hypotheses in Alzheimer`s disease field, the amyloid beta hypothesis and the tau hypothesis. Not surprisingly, Aβ and tau proteins are currently the major therapeutic research targets for AD treatment. Unfortunately, nothing but moderate success has emerged from such therapeutic approaches. With this in mind, we will discuss deep brain stimulation as a promising therapeutic strategy that aims to restore brain activity. Lastly, in the scope of cognitive deficit restoration, we will discuss the relevance of the limbic formation as a promising neuroanatomical target for deep brain stimulation. Immunohistochemistry for modified tau (phosphorylated at Ser199-202-Thr205 labelled by the antibody AT8) was performed on paraffin-embedded human brain sections providing a detailed characterization of NFT pathology. Abnormally phosphorylated tau protein is the key common marker in several brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson`s disease, Pick Disease, Down syndrome and frontotemporal dementia and is capable of affecting synaptic events that are critical for memory formation. With this in mind, therapeutic strategies aiming to restore synaptic events could offer better outcomes. The humble success of current therapeutic strategies along with the lack of basic knowledge of the brain disease mechanisms calls for alternatives that benefit patients in the present moment. One of particular interest is the neurostimulation strategy that is already a well-established treatment for several movement disorders and when compared to current Alzheimer`s therapeutic strategies, deep brain stimulation does not directly interfere with the normal protein function, therefore increasing the probability of success.

  11. Association Between Amyloid and Tau Accumulation in Young Adults With Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T; Sperling, Reisa A; Norton, Daniel J; Baena, Ana; Arboleda-Velasquez, Joseph F; Cosio, Danielle; Schultz, Aaron; Lapoint, Molly; Guzman-Velez, Edmarie; Miller, John B; Kim, Leo A; Chen, Kewei; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M; Johnson, Keith A

    2018-02-12

    It is critically important to improve our ability to diagnose and track Alzheimer disease (AD) as early as possible. Individuals with autosomal dominant forms of AD can provide clues as to which and when biological changes are reliably present prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. To characterize the associations between amyloid and tau deposits in the brains of cognitively unimpaired and impaired carriers of presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation. In this cross-sectional imaging study, we leveraged data from a homogeneous autosomal dominant AD kindred, which allowed us to examine measurable tau deposition as a function of individuals' proximity to the expected onset of dementia. Cross-sectional measures of carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography (PET) and flortaucipir F 18 (previously known as AV 1451, T807) PET imaging were assessed in 24 PSEN1 E280A kindred members (age range, 28-55 years), including 12 carriers, 9 of whom were cognitively unimpaired and 3 of whom had mild cognitive impairment, and 12 cognitively unimpaired noncarriers. We compared carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B PET cerebral with cerebellar distribution volume ratios as well as flortaucipir F 18 PET cerebral with cerebellar standardized uptake value ratios in mutation carriers and noncarriers. Spearman correlations characterized the associations between age and mean cortical Pittsburgh Compound B distribution volume ratio levels or regional flortaucipir standardized uptake value ratio levels in both groups. Of the 24 individuals, the mean (SD) age was 38.0 (7.4) years, or approximately 6 years younger than the expected onset of clinical symptoms in carriers. Compared with noncarriers, cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers had elevated mean cortical Pittsburgh Compound B distribution volume ratio levels in their late 20s, and 7 of 9 carriers older than 30 years reached the threshold for amyloidosis (distribution volume ratio level > 1.2). Elevated

  12. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Ion, Laura [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Murariu, Manuela; Habasescu, Laura [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, Iasi 700487 (Romania)

    2014-10-06

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1–3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloid-β peptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

  13. Anti-amyloid-β-mediated positron emission tomography imaging in Alzheimer's disease mouse brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel McLean

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated imaging of amyloid β (Aβ in Alzheimer's disease (AD offers a promising strategy to detect and monitor specific Aβ species, such as oligomers, that have important pathological and therapeutic relevance. The major current limitation of antibodies as a diagnostic and imaging device is poor blood-brain-barrier permeability. A classical anti-Aβ antibody, 6E10, is modified with 10 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG and a positron emitting isotope, Copper-64 (t(½ = 12.7 h, and intravenously delivered to the TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Modification of 6E10 with PEG (6E10-PEG increases accumulation of 6E10 in brain tissue in both TgCRND8 and wild type control animals. 6E10-PEG differentiates TgCRND8 animals from wild type controls using positron emission tomography (PET and provides a framework for using antibodies to detect pathology using non-invasive medical imaging techniques.

  14. Amyloid binding properties of curcumin analogues in Alzheimer's disease postmortem brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldman, Emma R; Jia, Zhisheng; Halldin, Christer; Svedberg, Marie M

    2016-09-06

    The presence of β-amyloid (Aβ) containing plaques in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and serves as a biomarker for confirmation of diagnosis postmortem. Early diagnosis is of great importance for optimal treatment and for monitoring disease progression in the brain. Highly specific and sensitive biomarkers are thus greatly needed to assess therapeutic efficacy, not only clinically, but also in terms of clearance of histopathological lesions and decelerated neurodegeneration. The objective of the present study was to give more insight into the binding of curcumin analogues, curcuminoids, to Aβ containing plaques in postmortem tissue from AD patients. In vitro autoradiography was utilized to explore affinity and displacement of the curcuminoids; curcumin, demethoxycurcumin (DMC), bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) and dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC). We found that BDMC had the highest affinity for Aβ containing plaques in cortical AD brain tissue in comparison to other curcuminoids. Subsequently, [(3)H]BDMC showed significantly higher specific binding in cortical AD brain tissue compared to control subjects. These findings suggest that curcumin analogues, especially BDMC, may serve as a potential radioligands for Aβ plaque neuroimaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Drugs and drug delivery systems targeting amyloid-β in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Robinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with no cure and limited treatment solutions that are unable to target any of the suspected causes. Increasing evidence suggests that one of the causes of neurodegeneration is the overproduction of amyloid beta (Aβ and the inability of Aβ peptides to be cleared from the brain, resulting in self-aggregation to form toxic oligomers, fibrils and plaques. One of the potential treatment options is to target Aβ and prevent self-aggregation to allow for a natural clearing of the brain. In this paper, we review the drugs and drug delivery systems that target Aβ in relation to Alzheimer's disease. Many attempts have been made to use anti-Aβ targeting molecules capable of targeting Aβ (with much success in vitro and in vivo animal models, but the major obstacle to this technique is the challenge posed by the blood brain barrier (BBB. This highly selective barrier protects the brain from toxic molecules and pathogens and prevents the delivery of most drugs. Therefore novel Aβ aggregation inhibitor drugs will require well thought-out drug delivery systems to deliver sufficient concentrations to the brain.

  16. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid-β in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya; Quesada, Kandi; Boles, Annette; Reddy, Arubala P

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice, curcumin, against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin, and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes, and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effects, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-arthritis, pro-healing, and boosting memory cognitive functions. In the last decade, several groups have designed and synthesized curcumin and its derivatives and extensively tested using cell and mouse models of AD. Recent research on Aβ and curcumin has revealed that curcumin prevents Aβ aggregation and crosses the blood-brain barrier, reach brain cells, and protect neurons from various toxic insults of aging and Aβ in humans. Recent research has also reported that curcumin ameliorates cognitive decline and improves synaptic functions in mouse models of AD. Further, recent groups have initiated studies on elderly individuals and patients with AD and the outcome of these studies is currently being assessed. This article highlights the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD. This article also critically assesses the current limitations of curcumin's bioavailability and urgent need for new formulations to increase its brain levels to treat patients with AD.

  17. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2012-02-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  18. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2010-06-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  19. Roles of Amyloid β-Peptide-Associated Oxidative Stress and Brain Protein Modifications in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Reed, Tanea; Newman, Shelley F.; Sultana, Rukhsana

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and ischemia just to name a few. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that is recognized as the most common form of dementia. AD is histopathologically characterized by the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, the presence of oligomers of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), and ...

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and preclinical validation of a PET radiopharmaceutical for interrogating Aβ (β-amyloid) plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Guruswami Sm; Dhavale, Dhruva; Prior, Julie L; Sivapackiam, Jothilingam; Laforest, Richard; Kotzbauer, Paul; Sharma, Vijay

    2015-12-01

    PET radiopharmaceuticals capable of imaging β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque burden in the brain could offer highly valuable diagnostic tools for clinical studies of Alzheimer's disease. To further supplement existing armamentarium of FDA-approved agents as well as those under development, and to correlate multiphoton-imaging data reported earlier, herein, we describe preclinical validation of a PET tracer. A novel PET radiopharmaceutical ((18)F-7B) was synthesized and characterized. To assess its affinity for Aβ, binding assays with Aβ1-42 fibrils, Alzheimer's disease (AD) homogenates, and autoradiography studies and their IHC correlations were performed. For assessing its overall pharmacokinetic profiles in general and its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in particular, biodistribution studies in normal mice were performed. Finally, for evaluating potential for (18)F-7B to serve as a targeted Aβ probe, the microPET/CT imaging was performed in age-matched amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) mice and wild-type (WT) counterparts. The radiotracer (18)F-7B shows saturable binding to autopsy-confirmed AD homogenates (K d = 17.7 nM) and Aβ1-42 fibrils (K d = 61 nM). Preliminary autoradiography studies show binding of (18)F-7B to cortical Aβ plaques in autopsy-confirmed AD tissue sections, inhibition of that binding by unlabeled counterpart 7A-indicating specificity, and a good correlation of tracer binding with Aβ immunostaining. The agent indicates high initial penetration into brains (7.23 ± 0.47%ID/g; 5 min) of normal mice, thus indicating a 5-min/120-min brain uptake clearance ratio of 4.7, a benchmark value (>4) consistent with the ability of agents to traverse the BBB to enable PET brain imaging. Additionally, (18)F-7B demonstrates the presence of parental species in human serum. Preliminary microPET/CT imaging demonstrates significantly higher retention of (18)F-7B in brains of transgenic mice compared with their WT counterparts

  1. The risk of renal disease is increased in lambda myeloma with bone marrow amyloid deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlowski P

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Piotr Kozlowski,1 Scott Montgomery,2–4 Rahel Befekadu,5 Victoria Hahn-Strömberg6 1Department of Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 2Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 3Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK; 5Department of Transfusion Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 6Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Background: Light chain amyloidosis (AL is a rare deposition disease and is present in 10–15% of patients with myeloma (MM. In contrast to symptomatic AL in MM, presence of bone marrow (BM amyloid deposits (AD in MM is not connected to kidney damage. Renal AD but not BM-AD occur mostly in MM with lambda paraprotein (lambda MM. Methods: We investigated amyloid presence in BM clots taken at diagnosis in 84 patients with symptomatic MM and compared disease characteristics in MM with kappa paraprotein (kappa MM/lambda MM with and without BM-AD. Results: Lambda MM with BM-AD was compared with kappa MM without BM-AD, kappa MM with BM-AD, and lambda MM without BM-AD: lambda MM with BM-AD patients had a significantly higher mean creatinine level (4.23 mg/dL vs 1.69, 1.14, and 1.28 mg/dL, respectively and a higher proportion presented with severe kidney failure (6/11 [55%] vs 6/32 [19%], 1/22 [5%], and 3/19 [16%], respectively. Proteinuria was more common in lambda MM with BM-AD patients compared with kappa MM without BM-AD patients (8/11 [73%] vs 5/32 [16%], respectively. Conclusion: Kidney damage was more common in lambda MM with BM-AD indicating presence of renal AD. Keywords: plasma cells, neoplasms, amyloidosis, renal insufficiency, proteinuria

  2. Peptides of presenilin-1 bind the amyloid precursor protein ectodomain and offer a novel and specific therapeutic approach to reduce ß-amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewji, Nazneen N; Singer, S Jonathan; Masliah, Eliezer; Rockenstein, Edward; Kim, Mihyun; Harber, Martha; Horwood, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) accumulation in the brain is widely accepted to be critical to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Current efforts at reducing toxic Aβ40 or 42 have largely focused on modulating γ-secretase activity to produce shorter, less toxic Aβ, while attempting to spare other secretase functions. In this paper we provide data that offer the potential for a new approach for the treatment of AD. The method is based on our previous findings that the production of Aβ from the interaction between the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Presenilin (PS), as part of the γ-secretase complex, in cell culture is largely inhibited if the entire water-soluble NH2-terminal domain of PS is first added to the culture. Here we demonstrate that two small, non-overlapping water-soluble peptides from the PS-1 NH2-terminal domain can substantially and specifically inhibit the production of total Aβ as well as Aβ40 and 42 in vitro and in vivo in the brains of APP transgenic mice. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of the entire amino terminal domain of PS-1 on Aβ production is largely focused in a few smaller sequences within that domain. Using biolayer interferometry and confocal microscopy we provide evidence that peptides effective in reducing Aβ give a strong, specific and biologically relevant binding with the purified ectodomain of APP 695. Finally, we demonstrate that the reduction of Aβ by the peptides does not affect the catalytic activities of β- or γ-secretase, or the level of APP. P4 and P8 are the first reported protein site-specific small peptides to reduce Aβ production in model systems of AD. These peptides and their derivatives offer new potential drug candidates for the treatment of AD.

  3. Protective effects of a natural product, curcumin, against amyloid ? induced mitochondrial and synaptic toxicities in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catharine; Mitchell, Andrew; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the protective effects of a natural product??curcumin?? in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neurons. Although much research has been done in AD, very little has been reported on the effects of curcumin on mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, function and synaptic activities. Therefore, the present study investigated the protective effects against amyloid ? (A?) induced mitochondrial and synaptic toxicities. Using human neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cells, curc...

  4. Anti-Amyloid Aggregation Activity of Black Sesame Pigment: Toward a Novel Alzheimer’s Disease Preventive Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Panzella

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Black sesame pigment (BSP represents a low cost, easily accessible material of plant origin exhibiting marked antioxidant and heavy metal-binding properties with potential as a food supplement. We report herein the inhibitory properties of the potentially bioaccessible fraction of BSP following simulated gastrointestinal digestion against key enzymes involved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. HPLC analysis indicated that BSP is transformed under the pH conditions mimicking the intestinal environment and the most abundant of the released compounds was identified as vanillic acid. More than 80% inhibition of acetylcholinesterase-induced aggregation of the β-amyloid Aβ1-40 was observed in the presence of the potentially bioaccessible fraction of BSP, which also efficiently inhibited self-induced Aβ1-42 aggregation and β-secretase (BACE-1 activity, even at high dilution. These properties open new perspectives toward the use of BSP as an ingredient of functional food or as a food supplement for the prevention of AD.

  5. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W. Brownjohn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation. : In this article, Livesey and colleagues perform a phenotypic drug screen in a human stem cell model of Alzheimer's disease. The anthelminthic avermectins are identified as a family of compounds that increase the production of short Aβ peptides over longer more toxic Aβ forms. The effect is analogous to existing γ-secretase modulators, but is independent of the core γ-secretase complex. Keywords: neural stem cells, Alzheimer's disease, phenotypic screening, iPSCs, human neurons, dementia, Down syndrome, amyloid beta, ivermectin, selamectin

  6. Immunotherapy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid-β or tau, which is the right target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo-Carranza DL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diana L Castillo-Carranza,1,2 Marcos J Guerrero-Muñoz,1,2 Rakez Kayed1–31Mitchell Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, 2Departments of Neurology, Neuroscience, and Cell Biology, 3Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques composed mainly of amyloid-β (Aβ protein. Overproduction or slow clearance of Aβ initiates a cascade of pathologic events that may lead to formation of neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal cell death, and dementia. Although immunotherapy in animal models has been demonstrated to be successful at removing plaques or prefibrillar forms of Aβ, clinical trials have yielded disappointing results. The lack of substantial cognitive improvement obtained by targeting Aβ raises the question of whether or not this is the correct target. Another important pathologic process in the AD brain is tau aggregation, which seems to become independent once initiated. Recent studies targeting tau in AD mouse models have displayed evidence of cognitive improvement, providing a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AD. In this review, we describe new advances in immunotherapy targeting Aβ peptide and tau protein, as well as future directions.Keywords: immunotherapy, Alzheimer's disease, β-amyloid, tau

  7. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...... of diabetes type II, while revealing the structure(s) of islet amyloid fibrils is necessary for potential design of therapeutic agents....

  8. Concomitant detection of beta-amyloid peptides with N-terminal truncation and different C-terminal endings in cortical plaques from cases with Alzheimer's disease, senile monkeys and triple transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtig, Wolfgang; Goldhammer, Simone; Bauer, Ute; Wegner, Florian; Wirths, Oliver; Bayer, Thomas A; Grosche, Jens

    2010-09-01

    The disturbed metabolism of beta-amyloid peptides generated from amyloid precursor protein is widely considered as a main factor during the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. A neuropathological hallmark in the brains from cases with Alzheimer's disease are senile plaques mainly composed of hardly soluble beta-amyloid peptides comprising up to 43 amino acids. Age-dependent cortical beta-amyloidosis was also shown in several transgenic mice and old individuals from various mammalian species, e.g., non-human primates. Beta-amyloid(1-42) is believed to be the main component in the core of senile plaques, whereas less hydrophobic beta-amyloid(1-40) predominantly occurs in the outer rim of plaques. Amino-terminally truncated pyroglutamyl-beta-amyloid(pE3-x) was recently found to be a beta-amyloid species of high relevance to the progression of the disease. While a few biochemical studies provided data on the co-occurrence of several beta-amyloid forms, their concomitant histochemical detection is still lacking. Here, we present a novel triple immunofluorescence labelling of amino- and differently carboxy-terminally truncated beta-amyloid peptides in cortical plaques from a case with Alzheimer's disease, senile macaques and baboons, and triple transgenic mice with age-dependent beta-amyloidosis and tau hyperphosphorylation. Additionally, beta-amyloid(pE3-x) and total beta-amyloid were concomitantly detected with beta-amyloid peptides ending with amino acid 40 or 42, respectively. Simultaneous staining of several beta-amyloid species reveals for instance vascular amyloid containing beta-amyloid(pE3-x) in Alzheimer's disease and monkeys, and may contribute to the further elucidation of beta-amyloidosis in neurodegenerative disorders and animal models. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Amyloid-β diurnal pattern: possible role of sleep in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Brendan P; Bateman, Randall J

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline that is a growing public health crisis with a prevalence projected to more than double in the next 20 years. Sleep is frequently impaired in individuals with AD. Further, recent studies have linked numerous age-related sleep disturbances such as poor sleep efficiency and sleep apnea, to future risk of cognitive impairment. Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) into extracellular plaques in the brain is a key step in AD pathogenesis and likely begins 20 years before the onset of dementia. Aβ concentrations in both humans and mouse models show Aβ concentrations rise during wakefulness and fall during sleep, that is, an Aβ diurnal pattern. There is evidence in animal models that changes in sleep time alter Aβ deposition, suggesting that sleep may play a role in AD pathogenesis. A hypothetical model for the role of sleep and the Aβ diurnal pattern in AD pathogenesis is proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild...... cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau...... in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42...

  11. Rapid and Quantitative Assay of Amyloid-Seeding Activity in Human Brains Affected with Prion Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanae Takatsuki

    Full Text Available The infectious agents of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are composed of amyloidogenic prion protein, PrPSc. Real-time quaking-induced conversion can amplify very small amounts of PrPSc seeds in tissues/body fluids of patients or animals. Using this in vitro PrP-amyloid amplification assay, we quantitated the seeding activity of affected human brains. End-point assay using serially diluted brain homogenates of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients demonstrated that 50% seeding dose (SD50 is reached approximately 10(10/g brain (values varies 10(8.79-10.63/g. A genetic case (GSS-P102L yielded a similar level of seeding activity in an autopsy brain sample. The range of PrPSc concentrations in the samples, determined by dot-blot assay, was 0.6-5.4 μg/g brain; therefore, we estimated that 1 SD50 unit was equivalent to 0.06-0.27 fg of PrPSc. The SD50 values of the affected brains dropped more than three orders of magnitude after autoclaving at 121°C. This new method for quantitation of human prion activity provides a new way to reduce the risk of iatrogenic prion transmission.

  12. Alzheimer's disease and amyloid beta-peptide deposition in the brain: a matter of 'aging'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Maria Luisa; Collins, Matthew J; Cappellini, Enrico

    2010-04-01

    Biomolecules can experience aging processes that limit their long-term functionality in organisms. Typical markers of protein aging are spontaneous chemical modifications, such as AAR (amino acid racemization) and AAI (amino acid isomerization), mainly involving aspartate and asparagine residues. Since these modifications may affect folding and turnover, they reduce protein functionality over time and may be linked to pathological conditions. The present mini-review describes evidence of AAR and AAI involvement in the misfolding and brain accumulation of Abeta (amyloid beta-peptide), a central event in AD (Alzheimer's disease) synaptic dysfunctions. Structural alterations introduced by site-specific modifications linked to protein aging may affect Abeta production, polymerization and clearance, and therefore play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of sporadic and genetic forms of AD. Early changes associated with molecular aging also have significant long-term consequences for Abeta folding and turnover. New fast, reproducible and accurate methods for the screening of protein aging markers in biological samples may contribute to improve diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in AD.

  13. Amyloid Accumulation Drives Proteome-wide Alterations in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease-like Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas, Jeffrey N; Wang, Yi-Zhi; DeNardo, Laura A; Martinez-Bartolome, Salvador; McClatchy, Daniel B; Hark, Timothy J; Shanks, Natalie F; Cozzolino, Kira A; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Smukowski, Samuel N; Park, Sung Kyu; Kelly, Jeffery W; Koo, Edward H; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Masliah, Eliezer; Ghosh, Anirvan; Yates, John R

    2017-11-28

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides impair multiple cellular pathways and play a causative role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology, but how the brain proteome is remodeled by this process is unknown. To identify protein networks associated with AD-like pathology, we performed global quantitative proteomic analysis in three mouse models at young and old ages. Our analysis revealed a robust increase in Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) levels in nearly all brain regions with increased Aβ levels. Taken together with prior findings on ApoE driving Aβ accumulation, this analysis points to a pathological dysregulation of the ApoE-Aβ axis. We also found dysregulation of protein networks involved in excitatory synaptic transmission. Analysis of the AMPA receptor (AMPAR) complex revealed specific loss of TARPγ-2, a key AMPAR-trafficking protein. Expression of TARPγ-2 in hAPP transgenic mice restored AMPA currents. This proteomic database represents a resource for the identification of protein alterations responsible for AD. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transmembrane amyloid-related proteins in CSF as potential biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease

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    Inmaculada eLopez-Font

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the continuing search for new cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, reasonable candidates are the secretase enzymes involved in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, as well as the large proteolytic cleavage fragments sAPPα and sAPPβ. The enzymatic activities of some of these secretases, such as BACE1 and TACE, have been investigated as potential AD biomarkers, and it has been assumed that these activities present in human CSF result from the soluble truncated forms of the membrane-bound enzymes. However, we and others recently identified soluble forms of BACE1 and APP in CSF containing the intracellular domains, as well as the multi-pass transmembrane presenilin-1 (PS1 and other subunits of γ-secretase. We also review recent findings that suggest that most of these soluble transmembrane proteins could display self-association properties based on hydrophobic and/or ionic interactions leading to the formation of heteromeric complexes. The oligomerization state of these potential new biomarkers needs to be taken into consideration for assessing their real potential as CSF biomarkers for AD by adequate molecular tools.

  15. Preclinical study of dimebon on β-amyloid-mediated neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease

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    Xie Mathew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dimebon is a retired non-selective antihistamine drug currently being investigated as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Results from several completed clinical trials are mixed and contradictory. Proper interpretations of these clinical observations, as well as future development of dimebon in AD treatment are complicated by the lack of concrete information on the mechanisms by which dimebon might benefit AD. Results The present studies are designed specifically to assess whether dimebon might modulate β-amyloid (Aβ-mediated responses which are central to the development and progression of AD dementia. We found that dimebon is bioavailable in the brains of mice following oral administration. AD mice chronically treated with dimebon exhibited a trend of improvement in spatial memory function without affecting the levels of total Aβ as well as soluble oligomeric Aβ in the brain. The same trend of behavior improvement is also seen in wild type animals chronically treated with dimebon. Conclusion Collectively, our preclinical studies using the TgCRND8 AD mouse model demonstrated that dimebon might have some beneficial effect in improving cognitive function independent of Alzheimer's disease-type Aβ-related mechanisms or global energy metabolism in the brain. Observations from our study and others suggesting dimebon might improve cognition in wild type mice and rats raises the possibility that dimebon might be able to benefit cognitive function in patients with other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington's disease, or in the aging population. Additional studies will be necessary to clarify the mechanisms by which dimebon might directly or indirectly benefit cognitive function.

  16. Arctigenin effectively ameliorates memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease model mice targeting both β-amyloid production and clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Jianming; Jiang, Wei; Yao, Xin-gang; Chen, Jing; Chen, Lili; Li, Chenjing; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2013-08-07

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) chiefly characterizes a progressively neurodegenerative disorder of the brain, and eventually leads to irreversible loss of intellectual abilities. The β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration is believed to be the main pathological mechanism of AD, and Aβ production inhibition or its clearance promotion is one of the promising therapeutic strategies for anti-AD research. Here, we report that the natural product arctigenin from Arctium lappa (L.) can both inhibit Aβ production by suppressing β-site amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 expression and promote Aβ clearance by enhancing autophagy through AKT/mTOR signaling inhibition and AMPK/Raptor pathway activation as investigated in cells and APP/PS1 transgenic AD model mice. Moreover, the results showing that treatment of arctigenin in mice highly decreased Aβ formation and senile plaques and efficiently ameliorated AD mouse memory impairment strongly highlight the potential of arctigenin in anti-AD drug discovery.

  17. BACE1 Function and Inhibition: Implications of Intervention in the Amyloid Pathway of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Koelsch

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by increasing loss in memory, cognition, and function of daily living. Among the many pathologic events observed in the progression of AD, changes in amyloid β peptide (Aβ metabolism proceed fastest, and precede clinical symptoms. BACE1 (β-secretase 1 catalyzes the initial cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein to generate Aβ. Therefore inhibition of BACE1 activity could block one of the earliest pathologic events in AD. However, therapeutic BACE1 inhibition to block Aβ production may need to be balanced with possible effects that might result from diminished physiologic functions BACE1, in particular processing of substrates involved in neuronal function of the brain and periphery. Potentials for beneficial or consequential effects resulting from pharmacologic inhibition of BACE1 are reviewed in context of ongoing clinical trials testing the effect of BACE1 candidate inhibitor drugs in AD populations.

  18. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  19. Protective effect of Nelumbo nucifera extracts on beta amyloid protein induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, in vitro model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaganandam Kumaran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. β-Amyloid (Aβ has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Deposits of insoluble Aβ are found in the brains of patients with AD and are one of the pathological hallmarks of the disease, but the underlying signaling pathways are poorly understood. In order to develop antidementia agents with potential therapeutic value, we examined the inhibitory effect of the Nelumbo nucifera seed embryo extracts on to the aggregated amyloid β peptide (agg Aβ1–40-induced damage of differentiated PC-12 cells (dPC-12, a well-known cell model for AD. In the present study, seed embryos of N. nucifera were extracted with 70% methanol in water and then separated into hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water layers. Among them, only the n-butanol layer showed strong activity and was therefore subjected to separation on Sephadex LH-20 chromatography. Two fractions showing potent activity were found to significantly inhibit Aβ1–40 toxicity on dPC-12 cells in increasing order of concentration (10–50 μg/mL. Further purification and characterization of these active fractions identified them to be flavonoids such as rutin, orientin, isoorientin, isoquercetrin, and hyperoside. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate scavenging activity of the extracts was also carried out to ascertain the possible mechanism of the activity.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid Beta and Tau Concentrations Are Not Modulated by 16 Weeks of Moderate- to High-Intensity Physical Exercise in Patients with Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen Jensen, Camilla; Portelius, Erik; Siersma, Volkert; Høgh, Peter; Wermuth, Lene; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Waldemar, Gunhild; Gregers Hasselbalch, Steen; Hviid Simonsen, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise may have some effect on cognition in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the underlying biochemical effects are unclear. Animal studies have shown that amyloid beta (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, can be altered with high levels of physical activity. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effect of 16 weeks of moderate- to high-intensity physical exercise on the biomarkers of AD, with special emphasis on the amyloidogenic pathway. From a total of 53 patients with AD participating in the Preserving Cognition, Quality of Life, Physical Health and Functional Ability in Alzheimer's Disease: The Effect of Physical Exercise (ADEX) study we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid samples for Aβ species, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) species. We also assessed the patients for apolipoprotein E ε4 (ApoE ε4) genotype. We found no effect of 16 weeks of physical exercise on the selected biomarkers, and no effect of ApoE ε4 genotype. Our findings suggest that the possible effect of physical exercise on cognition in patients with AD is not due to modulation of Aβ, t-tau, p-tau and sAPP species. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Long-term TNF-alpha blockade in patients with amyloid A amyloidosis complicating rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Olivé, Alejandro; Castro, María Carmen; Varela, Angela Herranz; Riera, Elena; Irigoyen, Maria V; García de Yébenes, María Jesús; García-Vicuña, Rosario

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients with amyloid A amyloidosis. Multicenter, controlled, dynamic prospective cohort study of 36 patients with amyloid A amyloidosis (94% kidney involvement) treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor agents (drug exposure of 102.97 patient-years). As an external control group, 35 propensity score-matched non-amyloid patients were chosen from the Base de Datos de Productos Biológicos de la Sociedad Española de Reumatología registry. The end points were kidney response and progression, anti-tumor necrosis factor continuation rate, patient survival, and adverse events. At the end of follow-up, a kidney response was observed in 12 of 22 patients (54.5%) and a kidney progression was observed in 6 of 36 patients (17%). The kidney amyloidosis remained stable in 16 of 36 patients (44%). The level of acute phase reactants diminished but did not reach the normal level. The continuation rates of anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs among patients with amyloid A amyloidosis after 1, 2, 3, and 4 or more years were 80%, 80%, 61%, and 52%, respectively, comparable to controls. The 5-year cumulative survival of amyloid A amyloidosis cases was 90.6%, and the 10-year survival was 78.5%. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the duration of amyloidosis and the level of proteinuria at the onset of anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment were independent predictors of treatment failure, whereas the level of proteinuria was the only factor that predicts mortality. Most adverse events were similar in both groups, although the number of infections was 3 times higher in amyloid A amyloidosis cases. Anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs are effective in treating amyloid A amyloidosis, although they might increase the risk of infection. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Antroquinonol Lowers Brain Amyloid-? Levels and Improves Spatial Learning and Memory in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer?s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Miles C.; Cheng, Irene H.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer?s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The deposition of brain amyloid-? peptides (A?), which are cleaved from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is one of the pathological hallmarks of AD. A?-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation play important roles in the pathogenesis of AD. Antroquinonol, a ubiquinone derivative isolated from Antrodia camphorata, has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines via activating the nuclear transcription fact...

  3. Quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange NMR of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) amyloid polymorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälti, Marielle Aulikki; Orts, Julien; Riek, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with the aggregation into amyloid fibrils of Aβ(1-42) and Aβ(1-40) peptides. Interestingly, these fibrils often do not obtain one single structure but rather show different morphologies, so-called polymorphs. Here, we compare quenched hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) fibril for which the 3D structure has been determined by solid-state NMR with H/D exchange previously determined on another structural polymorph. This comparison reveals secondary structural differences between the two polymorphs suggesting that the two polymorphisms can be classified as segmental polymorphs.

  4. Synthetic Curcumin Analogs as Inhibitors of β -Amyloid Peptide Aggregation: Potential Therapeutic and Diagnostic Agents for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    There is a crucial need to develop new effective drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as the currently available AD treatments provide only momentary and incomplete symptomatic relief. Amongst natural products, curcumin, a major constituent of turmeric, has been intensively investigated for its neuroprotective effect against β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced toxicity in cultured neuronal cells. The ability of curcumin to attach to Aβ peptide and prevent its accumulation is attributed to its three structural characteristics such as the presence of two aromatic end groups and their co-planarity, the length and rigidity of the linker region and the substitution conformation of these aromatics. However, curcumin failed to reach adequate brain levels after oral absorption in AD clinical trials due to its low water solubility and poor oral bioavailability. A number of new curcumin analogs that mimic the active site of the compound along with analogs that mimic the curcumin anti-amyloid effect combined with anticholinesterase effect have been developed to enhance the bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, water solubility, stability at physiological conditions and delivery of curcumin. In this article, we have summarized all reported synthetic analogs of curcumin showing effects on β-amyloid and discussed their potential as therapeutic and diagnostic agents for AD.

  5. Down's Syndrome with Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology: What Can It Teach Us about the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M. Bakkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Down's syndrome (DS, trisomy 21 represents a complex genetic abnormality that leads to pathology in later life that is similar to Alzheimer's disease (AD. We compared two cases of DS with APOE 3/3 genotypes, a similar age at death, and comparable amyloid-beta 42 peptide (A42 burdens in the brain but that differed markedly in the severity of AD-like pathology. One exhibited extensive neurofibrillary pathology whereas the other showed minimal features of this type. Comparable loads of A42 could relate to the cases' similar life-time accumulation of A due to trisomy 21-enhanced metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP. The cases' significant difference in AD-like pathology, however, suggests that parenchymal deposition of A42, even when extensive, may not inevitably trigger AD-like tau pathology (though it may be necessary. Thus, these observations of a natural experiment may contribute to understanding the nuances of the amyloid cascade hypothesis of AD pathogenesis.

  6. The Alzheimer Disease Protective Mutation A2T Modulates Kinetic and Thermodynamic Properties of Amyloid-β (Aβ) Aggregation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilova, Iryna; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Ungureanu, Andreea-Alexandra; Castillo Cano, Virginia; Snellinx, An; Ramakers, Meine; Bartic, Carmen; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; De Strooper, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Missense mutations in alanine 673 of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which corresponds to the second alanine of the amyloid β (Aβ) sequence, have dramatic impact on the risk for Alzheimer disease; A2V is causative, and A2T is protective. Assuming a crucial role of amyloid-Aβ in neurodegeneration, we hypothesized that both A2V and A2T mutations cause distinct changes in Aβ properties that may at least partially explain these completely different phenotypes. Using human APP-overexpressing primary neurons, we observed significantly decreased Aβ production in the A2T mutant along with an enhanced Aβ generation in the A2V mutant confirming earlier data from non-neuronal cell lines. More importantly, thioflavin T fluorescence assays revealed that the mutations, while having little effect on Aβ42 peptide aggregation, dramatically change the properties of the Aβ40 pool with A2V accelerating and A2T delaying aggregation of the Aβ peptides. In line with the kinetic data, Aβ A2T demonstrated an increase in the solubility at equilibrium, an effect that was also observed in all mixtures of the A2T mutant with the wild type Aβ40. We propose that in addition to the reduced β-secretase cleavage of APP, the impaired propensity to aggregate may be part of the protective effect conferred by A2T substitution. The interpretation of the protective effect of this mutation is thus much more complicated than proposed previously. PMID:25253695

  7. Curcumin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for detecting amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease mice using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kwok Kin; Chan, Pui Shan; Fan, Shujuan; Kwan, Siu Ming; Yeung, King Lun; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Chow, Albert Hee Lum; Wu, Ed X; Baum, Larry

    2015-03-01

    Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be performed with the assistance of amyloid imaging. The current method relies on positron emission tomography (PET), which is expensive and exposes people to radiation, undesirable features for a population screening method. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is cheaper and is not radioactive. Our approach uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) made of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) conjugated with curcumin, a natural compound that specifically binds to amyloid plaques. Coating of curcumin-conjugated MNPs with polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid block copolymer and polyvinylpyrrolidone by antisolvent precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer produces stable and biocompatible curcumin magnetic nanoparticles (Cur-MNPs) with mean diameter <100 nm. These nanoparticles were visualized by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and their structure and chemistry were further characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Cur-MNPs exhibited no cytotoxicity in either Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) or differentiated human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). The Papp of Cur-MNPs was 1.03 × 10(-6) cm/s in an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model. Amyloid plaques could be visualized in ex vivo T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of Tg2576 mouse brains after injection of Cur-MNPs, and no plaques could be found in non-transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical examination of the mouse brains revealed that Cur-MNPs were co-localized with amyloid plaques. Thus, Cur-MNPs have the potential for non-invasive diagnosis of AD using MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Effects of grain-sized moxibustion on learning and memory ability and amyloid deposition of transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Chu, Jia-Mei; Gao, Ling-Ai; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Bao, Ye-Hua

    2014-02-01

    To observe the effect of grain-sized moxibustion at "Xinshu" (BL 15) and "Shenshu" (BL 23) on memory-learning ability and amyloid deposition in transgenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice. seventeen amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin (PS)1 (APP+/PS 1+) double transgenic 6799 mice aged 3-4 weeks were randomly divided into model group (n = 9) and moxibustion group (n = 8). Nine wide-type (C 57 BL/6 J) female mice were used as the normal control group. Moxibustion (ignited grain-sized moxa cone) was applied to bilateral "Xinshu" (BL 15) and "Shenshu" (BL 23) for about 30 s, once a day for 9 courses (10 days constitute a therapeutic course, with 2 days' break between every two courses). Morris water maze tests were performed to detect the mice's learning-memory ability. The alterations of beta-amyloid deposition (number of the positive plaques) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus were detected by using an imaging analysis system following Congo red staining of the cerebral tissue sections. Compared with the normal group, the average escape latency of place navigation tests was significantly increased (P memory ability after moxibustion. Results of Congo red staining of the cerebral tissue showed that there were many irregular, uneven staining positive plaques in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of AD mice in the model group. Compared with the model group, the positive plaque numbers in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus were considerably reduced in the moxibustion group (P memory ability and restrain the formation of amyloid deposition in AD mice.

  9. A comparative study of dietary curcumin, nanocurcumin, and other classical amyloid-binding dyes for labeling and imaging of amyloid plaques in brain tissue of 5×-familial Alzheimer's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Panchanan; Hall, Tia C; Paladugu, Leela; Kolli, Nivya; Learman, Cameron; Rossignol, Julien; Dunbar, Gary L

    2016-11-01

    Deposition of amyloid beta protein (Aβ) is a key component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As an anti-amyloid natural polyphenol, curcumin (Cur) has been used as a therapy for AD. Its fluorescent activity, preferential binding to Aβ, as well as structural similarities with other traditional amyloid-binding dyes, make it a promising candidate for labeling and imaging of Aβ plaques in vivo. The present study was designed to test whether dietary Cur and nanocurcumin (NC) provide more sensitivity for labeling and imaging of Aβ plaques in brain tissues from the 5×-familial AD (5×FAD) mice than the classical Aβ-binding dyes, such as Congo red and Thioflavin-S. These comparisons were made in postmortem brain tissues from the 5×FAD mice. We observed that Cur and NC labeled Aβ plaques to the same degree as Aβ-specific antibody and to a greater extent than those of the classical amyloid-binding dyes. Cur and NC also labeled Aβ plaques in 5×FAD brain tissues when injected intraperitoneally. Nanomolar concentrations of Cur or NC are sufficient for labeling and imaging of Aβ plaques in 5×FAD brain tissue. Cur and NC also labeled different types of Aβ plaques, including core, neuritic, diffuse, and burned-out, to a greater degree than other amyloid-binding dyes. Therefore, Cur and or NC can be used as an alternative to Aβ-specific antibody for labeling and imaging of Aβ plaques ex vivo and in vivo. It can provide an easy and inexpensive means of detecting Aβ-plaque load in postmortem brain tissue of animal models of AD after anti-amyloid therapy.

  10. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês; Tsolaki, Magda; Gkatzima, Olymbia; Sermin, Genc; Yener, Görsev G; Simonsen, Anja; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Mara, Bourbouli; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mendes, Vera M; Manadas, Bruno; de Mendon, Alexandreça

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42 in the CSF. However, a significant positive correlation was found between the concentrations of theobromine, both in the CSF and in the plasma, with Aβ42 in the CSF. Theobromine in the CSF was positively correlated with the levels of other xanthines in the CSF, but not in the plasma, suggesting that it may be formed by central metabolic pathways. In conclusion, caffeine consumption does not modify the levels of CSF biomarkers, and does not require to be controlled for when measuring CSF biomarkers in a clinical setting. Since theobromine is associated with a favorable Aβ profile in the CSF, the possibility that it might have a protective role in AD should be further investigated.

  11. Predominant loss of glutamatergic terminal markers in a β-amyloid peptide model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, Paula M; Simões, Ana Patrícia; Rodrigues, Ricardo J; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized phenotypically by memory impairment, neurochemically by accumulation of β-amyloid peptide (such as Aβ1-42) and morphologically by an initial loss of nerve terminals in cortical and hippocampal regions. However, it is not known what nerve terminals are mostly affected in early AD. We now used a mouse model of AD, based on the intra-cerebral administration of soluble Aβ1-42, that leads to memory impairment and loss of nerve terminal markers within 2 weeks, to investigate which type of hippocampal nerve terminals was mostly affected in the hippocampus. Western blot analysis revealed a decrease of the density of vesicular glutamate transporters type 1 (vGluT1, a marker of glutamatergic terminals; -20.1 ± 3.6%) and of vesicular acetylcholine transporters (vAChT, a marker of cholinergic terminals; -27.2 ± 0.9%) but not of vesicular GABA transporters (vGAT, a marker of GABAergic terminals) in the hippocampus of Aβ-injected mice. Immunocytochemical analysis of single hippocampal nerve terminals revealed that the decrease of the density of vGluT1 reflects a reduction of the number of vGluT1-immunopositive nerve terminals (-10.6 ± 3.6%), while no significant changes in the number of vAChT- or vGAT-immunopositive nerve terminals were observed. This pilot study shows that, in this Aβ-based model of AD, there is an asymmetric loss of different synaptic markers with a predominant susceptibility of glutamatergic synapses. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A ketogenic diet reduces amyloid beta 40 and 42 in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Leuven Fred

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that primarily strikes the elderly. Studies in both humans and animal models have linked the consumption of cholesterol and saturated fats with amyloid-β (Aβ deposition and development of AD. Yet, these studies did not examine high fat diets in combination with reduced carbohydrate intake. Here we tested the effect of a high saturated fat/low carbohydrate diet on a transgenic mouse model of AD. Results Starting at three months of age, two groups of female transgenic mice carrying the "London" APP mutation (APP/V717I were fed either, a standard diet (SD composed of high carbohydrate/low fat chow, or a ketogenic diet (KD composed of very low carbohydrate/high saturated fat chow for 43 days. Animals fed the KD exhibited greatly elevated serum ketone body levels, as measured by β-hydroxybutyrate (3.85 ± 2.6 mM, compared to SD fed animals (0.29 ± 0.06 mM. In addition, animals fed the KD lost body weight (SD 22.2 ± 0.6 g vs. KD 17.5 ± 1.4 g, p = 0.0067. In contrast to earlier studies, the brief KD feeding regime significantly reduced total brain Aβ levels by approximately 25%. Despite changes in ketone levels, body weight, and Aβ levels, the KD diet did not alter behavioral measures. Conclusion Previous studies have suggested that diets rich in cholesterol and saturated fats increased the deposition of Aβ and the risk of developing AD. Here we demonstrate that a diet rich in saturated fats and low in carbohydrates can actually reduce levels of Aβ. Therefore, dietary strategies aimed at reducing Aβ levels should take into account interactions of dietary components and the metabolic outcomes, in particular, levels of carbohydrates, total calories, and presence of ketone bodies should be considered.

  13. An Alzheimer Disease-linked Rare Mutation Potentiates Netrin Receptor Uncoordinated-5C-induced Signaling That Merges with Amyloid β Precursor Protein Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Toyama, Yuka; Kusakari, Shinya; Nawa, Mikiro; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2016-06-03

    A missense mutation (T835M) in the uncoordinated-5C (UNC5C) netrin receptor gene increases the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and also the vulnerability of neurons harboring the mutation to various insults. The molecular mechanisms underlying T835M-UNC5C-induced death remain to be elucidated. In this study, we show that overexpression of wild-type UNC5C causes low-grade death, which is intensified by an AD-linked mutation T835M. An AD-linked survival factor, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP), and a natural ligand of UNC5C, netrin1, inhibit this death. T835M-UNC5C-induced neuronal cell death is mediated by an intracellular death-signaling cascade, consisting of death-associated protein kinase 1/protein kinase D/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)/JNK/NADPH oxidase/caspases, which merges at ASK1 with a death-signaling cascade, mediated by amyloid β precursor protein (APP). Notably, netrin1 also binds to APP and partially inhibits the death-signaling cascade, induced by APP. These results may provide new insight into the amyloid β-independent pathomechanism of AD. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Treadmill exercise decreases amyloid-β burden possibly via activation of SIRT-1 signaling in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jung-Hoon; Kang, Eun-Bum; Oh, Yoo-Sung; Yang, Dae-Seung; Cho, Joon-Yong

    2017-02-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) correlates significantly with progressive cognitive deficits, a main symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although treadmill exercise reduces Aβ levels, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects are not fully understood. We hypothesize that treadmill exercise decreases Aβ production and alleviates cognitive deficits by activating the non-amyloidogenic pathway via SIRT-1 signaling. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive deficits and alleviated neurotoxicity. Most importantly, treadmill exercise increased SIRT-1 level, which subsequently resulted in increased ADAM-10 level by down-regulation of ROCK-1 and upregulation of RARβ, ultimately facilitating the non-amyloidogenic pathway. Treadmill exercise-induced activation in SIRT-1 level also elevated PGC-1α level and reduced BACE-1 and C-99 level, resulting in inhibition of the amyloidogenic pathway. Treadmill exercise may thus inhibit Aβ production via upregulation of SIRT-1, which biases amyloid precursor protein processing toward the non-amyloidogenic pathway. This study provides novel and valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms possibly by which treadmill exercise reduces Aβ production. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. An Alzheimer Disease-linked Rare Mutation Potentiates Netrin Receptor Uncoordinated-5C-induced Signaling That Merges with Amyloid β Precursor Protein Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Toyama, Yuka; Kusakari, Shinya; Nawa, Mikiro; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    A missense mutation (T835M) in the uncoordinated-5C (UNC5C) netrin receptor gene increases the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and also the vulnerability of neurons harboring the mutation to various insults. The molecular mechanisms underlying T835M-UNC5C-induced death remain to be elucidated. In this study, we show that overexpression of wild-type UNC5C causes low-grade death, which is intensified by an AD-linked mutation T835M. An AD-linked survival factor, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP), and a natural ligand of UNC5C, netrin1, inhibit this death. T835M-UNC5C-induced neuronal cell death is mediated by an intracellular death-signaling cascade, consisting of death-associated protein kinase 1/protein kinase D/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)/JNK/NADPH oxidase/caspases, which merges at ASK1 with a death-signaling cascade, mediated by amyloid β precursor protein (APP). Notably, netrin1 also binds to APP and partially inhibits the death-signaling cascade, induced by APP. These results may provide new insight into the amyloid β-independent pathomechanism of AD. PMID:27068745

  16. Vascular remodeling versus amyloid beta-induced oxidative stress in the cerebrovascular dysfunctions associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin-Kang; Nicolakakis, Nektaria; Kocharyan, Ara; Hamel, Edith

    2005-11-30

    The roles of oxidative stress and structural alterations in the cerebrovascular dysfunctions associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) were investigated in transgenic mice overexpressing amyloid precusor protein (APP+) or transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF+). Age-related impairments and their in vitro reversibility were evaluated, and underlying pathogenic mechanisms were assessed and compared with those seen in AD brains. Vasoconstrictions to 5-HT and endothelin-1 were preserved, except in the oldest (18-21 months of age) TGF+ mice. Despite unaltered relaxations to sodium nitroprusside, acetylcholine (ACh) and calcitonin gene-related peptide-mediated dilatations were impaired, and there was an age-related deficit in the basal availability of nitric oxide (NO) that progressed more gradually in TGF+ mice. The expression and progression of these deficits were unrelated to the onset or extent of thioflavin-S-positive vessels. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) was upregulated in pial vessels and around brain microvessels of APP+ mice, pointing to a role of superoxide in the dysfunctions elicited by amyloidosis. In contrast, vascular wall remodeling associated with decreased levels of endothelial NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 and increased contents of vascular endothelial growth factor and collagen-I and -IV characterized TGF+ mice. Exogenous SOD or catalase normalized ACh dilatations and NO availability in vessels from aged APP+ mice but had no effect in those of TGF+ mice. Increased perivascular oxidative stress was not evidenced in AD brains, but vascular wall alterations compared well with those seen in TGF+ mice. We conclude that brain vessel remodeling and associated alterations in levels of vasoactive signaling molecules are key contributors to AD cerebrovascular dysfunctions.

