WorldWideScience

Sample records for underlying age-associated metabolic

  1. Dietary restriction protects from age-associated DNA methylation and induces epigenetic reprogramming of lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Oliver; Grönke, Sebastian; Stubbs, Thomas M; Ficz, Gabriella; Hendrich, Oliver; Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon; Zhang, Qifeng; Wakelam, Michael J; Beyer, Andreas; Reik, Wolf; Partridge, Linda

    2017-03-28

    Dietary restriction (DR), a reduction in food intake without malnutrition, increases most aspects of health during aging and extends lifespan in diverse species, including rodents. However, the mechanisms by which DR interacts with the aging process to improve health in old age are poorly understood. DNA methylation could play an important role in mediating the effects of DR because it is sensitive to the effects of nutrition and can affect gene expression memory over time. Here, we profile genome-wide changes in DNA methylation, gene expression and lipidomics in response to DR and aging in female mouse liver. DR is generally strongly protective against age-related changes in DNA methylation. During aging with DR, DNA methylation becomes targeted to gene bodies and is associated with reduced gene expression, particularly of genes involved in lipid metabolism. The lipid profile of the livers of DR mice is correspondingly shifted towards lowered triglyceride content and shorter chain length of triglyceride-associated fatty acids, and these effects become more pronounced with age. Our results indicate that DR remodels genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation so that age-related changes are profoundly delayed, while changes at loci involved in lipid metabolism affect gene expression and the resulting lipid profile.

  2. Failure of delayed nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity underlies age-associated long-term associative memory impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Shawn N

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive impairment associated with subtle changes in neuron and neuronal network function rather than widespread neuron death is a feature of the normal aging process in humans and animals. Despite its broad evolutionary conservation, the etiology of this aging process is not well understood. However, recent evidence suggests the existence of a link between oxidative stress in the form of progressive membrane lipid peroxidation, declining neuronal electrical excitability and functional decline of the normal aging brain. The current study applies a combination of behavioural and electrophysiological techniques and pharmacological interventions to explore this hypothesis in a gastropod model (Lymnaea stagnalis feeding system that allows pinpointing the molecular and neurobiological foundations of age-associated long-term memory (LTM failure at the level of individual identified neurons and synapses. Results Classical appetitive reward-conditioning induced robust LTM in mature animals in the first quartile of their lifespan but failed to do so in animals in the last quartile of their lifespan. LTM failure correlated with reduced electrical excitability of two identified serotonergic modulatory interneurons (CGCs critical in chemosensory integration by the neural network controlling feeding behaviour. Moreover, while behavioural conditioning induced delayed-onset persistent depolarization of the CGCs known to underlie appetitive LTM formation in this model in the younger animals, it failed to do so in LTM-deficient senescent animals. Dietary supplementation of the lipophilic anti-oxidant α-tocopherol reversed the effect of age on CGCs electrophysiological characteristics but failed to restore appetitive LTM function. Treatment with the SSRI fluoxetine reversed both the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of age in senior animals. Conclusions The results identify the CGCs as cellular loci of age-associated appetitive

  3. Age-Associated Loss of OPA1 in Muscle Impacts Muscle Mass, Metabolic Homeostasis, Systemic Inflammation, and Epithelial Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezze, Caterina; Romanello, Vanina; Desbats, Maria Andrea; Fadini, Gian Paolo; Albiero, Mattia; Favaro, Giulia; Ciciliot, Stefano; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Morbidoni, Valeria; Cerqua, Cristina; Loefler, Stefan; Kern, Helmut; Franceschi, Claudio; Salvioli, Stefano; Conte, Maria; Blaauw, Bert; Zampieri, Sandra; Salviati, Leonardo; Scorrano, Luca; Sandri, Marco

    2017-06-06

    Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs during aging, but its impact on tissue senescence is unknown. Here, we find that sedentary but not active humans display an age-related decline in the mitochondrial protein, optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), that is associated with muscle loss. In adult mice, acute, muscle-specific deletion of Opa1 induces a precocious senescence phenotype and premature death. Conditional and inducible Opa1 deletion alters mitochondrial morphology and function but not DNA content. Mechanistically, the ablation of Opa1 leads to ER stress, which signals via the unfolded protein response (UPR) and FoxOs, inducing a catabolic program of muscle loss and systemic aging. Pharmacological inhibition of ER stress or muscle-specific deletion of FGF21 compensates for the loss of Opa1, restoring a normal metabolic state and preventing muscle atrophy and premature death. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction in the muscle can trigger a cascade of signaling initiated at the ER that systemically affects general metabolism and aging. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Querying metabolism under different physiological constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Ali; Ozsoyoglu, Gultekin; Hanson, Richard W

    2010-04-01

    Metabolism is a representation of the biochemical principles that govern the production, consumption, degradation, and biosynthesis of metabolites in living cells. Organisms respond to changes in their physiological conditions or environmental perturbations (i.e. constraints) via cooperative implementation of such principles. Querying inner working principles of metabolism under different constraints provides invaluable insights for both researchers and educators. In this paper, we propose a metabolism query language (MQL) and discuss its query processing. MQL enables researchers to explore the behavior of the metabolism with a wide-range of predicates including dietary and physiological condition specifications. The query results of MQL are enriched with both textual and visual representations, and its query processing is completely tailored based on the underlying metabolic principles.

  5. Linking metabolomics data to underlying metabolic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eNägele

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive experimental analysis of a metabolic constitution plays a central role in approaches of organismal systems biology.Quantifying the impact of a changing environment on the homeostasis of cellular metabolism has been the focus of numerous studies applying various metabolomics techniques. It has been proven that approaches which integrate different analytical techniques, e.g. LC-MS, GC-MS, CE-MS and H-NMR, can provide a comprehensive picture of a certain metabolic homeostasis. Identification of metabolic compounds and quantification of metabolite levels represent the groundwork for the analysis of regulatory strategies in cellular metabolism. This significantly promotes our current understanding of the molecular organization and regulation of cells, tissues and whole organisms.Nevertheless, it is demanding to elicit the pertinent information which is contained in metabolomics data sets.Based on the central dogma of molecular biology, metabolite levels and their fluctuations are the result of a directed flux of information from gene activation over transcription to translation and posttranslational modification.Hence, metabolomics data represent the summed output of a metabolic system comprising various levels of molecular organization.As a consequence, the inverse assignment of metabolomics data to underlying regulatory processes should yield information which-if deciphered correctly-provides comprehensive insight into a metabolic system.Yet, the deduction of regulatory principles is complex not only due to the high number of metabolic compounds, but also because of a high level of cellular compartmentalization and differentiation.Motivated by the question how metabolomics approaches can provide a representative view on regulatory biochemical processes, this article intends to present and discuss current metabolomics applications, strategies of data analysis and their limitations with respect to the interpretability in context of

  6. Age associated differences in prevalence of individual rotterdam criteria and metabolic risk factors during reproductive age in 446 caucasian women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, D; Mumm, H; Ravn, P

    2012-01-01

    Clinical manifestations and metabolic risk factors may differ according to age in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Therefore, a retrospective trans-sectional study in academic tertiary-care medical center was designed. A cohort of 446 premenopausal, Caucasian women (age range 15......-49 years) with PCOS were divided into 4 subgroups according to age: group 1 (15-19 years, n=42), group 2 (20-29 years, n=180), group 3 (30-39 years, n=187), group 4 (40-49 years, n=37) and underwent clinical evaluation (Ferriman-Gallwey score, BMI, waist, blood pressure), hormone analyses (sex hormones......, fasting lipids, insulin, glucose), transvaginal ultrasound, oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) (n=234), and ACTH tests (n=201). BMI, waist, Ferriman-Gallwey score, blood pressure, and lipid profile were higher in older vs. younger age groups whereas androgen levels were lower. Measures of insulin...

  7. Secondary Metabolism in Brassica Rapa Under Hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lanfang; Darnell, Rebecca; Allen, Joan; Musgrave, Mary; Bisbee, Patricia

    Effect of altered gravity on secondary metabolism is of critical importance not only from the viewpoint of plant evolution, but also of productivity (carbon partition between edible and non-edible parts), plant fitness, as well as culinary and nutraceutical values to human diet. Previous work found that lignin content decreases in microgravity as the need for mechanical support decreases, while the response of other small molecular secondary metabolites to microgravity varies. Our recent ISS experiment showed that 3-butenyl glucosinolate (a predominant glucosinolate in Brassica rapa) increased in stems of B. rapa grown in the microgravity conditions. To further elucidate the role of gravity in plant secondary metabolism, a series of hypergravity (the other end of gravity spectrum) experiments were carried out using the 24-ft centrifuge at Ames Research Center. Thirteen-day-old B. rapa L. (cv. Astroplants) were transferred to the Plant Growth Facility attached to the centrifuge following previous experimental conditions, and subsequently grown for 16 days. Plants were harvested, immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen, and lyophilized prior to analysis for glucosinolates and lignin. In general, glucosinolate concentration was the highest in stems, followed by leaves, then roots. Glucosinolate concentration was significantly lower in stems of the 2-g and 4-g plants - averaging 4.6 and 2.5 ng/g DW, respectively - compared with the stationary control plants, which averaged 7.9 ng/g DW. Similarly, there was a 2.2-fold and 7.5-fold decrease in 3-butenyl glucosinolate in roots of the 2-g and 4-g plants, respectively, compared with the control (2.6 ng/g DW). There was a significant decrease in 3-butenyl glucosinolate concentration in leaves of the 4-g compared to leaves of the control plants (2.6 and 4.5 ng/g DW, respectively); however, there was no effect of 2-g on leaf glucosinolate concentration. Increasing gravity from 1-g to 2-g to 4-g generally resulted in further

  8. Metabolic Reprogramming in Chloroplasts under Heat Stress in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Long; Chen, Juan-Hua; He, Ning-Yu; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2018-03-14

    Increases in ambient temperatures have been a severe threat to crop production in many countries around the world under climate change. Chloroplasts serve as metabolic centers and play a key role in physiological adaptive processes to heat stress. In addition to expressing heat shock proteins that protect proteins from heat-induced damage, metabolic reprogramming occurs during adaptive physiological processes in chloroplasts. Heat stress leads to inhibition of plant photosynthetic activity by damaging key components functioning in a variety of metabolic processes, with concomitant reductions in biomass production and crop yield. In this review article, we will focus on events through extensive and transient metabolic reprogramming in response to heat stress, which included chlorophyll breakdown, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidant defense, protein turnover, and metabolic alterations with carbon assimilation. Such diverse metabolic reprogramming in chloroplasts is required for systemic acquired acclimation to heat stress in plants.

  9. Impeded Carbohydrate Metabolism in Rice Plants under Submergence Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Kumar ADAK

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The detrimental effects of submergence on physiological performances of some rice varieties with special references to carbohydrate metabolisms and their allied enzymes during post-flowering stages have been documented and clarified in the present investigation. It was found that photosynthetic rate and concomitant translocation of sugars into the panicles were both related to the yield. The detrimental effects of the complete submergence were recorded in generation of sucrose, starch, sucrose phosphate synthase and phosphorylase activity in the developing panicles of the plants as compared to those under normal or control (i.e. non-submerged condition. The accumulation of starch was significantly lower in plants under submergence and that was correlated with ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity. Photosynthetic rate was most affected under submergence in varying days of post-flowering and was also related to the down regulation of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. However, under normal or control condition, there recorded a steady maintenance of photosynthetic rate at the post-flowering stages and significantly higher values of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. Still, photosynthetic rate of the plants under both control and submerged conditions had hardly any significant correlation with sugar accumulation and other enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism like invertase with grain yield. Finally, plants under submergence suffered significant loss of yield by poor grain filling which was related to impeded carbohydrate metabolism in the tissues. It is evident that loss of yield under submergence is attributed both by lower sink size or sink capacity (number of panicles, in this case as well as subdued carbohydrate metabolism in plants and its subsequent partitioning into the grains.

  10. Reductive glutamine metabolism by IDH1 mediates lipogenesis under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallo, Christian M; Gameiro, Paulo A; Bell, Eric L; Mattaini, Katherine R; Yang, Juanjuan; Hiller, Karsten; Jewell, Christopher M; Johnson, Zachary R; Irvine, Darrell J; Guarente, Leonard; Kelleher, Joanne K; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Iliopoulos, Othon; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2011-11-20

    Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) is the central biosynthetic precursor for fatty-acid synthesis and protein acetylation. In the conventional view of mammalian cell metabolism, AcCoA is primarily generated from glucose-derived pyruvate through the citrate shuttle and ATP citrate lyase in the cytosol. However, proliferating cells that exhibit aerobic glycolysis and those exposed to hypoxia convert glucose to lactate at near-stoichiometric levels, directing glucose carbon away from the tricarboxylic acid cycle and fatty-acid synthesis. Although glutamine is consumed at levels exceeding that required for nitrogen biosynthesis, the regulation and use of glutamine metabolism in hypoxic cells is not well understood. Here we show that human cells use reductive metabolism of α-ketoglutarate to synthesize AcCoA for lipid synthesis. This isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1)-dependent pathway is active in most cell lines under normal culture conditions, but cells grown under hypoxia rely almost exclusively on the reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate for de novo lipogenesis. Furthermore, renal cell lines deficient in the von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor protein preferentially use reductive glutamine metabolism for lipid biosynthesis even at normal oxygen levels. These results identify a critical role for oxygen in regulating carbon use to produce AcCoA and support lipid synthesis in mammalian cells.

  11. Reductive glutamine metabolism by IDH1 mediates lipogenesis under hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallo, Christian M.; Gameiro, Paulo A.; Bell, Eric L.; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Yang, Juanjuan; Hiller, Karsten; Jewell, Christopher M.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Guarente, Leonard; Kelleher, Joanne K.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Iliopoulos, Othon; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) is the central biosynthetic precursor for fatty acid synthesis and protein acetylation. In the conventional view of mammalian cell metabolism, AcCoA is primarily generated from glucose-derived pyruvate through the citrate shuttle and adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase (ACL) in the cytosol1-3. However, proliferating cells that exhibit aerobic glycolysis and those exposed to hypoxia convert glucose to lactate at near stoichiometric levels, directing glucose carbon away from the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and fatty acid synthesis4. Although glutamine is consumed at levels exceeding that required for nitrogen biosynthesis5, the regulation and utilization of glutamine metabolism in hypoxic cells is not well understood. Here we show that human cells employ reductive metabolism of alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG) to synthesize AcCoA for lipid synthesis. This isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) dependent pathway is active in most cell lines under normal culture conditions, but cells grown under hypoxia rely almost exclusively on the reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived αKG for de novo lipogenesis. Furthermore, renal cell lines deficient in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein preferentially utilize reductive glutamine metabolism for lipid biosynthesis even at normal oxygen levels. These results identify a critical role for oxygen in regulating carbon utilization in order to produce AcCoA and support lipid synthesis in mammalian cells. PMID:22101433

  12. [Bone metabolism and cardiovascular function update. α-klotho/FGF23 system; a new insight into the field of mineral homeostasis and the pathogeneses of aging-associated syndromes and the complications of chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Yo Ichi

    2014-07-01

    α-klotho (α-kl) was first identified as an aging gene and was later shown to be a regulator of mineral homeostasis. α-kl (- / -) mice display multiple aging related phenotypes including atherosclerosis, cardiovascular/soft tissue calcifications, pulmonary emphysema, osteopenia, and senile atrophy of skin ; such age-related organ pathologies are associated with biochemical changes in blood, including severe hyperphosphatemia, elevated serum FGF23 and1,25 (OH) 2 Vitamin D levels. Of significance, advanced stage patients suffering chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop multiple complications quite resembling phenotypes observed in α-kl (- / -) mice, and high serum phosphate, the major cause of abnormalities of α-kl (- / -) mice, has been reported to be closely associated with high levels of cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD, particularly in patients with end-stage renal disease. In addition, the expressions of α-kl mRNA and α-Kl protein were severely reduced in these patients. These results suggest the involvement of α-Kl and FGF23 in the pathogeneses of not only aging-associated syndromes but also the complications of CKD. Here, the unveiling of the molecular functions of α-Klotho and FGF23 has recently given new insight into the field of mineral homeostasis and the pathogeneses of aging-associated syndromes and the complications of CKD.