  17. Amyloid positron emission tomography in sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy: A systematic critical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Farid

    2017-01-01

    . A total of six small-scale studies have addressed (or reported data useful to address the diagnostic utility of late-phase amyloid PET imaging in CAA, and one additional study dealt with early PiB images as a proxy of brain perfusion. Across these studies, amyloid PET imaging has definite diagnostic utility (currently tested only in probable CAA: it helps rule out CAA if negative, whether compared to healthy controls or to hypertensive deep ICH controls. If positive, however, differentiation from underlying incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD can be challenging and so far, no approach (regional values, ratios, visual assessment seems sufficient and specific enough, although early PiB data seem to hold promise. Based on the available evidence reviewed, we suggest a tentative diagnostic flow algorithm for amyloid-PET use in the clinical setting of suspected CAA, combining early- and late-phase PiB-PET images. We also identified ten mechanistic amyloid-PET studies providing early but promising proof-of-concept data on CAA pathophysiology and its various manifestations including key MRI lesions, cognitive impairment and large scale brain alterations. Key open questions that should be addressed in future studies of amyloid-PET imaging in CAA are identified and highlighted.

  18. Small Amphipathic Molecules Modulate Secondary Structure and Amyloid Fibril-forming Kinetics of Alzheimer Disease Peptide Aβ1–42

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Timothy M.; Friedhuber, Anna; Lind, Monica; Howlett, Geoffrey J.; Masters, Colin; Roberts, Blaine R.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is associated with a number of debilitating systemic and neurodegenerative diseases. One of the most prominent is Alzheimer disease in which aggregation and deposition of the Aβ peptide occur. Aβ is widely considered to mediate the extensive neuronal loss observed in this disease through the formation of soluble oligomeric species, with the final fibrillar end product of the aggregation process being relatively inert. Factors that influence the aggregation of these amyloid-forming proteins are therefore very important. We have screened a library of 96 amphipathic molecules for effects on Aβ1–42 aggregation and self-association. We find, using thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy assays, that 30 of the molecules inhibit the aggregation process, whereas 36 activate fibril formation. Several activators and inhibitors were subjected to further analysis using analytical ultracentrifugation and circular dichroism. Activators typically display a 1:10 peptide:detergent stoichiometry for maximal activation, whereas the inhibitors are effective at a 1:1 stoichiometry. Analytical ultracentrifugation and circular dichroism experiments show that activators promote a mixture of unfolded and β-sheet structures and rapidly form large aggregates, whereas inhibitors induce α-helical structures that form stable dimeric/trimeric oligomers. The results suggest that Aβ1–42 contains at least one small molecule binding site, which modulates the secondary structure and aggregation processes. Further studies of the binding of these compounds to Aβ may provide insight for developing therapeutic strategies aimed at stabilizing Aβ in a favorable conformation. PMID:22461629

  19. Small amphipathic molecules modulate secondary structure and amyloid fibril-forming kinetics of Alzheimer disease peptide Aβ(1-42).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Timothy M; Friedhuber, Anna; Lind, Monica; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Masters, Colin; Roberts, Blaine R

    2012-05-11

    Amyloid fibril formation is associated with a number of debilitating systemic and neurodegenerative diseases. One of the most prominent is Alzheimer disease in which aggregation and deposition of the Aβ peptide occur. Aβ is widely considered to mediate the extensive neuronal loss observed in this disease through the formation of soluble oligomeric species, with the final fibrillar end product of the aggregation process being relatively inert. Factors that influence the aggregation of these amyloid-forming proteins are therefore very important. We have screened a library of 96 amphipathic molecules for effects on Aβ(1-42) aggregation and self-association. We find, using thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy assays, that 30 of the molecules inhibit the aggregation process, whereas 36 activate fibril formation. Several activators and inhibitors were subjected to further analysis using analytical ultracentrifugation and circular dichroism. Activators typically display a 1:10 peptide:detergent stoichiometry for maximal activation, whereas the inhibitors are effective at a 1:1 stoichiometry. Analytical ultracentrifugation and circular dichroism experiments show that activators promote a mixture of unfolded and β-sheet structures and rapidly form large aggregates, whereas inhibitors induce α-helical structures that form stable dimeric/trimeric oligomers. The results suggest that Aβ(1-42) contains at least one small molecule binding site, which modulates the secondary structure and aggregation processes. Further studies of the binding of these compounds to Aβ may provide insight for developing therapeutic strategies aimed at stabilizing Aβ in a favorable conformation.

  20. Clearing Amyloid-β through PPARγ/ApoE Activation by Genistein is a Treatment of Experimental Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Blanco-Gandía, MariCarmen; Mas-Bargues, Cristina; Inglés, Marta; Garcia-Tarraga, Patricia; Rodriguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Borras, Consuelo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Viña, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) clearance from brain, which is decreased in Alzheimer's disease, is facilitated by apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE is upregulated by activation of the retinoid X receptor moiety of the RXR/PPARγ dimeric receptor. Genistein, a non-toxic, well-tested, and inexpensive drug activates the other moiety of the receptor PPARγ. Treatment of an Alzheimer's disease mouse model with genistein results in a remarkable and rapid improvement in various parameters of cognition, such as hippocampal learning, recognition memory, implicit memory, and odor discrimination. This is associated with a lowering of Aβ levels in brain, in the number and the area of amyloid plaques (confirmed in vivo by positron emission tomography) as well as in microglial reactivity. Finally, incubation of primary astrocytes with genistein results in a PPARγ-mediated increased release of ApoE. Our results strongly suggest that controlled clinical trials should be performed to test the effect of genistein as treatment of human Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Natural Products based P-glycoprotein Activators for Improved β-amyloid Clearance in Alzheimer's Disease: An in silico Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Pravin; Vidyasagar, Nikhil; Dhulap, Sivakami; Dhulap, Abhijeet; Hirwani, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age related disorder and is defined to be progressive, irreversible neurodegenerative disease. The potential targets which are associated with the Alzheimer's disease are cholinesterases, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, Beta secretase 1, Pregnane X receptor (PXR) and P-glycoprotein (Pgp). P-glycoprotein is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, which is an important integral of the blood-brain, blood-cerebrospinal fluid and the blood-testis barrier. Reports from the literature provide evidences that the up-regulation of the efflux pump is liable for a decrease in β -amyloid intracellular accumulation and is an important hallmark in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, targeting β-amyloid clearance by stimulating Pgp could be a useful strategy to prevent Alzheimer's advancement. Currently available drugs provide limited effectiveness and do not assure to cure Alzheimer's disease completely. On the other hand, the current research is now directed towards the development of synthetic or natural based therapeutics which can delay the onset or progression of Alzheimer's disease. Since ancient time medicinal plants such as Withania somnifera, Bacopa monieri, Nerium indicum have been used to prevent neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Till today around 125 Indian medicinal plants have been screened on the basis of ethnopharmacology for their activity against neurological disorders. In this paper, we report bioactives from natural sources which show binding affinity towards the Pgp receptor using ligand based pharmacophore development, virtual screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies for the bioactives possessing acceptable ADME properties. These bioactives can thus be useful to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Plasma Aβ (Amyloid-β) Levels and Severity and Progression of Small Vessel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leijsen, Esther M C; Kuiperij, H Bea; Kersten, Iris; Bergkamp, Mayra I; van Uden, Ingeborg W M; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Stoops, Erik; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; van Dijk, Ewoud J; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2018-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a frequent pathology in aging and contributor to the development of dementia. Plasma Aβ (amyloid β) levels may be useful as early biomarker, but the role of plasma Aβ in SVD remains to be elucidated. We investigated the association of plasma Aβ levels with severity and progression of SVD markers. We studied 487 participants from the RUN DMC study (Radboud University Nijmegen Diffusion Tensor and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Cohort) of whom 258 participants underwent 3 MRI assessments during 9 years. We determined baseline plasma Aβ38, Aβ40, and Aβ42 levels using ELISAs. We longitudinally assessed volume of white matter hyperintensities semiautomatically and manually rated lacunes and microbleeds. We analyzed associations between plasma Aβ and SVD markers by ANCOVA adjusted for age, sex, and hypertension. Cross-sectionally, plasma Aβ40 levels were elevated in participants with microbleeds (mean, 205.4 versus 186.4 pg/mL; P <0.01) and lacunes (mean, 194.8 versus 181.2 pg/mL; P <0.05). Both Aβ38 and Aβ40 were elevated in participants with severe white matter hyperintensities (Aβ38, 25.3 versus 22.7 pg/mL; P <0.01; Aβ40, 201.8 versus 183.3 pg/mL; P <0.05). Longitudinally, plasma Aβ40 levels were elevated in participants with white matter hyperintensity progression (mean, 194.6 versus 182.9 pg/mL; P <0.05). Both Aβ38 and Aβ40 were elevated in participants with incident lacunes (Aβ38, 24.5 versus 22.5 pg/mL; P <0.05; Aβ40, 194.9 versus 181.2 pg/mL; P <0.01) and Aβ42 in participants with incident microbleeds (62.8 versus 60.4 pg/mL; P <0.05). Plasma Aβ levels are associated with both presence and progression of SVD markers, suggesting that Aβ pathology might contribute to the development and progression of SVD. Plasma Aβ levels might thereby serve as inexpensive and noninvasive measure for identifying individuals with increased risk for progression of SVD. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Amyloid Beta-Mediated Hypomethylation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Correlates with Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Youn Sung

    Full Text Available To identify epigenetically regulated genes involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD we analyzed global mRNA expression and methylation profiles in amyloid precursor protein (APP-Swedish mutant-expressing AD model cells, H4-sw and selected heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1, which is associated with pathological features of AD such as neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. We examined the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of HMOX1 and its application as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for AD. Our results show that HMOX1 mRNA and protein expression was approximately 12.2-fold and 7.9-fold increased in H4-sw cells, respectively. Increased HMOX1 expression was also detected in the brain, particularly the hippocampus, of AD model transgenic mice. However, the methylation of specific CpG sites within its promoter, particularly at CpG located -374 was significantly decreased in H4-sw cells. Treatment of neuroglioma cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in reduced methylation of HMOX1 promoter accompanied by enhanced HMOX1 expression strongly supporting DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation of HMOX1. Toxic Aβ-induced aberrant hypomethylation of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site was correlated with increased HMOX1 expression. In addition to neuroglioma cells, we also found Aβ-induced epigenetic regulation of HMOX1 in human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells. We evaluated DNA methylation status of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site in blood samples from AD patients, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and control individuals using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. We observed lower methylation of HMOX1 at the -374 promoter CpG site in AD patients compared to MCI and control individuals, and a correlation between Mini-Mental State Examination score and demethylation level. Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed good discrimination of AD patients from MCI

  4. Reduction of β-amyloid pathology by celastrol in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachmeier Corbin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aβ deposits represent a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Both soluble and insoluble Aβ species are considered to be responsible for initiating the pathological cascade that eventually leads to AD. Therefore, the identification of therapeutic approaches that can lower Aβ production or accumulation remains a priority. NFκB has been shown to regulate BACE-1 expression level, the rate limiting enzyme responsible for the production of Aβ. We therefore explored whether the known NFκB inhibitor celastrol could represent a suitable compound for decreasing Aβ production and accumulation in vivo. Methods The effect of celastrol on amyloid precursor protein (APP processing, Aβ production and NFκB activation was investigated by western blotting and ELISAs using a cell line overexpressing APP. The impact of celastrol on brain Aβ accumulation was tested in a transgenic mouse model of AD overexpressing the human APP695sw mutation and the presenilin-1 mutation M146L (Tg PS1/APPsw by immunostaining and ELISAs. An acute treatment with celastrol was investigated by administering celastrol intraperitoneally at a dosage of 1 mg/Kg in 35 week-old Tg PS1/APPsw for 4 consecutive days. In addition, a chronic treatment (32 days with celastrol was tested using a matrix-driven delivery pellet system implanted subcutaneously in 5 month-old Tg PS1/APPsw to ensure a continuous daily release of 2.5 mg/Kg of celastrol. Results In vitro, celastrol dose dependently prevented NFκB activation and inhibited BACE-1 expression. Celastrol potently inhibited Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 production by reducing the β-cleavage of APP, leading to decreased levels of APP-CTFβ and APPsβ. In vivo, celastrol appeared to reduce the levels of both soluble and insoluble Aβ1-38, Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. In addition, a reduction in Aβ plaque burden and microglial activation was observed in the brains of Tg PS1/APPsw following a chronic administration of

  5. Interplay Between Age, Cerebral Small Vessel Disease, Parenchymal Amyloid-beta, and Tau Pathology: Longitudinal Studies in Hypertensive Stroke-Prone Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreiber, S; Drukarch, B.; Garz, C.; Niklass, S.; Stanaszek, L.; Kropf, S.; Bueche, C.; Held, F.; Vielhaber, S.; Attems, J.; Reymann, K.G.; Heinze, H.J.; Carare, R.O.; Wilhelmus, M.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau (ptau) accompany cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) in the aging brain and in Alzheimer's disease. CSVD is characterized by a heterogeneous spectrum of histopathological features possibly initiated by an endothelial dysfunction

  6. Effect of creatine supplementation on cognitive performance and apoptosis in a rat model of amyloid-beta-induced Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Alimohammadi-Kamalabadi

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Cr supplementation before and after β-amyloid injection into the CA1 area of hippocampus deteriorates the learning and memory impairment of rats and it does not protect neuronal apoptosis caused by β-amyloid.

  7. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  8. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition improves synaptic function, memory, and amyloid-beta load in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzo, Daniela; Staniszewski, Agnieszka; Deng, Shi Xian; Privitera, Lucia; Leznik, Elena; Liu, Shumin; Zhang, Hong; Feng, Yan; Palmeri, Agostino; Landry, Donald W; Arancio, Ottavio

    2009-06-24

    Memory loss, synaptic dysfunction, and accumulation of amyloid beta-peptides (A beta) are major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Downregulation of the nitric oxide/cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase/c-AMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) cascade has been linked to the synaptic deficits after A beta elevation. Here, we report that the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor (PDE5) sildenafil (Viagra), a molecule that enhances phosphorylation of CREB, a molecule involved in memory, through elevation of cGMP levels, is beneficial against the AD phenotype in a mouse model of amyloid deposition. We demonstrate that the inhibitor produces an immediate and long-lasting amelioration of synaptic function, CREB phosphorylation, and memory. This effect is also associated with a long-lasting reduction of A beta levels. Given that side effects of PDE5 inhibitors are widely known and do not preclude their administration to a senile population, these drugs have potential for the treatment of AD and other diseases associated with elevated A beta levels.

  9. Protein Polymers and Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Michael Wulff

    2014-01-01

    Several human disorders are caused by a common general disease mechanism arising from abnormal folding and aggregation of the underlying protein. These include the prevalent dementias like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, where accumulation of protein fibrillar structures, known as amyloid fibrils...... that inhibits its target protease through a large conformational change but mutations compromise this function and cause premature structural collapse into hyperstable polymers. Understanding the conformational disorders at a molecular level is not only important for our general knowledge on protein folding......, underlining the importance of understanding this relationship. The monomeric C-36 peptide was investigated by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy and found to be intrinsically disordered with minor propensities towards β-sheet structure. The plasticity of such a peptide makes it suitable for a whole range...

  10. Serum amyloid A isoforms in serum and synovial fluid from spontaneously diseased dogs with joint diseases or other conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads Jens; Christensen, Michelle B.; Lee, Marcel Huisung

    2007-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute phase protein in dogs. However, knowledge of qualitative properties of canine SAA and extent of its synthesis in extrahepatic tissues is limited. The aim of the study was to investigate expression of different SAA isoforms in serum and synovial fluid...... in samples obtained from dogs (n = 16) suffering from different inflammatory or non-inflammatory conditions, which were either related or unrelated to joints. Expression of SAA isoforms was visualized by denaturing isoelectric focusing and Western blotting. Serum amyloid A was present in serum from all dogs...

  11. The effect of tachykinin neuropeptides on amyloid β aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flashner, Efrat; Raviv, Uri; Friedler, Assaf

    2011-04-01

    A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is production of amyloid β peptides resulting from aberrant cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Amyloid β assembles into fibrils under physiological conditions, through formation of neurotoxic intermediate oligomers. Tachykinin peptides are known to affect amyloid β neurotoxicity in cells. To understand the mechanism of this effect, we studied how tachykinins affect Aβ(1-40) aggregation in vitro. Fibrils grown in the presence of tachykinins exhibited reduced thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, while their morphology, observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), did not alter. Cross linking studies revealed that the distribution of low molecular weight species was not affected by tachykinins. Our results suggest that there may be a specific interaction between tachykinins and Aβ(1-40) that allows them to co-assemble. This effect may explain the reduction of Aβ(1-40) neurotoxicity in cells treated with tachykinins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Factors Responsible for Plasma β-Amyloid Accumulation in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronewold, Janine; Klafki, Hans-Wolfgang; Baldelli, Enrico; Kaltwasser, Britta; Seidel, Ulla K; Todica, Olga; Volsek, Michaela; Haußmann, Ute; Wiltfang, Jens; Kribben, Andreas; Bruck, Heike; Hermann, Dirk M

    2016-07-01

    Disturbed brain-to-blood elimination of β-amyloid (Aβ) promotes cerebral Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer's disease. Considering that the kidneys are involved in Aβ elimination from the blood, we evaluated how chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects plasma Aβ. In 106 CKD patients stages 3-5 (including 19 patients on hemodialysis and 15 kidney recipients), 53 control subjects with comparable vascular risk profile and 10 kidney donors, plasma Aβ was determined using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay and gel electrophoresis followed by Western blotting. Plasma Aβ increased with CKD stage (control = 182.98 ± 76.73 pg/ml; CKD3A = 248.34 ± 103.77 pg/ml; CKD3B = 259.25 ± 97.74 pg/ml; CKD4 = 489.16 ± 154.16 pg/ml; CKD5 = 721.19 ± 291.69 pg/ml) and was not influenced by hemodialysis (CKD5D = 697.97 ± 265.91 pg/ml). Renal transplantation reduced plasma Aβ (332.57 ± 162.82 pg/ml), whereas kidney donation increased it (251.51 ± 34.34 pg/ml). Gel electrophoresis confirmed stage-dependent elevation namely of Aβ1-40, the most abundant Aβ peptide. In a multivariable regression including age, sex, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), potassium, hemoglobin, urine urea, and urine total protein, the factors eGFR (β = -0.42, p < 0.001), hemoglobin (β = -0.17, p = 0.020), and urine protein (β = 0.26, p = 0.008) were associated with plasma Aβ. In a regression including age, sex, eGFR, potassium, hemoglobin and the vascular risk factors systolic blood pressure, smoking, LDL, HDL, HbA1c, body mass index, brain-derived natriuretic peptide and fibrinogen, the factors eGFR (β = -0.53, p < 0.001), body mass index (β = -0.17, p = 0.022), and fibrinogen (β = 0.18, p = 0.024) were associated with plasma Aβ. Our results demonstrate a stage-dependent plasma Aβ increase that is augmented by loss of glomerulotubular integrity, low body weight, and inflammation

  13. Proximity to Parental Symptom Onset and Amyloid-β Burden in Sporadic Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Sylvia; Vogel, Jacob W; Gonneaud, Julie; Pichet Binette, Alexa; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Gauthier, Serge; Bateman, Randall J; Fagan, Anne M; Morris, John C; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Johnson, Sterling C; Breitner, John C S; Poirier, Judes

    2018-02-26

    Alzheimer disease (AD) develops during several decades. Presymptomatic individuals might be the best candidates for clinical trials, but their identification is challenging because they have no symptoms. To assess whether a sporadic parental estimated years to symptom onset calculation could be used to identify information about amyloid-β (Aβ) levels in asymptomatic individuals with a parental history of AD dementia. This cohort study analyzed Aβ1-42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 101 cognitively normal individuals who had a lumbar puncture as part of the Presymptomatic Evaluation of Novel or Experimental Treatments for Alzheimer Disease (PREVENT-AD) cohort from September 1, 2011, through November 30, 2016 (374 participants were enrolled in the cohort during this period). The study estimated each participant's proximity to his/her parent's symptom onset by subtracting the index relative's onset age from his/her current age. The association between proximity to parental symptom onset and Aβ levels was then assessed using apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE4) status and sex as interactive terms. These analyses were performed again in 2 independent cohorts using CSF and Pittsburgh compound B carbon 11-labeled positron emission tomography (PIB-PET) Aβ biomarkers: the Adult Children Study (ACS) and the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer Prevention (WRAP) cohorts. The association between proximity to parental symptom onset and Aβ burden in asymptomatic individuals with a parental history of sporadic AD. The present analysis included a subset of 101 PREVENT-AD individuals (mean [SD] age, 61.8 [5.1] years; 30 [29.7%] male), 128 ACS participants (112 participants underwent CSF measurement: mean [SD] age, 63.4 [5.1] years; 31 [27.7%] male; and 107 underwent PIB-PET: mean [SD] age, 64.6 [5.3] years; 27 [25.2%] male), and 135 WRAP participants (85 participants underwent CSF measurement: mean [SD] age, 59.9 [6.0] years; 27 [31.8%] male; and 135 underwent PIB-PET: mean

  14. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweers, K K M; Bennink, M L; Subramaniam, V

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils. (topical review)

  15. Visual Versus Fully Automated Analyses of 18F-FDG and Amyloid PET for Prediction of Dementia Due to Alzheimer Disease in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmer, Timo; Wutz, Carolin; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Drzezga, Alexander; Förster, Stefan; Förstl, Hans; Goldhardt, Oliver; Ortner, Marion; Sorg, Christian; Kurz, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers of Alzheimer disease (AD) can be imaged in vivo and can be used for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in people with cognitive decline and dementia. Indicators of amyloid deposition such as (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PiB) PET are primarily used to identify or rule out brain diseases that are associated with amyloid pathology but have also been deployed to forecast the clinical course. Indicators of neuronal metabolism including (18)F-FDG PET demonstrate the localization and severity of neuronal dysfunction and are valuable for differential diagnosis and for predicting the progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. It is a matter of debate whether to analyze these images visually or using automated techniques. Therefore, we compared the usefulness of both imaging methods and both analyzing strategies to predict dementia due to AD. In MCI participants, a baseline examination, including clinical and imaging assessments, and a clinical follow-up examination after a planned interval of 24 mo were performed. Of 28 MCI patients, 9 developed dementia due to AD, 2 developed frontotemporal dementia, and 1 developed moderate dementia of unknown etiology. The positive and negative predictive values and the accuracy of visual and fully automated analyses of (11)C-PiB for the prediction of progression to dementia due to AD were 0.50, 1.00, and 0.68, respectively, for the visual and 0.53, 1.00, and 0.71, respectively, for the automated analyses. Positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of fully automated analyses of (18)F-FDG PET were 0.37, 0.78, and 0.50, respectively. Results of visual analyses were highly variable between raters but were superior to automated analyses. Both (18)F-FDG and (11)C-PiB imaging appear to be of limited use for predicting the progression from MCI to dementia due to AD in short-term follow-up, irrespective of the strategy of analysis. On the other hand, amyloid PET is extremely useful to

  16. Amyloid Beta and Tau Proteins as Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment: Rethinking the Current Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Mondragón-Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is defined by the concurrence of accumulation of abnormal aggregates composed of two proteins: Amyloid beta (Aβ and tau, and of cellular changes including neurite degeneration and loss of neurons and cognitive functions. Based on their strong association with disease, genetically and pathologically, it is not surprising that there has been a focus towards developing therapies against the aggregated structures. Unfortunately, current therapies have but mild benefit. With this in mind we will focus on the relationship of synaptic plasticity with Aβ and tau protein and their role as potential targets for the development of therapeutic drugs. Finally, we will provide perspectives in developing a multifactorial strategy for AD treatment.

  17. Rationally Designed Peptides and Peptidomimetics as Inhibitors of Amyloid-β (Aβ) Aggregation: Potential Therapeutics of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Deepti; Shuaib, Suniba; Mann, Sukhmani; Goyal, Bhupesh

    2017-02-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with no clinically accepted treatment to cure or halt its progression. The worldwide effort to develop peptide-based inhibitors of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation can be considered an unplanned combinatorial experiment. An understanding of what has been done and achieved may advance our understanding of AD pathology and the discovery of effective therapeutic agents. We review here the history of such peptide-based inhibitors, including those based on the Aβ sequence and those not derived from that sequence, containing both natural and unnatural amino acid building blocks. Peptide-based aggregation inhibitors hold significant promise for future AD therapy owing to their high selectivity, effectiveness, low toxicity, good tolerance, low accumulation in tissues, high chemical and biological diversity, possibility of rational design, and highly developed methods for analyzing their mode of action, proteolytic stability (modified peptides), and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability.

  18. CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease concord with amyloid-β PET and predict clinical progression: A study of fully automated immunoassays in BioFINDER and ADNI cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Oskar; Seibyl, John; Stomrud, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Trojanowski, John Q; Bittner, Tobias; Lifke, Valeria; Corradini, Veronika; Eichenlaub, Udo; Batrla, Richard; Buck, Katharina; Zink, Katharina; Rabe, Christina; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M

    2018-03-01

    We studied whether fully automated Elecsys cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoassay results were concordant with positron emission tomography (PET) and predicted clinical progression, even with cutoffs established in an independent cohort. Cutoffs for Elecsys amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ), total tau/Aβ(1-42), and phosphorylated tau/Aβ(1-42) were defined against [ 18 F]flutemetamol PET in Swedish BioFINDER (n = 277) and validated against [ 18 F]florbetapir PET in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 646). Clinical progression in patients with mild cognitive impairment (n = 619) was studied. CSF total tau/Aβ(1-42) and phosphorylated tau/Aβ(1-42) ratios were highly concordant with PET classification in BioFINDER (overall percent agreement: 90%; area under the curve: 94%). The CSF biomarker statuses established by predefined cutoffs were highly concordant with PET classification in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (overall percent agreement: 89%-90%; area under the curves: 96%) and predicted greater 2-year clinical decline in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Strikingly, tau/Aβ ratios were as accurate as semiquantitative PET image assessment in predicting visual read-based outcomes. Elecsys CSF biomarker assays may provide reliable alternatives to PET in Alzheimer's disease diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Traffic jam at the blood-brain barrier promotes greater accumulation of Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β proteins in the cerebral vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyare, Edward K; Leonard, Sarah R; Curran, Geoffry L; Yu, Caroline C; Lowe, Val J; Paravastu, Anant K; Poduslo, Joseph F; Kandimalla, Karunya K

    2013-05-06

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain vasculature results in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), which occurs in about 80% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. While Aβ42 predominates parenchymal amyloid plaques in AD brain, Aβ40 is prevalent in the cerebrovascular amyloid. Dutch mutation of Aβ40 (E22Q) promotes aggressive cerebrovascular accumulation and leads to severe CAA in the mutation carriers; knowledge of how DutchAβ40 drives this process more efficiently than Aβ40 could reveal various pathophysiological events that promote CAA. In this study we have demonstrated that DutchAβ40 shows preferential accumulation in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) endothelial cells due to its inefficient blood-to-brain transcytosis. Consequently, DutchAβ40 establishes a permeation barrier in the BBB endothelium, prevents its own clearance from the brain, and promotes the formation of amyloid deposits in the cerebral microvessels. The BBB endothelial accumulation of native Aβ40 is not robust enough to exercise such a significant impact on its brain clearance. Hence, the cerebrovascular accumulation of Aβ40 is slow and may require other copathologies to precipitate into CAA. In conclusion, the magnitude of Aβ accumulation in the BBB endothelial cells is a critical factor that promotes CAA; hence, clearing vascular endothelium of Aβ proteins may halt or even reverse CAA.

  20. Traffic Jam at the Blood Brain Barrier Promotes Greater Accumulation of Alzheimer’s Disease Amyloid-β Proteins in the Cerebral Vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyare, Edward K.; Leonard, Sarah R.; Curran, Geoffry L.; Yu, Caroline C.; Lowe, Val J.; Paravastu, Anant K.; Poduslo, Joseph F.; Kandimalla, Karunya K.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain vasculature results in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), which occurs in about 80% of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. While Aβ42 predominates parenchymal amyloid plaques in AD brain, Aβ40 is prevalent in the cerebrovascular amyloid. Dutch mutation of Aβ40 (E22Q) promotes aggressive cerebrovascular accumulation and leads to severe CAA in the mutation carriers; knowledge of how DutchAβ40 drives this process more efficiently than Aβ40 could reveal various pathophysiological events that promote CAA. In this study we have demonstrated that DutchAβ40 show preferential accumulation in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) endothelial cells due to its inefficient blood-to-brain transcytosis. Consequently, DutchAβ40 establishes a permeation barrier in the BBB endothelium, prevents its own clearance from the brain and promotes the formation of amyloid deposits in the cerebral microvessels. The BBB endothelial accumulation of native Aβ40 is not robust enough to exercise such a significant impact on its brain clearance. Hence, the cerebrovascular accumulation of Aβ40 is slow and may require other co-pathologies to precipitate into CAA. In conclusion, the magnitude of Aβ accumulation in the BBB endothelial cells is a critical factor that promotes CAA; hence, clearing vascular endothelium of Aβ proteins may halt or even reverse CAA. PMID:23249146

  1. Neurons derived from sporadic Alzheimer's disease iPSCs reveal elevated TAU hyperphosphorylation, increased amyloid levels, and GSK3B activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ochalek, Anna; Mihalik, Balázs; Avci, Hasan X.

    2017-01-01

    , our aim was to establish an in vitro cell model based on patient-specific human neurons to study the pathomechanism of sporadic AD. Methods: We compared neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines of patients with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (fAD), all caused......, a physiological kinase of TAU, in neurons derived from AD iPSCs, as well as significant upregulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) synthesis and APP carboxy-terminal fragment cleavage. Moreover, elevated sensitivity to oxidative stress, as induced by amyloid oligomers or peroxide, was detected in both f...

  2. Proposal for novel curcumin derivatives as potent inhibitors against Alzheimer's disease: Ab initio molecular simulations on the specific interactions between amyloid-beta peptide and curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shintaro; Fujimori, Mitsuki; Ishimura, Hiromi; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2017-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain is closely related with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, we propose novel curcumin derivatives and investigate their binding properties with the amyloid precursor protein (APP), using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations. Our proposed derivative (curcumin XIV) is found to have a large binding energy with APP and interacts strongly with the cleavage site Ala19 by secretase. It is thus expected that curcumin XIV can protect APP from the secretase attack and be a potent inhibitor against the production of Aβ peptides.

  3. Evaluation of intrathecal serum amyloid P (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) synthesis in Alzheimer's disease with the use of index values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, S.D.; Hack, C.E.; van der Flier, W.M.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Veerhuis, R.

    2010-01-01

    Serum amyloid P (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are proteins involved in innate immunity. The expression of SAP and CRP is increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue, compared to healthy controls. Although both proteins are found in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), their origin is unclear. We

  4. [Immunization witha synthetic fragment 155-164 of neurotrophin receptor p75 prevents memory loss and decreases beta-amyloid level in mice with experimentally induced Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vol'pina, O M; Medvinskaia, N I; Kamynina, A V; Zaporozhskaia, Ia V; Aleksandrova, I Iu; Koroev, D O; Samokhin, A N; Volkova, T D; Arsen'ev, A S; Bobkova, N V

    2014-01-01

    Neurotoxic beta-amyloid peptide plays an important role in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. In aggregated form it binds to several proteins on the surface of the brain cells leading to their death. p75 receptor in- volved in supporting of cell balance is one of the targets for toxic beta-amyloid. We proposed that induction of antibodies against potential binding sites of p75 with beta-amyloid can be a promising approach towards new drug development for Alzheimer's disease therapy. Four potentially immunoactive fragments of p75 were chosen and chemically synthesized. Investigation of immunoprotective effect of the peptide fragments carried out in mice with experimentally induced form of Alzheimer's disease helped to reveal two fragments effectively preserving murine memory from impairment. Results obtained by ELISA biochemical analysis showed that only immunization with fragment p75 155-164 led to significant decrease in beta-amyloid level in the brain of the experimental mice. Thus, immunization with both fragments of p75 receptor is believed to be an effective tool for the development of new drugs against Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Ellipsometric Immunosensor for Detection of Amyloid Precursor Protein with a View of Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Nabok

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The detection of amyloid precursor protein isoform 770 (APP770 was achieved with the use of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE in a direct immunoassay format with DE2 monoclonal antibodies raised against the β amyloid peptide 1-16 (Aβ 1-16 which is a part of APP770. DE2 antibodies were immobilised on the surface of gold by electrostatic binding to a layer of (polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH via an intermediate layer of Protein G molecules. TIRE spectra were recorded after adsorption (binding of every molecular layer in a sequence of PAH, Protein G, DE2, and APP770. A noticeable increase in the adsorbed layer thickness was obtained upon binding of APP770 molecules from its solution of unknown concentration in Complete Medium, a complex mixture containing other proteins. For a purpose of TIRE biosensor calibration, complementary quartz crystal microbalance (QCM measurements were utilised and allowed the evaluation of surface concentrations of DE2 and APP770 of 1.08.1011 cm-2 and 4.73.1012 cm-2, respectively.

  6. Treadmill exercise improves short-term memory by enhancing neurogenesis in amyloid beta-induced Alzheimer disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-Kyun; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Baek, Sang-Bin; Ko, Yeong-Chan; Kim, Young-Pyo

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most devastating neurodegenerative disorders, and this disease is characterized by severe memory impairment and decline of cognition. Hippocampal neurons are vulnerable to injury induced by Alzheimer's disease. Physical exercise is known to promote cell survival and functional recovery after brain injuries. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on short-term memory in relation with neurogenesis in the rats with amyloid β25-35 (Aβ25-35)-induced Alzheimer's disease. The rat model of Alzheimer's disease was induced by the intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ25-35, using a stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the exercise group were forced to run on a treadmill for 30 min once daily for 4 consecutive weeks, starting 2 days after Aβ25-35 injection. Presently, short-term memory was deteriorated and apical dendritic length in the hippocampus was shortened in the hippocampus by Aβ25-35 injection. In contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated memory impairment and increased apical dendritic length in the Aβ25-35-injected rats. Neurogenesis and brain-derived neurotorphic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (trkB) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by Aβ25-35 injection. Treadmill exercise increased neurogenesis and expressions of BDNF and trkB expressions. The present study shows that treadmill exercise may provide therapeutic value for the alleviating symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Amyloid beta-mediated epigenetic alteration of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 controls cell survival in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Eun Nam; Lyu, Dahyun; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck

    2014-01-01

    Swedish double mutation (KM670/671NL) of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is reported to increase toxic amyloid β (Aβ) production via aberrant cleavage at the β-secretase site and thereby cause early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to AD pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Previously, our transcriptome sequence analyses revealed global expressional modifications of over 600 genes in APP-Swedish mutant-expressing H4 (H4-sw) cells compared to wild type H4 cells. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) is one gene that showed significantly decreased mRNA expression in H4-sw cells. In this study, we investigated the functional role of IGFBP3 in AD pathogenesis and elucidated the mechanisms regulating its expression. We observed decreased IGFBP3 expression in the H4-sw cell line as well as the hippocampus of AD model transgenic mice. Treatment with exogenous IGFBP3 protein inhibited Aβ1-42- induced cell death and caspase-3 activity, whereas siRNA-mediated suppression of IGFBP3 expression induced cell death and caspase-3 cleavage. In primary hippocampal neurons, administration of IGFBP3 protein blocked apoptotic cell death due to Aβ1-42 toxicity. These data implicate a protective role for IGFBP3 against Aβ1-42-mediated apoptosis. Next, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms of IGFBP3 expression in AD pathogenesis. We observed abnormal IGFBP3 hypermethylation within the promoter CpG island in H4-sw cells. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored IGFBP3 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Chronic exposure to Aβ1-42 induced IGFBP3 hypermethylation at CpGs, particularly at loci -164 and -173, and subsequently suppressed IGFBP3 expression. Therefore, we demonstrate that expression of anti-apoptotic IGFBP3 is regulated by epigenetic DNA methylation, suggesting a mechanism that contributes to AD pathogenesis.

  8. Immunosensor for diagnosis of Alzheimer disease using amyloid-β 1-40 peptide and silk fibroin thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, J M; Lima, L R; Moraes, M L; Ribeiro, S J L

    2016-11-01

    Layer-by-Layer (LbL) films containing silk fibroin (SF) and the 40 aminoacid-long amyloid-β peptide (Aβ1-40) were prepared with the purpose of developing a new prototype of an electrochemical immunosensor. The film showed a satisfactory growth in quartz substrate and screen-printed carbon electrodes, as observed by UV-vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric, respectively. The peptide immobilized in LbL films in junction with SF shows secondary structure induced, as shown by circular dichroism measurements, favoring the interaction SF/peptide LbL film with the specific antibody. Immunosensor showed a linear response in the presence of the antibody with concentrations from 0 to 10ngmL(-1) both analyzed by current changes in 0.3V and voltammogram area. This system can be applied as a new prototype for preliminary diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Intracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta - a predictor for synaptic dysfunction and neuron loss in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Bayer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite of long-standing evidence that beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides have detrimental effects on synaptic function, the relationship between Aβ, synaptic and neuron loss is largely unclear. During the last years there is growing evidence that early intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ peptides is one of the key events leading to synaptic and neuronal dysfunction. Many studies have been carried out using transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD which have been proven to be valuable model system in modern AD research. The present review discusses the impact of intraneuronal Aβ accumulation on synaptic impairment and neuron loss and provides an overview of currently available AD mouse models showing these pathological alterations.

  10. Nonsteroidal Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators and Selective Estrogen Receptor β Agonists Moderate Cognitive Deficits and Amyloid-β Levels in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Decreases of the sex steroids, testosterone and estrogen, are associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Testosterone and estrogen supplementation improves cognitive deficits in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease. Sex hormones play a role in the regulation of amyloid-β via induction of the amyloid-β degrading enzymes neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme. To mimic the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT), we administered a selective androgen receptor agonist, ACP-105, alone and in combination with the selective estrogen receptor β (ERβ) agonist AC-186 to male gonadectomized triple transgenic mice. We assessed long-term spatial memory in the Morris water maze, spontaneous locomotion, and anxiety-like behavior in the open field and in the elevated plus maze. We found that ACP-105 given alone decreases anxiety-like behavior. Furthermore, when ACP-105 is administered in combination with AC-186, they increase the amyloid-β degrading enzymes neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme and decrease amyloid-β levels in the brain as well as improve cognition. Interestingly, the androgen receptor level in the brain was increased by chronic treatment with the same combination treatment, ACP-105 and AC-186, not seen with DHT or ACP-105 alone. Based on these results, the beneficial effect of the selective ERβ agonist as a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer’s disease warrants further investigation. PMID:24020966

  11. APOE allele frequencies in suspected non-amyloid pathophysiology (SNAP and the prodromal stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Hohman

    Full Text Available Biomarker definitions for preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD have identified individuals with neurodegeneration (ND+ without β-amyloidosis (Aβ- and labeled them with suspected non-AD pathophysiology (SNAP. We evaluated Apolipoprotein E (APOE ε2 and ε4 allele frequencies across biomarker definitions-Aβ-/ND- (n = 268, Aβ+/ND- (n = 236, Aβ-/ND+ or SNAP (n = 78, Aβ+/ND+ (n = 204-hypothesizing that SNAP would have an APOE profile comparable to Aβ-/ND-. Using AD Neuroimaging Initiative data (n = 786, 72±7 years, 48% female, amyloid status (Aβ+ or Aβ- was defined by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF Aβ-42 levels, and neurodegeneration status (ND+ or ND- was defined by hippocampal volume from MRI. Binary logistic regression related biomarker status to APOE ε2 and ε4 allele carrier status, adjusting for age, sex, education, and cognitive diagnosis. Compared to the biomarker negative (Aβ-/ND- participants, higher proportions of ε4 and lower proportions of ε2 carriers were observed among Aβ+/ND- (ε4: OR = 6.23, p0.30. In supplemental analyses, comparable results were observed when coding SNAP using amyloid imaging and when using CSF tau levels. In contrast to APOE, a polygenic risk score for AD that excluded APOE did not show an association with amyloidosis or neurodegeneration (p-values>0.15, but did show an association with SNAP defined using CSF tau (β = 0.004, p = 0.02. Thus, in a population with low levels of cerebrovascular disease and a lower prevalence of SNAP than the general population, APOE and known genetic drivers of AD do not appear to contribute to the neurodegeneration observed in SNAP. Additional work in population based samples is needed to better elucidate the genetic contributors to various etiological drivers of SNAP.

  12. Interleukin-1β mediated amyloid plaque clearance is independent of CCR2 signaling in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Escalera, Fátima; Matousek, Sarah B; Ghosh, Simantini; Olschowka, John A; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is a key component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Particularly, the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is upregulated in human AD and believed to promote amyloid plaque deposition. However, studies from our laboratory have shown that chronic IL-1β overexpression in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mouse model of AD ameliorates amyloid pathology, increases plaque-associated microglia, and induces recruitment of peripheral immune cells to the brain parenchyma. To investigate the contribution of CCR2 signaling in IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance, seven month-old APP/PS1/CCR2(-/-) mice were intrahippocampally transduced with a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 containing the cleaved form of human IL-1β (rAAV2-IL-1β). Four weeks after rAAV2-IL-1β transduction, we found significant reductions in 6E10 and Congo red staining of amyloid plaques that was confirmed by decreased levels of insoluble Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-40 in the inflamed hippocampus. Bone marrow chimeric studies confirmed the presence of infiltrating immune cells following IL-1β overexpression and revealed that dramatic reduction of CCR2(+) peripheral mononuclear cell recruitment to the inflamed hippocampus did not prevent the ability of IL-1β to induce amyloid plaque clearance. These results suggest that infiltrating CCR2(+) monocytes do not contribute to IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Amyloid Imaging: Poised for Integration into Medical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Keshav; Sabbagh, Marwan

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid imaging represents a significant advance as an adjunct in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) because it is the first imaging modality that identifies in vivo changes known to be associated with the pathogenesis. Initially, 11 C-PIB was developed, which was the prototype for many 18 F compounds, including florbetapir, florbetaben, and flutemetamol, among others. Despite the high sensitivity and specificity of amyloid imaging, it is not commonly used in clinical practice, mainly because it is not reimbursed under current Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines in the USA. To guide the field in who would be most appropriate for the utility of amyloid positron emission tomography, current studies are underway [Imaging Dementia Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS) Study] that will inform the field on the utilization of amyloid positron emission tomography in clinical practice. With the advent of monoclonal antibodies that specifically target amyloid antibody, there is an interest, possibly a mandate, to screen potential treatment recipients to ensure that they are suitable for treatment. In this review, we summarize progress in the field to date.

  14. Infrared Probe Technique Reveals a Millipede-like Structure for Aβ(8-28) Amyloid Fibril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yachao; Zou, Ye; Ma, Yan; Wang, Dan; Sun, Ying; Ma, Gang

    2016-02-02

    Amyloid fibrils are unique fibrous polypeptide aggregates. They have been associated with more than 20 serious human diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Besides their pathological significance, amyloid fibrils are also gaining increasing attention as emerging nanomaterials with novel functions. Structural characterization of amyloid fibril is no doubt fundamentally important for the development of therapeutics for amyloid-related diseases and for the rational design of amyloid-based materials. In this study, we explored to use side-chain-based infrared (IR) probe to gain detailed structural insights into the amyloid fibril by a 21-residue model amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ(8-28). We first proposed an approach to incorporate thiocyanate (SCN) IR probe in a site-specific manner into amyloidogenic peptide using 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate as cyanylating agent. Using this approach, we obtained three Aβ(8-28) variants, labeled with SCN probe at three different positions. We then showed with thioflavin T fluorescence assay, Congo red assay, and atomic force microscopy that the three labeled Aβ(8-28) peptides can quickly form amyloid fibrils under high concentration and high salt conditions. Finally, we performed a detailed IR spectral analysis of the Aβ(8-28) fibril in both amide I and probe regions and proposed a millipede-like structure for the Aβ(8-28) fibril.

  15. Large proteins have a great tendency to aggregate but a low propensity to form amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ramshini

    Full Text Available The assembly of soluble proteins into ordered fibrillar aggregates with cross-β structure is an essential event of many human diseases. The polypeptides undergoing aggregation are generally small in size. To explore if the small size is a primary determinant for the formation of amyloids under pathological conditions we have created two databases of proteins, forming amyloid-related and non-amyloid deposits in human diseases, respectively. The size distributions of the two protein populations are well separated, with the systems forming non-amyloid deposits appearing significantly larger. We have then investigated the propensity of the 486-residue hexokinase-B from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (YHKB to form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. This size is intermediate between the size distributions of amyloid and non-amyloid forming proteins. Aggregation was induced under conditions known to be most effective for amyloid formation by normally globular proteins: (i low pH with salts, (ii pH 5.5 with trifluoroethanol. In both situations YHKB aggregated very rapidly into species with significant β-sheet structure, as detected using circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction, but a weak Thioflavin T and Congo red binding. Moreover, atomic force microscopy indicated a morphology distinct from typical amyloid fibrils. Both types of aggregates were cytotoxic to human neuroblastoma cells, as indicated by the MTT assay. This analysis indicates that large proteins have a high tendency to form toxic aggregates, but low propensity to form regular amyloid in vivo and that such a behavior is intrinsically determined by the size of the protein, as suggested by the in vitro analysis of our sample protein.

  16. Key aromatic/hydrophobic amino acids controlling a cross-amyloid peptide interaction versus amyloid self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakou, Maria; Hille, Kathleen; Kracklauer, Michael; Spanopoulou, Anna; Frost, Christina V; Malideli, Eleni; Yan, Li-Mei; Caporale, Andrea; Zacharias, Martin; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of the intrinsically disordered polypeptide islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), which is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), with the Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide modulates their self-assembly into amyloid fibrils and may link the pathogeneses of these two cell-degenerative diseases. However, the molecular determinants of this interaction remain elusive. Using a systematic alanine scan approach, fluorescence spectroscopy, and other biophysical methods, including heterocomplex pulldown assays, far-UV CD spectroscopy, the thioflavin T binding assay, transmission EM, and molecular dynamics simulations, here we identified single aromatic/hydrophobic residues within the amyloid core IAPP region as hot spots or key residues of its cross-interaction with Aβ40(42) peptide. Importantly, we also find that none of these residues in isolation plays a key role in IAPP self-assembly, whereas simultaneous substitution of four aromatic/hydrophobic residues with Ala dramatically impairs both IAPP self-assembly and hetero-assembly with Aβ40(42). Furthermore, our experiments yielded several novel IAPP analogs, whose sequences are highly similar to that of IAPP but have distinct amyloid self- or cross-interaction potentials. The identified similarities and major differences controlling IAPP cross-peptide interaction with Aβ40(42) versus its amyloid self-assembly offer a molecular basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms. We propose that these insights will aid in designing intervention strategies and novel IAPP analogs for the management of type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, or other diseases related to IAPP dysfunction or cross-amyloid interactions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Computational Modelling of the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby

    2014-01-01

    of a specific protein into amyloid fibrils. During this process, a cytotoxic event occurs which can be a serious actor in the evolvement of the disease. This thesis is concerned with elucidating the biological processes concerning amyloid proteins, more specifically, the peptide hormone human islet amyloid...... setup. We have exploited these strengths to study the interactions between an amyloid fibril and amyloid imaging agents. Imaging agents are promising tools for the detection of amyloid deposits in the brain of AD patients. This could aid in the early diagnosis as well as evaluation of new treatments......When proteins do not fold correctly, it can lead to very serious diseases. One such group of diseases is the amyloid diseases, of which Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are members. The amyloid diseases are characterized by the aggregation...

  18. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  19. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  20. In vivo changes in microglial activation and amyloid deposits in brain regions with hypometabolism in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokokura, Masamichi; Mori, Norio; Yoshihara, Yujiro; Wakuda, Tomoyasu; Takebayashi, Kiyokazu; Iwata, Yasuhide; Nakamura, Kazuhiko [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Hamamatsu (Japan); Yagi, Shunsuke; Ouchi, Yasuomi [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Laboratory of Human Imaging Research, Molecular Imaging Frontier Research Center, Hamamatsu (Japan); Yoshikawa, Etsuji [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu (Japan); Kikuchi, Mitsuru [Kanazawa University, Department of Psychiatry and Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Sugihara, Genichi; Suda, Shiro; Tsuchiya, Kenji J.; Suzuki, Katsuaki [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Research Center for Child Mental Development, Hamamatsu (Japan); Ueki, Takatoshi [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Hamamatsu (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Amyloid {beta} protein (A{beta}) is known as a pathological substance in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is assumed to coexist with a degree of activated microglia in the brain. However, it remains unclear whether these two events occur in parallel with characteristic hypometabolism in AD in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the in vivo relationship between A{beta} accumulation and neuroinflammation in those specific brain regions in early AD. Eleven nootropic drug-naive AD patients underwent a series of positron emission tomography (PET) measurements with [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195, [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]FDG and a battery of cognitive tests within the same day. The binding potentials (BPs) of [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 were directly compared with those of [{sup 11}C]PIB in the brain regions with reduced glucose metabolism. BPs of [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 and [{sup 11}C]PIB were significantly higher in the parietotemporal regions of AD patients than in ten healthy controls. In AD patients, there was a negative correlation between dementia score and [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 BPs, but not [{sup 11}C]PIB, in the limbic, precuneus and prefrontal regions. Direct comparisons showed a significant negative correlation between [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 and [{sup 11}C]PIB BPs in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) (p < 0.05, corrected) that manifested the most severe reduction in [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake. A lack of coupling between microglial activation and amyloid deposits may indicate that A{beta} accumulation shown by [{sup 11}C]PIB is not always the primary cause of microglial activation, but rather the negative correlation present in the PCC suggests that microglia can show higher activation during the production of A{beta} in early AD. (orig.)

  1. Amyloid plaque formation precedes dendritic spine loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Tobias; Burgold, Steffen; Dorostkar, Mario M; Fuhrmann, Martin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Schmidt, Boris; Kretzschmar, Hans; Herms, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid-beta plaque deposition represents a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. While numerous studies have described dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques, much less is known about the kinetics of these processes. In particular, the question as to whether synapse loss precedes or follows plaque formation remains unanswered. To address this question, and to learn more about the underlying kinetics, we simultaneously imaged amyloid plaque deposition and dendritic spine loss by applying two-photon in vivo microscopy through a cranial window in double transgenic APPPS1 mice. As a result, we first observed that the rate of dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques is the same in both young and aged animals. However, plaque size only increased significantly in the young cohort, indicating that spine loss persists even many months after initial plaque appearance. Tracking the fate of individual spines revealed that net spine loss is caused by increased spine elimination, with the rate of spine formation remaining constant. Imaging of dendritic spines before and during plaque formation demonstrated that spine loss around plaques commences at least 4 weeks after initial plaque formation. In conclusion, spine loss occurs, shortly but with a significant time delay, after the birth of new plaques, and persists in the vicinity of amyloid plaques over many months. These findings hence give further hope to the possibility that there is a therapeutic window between initial amyloid plaque deposition and the onset of structural damage at spines.

  2. Wild-type hen egg white lysozyme aggregation in vitro can form self-seeding amyloid conformational variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, Vishwanath; Prasanna, Nalla Lakshmi; Sharma, Neetu; Prasad, Archana; Patel, Basant K

    2016-12-01

    Misfolded β-sheet-rich protein aggregates termed amyloid, deposit in vivo leading to debilitating diseases such as Alzheimer's, prion and renal amyloidosis diseases etc. Strikingly, amyloid can induce conversion of their natively folded monomers into similarly aggregated conformation via 'seeding'. The specificity of seeding is well documented in vivo for prions, where prion-variants arising from conformationally altered amyloids of the same protein, faithfully seed monomers into amyloid displaying the original variant's conformation. Thus far, amyloid variant formation is reported only for a few non-prion proteins like Alzheimer's Aβ42-peptide and β-2 microglobulin, however, their conformational cross-seeding capabilities are unexplored. While mutant human lysozyme causes renal amyloidosis, the hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) has been extensively investigated in vitro as a model amyloid protein. Here we investigated if wild-type HEWL could form self-seeding amyloid variants to examine if variant formation is more wide-spread. We found that HEWL aggregates formed under quiescent versus agitated conditions, displayed different particle sizes, detergent stabilities & β-sheet content, and they only seeded monomeric HEWL under similar incubation conditions, but not under swapped incubation conditions thereby showing amyloid variant formation by HEWL analogous to prion variants. This may have implications to the amyloidosis caused by different mutants of human lysozyme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A bifunctional curcumin analogue for two-photon imaging and inhibiting crosslinking of amyloid beta in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Tian, Yanli; Yuan, Peng; Li, Yuyan; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Grutzendler, Jaime; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2014-10-09

    In this report, we designed a highly bright bifunctional curcumin analogue CRANAD-28. In vivo two-photon imaging suggested that CRANAD-28 could penetrate the blood brain barrier (BBB) and label plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathies (CAAs). We also demonstrated that this imaging probe could inhibit the crosslinking of amyloid beta induced either by copper or by natural conditions.

  4. Inhibition of Src kinase activity attenuates amyloid associated microgliosis in a murine model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhawan Gunjan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglial activation is an important histologic characteristic of the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. One hypothesis is that amyloid beta (Aβ peptide serves as a specific stimulus for tyrosine kinase-based microglial activation leading to pro-inflammatory changes that contribute to disease. Therefore, inhibiting Aβ stimulation of microglia may prove to be an important therapeutic strategy for AD. Methods Primary murine microglia cultures and the murine microglia cell line, BV2, were used for stimulation with fibrillar Aβ1-42. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, dasatinib, was used to treat the cells to determine whether Src family kinase activity was required for the Aβ stimulated signaling response and subsequent increase in TNFα secretion using Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, respectively. A histologic longitudinal analysis was performed using an AD transgenic mouse model, APP/PS1, to determine an age at which microglial protein tyrosine kinase levels increased in order to administer dasatinib via mini osmotic pump diffusion. Effects of dasatinib administration on microglial and astroglial activation, protein phosphotyrosine levels, active Src kinase levels, Aβ plaque deposition, and spatial working memory were assessed via immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and T maze analysis. Results Aβ fibrils stimulated primary murine microglia via a tyrosine kinase pathway involving Src kinase that was attenuated by dasatinib. Dasatinib administration to APP/PS1 mice decreased protein phosphotyrosine, active Src, reactive microglia, and TNFα levels in the hippocampus and temporal cortex. The drug had no effect on GFAP levels, Aβ plaque load, or the related tyrosine kinase, Lyn. These anti-inflammatory changes correlated with improved performance on the T maze test in dasatinib infused animals compared to control animals. Conclusions These data suggest that amyloid

  5. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquiza Sablón-Carrazana

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP:NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17-42 and Aβ16-21:NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the

  6. Increased serum amyloid A and its association with autoantibodies, acute phase reactants and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Sun, Xu-Guo; Liu, Na; Mu, Yun; Hong, Cheng-Cheng; Wei, Wei; Zheng, Fang

    2015-02-01

    Determination of disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has become an important component for RA management. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between circulating levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) and disease activity in RA patients. The types of disease and the respective number of patients enrolled in the present study were as follows: RA, 88; osteoarthritis (OA), 54; systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 43; and other autoimmune diseases, 30, as well as 50 healthy controls (HC). SAA levels were measured using an ELISA assay and western blot analysis was used to detect serum SAA levels. The correlations between SAA levels and disease activity score for 28 joints (DAS28), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C‑reactive protein (CRP), respectively, were evaluated; in addition, the presence and absence of rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti‑cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti‑CCP) were detected in respect to SAA levels. The results of the present study demonstrated that serum levels of SAA in RA patients were significantly increased compared to those of the OA, SLE, others and HC patients (P<0.05). SAA levels were found to be positively correlated with DAS28, ESR and CRP levels (R2=0.6174, 0.4422 and 0.3919, respectively). In addition, anti‑CCP was not correlated with DAS28 (R2=0.0154). Furthermore, increased SAA levels were detected in patients with positive anti‑CCP compared with those in anti‑CCP negative subjects (P<0.01). In conclusion, the results of the present study provided further evidence for possible roles of SAA in RA, which indicated that it may be a useful biomarker for assessing disease severity and may provide additional information about disease activity.

  7. Atypical Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with PrP-amyloid plaques in white matter: molecular characterization and transmission to bank voles show the M1 strain signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Marcello; Saverioni, Daniela; Di Bari, Michele; Baiardi, Simone; Lemstra, Afina Willemina; Pirisinu, Laura; Capellari, Sabina; Rozemuller, Annemieke; Nonno, Romolo; Parchi, Piero

    2017-11-23

    Amyloid plaques formed by abnormal prion protein (PrP Sc ) aggregates occur with low frequency in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, but represent a pathological hallmark of three relatively rare disease histotypes, namely variant CJD, sporadic CJDMV2K (methionine/valine at PRNP codon 129, PrP Sc type 2 and kuru-type amyloid plaques) and iatrogenic CJDMMiK (MM at codon 129, PrP Sc of intermediate type and kuru plaques). According to recent studies, however, PrP-amyloid plaques involving the subcortical and deep nuclei white matter may also rarely occur in CJDMM1 (MM at codon 129 and PrP Sc type 1), the most common CJD histotype.To further characterize the phenotype of atypical CJDMM1 with white matter plaques (p-CJDMM1) and unravel the basis of amyloid plaque formation in such cases, we compared clinical and histopathological features and PrP Sc physico-chemical properties between 5 p-CJDMM1 and 8 typical CJDMM1 brains lacking plaques. Furthermore, transmission properties after bioassay in two genetic lines of bank voles were also explored in the two groups.All 5 p-CJDMM1 cases had a disease duration longer than one year. Three cases were classified as sporadic CJDMM1, one as sporadic CJDMM1 + 2C and one as genetic CJDE200K-MM1. Molecular mass, protease sensitivity and thermo-solubilization of PrP Sc aggregates did not differ between p-CJDMM1 and classical CJDMM1 cases. Likewise, transmission properties such as incubation time, lesion profile and PrP Sc properties in bank voles also matched in the two groups.The present data further define the clinical-pathologic phenotype of p-CJDMM1, definitely establish it as a distinctive CJD histotype and demonstrate that PrP-plaque formation in this histotype is not a strain-specific feature. Since cases lacking amyloid plaques may also manifest a prolonged (i.e. > than one year) disease course, unidentified, host-specific factors likely play a significant role, in addition to disease duration, in generating white matter PrP-amyloid

  8. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  9. Genistein ameliorates learning and memory deficits in amyloid β(1-40) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Maryam; Joghataei, Mohammad-Taghi; Mohseni, Simin; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2011-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by increased β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition and neuronal dysfunction leading to impaired learning and recall. Ageing, heredity, and induced oxidative stress are among proposed risk factors. The increased frequency of the disease in women also suggests a role for estrogen in development of AD. In the present study, effects of the phytoestrogen genistein (10mg/kg) on learning and memory impairments was assessed in intrahippocampal Aβ(1-40)-injected rats. The estrogen receptor antagonist fulvestrant was injected intracerebroventricularly in a group of Aβ-lesioned rats. The Aβ-injected animals exhibited the following: lower spontaneous alternation score in Y-maze tasks, impaired retention and recall capability in the passive avoidance test, and fewer correct choices and more errors in the RAM task. Genistein, but not genistein and fulvestrant, significantly improved most of these parameters. Measurements of oxidative stress markers in hippocampal tissue of Aβ-injected rats showed an elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrite content, and a reduction of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Genistein significantly attenuated the increased MDA content but did not affect the nitrite content or SOD activity. These results indicate that genistein pretreatment ameliorates Aβ-induced impairment of short-term spatial memory in rats through an estrogenic pathway and by inducing attenuation of oxidative stress. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acceleration of Amyloidosis by Inflammation in the Amyloid-Beta Marmoset Monkey Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Ingrid H.; Ormel, Paul R.; Baarends, Guus; Johansson, Maja; Remarque, Ed J.; Doverskog, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Background: The immune system is increasingly mentioned as a potential target for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) treatment. Objective: In the present pilot study, the effect of (neuro)inflammation on amyloidopathy was investigated in the marmoset monkey, which has potential as an AD animal model due to its natural cerebral amyloidosis similar to humans. Methods: Six adult/aged marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were intracranial injected with amyloid-beta (Aβ) fibrils at three cortical locations in the right hemisphere. Additionally, in half of the monkeys, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was co-injected with the Aβ fibrils and injected in the other hemisphere without Aβ fibrils. The other three monkeys received phosphate buffered saline instead of LPS, as a control for the inflammatory state. The effect of inflammation on amyloidopathy was also investigated in an additional monkey that suffered from chronic inflammatory wasting syndrome. Mirror histology sections were analyzed to assess amyloidopathy and immune reaction, and peripheral blood for AD biomarker expression. Results: All LPS-injected monkeys showed an early AD immune blood cell expression profile on CD95 and CD45RA. Two out of three monkeys injected with Aβ and LPS and the additional monkey, suffering from chronic inflammation, developed plaques. None of the controls, injected with Aβ only, developed any plaques. Conclusion: This study shows the importance of immune modulation on the susceptibility for amyloidosis, a hallmark of AD, which offers new perspectives for disease modifying approaches in AD. PMID:27662314

  11. Acceleration of Amyloidosis by Inflammation in the Amyloid-Beta Marmoset Monkey Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Ingrid H; Ormel, Paul R; Baarends, Guus; Johansson, Maja; Remarque, Ed J; Doverskog, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is increasingly mentioned as a potential target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment. In the present pilot study, the effect of (neuro)inflammation on amyloidopathy was investigated in the marmoset monkey, which has potential as an AD animal model due to its natural cerebral amyloidosis similar to humans. Six adult/aged marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were intracranial injected with amyloid-beta (Aβ) fibrils at three cortical locations in the right hemisphere. Additionally, in half of the monkeys, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was co-injected with the Aβ fibrils and injected in the other hemisphere without Aβ fibrils. The other three monkeys received phosphate buffered saline instead of LPS, as a control for the inflammatory state. The effect of inflammation on amyloidopathy was also investigated in an additional monkey that suffered from chronic inflammatory wasting syndrome. Mirror histology sections were analyzed to assess amyloidopathy and immune reaction, and peripheral blood for AD biomarker expression. All LPS-injected monkeys showed an early AD immune blood cell expression profile on CD95 and CD45RA. Two out of three monkeys injected with Aβ and LPS and the additional monkey, suffering from chronic inflammation, developed plaques. None of the controls, injected with Aβ only, developed any plaques. This study shows the importance of immune modulation on the susceptibility for amyloidosis, a hallmark of AD, which offers new perspectives for disease modifying approaches in AD.

  12. Amyloid-β peptide-specific DARPins as a novel class of potential therapeutics for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanenberg, Michael; McAfoose, Jordan; Kulic, Luka; Welt, Tobias; Wirth, Fabian; Parizek, Petra; Strobel, Lisa; Cattepoel, Susann; Späni, Claudia; Derungs, Rebecca; Maier, Marcel; Plückthun, Andreas; Nitsch, Roger M

    2014-09-26

    Passive immunization with anti-amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) antibodies is effective in animal models of Alzheimer disease. With the advent of efficient in vitro selection technologies, the novel class of designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) presents an attractive alternative to the immunoglobulin scaffold. DARPins are small and highly stable proteins with a compact modular architecture ideal for high affinity protein-protein interactions. In this report, we describe the selection, binding profile, and epitope analysis of Aβ-specific DARPins. We further showed their ability to delay Aβ aggregation and prevent Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity in vitro. To demonstrate their therapeutic potential in vivo, mono- and trivalent Aβ-specific DARPins (D23 and 3×D23) were infused intracerebroventricularly into the brains of 11-month-old Tg2576 mice over 4 weeks. Both D23 and 3×D23 treatments were shown to result in improved cognitive performance and reduced soluble Aβ levels. These findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of Aβ-specific DARPins for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of human FE65, a ligand of Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein, by Sp1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yu, Hoi-Tin

    2010-03-01

    FE65 is a neuronal-enriched adaptor protein that binds to the Alzheimer\\'s disease amyloid precursor protein (APP). FE65 forms a transcriptionally active complex with the APP intracellular domain (AICD). The precise gene targets for this complex are unclear but several Alzheimer\\'s disease-linked genes have been proposed. Additionally, evidence suggests that FE65 influences APP metabolism. The mechanism by which FE65 expression is regulated is as yet unknown. To gain insight into the regulatory mechanism, we cloned a 1.6 kb fragment upstream of the human FE65 gene and found that it possesses particularly strong promoter activity in neurones. To delineate essential regions in the human FE65 promoter, a series of deletion mutants were generated. The minimal FE65 promoter was located between -100 and +5, which contains a functional Sp1 site. Overexpression of the transcription factor Sp1 potentiates the FE65 promoter activity. Conversely, suppression of the FE65 promoter was observed in cells either treated with an Sp1 inhibitor or in which Sp1 was knocked down. Furthermore, reduced levels of Sp1 resulted in downregulation of endogenous FE65 mRNA and protein. These findings reveal that Sp1 plays a crucial role in transcriptional control of the human FE65 gene.

  14. Royal jelly promotes DAF-16-mediated proteostasis to tolerate β-amyloid toxicity in C. elegans model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Cao, Min; Dong, Yuqing

    2016-08-23

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that dietary intervention may promote health and help prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD). We recently reported that bee products of royal jelly (RJ) and enzyme-treated royal jelly (eRJ) were potent to promote healthy aging in C. elegans. Here, we examined whether RJ/eRJ consumption may benefit to mitigate the AD symptom in the disease model of C. elegans. Our results showed that RJ/eRJ supplementation significantly delayed the body paralysis in AD worms, suggesting the β-amyloid (Aβ) toxicity attenuation effects of RJ/eRJ. Genetic analyses suggested that RJ/eRJ-mediated alleviation of Aβ toxicity in AD worms required DAF-16, rather than HSF-1 and SKN-1, in an insulin/IGF signaling dependent manner. Moreover, RJ/eRJ modulated the transactivity of DAF-16 and dramatically improved the protein solubility in aged worms. Given protein solubility is a hallmark of healthy proteostasis, our findings demonstrated that RJ/eRJ supplementation improved proteostasis, and this promotion depended on the transactivity of DAF-16. Collectively, the present study not only elucidated the possible anti-AD mechanism of RJ/eRJ, but also provided evidence from a practical point of view to shed light on the extensive correlation of proteostasis and the prevention of neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. A multimodal RAGE-specific inhibitor reduces amyloid β-mediated brain disorder in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Rashid; Singh, Itender; Sagare, Abhay P; Bell, Robert D; Ross, Nathan T; LaRue, Barbra; Love, Rachal; Perry, Sheldon; Paquette, Nicole; Deane, Richard J; Thiyagarajan, Meenakshisundaram; Zarcone, Troy; Fritz, Gunter; Friedman, Alan E; Miller, Benjamin L; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2012-04-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), amyloid β peptide (Aβ) accumulates in plaques in the brain. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mediates Aβ-induced perturbations in cerebral vessels, neurons, and microglia in AD. Here, we identified a high-affinity RAGE-specific inhibitor (FPS-ZM1) that blocked Aβ binding to the V domain of RAGE and inhibited Aβ40- and Aβ42-induced cellular stress in RAGE-expressing cells in vitro and in the mouse brain in vivo. FPS-ZM1 was nontoxic to mice and readily crossed the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In aged APPsw/0 mice overexpressing human Aβ-precursor protein, a transgenic mouse model of AD with established Aβ pathology, FPS-ZM1 inhibited RAGE-mediated influx of circulating Aβ40 and Aβ42 into the brain. In brain, FPS-ZM1 bound exclusively to RAGE, which inhibited β-secretase activity and Aβ production and suppressed microglia activation and the neuroinflammatory response. Blockade of RAGE actions at the BBB and in the brain reduced Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in brain markedly and normalized cognitive performance and cerebral blood flow responses in aged APPsw/0 mice. Our data suggest that FPS-ZM1 is a potent multimodal RAGE blocker that effectively controls progression of Aβ-mediated brain disorder and that it may have the potential to be a disease-modifying agent for AD.

  16. Varenicline Ameliorates Learning and Memory Deficits in Amyloid β(25–35 Rat Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourandokht Baluchnejadmojarad

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a enfeeble neurodegenerative disorder characterized by increased β-amyloid (Aβ deposition and neuronal dysfunction leading to impaired learning and recall. Among proposed risk factors, impaired cholinergic transmission is a main cause for incidence of disease. Methods: In the present study, effects of the intracerebroventricularly administration of an agonist of nicotinic cholinergic receptors, varenicline(0.5 and 2 μg/μl, on learning and memory impairments induced by intrahippocampal Aβ(25–35 injection was assessed in rats. Results: The results showed that the intrahippocampal Aβ(25–35 injected rats exhibit lower spontaneous alternation score inY-maze tasks (p<0.05, impaired retention and recall capability in the passive avoidance test (p<0.05, and fewer correct choices (p<0.001 and more errors(p<0.001 in the RAM task. Varenicline, almost in both doses, significantly improved alternation score in Y-maze task (p<0.001, impaired retention and recall capability in the passive avoidance test (p<0.05, and correct choices in the RAM task (p<0.001. Discussion: This study indicates that varenicline pretreatment attenuates Aβ- induced impairment of short-term spatial memory in rats probably due to its agonist activity at nicotinic receptors.

  17. Synchrotron-based Infrared and X-ray Imaging Shows Focalized Accumulation of Cu and Zn Co-localized With Beta-amyloid Deposits in Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.; Wang, Q.; Telivala, T.; Smith, R.; Lanzirotti, A.; Miklossy, J.

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the misfolding and plaque-like accumulation of a naturally occurring peptide in the brain called amyloid beta (Abeta). Recently, this process has been associated with the binding of metal ions such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). It is thought that metal dyshomeostasis is involved in protein misfolding and may lead to oxidative stress and neuronal damage. However, the exact role of the misfolded proteins and metal ions in the degenerative process of AD is not yet clear. In this study, we used synchrotron Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (FTIRM) to image the in situ secondary structure of the amyloid plaques in brain tissue of AD patients. These results were spatially correlated with metal ion accumulation in the same tissue sample using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe. For both techniques, a spatial resolution of 5-10 microm was achieved. FTIRM results showed that the amyloid plaques have elevated beta-sheet content, as demonstrated by a strong amide I absorbance at 1625cm(-1). Using SXRF microprobe, we find that AD tissue also contains 'hot spots' of accumulated metal ions, specifically Cu and Zn, with a strong spatial correlation between these two ions. The 'hot spots' of accumulated Zn and Cu were co-localized with beta-amyloid plaques. Thus for the first time, a strong spatial correlation has been observed between elevated beta-sheet content in Abeta plaques and accumulated Cu and Zn ions, emphasizing an association of metal ions with amyloid formation in AD

  18. Phase 2 safety trial targeting amyloid beta production with a gamma-secretase inhibitor in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Adam S; Raman, Rema; Siemers, Eric R; Becerra, Lida; Clark, Christopher M; Dean, Robert A; Farlow, Martin R; Galvin, James E; Peskind, Elaine R; Quinn, Joseph F; Sherzai, Abdullah; Sowell, B Brooke; Aisen, Paul S; Thal, Leon J

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and amyloid beta (Abeta) response to the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY450139 in Alzheimer disease. Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, dose-escalation, placebo-controlled trial. Community-based clinical research centers. Patients Fifty-one individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease were randomized to receive placebo (n=15) or LY450139 (100 mg [n=22] or 140 mg [n=14]), with 43 completing the treatment phase. Intervention The LY450139 groups received 60 mg/d for 2 weeks, then 100 mg/d for 6 weeks, and then either 100 or 140 mg/d for 6 additional weeks. Primary outcome measures were adverse events, plasma and cerebrospinal fluid Abeta levels, vital signs, electrocardiographic data, and laboratory safety test results. Secondary outcome measures included the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale cognitive subscale and the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Scale. Group differences were seen in skin and subcutaneous tissue concerns (P=.05), including 3 possible drug rashes and 3 reports of hair color change in the treatment groups. There were 3 adverse event-related discontinuations, including 1 transient bowel obstruction. The plasma Abeta(40) concentration was reduced by 58.2% for the 100-mg group and 64.6% for the 140-mg group (P<.001). No significant reduction was seen in cerebrospinal fluid Abeta levels. No group differences were seen in cognitive or functional measures. LY450139 was generally well tolerated at doses of up to 140 mg/d for 14 weeks, with several findings indicating the need for close clinical monitoring in future studies. Decreases in plasma Abeta concentrations were consistent with inhibition of gamma-secretase. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00244322.

  19. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  20. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  1. Immunization with the SDPM1 peptide lowers amyloid plaque burden and improves cognitive function in the APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiou-Miin; Devries, Sarah; Camboni, Marybeth; Glass, Matthew; Martin, Paul T

    2010-09-01

    Vaccination has become an important therapeutic approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, immunization with Abeta amyloid can have unwanted, potentially lethal, side effects. Here we demonstrate an alternative peptide-mimotope vaccine strategy using the SDPM1 peptide. SDPM1 is a 20 amino acid peptide bounded by cysteines that binds tetramer forms of Abeta(1-40)- and Abeta(1-42)-amyloids and blocks subsequent Abeta amyloid aggregation. Immunization of mice with SDPM1 induced peptide-mimotope antibodies with the same biological activity as the SDPM1 peptide. When done prior to the onset of amyloid plaque formation, SDPM1 vaccination of APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mice reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) levels in the brain, improved cognitive performance in Morris water maze tests, and resulted in no increased T cell responses to immunogenic or Abeta peptides or brain inflammation. When done after plaque burden was already significant, SDPM1 immunization still significantly reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40/1-42) peptide levels in APPswePSEN1(A246E) brain without inducing encephalitogenic T cell responses or brain inflammation, but treatment at this stage did not improve cognitive function. These experiments demonstrate the efficacy of a novel vaccine approach for Alzheimer's disease where immunization with an Abeta(1-40/1-42) amyloid-specific binding and blocking peptide is used to inhibit the development of neuropathology and cognitive dysfunction.

  2. Neurine, an acetylcholine autolysis product, elevates secreted amyloid-beta protein precursor and amyloid-beta peptide levels, and lowers neuronal cell viability in culture: a role in Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedie, David; Brossi, Arnold; Chen, DeMoa; Ge, Yuan-Wen; Bailey, Jason; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Kamal, Mohammad A; Sambamurti, Kumar; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Greig, Nigel H

    2006-09-01

    Classical hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are a synaptic loss, cholinergic neuron death, and abnormal protein deposition, particularly of toxic amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) that is derived from amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP) by the action of beta- and gamma-secretases. The trigger(s) initiating the biochemical cascades that underpin these hallmarks have yet to be fully elucidated. The typical forebrain cholinergic cell demise associated with AD brain results in a loss of presynaptic cholinergic markers and acetylcholine (ACh). Neurine (vinyl-trimethyl-ammonium hydroxide) is a breakdown product of ACh, consequent to autolysis and is an organic poison found in cadavre brain. The time- and concentration-dependent actions of neurine were assessed in human neuroblastoma (NB, SK-N-SH) cells in culture by quantifying cell viability by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and MTS assay, and AbetaPP and Abeta levels by Western blot and ELISA. NB cells displayed evidence of toxicity to neurine at > or = 3 mg/ml, as demonstrated by elevated LDH levels in the culture media and a reduced cell viability shown by the MTS assay. Using subtoxic concentrations of neurine, elevations in AbetaPP and Abeta1-40 peptide levels were detected in conditioned media samples.

  3. Immunolocalization of Kisspeptin Associated with Amyloid-β Deposits in the Pons of an Alzheimer’s Disease Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrutha Chilumuri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pons region of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD brain is one of the last to show amyloid-β (Aβ deposits and has been suggested to contain neuroprotective compounds. Kisspeptin (KP is a hormone that activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and has been suggested to be neuroprotective against Aβ toxicity. The localization of KP, plus the established endogenous neuroprotective compounds corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH and catalase, in tissue sections from the pons region of a male AD subject has been determined in relation to Aβ deposits. Results showed Aβ deposits also stained with KP, CRH, and catalase antibodies. At high magnification the staining of deposits was either KP or catalase positive, and there was only a limited area of the deposits with KP-catalase colocalization. The CRH does not bind Aβ, whilst both KP and catalase can bind Aβ, suggesting that colocalization in Aβ deposits is not restricted to compounds that directly bind Aβ. The neuroprotective actions of KP, CRH, and catalase were confirmed in vitro, and fibrillar Aβ preparations were shown to stimulate the release of KP in vitro. In conclusion, neuroprotective KP, CRH, and catalase all colocalize with Aβ plaque-like deposits in the pons region from a male AD subject.

  4. Amyloid Accumulation Drives Proteome-wide Alterations in Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease-like Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey N. Savas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Aβ peptides impair multiple cellular pathways and play a causative role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathology, but how the brain proteome is remodeled by this process is unknown. To identify protein networks associated with AD-like pathology, we performed global quantitative proteomic analysis in three mouse models at young and old ages. Our analysis revealed a robust increase in Apolipoprotein E (ApoE levels in nearly all brain regions with increased Aβ levels. Taken together with prior findings on ApoE driving Aβ accumulation, this analysis points to a pathological dysregulation of the ApoE-Aβ axis. We also found dysregulation of protein networks involved in excitatory synaptic transmission. Analysis of the AMPA receptor (AMPAR complex revealed specific loss of TARPγ-2, a key AMPAR-trafficking protein. Expression of TARPγ-2 in hAPP transgenic mice restored AMPA currents. This proteomic database represents a resource for the identification of protein alterations responsible for AD.

  5. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy and its co-occurrence with Alzheimer’s disease and other cerebrovascular neuropathologic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenowitz, Willa D.; Nelson, Peter T.; Besser, Lilah M.; Heller, Katherine B.; Kukull, Walter A.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the relationship between cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), Alzheimer’s disease neuropathologic changes (ADNC), other vascular brain pathologies, and cognition in a large multi-center autopsy sample. Data was obtained from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center on autopsied subjects (N=3,976) who died between 2005 and 2012. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression models estimated the associations between CAA and other pathologies, and between CAA severity and cognitive test scores proximal to death. CAA tended to co-occur with ADNC but a substantial minority of cases were discrepant. CAA was absent in 22% (n= 520) of subjects with frequent neuritic plaques but present in 20.9% (n=91) of subjects with no neuritic plaques. In subjects with no/sparse neuritic plaques, non-hemorrhagic brain infarcts were more common in those with CAA pathology than without (P= 0.007). In subjects without the APOE ε4 allele, CAA severity was associated with lower cognition proximal to death, factoring in other pathologies. The presence of CAA in non-AD patients may indicate a distinct cerebrovascular condition. PMID:26239176

  6. Distinct inflammatory phenotypes of microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages in Alzheimer's disease models: effects of aging and amyloid pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elodie; Boucher, Céline; Fontaine, Bertrand; Delarasse, Cécile

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by formation of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, activated microglia, and neuronal cell death leading to progressive dementia. Recent data indicate that microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) are key players in the initiation and progression of AD, yet their respective roles remain to be clarified. As AD occurs mostly in the elderly and aging impairs myeloid functions, we addressed the inflammatory profile of microglia and MDM during aging in TgAPP/PS1 and TgAPP/PS1dE9, two transgenic AD mouse models, compared to WT littermates. We only found MDM infiltration in very aged mice. We determined that MDM highly expressed activation markers at basal state. In contrast, microglia exhibited an activated phenotype only with normal aging and Aβ pathology. Our study showed that CD14 and CD36, two receptors involved in phagocytosis, were upregulated during Aβ pathogenesis. Moreover, we observed, at the protein levels in AD models, higher production of pro-inflammatory mediators: IL-1β, p40, iNOS, CCL-3, CCL-4, and CXCL-1. Taken together, our data indicate that microglia and MDM display distinct phenotypes in AD models and highlight the specific effects of normal aging vs Aβ peptides on inflammatory processes that occur during the disease progression. These precise phenotypes of different subpopulations of myeloid cells in normal and pathologic conditions may allow the design of pertinent therapeutic strategy for AD. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Nanoformulated alpha-mangostin ameliorates Alzheimer's disease neuropathology by elevating LDLR expression and accelerating amyloid-beta clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lei; Gu, Xiao; Song, Qingxiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Huang, Meng; Hu, Meng; Hou, Lina; Kang, Ting; Chen, Jun; Chen, Hongzhuan; Gao, Xiaoling

    2016-03-28

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is now representing one of the largest global healthcare challenges. However, an effective therapy is still lacking. Accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) in the brain is supposed to trigger pathogenic cascades that eventually lead to AD. Therefore, Aβ clearance strategy is being actively pursued as a promising disease modifying therapy. Here, we found that α-mangostin (α-M), a polyphenolic xanthone derivative from mangosteen, up-regulated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) expression in microglia and liver cells, and efficiently facilitated Aβ clearance. However, the in vivo application of α-M is limited due to its hydrophobic nature, poor aqueous solubility and stability, and thus low bioavailability and accumulation in the target organs. To overcome this limitation, α-M was encapsulated into the core of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lactide) (PEG-PLA) nanoparticles [NP(α-M)]. Such nanoencapsulation improved the biodistribution of α-M in both the brain and liver, enhanced the brain clearance of (125)I-radiolabeled Aβ1-42 in an LDLR-dependent manner, reduced Aβ deposition, attenuated neuroinflammatory responses, ameliorated neurologic changes and reversed behavioral deficits in AD model mice. These findings justified the concept that polyphenol-mediated modulation of LDLR expression might serve as a safe and efficient disease-modifying therapy for AD by accelerating Aβ clearance. It also demonstrated the powerful capacity of nanotechnology in modulating the biodistribution behavior of drug to improve its therapeutic efficacy in AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. PET imaging of brain with the β-amyloid probe, [11C]6-OH-BTA-1, in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Hiroshi; Ye, Daniel; Cohen, Robert M.; Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Cai, Lisheng; Musachio, John L.; Hong, Jinsoo; Crescenzo, Mathew; Tipre, Dnyanesh; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Zoghbi, Sami; Vines, Douglass C.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Jacobowitz, David; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V.; Katada, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacity of [ 11 C]6-OH-BTA-1 and positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). PET imaging was performed with the NIH ATLAS small animal scanner in six elderly transgenic mice (Tg2576; age 22.0±1.8 months; 23.6±2.6 g) overexpressing a mutated form of human β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) known to result in the production of Aβ plaques, and in six elderly wild-type litter mates (age 21.8±1.6 months; 29.5±4.7 g). Dynamic PET scans were performed for 30 min in each mouse under 1% isoflurane inhalation anesthesia after a bolus injection of 13-46 MBq of [ 11 C]6-OH-BTA-1. PET data were reconstructed with 3D OSEM. On the coronal PET image, irregular regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on frontal cortex (FR), parietal cortex (PA), striatum (ST), thalamus (TH), pons (PO), and cerebellum (CE), guided by a mouse stereotaxic atlas. Time-activity curves (TACs) (expressed as percent injected dose per gram normalized to body weight: % ID-kg/g) were obtained for FR, PA, ST, TH, PO, and CE. ROI-to-CE radioactivity ratios were also calculated. Following PET scans, sections of mouse brain prepared from anesthetized and fixative-perfused mice were stained with thioflavin-S. TACs for [ 11 C]6-OH-BTA-1 in all ROIs peaked early (at 30-55 s), with radioactivity washing out quickly thereafter in both transgenic and wild-type mice. Peak uptake in all regions was significantly lower in transgenic mice than in wild-type mice. During the later part of the washout phase (12-30 min), the mean FR/CE and PA/CE ratios were higher in transgenic than in wild-type mice (1.06±0.04 vs 0.98±0.07, p=0.04; 1.06±0.09 vs 0.93±0.08 p=0.02) while ST/CE, TH/CE, and PO/CE ratios were not. Ex vivo staining revealed widespread Aβ plaques in cortex, but not in cerebellum of transgenic mice or in any brain regions of wild-type mice. Marked reductions in brain uptake of this

  9. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  10. Maldi-Tof /Tof-MS Reveals Elevated Serum Haptoglobin and Amyloid A in Behcet's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mao, L.; Dong, H.; Yang, P.; Zhou, H.; Huang, X.; Lin, X.; Kijlstra, A.

    2008-01-01

    Behcet¿s disease (BD) is a multisystemic autoimmune disease with unclear etiology and pathogenesis. To screen aberrant serum proteins in BD, serum samples were obtained from eight male BD patients with active uveitis and eight male healthy volunteers with informed consent. The serum samples from

  11. A systematic review and meta-analysis of plasma amyloid 1-42 and tau as biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthanaa Balasubramanian Shanthi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42 and tau in cerebrospinal fluid are currently used as markers for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Conflicting reports exist regarding their plasma levels in Alzheimer’s disease patients. A meta-analysis was performed to statistically validate the use of plasma Aβ42 and tau as biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: Different databases were searched using the search key: (amyloid OR amyloid1-42 OR Aβ42 AND (tau OR total tau AND plasma AND (alzheimer’s OR alzheimer’s disease, and for databases not accepting boolean search, records were retrieved using the search key: plasma + amyloid + tau + alzheimer’s. A total of 1880 articles for Aβ42 and 1508 articles for tau were shortlisted. The abstracts were screened, and 69 articles reporting plasma Aβ42 levels and 6 articles reporting plasma tau were identified. After exclusion, 25 studies reporting plasma Aβ42 and 6 studies reporting total tau were analysed in Review Manager version 5.2 using weighted mean difference method, and the bias between studies was assessed using the funnel plot. Results: Plasma Aβ42 and tau did not vary significantly between Alzheimer’s disease patients and controls. The funnel plot showed that there was no bias between studies for Aβ42, while possible bias existed for tau due to availability of limited studies. Conclusion: This analysis pinpoints that plasma Aβ42 and tau could not serve as reliable markers independently for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and a cohort study with age, sex and apolipoprotein E correction is warranted for their possible use as Alzheimer’s disease markers.

  12. Imaging noradrenergic influence on amyloid pathology in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkeler, A.; Waerzeggers, Y.; Klose, A.; Monfared, P.; Thomas, A.V.; Jacobs, A.H.; Schubert, M.; Heneka, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims towards the non-invasive characterization of disease-specific molecular alterations in the living organism in vivo. In that, molecular imaging opens a new dimension in our understanding of disease pathogenesis, as it allows the non-invasive determination of the dynamics of changes on the molecular level. The imaging technology being employed includes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging as well as optical-based imaging technologies. These imaging modalities are employed together or alone for disease phenotyping, development of imaging-guided therapeutic strategies and in basic and translational research. In this study, we review recent investigations employing positron emission tomography and MRI for phenotyping mouse models of Alzheimers' disease by imaging. We demonstrate that imaging has an important role in the characterization of mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases. (orig.)

  13. Intracellular accumulation of toxic turn amyloid-β is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Naoko; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Nakamura, Norimichi; Himeno, Eri; Iinuma, Kyoko M; Sakae, Nobutaka; Yamasaki, Ryo; Tabira, Takeshi; Murakami, Kazuma; Irie, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Noriaki; LaFerla, Frank M; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Iwaki, Toru; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-β protein (Aβ) accumulates in the neurons of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients at an early stage of the disease. Recently, we found that Aβ with a toxic turn at positions 22 and 23 accumulates in neurons in AD brain. Here, we studied the accumulation of Aβ, toxic turn Aβ and high-molecular-weight Aβ oligomers in presenilin 1 (PS1) gene-transfected SH-SY5Y cells as well as in the brains of 3xTg-AD mice and AD patients. Immunostaining revealed that accumulation of toxic turn Aβ was promoted in G384A- and I143T-mutant PS1-transfected cells and further enhanced by co-transfection of cells with the Aβ-precursor protein (AβPP) gene. In contrast, accumulation of high-molecular-weight Aβ oligomers was promoted in mutant PS1 cells but attenuated by co-transfection of cells with the AβPP gene. Toxic turn Aβ was detected in the neurons of 3xTg-AD mice aged 2 months, when the mice were cognitively unimpaired. In contrast, high-molecular-weight Aβ oligomers were detected in the neurons of 7-month-old mice, when memory dysfunction is apparent. Furthermore, immunostaining and western blotting for Rab4, Rab6 and GRP78 revealed increased levels of these proteins in mutant PS1 cells and their accumulation in the neurons of 3xTg-AD mice. Remarkably, GRP78 immunoreactivity was increased at 2 months of age. Double-label immunostaining of AD brain revealed an apparent association between toxic turn Aβ and GRP78, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker. Intraneuronal accumulation of toxic turn Aβ may be associated with ER stress in the brains of AD model mice and AD patients at an early stage.

  14. Association between hypocretin-1 and amyloid-β42 cerebrospinal fluid levels in Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slats, Diane; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Lammers, Gert Jan; Melis, René J; Verbeek, Marcel M; Overeem, Sebastiaan

    2012-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with sleep disorders. Recently, animal studies demonstrated a link between hypocretin, a sleep-regulation neurotransmitter, and AD pathology. In this study, we investigated the circadian rhythm of hypocretin-1 in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients and controls. Moreover, we assessed the relation between CSF hypocretin-1 and amyloid-β. A continuous CSF sampling study via indwelling intrathecal catheter was performed to collect hourly CSF samples of six patients with AD (59-85 yrs, MMSE 16-26) and six healthy volunteers (64-77 yrs). CSF hypocretin-1 and Aβ42 concentrations were determined at 8 individual time points over 24 hours. A circadian pattern was assessed by fitting a 24 hour sine curve to the hypocretin-1 data using mixed model analysis. Clinical diagnosis and Aβ42 were entered into the model as time invariant covariates to determine differences between AD and controls, and correlate Aβ42 to hypocretin-1 levels. A hypocretin-1 circadian rhythm with an amplitude of 11.5 pg/ml was found in clinical AD patients, which did not differ from the control group (7.15 pg/ml). Lower mean CSF Aβ42 levels were related to lower hypocretin-1 levels; 1.6 pg/ml hypocretin-1 per 10 pg/ml Aβ42 (p=0.03), and a higher amplitude of the hypocretin-1 circadian rhythm (0.4 pg/ml, p=0.03). CSF hypocretin-1 has a circadian rhythm for which we could show no difference between AD and controls. However, the association between mean Aβ42 levels and mean hypocretin-1 levels and amplitude may suggest a relationship between AD pathology and hypocretin disturbance, which could hold possibilities for treatment of AD related sleep disorders.

  15. Structural origin of polymorphism of Alzheimer's amyloid β-fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopian, Audrey; Guo, Zhefeng

    2012-10-01

    Formation of senile plaques containing amyloid fibrils of Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Unlike globular proteins, which fold into unique structures, the fibrils of Aβ and other amyloid proteins often contain multiple polymorphs. Polymorphism of amyloid fibrils leads to different toxicity in amyloid diseases and may be the basis for prion strains, but the structural origin for fibril polymorphism is still elusive. In the present study we investigate the structural origin of two major fibril polymorphs of Aβ40: an untwisted polymorph formed under agitated conditions and a twisted polymorph formed under quiescent conditions. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we studied the inter-strand side-chain interactions at 14 spin-labelled positions in the Aβ40 sequence. The results of the present study show that the agitated fibrils have stronger inter-strand spin-spin interactions at most of the residue positions investigated. The two hydrophobic regions at residues 17-20 and 31-36 have the strongest interactions in agitated fibrils. Distance estimates on the basis of the spin exchange frequencies suggest that inter-strand distances at residues 17, 20, 32, 34 and 36 in agitated fibrils are approximately 0.2 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) closer than in quiescent fibrils. We propose that the strength of inter-strand side-chain interactions determines the degree of β-sheet twist, which then leads to the different association patterns between different cross β-units and thus distinct fibril morphologies. Therefore the inter-strand side-chain interaction may be a structural origin for fibril polymorphism in Aβ and other amyloid proteins.