  13. Aging-associated renal disease in mice is fructokinase dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Milagres, Tamara; Hernando, Ana Andres; Jensen, Thomas; Miyazaki, Makoto; Doke, Tomohito; Hayasaki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Marumaya, Shoichi; Long, David A; Garcia, Gabriela E; Kuwabara, Masanari; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Kang, Duk-Hee; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-10-01

    Aging-associated kidney disease is usually considered a degenerative process associated with aging. Recently, it has been shown that animals can produce fructose endogenously, and that this can be a mechanism for causing kidney damage in diabetic nephropathy and in association with recurrent dehydration. We therefore hypothesized that low-level metabolism of endogenous fructose might play a role in aging-associated kidney disease. Wild-type and fructokinase knockout mice were fed a normal diet for 2 yr that had minimal (renal injury was amplified by provision of high-salt diet for 3 wk, as noted by the presence of glomerular hypertrophy, mesangial matrix expansion, and alpha smooth muscle actin expression, and with segmental thrombi. Fructokinase knockout mice were protected from renal injury both at baseline and after high salt intake (3 wk) compared with wild-type mice. This was associated with higher levels of active (phosphorylated serine 1177) endothelial nitric oxide synthase in their kidneys. These studies suggest that aging-associated renal disease might be due to activation of specific metabolic pathways that could theoretically be targeted therapeutically, and raise the hypothesis that aging-associated renal injury may represent a disease process as opposed to normal age-related degeneration.

  14. ANTIOXIDANT SUPPLEMENTATION IN THE TREATMENT OF AGING-ASSOCIATED DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria eConti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is generally considered an imbalance between pro- and antioxidants species, which often results into indiscriminate and global damage at the organismal level. Elderly people are more susceptible to oxidative stress and this depends, almost in part, from a decreased performance of their endogenous antioxidant system. As many studies reported an inverse correlation between systemic levels of antioxidants and several diseases, primarily cardiovascular diseases, but also diabetes and neurological disorders, antioxidant supplementation has been foreseen as an effective preventive and therapeutic intervention for aging-associated pathologies. However, the expectations of this therapeutic approach have often been partially disappointed by clinical trials. The interplay of both endogenous and exogenous antioxidants with the systemic redox system is very complex and represents an issue that is still under debate. In this review a selection of recent clinical studies concerning antioxidants supplementation and the evaluation of their influence in aging-related diseases is analyzed. The controversial outcomes of the antioxidants supplementation therapy that might partially depend, among others, from an underestimation of the patient specific metabolic demand and genetic background, are presented.

  15. Metabolic and regulatory rearrangements underlying glycerol metabolism in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikel, Pablo I; Kim, Juhyun; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    While the natural niches of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida are unlikely to include significant amounts of free glycerol as a growth substrate, this bacterium is genetically equipped with the functions required for its metabolism. We have resorted to deep sequencing of the transcripts in glycerol-grown P. putida KT2440 cells to gain an insight into the biochemical and regulatory components involved in the shift between customary C sources (e.g. glucose or succinate) to the polyol. Transcriptomic results were contrasted with key enzymatic activities under the same culture conditions. Cognate expression profiles revealed that genes encoding enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff route and other catabolic pathways, e.g. the gluconate and 2-ketogluconate loops, were significantly downregulated on glycerol. Yet, the compound simultaneously elicited a gluconeogenic response that indicated an efficient channelling of C skeletons back to biomass build-up through the glyoxylate shunt rather than energization of the cells through downwards pathways, i.e. tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. The simultaneous glycolytic and gluconeogenic metabolic regimes on glycerol, paradoxical as they seem, make sense from an ecological point of view by favouring prevalence versus exploration. This metabolic situation was accompanied by a considerably low expression of stress markers as compared with other C sources. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. ROS signaling under metabolic stress: cross-talk between AMPK and AKT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Hu, Xingbin; Liu, Yajing; Dong, Shumin; Wen, Zhaowei; He, Wanming; Zhang, Shuyi; Huang, Qiong; Shi, Min

    2017-04-13

    Cancer cells are frequently confronted with metabolic stress in tumor microenvironments due to their rapid growth and limited nutrient supply. Metabolic stress induces cell death through ROS-induced apoptosis. However, cancer cells can adapt to it by altering the metabolic pathways. AMPK and AKT are two primary effectors in response to metabolic stress: AMPK acts as an energy-sensing factor which rewires metabolism and maintains redox balance. AKT broadly promotes energy production in the nutrient abundance milieu, but the role of AKT under metabolic stress is in dispute. Recent studies show that AMPK and AKT display antagonistic roles under metabolic stress. Metabolic stress-induced ROS signaling lies in the hub between metabolic reprogramming and redox homeostasis. Here, we highlight the cross-talk between AMPK and AKT and their regulation on ROS production and elimination, which summarizes the mechanism of cancer cell adaptability under ROS stress and suggests potential options for cancer therapeutics.

  17. Key Metabolic Enzymes Underlying Astrocytic Upregulation of GABAergic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław T. Kaczor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic plasticity is recognized as a key mechanism of shaping the activity of the neuronal networks. However, its description is challenging because of numerous neuron-specific mechanisms. In particular, while essential role of glial cells in the excitatory plasticity is well established, their involvement in GABAergic plasticity only starts to emerge. To address this problem, we used two models: neuronal cell culture (NC and astrocyte-neuronal co-culture (ANCC, where we chemically induced long-term potentiation at inhibitory synapses (iLTP. iLTP could be induced both in NC and ANCC but in ANCC its extent was larger. Importantly, this functional iLTP manifestation was accompanied by an increase in gephyrin puncta size. Furthermore, blocking astrocyte Krebs cycle with fluoroacetate (FA in ANCC prevented enhancement of both mIPSC amplitude and gephyrin puncta size but this effect was not observed in NC, indicating a key role in neuron-astrocyte cross-talk. Blockade of monocarboxylate transport with α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4CIN abolished iLTP both in NC and ANCC and in the latter model prevented also enlargement of gephyrin puncta. Similarly, blockade of glycogen phosphorylase with BAYU6751 prevented enlargement of gephyrin puncta upon iLTP induction. Finally, block of glutamine synthetase with methionine sulfoxide (MSO nearly abolished mIPSC increase in both NMDA stimulated cell groups but did not prevent enlargement of gephyrin puncta. In conclusion, we provide further evidence that GABAergic plasticity is strongly regulated by astrocytes and the underlying mechanisms involve key metabolic enzymes. Considering the strategic role of GABAergic interneurons, the plasticity described here indicates possible mechanism whereby metabolism regulates the network activity.

  18. Parallel Evolution of Chromatin Structure Underlying Metabolic Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian; Guo, Xiaoxian; Cai, Pengli; Cheng, Xiaozhi; Piškur, Jure; Ma, Yanhe; Jiang, Huifeng; Gu, Zhenglong

    2017-11-01

    Parallel evolution occurs when a similar trait emerges in independent evolutionary lineages. Although changes in protein coding and gene transcription have been investigated as underlying mechanisms for parallel evolution, parallel changes in chromatin structure have never been reported. Here, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a distantly related yeast species, Dekkera bruxellensis, are investigated because both species have independently evolved the capacity of aerobic fermentation. By profiling and comparing genome sequences, transcriptomic landscapes, and chromatin structures, we revealed that parallel changes in nucleosome occupancy in the promoter regions of mitochondria-localized genes led to concerted suppression of mitochondrial functions by glucose, which can explain the metabolic convergence in these two independent yeast species. Further investigation indicated that similar mutational processes in the promoter regions of these genes in the two independent evolutionary lineages underlay the parallel changes in chromatin structure. Our results indicate that, despite several hundred million years of separation, parallel changes in chromatin structure, can be an important adaptation mechanism for different organisms. Due to the important role of chromatin structure changes in regulating gene expression and organism phenotypes, the novel mechanism revealed in this study could be a general phenomenon contributing to parallel adaptation in nature. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Cholesterol metabolism in rabbit blastocysts under maternal diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pendzialek, S. Mareike; Schindler, Maria; Plösch, Torsten; Guerke, Jacqueline; Haucke, Elisa; Hecht, Stefanie; Fischer, Bernd; Santos, Anne Navarrete

    In the rabbit reproductive model, maternal experimentally induced insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (expIDD) leads to accumulation of lipid droplets in blastocysts. Cholesterol metabolism is a likely candidate to explain such metabolic changes. Therefore, in the present study we analysed maternal

  20. Metabolic state alters economic decision making under risk in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mkael Symmonds

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Animals' attitudes to risk are profoundly influenced by metabolic state (hunger and baseline energy stores. Specifically, animals often express a preference for risky (more variable food sources when below a metabolic reference point (hungry, and safe (less variable food sources when sated. Circulating hormones report the status of energy reserves and acute nutrient intake to widespread targets in the central nervous system that regulate feeding behaviour, including brain regions strongly implicated in risk and reward based decision-making in humans. Despite this, physiological influences per se have not been considered previously to influence economic decisions in humans. We hypothesised that baseline metabolic reserves and alterations in metabolic state would systematically modulate decision-making and financial risk-taking in humans.We used a controlled feeding manipulation and assayed decision-making preferences across different metabolic states following a meal. To elicit risk-preference, we presented a sequence of 200 paired lotteries, subjects' task being to select their preferred option from each pair. We also measured prandial suppression of circulating acyl-ghrelin (a centrally-acting orexigenic hormone signalling acute nutrient intake, and circulating leptin levels (providing an assay of energy reserves. We show both immediate and delayed effects on risky decision-making following a meal, and that these changes correlate with an individual's baseline leptin and changes in acyl-ghrelin levels respectively.We show that human risk preferences are exquisitely sensitive to current metabolic state, in a direction consistent with ecological models of feeding behaviour but not predicted by normative economic theory. These substantive effects of state changes on economic decisions perhaps reflect shared evolutionarily conserved neurobiological mechanisms. We suggest that this sensitivity in human risk-preference to current metabolic state has

  1. DRUM: A New Framework for Metabolic Modeling under Non-Balanced Growth. Application to the Carbon Metabolism of Unicellular Microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroukh, Caroline; Muñoz-Tamayo, Rafael; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Bernard, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic modeling is a powerful tool to understand, predict and optimize bioprocesses, particularly when they imply intracellular molecules of interest. Unfortunately, the use of metabolic models for time varying metabolic fluxes is hampered by the lack of experimental data required to define and calibrate the kinetic reaction rates of the metabolic pathways. For this reason, metabolic models are often used under the balanced growth hypothesis. However, for some processes such as the photoautotrophic metabolism of microalgae, the balanced-growth assumption appears to be unreasonable because of the synchronization of their circadian cycle on the daily light. Yet, understanding microalgae metabolism is necessary to optimize the production yield of bioprocesses based on this microorganism, as for example production of third-generation biofuels. In this paper, we propose DRUM, a new dynamic metabolic modeling framework that handles the non-balanced growth condition and hence accumulation of intracellular metabolites. The first stage of the approach consists in splitting the metabolic network into sub-networks describing reactions which are spatially close, and which are assumed to satisfy balanced growth condition. The left metabolites interconnecting the sub-networks behave dynamically. Then, thanks to Elementary Flux Mode analysis, each sub-network is reduced to macroscopic reactions, for which simple kinetics are assumed. Finally, an Ordinary Differential Equation system is obtained to describe substrate consumption, biomass production, products excretion and accumulation of some internal metabolites. DRUM was applied to the accumulation of lipids and carbohydrates of the microalgae Tisochrysis lutea under day/night cycles. The resulting model describes accurately experimental data obtained in day/night conditions. It efficiently predicts the accumulation and consumption of lipids and carbohydrates. PMID:25105494

  2. DRUM: a new framework for metabolic modeling under non-balanced growth. Application to the carbon metabolism of unicellular microalgae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Baroukh

    Full Text Available Metabolic modeling is a powerful tool to understand, predict and optimize bioprocesses, particularly when they imply intracellular molecules of interest. Unfortunately, the use of metabolic models for time varying metabolic fluxes is hampered by the lack of experimental data required to define and calibrate the kinetic reaction rates of the metabolic pathways. For this reason, metabolic models are often used under the balanced growth hypothesis. However, for some processes such as the photoautotrophic metabolism of microalgae, the balanced-growth assumption appears to be unreasonable because of the synchronization of their circadian cycle on the daily light. Yet, understanding microalgae metabolism is necessary to optimize the production yield of bioprocesses based on this microorganism, as for example production of third-generation biofuels. In this paper, we propose DRUM, a new dynamic metabolic modeling framework that handles the non-balanced growth condition and hence accumulation of intracellular metabolites. The first stage of the approach consists in splitting the metabolic network into sub-networks describing reactions which are spatially close, and which are assumed to satisfy balanced growth condition. The left metabolites interconnecting the sub-networks behave dynamically. Then, thanks to Elementary Flux Mode analysis, each sub-network is reduced to macroscopic reactions, for which simple kinetics are assumed. Finally, an Ordinary Differential Equation system is obtained to describe substrate consumption, biomass production, products excretion and accumulation of some internal metabolites. DRUM was applied to the accumulation of lipids and carbohydrates of the microalgae Tisochrysis lutea under day/night cycles. The resulting model describes accurately experimental data obtained in day/night conditions. It efficiently predicts the accumulation and consumption of lipids and carbohydrates.

  3. Hyperbilirubinemia Protects against Aging-Associated Inflammation and Metabolic Deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenka, Jaroslav; Dvořák, Aleš; Alán, Lukáš; Zadinová, Marie; Haluzík, Martin; Vítek, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Mild constitutive hyperbilirubinemia is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Since these pathologies are associated with aging, inflammation, and oxidative stress, we investigated whether hyperbilirubinemia interferes with ROS homeostasis in cell cultures and with inflammation, senescence, and mitochondrial dysfunction in aged rats. Human embryonic kidney cells and rat primary fibroblasts showed a dose-dependent decrease in the ratio of oxidized/reduced glutathione, intracellular H2O2 levels, and mitochondrial ROS production, with increasing bilirubin concentrations in the culture media. Compared to their normobilirubinemic siblings, aged hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats showed significantly smaller amounts of visceral fat, better glucose tolerance, and decreased serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-18. Simultaneously, livers from Gunn rats showed decreased expression of senescence markers and cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p16. Mitochondria from aged Gunn rats showed higher respiration and lower H2O2 production compared to controls. In conclusion, we demonstrated that mildly elevated serum bilirubin is generally associated with attenuation of oxidative stress and with better anthropometric parameters, decreased inflammatory status, increased glucose tolerance, fewer signs of cellular senescence, and enhanced mitochondrial function in aged rats.

  4. Hyperbilirubinemia Protects against Aging-Associated Inflammation and Metabolic Deterioration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelenka, J.; Dvořák, Aleš; Alán, Lukáš; Zadinová, M.; Haluzík, M.; Vítek, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 2016 (2016), č. článku 6190609. ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP305/12/P388 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : hyperbilirubinemia * ROS * senescence Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.593, year: 2016

  5. Fructan metabolism in tall fescue calli under different environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academic Journals

    2012-06-19

    Jun 19, 2012 ... Dourados - MS, 79.804-970, Brazil. 2Dipartimento di Biologia, Sezione di Fisiologia Vegetale, Università di Pisa (UNIPI), Pisa, 56124, Italy. ... E-mail: lguglielminetti@biologia.unipi.it. sucrose; therefore, their synthesis ...... (2005). Molecular genetics of fructan metabolism in perennial ryegrass. Plant Biotech.