  16. The effect of tachykinin neuropeptides on amyloid {beta} aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flashner, Efrat [The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Raviv, Uri, E-mail: raviv@chem.ch.huji.ac.il [The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Friedler, Assaf, E-mail: assaf@chem.ch.huji.ac.il [The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Mechanistic explanation of how tachykinin neuropeptides reduce A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity. {yields} Biophysical studies suggest that tachykinins do not modulate the distribution of A{beta} oligomeric states, but rather may incorporate into the fibrils. {yields} A possible strategy to inhibit toxicity of amyloid fibrils. -- Abstract: A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is production of amyloid {beta} peptides resulting from aberrant cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Amyloid {beta} assembles into fibrils under physiological conditions, through formation of neurotoxic intermediate oligomers. Tachykinin peptides are known to affect amyloid {beta} neurotoxicity in cells. To understand the mechanism of this effect, we studied how tachykinins affect A{beta}(1-40) aggregation in vitro. Fibrils grown in the presence of tachykinins exhibited reduced thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, while their morphology, observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), did not alter. Cross linking studies revealed that the distribution of low molecular weight species was not affected by tachykinins. Our results suggest that there may be a specific interaction between tachykinins and A{beta}(1-40) that allows them to co-assemble. This effect may explain the reduction of A{beta}(1-40) neurotoxicity in cells treated with tachykinins.

  17. Amyloid imaging: the court of public opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Alan J

    2013-09-24

    Human amyloid imaging is one of the great recent translational medicine stories. Beginning with the recognition that Thioflavin T derivatives could be used as PET tracers, through development of Pittsburgh compound B, to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of Florbetapir in 2012, human amyloid imaging has held great promise to allow in vivo inclusive diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), even though the first principle of amyloid PET is that it functions as a surrogate for β-amyloid pathology, and not necessarily as a surrogate for the diagnosis of AD.(1,2.)

  18. Immunoprecipitation of amyloid fibrils by the use of an antibody that recognizes a generic epitope common to amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin R Greiner

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils are associated with many maladies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. The isolation of amyloids from natural materials is very challenging because the extreme structural stability of amyloid fibrils makes it difficult to apply conventional protein science protocols to their purification. A protocol to isolate and detect amyloids is desired for the diagnosis of amyloid diseases and for the identification of new functional amyloids. Our aim was to develop a protocol to purify amyloid from organisms, based on the particular characteristics of the amyloid fold, such as its resistance to proteolysis and its capacity to be recognized by specific conformational antibodies. We used a two-step strategy with proteolytic digestion as the first step followed by immunoprecipitation using the amyloid conformational antibody LOC. We tested the efficacy of this method using as models amyloid fibrils produced in vitro, tissue extracts from C. elegans that overexpress Aβ peptide, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients diagnosed with AD. We were able to immunoprecipitate Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils, produced in vitro and then added to complex biological extracts, but not α-synuclein and gelsolin fibrils. This method was useful for isolating amyloid fibrils from tissue homogenates from a C. elegans AD model, especially from aged worms. Although we were able to capture picogram quantities of Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils produced in vitro when added to complex biological solutions, we could not detect any Aβ amyloid aggregates in CSF from AD patients. Our results show that although immunoprecipitation using the LOC antibody is useful for isolating Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils, it fails to capture fibrils of other amyloidogenic proteins, such as α-synuclein and gelsolin. Additional research might be needed to improve the affinity of these amyloid conformational antibodies for an array of amyloid fibrils without compromising their selectivity before

  19. Dopamine D2 receptor and β-arrestin 2 mediate Amyloid-β elevation induced by anti-parkinson's disease drugs, levodopa and piribedil, in neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lu

    Full Text Available Although levodopa is the first-line medication for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD showing unsurpassable efficiency, its chronic use causes dyskinesia. Accordingly, dopamine agonists are increasingly employed as monotherapy or in combination with levodopa to reduce the risk of motor complications. It is well recognized that patients with PD often exhibit cognitive deficits. However, clinical and animal studies assessing the effects of dopaminergic medications on cognition are controversial. Amyloid-β (Aβ is one of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD, leading to progressive memory loss and cognitive deficit. Interestingly, the abnormal accumulation of Aβ is also detected in PD patients with cognitive deficits. Evidence indicated that levodopa induced a mild increase of Aβ plaque number and size in the brain of AD mouse. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we present that both levodopa and piribedil enhance the generation of Aβ and the activity of γ-secretase in human neuronal cells and primary neurons isolated from AD mouse. This effect was reduced by either the antagonism or the knockdown of dopamine D2 receptor (D2R. We further showed that in the cells expressing β-arrestin 2-biased D2R mutant, piribedil promoted cellular Aβ production to the extent comparable to the wild-type D2R whereas this activity was absent in those with G protein-biased D2R mutant. Moreover, the knockdown of β-arrestin 2 attenuated the increases of Aβ generation and γ-secretase activity mediated by levodopa or piribedil. Thus, our study suggests that targeting D2R-mediated β-arrestin function may have potential risk in the modulation of Aβ pathology.

  20. Methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits improves memory impairment by decreasing brain oxidative stress in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Noumedem, Jaurès A; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Kuete, Victor; Mihasan, Marius

    2014-04-01

    The present study analyzed the possible memory-enhancing and antioxidant proprieties of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum L. fruits (50 and 100 mg/kg, orally, for 21 days) in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The memory-enhancing effects of the plant extract were studied by means of in vivo (Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using superoxide dismutase-, catalase-, glutathione peroxidase-specific activities and the total content of reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl levels. The amyloid beta(1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of spontaneous alternations percentage within Y-maze task and increase of working memory and reference memory errors within radial arm-maze task. Administration of the plant extract significantly improved memory performance and exhibited antioxidant potential. Our results suggest that the plant extract ameliorates amyloid beta(1-42)-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  1. Cerebral serotonin 4 receptors and amyloid-β in early Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karine; Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Holst, Klaus Kähler

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) patients in relation to cortical Aß burden. Eleven newly diagnosed untreated AD patients (mean MMSE 24, range 19–27) and twelve age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent a two-hour dynamic [11C]SB207145 PET scan to measure the binding potential of the 5-HT4 receptor. All AD...

  2. Multielement analysis of swiss mice brains with Alzheimer's disease induced by beta amyloid oligomers using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Danielle S.; Brigido, Matheus M.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Ferreira, Sergio S.; Souza, Amanda S.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive dementia that, in early stages, manifests as a profound inability to form new memories. The pathological features of AD include β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, loss of neurons and synapses, and activation of glia cells. Recently, several groups have raised the 'metal hypothesis' of AD. Metal ions, such as Cu and Zn, have been demonstrated to modulate amyloid aggregation along different pathways. Extensive research has been conducted on the effects of metals on Aβ aggregation and all of them have shown that both Cu and Zn accelerate the aggregation by shortening, or eliminating, the lag phase associated with the amyloid fibrillation process. The metal ions mentioned previously may have an important impact on the protein misfolding and the progression of the neurodegenerative process. The TXRF technique is very important, because can be used to identify and quantify trace elements present in the sample at very low concentrations (μg.g -1 ). In this work, three groups of females were studied: control, AD10 and AD100. The groups AD10 and AD100 were given a single intracerebroventricular injection of 10 pmol and 100 pmol of oligomers of β-amyloid peptide respectively to be induced AD. The TXRF measurements were performed using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system developed in the Laboratory of Nuclear Instrumentation (LIN/UFRJ) that uses an X-ray tube with a molybdenum anode operating at 40 kV and 500 mA used for the excitation and a detector Si-PIN with energy resolution of 145 eV at 200 eV. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rubidium. Results showed differences in the elemental concentration in some brain regions between the AD groups and the control group. (author)

  3. Multielement analysis of swiss mice brains with Alzheimer's disease induced by beta amyloid oligomers using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Danielle S.; Brigido, Matheus M.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Ferreira, Sergio S.; Souza, Amanda S.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: marcelin@uerj.br, E-mail: amandass@bioqmed.ufrj.br, E-mail: ferreira@bioqmed.ufrj.br, E-mail: amandass@bioqmed.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Armando Dias Tavares (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive dementia that, in early stages, manifests as a profound inability to form new memories. The pathological features of AD include β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, loss of neurons and synapses, and activation of glia cells. Recently, several groups have raised the 'metal hypothesis' of AD. Metal ions, such as Cu and Zn, have been demonstrated to modulate amyloid aggregation along different pathways. Extensive research has been conducted on the effects of metals on Aβ aggregation and all of them have shown that both Cu and Zn accelerate the aggregation by shortening, or eliminating, the lag phase associated with the amyloid fibrillation process. The metal ions mentioned previously may have an important impact on the protein misfolding and the progression of the neurodegenerative process. The TXRF technique is very important, because can be used to identify and quantify trace elements present in the sample at very low concentrations (μg.g{sup -1}). In this work, three groups of females were studied: control, AD10 and AD100. The groups AD10 and AD100 were given a single intracerebroventricular injection of 10 pmol and 100 pmol of oligomers of β-amyloid peptide respectively to be induced AD. The TXRF measurements were performed using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system developed in the Laboratory of Nuclear Instrumentation (LIN/UFRJ) that uses an X-ray tube with a molybdenum anode operating at 40 kV and 500 mA used for the excitation and a detector Si-PIN with energy resolution of 145 eV at 200 eV. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rubidium. Results showed differences in the elemental concentration in some brain regions between the AD groups and the control group. (author)

  4. The prion protein as a receptor for amyloid-beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, Helmut W.; Nguyen, Louis N.; Nabavi, Sadegh; Malinow, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Increased levels of brain amyloid-beta, a secreted peptide cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is believed to be critical in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased amyloid-beta can cause synaptic depression, reduce the number of spine protrusions (that is, sites of synaptic

  5. Protective effects of a natural product, curcumin, against amyloid β induced mitochondrial and synaptic toxicities in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catharine; Mitchell, Andrew; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the protective effects of a natural product-'curcumin'- in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neurons. Although much research has been done in AD, very little has been reported on the effects of curcumin on mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, function and synaptic activities. Therefore, the present study investigated the protective effects against amyloid β (Aβ) induced mitochondrial and synaptic toxicities. Using human neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cells, curcumin and Aβ, we studied the protective effects of curcumin against Aβ. Further, we also studied preventive (curcumin+Aβ) and intervention (Aβ+curcumin) effects of curcumin against Aβ in SHSY5Y cells. Using real time RT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analysis, we measured mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial biogenesis and synaptic genes. We also assessed mitochondrial function by measuring hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation, cytochrome oxidase activity and mitochondrial ATP. Cell viability was studied using the MTT assay. Aβ was found to impair mitochondrial dynamics, reduce mitochondrial biogenesis and decrease synaptic activity and mitochondrial function. In contrast, curcumin enhanced mitochondrial fusion activity and reduced fission machinery, and increased biogenesis and synaptic proteins. Mitochondrial function and cell viability were elevated in curcumin treated cells. Interestingly, curcumin pre- and post-treated cells incubated with Aβ showed reduced mitochondrial dysfunction, and maintained cell viability and mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial biogenesis and synaptic activity. Further, the protective effects of curcumin were stronger in pretreated SHSY5Y cells than in post-treated cells, indicating that curcumin works better in prevention than treatment in AD-like neurons. Our findings suggest that curcumin is a promising drug molecule to treat AD patients. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical

  6. Iterative Image Processing for Early Diagnostic of Beta-Amyloid Plaque Deposition in Pre-Clinical Alzheimer's Disease Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavine, Nikolai V; Kulkarni, Padmakar V; McColl, Roderick W

    2017-08-01

    To test and evaluate an efficient iterative image processing strategy to improve the quality of sub-optimal pre-clinical PET images. A novel iterative resolution subsets-based method to reduce noise and enhance resolution (RSEMD) has been demonstrated on examples of PET imaging studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) plaques deposition in mice brains. The RSEMD method was applied to imaging studies of non-invasive detection of beta-amyloid plaque in transgenic mouse models of AD. Data acquisition utilized a Siemens Inveon® micro PET/CT device. Quantitative uptake of the tracer in control and AD mice brains was determined by counting the extent of plaque deposition by histological staining. The pre-clinical imaging software inviCRO ® was used for fitting the recovery PET images to the mouse brain atlas and obtaining the time activity curves (TAC) from different brain areas. In all of the AD studies the post-processed images proved to have higher resolution and lower noise as compared with images reconstructed by conventional OSEM method. In general, the values of SNR reached a plateau at around 10 iterations with an improvement factor of about 2 over sub-optimal PET brain images. A rapidly converging, iterative deconvolution image processing algorithm with a resolution subsets-based approach RSEMD has been used for quantitative studies of changes in Alzheimer's pathology over time. The RSEMD method can be applied to sub-optimal clinical PET brain images to improve image quality to diagnostically acceptable levels and will be crucial in order to facilitate diagnosis of AD progression at the earliest stages.

  7. Phase II safety trial targeting amyloid beta production with a gamma-secretase inhibitor in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Adam S.; Raman, Rema; Siemers, Eric R.; Becerra, Lida; Clark, Christopher M.; Dean, Robert A; Farlow, Martin R.; Galvin, James E.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Sherzai, Abdullah; Sowell, B. Brooke; Aisen, Paul S.; Thal, Leon J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the safety, tolerability and amyloid beta (Aβ) response to a γ-secretase inhibitor (LY450139) in Alzheimer's disease. Design Multi-center, randomized, double-blind, dose-escalation, placebo-controlled trial. Setting Community based clinical research centers. Participants 51 participants with mild to moderate AD were randomized (placebo=15, 100mg=22, 140mg=14), with 43 completing the treatment phase. Intervention Subjects randomized to LY450139 received 60mg daily for 2 weeks followed by 100mg for 6 weeks, then re-randomized to 100mg or 140mg for 6 additional weeks. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcome measures consisted of adverse events, plasma and cerebrospinal fluid Aβ levels, vital signs, electrocardiogram data, and laboratory safety tests. Secondary outcome measures included the ADAS-cognitive subscale and the ADCS-Activities of Daily Living scale. Results Group differences were seen in “skin and subcutaneous tissue” complaints (p=0.052). These included 3 possible drug rashes and 3 reports of hair color change in the treatment groups. There were 3 adverse-event-related discontinuations, including one report of transient bowel obstruction. Plasma Aβ40 was reduced by 58.2% for the 100mg group and 64.6% for the 140mg group (P<0.001). No significant reduction was seen in CSF Aβ. No group differences were seen in cognitive or functional measures. Conclusions LY450139 was generally well tolerated at doses of up to 140mg taken daily for 14 weeks with several findings indicating the need for close clinical monitoring in future studies. Decreases in plasma Aβ concentrations were consistent with inhibition of γ-secretase. PMID:18695053

  8. Diagnostic value of β amyloid plaques imaging agent 131I-IMPY brain imaging in early Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Wanzhong; Lu Chunxiong; Yang Min; Bao Jiandong; Cheng Zhaohuo; Cai Deliang; Wang Zhiqiang; Yang Bixiu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of β-amyloid plaques imaging agent [ 131 I] 2( 4-dimethylaminop henyl)-6-iodoimidazo [1, 2-α] pyridine ( 131 I-IMPY) SPECT imaging in early Alzheimer's Disease. Methods: 24 cases of AD (7 males, 17 females, aged 48∼79 years) and 14 normal (6 males, 8 females, aged 42∼67 years) control subjects were selected for this study. 131 I-IMPY SPECT imaging was carried out 2-3 h post injection. 131 I-IMPY uptake defined as the ratio of each brain gyrus and cerebellum uptake on fixed region of interest (ROI) (Rcl/cb) was calculated. Comparative analysis between the two groups was carried out using t-test. Results: In patients with early AD (MCI), 131 I-IMPY was increased in parietal gyrus, temporal gyrus and frontal gyrus compared with normal control group and it were found to be statistically significant (t = 1.3967∼2.8757, all P 0.05). In patients with AD, increase in 131 I-IMPY were observed in parietal, temporal, occipital lobes and basal ganglia compared with normal control group and it were found to be statistically significant (t=2.1001∼6.2789, all P 0.05), and 131 I-IMPY was increased in occipital lobes and basal ganglia compared with MCI group and it were found to be statistically significant (t=2.0850∼3.6772, all P 131 I-IMPY was lightly increased in each brain of left side gyrus compared with right but without statistically significant difference (t=0.1273∼0.5571, all P>0.05). Conclusions: 131 I-IMPY SPECT Imaging was helpful for early diagnosis of AD. (authors)

  9. Satureja bachtiarica ameliorate beta-amyloid induced memory impairment, oxidative stress and cholinergic deficit in animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soodi, Maliheh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Dashti, Abolfazl; Sepand, Mohammad Reza; Moradi, Shahla

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular deposition of Beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is the main finding in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which damages cholinergic neurons through oxidative stress and reduces the cholinergic neurotransmission. Satureja bachtiarica is a medicinal plant from the Lamiaceae family which was widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible protective effects of S. bachtiarica methanolic extract on Aβ induced spatial memory impairment in Morris Water Maze (MWM), oxidative stress and cholinergic neuron degeneration. Pre- aggregated Aβ was injected into the hippocampus of each rat bilaterally (10 μg/rat) and MWM task was performed 14 days later to evaluate learning and memory function. Methanolic extract of S.bachtiarica (10, 50 and 100 mg/Kg) was injected intraperitoneally for 19 consecutive days, after Aβ injection. After the probe test the brain tissue were collected and lipid peroxidation, Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and Cholin Acetyl Transferees (ChAT) immunorectivity were measured in the hippocampus. Intrahipocampal injection of Aβ impaired learning and memory in MWM in training days and probe trail. Methanolic extract of S. bachtiarica (50 and 100 mg/Kg) could attenuate Aβ-induced memory deficit. ChAT immunostaining revealed that cholinergic neurons were loss in Aβ- injected group and S. bachtiarica (100 mg/Kg) could ameliorate Aβ- induced ChAT reduction in the hippocampus. Also S. bachtiarica could ameliorate Aβ-induced lipid peroxidation and AChE activity increase in the hippocampus. In conclusion our study represent that S.bachtiarica methanolic extract can improve Aβ-induced memory impairment and cholinergic loss then we recommended this extract as a candidate for further investigation in treatment of AD.

  10. Perspectives on future Alzheimer therapies: amyloid-β protofibrils - a new target for immunotherapy with BAN2401 in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannfelt, Lars; Möller, Christer; Basun, Hans; Osswald, Gunilla; Sehlin, Dag; Satlin, Andrew; Logovinsky, Veronika; Gellerfors, Pär

    2014-01-01

    The symptomatic drugs currently on the market for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have no effect on disease progression, and this creates a large unmet medical need. The type of drug that has developed most rapidly in the last decade is immunotherapy: vaccines and, especially, passive vaccination with monoclonal antibodies. Antibodies are attractive drugs as they can be made highly specific for their target and often with few side effects. Data from recent clinical AD trials indicate that a treatment effect by immunotherapy is possible, providing hope for a new generation of drugs. The first anti-amyloid-beta (anti-Aβ) vaccine developed by Elan, AN1792, was halted in phase 2 because of aseptic meningoencephalitis. However, in a follow-up study, patients with antibody response to the vaccine demonstrated reduced cognitive decline, supporting the hypothesis that Aβ immunotherapy may have clinically relevant effects. Bapineuzumab (Elan/Pfizer Inc./Johnson & Johnson), a monoclonal antibody targeting fibrillar Aβ, was stopped because the desired clinical effect was not seen. Solanezumab (Eli Lilly and Company) was developed to target soluble, monomeric Aβ. In two phase 3 studies, Solanezumab did not meet primary endpoints. When data from the two studies were pooled, a positive pattern emerged, revealing a significant slowing of cognitive decline in the subgroup of mild AD. The Arctic mutation has been shown to specifically increase the formation of soluble Aβ protofibrils, an Aβ species shown to be toxic to neurons and likely to be present in all cases of AD. A monoclonal antibody, mAb158, was developed to target Aβ protofibrils with high selectivity. It has at least a 1,000-fold higher selectivity for protofibrils as compared with monomers of Aβ, thus targeting the toxic species of the peptide. A humanized version of mAb158, BAN2401, has now entered a clinical phase 2b trial in a collaboration between BioArctic Neuroscience and Eisai without the safety concerns seen

  11. Putative Role of Serum Amyloid-A and Proinflammatory Cytokines as Biomarkers for Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Vitale, Antonio; Talarico, Rosaria; Lopalco, Antonio; Galeazzi, Mauro; Lapadula, Giovanni; Cantarini, Luca; Iannone, Florenzo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Behcet's disease (BD) is a multisystemic disorder of unknown etiology characterized by relapsing oral–genital ulcers, uveitis, and involvement of vascular, gastrointestinal, neurological, and musculoskeletal system. Although disease pathogenesis is still unclear, both innate and adaptive immunity have shown to play a pivotal role, and multiple proinflammatory cytokines seem to be involved in different pathogenic pathways that eventually lead to tissue damage. The aims of our study were to evaluate serum cytokines levels of IL-8, IL-18, IFN-α2a, IL-6, IFN-γ, CXCL10, CXCL11, CXCL9, and SAA levels in patients with BD, in comparison to healthy controls (HC), and to correlate their levels to disease activity. We included 78 serum samples obtained from 58 BD patients and analyzed a set of proinflammatory cytokines including IL-8, IL-18, IFN-α2a, IL-6, IFN-γ, CXCL10, CXCL11, and CXCL9 by multiplex bead analysis as well as SAA by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared to HC, BD patients showed elevated cytokine levels of IL-8, IL-18, IFN-α2a, and IL-6, and low levels of CXCL11. BD patients with SAA serum levels >20 mg/L showed higher levels of proinflammatory markers than HC or group with SAA ≤20 mg/L. IL-18, IFN-α2a, and IL-6 were higher in BD group with SAA >20 mg/L than HC, while IL-8 and CXCL9 levels were higher than in patients with SAA ≤20 mg/L and HC. Active BD patients with SAA >20 mg/L exhibited elevated levels of inflammatory mediators, suggesting that may exist a relationship between SAA and proinflammatory cytokines in the intricate scenario of BD pathogenesis. PMID:26496336

  12. Putative Role of Serum Amyloid-A and Proinflammatory Cytokines as Biomarkers for Behcet's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Vitale, Antonio; Talarico, Rosaria; Lopalco, Antonio; Galeazzi, Mauro; Lapadula, Giovanni; Cantarini, Luca; Iannone, Florenzo

    2015-10-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a multisystemic disorder of unknown etiology characterized by relapsing oral-genital ulcers, uveitis, and involvement of vascular, gastrointestinal, neurological, and musculoskeletal system. Although disease pathogenesis is still unclear, both innate and adaptive immunity have shown to play a pivotal role, and multiple proinflammatory cytokines seem to be involved in different pathogenic pathways that eventually lead to tissue damage.The aims of our study were to evaluate serum cytokines levels of IL-8, IL-18, IFN-α2a, IL-6, IFN-γ, CXCL10, CXCL11, CXCL9, and SAA levels in patients with BD, in comparison to healthy controls (HC), and to correlate their levels to disease activity.We included 78 serum samples obtained from 58 BD patients and analyzed a set of proinflammatory cytokines including IL-8, IL-18, IFN-α2a, IL-6, IFN-γ, CXCL10, CXCL11, and CXCL9 by multiplex bead analysis as well as SAA by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Compared to HC, BD patients showed elevated cytokine levels of IL-8, IL-18, IFN-α2a, and IL-6, and low levels of CXCL11. BD patients with SAA serum levels >20 mg/L showed higher levels of proinflammatory markers than HC or group with SAA ≤20 mg/L. IL-18, IFN-α2a, and IL-6 were higher in BD group with SAA >20 mg/L than HC, while IL-8 and CXCL9 levels were higher than in patients with SAA ≤20 mg/L and HC.Active BD patients with SAA >20 mg/L exhibited elevated levels of inflammatory mediators, suggesting that may exist a relationship between SAA and proinflammatory cytokines in the intricate scenario of BD pathogenesis.

  13. A role for heme in Alzheimer's disease: Heme binds amyloid β and has altered metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Atamna, Hani; Frey, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Heme is a common factor linking several metabolic perturbations in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including iron metabolism, mitochondrial complex IV, heme oxygenase, and bilirubin. Therefore, we determined whether heme metabolism was altered in temporal lobes obtained at autopsy from AD patients and age-matched nondemented subjects. AD brain demonstrated 2.5-fold more heme-b (P < 0.01) and 26% less heme-a (P = 0.16) compared with controls, resulting in a highly significant 2.9-fold decrease in he...

  14. 18F-flutemetamol amyloid imaging in Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment: a phase 2 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, Rik; Van Laere, Koen; Ivanoiu, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    The most widely studied positron emission tomography ligand for in vivo beta-amyloid imaging is (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PIB). Its availability, however, is limited by the need for an on-site cyclotron. Validation of the (18)F-labeled PIB derivative (18)F-flutemetamol could significantly...

  15. A systematic review of amyloid-beta peptides as putative mediators of the association between affective disorders and Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Heegaard, N. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    was to explore clinically founded evidence for amyloid-beta peptides in cerebrospinal fluid and blood as putative biomarkers for affective disorders. Method: Systematic searches in Embase and PubMed databases yielded 23 eligible, observational studies. Results: Despite inconsistencies that were partly ascribed...

  16. 18F-flutemetamol amyloid imaging in Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment: a phase 2 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, Rik; Van Laere, Koen; Ivanoiu, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    The most widely studied positron emission tomography ligand for in vivo beta-amyloid imaging is (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PIB). Its availability, however, is limited by the need for an on-site cyclotron. Validation of the (18)F-labeled PIB derivative (18)F-flutemetamol could significantl...

  17. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  18. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  19. General Amyloid Inhibitors? A Critical Examination of the Inhibition of IAPP Amyloid Formation by Inositol Stereoisomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Raleigh, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin) forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design. PMID:25260075

  20. Long-term treatment of thalidomide ameliorates amyloid-like pathology through inhibition of β-secretase in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping He

    Full Text Available Thalidomide is a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα inhibitor which has been found to have abilities against tumor growth, angiogenesis and inflammation. Recently, it has been applied in clinic for the treatment of multiple myeloma as well as some inflammatory diseases. However, whether thalidomide has any therapeutic effects on neurodegenerative disorders, i.e. Alzheimer's disease (AD is not clear. AD is characterized by excessive amount of amyloid β peptides (Aβ, which results in a significant release of inflammatory factors, including TNFα in the brain. Studies have shown that inhibition of TNFα reduces amyloid-associated pathology, prevents neuron loss and improves cognition. Our recent report showed that genetic inhibition of TNFα/TNF receptor signal transduction down-regulates β amyloid cleavage enzyme 1 (BACE1 activity, reduces Aβ generation and improves learning and memory deficits. However, the mechanism of thalidomide involving in the mitigation of AD neuropathological features remains unclear. Here, we chronically administrated thalidomide on human APPswedish mutation transgenic (APP23 mice from 9 months old (an onset of Aβ deposits and early stage of AD-like changes to 12 months old. We found that, in addition of dramatic decrease in the activation of both astrocytes and microglia, thalidomide significantly reduces Aβ load and plaque formation. Furthermore, we found a significant decrease in BACE1 level and activity with long-term thalidomide application. Interestingly, these findings cannot be observed in the brains of 12-month-old APP23 mice with short-term treatment of thalidomide (3 days. These results suggest that chronic thalidomide administration is an alternative approach for AD prevention and therapeutics.

  1. The nootropic and neuroprotective proline-containing dipeptide noopept restores spatial memory and increases immunoreactivity to amyloid in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskaya, Rita U; Gruden, Marina A; Bobkova, Natalya A; Sewell, Robert D E; Gudasheva, Tatyana A; Samokhin, Alexander N; Seredinin, Sergey B; Noppe, Wim; Sherstnev, Vladimir V; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2007-08-01

    The effects of the novel proline-containing nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide, noopept (GVS-111, N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) were investigated in NMRI mice following olfactory bulbectomy. We have shown previously that these animals developed Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like behaviour, morphology and biochemistry including impairment of spatial memory, regional neuronal degeneration and elevated Abeta peptide brain levels. In the current investigation, spatial memory was assessed using the Morris water maze and serum antibodies to in vitro morphologically characterized amyloid structures of both Abeta((25-35)) peptide and equine lysozyme, as well as to neurotrophic glial factor S100b, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Noopept (administered at a dose of 0.01 mg/kg for a period of 21 days and during a further 5 days training) restored spatial memory and increased serum antibody levels to oligomers of Abeta((25-35)) peptide but not to equine lysozyme amyloid or S100b protein in bulbectomized animals. The positive immunotropic effect of noopept to Abeta((25-35)) peptide prefibrillar aggregates was more marked in sham-operated compared to the bulbectomized subjects which were characterized by an overall suppression of immunoreactivity. Enhancement of the immune response to Abeta((25-35)) peptide prefibrils caused by noopept may attenuate the neurotoxic consequences of amyloid fibrillization and also be associated with an improvement in spatial memory in bulbectomized mice. These actions of noopept, combined with its previously reported neuroprotective and cholinomimetic properties, suggests that this dipeptide may well be useful for improving cognitive deficits induced by neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Molecular approaches to the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: tangle formation, amyloid-β, and microglia in Alzheimer's disease.

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    Takata, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), synaptic loss, and neurodegeneration. Senile plaques are composed of amyloid-β (Aβ) and are surrounded by microglia, a primary immune effector cell in the central nervous system. NFTs are formed by the intraneuronal accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau, and progressive synaptic and neuronal losses closely correlate with cognitive deficits in AD. Studies on responsible genes of familial AD and temporal patterns of pathological changes in brains of patients with Down's syndrome (Trisomy 21), who invariably develop neuropathology of AD, have suggested that Aβ accumulation is a primary event that influences other AD pathologies. Although details of the interaction between AD pathologies remain unclear, experimental evidences to discuss this issue have been accumulated. In this paper, we review and discuss recent findings that link the AD pathologies to each other. Further studies on the interaction between pathologies induced in AD brain may contribute to provide deep insight into the pathogenesis of AD and to develop novel therapeutic, prophylactic, and early diagnostic strategies for AD.

  3. Terapeutika amyloidóz

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Monika; Hrubý, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 12 (2016), s. 851-859 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : amyloidosis * amyloid * Alzheimer's disease Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.387, year: 2016 http://www.chemicke-listy.cz/common/article-vol_110-issue_12-page_851.html

  4. A Novel Cognitive Stress Test for the Detection of Preclinical Alzheimer Disease: Discriminative Properties and Relation to Amyloid Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, David A; Curiel, Rosie E; Greig, Maria T; Bauer, Russell M; Rosado, Marian; Bowers, Dawn; Wicklund, Meredith; Crocco, Elizabeth; Pontecorvo, Michael; Joshi, Abhinay D; Rodriguez, Rosemarie; Barker, Warren W; Hidalgo, Jacqueline; Duara, Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    To examine the utility of a novel "cognitive stress test" to detect subtle cognitive impairments and amyloid load within the brains of neuropsychologically normal community-dwelling elders. Participants diagnosed as cognitively normal (CN), subjective memory impairment (SMI), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and preclinical mild cognitive impairment (PreMCI) were administered the Loewenstein-Acevedo Scale for Semantic Interference and Learning (LASSI-L), a sensitive test of proactive semantic interference (PSI), retroactive semantic interference, and, uniquely, the ability to recover from the effects of PSI. Ninety-three subjects (31 men and 62 women) were recruited from three academic institutions in a research consortium. A subset of these individuals underwent 18F florbetapir positron emission tomography scanning. Relative percentages of impairment for each diagnostic group on the LASSI-L were calculated by χ(2) and Fisher's exact tests. Spearman's rho was used to examine associations between amyloid load and different cognitive measures. LASSI-L deficits were identified among 89% of those with MCI, 47% with PreMCI, 33% with SMI, and 13% classified as CN. CN subjects had no difficulties with recovery from PSI, whereas SMI, preMCI, and MCI participants evidenced deficits in recovery from PSI effects. Among a subgroup of participants with normal scores on traditional neuropsychological tests, the strong associations were between the failure to recover from the effects of PSI and amyloid load in the brain. Failure to recover or compensate for the effects of PSI on the LASSI-L distinguishes the LASSI-L from other widely used neuropsychological tests and appears to be sensitive to subtle cognitive impairments and increasing amyloid load. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhalation of coriander volatile oil increased anxiolytic-antidepressant-like behaviors and decreased oxidative status in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioanca, Oana; Hritcu, Lucian; Mihasan, Marius; Trifan, Adriana; Hancianu, Monica

    2014-05-28

    The present study analyzed the possible anxiolytic, antidepressant and antioxidant proprieties of inhaled coriander volatile oil extracted from Coriandrum sativum var. microcarpum in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of inhaled coriander volatile oil were studied by means of in vivo (elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using catalase specific activity and the total content of the reduced glutathione. The beta-amyloid (1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of the locomotor activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming and immobility times within forced swimming test. Exposure to coriander volatile oil significantly improved these parameters, suggesting anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects. Moreover, coriander volatile oil decreased catalase activity and increased glutathione level in the hippocampus. Our results suggest that multiple exposures to coriander volatile oil can be useful as a mean to counteract anxiety, depression and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Low background and high contrast PET imaging of amyloid-{beta} with [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in Alzheimer's disease patients

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    Forsberg, Anton; Andersson, Jan; Varnaes, Katarina; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Jureus, Anders; Swahn, Britt-Marie; Sandell, Johan; Julin, Per; Svensson, Samuel [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Cselenyi, Zsolt; Schou, Magnus; Johnstroem, Peter; Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Hospital, AstraZeneca Translational Sciences Centre, PET CoE, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksdotter, Maria; Freund-Levi, Yvonne [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jeppsson, Fredrik [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate AZD2995 side by side with AZD2184 as novel PET radioligands for imaging of amyloid-{beta} in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro binding of tritium-labelled AZD2995 and AZD2184 was studied and compared with that of the established amyloid-{beta} PET radioligand PIB. Subsequently, a first-in-human in vivo PET study was performed using [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in three healthy control subjects and seven AD patients. AZD2995, AZD2184 and PIB were found to share the same binding site to amyloid-{beta}. [{sup 3}H]AZD2995 had the highest signal-to-background ratio in brain tissue from patients with AD as well as in transgenic mice. However, [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 had superior imaging properties in PET, as shown by larger effect sizes comparing binding potential values in cortical regions of AD patients and healthy controls. Nevertheless, probably due to a lower amount of nonspecific binding, the group separation of the distribution volume ratio values of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 was greater in areas with lower amyloid-{beta} load, e.g. the hippocampus. Both AZD2995 and AZD2184 detect amyloid-{beta} with high affinity and specificity and also display a lower degree of nonspecific binding than that reported for PIB. Overall [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 seems to be an amyloid-{beta} radioligand with higher uptake and better group separation when compared to [{sup 11}C]AZD2995. However, the very low nonspecific binding of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 makes this radioligand potentially interesting as a tool to study minute levels of amyloid-{beta}. This sensitivity may be important in investigating, for example, early prodromal stages of AD or in the longitudinal study of a disease modifying therapy. (orig.)

  7. Time to Amyloid Positivity and Preclinical Changes in Brain Metabolism, Atrophy, and Cognition: Evidence for Emerging Amyloid Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip S. Insel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aβ pathology is associated with longitudinal changes of brain metabolism, atrophy, and cognition, in cognitively healthy elders. However, Aβ information is usually measured cross-sectionally and dichotomized to classify subjects as Aβ-positive or Aβ-negative, making it difficult to evaluate when brain and cognitive changes occur with respect to emerging Aβ pathology. In this study, we use longitudinal Aβ information to combine the level and rate of change of Aβ to estimate the time to Aβ-positivity for each subject and test this temporal proximity to significant Aβ pathology for associations with brain structure, metabolism, and cognition.Methods: In 89 cognitively healthy elders with up to 10 years of follow-up, we estimated the points at which rates of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET, MRI, and cognitive and functional decline begin to accelerate with respect to the time to Aβ-positivity. Points of initial acceleration in rates of decline were estimated using mixed-effects models with penalized regression splines.Results: Acceleration of rates of FDG PET were observed to occur 20+ years before the conventional threshold for Aβ-positivity. Subtle signs of cognitive dysfunction were observed 10+ years before Aβ-positivity.Conclusions: Aβ may have subtle associations with other hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease before Aβ biomarkers reach conventional thresholds for Aβ-positivity. Therefore, we propose that emerging Aβ pathology occurs many years before cognitively healthy elders reach the current threshold for Aβ positivity (preclinical AD. To allow prevention in the earliest disease stages, AD clinical trials may be designed to also include subjects with Aβ biomarkers in the sub-threshold range.

  8. BACE1 elevation is involved in amyloid plaque development in the triple transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease: differential Aβ antibody labeling of early-onset axon terminal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Macklin, Lauren N; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Oddo, Salvatore; Laferla, Frank M; Struble, Robert G; Rose, Gregory M; Patrylo, Peter R; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2012-02-01

    β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins mutations cause early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). Some FAD-based mouse models produce amyloid plaques, others do not. β-Amyloid (Aβ) deposition can manifest as compact and diffuse plaques; it is unclear why the same Aβ molecules aggregate in different patterns. Is there a basic cellular process governing Aβ plaque pathogenesis? We showed in some FAD mouse models that compact plaque formation is associated with a progressive axonal pathology inherent with increased expression of β-secretase (BACE1), the enzyme initiating the amyloidogenic processing of APP. A monoclonal Aβ antibody, 3D6, visualized distinct axon terminal labeling before plaque onset. The present study was set to understand BACE1 and axonal changes relative to diffuse plaque development and to further characterize the novel axonal Aβ antibody immunoreactivity (IR), using triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice as experimental model. Diffuse-like plaques existed in the forebrain in aged transgenics and were regionally associated with increased BACE1 labeled swollen/sprouting axon terminals. Increased BACE1/3D6 IR at axon terminals occurred in young animals before plaque onset. These axonal elements were also co-labeled by other antibodies targeting the N-terminal and mid-region of Aβ domain and the C-terminal of APP, but not co-labeled by antibodies against the Aβ C-terminal and APP N-terminal. The results suggest that amyloidogenic axonal pathology precedes diffuse plaque formation in the 3xTg-AD mice, and that the early-onset axonal Aβ antibody IR in transgenic models of AD might relate to a cross-reactivity of putative APP β-carboxyl terminal fragments.

  9. Anxiolytic and antidepressant profile of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Noumedem, Jaurès A; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Postu, Paula; Mihasan, Marius

    2015-03-29

    Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae) is employed in traditional medicine of many countries as analgesic, antiinflammatory, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, antidepressant and cognitive-enhancing agent. This study was undertaken in order to evaluate the possible anxiolytic, antidepressant and antioxidant properties of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of the methanolic extract were studied by means of in vivo (elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the amygdala was assessed using superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase specific activities, the total content of the reduced glutathione, protein carbonyl and malondialdehyde levels. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Significant differences were determined by Tukey's post hoc test. F values for which p < 0.05 were regarded as statistically significant. Pearson's correlation coefficient and regression analysis were used in order to evaluate the connection between behavioral measures, the antioxidant defence and lipid peroxidation. The beta-amyloid (1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of the exploratory activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming time and increase of immobility time within forced swimming test. Administration of the methanolic extract significantly exhibited anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects and also antioxidant potential. Taken together, our results suggest that the methanolic extract ameliorates beta-amyloid (1-42)-induced anxiety and depression by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat amygdala.

  10. Chiral recognition in amyloid fiber growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeev, Vladimir; Grogg, Marcel; Ruiz, Jérémy; Boehringer, Régis; Schirer, Alicia; Hellwig, Petra; Jeschke, Gunnar; Hilvert, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Insoluble amyloid fibers represent a pathological signature of many human diseases. To treat such diseases, inhibition of amyloid formation has been proposed as a possible therapeutic strategy. d-Peptides, which possess high proteolytic stability and lessened immunogenicity, are attractive candidates in this context. However, a molecular understanding of chiral recognition phenomena for d-peptides and l-amyloids is currently incomplete. Here we report experiments on amyloid growth of individual enantiomers and their mixtures for two distinct polypeptide systems of different length and structural organization: a 44-residue covalently-linked dimer derived from a peptide corresponding to the [20-41]-fragment of human β2-microglobulin (β2m) and the 99-residue full-length protein. For the dimeric [20-41]β2m construct, a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance of nitroxide-labeled constructs and (13) C-isotope edited FT-IR spectroscopy of (13) C-labeled preparations was used to show that racemic mixtures precipitate as intact homochiral fibers, i.e. undergo spontaneous Pasteur-like resolution into a mixture of left- and right-handed amyloids. In the case of full-length β2m, the presence of the mirror-image d-protein affords morphologically distinct amyloids that are composed largely of enantiopure domains. Removal of the l-component from hybrid amyloids by proteolytic digestion results in their rapid transformation into characteristic long straight d-β2m amyloids. Furthermore, the full-length d-enantiomer of β2m was found to be an efficient inhibitor of l-β2m amyloid growth. This observation highlights the potential of longer d-polypeptides for future development into inhibitors of amyloid propagation. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Alzheimer's Disease as Subcellular `Cancer' --- The Scale-Invariant Principles Underlying the Mechanisms of Aging ---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, M.

    1996-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the slow onset of neurodegeneration leading to dementia in many elderly people. The pathological hallmarks of AD are: the extracellular β-amyloid deposition in the senile plaques; the β-amyloid deposition in cerebral blood vessel walls especially in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch type (HCHWA-D); the intracellular neurofibrillary tangle formation composed of paired helical filaments (PHF), the principal component of which is a hyperphosphorylated form of the microtubule-binding protein, tau; and neurological dysfuction and neuronal cell death in limited regions and pathways of the central nervous system. Note that β-amyloid is a truncated form of a cell surface integral membrane glycoprotein: amyloid precursor protein (APP). Despite these hallmarks, the pathogenesis of AD has been poorly understood. In the present paper, a theory of aging is proposed to give a coherent account of the origins and causes of neurodegeneration common to the diverse neurodegenerative disorders such as AD and prion (proteinaceous infectious particles) diseases in comparison with the pathogenesis of cancers. Surprisingly, the self-aggregation of denatured proteins -- such as β-amyloid, PHF and prions -- responsible for neuronal cell death resembles, in many respects, the development (or the clonal evolution) of malignant cells at the expense of the entire organism harboring them. Although neurodegenerative disorders and cancers apparently differe in pathology, they nevertheless seem to follow the same priciples regardless of the level and scale of the biological organization. It is the general principles of heritable variations and natural selection as well as the general principles of self-organization that operate, not only on different molecules, but also at different hierarchical levels and scales of the biological organizaiton, independent of the details of diseases. Traditionally, natural selection, along

  12. Effects of curcumin and demethoxycurcumin on amyloid-β precursor and tau proteins through the internal ribosome entry sites: a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaflores, Oliver B; Chen, Ying-Ju; Chen, Chih-Ping; Yeh, Jui-Ming; Wu, Tzong-Yuan

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to determine the effects of curcumin and demethoxycurcumin on the internal ribosome entry site of the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) and tau protein through a bi-cistronic reporter assay for screening of anti-Alzheimer's disease agents. A bi-cistronic assay was performed wherein the expression of the first cistron, a β-galactosidase gene under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter, represents the canonical cap-dependent mechanism of translation initiation; while the second cistron involves the utilization of the APP or the tau IRES elements to drive the expression of secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under a cap-independent mechanism. Bioactive natural products reported to have therapeutic potential for AD such as curcumin and demethoxycurcumin were screened in an murine neuroblastoma (N2A) cell model. Western blot analyses for the expression of APP C-terminal protein, human tau-1, and phosphorylated tau at Serine 262 (p(262)) and Serine 396 (pS(396)) were done after treatment of N2A cells with the test compounds. The bi-cistronic reporter assay revealed that curcumin was more effective than demethoxycurcumin, a structural analog of curcumin, in inhibiting both APP and tau IRES-dependent translation initiation. This result was further confirmed by Western blot analysis for the expression of APP C-terminal protein, human tau-1, pS(262) and pS(396) suggesting that curcumin may play a role in AD pathology alleviation through the inhibition of the APP and tau IRES-mediated translation mechanism. On the other hand, demethoxycurcumin was observed to inhibit the phosphorylation of both tau pS(262) and pS(396). A novel assay system using the bi-cistronic reporter constructs for the identification of compounds with activity against the translation directed by APP and tau IRES was developed. The results provide novel suggestive insights for the potential use of the mentioned compounds as prophylactic and therapeutic anti-AD agents. Copyright

  13. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  14. Nonpathological extracellular amyloid is present during normal epididymal sperm maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Whelly

    Full Text Available Amyloids are aggregated proteins characterized by a specific cross-β-sheet structure and are typically associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. Recently, however, several nonpathological amyloids have been found in intracellular organelles of normal mammalian tissues suggesting that amyloid may also carry out biological functions. We previously have shown that the epididymal cystatin CRES (cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic, cst8, a reproductive-specific member of the cystatin superfamily of cysteine protease inhibitors, forms amyloid in vitro suggesting that CRES amyloid may also form in vivo within the epididymal lumen. Here we show that amyloid structures containing CRES are a component of the normal mouse epididymal lumen without any apparent cytotoxic effects on spermatozoa and that these structures change along the length of the tubule. These studies suggest the presence of a functional amyloid structure that may carry out roles in sperm maturation or maintenance of the luminal milieu and which itself may undergo maturational changes along the epididymis. In contrast to previous examples of functional amyloid which were intracellular, our studies now show that nonpathological/functional amyloid can also be extracellular. The presence of an extracellular and nonpathological amyloid in the epididymis suggests that similar amyloid structures may be present in other organ systems and may carry out distinctive tissue-specific functions.

  15. Early long-term administration of the CSF1R inhibitor PLX3397 ablates microglia and reduces accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid, neuritic plaque deposition and pre-fibrillar oligomers in 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosna, Justyna; Philipp, Stephan; Albay, Ricardo; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Baglietto-Vargas, David; LaFerla, Frank M; Glabe, Charles G

    2018-03-01

    Besides the two main classical features of amyloid beta aggregation and tau-containing neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation plays an important yet unclear role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Microglia are believed to be key mediators of neuroinflammation during AD and responsible for the regulation of brain homeostasis by balancing neurotoxicity and neuroprotective events. We have previously reported evidence that neuritic plaques are derived from dead neurons that have accumulated intraneuronal amyloid and further recruit Iba1-positive cells, which play a role in either neuronal demise or neuritic plaque maturation or both. To study the impact of microglia on neuritic plaque development, we treated two-month-old 5XFAD mice with a selective colony stimulation factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) inhibitor, PLX3397, for a period of 3 months, resulting in a significant ablation of microglia. Directly after this treatment, we analyzed the amount of intraneuronal amyloid and neuritic plaques and performed behavioral studies including Y-maze, fear conditioning and elevated plus maze. We found that early long-term PLX3397 administration results in a dramatic reduction of both intraneuronal amyloid as well as neuritic plaque deposition. PLX3397 treated young 5XFAD mice also displayed a significant decrease of soluble fibrillar amyloid oligomers in brain lysates, a depletion of soluble pre-fibrillar oligomers in plasma and an improvement in cognitive function measured by fear conditioning tests. Our findings demonstrate that CSF1R signaling, either directly on neurons or mediated by microglia, is crucial for the accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid and formation of neuritic plaques, suggesting that these two events are serially linked in a causal pathway leading to neurodegeneration and neuritic plaque formation. CSF1R inhibitors represent potential preventative or therapeutic approach that target the very earliest stages of the formation of

  16. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex that cleaves the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) within the transmembrane region, following prior processing by {beta}-secretase, producing amyloid {beta}-peptides (A{beta}{sub 40} and A{beta}{sub 42}). Errant production of A{beta}-peptides that substantially increases A{beta}{sub 42} production has been associated with the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Biophysical and genetic studies indicate that presenilin-1 (Psn-1), which contains the proteolytic active site, and three other membrane proteins, nicastrin (Nct), APH-1, and PEN-2 are required to form the core of the active {gamma}-secretase complex. Here, we report the purification of the native {gamma}-secretase complexes from HeLa cell membranes and the identification of an additional {gamma}-secretase complex subunit, CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. The presence of this subunit as an integral part of the complex itself was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation studies of the purified protein from HeLa cells and solubilized complexes from other cell lines such as neural cell HCN-1A and HEK293. Depletion of CD147 by RNA interference was found to increase the production of A{beta} peptides without changing the expression level of the other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates while CD147 overexpression had no statistically significant effect on amyloid {beta}-peptide production, other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates, indicating that the presence of the CD147 subunit within the {gamma}-secretase complex directly down-modulates the production of A{beta}-peptides. {gamma}-secretase was first recognized through its role in the production of the A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex with unusual aspartyl protease activity that cleaves a variety of type I membrane proteins

  17. Immunocytochemical Characterization of Alzheimer Disease Hallmarks in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Treated with a New Anti-Amyloid-β Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Carrera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available APP/PS1 double-transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, which overexpress mutated forms of the gene for human amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilin 1 (PS1, have provided robust neuropathological hallmarks of AD-like pattern at early ages. This study characterizes immunocytochemical patterns of AD mouse brain as a model for human AD treated with the EB101 vaccine. In this novel vaccine, a new approach has been taken to circumvent past failures by judiciously selecting an adjuvant consisting of a physiological matrix embedded in liposomes, composed of naturally occurring phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cholesterol. Our findings showed that administration of amyloid-β1−42 (Aβ and sphingosine-1-phosphate emulsified in liposome complex (EB101 to APP/PS1 mice before onset of Aβ deposition (7 weeks of age and/or at an older age (35 weeks of age is effective in halting the progression and clearing the AD-like neuropathological hallmarks. Passive immunization with EB101 did not activate inflammatory responses from the immune system and astrocytes. Consistent with a decreased inflammatory background, the basal immunological interaction between the T cells and the affected areas (hippocampus in the brain of treated mice was notably reduced. These results demonstrate that immunization with EB101 vaccine prevents and attenuates AD neuropathology in this type of double-transgenic mice.

  18. Oleocanthal-rich extra-virgin olive oil enhances donepezil effect by reducing amyloid-β load and related toxicity in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batarseh, Yazan S; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2017-12-27

    Previous evidence suggested that extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) is linked to attenuating amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology and improving cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse models. In addition, we recently reported the beneficial effect of oleocanthal, a phenolic compound in EVOO, against AD pathology. Currently, medications available to target AD pathology are limited. Donepezil is an acetylcholine esterase inhibitor approved for use for all AD stages. Donepezil has been reported to have limited Aβ-targeting mechanisms beside its acetylcholine esterase inhibition. The aim of this study was to investigate the consumption of EVOO rich with oleocanthal (hereafter EVOO) as a medical food on enhancing the effect of donepezil on attenuating Aβ load and related toxicity in 5xFAD mouse model of AD. Our results showed that EVOO consumption in combination with donepezil significantly reduced Aβ load and related pathological changes. Reduced Aβ load could be explained, at least in part, by enhancing Aβ clearance pathways including blood-brain barrier (BBB) clearance and enzymatic degradation, and shifting amyloid precursor protein processing toward the nonamyloidogenic pathway. Furthermore, EVOO combination with donepezil up-regulated synaptic proteins, enhanced BBB tightness and reduced neuroinflammation associated with Aβ pathology. In conclusion, EVOO consumption as a medical food combined with donepezil offers an effective therapeutic approach by enhancing the noncholinergic mechanisms of donepezil and by providing additional mechanisms to attenuate Aβ-related pathology in AD patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Different Populations of Human Locus Ceruleus Neurons Contain Heavy Metals or Hyperphosphorylated Tau: Implications for Amyloid-β and Tau Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    A marked loss of locus ceruleus (LC) neurons is a striking pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). LC neurons are particularly prone to taking up circulating toxicants such as heavy metals, and hyperphosphorylated tau (tau(HYP)) appears early in these neurons. In an attempt to find out if both heavy metals and tau(HYP) could be damaging LC neurons, we looked in the LC neurons of 21 sporadic AD patients and 43 non-demented controls for the heavy metals mercury, bismuth, and silver using autometallography, and for tau(HYP) using AT8 immunostaining. Heavy metals or tau(HYP) were usually seen in separate LC neurons, and rarely co-existed within the same neuron. The number of heavy metal-containing LC neurons did not correlate with the number containing tau(HYP). Heavy metals therefore appear to occupy a mostly different population of LC neurons to those containing tau(HYP), indicating that the LC in AD is vulnerable to two different assaults. Reduced brain noradrenaline from LC damage is linked to amyloid-β deposition, and tau(HYP) in the LC may seed neurofibrillary tangles in other neurons. A model is described, incorporating the present findings, that proposes that the LC plays a part in both the amyloid-β and tau pathologies of AD.

  20. Antroquinonol Lowers Brain Amyloid-β Levels and Improves Spatial Learning and Memory in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Miles C.; Cheng, Irene H.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The deposition of brain amyloid-β peptides (Aβ), which are cleaved from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is one of the pathological hallmarks of AD. Aβ-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation play important roles in the pathogenesis of AD. Antroquinonol, a ubiquinone derivative isolated from Antrodia camphorata, has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines via activating the nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway, which is downregulated in AD. Therefore, we examined whether antroquinonol could improve AD-like pathological and behavioral deficits in the APP transgenic mouse model. We found that antroquinonol was able to cross the blood-brain barrier and had no adverse effects via oral intake. Two months of antroquinonol consumption improved learning and memory in the Morris water maze test, reduced hippocampal Aβ levels, and reduced the degree of astrogliosis. These effects may be mediated through the increase of Nrf2 and the decrease of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) levels. These findings suggest that antroquinonol could have beneficial effects on AD-like deficits in APP transgenic mouse. PMID:26469245

  1. Antroquinonol Lowers Brain Amyloid-β Levels and Improves Spatial Learning and Memory in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Miles C; Cheng, Irene H

    2015-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The deposition of brain amyloid-β peptides (Aβ), which are cleaved from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is one of the pathological hallmarks of AD. Aβ-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation play important roles in the pathogenesis of AD. Antroquinonol, a ubiquinone derivative isolated from Antrodia camphorata, has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines via activating the nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway, which is downregulated in AD. Therefore, we examined whether antroquinonol could improve AD-like pathological and behavioral deficits in the APP transgenic mouse model. We found that antroquinonol was able to cross the blood-brain barrier and had no adverse effects via oral intake. Two months of antroquinonol consumption improved learning and memory in the Morris water maze test, reduced hippocampal Aβ levels, and reduced the degree of astrogliosis. These effects may be mediated through the increase of Nrf2 and the decrease of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) levels. These findings suggest that antroquinonol could have beneficial effects on AD-like deficits in APP transgenic mouse.

  2. Pioglitazone Improves Reversal Learning and Exerts Mixed Cerebrovascular Effects in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease with Combined Amyloid-β and Cerebrovascular Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Rochford, Joseph; Hamel, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are invaluable in dissecting the pathogenic mechanisms and assessing the efficacy of potential new therapies. Here, we used the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist pioglitazone in an attempt to rescue the pathogenic phenotype in adult (12 months) and aged (>18 months) bitransgenic A/T mice that overexpress a mutated human amyloid precursor protein (APPSwe,Ind) and a constitutively active form of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). A/T mice recapitulate the AD-related cognitive deficits, amyloid beta (Aβ) and cerebrovascular pathologies, as well as the altered metabolic and vascular coupling responses to increased neuronal activity. Pioglitazone normalized neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling responses to sensory stimulation, and reduced cortical astroglial and hippocampal microglial activation in both age groups. Spatial learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze were not rescued by pioglitazone, but reversal learning was improved in the adult cohort notwithstanding a progressing Aβ pathology. While pioglitazone preserved the constitutive nitric oxide synthesis in the vessel wall, it unexpectedly failed to restore cerebrovascular reactivity in A/T mice and even exacerbated the dilatory deficits. These data demonstrate pioglitazone’s efficacy on selective AD hallmarks in a complex AD mouse model of comorbid amyloidosis and cerebrovascular pathology. They further suggest a potential benefit of pioglitazone in managing neuroinflammation, cerebral perfusion and glucose metabolism in AD patients devoid of cerebrovascular pathology. PMID:23874687

  3. Formation of amyloid fibers by monomeric light chain variable domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumshtein, Boris; Esswein, Shannon R; Landau, Meytal; Ryan, Christopher M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Phillips, Martin L; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-10-03

    Systemic light chain amyloidosis is a lethal disease characterized by excess immunoglobulin light chains and light chain fragments composed of variable domains, which aggregate into amyloid fibers. These fibers accumulate and damage organs. Some light chains induce formation of amyloid fibers, whereas others do not, making it unclear what distinguishes amyloid formers from non-formers. One mechanism by which sequence variation may reduce propensity to form amyloid fibers is by shifting the equilibrium toward an amyloid-resistant quaternary structure. Here we identify the monomeric form of the Mcg immunoglobulin light chain variable domain as the quaternary unit required for amyloid fiber assembly. Dimers of Mcg variable domains remain stable and soluble, yet become prone to assemble into amyloid fibers upon disassociation into monomers. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. The effect of simvastatin treatment on the amyloid precursor protein and brain cholesterol metabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoglund, K; Thelen, K M; Syversen, S

    2005-01-01

    as on cognitive decline in patients with AD. Despite biochemical data suggesting that treatment with 20 mg/day of simvastatin for 12 months does affect the brain cholesterol metabolism, we did not find any change in CSF or plasma levels of beta-amyloid (Abeta)(1-42). However, by analysis of APP isoforms, we found...... with AD have been treated with simvastatin (20 mg/day) for 12 months. The aim was to further investigate the effect of simvastatin treatment on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of APP processing, AD biomarkers as total tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181, brain cholesterol metabolism as well...

  5. Chemical Methods to Knock Down the Amyloid Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Gao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid proteins are closely related with amyloid diseases and do tremendous harm to human health. However, there is still a lack of effective strategies to treat these amyloid diseases, so it is important to develop novel methods. Accelerating the clearance of amyloid proteins is a favorable method for amyloid disease treatment. Recently, chemical methods for protein reduction have been developed and have attracted much attention. In this review, we focus on the latest progress of chemical methods that knock down amyloid proteins, including the proteolysis-targeting chimera (PROTAC strategy, the “recognition-cleavage” strategy, the chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA strategy, the selectively light-activatable organic and inorganic molecules strategy and other chemical strategies.

  6. Yeast red pigment modifies Amyloid beta growth in Alzheimer disease models in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzglyadova, Olga V; Mikhailova, Ekaterina V; Amen, Triana R; Zenin, Valeriy V; Artemov, Alexey V; Kostyleva, Elena I; Mezhenskaya, Daria A; Rodin, Dmitry I; Saifitdinova, Alsu F; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail A; Sarantseva, Svetlana V; Soidla, Tonu R

    2015-01-01

    The effect of yeast red pigment on amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation and fibril growth was studied in yeasts, fruit flies and in vitro. Yeast strains accumulating red pigment (red strains) contained less amyloid and had better survival rates compared to isogenic strains without red pigment accumulation (white strains). Confocal and fluorescent microscopy was used to visualise fluorescent Aβ-GFP aggregates. Yeast cells containing less red pigment had more Aβ-GFP aggregates despite the lower level of overall GFP fluorescence. Western blot analysis with anti-GFP, anti-Aβ and A11 antibodies also revealed that red cells contained a considerably lower amount of Aβ GFP aggregates as compared to white cells. Similar results were obtained with exogenous red pigment that was able to penetrate yeast cells. In vitro experiments with thioflavine and TEM showed that red pigment effectively decreased Aβ fibril growth. Transgenic flies expressing Aβ were cultivated on medium containing red and white isogenic yeast strains. Flies cultivated on red strains had a significant decrease in Aβ accumulation levels and brain neurodegeneration. They also demonstrated better memory and learning indexes and higher locomotor ability.

  7. An Enzyme from Aristolochia indica Destabilizes Fibrin-β Amyloid Co-Aggregate: Implication in Cerebrovascular Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Bhattacharjee

    Full Text Available Fibrinogen and β-amyloid (Aβ peptide independently form ordered aggregates but in combination, they form disordered structures which are resistant to fibrinolytic enzymes like plasmin and cause severity in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA. A novel enzyme of 31.3 kDa has been isolated from the root of the medicinal plant Aristolochia indica that showed fibrinolytic as well as fibrin-Aβ co-aggregate destabilizing properties. This enzyme is functionally distinct from plasmin. Thrombolytic action of the enzyme was demonstrated in rat model. The potency of the plant enzyme in degrading fibrin and fibrin-plasma protein (Aβ, human serum albumin, lysozyme, transthyretin and fibronectin co-aggregates was demonstrated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy that showed better potency of the plant enzyme as compared to plasmin. Moreover, the plant enzyme inhibited localization of the co-aggregate inside SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and also co-aggregate induced cytotoxicity. Plasmin was inefficient in this respect. In the background of limited options for fragmentation of these co-aggregates, the plant enzyme may appear as a potential proteolytic enzyme.

  8. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins.As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l.We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of proteins (amyloidogenic proteins and non-amyloidogenic proteins has been

  9. Neuronal Store-Operated Calcium Entry and Mushroom Spine Loss in Amyloid Precursor Protein Knock-In Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Wu, Lili; Pchitskaya, Ekaterina; Zakharova, Olga; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2015-09-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common reason for elderly dementia in the world. We proposed that memory loss in AD is related to destabilization of mushroom postsynaptic spines involved in long-term memory storage. We demonstrated previously that stromal interaction molecule 2 (STIM2)-regulated neuronal store-operated calcium entry (nSOC) in postsynaptic spines play a key role in stability of mushroom spines by maintaining activity of synaptic Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII). Furthermore, we demonstrated previously that the STIM2-nSOC-CaMKII pathway is downregulated in presenilin 1 M146V knock-in (PS1-M146V KI) mouse model of AD, leading to loss of hippocampal mushroom spines in this model. In the present study, we demonstrate that hippocampal mushroom postsynaptic spines are also lost in amyloid precursor protein knock-in (APPKI) mouse model of AD. We demonstrated that loss of mushroom spines occurs as a result of accumulation of extracellular β-amyloid 42 in APPKI culture media. Our results indicate that extracellular Aβ42 acts by overactivating mGluR5 receptor in APPKI neurons, leading to elevated Ca(2+) levels in endoplasmic reticulum, compensatory downregulation of STIM2 expression, impaired synaptic nSOC, and reduced CaMKII activity. Pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 or overexpression of STIM2 rescued synaptic nSOC and prevented mushroom spine loss in APPKI hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that downregulation of synaptic STIM2-nSOC-CaMKII pathway causes loss of mushroom synaptic spines in both presenilin and APPKI mouse models of AD. We propose that modulators/activators of this pathway may have a potential therapeutic value for treatment of memory loss in AD. Significance statement: A direct connection between amyloid-induced synaptic mushroom spine loss and neuronal store-operated calcium entry pathway is shown. These results provide strong support for the calcium hypothesis of neurodegeneration and further validate the synaptic

  10. Clinical predictors of severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy and influence of APOE genotype in persons with pathologically-verified Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringman, John M.; Sachs, Michael C.; Zhou, Yan; Monsell, Sarah E.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Vinters, Harry V.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Though cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) has important clinical implications, our understanding of it and ability to diagnose it is limited. Objective We sought to determine pathological correlates and clinical factors identifiable during life that predict the presence of severe CAA in persons with pathologically-confirmed Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Design We compared demographic and clinical variables at the earliest visit during life at which subjects were found to have cognitive impairment, and pathological variables between persons ultimately found to have no or severe CAA at autopsy using logistic regression. Analyses were repeated separately for carriers and non-carriers of the APOE ε4 allele. Setting Data were obtained from the Uniform Data Set that comprises longitudinal clinical assessments performed in the Alzheimer’s Disease Centers funded by the National Institute on Aging. Participants 193 persons with severe CAA and 232 persons with no CAA. All subjects had cognitive impairment and met NIA-Reagan neuropathological criteria for AD. Main Outcome Measures Prevalence of demographic characteristics and the APOE ε4 allele and odds ratios of clinical variables for the prediction of severe CAA. Results Persons with severe CAA were more likely to carry an APOE ε4 allele (64.9% vs. 42.8%), to be Hispanic (6.8% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.003), to have had a transient ischemic attack (TIA, 12.5% vs. 6.1%, OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1 – 4.4), and had lower degrees of diffuse amyloid plaque pathology (mean CERAD scores 1.2 vs. 1.4, p = 0.01) than persons with no CAA. Intracerebral hemorrhage (9.3% vs. 3.5%, p = 0.01), cortical microinfarcts (20.7% vs. 12.9%, p = 0.03), and subcortical leukoencephalopathy (20.5% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.02) were more common in persons with CAA. A higher prevalence of stroke (11.1% vs. 3.9%, OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.0 – 14.6) and hypercholesterolemia (50% vs. 33.3%, OR = 2.3, CI 1.1 – 4.7) were found in non-carriers of the ε4 allele with

  11. Cognition and memory function of Taraxacum coreanum in an in vivo amyloid-β-induced mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ah Young

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether the ethyl acetate fraction of Taraxacum coreanum (ETC had a protective effect against memory impairment in an amyloid beta (Aβ-induced mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The formation of Aβ in the brain is a hallmark of AD. We examined whether oxidative stress contributes to learning and memory deficits using the T-maze test, the object recognition test, and the Morris water maze test in mice injected with Aβ. Cognition and memory function were significantly impaired in mice injected with Aβ, as compared to the normal group. However, mice that received ETC orally at doses of 50 or 100 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks showed high recognition behavior of tasks. ETC may have prevented oxidative stress to the brain tissue by reducing lipid peroxidation levels and a NO scavenger. ETC could be useful for the prevention and treatment of AD.

  12. ImmunoPEGliposome-mediated reduction of blood and brain amyloid levels in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease is restricted to aged animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordóñez-Gutiérrez, Lara; Posado-Fernández, Adrián; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2017-01-01

    ) and THP-1 phagocytes (stimulating uptake) was confirmed in vitro. The multivalent immunoliposomes dramatically reduced circulating and brain levels of Aβ1-40, and particularly Aβ1-42, in "aged" (16 month-old), but not "adult" (10 month-old) APP/PS1 transgenic mice on repeated intraperitoneal......The accumulation of extracellular amyloid-beta (Aβ) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (hyper-phosphorylated Tau) in the brain are two major neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Active and passive immunotherapy may limit cerebral Aβ deposition and/or accelerate its...... clearance. With the aid of a newly characterized monoclonal anti-Aβ antibody we constructed immunoPEGliposomes with high avidity for capturing Aβ in the periphery. The functionality of these vesicles in modulating Aβ uptake by both human brain capillary endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells (suppressing uptake...

  13. Alterations in Cerebral Cortical Glucose and Glutamine Metabolism Precedes Amyloid Plaques in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Aldana, Blanca I

    2017-01-01

    by mass spectrometry. The ATP synthesis rate of isolated whole-brain mitochondria was assessed by an on-line luciferin-luciferase assay. Significantly increased (13)C labeling of intracellular lactate and alanine and decreased tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity were observed from cerebral cortical...... rate tended to be decreased in isolated whole-brain mitochondria of APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Thus, several cerebral metabolic changes are evident in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mouse prior to amyloid plaque deposition, including altered glucose metabolism, hampered glutamine processing and mitochondrial......Alterations in brain energy metabolism have been suggested to be of fundamental importance for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, specific changes in brain energetics in the early stages of AD are poorly known. The aim of this study was to investigate cerebral energy metabolism...

  14. The n-Butanol Fraction and Rutin from Tartary Buckwheat Improve Cognition and Memory in an In Vivo Model of Amyloid-β-Induced Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Yeon; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Dong Gu; Cho, Sunghun; Yoon, Young-Ho; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Sanghyun

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the beneficial effects of the n-butanol fraction and rutin extracted from tartary buckwheat (TB) on learning and memory deficits in a mouse model of amyloid β (Aβ)-induced Alzheimer's disease (AD). Learning and memory were assessed using the T-maze, object recognition, and Morris water maze tests. Animals administered Aβ showed impaired cognition and memory, which were alleviated by oral administration of an n-butanol fraction and rutin extracted from TB. Similarly, Aβ-induced increases in nitric oxide formation and lipid peroxidation in the brain, liver, and kidneys were attenuated by treatment with n-butanol fraction and rutin from TB in addition to antioxidant effects observed in control (nonAβ-treated) animals. The results of the present study suggest that the n-butanol fraction and rutin extracted from TB are protective against and have possible therapeutic applications for the treatment of AD.

  15. Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis by detecting exogenous fluorescent signal of ligand bound to beta amyloid in the lens of human eye: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eKerbage

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We report results of a clinical exploratory human trial involving 10 participants using a combination of a fluorescent ligand and a laser scanning device, SAPPHIRE System, as an aid in the diagnosis of Probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such a technique has been used in vivo of a human lens. The primary goal of the clinical trial, in addition to safety assessment, was to evaluate efficacy of the system. By detecting specific fluorescent signature of ligand bound beta amyloid in the supranucleus region of the human lens, a two-fold differentiation factor between AD patients and Control groups is achieved. Data from our studies indicates that deeper regions of the supranucleus provide the highest measures of ligand bound fluorescence signal from both controls and AD patients. Further studies are underway involving a larger population for statistical evaluation of the method.

  16. Dual Targeting of Amyloid-beta Clearance and Neuroinflammation as a Novel Therapeutic Approach against Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batarseh, Yazan S.

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) cascade hypothesis suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is related to an imbalance between the production and clearance of Abeta peptide. Sporadic AD has been related to faulty clearance of Abeta. Accumulation of Abeta oligomers (Abetao) has been linked to several downstream toxic effects including neuroinflammation, synaptic loss, and cellular death. Abeta transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the primary pathways for reducing Abeta load in the brain, which work hand in hand with other parenchymal mechanisms to reduce Abeta levels including intra and extracellular degradation by a family of Abeta degrading enzymes. Established AD drugs, such as the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil, have been reported to have several additional non-cholinergic effects that alter Abeta pathology; reduce Abeta load, anti-inflammatory response, and attenuate synaptic loss. However, their limited effect only lead to minor improvements in AD symptoms without improving the prognosis of the disease. The lack of effective medical treatment for AD led to several studies focusing on establishing new therapeutic approaches to reduce Abeta pathology. We aimed to identify and characterize natural products that are capable of enhancing the BBB clearance of Abeta in addition to reducing neuroinflammation. Our first project was to investigate the role of oleocanthal (one of the active ingredients in extra-virgin olive oil; EVOO) on attenuating Abeta toxic effects on neurons and astrocytes. We developed Abeta oligomers (Abetao) induced inflammatory environment by exposing neurons and astrocytes to accumulative doses of Abetao to investigate oleocanthal effect on modulating Abetao pathological changes in neurons and astrocytes. Our findings demonstrated oleocanthal prevented Abetao-induced synaptic proteins, SNAP-25 and PSD-95, down-regulation in neurons, attenuated Abetao-induced inflammation, and restored glutamine transporter (GLT1) and glucose

  17. Xanthene food dye, as a modulator of Alzheimer's disease amyloid-beta peptide aggregation and the associated impaired neuronal cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Edward Wong

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of dementia. AD is a degenerative brain disorder that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. It has been suggested that aggregation of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ is closely linked to the development of AD pathology. In the search for safe, effective modulators, we evaluated the modulating capabilities of erythrosine B (ER, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved red food dye, on Aβ aggregation and Aβ-associated impaired neuronal cell function.In order to evaluate the modulating ability of ER on Aβ aggregation, we employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM, thioflavin T (ThT fluorescence assay, and immunoassays using Aβ-specific antibodies. TEM images and ThT fluorescence of Aβ samples indicate that protofibrils are predominantly generated and persist for at least 3 days. The average length of the ER-induced protofibrils is inversely proportional to the concentration of ER above the stoichiometric concentration of Aβ monomers. Immunoassay results using Aβ-specific antibodies suggest that ER binds to the N-terminus of Aβ and inhibits amyloid fibril formation. In order to evaluate Aβ-associated toxicity we determined the reducing activity of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells treated with Aβ aggregates formed in the absence or in the presence of ER. As the concentration of ER increased above the stoichiometric concentration of Aβ, cellular reducing activity increased and Aβ-associated reducing activity loss was negligible at 500 µM ER.Our findings show that ER is a novel modulator of Aβ aggregation and reduces Aβ-associated impaired cell function. Our findings also suggest that xanthene dye can be a new type of small molecule modulator of Aβ aggregation. With demonstrated safety profiles and blood-brain permeability, ER represents a particularly attractive aggregation modulator for amyloidogenic proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of amyloid beta species and monitoring therapy in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Tian, Yanli; Zhang, Can; Tian, Xiaoyu; Ross, Alana W.; Moir, Robert D.; Sun, Hongbin; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) molecular imaging has been widely applied to monitoring therapy of cancer and other diseases in preclinical studies; however, this technology has not been applied successfully to monitoring therapy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although several NIRF probes for detecting amyloid beta (Aβ) species of AD have been reported, none of these probes has been used to monitor changes of Aβs during therapy. In this article, we demonstrated that CRANAD-3, a curcumin analog, is capable of detecting both soluble and insoluble Aβ species. In vivo imaging showed that the NIRF signal of CRANAD-3 from 4-mo-old transgenic AD (APP/PS1) mice was 2.29-fold higher than that from age-matched wild-type mice, indicating that CRANAD-3 is capable of detecting early molecular pathology. To verify the feasibility of CRANAD-3 for monitoring therapy, we first used the fast Aβ-lowering drug LY2811376, a well-characterized beta-amyloid cleaving enzyme-1 inhibitor, to treat APP/PS1 mice. Imaging data suggested that CRANAD-3 could monitor the decrease in Aβs after drug treatment. To validate the imaging capacity of CRANAD-3 further, we used it to monitor the therapeutic effect of CRANAD-17, a curcumin analog for inhibition of Aβ cross-linking. The imaging data indicated that the fluorescence signal in the CRANAD-17–treated group was significantly lower than that in the control group, and the result correlated with ELISA analysis of brain extraction and Aβ plaque counting. It was the first time, to our knowledge, that NIRF was used to monitor AD therapy, and we believe that our imaging technology has the potential to have a high impact on AD drug development. PMID:26199414

  19. Losartan improves cerebrovascular function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease with combined overproduction of amyloid-β and transforming growth factor-β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Tong, Xin-Kang; Imboden, Hans; Hamel, Edith

    2017-06-01

    Alterations of the renin-angiotensin system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We tested the efficacy of losartan (10 mg/kg/day for three months), a selective angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, in alleviating cerebrovascular and cognitive deficits in double-transgenic mice (six months at endpoint) that overexpress a mutated form of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP Swe,Ind ) and a constitutively active form of the transforming growth factor-β1, thereafter named A/T mice. Losartan rescued cerebrovascular reactivity, particularly the dilatory responses, but failed to attenuate astroglial activation and to normalize the neurovascular uncoupling response to sensory stimulation. The cognitive deficits of A/T mice were not restored by losartan nor were the increased brain levels of soluble and insoluble Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 peptides normalized. Our results are the first to demonstrate the capacity of losartan to improve cerebrovascular reactivity in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model of combined Aβ-induced vascular oxidative stress and transforming growth factor-β1-mediated vascular fibrosis. These data suggest that losartan may be promising for restoring cerebrovascular function in patients with vascular diseases at risk for vascular dementia or Alzheimer's disease. However, a combined therapy may be warranted for rescuing both vascular and cognitive deficits in a multifaceted pathology like Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Impaired JIP3-dependent axonal lysosome transport promotes amyloid plaque pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrishankar, Swetha; Wu, Yumei; Ferguson, Shawn M

    2017-10-02

    Lysosomes robustly accumulate within axonal swellings at Alzheimer's disease (AD) amyloid plaques. However, the underlying mechanisms and disease relevance of such lysosome accumulations are not well understood. Motivated by these problems, we identified JNK-interacting protein 3 (JIP3) as an important regulator of axonal lysosome transport and maturation. JIP3 knockout mouse neuron primary cultures accumulate lysosomes within focal axonal swellings that resemble the dystrophic axons at amyloid plaques. These swellings contain high levels of amyloid precursor protein processing enzymes (BACE1 and presenilin 2) and are accompanied by elevated Aβ peptide levels. The in vivo importance of the JIP3-dependent regulation of axonal lysosomes was revealed by the worsening of the amyloid plaque pathology arising from JIP3 haploinsufficiency in a mouse model of AD. These results establish the critical role of JIP3-dependent axonal lysosome transport in regulating amyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein processing and support a model wherein Aβ production is amplified by plaque-induced axonal lysosome transport defects. © 2017 Gowrishankar et al.

  1. Glia in Alzheimer's disease and aging: Molecular mechanisms underlying astrocyte and microglia reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orre, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in our society. The disease is characterized by pathological hallmarks such as Amyloid beta (Aß) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. These pathological changes are associated with neuronal dysfunction and severe cognitive impairment. In

  2. Alloimmunization in multitransfused liver disease patients: Impact of underlying disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Bajpai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transfusion support is vital to the management of patients with liver diseases. Repeated transfusions are associated with many risks such as transfusion-transmitted infection, transfusion immunomodulation, and alloimmunization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective data analysis of antibody screening and identification was done from February 2012 to February 2014 to determine the frequency and specificity of irregular red-cell antibodies in multitransfused liver disease patients. The clinical and transfusion records were reviewed. The data was compiled, statistically analyzed, and reviewed. Results: A total of 842 patients were included in our study. Alloantibodies were detected in 5.22% of the patients. Higher rates of alloimmunization were seen in patients with autoimmune hepatitis, cryptogenic liver disease, liver damage due to drugs/toxins, and liver cancer patients. Patients with alcoholic liver disease had a lower rate of alloimmunization. The alloimmunization was 12.7% (23/181 in females and 3.17% (21/661 in males. Antibodies against the Rh system were the most frequent with 27 of 44 alloantibodies (61.36%. The most common alloantibody identified was anti-E (11/44 cases, 25%, followed by anti-C (6/44 cases, 13.63%. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alloimmunization rate is affected by underlying disease. Provision of Rh and Kell phenotype-matched blood can significantly reduce alloimmunization.

  3. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Hisashi [Research Center for Computational Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Department of Structural Molecular Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  4. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anckarsäter Henrik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and β-amyloid (Aβ is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB. Methods The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the β-amyloid peptides Aβ38, Aβ40 and Aβ42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP isoforms α-sAPP and β-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau and neurofilament protein (NFL were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. Results In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Conclusions Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  5. Influence of scan duration on the accuracy of {beta}-amyloid PET with florbetaben in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiepolt, Solveig; Barthel, Henryk; Butzke, Daniel; Hesse, Swen; Patt, Marianne; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Pharma AG, Global Clinical Development, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Florbetaben is a {beta}-amyloid-targeted PET tracer with significant potential for augmenting the toolbox in the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In dementia imaging, shortening of scan duration may simplify future clinical use. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the effect of scan duration on diagnostic accuracy. PET scans obtained from 25 AD patients and 25 healthy volunteers (HVs) were analysed. In each subject, scans of three different durations (5, 10 and 20 min; all starting 90 min after injection) were obtained, randomized, and visually assessed by three experts blinded to the subject's identity and group affiliation. Presence/absence of {beta}-amyloid and diagnostic confidence (0-100 %) were scored, and 10 % of the scans were re-read. Further, randomly selected datasets of ten AD patients and ten HVs were quantified using an established VOI-based approach and using a voxel-based approach. The sensitivity and specificity of the blinded read were 80 % and 96 %, respectively, for all scan durations. Diagnostic confidence was high (97 {+-} 6 %, 97 {+-} 6 % and 95 {+-} 8 % for the 20-min, 10-min and 5-min scans, respectively; n.s.), as was interreader agreement (kappa{sub 20} {sub min} = 0.94, kappa{sub 10} {sub min} = 0.94, kappa{sub 5} {sub min} = 0.89; n.s.). Intrareader agreement was highest for the 20-min scan (kappa = 1.00) and lower for the 10-min scan (kappa = 0.71) and 5-min scan (kappa = 0.80; p = 0.002 and 0.003 vs. the 20-min scan). For all scan durations, composite SUVRs (Cohen's d effect size 4.5, 3.9 and 4.8 for the 5-min, 10-min and 20-min scans; p < 0.0001 each) and individual brain volumes affected by {beta}-amyloid (Cohen's d effect size 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 for the 5-min, 10-min and 20-min scans; p < 0.005 each) were significantly higher in AD patients than in HVs. Reduction in scan duration did not relevantly affect the accuracy of florbetaben PET scans in discriminating between AD patients

  6. What is the role of amyloid precursor protein dimerization?

    OpenAIRE

    Khalifa, Naouel Ben; Van Hees, Joanne; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Huysseune, Sandra; Smith, Steven O.; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Octave, Jean-Noël; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research efforts have been conducted over the past decades to understand the processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP). APP cleavage leads to the production of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta), which is the major constituent of the amyloid core of senile plaques found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Abeta is produced by the sequential cleavage of APP by beta- and gamma-secretases. Cleavage of APP by gamma-secretase also generates the APP Intracellula...

  7. Regional Amyloid Deposition in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease Evaluated by [18F]AV-45 Positron Emission Tomography in Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Kuo, Hung-Chou; Hsu, Wen-Chuin; Chuang, Wen-Li; Kung, Mei-Ping; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wai, Yau-Yau; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Huang, Chin-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background To compare the neocortical amyloid loads among cognitively normal (CN), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects with [18F]AV-45 positron emission tomography (PET). Materials and Methods [18F]AV-45 PET was performed in 11 CN, 13 aMCI, and 12 AD subjects to compare the cerebral cortex-to-whole cerebellum standard uptake value ratios (SUVRs) of global and individual volumes of interest (VOIs) cerebral cortex. The correlation between global cortical [18F]AV-45 SUVRs and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores was analyzed. Results The global cortical [18F]AV-45 SUVRs were significantly different among the CN (1.08±0.08), aMCI (1.27±0.06), and AD groups (1.34±0.13) (p = 0.0003) with amyloidosis positivity rates of 9%, 62%, and 92% in the three groups respectively. Compared to CN subjects, AD subjects had higher SUVRs in the global cortical, precuneus, frontal, parietal, occipital, temporal, and posterior cingulate areas; while aMCI subjects had higher values in the global cortical, precuneus, frontal, occipital and posterior cingulate areas. There were negative correlations of MMSE scores with SUVRs in the global cortical, precuneus, frontal, parietal, occipital, temporal, posterior cingulate and anterior cingulate areas on a combined subject pool of the three groups after age and education attainment adjustment. Conclusions Amyloid deposition occurs relatively early in precuneus, frontal and posterior cingulate in aMCI subjects. Higher [18F]AV-45 accumulation is present in parietal, occipital and temporal gyri in AD subjects compared to the aMCI group. Significant correlation between MMSE scores and [18F]AV-45 SUVRs can be observed among CN, aMCI and AD subjects. PMID:23516589

  8. Comparison of the binding characteristics of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 and other amyloid imaging tracers to Alzheimer's disease pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Furumoto, Shozo [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tago, Tetsuro; Iwata, Ren [Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Maruyama, Masahiro; Higuchi, Makoto [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Arai, Hiroyuki [Tohoku University, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Sendai (Japan); Kudo, Yukitsuka [Tohoku University, Innovation of New Biomedical Engineering Center, Sendai (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Extensive deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although several PET imaging agents have been developed for in vivo detection of senile plaques, no PET probe is currently available for selective detection of neurofibrillary tangles in the living human brain. Recently, [{sup 18}F]THK-523 was developed as a potential in vivo imaging probe for tau pathology. The purpose of this study was to compare the binding properties of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 and other amyloid imaging agents, including PiB, BF-227 and FDDNP, to synthetic protein fibrils and human brain tissue. In vitro radioligand binding assays were conducted using synthetic amyloid {beta}{sub 42} and K18{Delta}K280-tau fibrils. Nonspecific binding was determined by the addition of unlabelled compounds at a concentration of 2 {mu}M. To examine radioligand binding to neuropathological lesions, in vitro autoradiography was conducted using sections of AD brain. [{sup 18}F]THK-523 showed higher affinity for tau fibrils than for A{beta} fibrils, whereas the other probes showed a higher affinity for A{beta} fibrils. The autoradiographic analysis indicated that [{sup 18}F]THK-523 accumulated in the regions containing a high density of tau protein deposits. Conversely, PiB and BF-227 accumulated in the regions containing a high density of A{beta} plaques. These findings suggest that the unique binding profile of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 can be used to identify tau deposits in AD brain. (orig.)

  9. Analysis of serum β-amyloid peptides, α2-macroglobulin, complement factor H, and clusterin levels in APP/PS1 transgenic mice during progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dejiang; Di, Xiangjun; Fu, Lu; Li, Yingnan; Han, Xiao; Wu, Hui; Cai, Linjun; Meng, Xiangyu; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Su, Weiheng

    2016-10-19

    As a progressive age-related neurodegenerative disorder, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a global health concern. Despite the availability of psychological testing, neuroimaging, genetic testing, and biochemical assays of cerebrospinal fluid, convenient and accurate blood biomarkers for the prediction, diagnosis, and preclinical studies of AD are still lacking. The present study aims to longitudinally evaluate the feasibility of β-amyloid proteins, α2-macroglobulin (α-2M), complement factor H (CFH), and clusterin as blood biomarkers of AD. Using APP/PS1 transgenic and wild-type mice, cognitive impairment and amyloid plaque counts in the brain were evaluated over a range of ages using the Morris water maze test and immunohistochemistry methods, respectively. Serum Aβ40, Aβ42, α-2M, CFH, and clusterin levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and correlated with progression of AD. APP/PS1 transgenic mice presented progressive AD characteristics at the ages of 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Serum Aβ42 levels and Aβ42/Aβ40 ratios increased significantly in transgenic 3- and 6-month-old mice compared with controls. Serum CFH levels decreased significantly in 3- and 6-month-old transgenic mice compared with controls. Meanwhile, serum clusterin levels increased significantly in 12-month-old transgenic mice compared with controls. The α-2M level was not significantly different between transgenic and wild-type mice. The APP/PS1 transgenic mouse is a model of familial AD. The present study indicated that the serum Aβ42 level, Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio, and CFH level are potential biomarkers in preclinical and early stages of AD, whereas serum clusterin level is a potential biomarker in the late stage of AD.

  10. Gelsolin bound β-amyloid peptides(1-40/1-42): electrochemical evaluation of levels of soluble peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanyan; Sun, Xiaoyu; Tang, Daoquan; Li, Chenglin; Zhang, Lin; Nie, Dongxia; Yin, Xiaoxing; Shi, Guoyue

    2015-06-15

    A method for the highly sensitive determination of soluable β-amyloid peptides (Aβ(1-40/1-42)) that employs a detection bioconjugate of HRP-Au-gelsolin as the electrochemical nanoprobe is presented. Contrary to previous detection notions that utilized antibodies, which could specifically recognize the N- or C-terminus of peptides, we demonstrate herein that the reported specific binding between gelsolin and Aβ might provide an alternative way to evaluate the peptides sensitively and selectively. The HRP-Au-gelsolin nanohybrid was designed by one-pot functionalization of Au nanaoparticles (NPs) with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and gelsolin. Through a sandwich-type sensor array, soluble Aβ(1-40/1-42) were captured onto the array due to the interactions between targeted peptides and surface-confined gelsolin and electrochemical signals were amplified by abundant attachments of HRP labeled on AuNPs, which could specifically catalyse its substrate, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2 to give rise to measurable signals. The proposed gelsolin-bound Aβ methodology displayed satisfactory sensitivity and wide linear range towards Aβ(1-40/1-42) with a detection limit down to 28 pM, which are verified to be sensitive-enough for the assessment of Aβ levels both in normal and Alzheimer's disease (AD) rat brains. Experimental results indicated that compared with normal group, soluble β-amyloid peptide levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and targeted brain tissues of AD rats all declined with differentiable degrees. In short, the newly unfolding strategy presents valuable information related to pathological events in brain and will exhibit a braw perspective for the early diagnosis of AD process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Natural product-based amyloid inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velander, Paul; Wu, Ling; Henderson, Frances; Zhang, Shijun; Bevan, David R; Xu, Bin

    2017-09-01

    Many chronic human diseases, including multiple neurodegenerative diseases, are associated with deleterious protein aggregates, also called protein amyloids. One common therapeutic strategy is to develop protein aggregation inhibitors that can slow down, prevent, or remodel toxic amyloids. Natural products are a major class of amyloid inhibitors, and several dozens of natural product-based amyloid inhibitors have been identified and characterized in recent years. These plant- or microorganism-extracted compounds have shown significant therapeutic potential from in vitro studies as well as in vivo animal tests. Despite the technical challenges of intrinsic disordered or partially unfolded amyloid proteins that are less amenable to characterizations by structural biology, a significant amount of research has been performed, yielding biochemical and pharmacological insights into how inhibitors function. This review aims to summarize recent progress in natural product-based amyloid inhibitors and to analyze their mechanisms of inhibition in vitro. Major classes of natural product inhibitors and how they were identified are described. Our analyses comprehensively address the molecular interactions between the inhibitors and relevant amyloidogenic proteins. These interactions are delineated at molecular and atomic levels, which include covalent, non-covalent, and metal-mediated mechanisms. In vivo animal studies and clinical trials have been summarized as an extension. To enhance natural product bioavailability in vivo, emerging work using nanocarriers for delivery has also been described. Finally, issues and challenges as well as future development of such inhibitors are envisioned. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of a Common Binding Mode for Imaging Agents to Amyloid Fibrils from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby; Sørensen, Jesper; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid diseases are characterized by the misfolding and deposition of proteins in the body in the form of insoluble amyloid fibrils. Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are two examples of amyloid diseases which are closely related both with respect to the atomic structures of the a...... binding modes for imaging agents is proposed to originate from subtle differences in amino acid composition of the surface grooves on an amyloid fibril, resulting in fine tuning of the binding affinities for a specific amyloid fibril....... experimentally due to the insoluble nature of amyloid fibrils. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interactions between 13 aromatic amyloid imaging agents, entailing 4 different organic scaffolds, and a model of an amyloid fibril. Clustering analysis combined with free energy...

  13. The Significance of α-Synuclein, Amyloid-β and Tau Pathologies in Parkinson’s Disease Progression and Related Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compta, Y.; Parkkinen, L.; Kempster, P.; Selikhova, M.; Lashley, T.; Holton, J.L.; Lees, A.J.; Revesz, T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dementia is one of the milestones of advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), with its neuropathological substrate still being a matter of debate, particularly regarding its potential mechanistic implications. Objective The aim of this study was to review the relative importance of Lewy-related α-synuclein and Alzheimer’s tau and amyloid-β (Aβ) pathologies in disease progression and dementia in PD. Methods We reviewed studies conducted at the Queen Square Brain Bank, Institute of Neurology, University College London, using large PD cohorts. Results Cortical Lewy- and Alzheimer-type pathologies are associated with milestones of poorer prognosis and with non-tremor predominance, which have been, in turn, linked to dementia. The combination of these pathologies is the most robust neuropathological substrate of PD-related dementia, with cortical Aβ burden determining a faster progression to dementia. Conclusion The shared relevance of these pathologies in PD progression and dementia is in line with experimental data suggesting synergism between α-synuclein, tau and Aβ and with studies testing these proteins as disease biomarkers, hence favouring the eventual testing of therapeutic strategies targeting these proteins in PD. PMID:24028925

  14. MetAmyl: a METa-predictor for AMYLoid proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Emily

    Full Text Available The aggregation of proteins or peptides in amyloid fibrils is associated with a number of clinical disorders, including Alzheimer's, Huntington's and prion diseases, medullary thyroid cancer, renal and cardiac amyloidosis. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of fibril formation remain largely unknown. Several lines of evidence revealed that short amino-acid segments (hot spots, located in amyloid precursor proteins act as seeds for fibril elongation. Therefore, hot spots are potential targets for diagnostic/therapeutic applications, and a current challenge in bioinformatics is the development of methods to accurately predict hot spots from protein sequences. In this paper, we combined existing methods into a meta-predictor for hot spots prediction, called MetAmyl for METapredictor for AMYLoid proteins. MetAmyl is based on a logistic regression model that aims at weighting predictions from a set of popular algorithms, statistically selected as being the most informative and complementary predictors. We evaluated the performances of MetAmyl through a large scale comparative study based on three independent datasets and thus demonstrated its ability to differentiate between amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic polypeptides. Compared to 9 other methods, MetAmyl provides significant improvement in prediction on studied datasets. We further show that MetAmyl is efficient to highlight the effect of point mutations involved in human amyloidosis, so we suggest this program should be a useful complementary tool for the diagnosis of these diseases.