  6. Under- and overnutrition and evidence of metabolic disease risk in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Stunting levels were higher in the boys than in the girls in mid to late childhood in a rural setting in South Africa, while the girls had a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than the boys. Pre-hypertension prevalence in the boys and girls was high. Other metabolic risk factors, i.e. impaired FG and lipids, ...

  7. Estimates of metabolic rate and major constituents of metabolic demand in fishes under field conditions: Methods, proxies, and new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treberg, Jason R; Killen, Shaun S; MacCormack, Tyson J; Lamarre, Simon G; Enders, Eva C

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic costs are central to individual energy budgets, making estimates of metabolic rate vital to understanding how an organism interacts with its environment as well as the role of species in their ecosystem. Despite the ecological and commercial importance of fishes, there are currently no widely adopted means of measuring field metabolic rate in fishes. The lack of recognized methods is in part due to the logistical difficulties of measuring metabolic rates in free swimming fishes. However, further development and refinement of techniques applicable for field-based studies on free swimming animals would greatly enhance the capacity to study fish under environmentally relevant conditions. In an effort to foster discussion in this area, from field ecologists to biochemists alike, we review aspects of energy metabolism and give details on approaches that have been used to estimate energetic parameters in fishes. In some cases, the techniques have been applied to field conditions; while in others, the methods have been primarily used on laboratory held fishes but should be applicable, with validation, to fishes in their natural environment. Limitations, experimental considerations and caveats of these measurements and the study of metabolism in wild fishes in general are also discussed. Potential novel approaches to FMR estimates are also presented for consideration. The innovation of methods for measuring field metabolic rate in free-ranging wild fish would revolutionize the study of physiological ecology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  9. Biology, Genetics, and Environment: Underlying Factors Influencing Alcohol Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Tamara L; Luczak, Susan E; Hiller-Sturmhöfel, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Gene variants encoding several of the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), are among the largest genetic associations with risk for alcohol dependence. Certain genetic variants (i.e., alleles)--particularly the ADH1B*2, ADH1B*3, ADH1C*1, and ALDH2*2 alleles--have been associated with lower rates of alcohol dependence. These alleles may lead to an accumulation of acetaldehyde during alcohol metabolism, which can result in heightened subjective and objective effects. The prevalence of these alleles differs among ethnic groups; ADH1B*2 is found frequently in northeast Asians and occasionally Caucasians, ADH1B*3 is found predominantly in people of African ancestry, ADH1C*1 varies substantially across populations, and ALDH2*2 is found almost exclusively in northeast Asians. Differences in the prevalence of these alleles may account at least in part for ethnic differences in alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorder (AUD). However, these alleles do not act in isolation to influence the risk of AUD. For example, the gene effects of ALDH2*2 and ADH1B*2 seem to interact. Moreover, other factors have been found to influence the extent to which these alleles affect a person's alcohol involvement, including developmental stage, individual characteristics (e.g., ethnicity, antisocial behavior, and behavioral undercontrol), and environmental factors (e.g., culture, religion, family environment, and childhood adversity).

  10. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W.A. Murphy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2 < 2 mg/L occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health.

  11. The underlying mechanisms for development of hypertension in the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Hiroshi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High blood pressure is an important constituent of the metabolic syndrome. However, the underlying mechanisms for development of hypertension in the metabolic syndrome are very complicated and remain still obscure. Visceral/central obesity, insulin resistance, sympathetic overactivity, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, activated renin-angiotensin system, increased inflammatory mediators, and obstructive sleep apnea have been suggested to be possible factors to develop hypertension in the metabolic syndrome. Here, we will discuss how these factors influence on development of hypertension in the metabolic syndrome.

  12. Systems biology analysis of drivers underlying hallmarks of cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Daniel C.; Jamshidi, Neema; Corbett, Austin J.; Bordbar, Aarash; Thomas, Alex; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2017-01-01

    Malignant transformation is often accompanied by significant metabolic changes. To identify drivers underlying these changes, we calculated metabolic flux states for the NCI60 cell line collection and correlated the variance between metabolic states of these lines with their other properties. The analysis revealed a remarkably consistent structure underlying high flux metabolism. The three primary uptake pathways, glucose, glutamine and serine, are each characterized by three features: (1) metabolite uptake sufficient for the stoichiometric requirement to sustain observed growth, (2) overflow metabolism, which scales with excess nutrient uptake over the basal growth requirement, and (3) redox production, which also scales with nutrient uptake but greatly exceeds the requirement for growth. We discovered that resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs in these lines broadly correlates with the amount of glucose uptake. These results support an interpretation of the Warburg effect and glutamine addiction as features of a growth state that provides resistance to metabolic stress through excess redox and energy production. Furthermore, overflow metabolism observed may indicate that mitochondrial catabolic capacity is a key constraint setting an upper limit on the rate of cofactor production possible. These results provide a greater context within which the metabolic alterations in cancer can be understood.

  13. Obesity, metabolic profile, and inhibition failure: Young women under scrutiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catoira, N P; Tapajóz, F; Allegri, R F; Lajfer, J; Rodríguez Cámara, M J; Iturry, M L; Castaño, G O

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of obesity, as well as evidence about this pathology as a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia in the elderly, is increasing worldwide. Executive functions have been found to be compromised in most studies, although the specific results are dissimilar. Obese young women constitute an interesting study and intervention group, having been found to be unaffected by age and hormonal negative effects on cognition and considering that their health problems affect not only themselves but their families and offspring. The objective of the present study was to compare the executive performance of obese young women with that of a healthy control group. A cross-sectional study was done among premenopausal women from a public hospital in Buenos Aires. The sample comprised 113 participants (32 healthy controls and 81 obese women), who were evaluated for depressive and anxiety symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and executive functioning (Trail-Making Test B, Stroop Color and Word Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and verbal fluency test). Statistical analysis was done by using the SPSS version 20.0 software. Among executive functions, a significant difference was found between groups in inhibition (pobese group, there was a negative slightly correlation between this cognitive test and 2h post-load glucose level. Inhibition was decreased in our obese young women group, and glucose/lipid metabolism may be involved in this association. The cognitive impairment is comparable with that described in addictive conditions. Our conclusions support the concept of multidisciplinary management of obese patients from the time of diagnosis. Detecting and understanding cognitive dysfunction in this population is essential to providing appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Citric Acid Metabolism in Resistant Hypertension: Underlying Mechanisms and Metabolic Prediction of Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Martinez, Paula J; Baldan-Martin, Montserrat; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Prado, Jose Carlos; Segura, Julian; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Vivanco, Fernando; Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2017-11-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) affects 9% to 12% of hypertensive adults. Prolonged exposure to suboptimal blood pressure control results in end-organ damage and cardiovascular risk. Spironolactone is the most effective drug for treatment, but not all patients respond and side effects are not negligible. Little is known on the mechanisms responsible for RH. We aimed to identify metabolic alterations in urine. In addition, a potential capacity of metabolites to predict response to spironolactone was investigated. Urine was collected from 29 patients with RH and from a group of 13 subjects with pseudo-RH. For patients, samples were collected before and after spironolactone administration and were classified in responders (n=19) and nonresponders (n=10). Nuclear magnetic resonance was applied to identify altered metabolites and pathways. Metabolites were confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Citric acid cycle was the pathway most significantly altered ( P citric acid cycle and deregulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis control continue its activation after hypertension was developed. A metabolic panel showing alteration before spironolactone treatment and predicting future response of patients is shown. These molecular indicators will contribute optimizing the rate of control of RH patients with spironolactone. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Evaluation of microorganisms with sulfidogenic metabolic potential under anaerobic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Kimiko Sakamoto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to identify groups of microorganisms that are capable of degrading organic matter utilizing sulfate as an electron acceptor. The assay applied for this purpose consisted of running batch reactors and monitoring lactate consumption, sulfate reduction and sulfide production. A portion of the lactate added to the batch reactors was consumed, and the remainder was converted into acetic, propionic and butyric acid after 111 hours of operation These results indicate the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB catalyzing both complete and incomplete oxidation of organic substrates. The sulfate removal efficiency was 49.5% after 1335 hours of operation under an initial sulfate concentration of 1123 mg/L. The SRB concentrations determined by the most probable number (MPN method were 9.0x10(7 cells/mL at the beginning of the assay and 8.0x10(5 cells/mL after 738 hours of operation.

  16. [The characteristics of iron metabolism under iron-deficiency anemia and chronic disorders anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorkalova, E V; Aznabaeva, L F; Nikulicheva, V I; Safuanova, G Sh; Chepurnaia, A N

    2011-07-01

    The study investigated the issues of iron metabolism under iron-deficiency anemia and chronic disorders anemia and dependencies of production of IL-1? and sICAM-1 immunoinflammatory markers from degree of severity and duration of anemia. The study data indicates that under iron-deficiency anemia lactoferrin and sICAM-1 are the negative regulators of hemopoiesis. The inhibition of transferrin expression by the proinflammatory cytokines is one of the causes of inefficient hemopoiesis under chronic disorders anemia.

  17. Metabolic pathways for lipid synthesis under nitrogen stress in Chlamydomonas and Nannochloropsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Avik; Maiti, Subodh K; Guria, Chandan; Banerjee, Chiranjib

    2017-01-01

    Microalgae are currently being considered as a clean, sustainable and renewable energy source. Enzymes that catalyse the metabolic pathways for biofuel production are specific and require strict regulation and co-ordination. Thorough knowledge of these key enzymes along with their regulatory molecules is essential to enable rational metabolic engineering, to drive the metabolic flux towards the desired metabolites of importance. This paper reviews two key enzymes that play their role in production of bio-oil: DGAT (acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase) and PDAT (phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase). It also deals with the transcription factors that control the enzymes while cell undergoes a metabolic shift under stress. The paper also discusses the association of other enzymes and pathways that provide substrates and precursors for oil accumulation. Finally a futuristic solution has been proposed about a synthetic algal cell platform that would be committed towards biofuel synthesis.

  18. An improved sample loading technique for cellular metabolic response monitoring under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikunda, Millicent Nkirote

    To monitor cellular metabolism under pressure, a pressure chamber designed around a simple-to-construct capillary-based spectroscopic chamber coupled to a microliter-flow perfusion system is used in the laboratory. Although cyanide-induced metabolic responses from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) could be controllably induced and monitored under pressure, previously used sample loading technique was not well controlled. An improved cell-loading technique which is based on use of a secondary inner capillary into which the sample is loaded then inserted into the capillary pressure chamber, has been developed. As validation, we demonstrate the ability to measure the chemically-induced metabolic responses at pressures of up to 500 bars. This technique is shown to be less prone to sample loss due to perfusive flow than the previous techniques used.

  19. Fungal community composition and metabolism under elevated CO2 and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegeun Chung; Donald R. Zak; Erik A. Lilleskov

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 and O30 concentrations are increasing due to human activity and both trace gases have the potential to alter C cycling in forest ecosystems. Because soil microorganisms depend on plant litter as a source of energy for metabolism, changes in the amount or the biochemistry of plant litter produced under...

  20. Metabolic Shift of Escherichia coli under Salt Stress in the Presence of Glycine Betaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metris, A.; George, S. M.; Mulholland, F.; Carter, A. T.

    2014-01-01

    An important area of food safety focuses on bacterial survival and growth in unfavorable environments. In order to understand how bacteria adapt to stresses other than nutrient limitation in batch cultures, we need to develop mechanistic models of intracellular regulation and metabolism under stress. We studied the growth of Escherichia coli in minimal medium with added salt and different osmoprotectants. To characterize the metabolic efficiency with a robust parameter, we identified the optical density (OD) values at the inflection points of measured “OD versus time” growth curves and described them as a function of glucose concentration. We found that the metabolic efficiency parameter did not necessarily follow the trend of decreasing specific growth rate as the salt concentration increased. In the absence of osmoprotectant, or in the presence of proline, the metabolic efficiency decreased with increasing NaCl concentration. However, in the presence of choline or glycine betaine, it increased between 2 and 4.5% NaCl before declining at 5% NaCl and above. Microarray analysis of the transcriptional network and proteomics analysis with glycine betaine in the medium indicated that between 4.5 and 5% NaCl, the metabolism switched from aerobic to fermentative pathways and that the response to osmotic stress is similar to that for oxidative stress. We conclude that, although the growth rate appeared to decrease smoothly with increasing NaCl, the metabolic strategy of cells changed abruptly at a threshold concentration of NaCl. PMID:24858086

  1. Concerted changes in N and C primary metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under water restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Molero, Gemma; Gilard, Françoise; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Nogués, Salvador

    2013-02-01

    Although the mechanisms of nodule N(2) fixation in legumes are now well documented, some uncertainty remains on the metabolic consequences of water deficit. In most cases, little consideration is given to other organs and, therefore, the coordinated changes in metabolism in leaves, roots, and nodules are not well known. Here, the effect of water restriction on exclusively N(2)-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants was investigated, and proteomic, metabolomic, and physiological analyses were carried out. It is shown that the inhibition of nitrogenase activity caused by water restriction was accompanied by concerted alterations in metabolic pathways in nodules, leaves, and roots. The data suggest that nodule metabolism and metabolic exchange between plant organs nearly reached homeostasis in asparagine synthesis and partitioning, as well as the N demand from leaves. Typically, there was (i) a stimulation of the anaplerotic pathway to sustain the provision of C skeletons for amino acid (e.g. glutamate and proline) synthesis; (ii) re-allocation of glycolytic products to alanine and serine/glycine; and (iii) subtle changes in redox metabolites suggesting the implication of a slight oxidative stress. Furthermore, water restriction caused little change in both photosynthetic efficiency and respiratory cost of N(2) fixation by nodules. In other words, the results suggest that under water stress, nodule metabolism follows a compromise between physiological imperatives (N demand, oxidative stress) and the lower input to sustain catabolism.

  2. IL-10 prevents aging-associated inflammation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Sezin; Jung, Dae Young; Friedline, Randall H; Noh, Hye Lim; Kim, Jong Hun; Patel, Payal R; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Inashima, Kunikazu; Tran, Duy A; Hu, Xiaodi; Loubato, Marilia M; Craige, Siobhan M; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jason K

    2017-02-01

    Altered energy balance and insulin resistance are important characteristics of aging. Skeletal muscle is a major site of glucose disposal, and the role of aging-associated inflammation in skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains unclear. To investigate, we examined glucose metabolism in 18-mo-old transgenic mice with muscle-specific overexpression of IL-10 (M IL10 ) and in wild-type mice during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping. Despite similar fat mass and energy balance, M IL10 mice were protected from aging-associated insulin resistance with significant increases in glucose infusion rates, whole-body glucose turnover, and skeletal muscle glucose uptake (∼60%; P Friedline, R. H., Noh, H. L., Kim, J. H., Patel, P. R., Tsitsilianos, N., Inashima, K., Tran, D. A., Hu, X., Loubato, M. M., Craige, S. M., Kwon, J. Y., Lee, K. W., Kim, J. K. IL-10 prevents aging-associated inflammation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. © FASEB.

  3. Metabolic flux analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under mixotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagesan, Swathi; Gaudana, Sandeep B; Sinha, Avinash; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2013-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes capable of utilizing solar energy to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide to biomass. Despite several "proof of principle" studies, low product yield is an impediment in commercialization of cyanobacteria-derived biofuels. Estimation of intracellular reaction rates by (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) would be a step toward enhancing biofuel yield via metabolic engineering. We report (13)C-MFA for Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, known for enhanced hydrogen yield under mixotrophic conditions. Rates of reactions in the central carbon metabolism under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions were estimated by monitoring the competitive incorporation of (12)C and (13)C from unlabeled CO2 and uniformly labeled glycerol, respectively, into terminal metabolites such as amino acids. The observed labeling patterns suggest mixotrophic growth under both the conditions, with a larger fraction of unlabeled carbon in nitrate-sufficient cultures asserting a greater contribution of carbon fixation by photosynthesis and an anaplerotic pathway. Indeed, flux analysis complements the higher growth observed under nitrate-sufficient conditions. On the other hand, the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle was greater in nitrate-deficient conditions, possibly to supply the precursors and reducing equivalents needed for nitrogen fixation. In addition, an enhanced flux through fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase possibly suggests the organism's preferred mode under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The (13)C-MFA results complement the reported predictions by flux balance analysis and provide quantitative insight into the organism's distinct metabolic features under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions.