  15. Individualized quantification of brain {beta}-amyloid burden: results of a proof of mechanism phase 0 florbetaben PET trial in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, Henryk; Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg; Patt, Marianne; Sattler, Bernhard; Schildan, Andreas; Hesse, Swen; Meyer, Philipp M.; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Hammerstein, Eva; Hartwig, Kristin; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Eggers, Birk [Arzneimittelforschung Leipzig GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); University of Zurich, Department of Psychiatry, Zurich (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Torsten; Reischl, Joachim; Rohde, Beate; Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Healthcare, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Complementing clinical findings with those generated by biomarkers - such as {beta}-amyloid-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging - has been proposed as a means of increasing overall accuracy in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Florbetaben ([{sup 18}F]BAY 94-9172) is a novel {beta}-amyloid PET tracer currently in global clinical development. We present the results of a proof of mechanism study in which the diagnostic efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of florbetaben were assessed. The value of various quantitative parameters derived from the PET scans as potential surrogate markers of cognitive decline was also investigated. Ten patients with mild-moderate probable AD (DSM-IV and NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) and ten age-matched ({>=} 55 years) healthy controls (HCs) were administered a single dose of 300 MBq florbetaben, which contained a tracer mass dose of < 5 {mu}g. The 70-90 min post-injection brain PET data were visually analysed by three blinded experts. Quantitative assessment was also performed via MRI-based, anatomical sampling of predefined volumes of interest (VOI) and subsequent calculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios (SUVRs, cerebellar cortex as reference region). Furthermore, single-case, voxelwise analysis was used to calculate individual ''whole brain {beta}-amyloid load''. Visual analysis of the PET data revealed nine of the ten AD, but only one of the ten HC brains to be {beta}-amyloid positive (p = 0.001), with high inter-reader agreement (weighted kappa {>=} 0.88). When compared to HCs, the neocortical SUVRs were significantly higher in the ADs (with descending order of effect size) in frontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, occipital cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, and parietal cortex (p = 0.003-0.010). Voxel-based group comparison confirmed these differences. Amongst the PET-derived parameters, the Statistical Parametric Mapping-based whole brain

  16. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: Structure, Function, and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin plays a role in glucose homeostasis but aggregates to form islet amyloid in type-2 diabetes. Islet amyloid formation contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death in the disease and to the failure of islet transplants. Recent work suggests a role for IAPP aggregation in cardiovascular complications of type-2 diabetes and hints at a possible role in type-1 diabetes. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation in vivo or in vitro are not understood and the mechanisms of IAPP induced β-cell death are not fully defined. Activation of the inflammasome, defects in autophagy, ER stress, generation of reactive oxygen species, membrane disruption, and receptor mediated mechanisms have all been proposed to play a role. Open questions in the field include the relative importance of the various mechanisms of β-cell death, the relevance of reductionist biophysical studies to the situation in vivo, the molecular mechanism of amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, the factors which trigger amyloid formation in type-2 diabetes, the potential role of IAPP in type-1 diabetes, the development of clinically relevant inhibitors of islet amyloidosis toxicity, and the design of soluble, bioactive variants of IAPP for use as adjuncts to insulin therapy.

  17. Amyloid-β-Secondary Structure Distribution in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood Measured by an Immuno-Infrared-Sensor: A Biomarker Candidate for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabers, Andreas; Ollesch, Julian; Schartner, Jonas; Kötting, Carsten; Genius, Just; Hafermann, Henning; Klafki, Hans; Gerwert, Klaus; Wiltfang, Jens

    2016-03-01

    The misfolding of the Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide into β-sheet enriched conformations was proposed as an early event in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Here, the Aβ peptide secondary structure distribution in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma of 141 patients was measured with an immuno-infrared-sensor. The sensor detected the amide I band, which reflects the overall secondary structure distribution of all Aβ peptides extracted from the body fluid. We observed a significant downshift of the amide I band frequency of Aβ peptides in Dementia Alzheimer type (DAT) patients, which indicated an overall shift to β-sheet. The secondary structure distribution of all Aβ peptides provides a better marker for DAT detection than a single Aβ misfold or the concentration of a specific oligomer. The discrimination between DAT and disease control patients according to the amide I frequency was in excellent agreement with the clinical diagnosis (accuracy 90% for CSF and 84% for blood). The amide I band maximum above or below the decisive marker frequency appears as a novel spectral biomarker candidate of AD. Additionally, a preliminary proof-of-concept study indicated an amide I band shift below the marker band already in patients with mild cognitive impairment due to AD. The presented immuno-IR-sensor method represents a promising, simple, robust, and label-free diagnostic tool for CSF and blood analysis.

  18. A Food and Drug Administration-approved asthma therapeutic agent impacts amyloid β in the brain in a transgenic model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yukiko; Takeda, Shuko; Cho, Hansang; Wegmann, Susanne; Shoup, Timothy M; Takahashi, Kazue; Irimia, Daniel; Elmaleh, David R; Hyman, Bradley T; Hudry, Eloise

    2015-01-23

    Interfering with the assembly of Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides from monomer to oligomeric species and fibrils or promoting their clearance from the brain are targets of anti-Aβ-directed therapies in Alzheimer disease. Here we demonstrate that cromolyn sodium (disodium cromoglycate), a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug already in use for the treatment of asthma, efficiently inhibits the aggregation of Aβ monomers into higher-order oligomers and fibrils in vitro without affecting Aβ production. In vivo, the levels of soluble Aβ are decreased by over 50% after only 1 week of daily intraperitoneally administered cromolyn sodium. Additional in vivo microdialysis studies also show that this compound decreases the half-life of soluble Aβ in the brain. These data suggest a clear effect of a peripherally administered, Food and Drug Administration-approved medication on Aβ economy, supporting further investigation of the potential long-term efficacy of cromolyn sodium in Alzheimer disease. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. A new molecular model for Congo Red-β amyloid interaction: implications for diagnosis and inhibition of brain plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kristine A.; Li, Yat

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. One strong pathological indicator of AD is senile plaques, which are aggregates of fibrils formed from amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. Thus, detection and inhibition of Aβ aggregation are critical for the prevention and treatment of AD. Congo red (CR) is one of the most widely used dye molecules for probing as well as inhabiting Aβ aggregation. However, the nature of interaction between CR and Aβ is not well understood. In this research, we systematically studied the interaction between CR and Aβ using a combination of optical techniques, including electronic absorption, fluorescence, Raman scattering, and circular dichroism, to provide detailed information with molecular specificity and high sensitivity. Compared to CR alone, interaction of the dye with Aβ results in a new absorption peak near 540 nm and significantly enhanced photoluminescence as well as Raman signal. Our results led us to propose a new model suggesting that CR exists primarily in a micellar form, resembling H-aggregates, in water and dissociates into monomers upon interaction with Aβ. This model has significant implications for the development of new strategies to detect and inhibit brain plaques for treatment of neurological diseases like AD.

  20. A multimodal RAGE-specific inhibitor reduces amyloid β–mediated brain disorder in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Rashid; Singh, Itender; Sagare, Abhay P.; Bell, Robert D.; Ross, Nathan T.; LaRue, Barbra; Love, Rachal; Perry, Sheldon; Paquette, Nicole; Deane, Richard J.; Thiyagarajan, Meenakshisundaram; Zarcone, Troy; Fritz, Gunter; Friedman, Alan E.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2012-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), amyloid β peptide (Aβ) accumulates in plaques in the brain. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mediates Aβ-induced perturbations in cerebral vessels, neurons, and microglia in AD. Here, we identified a high-affinity RAGE-specific inhibitor (FPS-ZM1) that blocked Aβ binding to the V domain of RAGE and inhibited Aβ40- and Aβ42-induced cellular stress in RAGE-expressing cells in vitro and in the mouse brain in vivo. FPS-ZM1 was nontoxic to mice and readily crossed the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In aged APPsw/0 mice overexpressing human Aβ-precursor protein, a transgenic mouse model of AD with established Aβ pathology, FPS-ZM1 inhibited RAGE-mediated influx of circulating Aβ40 and Aβ42 into the brain. In brain, FPS-ZM1 bound exclusively to RAGE, which inhibited β-secretase activity and Aβ production and suppressed microglia activation and the neuroinflammatory response. Blockade of RAGE actions at the BBB and in the brain reduced Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in brain markedly and normalized cognitive performance and cerebral blood flow responses in aged APPsw/0 mice. Our data suggest that FPS-ZM1 is a potent multimodal RAGE blocker that effectively controls progression of Aβ-mediated brain disorder and that it may have the potential to be a disease-modifying agent for AD. PMID:22406537

  1. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide inhibits amyloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Boun...

  2. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M; Jagust, William J; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer's disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir ((18)F) positron emission tomography, (18)F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake while correcting in addition for cortex-wide florbetapir uptake. P-values for each setting

  3. The 5XFAD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease Exhibits an Age-Dependent Increase in Anti-Ceramide IgG and Exogenous Administration of Ceramide Further Increases Anti-Ceramide Titers and Amyloid Plaque Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkins, Michael B; Dasgupta, Somsankar; Wang, Guanghu; Zhu, Gu; He, Qian; Kong, Ji Na; Bieberich, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that 5XFAD Alzheimer's disease model mice develop an age-dependent increase in antibodies against ceramide, suggesting involvement of autoimmunity against ceramide in Alzheimer's disease pathology. To test this, we increased serum anti-ceramide IgG (2-fold) by ceramide administration and analyzed amyloid plaque formation in 5XFAD mice. There were no differences in soluble or total amyloid-β levels. However, females receiving ceramide had increased plaque burden (number, area, and size) compared to controls. Ceramide-treated mice showed an increase of serum exosomes (up to 3-fold using Alix as marker), suggesting that systemic anti-ceramide IgG and exosome levels are correlated with enhanced plaque formation.

  4. Prevalence of amyloid PET positivity in dementia syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non-AD dementia. OBJECTIVE: To us...

  5. Specific Triazine Herbicides Induce Amyloid-beta(42) Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portelius, Erik; Durieu, Emilie; Bodin, Marion; Cam, Morgane; Pannee, Josef; Leuxe, Charlotte; Mabondzo, Aloise; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Herve; Lee, Jung Yeol; Chang, Young-Tae; Stuber, Kathrin; Koch, Philipp; Fontaine, Gaelle; Potier, Marie-Claude; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D.; Covaci, Adrian; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter; Karg, Frank; Flajolet, Marc; Omori, Chiori; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (A beta PP) ecretases leads to extracellular release of amyloid-beta (A beta) peptides. Increased production of A beta(42) over A beta(40) and aggregation into oligomers and plaques constitute an Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmark.

  6. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...

  7. Whole body amyloid deposition imaging by 123I-SAP scintigraphy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rheenen, Ronald; Glaudemans, Andor; Hazenberg, Bouke

    2011-01-01

    Amyloidosis is the name of a group of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Deposition of amyloid can be localized or systemic. The 123I-SAP-scan can be used to image extent and distribution of amyloid deposition in patients with systemic AA, AL and ATTR amyloidosis.

  8. Evaluation of the Expression of Amyloid Precursor Protein and the Ratio of Secreted Amyloid Beta 42 to Amyloid Beta 40 in SH-SY5Y Cells Stably Transfected with Wild-Type, Single-Mutant and Double-Mutant Forms of the APP Gene for the Study of Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahrudin Arrozi, Aslina; Shukri, Siti Nur Syazwani; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Ahmad Damanhuri, Mohd Hanafi; Makpol, Suzana

    2017-11-01

    Neuroblastoma cell lines such as SH-SY5Y are the most frequently utilized models in neurodegenerative research, and their use has advanced the understanding of the pathology of neurodegeneration over the past few decades. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), several pathogenic mutations have been described, all of which cause elevated levels of pathological hallmarks such as amyloid-beta (Aβ). Although the genetics of Alzheimer's disease is well known, familial AD only accounts for a small number of cases in the population, with the rest being sporadic AD, which contains no known mutations. Currently, most of the in vitro models used to study AD pathogenesis only examine the level of Aβ42 as a confirmation of successful model generation and only perform comparisons between wild-type APP and single mutants of the APP gene. Recent findings have shown that the Aβ42/40 ratio in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a better diagnostic indicator for AD patients than is Aβ42 alone and that more extensive Aβ formation, such as accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ, Aβ plaques, soluble oligomeric Aβ (oAβ), and insoluble fibrillar Aβ (fAβ) occurs in TgCRND8 mice expressing a double-mutant form (Swedish and Indiana) of APP, later leading to greater progressive impairment of the brain. In this study, we generated SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected separately with wild-type APP, the Swedish mutation of APP, and the Swedish and Indiana mutations of APP and evaluated the APP expression as well as the Aβ42/40 ratio in those cells. The double-mutant form of APP (Swedish/Indiana) expressed markedly high levels of APP protein and showed a high Aβ2/40 ratio compared to wild-type and single-mutant cells.

  9. Pro-inflammatory interleukin-18 increases Alzheimer’s disease-associated amyloid-β production in human neuron-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutinen Elina M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD involves increased accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles as well as neuronal loss in various regions of the neocortex. Neuroinflammation is also present, but its role in AD is not fully understood. We previously showed increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-18 (IL-18 in different regions of AD brains, where it co-localized with Aβ-plaques, as well as the ability of IL-18 to increase expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β and cyclin dependent kinase 5, involved in hyperphosphorylation of tau-protein. Elevated IL-18 has been detected in several risk conditions for AD, including obesity, type-II diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases as well as in stress. Methods We differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells as neuron-like and exposed them to IL-18 for various times. We examined the protein levels of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP and its processing products, its cleaving enzymes, involved in amyloidogenic processing of APP, and markers of apoptosis. Results IL-18 increased protein levels of the β-site APP-cleaving enzyme BACE-1, the N-terminal fragment of presenilin-1 and slightly presenilin enhancer 2, both of which are members of the γ-secretase complex, as well as Fe65, which is a binding protein of the C-terminus of APP and one regulator for GSK-3β. IL-18 also increased APP expression and phosphorylation, which preceded increased BACE-1 levels. Further, IL-18 altered APP processing, increasing Aβ40 production in particular, which was inhibited by IL-18 binding protein. Increased levels of soluble APPβ were detected in culture medium after the IL-18 exposure. IL-18 also increased anti-apoptotic bcl-xL levels, which likely counteracted the minor increase of the pro-apoptotic caspase-3. Lactate dehydrogenase activity in culture medium was unaffected. Conclusions The IL-18 induction of BACE-1, APP processing, and Aβ is likely to be

  10. Imaging characteristic of dual-phase 18F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET for the concomitant detection of perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Kun-Ju; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Huang, Chin-Chang; Huang, Kuo-Lun

    2016-01-01

    We investigated dual-phase 18 F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET imaging for the concomitant detection of brain perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and in cognitively healthy controls (HCs). A total of 82 subjects (24 AD patients, 44 MCI patients and 14 HCs) underwent both dual-phase 18 F-AV-45 PET and MRI imaging. Dual-phase dynamic PET imaging consisted of (1) five 1-min scans obtained 1 - 6 min after tracer injection (perfusion 18 F-AV-45 imaging, pAV-45), and (2) ten 1-min scans obtained 50 - 60 min after tracer injection (amyloid 18 F-AV-45 imaging). Amyloid-negative MCI/AD patients were excluded. Volume of interest analysis and statistical parametric mapping of pAV-45 and 18 F-AV-45 images were performed to investigate the perfusion deficits and the beta-amyloid burden in the three study groups. The associations between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and global perfusion deficits and amyloid deposition were investigated with linear and segmental linear correlation analyses. HCs generally had normal pAV-45 findings, whereas perfusion deficits were evident in the hippocampus, and temporal, parietal and middle frontal cortices in both MCI and AD patients. The motor-sensory cortex was relatively preserved. MMSE scores in the entire study cohort were significantly associated with the degree of perfusion impairment as assessed by pAV-45 imaging (r = 0.5156, P < 0.0001). 18 F-AV-45 uptake was significantly higher in AD patients than in the two other study groups. However, the correlation between MMSE scores and 18 F-AV-45 uptake in MCI patients was more of a binary phenomenon and began in MCI patients with MMSE score 23.14 when 18 F-AV-45 uptake was higher and MMSE score lower than in patients with early MCI. Amyloid deposition started in the precuneus and the frontal and temporal regions in early MCI, ultimately reaching the maximum burden in advanced

  11. Imaging characteristic of dual-phase (18)F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET for the concomitant detection of perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun-Ju; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Huang, Chin-Chang; Huang, Kuo-Lun; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-07-01

    We investigated dual-phase (18)F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET imaging for the concomitant detection of brain perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and in cognitively healthy controls (HCs). A total of 82 subjects (24 AD patients, 44 MCI patients and 14 HCs) underwent both dual-phase (18)F-AV-45 PET and MRI imaging. Dual-phase dynamic PET imaging consisted of (1) five 1-min scans obtained 1 - 6 min after tracer injection (perfusion (18)F-AV-45 imaging, pAV-45), and (2) ten 1-min scans obtained 50 - 60 min after tracer injection (amyloid (18)F-AV-45 imaging). Amyloid-negative MCI/AD patients were excluded. Volume of interest analysis and statistical parametric mapping of pAV-45 and (18)F-AV-45 images were performed to investigate the perfusion deficits and the beta-amyloid burden in the three study groups. The associations between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and global perfusion deficits and amyloid deposition were investigated with linear and segmental linear correlation analyses. HCs generally had normal pAV-45 findings, whereas perfusion deficits were evident in the hippocampus, and temporal, parietal and middle frontal cortices in both MCI and AD patients. The motor-sensory cortex was relatively preserved. MMSE scores in the entire study cohort were significantly associated with the degree of perfusion impairment as assessed by pAV-45 imaging (r = 0.5156, P AV-45 uptake was significantly higher in AD patients than in the two other study groups. However, the correlation between MMSE scores and (18)F-AV-45 uptake in MCI patients was more of a binary phenomenon and began in MCI patients with MMSE score 23.14 when (18)F-AV-45 uptake was higher and MMSE score lower than in patients with early MCI. Amyloid deposition started in the precuneus and the frontal and temporal regions in early MCI, ultimately reaching the maximum burden in

  12. Imaging characteristic of dual-phase {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET for the concomitant detection of perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kun-Ju; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences and Healthy Aging Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Hsu, Jung-Lung [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Section of Dementia and Cognitive Impairment, Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China); Taipei Medical University, Graduate Institute of Humanities in Medicine, Taipei (China); Huang, Chin-Chang; Huang, Kuo-Lun [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and University, Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China)

    2016-07-15

    We investigated dual-phase {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET imaging for the concomitant detection of brain perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and in cognitively healthy controls (HCs). A total of 82 subjects (24 AD patients, 44 MCI patients and 14 HCs) underwent both dual-phase {sup 18}F-AV-45 PET and MRI imaging. Dual-phase dynamic PET imaging consisted of (1) five 1-min scans obtained 1 - 6 min after tracer injection (perfusion {sup 18}F-AV-45 imaging, pAV-45), and (2) ten 1-min scans obtained 50 - 60 min after tracer injection (amyloid {sup 18}F-AV-45 imaging). Amyloid-negative MCI/AD patients were excluded. Volume of interest analysis and statistical parametric mapping of pAV-45 and {sup 18}F-AV-45 images were performed to investigate the perfusion deficits and the beta-amyloid burden in the three study groups. The associations between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and global perfusion deficits and amyloid deposition were investigated with linear and segmental linear correlation analyses. HCs generally had normal pAV-45 findings, whereas perfusion deficits were evident in the hippocampus, and temporal, parietal and middle frontal cortices in both MCI and AD patients. The motor-sensory cortex was relatively preserved. MMSE scores in the entire study cohort were significantly associated with the degree of perfusion impairment as assessed by pAV-45 imaging (r = 0.5156, P < 0.0001). {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake was significantly higher in AD patients than in the two other study groups. However, the correlation between MMSE scores and {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake in MCI patients was more of a binary phenomenon and began in MCI patients with MMSE score 23.14 when {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake was higher and MMSE score lower than in patients with early MCI. Amyloid deposition started in the precuneus and the frontal and temporal regions in early MCI, ultimately

  13. Amyloid-related imaging abnormalities in amyloid-modifying therapeutic trials: Recommendations from the Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable Workgroup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperling, R.A.; Jack, C.R.; Black, S.E.; Frosch, M.P.; Greenberg, S.M.; Hyman, B.T.; Scheltens, P.; Carrillo, M.C.; Thies, W.; Bednar, M.M.; Black, R.S.; Brashear, H.R.; Grundman, M.; Siemers, E.R.; Feldman, H.H.; Schindler, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid imaging related abnormalities (ARIA) have now been reported in clinical trials with multiple therapeutic avenues to lower amyloid-β burden in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In response to concerns raised by the Food and Drug Administration, the Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable convened

  14. What is normal in normal aging? Effects of Aging, Amyloid and Alzheimer’s Disease on the Cerebral Cortex and the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjell, Anders M.; McEvoy, Linda; Holland, Dominic; Dale, Anders M.; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2015-01-01

    What can be expected in normal aging, and where does normal aging stop and pathological neurodegeneration begin? With the slow progression of age-related dementias such as Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), it is difficult to distinguish age-related changes from effects of undetected disease. We review recent research on changes of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus in aging and the borders between normal aging and AD. We argue that prominent cortical reductions are evident in fronto-temporal regions in elderly even with low probability of AD, including regions overlapping the default mode network. Importantly, these regions show high levels of amyloid deposition in AD, and are both structurally and functionally vulnerable early in the disease. This normalcy-pathology homology is critical to understand, since aging itself is the major risk factor for sporadic AD. Thus, rather than necessarily reflecting early signs of disease, these changes may be part of normal aging, and may inform on why the aging brain is so much more susceptible to AD than is the younger brain. We suggest that regions characterized by a high degree of life-long plasticity are vulnerable to detrimental effects of normal aging, and that this age-vulnerability renders them more susceptible to additional, pathological AD-related changes. We conclude that it will be difficult to understand AD without understanding why it preferably affects older brains, and that we need a model that accounts for age-related changes in AD-vulnerable regions independently of AD-pathology. PMID:24548606

  15. Differential expression of C-Reactive protein and Serum amyloid A in different cell types in the lung tissue of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic systemic inflammatory syndrome has been implicated in the pathobiology of extrapulmonary manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to investigate which cell types within lung tissue are responsible for expressing major acute-phase reactants in COPD patients and disease-free (“resistant”) smokers. Methods An observational case–control study was performed to investigate three different cell types in surgical lung samples of COPD patients and resistant smokers via expression of the C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA1, SAA2 and SAA4) genes. Epithelial cells, macrophages and fibroblasts from the lung parenchyma were separated by magnetic microbeads (CD326, CD14 and anti-fibroblast), and gene expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. Results The sample consisted of 74 subjects, including 40 COPD patients and 34 smokers without disease. All three cell types were capable of synthesizing these biomarkers to some extent. In fibroblasts, gene expression analysis of the studied biomarkers demonstrated increased SAA2 and decreased SAA1 in patients with COPD. In epithelial cells, there was a marked increase in CRP, which was not observed in fibroblasts or macrophages. In macrophages, however, gene expression of these markers was decreased in COPD patients compared to controls. Conclusions These results provide novel information regarding the gene expression of CRP and SAA in different cell types in the lung parenchyma. This study revealed differences in the expression of these markers according to cell type and disease status and contributes to the identification of cell types that are responsible for the secretion of these molecules. PMID:24884805

  16. Strong transthyretin immunostaining: potential pitfall in cardiac amyloid typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoskar, Anjali A; Efebera, Yvonne; Hasan, Ayesha; Brodsky, Sergey; Nadasdy, Gyongyi; Dogan, Ahmet; Nadasdy, Tibor

    2011-11-01

    Although systemic amyloidosis commonly presents with renal disease, cardiac involvement usually determines the patient's prognosis. Cardiac involvement is seen in light chain amyloid and transthyretin amyloidosis. Distinguishing between these two is critical because prognosis and treatment differ. Our study demonstrates the unreliability of transthyretin immunostaining in subtyping cardiac amyloid. Between January 2003 and August 2010, we retrieved 229 native endomyocardial biopsies, of which 24 had amyloid. Immunohistochemistry for κ, λ, transthyretin, and serum amyloid A protein was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Staining was graded as weak (trace to 1+) or strong (2 to 3+). Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic typing of microdissected amyloid material was performed on selected cases. Fifteen patients had monoclonal gammopathy/plasma cell dyscrasia with cardiac amyloid. Eight of them (53%) showed strong transthyretin staining in the cardiac amyloid deposits. MS was performed in 5 of these 8 biopsies, and all 5 biopsies revealed light chain amyloid-type amyloid. Two of these 5 light chain amyloid biopsies did not even have concomitant strong staining for the appropriate light chain. Among the 15 cases with plasma cell dyscrasia, only 7 biopsies showed strong staining for the corresponding monoclonal light chain. Strong, false-positive immunostaining for transthyretin in cardiac amyloid is a potential pitfall, augmented by the frequent lack of staining for immunoglobulin light chains. Therefore, the presence of amyloid in the cardiac biopsy should prompt a search for plasma cell dyscrasia irrespective of transthyretin staining. Confirmation with MS should be sought, particularly if there is any discrepancy between κ/λ staining and serum immunofixation results.

  17. Neural correlates underlying micrographia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Zhang, Jiarong; Hallett, Mark; Feng, Tao; Hou, Yanan; Chan, Piu

    2016-01-01

    Micrographia is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease, which manifests as either a consistent or progressive reduction in the size of handwriting or both. Neural correlates underlying micrographia remain unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate micrographia-related neural activity and connectivity modulations. In addition, the effect of attention and dopaminergic administration on micrographia was examined. We found that consistent micrographia was associated with decreased activity and connectivity in the basal ganglia motor circuit; while progressive micrographia was related to the dysfunction of basal ganglia motor circuit together with disconnections between the rostral supplementary motor area, rostral cingulate motor area and cerebellum. Attention significantly improved both consistent and progressive micrographia, accompanied by recruitment of anterior putamen and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Levodopa improved consistent micrographia accompanied by increased activity and connectivity in the basal ganglia motor circuit, but had no effect on progressive micrographia. Our findings suggest that consistent micrographia is related to dysfunction of the basal ganglia motor circuit; while dysfunction of the basal ganglia motor circuit and disconnection between the rostral supplementary motor area, rostral cingulate motor area and cerebellum likely contributes to progressive micrographia. Attention improves both types of micrographia by recruiting additional brain networks. Levodopa improves consistent micrographia by restoring the function of the basal ganglia motor circuit, but does not improve progressive micrographia, probably because of failure to repair the disconnected networks. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Florbetapir PET analysis of amyloid-β deposition in the presenilin 1 E280A autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease kindred: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Adam S; Chen, Kewei; Quiroz, Yakeel T; Jakimovich, Laura J; Gomez, Madelyn Gutierrez; Langois, Carolyn M; Langbaum, Jessica B S; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Roontiva, Auttawut; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Lee, Wendy; Mo, Hua; Lopez, Liliana; Moreno, Sonia; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Giraldo, Margarita; Garcia, Gloria; Reiman, Rebecca A; Huentelman, Matthew J; Kosik, Kenneth S; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) is thought to begin accumulating in the brain many years before the onset of clinical impairment in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. By assessing the accumulation of Aβ in people at risk of genetic forms of Alzheimer’s disease, we can identify how early preclinical changes start in individuals certain to develop dementia later in life. We sought to characterise the age-related accumulation of Aβ deposition in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers across the spectrum of preclinical disease. Methods Between Aug 1 and Dec 6, 2011, members of the familial Alzheimer’s disease Colombian kindred aged 18–60 years were recruited from the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative’s registry at the University of Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia. Cross-sectional assessment using florbetapir PET was done in symptomatic mutation carriers with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia, asymptomatic carriers, and asymptomatic non-carriers. These assessments were done at the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute in Phoenix, AZ, USA. A cortical grey matter mask consisting of six predefined regions. was used to measure mean cortical florbetapir PET binding. Cortical-to-pontine standard-uptake value ratios were used to characterise the cross-sectional accumulation of fibrillar Aβ deposition in carriers and non-carriers with regression analysis and to estimate the trajectories of fibrillar Aβ deposition. Findings We enrolled a cohort of 11 symptomatic individuals, 19 presymptomatic mutation carriers, and 20 asymptomatic non-carriers, ranging in age from 20 to 56 years. There was greater florbetapir binding in asymptomatic PSEN1 E280A mutation carriers than in age matched non-carriers. Fibrillar Aβ began to accumulate in PSEN 1E280A mutation carriers at a mean age of 28·2 years (95% CI 27·3–33·4), about 16 years and 21 years before the predicted median ages at mild cognitive impairment and dementia onset, respectively. 18F

  19. Effect of a short- and long-term treatment with Ginkgo biloba extract on amyloid precursor protein levels in a transgenic mouse model relevant to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Sabine; Rimbach, Gerald; Augustin, Kay; Schliebs, Reinhard; Wolffram, Siegfried; Cermak, Rainer

    2009-01-15

    Several clinical trials have reported beneficial effects of the Ginkgo biloba extract EGb761 in the prevention and therapy of cognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of the present long-term feeding trial was to study the impact of dietary EGb761 on Amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism in mice transgenic for human APP (Tg2576). Tg2576 mice were fed diets with and without EGb761 (300 mg/kg diet) for 1 and 16 months, respectively. Long-term treatment (16 months) with EGb761 significantly lowered human APP protein levels by approximately 50% as compared to controls in the cortex but not in the hippocampus. However, APP levels were not affected by EGb761 in young mice. Current data indicate that APP seems to be an important molecular target of EGb761 in relation to the duration of the Ginkgo biloba treatment and/or the age of the animals. Potential neuroprotective properties of EGb761 may be, at least partly, related to its APP lowering activity.

  20. Pelargonidin Improves Passive Avoidance Task Performance in a Rat Amyloid Beta25-35 Model of Alzheimer’s Disease Via Estrogen Receptor Independent Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Sohanaki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a disorder with multiple pathophysiological causes, destructive outcomes, and no available definitive cure. Pelargonidin (Pel, an anthocyanin derivative, is an estrogen receptor agonist with little estrogen side effects. This study was designed to assess Pel memory enhancing effects on the a rat Amyloid Beta25-35 (Aβ intrahippocampal microinjections model of AD in the passive avoidance task performance paradigm and further evaluate the potential estrogen receptor role on the memory-evoking compound. Equally divided rats were assigned to 5 groups of sham, Aβ intrahippocampal microinjected, Pel pretreated (10 mg/kg; P.O, α estrogen antagonist intra-cerebrovascular (i.c.v. microinjected, and β estrogen antagonist (i.c.v microinjected animals. Intrahippocampal microinjections of Aβ were adopted to provoke AD model. Passive avoidance task test was also used to assess memory performance. Pel pretreatment prior to Aβ microinjections significantly improved step-through latency (P<0.001 in passive avoidance test. In α and β estrogen, antagonists received animals, passive avoidance task performance was not statistically changed (P=0.11 & P=0.41 respectively compared to Pel pretreated and sham animals. Our results depicted that Pel improves Aβ induced memory dysfunction in passive avoidance test performance through estrogen receptor independently related pathways.

  1. Amyloid beta and the longest-lived rodent: the naked mole-rat as a model for natural protection from Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrey, Yael H; Medina, David X; Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A; Oddo, Salvatore; Caccamo, Antonella; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2013-10-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) as an integral component of both neural toxicity and plaque formation. Brains of the longest-lived rodents, naked mole-rats (NMRs) approximately 32 years of age, had levels of Aβ similar to those of the 3xTg-AD mouse model of AD. Interestingly, there was no evidence of extracellular plaques, nor was there an age-related increase in Aβ levels in the individuals examined (2-20+ years). The NMR Aβ peptide showed greater homology to the human sequence than to the mouse sequence, differing by only 1 amino acid from the former. This subtle difference led to interspecies differences in aggregation propensity but not neurotoxicity; NMR Aβ was less prone to aggregation than human Aβ. Nevertheless, both NMR and human Aβ were equally toxic to mouse hippocampal neurons, suggesting that Aβ neurotoxicity and aggregation properties were not coupled. Understanding how NMRs acquire and tolerate high levels of Aβ with no plaque formation could provide useful insights into AD, and may elucidate protective mechanisms that delay AD progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Label-free detection of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42): a colorimetric sensor array for plasma monitoring of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Forough; Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2018-04-05

    Monitoring the ratio of 40- and 42-residue amyloid β peptides (i.e., Aβ40 and Aβ42) in human plasma is considered one of the hallmarks of detection of the early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, development of a specific, yet non-antibody-based method for simultaneous detection of Aβ40 and Aβ42 may have considerable clinical applications. Here, we developed a 'nanoparticle-based colorimetric sensor array' utilizing label-free gold and silver nanoparticles for visual detection of Aβ42 and Aβ40. Different aggregation behaviors of nanoparticles through their conjugation with Aβ42 and Aβ40 followed by the coordination of Aβ42 and Aβ40 with Cu(ii) led to diverse spectral and color changes. The spectral changes were quantitatively differentiated by a supervised pattern recognition approach, linear discriminant analysis (LDA). The proposed sensor array was able to discriminate among Aβ42, Aβ40, and HSA in different concentrations (50 nmol L-1 to 500 nmol L-1) and their mixtures. Moreover, the sensor array had the capability to identify structurally similar Aβ peptides in human plasma samples. The developed sensor array technology might pave the way for a cheap and rapid, yet robust, platform for high-throughput screening of human plasma for defining the at-risk population for AD.

  3. Effects of breviscapine on amyloid beta 1-42 induced Alzheimer's disease mice: A HPLC-QTOF-MS based plasma metabonomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongjun; Wu, Lingling; Chu, Mengying; Feng, Huimin; Lu, Chunliang; Wang, Qinghe; He, Minghai; Ge, Xiaoqun

    2017-07-01

    Herba Erigerontis has long been used to cure apoplexy hemiplegia and precordial pain in China. In addition, the bioactivities of its total flavonoids-breviscapine included inhibiting amyloid beta (Aβ) fibril formation, antioxidation and metal chelating, which are beneficial to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hence, A HPLC-QTOF-MS based plasma metabonomics approach was applied to investigate the neuroprotective effects of breviscapine on intracerebroventricular injection of aggregated Aβ 1-42 induced AD mice for the first time in the study. Ten potential biomarkers were screened out by multivariate statistical analysis, eight of which were further identified as indoleacrylic acid, C16 sphinganine, LPE (22:6), sulfolithocholic acid, LPC (16:0), PA (22:1/0:0), taurodeoxycholic acid, and PC (0:0/18:0). According to their metabolic pathways, it was supposed that breviscapine ameliorated the learning and memory deficits of AD mice predominantly by regulating phospholipids metabolism, elevating serotonin level and lowering cholesterols content in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Alzheimer's Disease Brain-Derived Amyloid-{beta}-Mediated Inhibition of LTP In Vivo Is Prevented by Immunotargeting Cellular Prion Protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Andrew E

    2011-05-18

    Synthetic amyloid-β protein (Aβ) oligomers bind with high affinity to cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), but the role of this interaction in mediating the disruption of synaptic plasticity by such soluble Aβ in vitro is controversial. Here we report that intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ-containing aqueous extracts of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) brain robustly inhibits long-term potentiation (LTP) without significantly affecting baseline excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus in vivo. Moreover, the disruption of LTP was abrogated by immunodepletion of Aβ. Importantly, intracerebroventricular administration of antigen-binding antibody fragment D13, directed to a putative Aβ-binding site on PrP(C), prevented the inhibition of LTP by AD brain-derived Aβ. In contrast, R1, a Fab directed to the C terminus of PrP(C), a region not implicated in binding of Aβ, did not significantly affect the Aβ-mediated inhibition of LTP. These data support the pathophysiological significance of SDS-stable Aβ dimer and the role of PrP(C) in mediating synaptic plasticity disruption by soluble Aβ.

  5. A ketone ester diet exhibits anxiolytic and cognition-sparing properties, and lessens amyloid and tau pathologies in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Bergman, Christian; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Wan, Ruiqian; King, M. Todd; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Okun, Eitan; Clarke, Kieran; Mattson, Mark P.; Veech, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) involves progressive accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and neurofibrillary pathologies, and glucose hypometabolism in brain regions critical for memory. The 3xTgAD mouse model was used to test the hypothesis that a ketone ester–based diet can ameliorate AD pathogenesis. Beginning at a presymptomatic age, 2 groups of male 3xTgAD mice were fed a diet containing a physiological enantiomeric precursor of ketone bodies (KET) or an isocaloric carbohydrate diet. The results of behavioral tests performed at 4 and 7 months after diet initiation revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited significantly less anxiety in 2 different tests. 3xTgAD mice on the KET diet also exhibited significant, albeit relatively subtle, improvements in performance on learning and memory tests. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited decreased Aβ deposition in the subiculum, CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, and the amygdala. KET-fed mice exhibited reduced levels of hyperphosphorylated tau deposition in the same regions of the hippocampus, amygdala, and cortex. Thus, a novel ketone ester can ameliorate proteopathic and behavioral deficits in a mouse AD model. PMID:23276384

  6. A ketone ester diet exhibits anxiolytic and cognition-sparing properties, and lessens amyloid and tau pathologies in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Bergman, Christian; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Wan, Ruiqian; King, M Todd; Mughal, Mohamed R; Okun, Eitan; Clarke, Kieran; Mattson, Mark P; Veech, Richard L

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves progressive accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and neurofibrillary pathologies, and glucose hypometabolism in brain regions critical for memory. The 3xTgAD mouse model was used to test the hypothesis that a ketone ester-based diet can ameliorate AD pathogenesis. Beginning at a presymptomatic age, 2 groups of male 3xTgAD mice were fed a diet containing a physiological enantiomeric precursor of ketone bodies (KET) or an isocaloric carbohydrate diet. The results of behavioral tests performed at 4 and 7 months after diet initiation revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited significantly less anxiety in 2 different tests. 3xTgAD mice on the KET diet also exhibited significant, albeit relatively subtle, improvements in performance on learning and memory tests. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited decreased Aβ deposition in the subiculum, CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, and the amygdala. KET-fed mice exhibited reduced levels of hyperphosphorylated tau deposition in the same regions of the hippocampus, amygdala, and cortex. Thus, a novel ketone ester can ameliorate proteopathic and behavioral deficits in a mouse AD model. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. iPSC-Based Compound Screening and In Vitro Trials Identify a Synergistic Anti-amyloid β Combination for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Kondo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the process of drug development, in vitro studies do not always adequately predict human-specific drug responsiveness in clinical trials. Here, we applied the advantage of human iPSC-derived neurons, which offer human-specific drug responsiveness, to screen and evaluate therapeutic candidates for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Using AD patient neurons with nearly 100% purity from iPSCs, we established a robust and reproducible assay for amyloid β peptide (Aβ, a pathogenic molecule in AD, and screened a pharmaceutical compound library. We acquired 27 Aβ-lowering screen hits, prioritized hits by chemical structure-based clustering, and selected 6 leading compounds. Next, to maximize the anti-Aβ effect, we selected a synergistic combination of bromocriptine, cromolyn, and topiramate as an anti-Aβ cocktail. Finally, using neurons from familial and sporadic AD patients, we found that the cocktail showed a significant and potent anti-Aβ effect on patient cells. This human iPSC-based platform promises to be useful for AD drug development.

  8. Amyloid-β Plaques in Clinical Alzheimer’s Disease Brain Incorporate Stable Isotope Tracer In Vivo and Exhibit Nanoscale Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildburger, Norelle C.; Gyngard, Frank; Guillermier, Christelle; Patterson, Bruce W.; Elbert, Donald; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Schneider, Theresa; Green, Karen; Roth, Robyn; Schmidt, Robert E.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.; Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with clinical manifestations of progressive memory decline and loss of executive function and language. AD affects an estimated 5.3 million Americans alone and is the most common form of age-related dementia with a rapidly growing prevalence among the aging population—those 65 years of age or older. AD is characterized by accumulation of aggregated amyloid-beta (Aβ) in the brain, which leads to one of the pathological hallmarks of AD—Aβ plaques. As a result, Aβ plaques have been extensively studied after being first described over a century ago. Advances in brain imaging and quantitative measures of Aβ in biological fluids have yielded insight into the time course of plaque development decades before and after AD symptom onset. However, despite the fundamental role of Aβ plaques in AD, in vivo measures of individual plaque growth, growth distribution, and dynamics are still lacking. To address this question, we combined stable isotope labeling kinetics (SILK) and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) imaging in an approach termed SILK–SIMS to resolve plaque dynamics in three human AD brains. In human AD brain, plaques exhibit incorporation of a stable isotope tracer. Tracer enrichment was highly variable between plaques and the spatial distribution asymmetric with both quiescent and active nanometer sub-regions of tracer incorporation. These data reveal that Aβ plaques are dynamic structures with deposition rates over days indicating a highly active process. Here, we report the first, direct quantitative measures of in vivo deposition into plaques in human AD brain. Our SILK–SIMS studies will provide invaluable information on plaque dynamics in the normal and diseased brain and offer many new avenues for investigation into pathological mechanisms of the disease, with implications for therapeutic development. PMID:29623063

  9. Amyloid-β Plaques in Clinical Alzheimer’s Disease Brain Incorporate Stable Isotope Tracer In Vivo and Exhibit Nanoscale Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norelle C. Wildburger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder with clinical manifestations of progressive memory decline and loss of executive function and language. AD affects an estimated 5.3 million Americans alone and is the most common form of age-related dementia with a rapidly growing prevalence among the aging population—those 65 years of age or older. AD is characterized by accumulation of aggregated amyloid-beta (Aβ in the brain, which leads to one of the pathological hallmarks of AD—Aβ plaques. As a result, Aβ plaques have been extensively studied after being first described over a century ago. Advances in brain imaging and quantitative measures of Aβ in biological fluids have yielded insight into the time course of plaque development decades before and after AD symptom onset. However, despite the fundamental role of Aβ plaques in AD, in vivo measures of individual plaque growth, growth distribution, and dynamics are still lacking. To address this question, we combined stable isotope labeling kinetics (SILK and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS imaging in an approach termed SILK–SIMS to resolve plaque dynamics in three human AD brains. In human AD brain, plaques exhibit incorporation of a stable isotope tracer. Tracer enrichment was highly variable between plaques and the spatial distribution asymmetric with both quiescent and active nanometer sub-regions of tracer incorporation. These data reveal that Aβ plaques are dynamic structures with deposition rates over days indicating a highly active process. Here, we report the first, direct quantitative measures of in vivo deposition into plaques in human AD brain. Our SILK–SIMS studies will provide invaluable information on plaque dynamics in the normal and diseased brain and offer many new avenues for investigation into pathological mechanisms of the disease, with implications for therapeutic development.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid beta 1-43 in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment or early Alzheimer’s disease: a 2-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla eLauridsen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract IntroductionBiomarkers that will reliably predict the onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD are urgently needed. Although cerebrospinal fluid (CSF amyloid beta 1-42 (Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau can be used to complement the clinical diagnosis of AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI, the prodromal phase of AD, is heterogeneous. Biomarkers should be able to determine which patients with aMCI are at greatest risk of AD. Histological studies and animal models indicate that amyloid beta 1-43 (Aβ43 aggregates early, and may play a role in the pathological process of AD. We have examined levels of CSF Aβ43 in a two-year longitudinal study of aMCI and early AD. Materials and methodsCSF was collected at baseline, and after one and two years from patients with AD (n=19, and patients with aMCI (n=42. Of these, 21 progressed to AD during the two years of study, whereas 21 did not. Controls (n=32 were lumbar punctured at baseline only. CSF analyses of Aβ43, Aβ42 and total tau were carried out with ELISA.ResultsAt baseline, CSF Aβ43, CSF Aβ42 and ratios with total tau could be used to separate controls from all three patient groups. CSF Aβ43, but not Aβ42, could separate patients with aMCI who progressed to AD during the two years of follow-up, from those that did not. The CSF total tau/Aβ43 ratio had a slightly but significantly larger area under the receiver operating characteristic curve when compared to the CSF total tau/Aβ42 ratio. CSF Aβ43 levels, but not Aβ42 levels, decreased from baseline to two years in the AD group.Discussion and conclusionCSF Aβ43 was demonstrated to be significantly reduced in patients already by the time that aMCI or AD was diagnosed, compared to controls, and this change must have occurred during the preclinical period. Since our results suggested that CSF Aβ43 distinguishes between subgroups of patients with aMCI better than CSF Aβ42, it may prove to be a useful additional biomarker for

  11. Difference in aggregation between functional and toxic amyloids studied by atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo Pacheco, Martin; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloids are highly structured protein aggregates, normally associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, a number of nontoxic amyloids with physiologically normal functions, called functional amyloids, have been found. It is known that soluble small oligomers are more toxic than large fibrils. Thus, we study with atomistic explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations the oligomer formation of the amyloid- β peptide Aβ25 - 35, associated with Alzheimer's disease, and two functional amyloid-forming tachykinin peptides: kassinin and neuromedin K. Our simulations show that monomeric peptides in extended conformations aggregate faster than those in collapsed hairpin-like conformations. In addition, we observe faster aggregation by functional amyloids than toxic amyloids, which could explain their lack of toxicity.

  12. Amyloid Fibril Solubility

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzi, L. G.; Auer, S.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactio...

  13. Brain imaging with a novel β-amyloid plaque probe 131I-IMPY in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Wanzhong; Cheng Zaohuo; Lu Chunxiong; Cai Deliang; Yang Min; Bao Jiandong; Wang Zhiqiang; Yang Bixiu

    2011-01-01

    .6772, all P<0.05). Conclusion: 131 I-IMPY as a β-amyloid plaque probe for brain SPECT imaging may be potentially helpful for early diagnosis of AD. (authors)

  14. In vivo detection of amyloid β deposition using ¹⁹F magnetic resonance imaging with a ¹⁹F-containing curcumin derivative in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, D; Amatsubo, T; Morikawa, S; Taguchi, H; Urushitani, M; Shirai, N; Hirao, K; Shiino, A; Inubushi, T; Tooyama, I

    2011-06-16

    Amyloid β (Aβ) deposition in the brain is considered the initiating event in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid imaging is widely studied in diagnosing AD and evaluating the disease stage, with considerable advances achieved in recent years. We have developed a novel ¹⁹F-containing curcumin derivative (named FMeC1) as a potential imaging agent. This compound can exist in equilibrium between keto and enol tautomers, with the enol form able to bind Aβ aggregates while the keto form cannot. This study investigated whether FMeC1 is suitable as a ¹⁹F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probe to detect Aβ deposition in the Tg2576 mouse, a model of AD. In ¹⁹F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra obtained from the whole head, a delayed decreased rate of F ¹⁹F signal was observed in Tg2576 mice that were peripherally injected with FMeC1 in comparison to wild-type mice. Furthermore, ¹⁹F MRI displayed remarkable levels of ¹⁹F signal in the brain of Tg2576 mice after the injection of FMeC1. Histological analysis of FMeC1-injected mouse brain showed penetration of the compound across the blood-brain barrier and binding to Aβ plaques in peripherally injected Tg2576 mice. Moreover, the distribution of Aβ deposits in Tg2576 mice was in accordance with the region of the brain in which the ¹⁹F signal was imaged. FMeC1 also exhibited an affinity for senile plaques in human brain sections. These findings suggest the usefulness of FMeC1 as a ¹⁹F MRI probe for the detection of amyloid deposition in the brain. Furthermore, the properties of FMeC1 could form the basis for further novel amyloid imaging probes. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Amyloid formation via supramolecular peptide assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Roger A; Hayes, Stanley F; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Priola, Suzette A

    2007-06-19

    Amyloid fibrils have been classically defined as linear, nonbranched polymeric proteins with a cross beta-sheet structure and the ability to alter the optical properties of the amyloid-specific dye Congo Red. Mounting evidence suggests that soluble oligomeric peptide assemblies approximately 2-20 nm in diameter are critical intermediates in amyloid formation. Using a pathogenic prion protein peptide comprised of residues 23-144, we demonstrate that, under quiescent but not agitated conditions, much larger globular assemblies up to 1 mum in diameter are made. These globules precede fibril formation and directly interact with growing fibril bundles. Fibrils made via these large spherical peptide assemblies displayed a remarkable diversity of ultrastructural features. Fibrillization of the Abeta1-40 peptide under similar conditions yielded similar results, suggesting a mechanism of general amyloid formation that can proceed through intermediates much larger than those previously described. Our data suggest that simply changing the physical microenvironment can profoundly influence the mechanism of amyloid formation and yield fibrils with novel ultrastructural properties.

  16. Blood amyloid beta levels in healthy, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease individuals: replication of diastolic blood pressure correlations and analysis of critical covariates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Ruiz

    Full Text Available Plasma amyloid beta (Aβ levels are being investigated as potential biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. In AB128 cross-sectional study, a number of medical relevant correlates of blood Aβ40 or Aβ42 were analyzed in 140 subjects (51 Alzheimer's disease patients, 53 healthy controls and 36 individuals diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment. We determined the association between multiple variables with Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels measured in three different blood compartments called i Aβ directly accessible (DA in the plasma, ii Aβ recovered from the plasma matrix (RP after diluting the plasma sample in a formulated buffer, and iii associated with the remaining cellular pellet (CP. We confirmed that diastolic blood pressure (DBP is consistently correlated with blood DA Aβ40 levels (r=-0.19, P=0.032. These results were consistent in the three phenotypic groups studied. Importantly, the observation resisted covariation with age, gender or creatinine levels. Observed effect size and direction of Aβ40 levels/DBP correlation are in accordance with previous reports. Of note, DA Aβ40 and the RP Aβ40 were also strongly associated with creatinine levels (r=0.599, P<<0.001 and to a lesser extent to urea, age, hematocrit, uric acid and homocysteine (p<0.001. DBP and the rest of statistical significant correlates identified should be considered as potential confounder factors in studies investigating blood Aβ levels as potential AD biomarker. Remarkably, the factors affecting Aβ levels in plasma (DA, RP and blood cell compartments (CP seem completely different.

  17. β-Amyloid burden in healthy aging: regional distribution and cognitive consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigue, K M; Kennedy, K M; Devous, M D; Rieck, J R; Hebrank, A C; Diaz-Arrastia, R; Mathews, D; Park, D C

    2012-02-07

    Several lines of evidence suggest that pathologic changes underlying Alzheimer disease (AD) begin years prior to the clinical expression of the disease, underscoring the need for studies of cognitively healthy adults to capture these early changes. The overall goal of the current study was to map the cortical distribution of β-amyloid (Aβ) in a healthy adult lifespan sample (aged 30-89), and to assess the relationship between elevated amyloid and cognitive performance across multiple domains. A total of 137 well-screened and cognitively normal adults underwent Aβ PET imaging with radiotracer (18)F-florbetapir. Aβ load was estimated from 8 cortical regions. Participants were genotyped for APOE and tested for processing speed, working memory, fluid reasoning, episodic memory, and verbal ability. Aβ deposition is distributed differentially across the cortex and progresses at varying rates with age across cortical brain regions. A subset of cognitively normal adults aged 60 and over show markedly elevated deposition, and also had a higher rate of APOE ε4 (38%) than nonelevated adults (19%). Aβ burden was linked to poorer cognitive performance on measures of processing speed, working memory, and reasoning. Even in a highly selected lifespan sample of adults, Aβ deposition is apparent in some adults and is influenced by APOE status. Greater amyloid burden was related to deleterious effects on cognition, suggesting that subtle cognitive changes accrue as amyloid progresses.

  18. Quantum dots induce charge-specific amyloid-like fibrillation of insulin at physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanova, Alyona; Poly, Simon; Shemetov, Anton; Nabiev, Igor R.

    2012-10-01

    Agglomeration of some proteins may give rise to aggregates that have been identified as the main cause of amyloid diseases. For example, fibrillation of insulin is related to diabetes mellitus. Quantum dots (QDs) are of special interest as tagging agents for diagnostic and therapeutic studies due to their broad absorption spectra, narrow emission spectra, and high photostability. In this study, PEGylated CdSe/ZnS QDs have been shown to induce the formation of amyloid-like fibrils of human insulin under physiological conditions, this process being dependent on the variation of the surface charge of the nanoparticles (NPs) used. Circular dichroism (CD), protein secondary structure analysis, thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, and the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique have been used for comparative analysis of different stages of the fibrillation process. In particular, insulin secondary structure remodelling accompanied by a considerable increase in the rate of amyloid fiber formation have been observed after insulin was mixed with PEGylated QDs. Nanoparticles may significantly influence the rate of protein fibrillation and induce new mechanisms of amyloid diseases, as well as offer opportunities for their treatment.

  19. Modeling Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology in Amyloid-β Metabolism using Neural-Crest-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Cheung

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: There is growing recognition of cerebrovascular contributions to neurodegenerative diseases. In the walls of cerebral arteries, amyloid-beta (Aβ accumulation is evident in a majority of aged people and patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Here, we leverage human pluripotent stem cells to generate vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs from neural crest progenitors, recapitulating brain-vasculature-specific attributes of Aβ metabolism. We confirm that the lipoprotein receptor, LRP1, functions in our neural-crest-derived SMCs to mediate Aβ uptake and intracellular lysosomal degradation. Hypoxia significantly compromises the contribution of SMCs to Aβ clearance by suppressing LRP1 expression. This enabled us to develop an assay of Aβ uptake by using the neural crest-derived SMCs with hypoxia as a stress paradigm. We then tested several vascular protective compounds in a high-throughput format, demonstrating the value of stem-cell-based phenotypic screening for novel therapeutics and drug repurposing, aimed at alleviating amyloid burden. : The contribution of blood vessel pathologies to neurodegenerative disorders is relatively neglected, partly due to inadequate human tissues for research. By using human stem cells, Cheung et al. establish a method of generating vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs from neural crest progenitors, the primary precursors that give rise to brain blood vessels. These stem-cell-derived SMCs display defective amyloid processing under chronic hypoxia, a phenomenon well documented in the cerebral vasculatures of aged people and patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

  20. Link between Aluminum and the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease: The Integration of the Aluminum and Amyloid Cascade Hypotheses

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Kato-Negishi, Midori

    2011-01-01

    Whilst being environmentally abundant, aluminum is not essential for life. On the contrary, aluminum is a widely recognized neurotoxin that inhibits more than 200 biologically important functions and causes various adverse effects in plants, animals, and humans. The relationship between aluminum exposure and neurodegenerative diseases, including dialysis encephalopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism dementia in the Kii Peninsula and Guam, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been...

  1. Amelioration of lupus nephritis by serum amyloid P component gene therapy with distinct mechanisms varied from different stage of the disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijuan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous study revealed that administration of syngeneic female BALB/c mice with excessive self activated lymphocyte-derived DNA (ALD-DNA could induce systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE disease, indicating that overload of self-DNA might exceed normal clearance ability and comprise the major source of autoantigens in lupus mice. Serum amyloid P component (SAP, an acute-phase serum protein with binding reactivity to DNA in mice, was proved to promote the clearance of free DNA and prevent mice against self-antigen induced autoimmune response. It is reasonable to hypothesize that SAP treatment might contribute to alleviation of SLE disease, whereas its role in ALD-DNA-induced lupus nephritis is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The ratios of SAP to DNA significantly decreased and were negatively correlated with the titers of anti-dsDNA antibodies in ALD-DNA-induced lupus mice, indicating SAP was relatively insufficient in lupus mice. Herein a pcDNA3-SAP plasmid (pSAP was genetically constructed and intramuscularly injected into BALB/c mice. It was found that SAP protein purified from the serum of pSAP-treated mice bound efficiently to ALD-DNA and inhibited ALD-DNA-mediated innate immune response in vitro. Treatment of ALD-DNA-induced lupus mice with pSAP in the early stage of SLE disease with the onset of proteinuria reversed lupus nephritis via decreasing anti-dsDNA autoantibody production and immune complex (IC deposition. Further administration of pSAP in the late stage of SLE disease that had established lupus nephritis alleviated proteinuria and ameliorated lupus nephritis. This therapeutic effect of SAP was not only attributable to the decreased levels of anti-dsDNA autoantibodies, but also associated with the decreased infiltration of lymphocytes and the reduced production of inflammatory markers. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that SAP administration could effectively alleviated lupus

  2. Coeliac disease : investigation of the genetic factors underlying coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, M.J. (Martine Juliana) van

    2003-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a common food intolerance with a complex genetic aetiology. It is caused by ingestion of gluten peptides from wheat and related proteins from barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. The disease affects the small intestine and leads to abnormalities ranging from the

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer...... of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells....

  4. Conformational dynamics of amyloid proteins at the aqueous interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Matthew; Horst, Nathan; Aoki, Brendy; Malik, Saad; Soto, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid proteins is a class of proteins that exhibit distinct monomeric and oligomeric conformational states hallmark of deleterious neurological diseases for which there are not yet cures. Our goal is to examine the extent of which the aqueous/membrane interface modulates the folding energy landscape of amyloid proteins. To this end, we probe the dynamic conformational ensemble of amyloids (monomer prion protein and Alzheimer's Ab protofilaments) interacting with model bilayers. We will present the results of our coarse grain molecular modeling study in terms of the existence of preferential binding spots of the amyloid to the bilayer and the response of the bilayer to the interaction with the amyloid. NSF Nebraska EPSCoR First Award

  5. Inhibition of Toxic IAPP Amyloid by Extracts of Common Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Pei-Yu; Green, Evangeline; Pereira, Catalina; Ekimura, Shauna; Juarez, Dennis; Whyte, Travis; Arhar, Taylor; Malaspina, Bianca; Nogaj, Luiza A; Moffet, David A

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of the 37-amino acid polypeptide islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, amylin), as either insoluble amyloid or as small oligomers, appears to play a direct role in the death of pancreatic β-islet cells in type 2 diabetes. It is believed that inhibiting the aggregation of IAPP may slow down, if not prevent entirely, the progression of this disease. Extracts of thirteen different common fruits were analyzed for their ability to prevent the aggregation of amyloidogenic IAPP. Thioflavin T binding, immuno-detection and circular dichroism assays were performed to test the in vitro inhibitory potential of each extract. Atomic force microscopy was used to visualize the formation of amyloid fibrils with and without each fruit extract. Finally, extracts were tested for their ability to protect living mammalian cells from the toxic effects of amyloid IAPP. Several fruits showed substantial ability to inhibit IAPP aggregation and protect living cells from toxic IAPP amyloid.

  6. Loss of GPR3 reduces the amyloid plaque burden and improves memory in Alzheimer's disease mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Yunhong; Skwarek-Maruszewska, Aneta; Horré, Katrien; Vandewyer, Elke; Wolfs, Leen; Snellinx, An; Saito, Takashi; Radaelli, Enrico; Corthout, Nikky; Colombelli, Julien; Lo, Adrian C; Van Aerschot, Leen; Callaerts-Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Trabzuni, Daniah; Bossers, Koen; Verhaagen, Joost; Ryten, Mina; Munck, Sebastian; D'Hooge, Rudi; Swaab, Dick F; Hardy, John; Saido, Takaomi C; De Strooper, Bart; Thathiah, Amantha

    2015-01-01

    The orphan G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR) GPR3 regulates activity of the γ-secretase complex in the absence of an effect on Notch proteolysis, providing a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, given the vast

  7. A Peptide-Fc Opsonin with Pan-Amyloid Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Foster

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a continuing need for therapeutic interventions for patients with the protein misfolding disorders that result in systemic amyloidosis. Recently, specific antibodies have been employed to treat AL amyloidosis by opsonizing tissue amyloid deposits thereby inducing cell-mediated dissolution and organ improvement. To develop a pan-amyloid therapeutic agent, we have produced an Fc-fusion product incorporating a peptide, p5, which binds many if not all forms of amyloid. This protein, designated Fcp5, expressed in mammalian cells, forms the desired bivalent dimer structure and retains pan-amyloid reactivity similar to the p5 peptide as measured by immunosorbent assays, immunohistochemistry, surface plasmon resonance, and pulldown assays using radioiodinated Fcp5. Additionally, Fcp5 was capable of opsonizing amyloid fibrils in vitro using a pH-sensitive fluorescence assay of phagocytosis. In mice,125 I-labeled Fcp5 exhibited an extended serum circulation time, relative to the p5 peptide. It specifically bound AA amyloid deposits in diseased mice, as evidenced by biodistribution and microautoradiographic methods, which coincided with an increase in active, Iba-1-positive macrophages in the liver at 48 h postinjection of Fcp5. In healthy mice, no specific tissue accumulation was observed. The data indicate that polybasic, pan-amyloid-targeting peptides, in the context of an Fc fusion, can yield amyloid reactive, opsonizing reagents that may serve as next-generation immunotherapeutics.

  8. Amyloid-β Derived from the Brain of the Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mouse Is Resistant to Proteolytic Digestion Due to Its Conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baian; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Shubo; Wang, Wen; Yao, Zitong; Sun, Quan; Wu, Yi; Lu, Jing

    2017-08-01

    The main pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the formation of abundant amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques in the human brain. Studies have reported that Aβ from the AD brain is resistant to proteolytic digestion, which may explain why Aβ cannot be readily eliminated from this organ. However, there are only a few studies that address this important question. We used the AD transgenic mouse (APP/PS1) model to show that Aβ derived from the brain of the old mouse is resistant to proteolytic digestion. This was in contrast to the proteinase K-sensitive human Aβ peptide, whose amino acid sequence was identical to that of AD mouse-derived Aβ but whose conformation was different (i.e., the native protein, but not the peptide, folded into a three-dimensional conformation). To address this question, we denatured AD mouse-derived Aβ with urea and found that Aβ became proteinase K-sensitive. This phenomenon was concentration-dependent, and these results were confirmed by another protein denaturant, guanidinium hydrochloride. We recovered the conformation of the denatured AD mouse-derived Aβ by eliminating urea and adding the human Aβ peptide, and we found that human Aβ was converted to the proteinase K-resistant form in the presence of partially undenatured AD mouse-derived Aβ. However, upon the addition of the rat Aβ peptide, there were no Aβ proteinase K-resistant fragments. Our results show that the resistance of AD mouse-derived Aβ to proteolytic digestion is dependent on the three-dimensional conformation of Aβ. In summary, this study provides new insights on why Aβ plaques fail to be degraded in the human brain.

  9. C-Reactive Protein and Serum Amyloid A Overexpression in Lung Tissues of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Campos, Jose Luis; Calero, Carmen; Rojano, Belén; López-Porras, Marta; Sáenz-Coronilla, Javier; Blanco, Ana I; Sánchez-López, Verónica; Tobar, Daniela; Montes-Worboys, Ana; Arellano, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Background. Although researchers have consistently demonstrated systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), its origin is yet unknown. We aimed to compare the lung bronchial and parenchymal tissues as potential sources of major acute-phase reactants in COPD patients and resistant smokers. Methods. Consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for suspected primary lung cancer were considered for the study. Patients were categorized as COPD or resistant smokers according to their spirometric results. Lung parenchyma and bronchus sections distant from the primary lesion were obtained. C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA1, SAA2 and SAA4) gene expressions were evaluated by RT-PCR. Protein levels were evaluated in paraffin embedded lung tissues by immunohistochemistry and in serum samples by nephelometry. Results. Our study included 85 patients with COPD and 87 resistant smokers. In bronchial and parenchymal tissues, both CRP and SAA were overexpressed in COPD patients. In the bronchus, CRP, SAA1, SAA2, and SA4 gene expressions in COPD patients were 1.89-fold, 4.36-fold, 3.65-fold, and 3.9-fold the control values, respectively. In the parenchyma, CRP, SAA1, and SAA2 gene expressions were 2.41-, 1.97-, and 1.76-fold the control values, respectively. Immunohistochemistry showed an over-stained pattern of these markers on endovascular cells of COPD patients. There was no correlation with serum protein concentration. Conclusions. These results indicate an overexpression of CRP and SAA in both bronchial and parenchymal tissue in COPD, which differs between both locations, indicating tissue/cell type specificity. The endothelial cells might play a role in the production of theses markers. PMID:23801879

  10. Neuroprotective effects of hydrated fullerene C60: cortical and hippocampal EEG interplay in an amyloid-infused rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyov, Vasily; Kaptsov, Vladimir; Gordon, Rita; Makarova, Ekaterina; Podolski, Igor; Sengpiel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of fullerene C60 nanoparticles, namely hydrated fullerene C60 (C60HyFn), on interrelations between EEG frequency spectra from the frontal cortex and the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) on an amyloid-β (Aβ) rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Infusion of Aβ1-42 protein (1.5 μl) into the CA1 region two weeks before EEG testing diminished hippocampal theta (3.8-8.4 Hz) predominance and eliminated cortical beta (12.9-26.2 Hz) predominance observed in baseline EEG of rats infused with saline (control) or with C60HyFn alone. In contrast, these Aβ1-42 effects were abolished in rats pretreated with C60HyFn, 30 min apart. Dopaminergic mediation in AD has been shown to be involved in neuronal plasticity and Aβ transformation in different ways. To clarify its role in the cortex-hippocampus interplay in the Aβ model of AD, we used peripheral injection of a dopamine agonist, apomorphine (APO), at a low dose (0.1 mg/kg). In rats infused with C60HyFn or Aβ1-42 alone, APO attenuated the cortical beta predominance, with immediate and delayed phases evident in the Aβ1-42-rats. Pretreatment with C60HyFn diminished the APO effect in the Aβ1-42-treated rats. Thus, we show that intrahippocampal injection of Aβ1-42 dramatically disrupts cortical versus hippocampal EEG interrelations and that pretreatment with the fullerene eliminates this abnormality. We suggest that some effects of C60HyFn may be mediated through presynaptic dopamine receptors and that water-soluble C60 fullerenes have a neuroprotective potential.

  11. [18F]Flutemetamol amyloid-beta PET imaging compared with [11C]PIB across the spectrum of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatashita, Shizuo; Yamasaki, Hidetomo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Tanaka, Kumiko; Wakebe, Daichi; Hayakawa, Hideki

    2014-02-01

    The aim was to identify the amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the (18)F-labeled Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) derivative [(18)F]flutemetamol (FMM) across a spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to compare Aβ deposition between [(18)F]FMM and [(11)C]PIB PET imaging. The study included 36 patients with AD, 68 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 41 older healthy controls (HC) (aged ≥56), 11 young HC (aged ≤45), and 10 transitional HC (aged 46-55). All 166 subjects underwent 30-min static [(18)F]FMM PET 85 min after injection, 60-min dynamic [(11)C]PIB PET, and cognitive testing. [(18)F]FMM scans were assessed visually, and standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) were defined quantitatively in regions of interest identified on coregistered MRI (cerebellar cortex as a reference region). The PIB distribution volume ratios (DVR) were determined in the same regions. Of 36 AD patients, 35 had positive scans, while 36 of 41 older HC subjects had negative scans. [(18)F]FMM scans had a sensitivity of 97.2% and specificity of 85.3% in distinguishing AD patients from older HC subjects, and a specificity of 100% for young and transitional HC subjects. The [(11)C]PIB scan had the same results. Interreader agreement was excellent (kappa score = 0.81). The cortical FMM SUVR in AD patients was significantly greater than in older HC subjects (1.76 ± 0.23 vs 1.30 ± 0.26, p PIB DVR (r = 0.94, n = 145, p PIB PET.

  12. Potential Natural Products for Alzheimer’s Disease: Targeted Search Using the Internal Ribosome Entry Site of Tau and Amyloid-β Precursor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Chieh Tasi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP and the hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein are vital in the understanding of the cause of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. As a consequence, regulation of the expression of both APP and tau proteins is one important approach in combating AD. The APP and tau proteins can be targeted at the levels of transcription, translation and protein structural integrity. This paper reports the utilization of a bi-cistronic vector containing either APP or tau internal ribosome entry site (IRES elements flanked by β-galactosidase gene (cap-dependent and secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP (cap-independent to discern the mechanism of action of memantine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist. Results indicate that memantine could reduce the activity of both the APP and tau IRES at a concentration of ~10 μM (monitored by SEAP activity without interfering with the cap-dependent translation as monitored by the β-galactosidase assay. Western blot analysis of the tau protein in neuroblastoma (N2A and rat hippocampal cells confirmed the halting of the expression of the tau proteins. We also employed this approach to identify a preparation named NB34, extracts of Boussingaultia baselloides (madeira-vine fermented with Lactobacillus spp., which can function similarly to memantine in both IRES of APP and Tau. The water maze test demonstrated that NB34 could improve the spatial memory of a high fat diet induced neurodegeneration in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE−/− mice. These results revealed that the bi-cistronic vector provided a simple, and effective platform in screening and establishing the mechanistic action of potential compounds for the treatment and management of AD.

  13. Calcium-Sensing Receptors of Human Astrocyte-Neuron Teams: Amyloid-β-Driven Mediators and Therapeutic Targets of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Prà, I; Chiarini, A; Pacchiana, R; Gardenal, E; Chakravarthy, B; Whitfield, J F; Armato, U

    2014-07-01

    It is generally assumed that the neuropathology of sporadic (late-onset or nonfamilial) Alzheimer's disease (AD) is driven by the overproduction and spreading of first Amyloid-βx-42 (Aβ42) and later hyperphosphorylated (hp)-Tau oligomeric "infectious seeds". Hitherto, only neurons were held to make and spread both oligomer types; astrocytes would just remove debris. However, we have recently shown that exogenous fibrillar or soluble Aβ peptides specifically bind and activate the Ca(2+)-sensing receptors (CaSRs) of untransformed human cortical adult astrocytes and postnatal neurons cultured in vitro driving them to produce, accrue, and secrete surplus endogenous Aβ42. While the Aβ-exposed neurons start dying, astrocytes survive and keep oversecreting Aβ42, nitric oxide (NO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. Thus astrocytes help neurons' demise. Moreover, we have found that a highly selective allosteric CaSR agonist ("calcimimetic"), NPS R-568, mimics the just mentioned neurotoxic actions triggered by Aβ●CaSR signaling. Contrariwise, and most important, NPS 2143, a highly selective allosteric CaSR antagonist ("calcilytic"), fully suppresses all the Aβ●CaSR signaling-driven noxious actions. Altogether our findings suggest that the progression of AD neuropathology is promoted by unceasingly repeating cycles of accruing exogenous Aβ42 oligomers interacting with the CaSRs of swelling numbers of astrocyte-neuron teams thereby recruiting them to overrelease additional Aβ42 oligomers, VEGF-A, and NO. Calcilytics would beneficially break such Aβ/CaSR-driven vicious cycles and hence halt or at least slow the otherwise unstoppable spreading of AD neuropathology.

  14. Calcium-Sensing Receptors of Human Astrocyte-Neuron Teams: Amyloid-β-Driven Mediators and Therapeutic Targets of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Prà, I; Chiarini, A; Pacchiana, R; Gardenal, E; Chakravarthy, B; Whitfield, J. F; Armato, U

    2014-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the neuropathology of sporadic (late-onset or nonfamilial) Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is driven by the overproduction and spreading of first Amyloid-βx-42 (Aβ42) and later hyperphosphorylated (hp)-Tau oligomeric “infectious seeds”. Hitherto, only neurons were held to make and spread both oligomer types; astrocytes would just remove debris. However, we have recently shown that exogenous fibrillar or soluble Aβ peptides specifically bind and activate the Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSRs) of untransformed human cortical adult astrocytes and postnatal neurons cultured in vitro driving them to produce, accrue, and secrete surplus endogenous Aβ42. While the Aβ-exposed neurons start dying, astrocytes survive and keep oversecreting Aβ42, nitric oxide (NO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. Thus astrocytes help neurons’ demise. Moreover, we have found that a highly selective allosteric CaSR agonist (“calcimimetic”), NPS R-568, mimics the just mentioned neurotoxic actions triggered by Aβ●CaSR signaling. Contrariwise, and most important, NPS 2143, a highly selective allosteric CaSR antagonist (“calcilytic”), fully suppresses all the Aβ●CaSR signaling-driven noxious actions. Altogether our findings suggest that the progression of AD neuropathology is promoted by unceasingly repeating cycles of accruing exogenous Aβ42 oligomers interacting with the CaSRs of swelling numbers of astrocyte-neuron teams thereby recruiting them to overrelease additional Aβ42 oligomers, VEGF-A, and NO. Calcilytics would beneficially break such Aβ/CaSR-driven vicious cycles and hence halt or at least slow the otherwise unstoppable spreading of AD neuropathology PMID:25342943

  15. Case report 480: Periosteal amyloid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.O.; Karjoo, R.; Johnstone, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    In summary, a 66-year-old woman presented with an asymptomatic left pretibial tumor of 7 years duration. Serial radiographs over this period demonstrated a slowly enlarging periosteal tumor with focal and increasing calcifications/ossifications. No involvement of the underlying medullary bone, as demonstrated by computed tomography was noted. Following the diagnosis by biopsy of an amyloid tumor, serum and urine electrophoreses, complete blood count, SMAC panel, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and serum rheumatoid factor level were found to be within reference ranges. A needle biopsy of the abdominal wall failed to reveal amyloid in the fat by Congo-red staining. (orig.)

  16. Inhibition of amyloid oligomerization into different supramolecular architectures by small molecules: mechanistic insights and design rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmachari, Sayanti; Paul, Ashim; Segal, Daniel; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-05-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation have been associated with several human disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, as well as senile systemic amyloidosis and Type II diabetes. However, there is no current disease-modifying therapy available for the treatment of these disorders. In spite of extensive academic, pharmaceutical, medicinal and clinical research, a complete mechanistic model for this family of diseases is still lacking. In this review, we primarily discuss the different types of small molecular entities which have been used for the inhibition of the aggregation process of different amyloidogenic proteins under diseased conditions. These include small peptides, polyphenols, inositols, quinones and their derivatives, and metal chelator molecules. In recent years, these groups of molecules have been extensively studied using in vitro, in vivo and computational models to understand their mechanism of action and common structural features underlying the process of inhibition. A salient feature found to be instrumental in the process of inhibition is the balance between the aromatic unit that functions as the amyloid recognition unit and the hydrophilic amyloid breaker unit. The establishment of structure-function relationship for amyloid-modifying therapies by the various functional entities should serve as an important step toward the development of efficient therapeutics.

  17. High tryptophan diet reduces CA1 intraneuronal ss-amyloid in the triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Noristani, H. N.; Verkhratsky, A.; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2012), s. 810-822 ISSN 1474-9718 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/09/1696; GA ČR GA305/08/1384; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease * hippocampus * L-tryptophan diet Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.705, year: 2012

  18. The N-terminal helix controls the transition between the soluble and amyloid states of an FF domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Virginia; Chiti, Fabrizio; Ventura, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation is linked to the onset of an increasing number of human nonneuropathic (either localized or systemic) and neurodegenerative disorders. In particular, misfolding of native α-helical structures and their self-assembly into nonnative intermolecular β-sheets has been proposed to trigger amyloid fibril formation in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Here, we use a battery of biophysical techniques to elucidate the conformational conversion of native α-helices into amyloid fibrils using an all-α FF domain as a model system. We show that under mild denaturing conditions at low pH this FF domain self-assembles into amyloid fibrils. Theoretical and experimental dissection of the secondary structure elements in this domain indicates that the helix 1 at the N-terminus has both the highest α-helical and amyloid propensities, controlling the transition between soluble and aggregated states of the protein. The data illustrates the overlap between the propensity to form native α-helices and amyloid structures in protein segments. The results presented contribute to explain why proteins cannot avoid the presence of aggregation-prone regions and indeed use stable α-helices as a strategy to neutralize such potentially deleterious stretches.

  19. Epigenetic mechanisms underlying nervous system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2018-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms act as control systems for modulating genomic structure and activity in response to evolving profiles of cell-extrinsic, cell-cell, and cell-intrinsic signals. These dynamic processes are responsible for mediating cell- and tissue-specific gene expression and function and gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions. The major epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation; histone protein posttranslational modifications, nucleosome remodeling/repositioning, and higher-order chromatin reorganization; noncoding RNA regulation; and RNA editing. These mechanisms are intimately involved in executing fundamental genomic programs, including gene transcription, posttranscriptional RNA processing and transport, translation, X-chromosome inactivation, genomic imprinting, retrotransposon regulation, DNA replication, and DNA repair and the maintenance of genomic stability. For the nervous system, epigenetics offers a novel and robust framework for explaining how brain development and aging occur, neural cellular diversity is generated, synaptic and neural network connectivity and plasticity are mediated, and complex cognitive and behavioral phenotypes are inherited transgenerationally. Epigenetic factors and processes are, not surprisingly, implicated in nervous system disease pathophysiology through several emerging paradigms - mutations and genetic variation in genes encoding epigenetic factors; impairments in epigenetic factor expression, localization, and function; epigenetic mechanisms modulating disease-associated factors and pathways; and the presence of deregulated epigenetic profiles in central and peripheral tissues. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hyperhemolysis Syndrome without Underlying Hematologic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Anne Eberly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hyperhemolysis is characterized by a life-threatening hemolytic transfusion reaction, with hemoglobin (Hb and hematocrit (Hct dropping markedly lower than before transfusion. This phenomenon, commonly described in sickle cell disease, is a rare occurrence in patients without hemoglobinopathies. Case Report. A 55-year-old male presented to the hospital after a motorcycle crash and received 10 units of cross-matched blood for active bleeding. The patient was blood group O, with a negative antibody screen. Ten days later, he represented complaining of dyspnea and was found to have a hematocrit of 12%. The direct antiglobulin test was positive for anti-immunoglobin G and complement. Indirect antiglobulin test was positive for anti-Jka alloantibodies. The presence of Jka antigen was revealed in one unit of previously transfused blood; patient’s RBCs were negative for the Jka antigen. Laboratory data demonstrated findings consistent with DHTR, as well as reticulopenia and elevated ferritin levels. He continued to show signs of active hemolysis, requiring a total of 4 subsequent units of pRBCs. Each transfusion precipitated a drop in Hb and Hct to levels lower than before transfusion; once transfusions were held, the patient slowly recovered. Discussion. Hyperhemolysis in the setting of a DHTR can occur in patients without hematologic disease.

  1. Quantitative characterization of brain β-amyloid using a joint PiB/FDG PET image histogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jon J.; Hanson, Dennis P.; Holmes, David R.; Kemp, Bradley J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Murray, Melissa E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Parisi, Joseph; Petersen, Ronald C.; Lowe, Val J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2014-03-01

    A complex analysis performed by spatial registration of PiB and MRI patient images in order to localize the PiB signal to specific cortical brain regions has been proven effective in identifying imaging characteristics associated with underlying Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Lewy Body Disease (LBD) pathology. This paper presents an original method of image analysis and stratification of amyloid-related brain disease based on the global spatial correlation of PiB PET images with 18F-FDG PET images (without MR images) to categorize the PiB signal arising from the cortex. Rigid registration of PiB and 18F-FDG images is relatively straightforward, and in registration the 18F-FDG signal serves to identify the cortical region in which the PiB signal is relevant. Cortical grey matter demonstrates the highest levels of amyloid accumulation and therefore the greatest PiB signal related to amyloid pathology. The highest intensity voxels in the 18F-FDG image are attributed to the cortical grey matter. The correlation of the highest intensity PiB voxels with the highest 18F-FDG values indicates the presence of β-amyloid protein in the cortex in disease states, while correlation of the highest intensity PiB voxels with mid-range 18F-FDG values indicates only nonspecific binding in the white matter.

  2. Aerosol Delivery of Curcumin Reduced Amyloid-β Deposition and Improved Cognitive Performance in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Richard; Ong, Henry; Janve, Vaibhab; Barton, Shawn; Zhu, Meiying; Li, Bo; Dawes, Mary; Jerome, W Gray; Anderson, Adam; Massion, Pierre; Gore, John C; Pham, Wellington

    2017-01-01

    We report a novel approach for the delivery of curcumin to the brain via inhalation of the aerosol for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The percentage of plaque fraction in the subiculum and hippocampus reduced significantly when young 5XFAD mice were treated with inhalable curcumin over an extended period of time compared to age-matched nontreated counterparts. Further, treated animals demonstrated remarkably improved overall cognitive function, no registered systemic or pulmonary toxicity associated with inhalable curcumin observed during the course of this work.

  3. Treadmill exercise improves motor coordination through ameliorating Purkinje cell loss in amyloid beta23-35-induced Alzheimer's disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Min; Shin, Mal-Soon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Tae-Woon; Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Chang-Ju; Jang, Myung-Soo; Kim, Tae-Wook; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Dong-Hee

    2014-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a most common age-related neurodegenerative disease. AD is characterized by a progressive loss of neurons causing cognitive dysfunction. The cerebellum is closely associated with integration of movement, including motor coordination, control, and equilibrium. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of tread-mill exercise on the survival of Purkinje neurons in relation with reactive astrocyte in the cerebellum using Aβ25-35-induced AD rats. AD was induced by a bilateral intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ25-35. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 4 weeks, starting 2 days after Aβ25-35 injection. In the present results, ICV injection of Aβ25-35 deteriorated motor coordination and balance. The number of calbindin-positive cells in the cerebellar vermis was decreased and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the cerebellar vermis was increased in the Aβ25-35-induced AD rats. Treadmill exercise improved motor coordination and balance. Treadmill exercise increased the number of Purkinje neurons and suppressed GFAP expression in the cerebellar vermis. The present study demonstrated that treadmill exercises alleviated dysfunction of motor coordination and balance by reduction of Purkinje cell loss through suppressing reactive astrocytes in the cerebellum of AD rats. The present study provides the possibility that treadmill exercise might be an important therapeutic strategy for the symptom improvement of AD patients.

  4. Streptococcus bovis bacteremia and underlying gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, H W; Roberts, R B

    1978-07-01

    Twenty-six adults with Streptococcus bovis endocarditis and ten with bacteremia alone were studied to determine possible portals of entry. Of 36 patients (17 with endocarditis, eight with bacteremia alone), 25 had gastrointestinal lesions or manipulation. In 22, the gastrointestinal tract appeared to be the source of S bovis bacteremia. Four patients had either carcinoma of the colon (two) or potentially malignant villous adenomas (two) when first seen because of S bovis bacteremia. None of these, nor two other patients with benign colonic polyps, had bowel-related symptoms or signs prior to admission. Since S bovis is a normal intestinal tract inhabitant, bacteremia may frequently be associated with bowel lesions. Streptococcus bovis bacteremia may provide an early clue to the presence of serious and clinically unexpected gastrointestinal disease. Gastrointestinal tract evaluation should be part of S bovis bacteremia patient management, with or without endocarditis.

  5. [The disease of beta 2-amyloid deposition in the differential diagnosis of juxta-articular subchondral geode lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marri, C; Romagnoli, C; Solano, G; Caldeo, A; Emiliani, G

    1993-01-01

    Beta-2 amyloidosis deposition is a new type of amyloidosis recently observed in long-term hemodialysis patients. One of the major osteoarticular complications of this disease is the appearance of subchondral bone cysts. In this paper the radiologic features of such radiolucencies are described and the criteria are outlined of the differential diagnosis from the geodes found in other arthropathies or para-physiologic conditions. The importance of the status of the joint space is stressed: on the basis of its patterns, arthropathies may be grouped as follows: inhomogeneous space narrowing in degenerative arthritis; homogeneous space narrowing in inflammatory arthritis; normal or nearly normal joint space if there is no/not-prevalent involvement of articular cartilage.

  6. DNA polymerase-beta is expressed early in neurons of Alzheimer's disease brain and is loaded into DNA replication forks in neurons challenged with beta-amyloid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copani, Agata; Hoozemans, Jeroen J. M.; Caraci, Filippo; Calafiore, Marco; van Haastert, Elise S.; Veerhuis, Robert; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.; Aronica, Eleonora; Sortino, Maria Angela; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2006-01-01

    Cultured neurons exposed to synthetic beta-amyloid (Abeta) fragments reenter the cell cycle and initiate a pathway of DNA replication that involves the repair enzyme DNA polymerase-beta (DNA pol-beta) before undergoing apoptotic death. In this study, by performing coimmunoprecipitation experiments

  7. Fish β-parvalbumin acquires allergenic properties by amyloid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Javier; Sánchez, Rosa; Castellanos, Milagros; Fernández-Escamilla, Ana M; Vázquez-Cortés, Sonia; Fernández-Rivas, Montserrat; Gasset, María

    2015-01-01

    Amyloids are highly cross-β-sheet-rich aggregated states that confer protease resistance, membrane activity and multivalence properties to proteins, all essential features for the undesired preservation of food proteins transiting the gastrointestinal tract and causing type I allergy. Amyloid propensity of β-parvalbumin, the major fish allergen, was theoretically analysed and assayed under gastrointestinal-relevant conditions using the binding of thioflavin T, the formation of sodium dodecyl sulphate- (SDS-) resistant aggregates, circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy fibril imaging. Impact of amyloid aggregates on allergenicity was assessed with dot blot. Sequences of β-parvalbumin from species with commercial value contain several adhesive hexapeptides capable of driving amyloid formation. Using Atlantic cod β-parvalbumin (rGad m 1) displaying high IgE cross-reactivity, we found that formation of amyloid fibres under simulated gastrointestinal conditions accounts for the resistance to acid and neutral proteases, for the presence of membrane active species under gastrointestinal relevant conditions and for the IgE-recognition in the sera of allergic patients. Incorporation of the anti-amyloid compound epigallocatechin gallate prevents rGad m 1 fibrillation, facilitates its protease digestion and impairs its recognition by IgE. the formation of amyloid by rGad m 1 explains its degradation resistance, its facilitated passage across the intestinal epithelial barrier and its epitope architecture as allergen.

  8. Monoamine oxidase B is elevated in Alzheimer disease neurons, is associated with γ-secretase and regulates neuronal amyloid β-peptide levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Hromadkova, Lenka; Teranishi, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Natsuko Goto; Wiehager, Birgitta; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Winblad, Bengt; Sandebring-Matton, Anna; Frykman, Susanne; Tjernberg, Lars O

    2017-08-01

    Increased levels of the pathogenic amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), released from its precursor by the transmembrane protease γ-secretase, are found in Alzheimer disease (AD) brains. Interestingly, monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) activity is also increased in AD brain, but its role in AD pathogenesis is not known. Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that the increased MAO-B expression in AD brain starts several years before the onset of the disease. Here, we show a potential connection between MAO-B, γ-secretase and Aβ in neurons. MAO-B immunohistochemistry was performed on postmortem human brain. Affinity purification of γ-secretase followed by mass spectrometry was used for unbiased identification of γ-secretase-associated proteins. The association of MAO-B with γ-secretase was studied by coimmunoprecipitation from brain homogenate, and by in-situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) in neurons as well as mouse and human brain sections. The effect of MAO-B on Aβ production and Notch processing in cell cultures was analyzed by siRNA silencing or overexpression experiments followed by ELISA, western blot or FRET analysis. Methodology for measuring relative intraneuronal MAO-B and Aβ42 levels in single cells was developed by combining immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy with quantitative image analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed MAO-B staining in neurons in the frontal cortex, hippocampus CA1 and entorhinal cortex in postmortem human brain. Interestingly, the neuronal staining intensity was higher in AD brain than in control brain in these regions. Mass spectrometric data from affinity purified γ-secretase suggested that MAO-B is a γ-secretase-associated protein, which was confirmed by immunoprecipitation and PLA, and a neuronal location of the interaction was shown. Strikingly, intraneuronal Aβ42 levels correlated with MAO-B levels, and siRNA silencing of MAO-B resulted in significantly reduced levels of intraneuronal Aβ42. Furthermore, overexpression of

  9. Effects of Huperzin-A on the Beta-amyloid accumulation in the brain and skeletal muscle cells of a rat model for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkseven, Cagatay Han; Buyukakilli, Belgin; Balli, Ebru; Yetkin, Derya; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Yilmaz, Senay Gorucu; Sahin, Leyla

    2017-09-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is characterized by a loss of cognitive function and also the accumulation of β-amyloid peptide (βAP) in the brain parenchyma, which plays an important role in this disease. However, it is often also associated with the non-cognitive symptoms such as loss of muscle function (Inclusion-Body Myositis-IBM). Sprague-Dawley rats (13 weeks-n=68) were randomly assigned into five groups: Group C: Control; Group D: d-galactose; Group O+D: Bilateral oophorectomy+d-galactose; Group O: Bilateral oophorectomy; Group O+D+H: Bilateral oophorectomy+d-galactose+Hup-A. Tissue fixation was performed with the perfusion method. The Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) and mechanical muscle activity were recorded using the standard electro-biophysical techniques. Immune staining was performed with specific antibodies, and the pathological changes were examined. RNA was obtained from brain tissue samples with the Trizol Method. Then, the expression data of mature-miRNAs (rno-miR-9-5p, rno-miR-29a-3p, rno-miR-106a-5p, rno-miR-107 and rno-miR-125a-3p), which may be effective in AD, were taken with Real-Time PCR. Impairments occurred in behavioral tests of the rats in the O+D group. βAP accumulation and AChE activity increased significantly in the forebrain in the O+D group compared to the C group. It was seen that Huperzine-A (Hup-A) reduced AChE activity and destructed βAP accumulation. There was a significant decrease in the maximum contractile force at different frequencies in the O+D group and in the O group compared to the C group. It was found that Hup-A contributed to the healing process in rats for damage occurring both in the brain and in the neuro-muscular system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF AUTOMATED SOFTWARE PROGRAM FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE BETA-AMYLOID SCANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, Jack; Zubal, George

    2013-12-18

    Study goal: A Phase 1 evaluation of the kinetics, clearance and cerebral distribution of one novel peripheral benzodiazepine receptors(PBR)positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent, 18F-PBR-111 following intravenous administration in healthy volunteers and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Short title: Evaluation of PET imaging with PBR-111 in HV and AD subjects Proof of Mechanism. Primary Objective: To evaluate the cerebral distribution of PBR-111 positron emission tomography (PET) for detection/exclusion of microglial activation in patients with Alzheimer's disease subjects compared to healthy volunteers. Secondary objectives: - To assess the dynamic uptake and washout of [18F]PBR-111, a potential imaging bio-marker for inflammatory changes in brain, using positron emission tomography in subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy volunteers (HV). - To perform blood metabolite characterization of [18F]PBR-111 in subjects with AD and HV to determine the nature of metabolites in assessment of [18F]-PBR-111 as a PET brain imaging agent. Name of radioactive drug substance: PBR-111 Dose(s): The applied PBR-111 radioactive dose will be up to 5.0 mCi, diluted in a maximum of 10 ml of saline. The radioligand will be administered as a slow intravenous bolus injection (i.e., 6 sec/ml) into a large vein (e.g., antecubital vein). Route of administration: Intravenous injection Duration of treatment: Single administration of a diagnostic agent Indication: PBR-111 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has the potential to detect microglial activation. In the presence of PBR-111 uptake (representative of microglial activation), inflammation in the brain can be detected. Diagnosis and main criteria for inclusion: Study participants will be HVs and patients diagnosed with probable AD. HVs must be 18 years of age (at least four subjects 50 years of age) and have no evidence of cognitive impairment or other neurologic disease by medical history

  11. Mitochondrial mislocalization underlies Abeta42-induced neuronal dysfunction in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanae Iijima-Ando

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid-beta 42 (Abeta42 is thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Abeta42 induces neuronal dysfunction and degeneration remain elusive. Mitochondrial dysfunctions are implicated in AD brains. Whether mitochondrial dysfunctions are merely a consequence of AD pathology, or are early seminal events in AD pathogenesis remains to be determined. Here, we show that Abeta42 induces mitochondrial mislocalization, which contributes to Abeta42-induced neuronal dysfunction in a transgenic Drosophila model. In the Abeta42 fly brain, mitochondria were reduced in axons and dendrites, and accumulated in the somata without severe mitochondrial damage or neurodegeneration. In contrast, organization of microtubule or global axonal transport was not significantly altered at this stage. Abeta42-induced behavioral defects were exacerbated by genetic reductions in mitochondrial transport, and were modulated by cAMP levels and PKA activity. Levels of putative PKA substrate phosphoproteins were reduced in the Abeta42 fly brains. Importantly, perturbations in mitochondrial transport in neurons were sufficient to disrupt PKA signaling and induce late-onset behavioral deficits, suggesting a mechanism whereby mitochondrial mislocalization contributes to Abeta42-induced neuronal dysfunction. These results demonstrate that mislocalization of mitochondria underlies the pathogenic effects of Abeta42 in vivo.

  12. Infectious particles, stress, and induced prion amyloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs) are believed by many to arise by spontaneous conversion of host prion protein (PrP) into an infectious amyloid (PrP-res, PrPSc) without nucleic acid. Many TSE agents reside in the environment, with infection controlled by public health measures. These include the disappearance of kuru with the cessation of ritual cannibalism, the dramatic reduction of epidemic bovine encephalopathy (BSE) by removal of contaminated feed, and the lack of endemic scrapie in geographically isolated Australian sheep with susceptible PrP genotypes. While prion protein modeling has engendered an intense focus on common types of protein misfolding and amyloid formation in diverse organisms and diseases, the biological characteristics of infectious TSE agents, and their recognition by the host as foreign entities, raises several fundamental new directions for fruitful investigation such as: (1) unrecognized microbial agents in the environmental metagenome that may cause latent neurodegenerative disease, (2) the evolutionary social and protective functions of different amyloid proteins in diverse organisms from bacteria to mammals, and (3) amyloid formation as a beneficial innate immune response to stress (infectious and non-infectious). This innate process however, once initiated, can become unstoppable in accelerated neuronal aging. PMID:23633671

  13. Toxic species in amyloid disorders: Oligomers or mature fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders. These protein aggregation (fibrillization disorders are also known as amyloid disorders. The mechanism of protein aggregation involves conformation switch of the native protein, oligomer formation leading to protofibrils and finally mature fibrils. Mature fibrils have long been considered as the cause of disease pathogenesis; however, recent evidences suggest oligomeric intermediates formed during fibrillization to be toxic. In this review, we have tried to address the ongoing debate for these toxic amyloid species. We did an extensive literature search and collated information from Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and Google search using various permutations and combinations of the following keywords: Neurodegeneration, amyloid disorders, protein aggregation, fibrils, oligomers, toxicity, Alzheimer′s Disease, Parkinson′s Disease. We describe different instances showing the toxicity of mature fibrils as well as oligomers in Alzheimer′s Disease and Parkinson′s Disease. Distinct structural framework and morphology of amyloid oligomers suggests difference in toxic effect between oligomers and fibrils. We highlight the difference in structure and proposed toxicity pathways for fibrils and oligomers. We also highlight the evidences indicating that intermediary oligomeric species can act as potential diagnostic biomarker. Since the formation of these toxic species follow a common structural switch among various amyloid disorders, the protein aggregation events can be targeted for developing broad-range therapeutics. The therapeutic trials based on the understanding of different protein conformers (monomers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils in amyloid cascade are also described.