  4. Modeling of Pharmaceutical Biotransformation by Enriched Nitrifying Culture under Different Metabolic Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yifeng; Chen, Xueming; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2018-01-01

    a comprehensive model to describe and evaluate the biodegradation of pharmaceuticals and the formation of their biotransformation products by enriched nitrifying cultures. The biotransformation of parent compounds was linked to the microbial processes via cometabolism induced by ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB......) growth, metabolism by AOB, cometabolism by heterotrophs (HET) growth, and metabolism by HET in the model framework. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from pharmaceutical biodegradation experiments at realistic levels, taking two pharmaceuticals as examples, i.e., atenolol...... and acyclovir. Results demonstrated the good predictive performance of the established biotransformation model under different metabolic conditions, as well as the reliability of the established model in predicting different pharmaceutical biotransformations. The linear positive correlation between ammonia...

  5. Metabolic acidosis as an underlying mechanism of respiratory distress in children with severe acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Kathleen L; Clark, Jeff; Sarnaik, Ashok P

    2007-11-01

    1) To alert the clinician that increasing rate and depth of breathing during treatment of acute asthma may be a manifestation of metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation rather than worsening airway obstruction; and 2) to describe the frequency of metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation in children with severe acute asthma admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit. Retrospective medical record review. University-affiliated children's hospital. All patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with a diagnosis of asthma between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2005. None. Fifty-three patients with asthma (median age 7.8 yrs, range 0.7-17.9 yrs; 35 [66%] male; 46 [87%] black and 7 [13%] white) were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit during the study period. Fifteen (28%) patients developed metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation (pH 120 mg/dL [6.7 mmol/L]). Patients who developed metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation received asthma therapy similar to that received by patients who did not develop the disorder. Metabolic acidosis resolved contemporaneously with tapering of beta2-adrenergic agonists and administration of supportive care. All patients survived. Metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation manifesting as respiratory distress can occur in children with severe acute asthma. A pathophysiologic rationale exists for the contribution of beta2-adrenergic agents to the development of this acid-base disorder. Failure to recognize metabolic acidosis as the underlying mechanism of respiratory distress may lead to inappropriate intensification of bronchodilator therapy. Supportive care and tapering of beta2-adrenergic agents are recommended to resolve this condition.

  6. Exogenous trehalose improves growth under limiting nitrogen through upregulation of nitrogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yingchao; Zhang, Jie; Gao, Weichang; Chen, Yi; Li, Hongxun; Lawlor, David W; Paul, Matthew J; Pan, Wenjie

    2017-12-19

    The trehalose (Tre) pathway has strong effects on growth and development in plants through regulation of carbon metabolism. Altering either Tre or trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P) can improve growth and productivity of plants as observed under different water availability. As yet, there are no reports of the effects of modification of Tre orT6P on plant performance under limiting nutrition. Here we report that nitrogen (N) metabolism is positively affected by exogenous application of Tre in nitrogen-deficient growing conditions. Spraying foliage of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with trehalose partially alleviated symptoms of nitrogen deficiency through upregulation of nitrate and ammonia assimilation and increasing activities of nitrate reductase (NR), glycolate oxidase (GO), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT) with concomitant changes in ammonium (NH 4 + ) and nitrate (NO 3 - ) concentrations, glutamine and amino acids. Chlorophyll and total nitrogen content of leaves and rates of photosynthesis were increased compared to nitrogen-deficient plants without applied Tre. Total plant biomass accumulation was also higher in Tre -fed nitrogen-deficient plants, with a smaller proportion of dry weight partitioned to roots, compared to nitrogen-deficient plants without applied Tre. Consistent with higher nitrogen assimilation and growth, Tre application reduced foliar starch. Minimal effects of Tre feeding were observed on nitrogen-sufficient plants. The data show, for the first time, significant stimulatory effects of exogenous Tre on nitrogen metabolism and growth in plants growing under deficient nitrogen. Under such adverse conditions metabolism is regulated for survival rather than productivity. Application of Tre can alter this regulation towards maintenance of productive functions under low nitrogen. This has implications for considering approaches to modifying the Tre pathway for to improve crop nitrogen-use efficiency and

  7. Metabolic consequences and vulnerability to diet-induced obesity in male mice under chronic social stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bartolomucci

    Full Text Available Social and psychological factors interact with genetic predisposition and dietary habit in determining obesity. However, relatively few pre-clinical studies address the role of psychosocial factors in metabolic disorders. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated in male mice: 1 opposite status-dependent effect on body weight gain under chronic psychosocial stress; 2 a reduction in body weight in individually housed (Ind male mice. In the present study these observations were extended to provide a comprehensive characterization of the metabolic consequences of chronic psychosocial stress and individual housing in adult CD-1 male mice. Results confirmed that in mice fed standard diet, dominant (Dom and Ind had a negative energy balance while subordinate (Sub had a positive energy balance. Locomotor activity was depressed in Sub and enhanced in Dom. Hyperphagia emerged for Dom and Sub and hypophagia for Ind. Dom also showed a consistent decrease of visceral fat pads weight as well as increased norepinephrine concentration and smaller adipocytes diameter in the perigonadal fat pad. On the contrary, under high fat diet Sub and, surprisingly, Ind showed higher while Dom showed lower vulnerability to obesity associated with hyperphagia. In conclusion, we demonstrated that social status under chronic stress and individual housing deeply affect mice metabolic functions in different, sometime opposite, directions. Food intake, the hedonic response to palatable food as well as the locomotor activity and the sympathetic activation within the adipose fat pads all represent causal factors explaining the different metabolic alterations observed. Overall this study demonstrates that pre-clinical animal models offer a suitable tool for the investigation of the metabolic consequences of chronic stress exposure and associated psychopathologies.

  8. Metabolic Consequences and Vulnerability to Diet-Induced Obesity in Male Mice under Chronic Social Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Cabassi, Aderville; Govoni, Paolo; Ceresini, Graziano; Cero, Cheryl; Berra, Daniela; Dadomo, Harold; Franceschini, Paolo; Dell'Omo, Giacomo

    2009-01-01

    Social and psychological factors interact with genetic predisposition and dietary habit in determining obesity. However, relatively few pre-clinical studies address the role of psychosocial factors in metabolic disorders. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated in male mice: 1) opposite status-dependent effect on body weight gain under chronic psychosocial stress; 2) a reduction in body weight in individually housed (Ind) male mice. In the present study these observations were extended to provide a comprehensive characterization of the metabolic consequences of chronic psychosocial stress and individual housing in adult CD-1 male mice. Results confirmed that in mice fed standard diet, dominant (Dom) and Ind had a negative energy balance while subordinate (Sub) had a positive energy balance. Locomotor activity was depressed in Sub and enhanced in Dom. Hyperphagia emerged for Dom and Sub and hypophagia for Ind. Dom also showed a consistent decrease of visceral fat pads weight as well as increased norepinephrine concentration and smaller adipocytes diameter in the perigonadal fat pad. On the contrary, under high fat diet Sub and, surprisingly, Ind showed higher while Dom showed lower vulnerability to obesity associated with hyperphagia. In conclusion, we demonstrated that social status under chronic stress and individual housing deeply affect mice metabolic functions in different, sometime opposite, directions. Food intake, the hedonic response to palatable food as well as the locomotor activity and the sympathetic activation within the adipose fat pads all represent causal factors explaining the different metabolic alterations observed. Overall this study demonstrates that pre-clinical animal models offer a suitable tool for the investigation of the metabolic consequences of chronic stress exposure and associated psychopathologies. PMID:19180229

  9. Identification of Mutations Underlying 20 Inborn Errors of Metabolism in the United Arab Emirates Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Rebeh, Imen; Hertecant, Jozef L.; Al-Jasmi, Fatma A.; Aburawi, Hanan E.; Al-Yahyaee, Said A.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2012-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are frequently encountered by physicians in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). However, the mutations underlying a large number of these disorders have not yet been determined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the mutations underlying a number of IEM disorders among UAE residents from both national and expatriate families. A case series of patients from 34 families attending the metabolic clinic at Tawam Hospital were clinically evaluated, and molecular testing was carried out to determine their causative mutations. The mutation analysis was carried out at molecular genetics diagnostic laboratories. Thirty-eight mutations have been identified as responsible for twenty IEM disorders, including in the metabolism of amino acids, lipids, steroids, metal transport and mitochondrial energy metabolism, and lysosomal storage disorders. Nine of the identified mutations are novel, including two missense mutations, three premature stop codons and four splice site mutations. Mutation analysis of IEM disorders in the UAE population has an important impact on molecular diagnosis and genetic counseling for families affected by these disorders. PMID:22106832

  10. Glucose metabolism in different regions of the rat brain under hypokinetic stress influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konitzer, K.; Voigt, S.

    1980-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in rats kept under long term hypokinetic stress was studied in 7 brain regions. Determination was made of the regional levels of glucose, lactate, glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, gamma-aminobutyrate and the incorporation of C-14 from plasma glucose into these metabolites, in glycogen and protein. From the content and activity data the regional glucose flux was approximated quantitatively. Under normal conditions the activity gradient cortex and frontal pole cerebellum, thalamus and mesencephalon, hypothalamus and pons and medulla is identical with that of the regional blood supply (measured with I131 serum albumin as the blood marker). Within the first days of immobilization a functional hypoxia occurred in all brain regions and the utilization of cycle amino acids for protein synthesis was strongly diminished. After the first week of stress the capillary volumes of all regions increased, aerobic glucose metabolism was enhanced (factors 1.3 - 2.0) and the incorporation of glucose C-14 via cycle amino acids into protein was considerably potentiated. The metabolic parameters normalized between the 7th and 11th week of stress. Blood supply and metabolic rate increased most in the hypothalamus.

  11. Adenylate kinase I does not affect cellular growth characteristics under normal and metabolic stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Wieke; Oerlemans, Frank; Wieringa, Bé

    2004-07-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK)-catalyzed phosphotransfer is essential in the maintenance of cellular energetic economy in cells of fully differentiated tissues with highly variable energy demand, such as muscle and brain. To investigate if AK isoenzymes have a comparable function in the energy-demand management of proliferating cells, AK1 and AK1beta were expressed in mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells and in human colon carcinoma SW480 cells. Glucose deprivation, galactose feeding, and metabolic inhibitor tests revealed a differential energy dependency for these two cell lines. N2a cells showed a faster proliferation rate and strongest coupling to mitochondrial activity, SW480 proliferation was more dependent on glycolysis. Despite these differences, ectopic expression of AK1 or AK1beta did not affect their growth characteristics under normal conditions. Also, no differential effects were seen under metabolic stress upon treatment with mitochondrial and glycolytic inhibitors in in vitro culture or in solid tumors grown in vivo. Although many intimate connections have been revealed between cell death and metabolism, our results suggest that AK1- or AK1beta-mediated high-energy phosphoryl transfer is not a modulating factor in the survival of tumor cells during episodes of metabolic crisis.

  12. [Development and metabolism of chicken embryos in the prenatal period under acoustic stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldatova, I B

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic influence on the metabolic process in the last days of incubation of embryos of domestic chicken was found. It was shown that the changes that appear under the influence of acoustic signals lead to a decrease in incubation time. As a result of acoustic hyperstimulation, gaseous exchange and growth of the embryo continue to follow a power dependence characteristic of an earlier period of embryogenesis, i.e., the depression typical of these processes in the end of incubation is arrested. In acoustically stimulated embryos, a tendency toward a decrease in the total energy expenses on growth and metabolism is observed in the period from 17 days of incubation up to hatching, but the daily expenses on energetic exchange and growth are higher under acoustic influence than in the control group.

  13. Role of ribose deficit in rat testicular metabolism under conditions of overtraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, V D; Race, B A; Chigrinskiy, E A

    2011-03-01

    Acute disorders of purine metabolism develop in rat testes under conditions of overtraining. These disorders are characterized by enhanced catabolism and reduced reutilization of purine mononucleotides and activation of lipid peroxidation of membrane structures against the background of reduced activities of the pentose cycle and antioxidant system. Administration of D-ribose to rats subjected to overtraining improves purine reutilization, stimulates the pentose cycle work, inhibits lipid peroxidation in membrane structures of the testes, and saves the testicular incretory function.

  14. IL-10 prevents aging-associated inflammation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Dagdeviren, Sezin; Jung, Dae Young; Friedline, Randall H.; Noh, Hye Lim; Kim, Jong Hun; Patel, Payal R.; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Inashima, Kunikazu; Tran, Duy A.; Hu, Xiaodi; Loubato, Marilia M.; Craige, Siobhan M.; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jason K.

    2016-01-01

    Altered energy balance and insulin resistance are important characteristics of aging. Skeletal muscle is a major site of glucose disposal, and the role of aging-associated inflammation in skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains unclear. To investigate, we examined glucose metabolism in 18-mo-old transgenic mice with muscle-specific overexpression of IL-10 (MIL10) and in wild-type mice during hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic clamping. Despite similar fat mass and energy balance, MIL10 mice were ...

  15. [Effect of locomotion and feeding on metabolic mode of juvenile lenok, Brachymystax lenok (Pallas) under different water temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ge-Feng; Wang, Yu-Yu; Han, Ying; Li, Xiang; Ma, Bo; Liu, Yang; Mou, Zhen-Bo

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the effect of locomotion and feeding on the metabolic mode of juvenile lenok, Brachymystax lenok (Pallas) under different water temperatures, the pre-exercise oxygen consumption rate (MO2p), active oxygen consumption rate (MO2a), metabolic scope (MS), critical swimming speed (Uc) and swimming metabolic rate of both fasting and fed fish were measured at five temperature levels (4 degrees C, 8 degrees C, 12 degrees C, 16 degrees C and 20 degrees C) and ten flow velocities with saturated dissolved oxygen (> 8.0 mg x L(-1)). The results showed that the MO2p and MO2a of the feeding group were significantly higher (P 0.05), but the MS showed a trend of decline with increase in water temperature. Swimming metabolic rate of fish was increased with increasing the flow velocity, and further increase of flow velocity resulted in a decline in swimming metabolic rate, and the swimming metabolic rate of the feeding group was significantly higher than that of the fasting group (P swimming speed up to 70% Uc, and then decreased with increasing the swimming speed up to Uc. It was concluded that, under certain temperature, the maximum metabolic rate was induced by exercise and feeding; the metabolic rate exhibited the additive metabolic mode before increasing to the maximum and thereafter, the metabolic rate induced by feeding reduced with decreasing the swimming metabolic rate, exhibiting the locomotion prioritized mode.

  16. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Gen; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Hirose, Atsumi; Kasai, Takuya; Yoshida, Gen; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode), the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor.

  17. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Nakagawa

    Full Text Available In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor.