  14. Zileuton improves memory deficits, amyloid and tau pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease with plaques and tangles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Chu

    Full Text Available The 5-lipoxygenase (5LO enzyme is widely distributed within the central nervous system. Previous works showed that this protein is up-regulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD, and plays an active role in the development of brain amyloidosis in the APP transgenic mice. In the present paper, we studied the effect of its pharmacological inhibition on the entire AD-like phenotype of a mouse model with plaques and tangles, the 3 × Tg mice. Compared with mice receiving placebo, the group treated with zileuton, a specific 5LO inhibitor, manifested a significant improvement of their memory impairments. The same animals had a significant reduction in Aβ levels and deposition, which was secondary to a down-regulation of the γ-secretase pathway. Additionally, while total tau levels were unchanged for both groups, zileuton-treated mice had a significant reduction in its phosphorylation state and insoluble forms, secondary to a decreased activation of the cdk5 kinase. These data establish a functional role for 5LO in the pathogenesis of the full spectrum of the AD-like phenotype and represent the successful completion of the initial step for the preclinical development of 5LO inhibitors as viable therapeutic agents for AD.

  15. Intratubular amyloid in light chain cast nephropathy is a risk factor for systemic light chain amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibier, Jean-Baptiste; Gnemmi, Viviane; Glowacki, François; Boyle, Eileen M; Lopez, Benjamin; MacNamara, Evelyne; Hoffmann, Maxime; Azar, Raymond; Guincestre, Thomas; Bourdon, Franck; Copin, Marie-Christine; Buob, David

    2017-10-20

    Light chain cast nephropathy is the most common form of kidney disease in patients with multiple myeloma. Light chain casts may occasionally show amyloid staining properties, that is, green birefringence after Congo red staining. The frequency and clinical significance of this intratubular amyloid are poorly understood. Here, we retrospectively assessed the clinicopathological features of 60 patients with histologically proven light chain cast nephropathy with a specific emphasis on intratubular amyloid, especially, its association with extrarenal systemic light chain amyloidosis. We found intratubular amyloid in 17 cases (17/60, 28%) and it was more frequent in patients with λ light chain gammopathy (13/17 in the 'intratubular amyloid' group vs 19/43 in the 'no intratubular amyloid' group, P=0.02). Pathological examination of extrarenal specimens showed that intratubular amyloid was significantly associated with the occurrence of systemic light chain amyloidosis (5/13 in the 'intratubular amyloid' group vs 0/30 in the 'no intratubular amyloid' group, P=0.001). Our results indicate that first, intratubular amyloid is not a rare finding in kidney biopsies of patients with light chain cast nephropathy, and, second, it reflects an amyloidogenic capacity of light chains that can manifest as systemic light chain amyloidosis. Thus, intratubular amyloid should be systematically screened for in kidney biopsies from patients with light chain cast nephropathy and, if detected, should prompt a work-up for associated systemic light chain amyloidosis.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 20 October 2017; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2017.124.

  16. Imaging amyloid beta peptide oligomeric particles in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jijun; Apkarian, Robert P; Lynn, David G

    2005-09-01

    While all protein misfolding diseases are characterized by fibrous amyloid deposits, the favorable free energy and strongly cooperative nature of the self-assembly have complicated the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing their formation. As structural models for the amyloid fibrils approach atomic resolution, increasing evidence suggests that early folding intermediates, rather than the final structure, are more strongly associated with the loss of neuronal function. For that reason we now demonstrate the use of cryo-etch high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (cryo-HRSEM) for the direct observation of pathway intermediates in amyloid assembly. A congener of the Abeta peptide of Alzheimer's disease, Abeta(13-21), samples a variety of time-dependent self-assembles in a manner similar to those seen for larger proteins. A morphological description of these intermediates is the first step towards their structural characterization and the definition of their role in both amyloid assembly and neurotoxicity.

  17. Depletion of spleen macrophages delays AA amyloid development: a study performed in the rapid mouse model of AA amyloidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Lundmark

    Full Text Available AA amyloidosis is a systemic disease that develops secondary to chronic inflammatory diseases Macrophages are often found in the vicinity of amyloid deposits and considered to play a role in both formation and degradation of amyloid fibrils. In spleen reside at least three types of macrophages, red pulp macrophages (RPM, marginal zone macrophages (MZM, metallophilic marginal zone macrophages (MMZM. MMZM and MZM are located in the marginal zone and express a unique collection of scavenger receptors that are involved in the uptake of blood-born particles. The murine AA amyloid model that resembles the human form of the disease has been used to study amyloid effects on different macrophage populations. Amyloid was induced by intravenous injection of amyloid enhancing factor and subcutaneous injections of silver nitrate and macrophages were identified with specific antibodies. We show that MZMs are highly sensitive to amyloid and decrease in number progressively with increasing amyloid load. Total area of MMZMs is unaffected by amyloid but cells are activated and migrate into the white pulp. In a group of mice spleen macrophages were depleted by an intravenous injection of clodronate filled liposomes. Subsequent injections of AEF and silver nitrate showed a sustained amyloid development. RPMs that constitute the majority of macrophages in spleen, appear insensitive to amyloid and do not participate in amyloid formation.

  18. Toward the treatment for Alzheimer's disease: adsorption is primary mechanism of removing amyloid β protein with hollow-fiber dialyzers of the suitable materials, polysulfone and polymethyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Saigusa, Akira; Yamada, Shinji; Gotoh, Takehiro; Nakai, Shigeru; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Hasegawa, Midori; Yuzawa, Yukio; Kitaguchi, Nobuya

    2016-06-01

    The accumulation of amyloid β protein (Aβ) in the brain reflects cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that the rapid removal of Aβ from the blood by an extracorporeal system may act as a peripheral Aβ sink from the brain. The present study aimed to determine the optimal materials and modality for Aβ removal by hemodialyzers. In a batch analysis, hollow-fiber fragments of polysulfone (PSf) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) showed greater removal efficiency of Aβ than did other materials, such as cellulose-triacetates and ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (PSf:PMMA at 30 min, 98.6 ± 2.4 %:97.8 ± 0.4 % for Aβ1-40 and 96.6 ± 0.3 %:99.0 ± 1.0 % for Aβ1-42). In a modality study, the Aβ solution was applied to PSf dialyzers and circulated in the dialysis and Air-filled adsorption-mode (i.e., the outer space of the hollow fibers was filled with air) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-filled adsorption modes. The Aβ1-40 removal efficiency of the pre/post dialyzer in the Air-filled adsorption-mode was the highest (62.4 ± 12.6 %, p = 0.007). In a flow rate study in the Air-filled adsorption-mode, 200 mL/min showed the highest Aβ1-40 reduction rate of pool solution (97.3 ± 0.8 % at 15 min) compared with 20 mL/min (p = 0.00001) and 50 mL/min (p = 0.00382). PMMA dialyzers showed similar high reduction rates. Thus, the optimal modality for Aβ removal was the adsorption-mode with PSf or PMMA hollow fibers at around 50 mL/min flow rate, which seems to be suitable for clinical use.

  19. The effect of focal brain injury on beta-amyloid plaque deposition, inflammation and synapses in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jessica M; King, Anna E; Woodhouse, Adele; Kirkcaldie, Matthew T K; Vickers, James C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), however the effect of such neural damage on the onset and progression of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaque pathology is not well understood. This study utilized an in vivo model of focal brain injury to examine how localized damage may acutely affect the onset and progression of Aβ plaque deposition as well as inflammatory and synaptic changes, in the APP/PS1 (APPSWE, PSEN1dE9) transgenic model of AD relative to wild-type (Wt) mice. Acute focal brain injury in 3- and 9-month-old APP/PS1 and Wt mice was induced by insertion of a needle into the somatosensory neocortex, as compared to sham surgery, and examined at 24h and 7d post-injury (PI). Focal brain injury did not induce thioflavine-S stained or (pan-Aβ antibody) MOAB-2-labeled plaques at either 24h or 7d PI in 3-month-old APP/PS1 mice or Wt mice. Nine-month-old APP/PS1 mice demonstrate cortical Aβ plaques but focal injury had no statistically significant (p>0.05) effect on thioflavine-S or MOAB-2 plaque load surrounding the injury site at 24h PI or 7d PI. There was a significant (p0.05). For both Wt and APP/PS1 mice alike, synaptophysin puncta near the injury site were significantly reduced 24h PI (compared to sites distant to the injury and the corresponding area in sham mice; p0.05). There was no significant effect of genotype on this response (p>0.05). These results indicate that focal brain injury and the associated microglial response do not acutely alter Aβ plaque deposition in the APP/PS1 mouse model. Furthermore the current study demonstrated that the brains of both Wt and APP/PS1 mice are capable of recovering lost synaptophysin immunoreactivity post-injury, the latter in the presence of Aβ plaque pathology that causes synaptic degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [{sup 18}F]Flutemetamol amyloid-beta PET imaging compared with [{sup 11}C]PIB across the spectrum of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatashita, Shizuo; Yamasaki, Hidetomo [Shonan-Atsugi Hospital, Neurology, PET Center, Atsugi (Japan); Suzuki, Yutaka; Wakebe, Daichi; Hayakawa, Hideki [Shonan-Atsugi Hospital, Radiology, PET Center, Atsugi (Japan); Tanaka, Kumiko [Shonan-Atsugi Hospital, Pharmacology, PET Center, Atsugi (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The aim was to identify the amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the {sup 18}F-labeled Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) derivative [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol (FMM) across a spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to compare Aβ deposition between [{sup 18}F]FMM and [{sup 11}C]PIB PET imaging. The study included 36 patients with AD, 68 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 41 older healthy controls (HC) (aged ≥56), 11 young HC (aged ≤45), and 10 transitional HC (aged 46-55). All 166 subjects underwent 30-min static [{sup 18}F]FMM PET 85 min after injection, 60-min dynamic [{sup 11}C]PIB PET, and cognitive testing. [{sup 18}F]FMM scans were assessed visually, and standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) were defined quantitatively in regions of interest identified on coregistered MRI (cerebellar cortex as a reference region). The PIB distribution volume ratios (DVR) were determined in the same regions. Of 36 AD patients, 35 had positive scans, while 36 of 41 older HC subjects had negative scans. [{sup 18}F]FMM scans had a sensitivity of 97.2 % and specificity of 85.3 % in distinguishing AD patients from older HC subjects, and a specificity of 100 % for young and transitional HC subjects. The [{sup 11}C]PIB scan had the same results. Interreader agreement was excellent (kappa score = 0.81). The cortical FMM SUVR in AD patients was significantly greater than in older HC subjects (1.76 ± 0.23 vs 1.30 ± 0.26, p < 0.01). Of the MCI patients, 68 had a bimodal distribution of SUVR, and 29 of them (42.6 %) had positive scans. Cortical FMM SUVR values were strongly correlated with PIB DVR (r = 0.94, n = 145, p < 0.001). [{sup 18}F]FMM PET imaging detects Aβ deposition in patients along the continuum from normal cognitive status to dementia of AD and discriminates AD patients from HC subjects, similar to [{sup 11}C]PIB PET. (orig.)

  1. Recurrent Syncope, a Clue in Amyloid Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian A. Marin-Acevedo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Infiltrative cardiomyopathies include a variety of disorders that lead to myocardial thickening resulting in a constellation of clinical manifestations and eventually heart failure that could be the first clue to reach the diagnosis. Among the more described infiltrative diseases of the heart is amyloid cardiomyopathy. The disease usually presents with subtle, nonspecific symptoms. Herein, we illustrate a case of recurrent syncope as the initial presenting symptom for systemic amyloid with polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy as a cause of syncope. The article illustrates the role of advanced cardiac imaging in the diagnosis of the disease with a focused literature review. We also highlight the role of early, shared decision-making between patient, family, and medical team in the management of cardiac amyloidosis.

  2. Using bacterial inclusion bodies to screen for amyloid aggregation inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42) is the main component of the inter-neuronal amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanism by which Aβ42 and other amyloid peptides assemble into insoluble neurotoxic deposits is still not completely understood and multiple factors have been reported to trigger their formation. In particular, the presence of endogenous metal ions has been linked to the pathogenesis of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Results Here we describe a rapid and high-throughput screening method to identify molecules able to modulate amyloid aggregation. The approach exploits the inclusion bodies (IBs) formed by Aβ42 when expressed in bacteria. We have shown previously that these aggregates retain amyloid structural and functional properties. In the present work, we demonstrate that their in vitro refolding is selectively sensitive to the presence of aggregation-promoting metal ions, allowing the detection of inhibitors of metal-promoted amyloid aggregation with potential therapeutic interest. Conclusions Because IBs can be produced at high levels and easily purified, the method overcomes one of the main limitations in screens to detect amyloid modulators: the use of expensive and usually highly insoluble synthetic peptides. PMID:22553999

  3. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high {sup 11}C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by {sup 11}C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  4. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordberg, Agneta

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high 11 C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by 11 C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  5. Does a carpal tunnel syndrome predict an underlying disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. de Rijk (Maarten); F.H. Vermeij (Frederique); M. Suntjens (Maartje); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCarpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may be the presenting symptom of an underlying disease such as diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism or connective tissue disease (CTD). It was investigated whether additional blood tests (glucose level, thyroid-stimulating hormone level and erythrocyte

  6. Fibrillar amyloid plaque formation precedes microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christian K E; Keppler, Kevin; Steinbach, Sonja; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Herms, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), hallmark β-amyloid deposits are characterized by the presence of activated microglia around them. Despite an extensive characterization of the relation of amyloid plaques with microglia, little is known about the initiation of this interaction. In this study, the detailed investigation of very small plaques in brain slices in AD transgenic mice of the line APP-PS1(dE9) revealed different levels of microglia recruitment. Analysing plaques with a diameter of up to 10 μm we find that only the half are associated with clear morphologically activated microglia. Utilizing in vivo imaging of new appearing amyloid plaques in double-transgenic APP-PS1(dE9)xCX3CR1+/- mice further characterized the dynamic of morphological microglia activation. We observed no correlation of morphological microglia activation and plaque volume or plaque lifetime. Taken together, our results demonstrate a very prominent variation in size as well as in lifetime of new plaques relative to the state of microglia reaction. These observations might question the existing view that amyloid deposits by themselves are sufficient to attract and activate microglia in vivo.

  7. Detection of Soluble Amyloid-β Oligomers and Insoluble High-Molecular-Weight Particles in CSF: Development of Methods with Potential for Diagnosis and Therapy Monitoring of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Aileen Funke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease (AD can be established premortem based on clinical criteria like neuropsychological tests. Post mortem, specific neuropathological changes like amyloid plaques define AD. However, the standard criteria based on medical history and mental status examinations do not take into account the long preclinical features of the disease, and a biomarker for improved diagnosis of AD is urgently needed. In a large number of studies, amyloid-β (Aβ monomer concentrations in CSF of AD patients are consistently and significantly reduced when compared to healthy controls. Therefore, monomeric Aβ in CSF was suggested to be a helpful biomarker for the diagnosis of preclinical AD. However, not the monomeric form, but Aβ oligomers have been shown to be the toxic species in AD pathology, and their quantification and characterization could facilitate AD diagnosis and therapy monitoring. Here, we review the current status of assay development to reliably and routinely detect Aβ oligomers and high-molecular-weight particles in CSF.

  8. Amyloid-plaque imaging in diagnosis of dementia; Amyloidplaque-Bildgebung in der Demenzdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drzezga, A. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    2009-06-15

    The increasing life-expectancy of our society results in a continuously growing number of patients suffering from dementing disorders, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD). Apart from the deleterious consequences for the patients and their relatives, this has also alarming effects on our social systems. These facts have justified increased scientific efforts regarding the identification of basic pathomechanisms of dementia and the development of new treatment options. Increased production of specific proteins and their pathologic aggregation in the brain appears to be a pathomechanism which occurs early in the course of many different neurodegenerative disorders. Among the most well-known of these protein aggregations are the amyloid-plaques, which arise from the aggregation of the {beta}-amyloid protein. Currently, this amyloid-aggregation pathology is regarded as a key pathology, playing a causal role in the development of AD. Consequently, modern therapy approaches are directed towards this target. Limited access to brain tissue has so far restricted the definite diagnosis of AD to post mortem histopathological assessment of brain tissue. For the same reason, a clear association between extent of amyloid deposition pathology and clinical course of AD has not been established so far. However, particularly with regard to new therapeutic options a reliable in vivo diagnosis is required. Modern molecular imaging tracers such as [{sup 11}C]PIB do now open the possibility to visualize amyloid-depositions in vivo, using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). These techniques allow the characterization of dementing disorders on the basis of the underlying pathology rather than on their symptomatic appearance. This type of ''in vivo histopathology''-approach may offer improved options for early and differential diagnosis, as well as for patient selection for therapy trials and for objective therapy monitoring. (orig.)

  9. Homocysteine metabolism is associated with cerebrospinal fluid levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein and amyloid beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomidi, Aikaterini; Lewczuk, Piotr; Kornhuber, Johannes; Smulders, Yvo; Linnebank, Michael; Semmler, Alexander; Popp, Julius

    2016-10-01

    Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between cerebral amyloid production and both blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of the homocysteine metabolism. We assessed CSF concentrations of soluble APPα, soluble APPβ, and amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42), as well as plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcys), total vitamin B12, and folate, and CSF concentrations of homocysteine (Hcys-CSF), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in 59 subjects with normal cognition. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess associations between homocysteine metabolism parameters and amyloid production. The study was approved by the Ethical Committee of the University of Bonn. After controlling for age, gender, APOEe4 status, and albumin ratio (Qalb), higher Aβ1-42 CSF levels were associated with high Hcys and low vitamin B12 plasma levels as well as with high Hcys, high SAH, and low 5-MTHF CSF levels. Higher CSF concentrations of sAPPα and sAPPβ were associated with high SAH levels. The results suggest that disturbed homocysteine metabolism is related to increased CSF levels of sAPP forms and Aβ1-42, and may contribute to the accumulation of amyloid pathology in the brain. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. We found associations between CSF levels of soluble APP forms and Aβ1-42, and markers of the homocysteine metabolism in both plasma and CSF in adults with normal cognition. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may represent a target for preventive and early disease-modifying interventions in Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Kinetically controlled thermal response of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Kenji; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2005-09-23

    Calorimetric measurements were carried out using a differential scanning calorimeter in the temperature range from 10 to 120 degrees C for characterizing the thermal response of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils. The thermograms of amyloid fibril solution showed a remarkably large decrease in heat capacity that was essentially released upon the thermal unfolding of the fibrils, in which the magnitude of negative heat capacity change was not explicable in terms of the current accessible surface area model of protein structural thermodynamics. The heat capacity-temperature curve of amyloid fibrils prior to the fibril unfolding exhibited an unusual dependence on the fibril concentration and the heating rate. Particularly, the heat needed to induce the thermal response was found to be linearly dependent on the heating rate, indicating that its thermal response is under a kinetic control and precluding the interpretation in terms of equilibrium thermodynamics. Furthermore, amyloid fibrils of amyloid beta peptides also exhibited a heating rate-dependent exothermic process before the fibril unfolding, indicating that the kinetically controlled thermal response may be a common phenomenon to amyloid fibrils. We suggest that the heating rate-dependent negative change in heat capacity is coupled to the association of amyloid fibrils with characteristic hydration pattern.

  11. alpha-Synuclein enhances secretion and toxicity of amyloid beta peptides in PC12 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazmierczak, Anna; Strosznajder, Joanna B.; Adamczyk, Agata

    2008-01-01

    alpha-Synuclein is the fundamental component of Lewy bodies which occur in the brain of 60% of sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease patients. Moreover, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-synuclein, the so-called non-amyloid component of Alzheimer's disease amyloid, was found to be an integral part

  12. Neurotrophic and Neurotoxic Effects of Amyloid |beta Protein: Reversal by Tachykinin Neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankner, Bruce A.; Duffy, Lawrence K.; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    1990-10-01

    The amyloid β protein is deposited in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease but its pathogenic role is unknown. In culture, the amyloid β protein was neurotrophic to undifferentiated hippocampal neurons at low concentrations and neurotoxic to mature neurons at higher concentrations. In differentiated neurons, amyloid β protein caused dendritic and axonal retraction followed by neuronal death. A portion of the amyloid β protein (amino acids 25 to 35) mediated both the trophic and toxic effects and was homologous to the tachykinin neuropeptide family. The effects of the amyloid β protein were mimicked by tachykinin antagonists and completely reversed by specific tachykinin agonists. Thus, the amyloid β protein could function as a neurotrophic factor for differentiating neurons, but at high concentrations in mature neurons, as in Alzheimer's disease, could cause neuronal degeneration.

  13. Amyloid PET Positivity in Different Primary Progressive Aphasia Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, Emilie; Vercouillie, Johnny; Vierron, Emilie; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Camus, Vincent; Mondon, Karl; Guilloteau, Denis; Hommet, Caroline; Ribeiro, Maria Joao

    2018-04-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurological syndrome in which language functions become progressively impaired with relative sparing of memory and other instrumental functions. The pathologic causes of PPA are heterogeneous, but studies suggest that logopenic PPA (LPA) is underpinned by Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology in a high proportion of cases. The purposes of this descriptive and retrospective study were to characterize F-florbetapir PET imaging in a group of patients with a clinical syndrome of PPA, to determine the value of clinical characterization based on language phenotype in predicting the underlying pathology of PPA with F-florbetapir, and to quantify amyloid load in PPA subjects classified as "positive" F-florbetapir scans. Then, we compare the quantification and distribution of F-florbetapir uptake with those of typical, predominantly amnestic AD patients. We conducted a PET study with F-florbetapir in a cohort of 12 right-handed patients diagnosed with PPA: 3 patients with semantic-variant PPA, 5 with nonfluent PPA, 1 with LPA, and 3 unclassifiable patients. We evaluated amyloid deposition between APP groups and 11 patients with typical amnestic AD. Among the 12 patients with PPA syndrome, 8 (66.7%) were considered as amyloid positive. One of the 3 patients with semantic-variant PPA was F-florbetapir positive. In contrast, 4 of the 5 nonfluent-variant PPA, 2 of the 3 unclassifiable cases and the single patient with LPA were F-florbetapir positive. A significantly higher F-florbetapir uptake was observed in PPA F-florbetapir-positive patients compared with typical AD patients. This difference was observed in all regions of interest, except in posterior cingulate and temporal cortex. These results suggest that F-florbetapir PET may be useful in a routine clinical procedure to improve the reliability of identifying AD pathology in patients with PPA syndrome, with different clinical subtypes of the PPA syndrome.

  14. How ionic strength affects the conformational behavior of human and rat beta amyloids--a computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Kříž

    Full Text Available Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid beta occurs in Alzheimers disease and during the aging of certain mammals (human, monkey, dog, bear, cow, cat but not others (rat, mouse. It is possibly due to different amino acid sequences at positions 5, 10 and 13. To address this issue, we performed series of 100 ns long trajectories (each trajectory was run twice with different initial velocity distribution on amyloid beta (1-42 with the human and rat amino acid sequence in three different environments: water with only counter ions, water with NaCl at a concentration of 0.15 M as a model of intracellular Na(+ concentration at steady state, and water with NaCl at a concentration of 0.30 M as a model of intracellular Na(+ concentration under stimulated conditions. We analyzed secondary structure stability, internal hydrogen bonds, and residual fluctuation. It was observed that the change in ionic strength affects the stability of internal hydrogen bonds. Increasing the ionic strength increases atomic fluctuation in the hydrophobic core of the human amyloid, and decreases the atomic fluctuation in the case of rat amyloid. The secondary structure analyses show a stable α-helix part between residues 10 and 20. However, C-terminus of investigated amyloids is much more flexible showing no stable secondary structure elements. Increasing ionic strength of the solvent leads to decreasing stability of the secondary structural elements. The difference in conformational behavior of the three amino acids at position 5, 10 and 13 for human and rat amyloids significantly changes the conformational behavior of the whole peptide.

  15. Light-triggered dissociation of self-assembled β-amyloid aggregates into small, nontoxic fragments by ruthenium (II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Giyeong; Lee, Byung Il; Chung, You Jung; Park, Chan Beum

    2018-02-01

    The self-assembly of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides into highly stable plaques is a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report visible light-driven dissociation of β-sheet-rich Aβ aggregates into small, nontoxic fragments using ruthenium (II) complex {[Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ } that functions as a highly sensitive, biocompatible, photoresponsive anti-Aβ agent. According to our multiple analyses using thioflavin T, bicinchoninic acid, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ successfully disassembled Aβ aggregates by destabilizing the β-sheet secondary structure under illumination of white light-emitting diode light. We validated that photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ causes oxidative damages of Aβ peptides, resulting in the dissociation of Aβ aggregates. The efficacy of [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ is attributed to reactive oxygen species, such as singlet oxygen, generated from [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ that absorbed photon energy in the visible range. Furthermore, photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ strongly inhibited the self-assembly of Aβ monomers even at concentrations as low as 1 nM and reduced the cytotoxicity of Aβ aggregates. Alzheimer's disease is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disease, affecting more than 13% of the population over age 65. Over the last decades, researchers have focused on understanding the mechanism of amyloid formation, the hallmark of various amyloid diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. In this paper, we successfully demonstrate the dissociation of β-Amyloid (Aβ) aggregates into small, less-amyloidic fragments by photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ through destabilization of β-sheet secondary structure. We validated the light-triggered dissociation of amyloid structure using multiple analytical tools. Furthermore, we confirmed that photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ reduces cytotoxicity of Aβ aggregates. Our work should open a new horizon in the study of

  16. Interaction of the molecular chaperone DNAJB6 with growing amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42) aggregates leads to sub-stoichiometric inhibition of amyloid formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Månsson, Cecilia; Arosio, Paolo; Hussein, Rasha; Kampinga, Harm H; Hashem, Reem M; Boelens, Wilbert C; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Linse, Sara; Emanuelsson, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The human molecular chaperone protein DNAJB6 was recently found to inhibit the formation of amyloid fibrils from polyglutamine peptides associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. We show in the present study that DNAJB6 also inhibits amyloid formation by an even more

  17. Amyloid structure exhibits polymorphism on multiple length scales in human brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiliang; Costantino, Isabel; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Fischetti, Robert F.; Hyman, Bradley; Frosch, Matthew; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Makowski, Lee

    2016-09-15

    Although aggregation of Aβ amyloid fibrils into plaques in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the correlation between amyloid burden and severity of symptoms is weak. One possible reason is that amyloid fibrils are structurally polymorphic and different polymorphs may contribute differentially to disease. However, the occurrence and distribution of amyloid polymorphisms in human brain is poorly documented. Here we seek to fill this knowledge gap by using X-ray microdiffraction of histological sections of human tissue to map the abundance, orientation and structural heterogeneities of amyloid within individual plaques; among proximal plaques and in subjects with distinct clinical histories. A 5 µ x-ray beam was used to generate diffraction data with each pattern arising from a scattering volume of only ~ 450 µ3 , making possible collection of dozens to hundreds of diffraction patterns from a single amyloid plaque. X-ray scattering from these samples exhibited all the properties expected for scattering from amyloid. Amyloid distribution was mapped using the intensity of its signature 4.7 Å reflection which also provided information on the orientation of amyloid fibrils across plaques. Margins of plaques exhibited a greater degree of orientation than cores and orientation around blood vessels frequently appeared tangential. Variation in the structure of Aβ fibrils is reflected in the shape of the 4.7 Å peak which usually appears as a doublet. Variations in this peak correspond to differences between the structure of amyloid within cores of plaques and at their periphery. Examination of tissue from a mismatch case - an individual with high plaque burden but no overt signs of dementia at time of death - revealed a diversity of structure and spatial distribution of amyloid that is distinct from typical AD cases. We demonstrate the existence of structural polymorphisms among amyloid within and among plaques of a single individual and suggest

  18. IS BRAIN AMYLOID PRODUCTION A CAUSE OR A RESULT OF DEMENTIA OF THE ALZHEIMER TYPE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala, Tom; Patrylo, Peter R.; Brewer, Gregory J.; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2011-01-01

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis has guided much of research into Alzheimer disease (AD) over the last 25 years. We argue that the hypothesis of beta amyloid (Aβ) as the primary cause of dementia may not be fully correct. Rather, we propose that decline in brain metabolic activity, which is tightly linked to synaptic activity, actually underlies both the cognitive decline and the deposition of Aβ. Aβ may further exacerbate metabolic decline and result in a downward spiral of cognitive function, leading to dementia. This novel interpretation can tie the disparate risk factors for dementia to a unifying hypothesis and present a roadmap for interventions to decrease the prevalence of dementia in the elderly population. PMID:20847431

  19. Beta-amyloid and cholinergic neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Vladimír; Kašparová, Jana

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, 3-4 (2003), s. 499-506 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/01/0283; GA AV ČR IAA5011206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cholinergic neurons * AlzheimerŽs disease * beta-amyloid Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.511, year: 2003

  20. Renal amyloid A amyloidosis as a complication of hidradenitis suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schandorff, Kristine D; Miller, Iben M; Krustrup, Dorrit

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic disease is the dominant cause of amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, but other chronic inflammatory diseases may have similar consequences. Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a relatively common, but little known skin disease characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we present a case of chroni...... HS leading to biopsy-verified severe renal AA amyloidosis and dialysis dependency....

  1. The proton-pump inhibitor lansoprazole enhances amyloid beta production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiola, Nahuai; Alcalde, Victor; Pujol, Albert; Münter, Lisa-Marie; Multhaup, Gerd; Lleó, Alberto; Coma, Mireia; Soler-López, Montserrat; Aloy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A key event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) species in the brain, derived from the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. Based on a systems biology study to repurpose drugs for AD, we explore the effect of lansoprazole, and other proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), on Aβ production in AD cellular and animal models. We found that lansoprazole enhances Aβ37, Aβ40 and Aβ42 production and lowers Aβ38 levels on amyloid cell models. Interestingly, acute lansoprazole treatment in wild type and AD transgenic mice promoted higher Aβ40 levels in brain, indicating that lansoprazole may also exacerbate Aβ production in vivo. Overall, our data presents for the first time that PPIs can affect amyloid metabolism, both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Mechanism of prion propagation: amyloid growth occurs by monomer addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R Collins

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abundant nonfibrillar oligomeric intermediates are a common feature of amyloid formation, and these oligomers, rather than the final fibers, have been suggested to be the toxic species in some amyloid diseases. Whether such oligomers are critical intermediates for fiber assembly or form in an alternate, potentially separable pathway, however, remains unclear. Here we study the polymerization of the amyloidogenic yeast prion protein Sup35. Rapid polymerization occurs in the absence of observable intermediates, and both targeted kinetic and direct single-molecule fluorescence measurements indicate that fibers grow by monomer addition. A three-step model (nucleation, monomer addition, and fiber fragmentation accurately accounts for the distinctive kinetic features of amyloid formation, including weak concentration dependence, acceleration by agitation, and sigmoidal shape of the polymerization time course. Thus, amyloid growth can occur by monomer addition in a reaction distinct from and competitive with formation of potentially toxic oligomeric intermediates.

  3. Ebola Virus Disease Candidate Vaccines Under Evaluation in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Karen A.; Jahrling, Peter B.; Bavari, Sina; Kuhn, Jens H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Filoviruses are the etiological agents of two human illnesses: Ebola virus disease and Marburg virus disease. Until 2013, medical countermeasure development against these afflictions was limited to only a few research institutes worldwide as both infections were considered exotic due to very low case numbers. Together with the high case-fatality rate of both diseases, evaluation of any candidate countermeasure in properly controlled clinical trials seemed impossible. However, in 2013, Ebola virus was identified as the etiological agent of a large disease outbreak in Western Africa including almost 30,000 infections and more than 11,000 deaths, including case exportations to Europe and North America. These large case numbers resulted in medical countermeasure development against Ebola virus disease becoming a global public-health priority. This review summarizes the status quo of candidate vaccines against Ebola virus disease, with a focus on those that are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:27160784

  4. Microglial Amyloid-β1-40 Phagocytosis Dysfunction Is Caused by High-Mobility Group Box Protein-1: Implications for the Pathological Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyuki Takata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer disease (AD patient brains, the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides is associated with activated microglia. Aβ is derived from the amyloid precursor protein; two major forms of Aβ, that is, Aβ1-40 (Aβ40 and Aβ1-42 (Aβ42, exist. We previously reported that rat microglia phagocytose Aβ42, and high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1, a chromosomal protein, inhibits phagocytosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of exogenous HMGB1 on rat microglial Aβ40 phagocytosis. In the presence of exogenous HMGB1, Aβ40 markedly increased in microglial cytoplasm, and the reduction of extracellular Aβ40 was inhibited. During this period, HMGB1 was colocalized with Aβ40 in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, exogenous HMGB1 inhibited the degradation of Aβ40 induced by the rat microglial cytosolic fraction. Thus, extracellular HMGB1 may internalize with Aβ40 in the microglial cytoplasm and inhibit Aβ40 degradation by microglia. This may subsequently delay Aβ40 clearance. We further confirmed that in AD brains, the parts of senile plaques surrounded by activated microglia are composed of Aβ40, and extracellular HMGB1 is deposited on these plaques. Taken together, microglial Aβ phagocytosis dysfunction may be caused by HMGB1 that accumulates extracellularly on Aβ plaques, and it may be critically involved in the pathological progression of AD.

  5. The molecular mass of dextran used to modify magnetite nanoparticles affects insulin amyloid aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siposova, Katarina [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia); Pospiskova, Kristyna [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Bednarikova, Zuzana [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Safarik University, Kosice (Slovakia); Safarik, Ivo [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Biology Centre, ISB, CAS, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Safarikova, Mirka [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Biology Centre, ISB, CAS, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Kubovcikova, Martina; Kopcansky, Peter [Department of Magnetism, Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia); Gazova, Zuzana, E-mail: gazova@saske.sk [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia)

    2017-04-01

    Protein transformation from its soluble state into amyloid aggregates is associated with amyloid-related diseases. Amyloid deposits of insulin fibrils have been found in the sites of subcutaneous insulin application in patients with prolonged diabetes. Using atomic force microscopy and ThT fluorescence assay we have investigated the interference of insulin amyloid aggregation with superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-based nanoparticles (SPIONs) coated with dextran (DEX); molecular mass of dextran was equal to 15–20, 40 or 70 kDa. The obtained data indicate that all three types of dextran coated nanoparticles (NP-FeDEXs) are able to inhibit insulin fibrillization and to destroy amyloid fibrils. The extent of anti-amyloid activities depends on the properties of NP-FeDEXs, mainly on the size of nanoparticles which is determined by molecular mass of dextran molecules. The most effective inhibiting activity was observed for the smallest nanoparticles coated with 15–20 kDa dextran. Contrary, the highest destroying activity was observed for the largest NP-FeDEX (70 kDa dextran). - Highlights: • Interference of dextran- magnetite nanoparticles with insulin amyloid aggregation. • Nanoparticles inhibited insulin fibrillization and depolymerized insulin amyloid fibrils. • Size of nanoparticles significantly influences their anti-amyloid activities. • The most effective inhibition of insulin amyloid fibrillization was detected for the smallest nanoparticles. • Contrary, DC{sub 50} values decreased with increasing size of nanoparticles.

  6. Do CSF levels of t-Tau, p-Tau and β{sub 1-42} amyloid correlate with dopaminergic system impairment in patients with a clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease? A {sup 123}I-FP-CIT study in the early stages of the disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Fiorentini, Alessandro; Lacanfora, Annamaria [University Tor Vergata, Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Rome (Italy); Stefani, Alessandro [University Tor Vergata, Department of Neurosciences, Rome (Italy); IRCCS Santa Lucia, Rome (Italy); Stanzione, Paolo [University Tor Vergata, Department of Neurosciences, Rome (Italy); Schillaci, Orazio [University Tor Vergata, Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Rome (Italy); IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    To investigate the relationships among cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of t-Tau, p-Tau and Aβ{sub 1-42} amyloid peptide and {sup 123}I-FP-CIT uptake. The study included 58 subjects (31 men and 27 women, age 67 ± 9 years) with a clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease diagnosed according to the United Kingdom Parkinson Disease Society Brain Bank criteria. All subjects underwent a CSF assay 28 ± 3 days before {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT scanning. The relationships were evaluated by means of linear regression analysis and Pearson correlation. Striatal {sup 123}I-FP-CIT was positively related to both t-Tau and p-Tau CSF values with low levels of t-Tau and p-Tau being related to a low uptake of {sup 123}I-FP-CIT. In particular, differences with higher statistical significance were found for the striatum between the contralateral side and the side mainly affected on clinical examination (P < 0.001). No significant relationships were found between Aβ{sub 1-42} amyloid peptide and {sup 123}I-FP-CIT binding. The results of our study suggest that the presynaptic dopaminergic system is more involved in Parkinson disease patients with lower t-Tau and p-Tau CSF values while values of Aβ{sub 1-42} amyloid peptide seems not to be related to nigrostriatal degeneration in our series. (orig.)

  7. Do CSF levels of t-Tau, p-Tau and β1-42 amyloid correlate with dopaminergic system impairment in patients with a clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease? A 123I-FP-CIT study in the early stages of the disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Fiorentini, Alessandro; Lacanfora, Annamaria; Stefani, Alessandro; Stanzione, Paolo; Schillaci, Orazio

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the relationships among cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of t-Tau, p-Tau and Aβ 1-42 amyloid peptide and 123 I-FP-CIT uptake. The study included 58 subjects (31 men and 27 women, age 67 ± 9 years) with a clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease diagnosed according to the United Kingdom Parkinson Disease Society Brain Bank criteria. All subjects underwent a CSF assay 28 ± 3 days before 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT scanning. The relationships were evaluated by means of linear regression analysis and Pearson correlation. Striatal 123 I-FP-CIT was positively related to both t-Tau and p-Tau CSF values with low levels of t-Tau and p-Tau being related to a low uptake of 123 I-FP-CIT. In particular, differences with higher statistical significance were found for the striatum between the contralateral side and the side mainly affected on clinical examination (P 1-42 amyloid peptide and 123 I-FP-CIT binding. The results of our study suggest that the presynaptic dopaminergic system is more involved in Parkinson disease patients with lower t-Tau and p-Tau CSF values while values of Aβ 1-42 amyloid peptide seems not to be related to nigrostriatal degeneration in our series. (orig.)

  8. Yeast prions form infectious amyloid inclusion bodies in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espargaró Alba

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prions were first identified as infectious proteins associated with fatal brain diseases in mammals. However, fungal prions behave as epigenetic regulators that can alter a range of cellular processes. These proteins propagate as self-perpetuating amyloid aggregates being an example of structural inheritance. The best-characterized examples are the Sup35 and Ure2 yeast proteins, corresponding to [PSI+] and [URE3] phenotypes, respectively. Results Here we show that both the prion domain of Sup35 (Sup35-NM and the Ure2 protein (Ure2p form inclusion bodies (IBs displaying amyloid-like properties when expressed in bacteria. These intracellular aggregates template the conformational change and promote the aggregation of homologous, but not heterologous, soluble prionogenic molecules. Moreover, in the case of Sup35-NM, purified IBs are able to induce different [PSI+] phenotypes in yeast, indicating that at least a fraction of the protein embedded in these deposits adopts an infectious prion fold. Conclusions An important feature of prion inheritance is the existence of strains, which are phenotypic variants encoded by different conformations of the same polypeptide. We show here that the proportion of infected yeast cells displaying strong and weak [PSI+] phenotypes depends on the conditions under which the prionogenic aggregates are formed in E. coli, suggesting that bacterial systems might become useful tools to generate prion strain diversity.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of statins against amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hua Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that disruption of the homeostasis of lipid metabolism affects the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in the brain has been reported to considerably increase the risk of developing AD. Thus, dysregulation of lipid homeostasis may increase the amyloid β (Aβ levels by affecting amyloid precursor protein (APP cleavage, which is the most important risk factor involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Previous research demonstrated that Aβ can trigger neuronal insulin resistance, which plays an important role in response to Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in AD. Epidemiological studies also suggested that statin use is associated with a decreased incidence of AD. Therefore, statins are believed to be a good candidate for conferring neuroprotective effects against AD. Statins may play a beneficial role in reducing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Their effect involves a putative mechanism beyond its cholesterol-lowering effects in preventing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the protective effect of statins have not been clearly determined in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Given that statins may provide benefits beyond the inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, these drugs may also improve the brain. Thus, statins may have beneficial effects on impaired insulin signaling by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in neuronal cells. They play a potential therapeutic role in targeting Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity.

  10. Polymorphism of Protein Aggregation: From Amyloid Fibrils to Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad S.; Conrad, Jacinta C.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    Protein aggregation is commonly observed in neurological diseases and in different types of cancer. Despite the established mechanism of amyloid formation, the polymorphism of aggregation is not very well understood; improved knowledge of mechanisms for aggregation that operate in vivo or under physiological conditions is likely to inform therapeutic design. Here we show that reduction of disulfide bonds in lysozyme can lead to formation of gel-like oligomers that are precursors for protein crystal nucleation events. The growth in size of oligomers follows slow first-order kinetics, suggesting that monomers with free thiol contribute to formation of clusters. Free thiol concentration measurements showed that the thiol concentration was relatively stable over 12 hr, confirming the slow kinetics was due to gelation inside the clusters. We probed the hydrophobicity of the clusters using ANS and ThT assays, and showed that the protein conformation in these clusters differs from that of thermally denatured aggregates. Although partial unfolding aids the formation of precursors to both amyloids and crystals, our results suggest that these pathways exhibit distinct signatures even at the earliest stages. NASA.

  11. Nanostructural Differentiation and Toxicity of Amyloid-β25-35 Aggregates Ensue from Distinct Secondary Conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongxiu; Li, Ping; Liu, Lei; Bortolini, Christian; Dong, Mingdong

    2018-01-15

    Amyloid nanostructures are originated from protein misfolding and aberrant aggregation, which is associated with the pathogenesis of many types of degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease. The secondary conformation of peptides is of a fundamental importance for aggregation and toxicity of amyloid peptides. In this work, Aβ25-35, a fragment of amyloid β(1-42) (Aβ42), was selected to investigate the correlation between secondary structures and toxicity of amyloid fibrils. Furthermore, each aggregation assemblies show different cell membrane disruption and cytotoxicity. The structural analysis of amyloid aggregates originated from different secondary structure motifs is helpful to understand the mechanism of peptides/cell interactions in the pathogenesis of amyloid diseases.

  12. Magnetic resonance T2 relaxation time at 7 Tesla associated with amyloid β pathology and age in a double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lang; Wang, Xiao-Yi; Gao, Fa-Bao; Wang, Lei; Xia, Rui; Li, Zhi-Xiao; Xing, Wu; Tang, Bei-Sha; Zeng, Yi; Zhou, Gao-Feng; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Liao, Wei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand the effect of amyloid-β plaques on magnetic resonance T2 relaxation time. We investigated these changes associated with age in an APP/PS1 mouse model of AD at 7 Tesla, combined with histology. Ten double-transgenic AD and ten wild type (WT) female mice (aged 12-20 months) were used in a cross-sectional study. Mean T2 values and standard deviations were calculated for each Regions of interest (ROIs) on T2 map. Immunohistochemistry for amyloid plaques and fluorescence staining with thioflavine S were performed of brain sections after imaging. The results showed that mean T2 values of the hippocampus, cortex, corpus callosum, and thalamus of older mice were significantly lower than of the younger. Compared to WT mice, the T2 values of the hippocampus, corpus callosum, and thalamus in younger AD mice were significantly greater, while the T2 values of the hippocampus and cortex in older AD mice were significantly less. Aβ-40 immunohistochemistry and thioflavine S stainging were positive in the matched region both for younger and older AD mice, while neither Aβ-40 nor thioflavine S were observed in WT mice. These findings suggest that regional T2 values of AD mice may decrease with age, and changes in T2 values in AD mice may be influenced by many factors besides amyloid-β plaque accumulation. Furthermore, they support that the standard deviation of the mean T2 value should be considered as well as the mean. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Screening for Amyloid Aggregation by Semi-Denaturing Detergent-Agarose Gel Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Halfmann, Randal; Lindquist, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation is associated with numerous protein misfolding pathologies and underlies the infectious properties of prions, which are conformationally self-templating proteins that are thought to have beneficial roles in lower organisms. Amyloids have been notoriously difficult to study due to their insolubility and structural heterogeneity. However, resolution of amyloid polymers based on size and detergent insolubility has been made possible by Semi-Denaturing Detergent-Agarose Gel El...

  14. Declining Prevalence of Disease Vectors Under Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Luis E.; Romero-Alvarez, Daniel; Leon, Renato; Lepe-Lopez, Manuel A.; Craft, Meggan E.; Borbor-Cordova, Mercy J.; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-12-01

    More than half of the world population is at risk of vector-borne diseases including dengue fever, chikungunya, zika, yellow fever, leishmaniasis, chagas disease, and malaria, with highest incidences in tropical regions. In Ecuador, vector-borne diseases are present from coastal and Amazonian regions to the Andes Mountains; however, a detailed characterization of the distribution of their vectors has never been carried out. We estimate the distribution of 14 vectors of the above vector-borne diseases under present-day and future climates. Our results consistently suggest that climate warming is likely threatening some vector species with extinction, locally or completely. These results suggest that climate change could reduce the burden of specific vector species. Other vector species are likely to shift and constrain their geographic range to the highlands in Ecuador potentially affecting novel areas and populations. These forecasts show the need for development of early prevention strategies for vector species currently absent in areas projected as suitable under future climate conditions. Informed interventions could reduce the risk of human exposure to vector species with distributional shifts, in response to current and future climate changes. Based on the mixed effects of future climate on human exposure to disease vectors, we argue that research on vector-borne diseases should be cross-scale and include climatic, demographic, and landscape factors, as well as forces facilitating disease transmission at fine scales.

  15. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both proteins are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage, and prevent neurons from functioning normally. In this paper, we will outline current knowledge of the intracellular localization of amyloid-beta. Moreover, we summarize evidence from AD postmortem brain as well as animal AD models showing that amyloid-beta triggers mitochondrial dysfunction through a number of pathways such as impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, elevation of reactive oxygen species production, alteration of mitochondrial dynamics, and interaction with mitochondrial proteins. Thus, this paper supports the Alzheimer cascade mitochondrial hypothesis such as the most important early events in this disease, and probably one of the future strategies on the therapy of this neurodegenerative disease.

  16. Evidence of amyloid-β cerebral amyloid angiopathy transmission through neurosurgery.

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    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Quaegebeur, Annelies; Taipa, Ricardo; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Barbosa, Raquel; Koriath, Carolin; Sciot, Raf; Mead, Simon; Brandner, Sebastian

    2018-02-15

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a peptide deposited in the brain parenchyma in Alzheimer's disease and in cerebral blood vessels, causing cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Aβ pathology is transmissible experimentally in animals and through medical procedures in humans, such as contaminated growth hormone or dura mater transplantation in the context of iatrogenic prion disease. Here, we present four patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures during childhood or teenage years and presented with intracerebral haemorrhage approximately three decades later, caused by severe CAA. None of these patients carried pathogenic mutations associated with early Aβ pathology development. In addition, we identified in the literature four patients with a history of neurosurgical intervention and subsequent development of CAA. These findings raise the possibility that Aβ pathology may be transmissible, as prion disease is, through neurosurgical procedures.

  17. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes.

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    Helen P McWilliams-Koeppen

    Full Text Available Light chain (AL amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(PH-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.