  18. Effect of apple polyphenol concentrate on lipid metabolism in rats under experimental insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagayko, Andriy L; Kravchenko, Ganna B; Fylymonenko, Viktoriia P; Krasilnikova, Oksana A

    Obesity is strongly associated with an increased risk of developing insulin resistance as the metabolic indicator of prediabetes and a major risk factor in diabetes mellitus type 2 pathogenesis. Medicinal products obtained from apples can be used as potent prophylactic and therapeutic remedies in treatment of diabetes mellitus. Experiment was designed to study the effect of total apple polyphenol food concentrate on lipid metabolism under experimental IR. Male Wistar rats weighting 180-210 g were used in the experiment. IR was induced by high-calorie diet enriched with fructose. The effect of total apple polyphenol food concentrate was compared with the action of epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin. To estimate the alterations in lipid metabolism in liver homogenate were measured triacylglycerols, free fatty acids, total phospholipids, TBA-reactive substance and conjugated dienes contents. In blood serum were measured total lipids, triacylglycerols, cholesterol, total phospholipids and reduced glutathione levels. The obtained results indicated that feeding rats with high-calorie diet enriched with fructose caused the dyslipidemia and oxidative stress development. The administration of quercetin, epigallocatechin gallate and total apple polyphenol food concentrate improved disorders of lipid metabolism and pro-oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis. Total apple polyphenol food concentrate had a more pronounced effect on studied indices that is probably due to synergism and additive effect of extract numerous components.

  19. Metabolic responses and pathway changes of mammalian cells under different culture conditions with media supplementations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seo-Young; Reimonn, Thomas M; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Brorson, Kurt A; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2018-02-21

    Amino acids and glucose consumption, cell growth and monoclonal antibody (mAb) production in mammalian cell culture are key considerations during upstream process and particularly media optimization. Understanding the interrelations and the relevant cellular physiology will provide insight for setting strategy of robust and effective mAb production. The aim of this study was to further our understanding of nutrient consumption metabolism, since this could have significant impact on enhancing mAb titer, cell proliferation, designing feeding strategies, and development of feed media. The nutrient consumption pattern, mAb concentration, and cell growth were analyzed in three sets of cell cultures with media supplementation of glucose, methionine, threonine, tryptophan, and tyrosine. The amino acids metabolism and its impact on cell growth and mAb production during the batch and fed-batch culture were closely analyzed. It was shown that the phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan biosynthesis pathways were significantly altered under different culture conditions with different media. These changes were more apparent in the fed-batch process in which higher mAb titer was observed due to the metabolic changes than mAb titer in the batch process. The pathway analysis approach was well utilized for evaluating the impact on the relevant pathways involved under different cell culture conditions to improve cell growth and mAb titer. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. Flexibility in metabolic rate confers a growth advantage under changing food availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Sonya K; Salin, Karine; Rudolf, Agata M; Anderson, Graeme J; Metcalfe, Neil B; Ardia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic flexibility in physiological, morphological and behavioural traits can allow organisms to cope with environmental challenges. Given recent climate change and the degree of habitat modification currently experienced by many organisms, it is therefore critical to quantify the degree of phenotypic variation present within populations, individual capacities to change and what their consequences are for fitness. Flexibility in standard metabolic rate (SMR) may be particularly important since SMR reflects the minimal energetic cost of living and is one of the primary traits underlying organismal performance. SMR can increase or decrease in response to food availability, but the consequences of these changes for growth rates and other fitness components are not well known. We examined individual variation in metabolic flexibility in response to changing food levels and its consequences for somatic growth in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta). SMR increased when individuals were switched to a high food ration and decreased when they were switched to a low food regime. These shifts in SMR, in turn, were linked with individual differences in somatic growth; those individuals that increased their SMR more in response to elevated food levels grew fastest, while growth at the low food level was fastest in those individuals that depressed their SMR most. Flexibility in energy metabolism is therefore a key mechanism to maximize growth rates under the challenges imposed by variability in food availability and is likely to be an important determinant of species’ resilience in the face of global change. PMID:25939669

  1. Salmonella Modulates Metabolism During Growth under Conditions that Induce Expression of Virulence Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Mo; Schmidt, Brian; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Ansong, Charles; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-04-05

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative pathogen that uses complex mechanisms to invade and proliferate within mammalian host cells. To investigate possible contributions of metabolic processes in S. Typhimurium grown under conditions known to induce expression of virulence genes, we used a metabolomics-driven systems biology approach coupled with genome scale modeling. First, we identified distinct metabolite profiles associated with bacteria grown in either rich or virulence-inducing media and report the most comprehensive coverage of the S. Typhimurium metabolome to date. Second, we applied an omics-informed genome scale modeling analysis of the functional consequences of adaptive alterations in S. Typhimurium metabolism during growth under our conditions. Excitingly, we observed possible sequestration of metabolites recently suggested to have immune modulating roles. Modeling efforts highlighted a decreased cellular capability to both produce and utilize intracellular amino acids during stationary phase culture in virulence conditions, despite significant abundance increases for these molecules as observed by our metabolomics measurements. Model-guided analysis suggested that alterations in metabolism prioritized other activities necessary for pathogenesis instead, such as lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

  2. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic changes in oculopalatal myoclonus: implication for neural pathways, underlying the disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Moon, So Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is characterized by rhythmic involuntary jerky movements of the soft palate of the throat. When associated with eye movements, it is called oculopalatal myoclonus (OPM). Ordinary PM is characterized by hypertrophic olivary degeneration, a trans-synaptic degeneration following loss of neuronal input to the inferior olivary nucleus due to an interruption of the Guillain-Mollaret triangle usually by a hemorrhage. However, the neural pathways underlying the disorder are uncertain. In an attempt to understand the pathologic neural pathways, we examined the metabolic correlates of this tremulous condition. Brain FDG PET scans were acquired in 8 patients with OPM (age, 49.9{+-}4.6 y: all males: 7 with pontine hemorrhage, 1 with diffuse brainstem infarction) and age-matched 50 healthy males (age, 50.7{+-} 9.0) and the regional glucose metabolism compared using SPM99. For group analysis, the hemispheres containing lesions were assigned to the right side of the brain. Patients with OPM had significant hypometabolism in the ipsilateral (to the lesion) brainstem and superior temporal and parahippocampal gyri (P < 0.05 corrected, k = 100). By contrast, there was significant hypermetabolism in the contralateral middle and inferior temporal gyri, thalamus, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus (P < 0.05 corrected, k=l00). Our data demonstrate the distinct metabolic changes between several ipsilateral and contralateral brain regions (hypometabolism vs. hypermetabolism) in patients with OPM. This may provide clues for understanding the neural pathways underlying the disorder.

  3. Metabolic profiles in heart failure due to non-ischemic cardiomyopathy at rest and under exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Hennessen, Matthias; Sigl, Johanna; Fuhrmann, Jens C; Witt, Henning; Reszka, Regina; Schmitz, Oliver; Kastler, Jürgen; Fischer, Jenny J; Müller, Oliver J; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Weis, Tanja; Frey, Norbert; Katus, Hugo A

    2017-05-01

    Identification of metabolic signatures in heart failure (HF) patients and evaluation of their diagnostic potential to discriminate HF patients from healthy controls during baseline and exercise conditions. Plasma samples were collected from 22 male HF patients with non-ischemic idiopathic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular systolic dysfunction and 19 healthy controls before (t0), at peak (t1) and 1 h after (t2) symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Two hundred fifty-two metabolites were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS-based metabolite profiling. Plasma metabolite profiles clearly differed between HF patients and controls at t0 ( P  HF was characterized by decreased levels of complex lipids and fatty acids, notably phosphatidylcholines, cholesterol, and sphingolipids. Moreover, reduced glutamine and increased glutamate plasma levels, significantly increased purine degradation products, as well as signs of impaired glucose metabolism were observed. The metabolic differences increased strongly according to New York Heart Association functional class and the addition of three metabolites further improved prediction of exercise capacity (Q 2  = 0.24 to 0.35). Despite a high number of metabolites changing significantly with exercise (30.2% at t1/t0), the number of significant alterations between HF and controls was almost unchanged at t 1 and t 2 (30.7 and 29.0% vs. 31.3% at t 0 ) with a similar predictive group separation (Q 2  = 0.50 for t0, 0.52 for t1, and 0.56 for t2, respectively). Our study identified a metabolic signature of non-ischemic HF with prominent changes in complex lipids including phosphatidylcholines, cholesterol, and sphingolipids. The metabolic changes were already evident at rest and largely preserved under exercise.

  4. Metabolic profiles in heart failure due to non‐ischemic cardiomyopathy at rest and under exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller‐Hennessen, Matthias; Sigl, Johanna; Fuhrmann, Jens C.; Witt, Henning; Reszka, Regina; Schmitz, Oliver; Kastler, Jürgen; Fischer, Jenny J.; Müller, Oliver J.; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Weis, Tanja; Frey, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims Identification of metabolic signatures in heart failure (HF) patients and evaluation of their diagnostic potential to discriminate HF patients from healthy controls during baseline and exercise conditions. Methods Plasma samples were collected from 22 male HF patients with non‐ischemic idiopathic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular systolic dysfunction and 19 healthy controls before (t0), at peak (t1) and 1 h after (t2) symptom‐limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Two hundred fifty‐two metabolites were quantified by gas chromatography‐mass spectrometry (GC‐MS) and liquid chromatography (LC)‐MS/MS‐based metabolite profiling. Results Plasma metabolite profiles clearly differed between HF patients and controls at t0 (P HF was characterized by decreased levels of complex lipids and fatty acids, notably phosphatidylcholines, cholesterol, and sphingolipids. Moreover, reduced glutamine and increased glutamate plasma levels, significantly increased purine degradation products, as well as signs of impaired glucose metabolism were observed. The metabolic differences increased strongly according to New York Heart Association functional class and the addition of three metabolites further improved prediction of exercise capacity (Q2 = 0.24 to 0.35). Despite a high number of metabolites changing significantly with exercise (30.2% at t1/t0), the number of significant alterations between HF and controls was almost unchanged at t1 and t2 (30.7 and 29.0% vs. 31.3% at t0) with a similar predictive group separation (Q2 = 0.50 for t0, 0.52 for t1, and 0.56 for t2, respectively). Conclusions Our study identified a metabolic signature of non‐ischemic HF with prominent changes in complex lipids including phosphatidylcholines, cholesterol, and sphingolipids. The metabolic changes were already evident at rest and largely preserved under exercise. PMID:28451455

  5. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism in arbuscular mycorrhizal maize plants under low-temperature stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xian-Can; Song, Feng-Bin; Liu, Fulai

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus tortuosum on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism of Zea mays L. grown under low-temperature stress was investigated. Maize plants inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus were grown in a growth chamber at 258C for 4 weeks...... plants were higher than those of non-AM plants. AM plants had a higher net photosynthetic rate (Pn) than non-AM plants, although low temperature inhibited the Pn. Compared with non-AM plants, AM plants exhibited higher leaf soluble sugars, reducing sugars, root sucrose and fructose contents, and sucrose...... phosphate synthase and amylase activities at low temperature. Moreover, low-temperature stress increased theC :Nratio in the leaves of maize plants, and AM colonisation decreased the root C :N ratio. These results suggested a difference in the C and N metabolism of maize plants at ambient and low...

  6. mTORC1-Dependent Metabolic Reprogramming Underlies Escape from Glycolysis Addiction in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusapati, Raju V; Daemen, Anneleen; Wilson, Catherine; Sandoval, Wendy; Gao, Min; Haley, Benjamin; Baudy, Andreas R; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Evangelista, Marie; Settleman, Jeff

    2016-04-11

    Although glycolysis is substantially elevated in many tumors, therapeutic targeting of glycolysis in cancer patients has not yet been successful, potentially reflecting the metabolic plasticity of tumor cells. In various cancer cells exposed to a continuous glycolytic block, we identified a recurrent reprogramming mechanism involving sustained mTORC1 signaling that underlies escape from glycolytic addiction. Active mTORC1 directs increased glucose flux via the pentose phosphate pathway back into glycolysis, thereby circumventing a glycolysis block and ensuring adequate ATP and biomass production. Combined inhibition of glycolysis and mTORC1 signaling disrupted metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and inhibited their growth in vitro and in vivo. These findings reveal novel combinatorial therapeutic strategies to realize the potential benefit from targeting the Warburg effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptional Profiling of Hydrogen Production Metabolism of Rhodobacter capsulatus under Temperature Stress by Microarray Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muazzez Gürgan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biohydrogen is a clean and renewable form of hydrogen, which can be produced by photosynthetic bacteria in outdoor large-scale photobioreactors using sunlight. In this study, the transcriptional response of Rhodobacter capsulatus to cold (4 °C and heat (42 °C stress was studied using microarrays. Bacteria were grown in 30/2 acetate/glutamate medium at 30 °C for 48 h under continuous illumination. Then, cold and heat stresses were applied for two and six hours. Growth and hydrogen production were impaired under both stress conditions. Microarray chips for R. capsulatus were custom designed by Affymetrix (GeneChip®. TR_RCH2a520699F. The numbers of significantly changed genes were 328 and 293 out of 3685 genes under cold and heat stress, respectively. Our results indicate that temperature stress greatly affects the hydrogen production metabolisms of R. capsulatus. Specifically, the expression of genes that participate in nitrogen metabolism, photosynthesis and the electron transport system were induced by cold stress, while decreased by heat stress. Heat stress also resulted in down regulation of genes related to cell envelope, transporter and binding proteins. Transcriptome analysis and physiological results were consistent with each other. The results presented here may aid clarification of the genetic mechanisms for hydrogen production in purple non-sulfur (PNS bacteria under temperature stress.

  8. Metabolic Profiles Reveal Changes in Wild and Cultivated Soybean Seedling Leaves under Salt Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Dongshuang; Li, Mingxia; Shi, Lianxuan

    2016-01-01

    Clarification of the metabolic mechanisms underlying salt stress responses in plants will allow further optimization of crop breeding and cultivation to obtain high yields in saline-alkali land. Here, we characterized 68 differential metabolites of cultivated soybean (Glycine max) and wild soybean (Glycine soja) under neutral-salt and alkali-salt stresses using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics, to reveal the physiological and molecular differences in salt tolerance. According to comparisons of growth parameters under the two kinds of salt stresses, the level of inhibition in wild soybean was lower than in cultivated soybean, especially under alkali-salt stress. Moreover, wild soybean contained significantly higher amounts of phenylalanine, asparagine, citraconic acid, citramalic acid, citric acid and α-ketoglutaric acid under neutral-salt stress, and higher amounts of palmitic acid, lignoceric acid, glucose, citric acid and α-ketoglutaric acid under alkali-salt stress, than cultivated soybean. Further investigations demonstrated that the ability of wild soybean to salt tolerance was mainly based on the synthesis of organic and amino acids, and the more active tricarboxylic acid cycle under neutral-salt stress. In addition, the metabolite profiling analysis suggested that the energy generation from β-oxidation, glycolysis and the citric acid cycle plays important roles under alkali-salt stress. Our results extend the understanding of mechanisms involved in wild soybean salt tolerance and provide an important reference for increasing yields and developing salt-tolerant soybean cultivars. PMID:27442489

  9. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functions: Anabolism (uh-NAB-uh-liz-um), or constructive metabolism, is all about building and storing. It ... in infants and young children. Hypothyroidism slows body processes and causes fatigue (tiredness), slow heart rate, excessive ...

  10. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... acid phenylalanine, needed for normal growth and protein production). Inborn errors of metabolism can sometimes lead to ...

  11. Gene Regulation and Survival under Hypoxia Requires Starch Availability and Metabolism1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Plants respond to hypoxia, often caused by submergence, by expressing a specific set of genes that contribute to acclimation to this unfavorable environmental condition. Genes induced by low oxygen include those encoding enzymes for carbohydrate metabolism and fermentation, pathways that are required for survival. Sugar availability is therefore of crucial importance for energy production under hypoxia. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants require starch for surviving submergence as well as for ensuring the rapid induction of genes encoding enzymes required for anaerobic metabolism. The starchless pgm mutant is highly susceptible to submergence and also fails to induce anaerobic genes at the level of the wild type. Treating wild-type plants under conditions inducing sugar starvation results in a weak induction of alcohol dehydrogenase and other anaerobic genes. Induction of gene expression under hypoxia requires transcription factors belonging to group VII ethylene response factors (ERF-VII) that, together with plant Cys oxidases, act as an oxygen-sensing mechanism. We show that repression of this pathway by sugar starvation occurs downstream of the hypoxia-dependent stabilization of ERF-VII proteins and independently of the energy sensor protein kinases SnRK1.1 (SNF1-related kinase 1.1). PMID:29084901

  12. Gene Regulation and Survival under Hypoxia Requires Starch Availability and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreti, Elena; Valeri, Maria Cristina; Novi, Giacomo; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2018-02-01

    Plants respond to hypoxia, often caused by submergence, by expressing a specific set of genes that contribute to acclimation to this unfavorable environmental condition. Genes induced by low oxygen include those encoding enzymes for carbohydrate metabolism and fermentation, pathways that are required for survival. Sugar availability is therefore of crucial importance for energy production under hypoxia. Here, we show that Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) plants require starch for surviving submergence as well as for ensuring the rapid induction of genes encoding enzymes required for anaerobic metabolism. The starchless pgm mutant is highly susceptible to submergence and also fails to induce anaerobic genes at the level of the wild type. Treating wild-type plants under conditions inducing sugar starvation results in a weak induction of alcohol dehydrogenase and other anaerobic genes. Induction of gene expression under hypoxia requires transcription factors belonging to group VII ethylene response factors (ERF-VII) that, together with plant Cys oxidases, act as an oxygen-sensing mechanism. We show that repression of this pathway by sugar starvation occurs downstream of the hypoxia-dependent stabilization of ERF-VII proteins and independently of the energy sensor protein kinases SnRK1.1 (SNF1-related kinase 1.1). © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of glucose and xylose metabolism in Escherichia coli under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by13C metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jacqueline E; Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2017-01-01

    Glucose and xylose are the two most abundant sugars derived from the breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass. While aerobic glucose metabolism is relatively well understood in E. coli, until now there have been only a handful of studies focused on anaerobic glucose metabolism and no 13 C-flux studies on xylose metabolism. In the absence of experimentally validated flux maps, constraint-based approaches such as MOMA and RELATCH cannot be used to guide new metabolic engineering designs. In this work, we have addressed this critical gap in current understanding by performing comprehensive characterizations of glucose and xylose metabolism under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, using recent state-of-the-art techniques in 13 C metabolic flux analysis ( 13 C-MFA). Specifically, we quantified precise metabolic fluxes for each condition by performing parallel labeling experiments and analyzing the data through integrated 13 C-MFA using the optimal tracers [1,2- 13 C]glucose, [1,6- 13 C]glucose, [1,2- 13 C]xylose and [5- 13 C]xylose. We also quantified changes in biomass composition and confirmed turnover of macromolecules by applying [U- 13 C]glucose and [U- 13 C]xylose tracers. We demonstrated that under anaerobic growth conditions there is significant turnover of lipids and that a significant portion of CO 2 originates from biomass turnover. Using knockout strains, we also demonstrated that β-oxidation is critical for anaerobic growth on xylose. Quantitative analysis of co-factor balances (NADH/FADH 2 , NADPH, and ATP) for different growth conditions provided new insights regarding the interplay of energy and redox metabolism and the impact on E. coli cell physiology. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Robustness analysis of a constraint-based metabolic model links cell growth and proteomics of Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis under temperature perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei; Chen, Zhen; Cao, Zhe; Wang, Quanhui; Zhang, Jiyuan; Bai, Xue; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2013-04-05

    The integration of omic data with metabolic networks has been demonstrated to be an effective approach to elucidate the underlying metabolic mechanisms in life. Because the metabolic pathways of Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (T. tengcongensis) are incomplete, we used a 1-(13)C-glucose culture to monitor intracellular isotope-labeled metabolites by GC/MS and identified the gap gene in glucose catabolism, Re-citrate synthase. Based on genome annotation and biochemical information, we reconstructed the metabolic network of glucose metabolism and amino acid synthesis in T. tengcongensis, including 253 reactions, 227 metabolites, and 236 genes. Furthermore, we performed constraint based modeling (CBM)-derived robustness analysis on the model to study the dynamic changes of the metabolic network. By perturbing the culture temperature from 75 to 55 °C, we collected the bacterial growth rates and differential proteomes. Assuming that protein abundance changes represent metabolic flux variations, we proposed that the robustness analysis of the CBM model could decipher the effect of proteome change on the bacterial growth under perturbation. For approximately 73% of the reactions, the predicted cell growth changes due to such reaction flux variations matched the observed cell growth data. Our study, therefore, indicates that differential proteome data can be integrated with metabolic network modeling and that robustness analysis is a strong method for representing the dynamic change in cell phenotypes under perturbation.

  15. Imaging microbial metal metabolism in situ under conditions of the deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oger, P. M.; Daniel, I.; Simionovici, A.; Picard, A.

    2006-12-01

    High-pressure biotopes are the most widely spread biotopes on Earth. They represent one possible location for the origin of life. They also share striking similarities with extraterrestrial biotopes such as those postulated for Europe or Mars. In absence of light, dissimilatory reduction of metals (DMR) is fueling the ecosystem. Monitoring the metabolism of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent microbial fauna under P, T and chemical conditions relevant to their isolation environment can be difficult because of the confinement and because most spectroscopic probes do not sense metallic ions in solution. We demonstrated the possibility to use Xray spectroscopy to monitor the speciation of metallic species in solution. Experiments were performed at The ESRF using Selenium (Se) detoxification by Agrobacterium tumefaciens as an analog of DMR. The reduction of Se from selenite to the metal was monitored by a combiantion of two Xray spectroscopic techniques (XANES and μXRF). Cells were incubated in the low pressure DAC in growth medium supplemented with 5mM Selenite and incubated under pressures up to 60 Mpa at 30°C for 24h. The evolution of the speciation can be easily monitored and the concentration of each Se species determined from the Xray spectra by linear combinations of standard spectra. Selenite is transformed by the bacterium into a mixture of metal Se and methylated Se after 24 hours. Se detoxification is observed in situ up to at least 25 MPa. The technique, developped for Se can be adapted to monitor other elements more relevant to DMR such as As, Fe or S, which should allow to monitor in situ under controlled pressure and temperature the metabolism of vent organisms. It is also amenable to the monitoring of toxic metals. Xray spectroscopy and the lpDAC are compatible with other spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman, UV or IR spectroscopies, allowing to probe other metabolic activities. Hence, enlarging the range of metabolic information that can be obtained in

  16. Flexibility in metabolic rate confers a growth advantage under changing food availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Sonya K; Salin, Karine; Rudolf, Agata M; Anderson, Graeme J; Metcalfe, Neil B

    2015-09-01

    1. Phenotypic flexibility in physiological, morphological and behavioural traits can allow organisms to cope with environmental challenges. Given recent climate change and the degree of habitat modification currently experienced by many organisms, it is therefore critical to quantify the degree of phenotypic variation present within populations, individual capacities to change and what their consequences are for fitness. 2. Flexibility in standard metabolic rate (SMR) may be particularly important since SMR reflects the minimal energetic cost of living and is one of the primary traits underlying organismal performance. SMR can increase or decrease in response to food availability, but the consequences of these changes for growth rates and other fitness components are not well known. 3. We examined individual variation in metabolic flexibility in response to changing food levels and its consequences for somatic growth in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta). 4. SMR increased when individuals were switched to a high food ration and decreased when they were switched to a low food regime. These shifts in SMR, in turn, were linked with individual differences in somatic growth; those individuals that increased their SMR more in response to elevated food levels grew fastest, while growth at the low food level was fastest in those individuals that depressed their SMR most. 5. Flexibility in energy metabolism is therefore a key mechanism to maximize growth rates under the challenges imposed by variability in food availability and is likely to be an important determinant of species' resilience in the face of global change. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society.

  17. Metabolic Remodeling of Membrane Glycerolipids in the Microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica under Nitrogen Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danxiang Han

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available HIGHLIGHTSAn electrospray ionization mass spectrometry-based lipidomics method was developed and integrated with transcriptomics to elucidate metabolic remodeling and turnover of microalgal membrane lipids by using Nannochloropsis oceanica as a model.The lack of lipidome analytical tools has limited our ability to gain new knowledge about lipid metabolism in microalgae, especially for membrane glycerolipids. An electrospray ionization mass spectrometry-based lipidomics method was developed for Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1, which resolved 41 membrane glycerolipids molecular species belonging to eight classes. Changes in membrane glycerolipids under nitrogen deprivation and high-light (HL conditions were uncovered. The results showed that the amount of plastidial membrane lipids including monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, and the extraplastidic lipids diacylglyceryl-O-4′-(N, N, N,-trimethyl homoserine and phosphatidylcholine decreased drastically under HL and nitrogen deprivation stresses. Algal cells accumulated considerably more digalactosyldiacylglycerol and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols under stresses. The genes encoding enzymes responsible for biosynthesis, modification and degradation of glycerolipids were identified by mining a time-course global RNA-seq data set. It suggested that reduction in lipid contents under nitrogen deprivation is not attributable to the retarded biosynthesis processes, at least at the gene expression level, as most genes involved in their biosynthesis were unaffected by nitrogen supply, yet several genes were significantly up-regulated. Additionally, a conceptual eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA biosynthesis network is proposed based on the lipidomic and transcriptomic data, which underlined import of EPA from cytosolic glycerolipids to the plastid for synthesizing EPA-containing chloroplast membrane lipids.

  18. Dissecting rice polyamine metabolism under controlled long-term drought stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Thi Do

    Full Text Available A selection of 21 rice cultivars (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica and japonica was characterized under moderate long-term drought stress by comprehensive physiological analyses and determination of the contents of polyamines and selected metabolites directly related to polyamine metabolism. To investigate the potential regulation of polyamine biosynthesis at the transcriptional level, the expression of 21 genes encoding enzymes involved in these pathways were analyzed by qRT-PCR. Analysis of the genomic loci revealed that 11 of these genes were located in drought-related QTL regions, in agreement with a proposed role of polyamine metabolism in rice drought tolerance. The cultivars differed widely in their drought tolerance and parameters such as biomass and photosynthetic quantum yield were significantly affected by drought treatment. Under optimal irrigation free putrescine was the predominant polyamine followed by free spermidine and spermine. When exposed to drought putrescine levels decreased markedly and spermine became predominant in all cultivars. There were no correlations between polyamine contents and drought tolerance. GC-MS analysis revealed drought-induced changes of the levels of ornithine/arginine (substrate, substrates of polyamine synthesis, proline, product of a competing pathway and GABA, a potential degradation product. Gene expression analysis indicated that ADC-dependent polyamine biosynthesis responded much more strongly to drought than the ODC-dependent pathway. Nevertheless the fold change in transcript abundance of ODC1 under drought stress was linearly correlated with the drought tolerance of the cultivars. Combining metabolite and gene expression data, we propose a model of the coordinate adjustment of polyamine biosynthesis for the accumulation of spermine under drought conditions.

  19. Biomechanical walking mechanisms underlying the metabolic reduction caused by an autonomous exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Herr, Hugh M

    2016-01-28

    Ankle exoskeletons can now reduce the metabolic cost of walking in humans without leg disability, but the biomechanical mechanisms that underlie this augmentation are not fully understood. In this study, we analyze the energetics and lower limb mechanics of human study participants walking with and without an active autonomous ankle exoskeleton previously shown to reduce the metabolic cost of walking. We measured the metabolic, kinetic and kinematic effects of wearing a battery powered bilateral ankle exoskeleton. Six participants walked on a level treadmill at 1.4 m/s under three conditions: exoskeleton not worn, exoskeleton worn in a powered-on state, and exoskeleton worn in a powered-off state. Metabolic rates were measured with a portable pulmonary gas exchange unit, body marker positions with a motion capture system, and ground reaction forces with a force-plate instrumented treadmill. Inverse dynamics were then used to estimate ankle, knee and hip torques and mechanical powers. The active ankle exoskeleton provided a mean positive power of 0.105 ± 0.008 W/kg per leg during the push-off region of stance phase. The net metabolic cost of walking with the active exoskeleton (3.28 ± 0.10 W/kg) was an 11 ± 4 % (p = 0.019) reduction compared to the cost of walking without the exoskeleton (3.71 ± 0.14 W/kg). Wearing the ankle exoskeleton significantly reduced the mean positive power of the ankle joint by 0.033 ± 0.006 W/kg (p = 0.007), the knee joint by 0.042 ± 0.015 W/kg (p = 0.020), and the hip joint by 0.034 ± 0.009 W/kg (p = 0.006). This study shows that the ankle exoskeleton does not exclusively reduce positive mechanical power at the ankle joint, but also mitigates positive power at the knee and hip. Furthermore, the active ankle exoskeleton did not simply replace biological ankle function in walking, but rather augmented the total (biological + exoskeletal) ankle moment and power. This study

  20. ROS signaling under metabolic stress: cross-talk between AMPK and AKT pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yang; Hu, Xingbin; Liu, Yajing; Dong, Shumin; Wen, Zhaowei; He, Wanming; Zhang, Shuyi; Huang, Qiong; Shi, Min

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells are frequently confronted with metabolic stress in tumor microenvironments due to their rapid growth and limited nutrient supply. Metabolic stress induces cell death through ROS-induced apoptosis. However, cancer cells can adapt to it by altering the metabolic pathways. AMPK and AKT are two primary effectors in response to metabolic stress: AMPK acts as an energy-sensing factor which rewires metabolism and maintains redox balance. AKT broadly promotes energy production in the nut...

  1. [Metabolic changes in cells under electromagnetic radiation of mobile communication systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakimenko, I L; Sidorik, E P; Tsybulin, A S

    2011-01-01

    Review is devoted to the analysis of biological effects of microwaves. The results of last years' researches indicated the potential risks of long-term low-level microwaves exposure for human health. The analysis of metabolic changes in living cells under the exposure of microwaves from mobile communication systems indicates that this factor is stressful for cells. Among the reproducible effects of low-level microwave radiation are overexpression of heat shock proteins, an increase of reactive oxygen species level, an increase of intracellular Ca2+, damage of DNA, inhibition of DNA reparation, and induction of apoptosis. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinases ERK and stress-related kinases p38MAPK are involved in metabolic changes. Analysis of current data suggests that the concept of exceptionally thermal mechanism of biological effects of microwaves is not correct. In turn, this raises the question of the need to revaluation of modern electromagnetic standards based on thermal effects of non-ionizing radiation on biological systems.

  2. Underlying mechanisms for syntrophic metabolism of essential enzyme cofactors in microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Margaret F; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Maezato, Yukari; Osterman, Andrei L; Nelson, William C

    2017-06-01

    Many microorganisms are unable to synthesize essential B vitamin-related enzyme cofactors de novo. The underlying mechanisms by which such microbes survive in multi-species communities are largely unknown. We previously reported the near-complete genome sequence of two ~18-member unicyanobacterial microbial consortia that maintain stable membership on defined medium lacking vitamins. Here we have used genome analysis and growth studies on isolates derived from the consortia to reconstruct pathways for biogenesis of eight essential cofactors and predict cofactor usage and precursor exchange in these communities. Our analyses revealed that all but the two Halomonas and cyanobacterial community members were auxotrophic for at least one cofactor. We also observed a mosaic distribution of salvage routes for a variety of cofactor precursors, including those produced by photolysis. Potentially bidirectional transporters were observed to be preferentially in prototrophs, suggesting a mechanism for controlled precursor release. Furthermore, we found that Halomonas sp. do not require cobalamin nor control its synthesis, supporting the hypothesis that they overproduce and export vitamins. Collectively, these observations suggest that the consortia rely on syntrophic metabolism of cofactors as a survival strategy for optimization of metabolic exchange within a shared pool of micronutrients.

  3. Leptin signal transduction underlies the differential metabolic response of LEW and WKY rats to cafeteria diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Micaelo, N; González-Abuín, N; Ardévol, A; Pinent, M; Petretto, E; Behmoaras, J; Blay, M

    2016-01-01

    Although the effect of genetic background on obesity-related phenotypes is well established, the main objective of this study is to determine the phenotypic responses to cafeteria diet (CAF) of two genetically distinct inbred rat strains and give insight into the molecular mechanisms that might be underlying. Lewis (LEW) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were fed with either a standard or a CAF diet. The effects of the diet and the strain in the body weight gain, food intake, respiratory quotient, biochemical parameters in plasma as well as in the expression of genes that regulate leptin signalling were determined. Whereas CAF diet promoted weight gain in LEW and WKY rats, as consequence of increased energy intake, metabolic management of this energy surplus was significantly affected by genetic background. LEW and WKY showed a different metabolic profile, LEW rats showed hyperglycaemia, hypertriglyceridemia and high FFA levels, ketogenesis, high adiposity index and inflammation, but WKY did not. Leptin signalling, and specifically the LepRb-mediated regulation of STAT3 activation and Socs3 gene expression in the hypothalamus were inversely modulated by the CAF diet in LEW (upregulated) and WKY rats (downregulated). In the present study, we show evidence of gene-environment interactions in obesity exerted by differential phenotypic responses to CAF diet between LEW and WKY rats. Specifically, we found the leptin-signalling pathway as a divergent point between the strain-specific adaptations to diet. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  4. Late-onset ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency: An under recognized cause of metabolic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric T Rush

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is the most common inherited disorder of the urea cycle, has a variable phenotype, and is caused by mutations in the OTC gene. We report three cases of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency to illustrate the late-onset presentation of this disorder and provide strategies for diagnosis and treatment. The patients were maternal first cousins, presenting with hyperammonemia and obtundation. Urea cycle disorder was not initially suspected in the first patient, delaying diagnosis. Results: Sequencing of the OTC gene showed a novel missense mutation, c.563G > C (p.G188A. Numerous family members were found to carry this mutation, which shows a trend toward later onset. Each urea cycle disorder has its own unique pattern of biochemical abnormalities, which differ from non-metabolic causes of critical illness. Conclusion: Regardless of age, clinical suspicion of a urea cycle disorder is important in encephalopathic patients to ensure quick diagnosis and definitive treatment of the underlying inborn error of metabolism.

  5. Physiological-metabolic variables of caloric stress in cows under silvopastoral and prairie without trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barragan Hernandez, Wilson Andres; Cajas-Giron, Yasmin Socorro; Mahecha-Ledesma, Lilliana

    2015-01-01

    Changes in physiological and metabolic parameters were assessed as indicators of caloric stress of cows under grazing were investigated. The study was developed at the Centro de Investigacion Corpoica Turipana, Region Caribe, Cerete, Colombia, during the years 2011-2012. Temperature (T) and relative humidity (H), and in animals: rectal temperature (RT), skin temperature (TP), respiratory rate (RF) and acid-base status were determined. The variables were measured in the morning (6:00 h) and in the afternoon (13:00 h). Effect of treatment on environmental temperature was found with 7 and 6% less temperature in p-Arbur-Arbor and p-Arbor, respectively, compared with the grass treatment. There was an effect of time (p <0.05) on T and H and interaction treatment x hour on T (p <0.05). The variables TP and FR recorded effect (p <0.05) of treatment, time and treatment interaction x hour (6:00/13:00 h). A positive effect of the show from trees was shown in the system on the physiological variables. The negative effects observed in treatment without shade of trees had minimal repercussion in metabolic alterations, evidencing homeostatic responses in the animal before the stressful environmental conditions evaluated. (author) [es

  6. Experimental results concerning the metabolism of ingested iodine-131 in adult sheep under lactation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daburon, F.; Capelle, A.; Tricaud, Y.; Nizza, P.

    1967-01-01

    The authors give the results of a series of experiments on metabolism of ingested iodine-131 in adult sheep under lactation; the measurement were carried out over a number of years from 1961 to 1966. The work was concerned initially with the fixation of iodine 131 in the thyroid gland, with the calculation of radiation doses absorbed and with ways of showing up any possible radiation damage in the gland. The modes of absorption of iodine 131 and its elimination through milk, urine and the faeces were then considered. Finally, a last chapter is devoted to changes in the radioactivity of the blood and of the milk, to variations of the PBI level of the blood serum as to different methods for measuring this level. (authors) [fr

  7. Effects of acupuncture on the citrate and glucose metabolism in the liver under various types of stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Y.Y.; Seto, K.; Saito, H.; Kawakami, M.

    A study was made of the effect of acupuncture on citrate and glucose metabolism in the liver in terms of incorporation of /sup 14/C-1, 5-citric acid and /sup 14/C-u-glucose in some metabolites. The effect of acupuncture on citrate metabolism in the liver under control conditions was such as to increase production of G and reduce that of KB, FC and FFA. No effect of acupuncture on glucose metabolism in the liver under such conditions was observed. Both citrate and glucose metabolism were affected to a marked extent by immobilization stress or exposure to heat or cold. The deleterious effect of these types of stress was less prominent in animals receiving acupuncture at the Tsu-San-Li locus than in those treated otherwise or receiving no treatment.

  8. Effects of acupuncture on the citrate and glucose metabolism in the liver under various types of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Y.Y.; Seto, K.; Saito, H.; Kawakami, M.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of acupuncture on citrate and glucose metabolism in the liver in terms of incorporation of 14 C-1, 5-citric acid and 14 C-u-glucose in some metabolites. The effect of acupuncture on citrate metabolism in the liver under control conditions was such as to increase production of G and reduce that of KB, FC and FFA. No effect of acupuncture on glucose metabolism in the liver under such conditions was observed. Both citrate and glucose metabolism were affected to a marked extent by immobilization stress or exposure to heat or cold. The deleterious effect of these types of stress was less prominent in animals receiving acupuncture at the Tsu-San-Li locus than in those treated otherwise or receiving no treatment

  9. Histological and morphometric studies on the age-associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histological and morphometric studies on the age-associated changes in the colon of the mouse. MA Motabagani. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy Vol. 5(1) 2006: 48-58. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  10. Metabolic Profile and Inflammatory Responses in Dairy Cows with Left Displaced Abomasum Kept under Small-Scaled Farm Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenja Klevenhusen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Left displaced abomasum (LDA is a severe metabolic disease of cattle with a strong negative impact on production efficiency of dairy farms. Metabolic and inflammatory alterations associated with this disease have been reported in earlier studies, conducted mostly in large dairy farms. This research aimed to: (1 evaluate metabolic and inflammatory responses in dairy cows affected by LDA in small-scaled dairy farms; and (2 establish an Animals 2015, 5 1022 association between lactation number and milk production with the outcome of metabolic variables. The cows with LDA had lower serum calcium (Ca, but greater concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA and beta-hydroxy-butyrate (BHBA, in particular when lactation number was >2. Cows with LDA showed elevated levels of aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and serum amyloid A (SAA, regardless of lactation number. In addition, this study revealed strong associations between milk yield and the alteration of metabolic profile but not with inflammation in the sick cows. Results indicate metabolic alterations, liver damage, and inflammation in LDA cows kept under small-scale farm conditions. Furthermore, the data suggest exacerbation of metabolic profile and Ca metabolism but not of inflammation and liver health with increasing lactation number and milk yield in cows affected by LDA.

  11. Metabolic differences underlying two distinct rat urinary phenotypes, a suggested role for gut microbial metabolism of phenylalanine and a possible connection to autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, T Andrew

    2012-04-05

    A novel explanation is proposed for the metabolic differences underlying two distinct rat urinary compositional phenotypes i.e. that these may arise from differences in the gut microbially-mediated metabolism of phenylalanine. As part of this hypothesis, it is further suggested that elements of the mammalian gut microbiota may convert phenylalanine to cinnamic acid, either by means of an ammonia lyase-type reaction or by means of a three step route via phenylpyruvate and phenyllactate. The wider significance of such conversions is discussed with similar metabolism of tryptophan and subsequent glycine conjugation potentially explaining the origin of trans-indolylacryloylglycine, a postulated marker for autism. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Requirement of a specific group of sphingolipid-metabolizing enzyme for growth of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under impaired metabolism of glycerophospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2010-10-01

    Sphingolipids play critical roles in many physiologically important events in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we screened for yeast mutants showing high sensitivity to Aureobasidin A, an inhibitor of inositol phosphorylceramide synthase, and found that a lack of SAC1 encoding phosphoinositides phosphatase causes high sensitivity to the inhibitor. Double mutation analysis involving the SAC1 and non-essential sphingolipid-metabolizing enzyme genes revealed that csg1Δ, csg2Δ, ipt1Δ or scs7Δ causes synthetic lethality with deletion of SAC1. As previously reported, SAC1-repressed cells exhibited a reduced cellular phosphatidylserine (PS) level, and overexpression of PSS1 encoding PS synthase complemented the growth defects of scs7Δ, csg1Δ and ipt1Δ cells under SAC1-repressive conditions. Furthermore, repression of PSS1 expression resulted in synthetic growth defect with the deletion of CSG1, IPT1 or SCS7. The growth defects of scs7Δ, csg1Δ and ipt1Δ cells under SAC1- or PSS1-repressive conditions were also complemented by overexpression of Arf-GAP AGE1, which encodes a protein related to membrane trafficking. Under SAC1-repressive conditions, scs7Δ, csg1Δ and ipt1Δ cells showed defects in vacuolar morphology, which were complemented by overexpression of each of PSS1 and AGE1. These results suggested that a specific group of sphingolipid-metabolizing enzyme is required for yeast cell growth under impaired metabolism of glycerophospholipids.

  13. A study of proline metabolism in canola (Brassica napus L.) seedlings under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadia, Mubshara; Jamil, Amer; Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2012-05-16

    Expression analysis of crop plants has improved our knowledge about the veiled underlying mechanisms for salt tolerance. In order to observe the time course effects of salinity stress on gene expression for enzymes regulating proline metabolism, we comparatively analyzed the expression of specific genes for proline metabolism in root and shoot tissues of salt-tolerant (cv. Dunkled) and salt-sensitive (cv. Cyclone) canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars through reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); following the NaCl treatment for various durations. Both lines showed an increase in ∆¹-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase1 (P5CS1) gene expression after induction of salt stress with enhanced expression in the root tissue of the tolerant line, while maximum expression was noted in the shoot tissues of the sensitive line. We observed a much reduced proline dehydrogenase (PDH) expression in both the root and shoot tissues of both canola lines, with more marked reduction of PDH expression in the shoot tissues than that in the root ones. To confirm the increase in P5CS1 gene expression, total proline content was also measured in the root and shoot tissues of both the canola lines. The root tissues of canola sensitive line showed a gradually increasing proline concentration pattern with regular increase in salinity treatment, while an increase in proline concentration in the tolerant line was noted at 24 h post salinity treatment after a sudden decrease at 6 h and 12 h of salt treatment. A gradually increasing concentration of free proline content was found in shoot tissues of the tolerant canola line though a remarkable increase in proline concentration was noted in the sensitive canola line at 24 h post salinity treatment, indicating the initiation of proline biosynthesis process in that tissue of sensitive canola.

  14. Antinociceptive effects, metabolism and disposition of ketamine in ponies under target-controlled drug infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, M.; Portier, C.J.; Levionnois, O.L.; Theurillat, R.; Thormann, W.; Spadavecchia, C.; Mevissen, M.

    2006-01-01

    Ketamine is widely used as an anesthetic in a variety of drug combinations in human and veterinary medicine. Recently, it gained new interest for use in long-term pain therapy administered in sub-anesthetic doses in humans and animals. The purpose of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPk) model for ketamine in ponies and to investigate the effect of low-dose ketamine infusion on the amplitude and the duration of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR). A target-controlled infusion (TCI) of ketamine with a target plasma level of 1 μg/ml S-ketamine over 120 min under isoflurane anesthesia was performed in Shetland ponies. A quantitative electromyographic assessment of the NWR was done before, during and after the TCI. Plasma levels of R-/S-ketamine and R-/S-norketamine were determined by enantioselective capillary electrophoresis. These data and two additional data sets from bolus studies were used to build a PBPk model for ketamine in ponies. The peak-to-peak amplitude and the duration of the NWR decreased significantly during TCI and returned slowly toward baseline values after the end of TCI. The PBPk model provides reliable prediction of plasma and tissue levels of R- and S-ketamine and R- and S-norketamine. Furthermore, biotransformation of ketamine takes place in the liver and in the lung via first-pass metabolism. Plasma concentrations of S-norketamine were higher compared to R-norketamine during TCI at all time points. Analysis of the data suggested identical biotransformation rates from the parent compounds to the principle metabolites (R- and S-norketamine) but different downstream metabolism to further metabolites. The PBPk model can provide predictions of R- and S-ketamine and norketamine concentrations in other clinical settings (e.g. horses)

  15. Expansion of plants with Crassulacean Acid Metabolism under global environment change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K.; D'Odorico, P.; Collins, S. L.; Carr, D.

    2016-12-01

    The abundance of plants with Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) has increased in many drylands worldwide. This is hypothesized to occur because CAM plants store water, take up CO2 at night, exhibit photosynthetic plasticity, and have high water use efficiency. The increased dominance of CAM plants, however, also depends on their competitive relationship with other functional groups, an aspect of CAM plant sensitivity to global environmental change that has remained largely understudied. Here, we investigated the response of CAM plants and their competitive relationships with C3 and C4 plants under global environmental change. We focused on two pairs of CAM and non-CAM species, namely Cylindropuntia imbricata (a constitutive CAM species) and Bouteloua eriopoda (C4 grass), which co-occur in desert grasslands in northern Mexico, and invasive Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (a facultative CAM species) and Bromus mollis (a C3 invasive grass), which coexist in California's coastal grasslands. A set of growth chamber experiments under altered CO2 and water conditions show that C. imbricata outcompeted B. eriopoda under drought conditions, while in well-watered conditions B. eriopoda was a stronger competitor for soil water than C. imbricata. Under drought conditions a more positive response to CO2 enrichment by C. imbricata indirectly disfavored B. eriopoda, which suggests that interspecific competition can outweigh the favorable direct effect of CO2 enrichment on plant growth. A set of greenhouse experiments under water, N, and soil salinity manipulations showed that drought, N deposition, and/or increased soil salinity served as important drivers for success of M. crystallinum invasion, while B. mollis exerted strong competitive effects on M. crystallinum for light and soil nutrients in well-watered conditions. M. crystallinum switched from C3 photosynthesis to CAM photosynthesis as an adaptive strategy in response to moderate intensity of competition from B. mollis, in

  16. Preventive role of exercise training in autonomic, hemodynamic, and metabolic parameters in rats under high risk of metabolic syndrome development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Silva, Ivana Cinthya; Mostarda, Cristiano; Moreira, Edson Dias; Silva, Kleiton Augusto Santos; dos Santos, Fernando; de Angelis, Kátia; Farah, Vera de Moura Azevedo; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia

    2013-03-15

    High fructose consumption contributes to metabolic syndrome incidence, whereas exercise training promotes several beneficial adaptations. In this study, we demonstrated the preventive role of exercise training in the metabolic syndrome derangements in a rat model. Wistar rats receiving fructose overload in drinking water (100 g/l) were concomitantly trained on a treadmill (FT) or kept sedentary (F) for 10 wk. Control rats treated with normal water were also submitted to exercise training (CT) or sedentarism (C). Metabolic evaluations consisted of the Lee index and glycemia and insulin tolerance test (kITT). Blood pressure (BP) was directly measured, whereas heart rate (HR) and BP variabilities were evaluated in time and frequency domains. Renal sympathetic nerve activity was also recorded. F rats presented significant alterations compared with all the other groups in insulin resistance (in mg · dl(-1) · min(-1): F: 3.4 ± 0.2; C: 4.7 ± 0.2; CT: 5.0 ± 0.5 FT: 4.6 ± 0.4), mean BP (in mmHG: F: 117 ± 2; C: 100 ± 2; CT: 98 ± 2; FT: 105 ± 2), and Lee index (in g/mm: F = 0.31 ± 0.001; C = 0.29 ± 0.001; CT = 0.27 ± 0.002; FT = 0.28 ± 0.002), confirming the metabolic syndrome diagnosis. Exercise training blunted all these derangements. Additionally, FS group presented autonomic dysfunction in relation to the others, as seen by an ≈ 50% decrease in baroreflex sensitivity and 24% in HR variability, and increases in sympathovagal balance (140%) and in renal sympathetic nerve activity (45%). These impairments were not observed in FT group, as well as in C and CT. Correlation analysis showed that both Lee index and kITT were associated with vagal impairment caused by fructose. Therefore, exercise training plays a preventive role in both autonomic and hemodynamic alterations related to the excessive fructose consumption.

  17. Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy to monitor microbial metabolism in situ under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Although high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) biotopes are ubiquitous on Earth, little is known about the metabolism of piezophile organisms. Cell culture under HHP can be technically challenging, and equipment- dependent. In addition, the depressurization step required for analysis can lead to erroneous data. Therefore, to understand how piezophile organisms react to pressure, it is crucial to be able to monitor their activity in situ under HHP. We developed the use of Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy (QRS, 1) to monitor in situ the metabolism of organic molecules. This technique is based on the specific spectral signature of an analyte from which its concentration can be deduced. An application of this technique to the monitoring of alcoholic fermentation by the piezotolerant micro-eucaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. Ethanol fermentation from glucose was monitored during 24h from ambient P up to 100 MPa in the low- pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (lpDAC, 2). The experimental compression chamber consisted in a 300 μm-thick Ni gasket in which a 500 μm-diameter hole was drilled. Early-stationnary yeast cells were inoculated into fresh low-fluorescence medium containing 0.15 M of glucose. Ethanol concentration was determined in situ by QRS using the symmetric C-C stretching mode of ethanol at 878 cm-1 normalizing the data to the intensity of the sulfate S-O stretching mode at 980 cm-1. In our setup, the detection limit of ethanol is lower than 0.05 mM with a precision below 1%. At ambient P, ethanol production in the lpDAC and in control experiments proceeds with the same kinetics. Thus, yeast is not affected by its confinement. This is further confirmed by its ability to bud with a generation time similar to control experiments performed in glass tubes at ambient pressure inside the lpDAC. Ethanol production by yeast occurs to at least 65 MPa (3). At 10 MPa, fermentation proceeds 3 times faster than at ambient P. Fermentation rates decrease linearly from 20 to

  18. A Combined Proteomic and Transcriptomic Analysis on Sulfur Metabolism Pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana under Simulated Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhua; Simon, Martin; Wu, Feihua; Hu, Wenjun; Chen, Juan B.; Zheng, Hailei

    2014-01-01

    With rapid economic development, most regions in southern China have suffered acid rain (AR) pollution. In our study, we analyzed the changes in sulfur metabolism in Arabidopsis under simulated AR stress which provide one of the first case studies, in which the systematic responses in sulfur metabolism were characterized by high-throughput methods at different levels including proteomic, genomic and physiological approaches. Generally, we found that all of the processes related to sulfur metabolism responded to AR stress, including sulfur uptake, activation and also synthesis of sulfur-containing amino acid and other secondary metabolites. Finally, we provided a catalogue of the detected sulfur metabolic changes and reconstructed the coordinating network of their mutual influences. This study can help us to understand the mechanisms of plants to adapt to AR stress. PMID:24595051

  19. Cerium chloride improves protein and carbohydrate metabolism of fifth-instar larvae of Bombyx mori under phoxim toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Xie, Yi; Cheng, Zhe; Cheng, Jie; Hu, Rengping; Sang, Xuezi; Gui, Suxin; Sun, Qingqing; Gong, Xiaolan; Cui, Yaling; Shen, Weide; Hong, Fashui

    2012-12-01

    The organophosphorus pesticide poisoning of the silkworm Bombyx mori is one of the major events causing serious damage to sericulture. Added low-dose rare earths are demonstrated to increase resistance in animals. However, very little is known about whether or not added CeCl₃ can increase resistance of silkworm to phoxim poisoning. The present findings suggested that added CeCl₃ to mulberry leaves markedly increased contents of protein, glucose and pyruvate, and carbohydrate metabolism-related enzyme activities, including lactate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase, and attenuated free amino acids, urea, uric acid and lactate levels and inhibited the protein metabolism-related enzymes activities, such as protease, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase in the haemolymph of B. mori, under phoxim toxicity. These findings suggest that added CeCl₃ may improve protein and carbohydrate metabolisms, thus leading to increases of growth and survival rate of B. mori under phoxim stress.

  20. Arctigenin preferentially induces tumor cell death under glucose deprivation by inhibiting cellular energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Qi, Chunting; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhang, Haohao; Hu, Lihong; Yuan, Junying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-08-15

    Selectively eradicating cancer cells with minimum adverse effects on normal cells is a major challenge in the development of anticancer therapy. We hypothesize that nutrient-limiting conditions frequently encountered by cancer cells in poorly vascularized solid tumors might provide an opportunity for developing selective therapy. In this study, we investigated the function and molecular mechanisms of a natural compound, arctigenin, in regulating tumor cell growth. We demonstrated that arctigenin selectively promoted glucose-starved A549 tumor cells to undergo necrosis by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. In doing so, arctigenin elevated cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocked cellular energy metabolism in the glucose-starved tumor cells. We also demonstrated that cellular ROS generation was caused by intracellular ATP depletion and played an essential role in the arctigenin-induced tumor cell death under the glucose-limiting condition. Furthermore, we combined arctigenin with the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and examined their effects on tumor cell growth. Interestingly, this combination displayed preferential cell-death inducing activity against tumor cells compared to normal cells. Hence, we propose that the combination of arctigenin and 2DG may represent a promising new cancer therapy with minimal normal tissue toxicity. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxidative metabolism is associated with physiological disorders in fruits stored under multiple environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Geoffrey B; Shelp, Barry J; DeEll, Jennifer R; Bozzo, Gale G

    2016-04-01

    In combination with low temperature, controlled atmosphere storage and 1-methylcyclopropene (ethylene antagonist) application are used to delay senescence of many fruits and vegetables. Controlled atmosphere consists of low O2 and elevated CO2. When sub-optimal partial pressures are used, these practices represent multiple abiotic stresses that can promote the development of physiological disorders in pome fruit, including flesh browning and cavities, although there is some evidence for genetic differences in susceptibility. In the absence of surface disorders, fruit with flesh injuries are not easily distinguished from asymptomatic fruit until these are consumed. Oxidative stress metabolites tend to accumulate (e.g., γ-aminobutyrate) or rapidly decline (e.g., ascorbate and glutathione) in vegetative tissues exposed to hypoxic and/or elevated CO2 environments. Moreover, these phenomena can be associated with altered energy and redox status. Biochemical investigations of Arabidopsis and tomato plants with genetically-altered levels of enzymes associated with the γ-aminobutyrate shunt and the ascorbate-glutathione pathway indicate that these metabolic processes are functionally related and critical for dampening the oxidative burst in vegetative and fruit tissues, respectively. Here, we hypothesize that γ-aminobutyrate accumulation, as well energy and antioxidant depletion are associated with the development of physiological injury in pome fruit under multiple environmental stresses. An improved understanding of this relationship could assist in maintaining the quality of stored fruit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolite analysis of Mycobacterium species under aerobic and hypoxic conditions reveals common metabolic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapal, Margit; Wheeler, Paul R; Fraser, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    A metabolite profiling approach has been implemented to elucidate metabolic adaptation at set culture conditions in five Mycobacterium species (two fast- and three slow-growing) with the potential to act as model organisms for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Analysis has been performed over designated growth phases and under representative environments (nutrient and oxygen depletion) experienced by Mtb during infection. The procedure was useful in determining a range of metabolites (60-120 compounds) covering nucleotides, amino acids, organic acids, saccharides, fatty acids, glycerols, -esters, -phosphates and isoprenoids. Among these classes of compounds, key biomarker metabolites, which can act as indicators of pathway/process activity, were identified. In numerous cases, common metabolite traits were observed for all five species across the experimental conditions (e.g. uracil indicating DNA repair). Amino acid content, especially glutamic acid, highlighted the different properties between the fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria studied (e.g. nitrogen assimilation). The greatest similarities in metabolite composition between fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria were apparent under hypoxic conditions. A comparison to previously reported transcriptomic data revealed a strong correlation between changes in transcription and metabolite content. Collectively, these data validate the changes in the transcription at the metabolite level, suggesting transcription exists as one of the predominant modes of cellular regulation in Mycobacterium. Sectors with restricted correlation between metabolites and transcription (e.g. hypoxic cultivation) warrant further study to elucidate and exploit post-transcriptional modes of regulation. The strong correlation between the laboratory conditions used and data derived from in vivo conditions, indicate that the approach applied is a valuable addition to our understanding of cell regulation in these Mycobacterium species.

  3. Metabolic flexibility of d-ribose producer strain of Bacillus pumilus under environmental perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Rajesh K.; Maiti, Soumen K.; Das, Debasish

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic reaction rate vector is a bridge that links gene and protein expression alterations to the phenotypic endpoint. We present a simple approach for the estimation of flux distribution at key branch points in the metabolic network by using substrate uptake, metabolite secretion rate, an...

  4. Acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 promotes acetate utilization and maintains cancer cell growth under metabolic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Schug, Zachary T.; Peck, Barrie; Jones, Dylan T.; Zhang, Qifeng; Grosskurth, Shaun; Alam, Israt S.; Goodwin, Louise M.; Smethurst, Elizabeth; Mason, Susan; Blyth, Karen; McGarry, Lynn; James, Daniel; Shanks, Emma; Kalna, Gabriela; Saunders, Rebecca E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A functional genomics study revealed that the activity of acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (ACSS2) contributes to cancer cell growth under low-oxygen and lipid-depleted conditions. Comparative metabolomics and lipidomics demonstrated that acetate is used as a nutritional source by cancer cells in an ACSS2-dependent manner, and supplied a significant fraction of the carbon within the fatty acid and phospholipid pools. ACSS2 expression is upregulated under metabolically stressed conditions and A...

  5. Metabolic alkalosis due to feeding chicks in breeding Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae under natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Sato, Katsufumi; Kato, Akiko; Fukui, Daisuke; Bando, Gen; Naito, Yasuhiko; Habara, Yoshiaki; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Fujita, Shoichi

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged abnormal vomiting causes metabolic alkalosis. Many seabirds are known to feed their chicks by regurgitation. We hypothesized that metabolic alkalosis occurs in seabirds even under natural conditions during the breeding season. Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae feed their chicks by regurgitating food for 50-60 d until the chicks fledge. In this study, the concentrations of Cl(-), HCO(3)(-), Na+, K+, pH, and PCO2 in the blood of breeding Adélie penguins were measured throughout the chick-rearing season. The pH of penguin venous blood shifted from 7.54 in the guarding period to 7.47 in the crèche period. Decreasing Cl(-) and increasing HCO(3)(-) blood concentrations in parents were associated with increasing mass of their brood in the guarding period, the early phase of the rearing season, indicating that regurgitating to feed chicks causes loss of gastric acid and results in relative metabolic alkalosis. The inverse trend was observed during the crèche period, the latter phase of the rearing season, when parents spent more time at sea and have fewer opportunities for gastric acid loss. This was assumed to be the recovery phase. These results indicate that regurgitation might cause metabolic alkalosis in breeding Adélie penguins. To our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate that seabirds exhibit metabolic alkalosis due to regurgitation to feed chicks under natural conditions.

  6. Flower abscission in Vitis vinifera L. triggered by gibberellic acid and shade discloses differences in the underlying metabolic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eDomingos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding abscission is both a biological and an agronomic challenge. Flower abscission induced independently by shade and gibberellic acid (GAc sprays was monitored in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. growing under a soilless greenhouse system during two seasonal growing conditions, in an early and late production cycle. Physiological and metabolic changes triggered by each of the two distinct stimuli were determined. Environmental conditions exerted a significant effect on fruit set as showed by the higher natural drop rate recorded in the late production cycle with respect to the early cycle. Shade and GAc treatments increased the percentage of flower drop compared to the control, and at a similar degree, during the late production cycle. The reduction of leaf gas exchanges under shade conditions was not observed in GAc treated vines. The metabolic profile assessed in samples collected during the late cycle differently affected primary and secondary metabolisms and showed that most of the treatment-resulting variations occurred in opposite trends in inflorescences unbalanced in either hormonal or energy deficit abscission-inducing signals. Particularly concerning carbohydrates metabolism, sucrose, glucose, tricarboxylic acid (TCA metabolites and intermediates of the raffinose family oligosaccharides pathway were lower in shaded and higher in GAc samples. Altered oxidative stress remediation mechanisms and indolacetic acid (IAA concentration were identified as abscission signatures common to both stimuli. According to the global analysis performed, we report that grape flower abscission mechanisms triggered by GAc application and C-starvation are not based on the same metabolic pathways.

  7. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F.; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA) and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography (MRA) in subjects without (N = 294) and with (N = 109) RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  8. Patterns of age-associated degeneration differ in shoulder muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam eRaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC. The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography in subjects without (N=294 and with (N=109 RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  9. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA) and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography (MRA) in subjects without (N = 294) and with (N = 109) RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  10. [The mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of reflexotherapy and drinking mineral waters in the patients presenting with metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernov, V A; Frolkov, V K; Zubarkina, M M

    Both acupuncture and drinking mineral water can influence the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids as well as their hormonal regulation, but the possibility of the application of these therapeutic factors for the correction of insulin resistance has not been studied in the patients presenting with metabolic syndrome. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects produced by the intake of drinking mineral water and acupuncture on the various parameters characterizing the patients suffering from metabolic syndrome in combination with altered insulin resistance. Ninety patients with this condition included in the study underwent the analysis of their the blood pressure, body mass index, blood glucose and lipid levels, insulin and cortisol secretion. We undertook the analysis of the effects of the single and repeated intakes of Essentuki No 17 mineral water included in the combined treatment of the patients with metabolic syndrome and revealed many common responses of the organism to its therapeutic action. Specifically, the stress-type reactions suggested the initiation of the adaptive processes in the system of hormonal regulation of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Simultaneously, the manifestations of insulin resistance became less pronounced indicating that both acupuncture and drinking mineral water suppressed the action of the main pathogenic mechanisms underlying the development of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, it was shown that acupuncture had a stronger hypotensive effect in the combination with the decrease of the overproduction of cortisol whereas the intake of the mineral water had a greater metabolic potential and contributed to the intensification of the basal secretion of glucocorticoids. Both reflexotherapy and drinking mineral water have a well apparent effect on the pathogenetic reactions of the metabolic syndrome and therefore can be used in addition to the standard therapy to activate the non-specific, phylogenetically

  11. Role of PGC-1α in exercise training- and resveratrol-induced prevention of age-associated inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jesper; Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm; Nielsen, Maja Munk

    2013-01-01

    Age-related metabolic diseases are often associated with low-grade inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the transcriptional co-activator PGC-1α in the potential beneficial effects of exercise training and/or resveratrol in the prevention of age-associated low......-grade inflammation. To address this, a long-term voluntary exercise training and resveratrol supplementation study was conducted....

  12. CO2 -dependent metabolic modulation in red blood cells stored under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Larry J; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    2016-02-01

    Anaerobic red blood cell (RBC) storage reduces oxidative damage, maintains adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) levels, and has superior 24-hour recovery at 6 weeks compared to standard storage. This study will determine if removal of CO2 during O2 depletion by gas exchange may affect RBCs during anaerobic storage. This is a matched three-arm study (n = 14): control, O2 and CO2 depleted with Ar (AN), and O2 depleted with 95%Ar/5%CO2 (AN[CO2 ]). RBCs in additives AS-3 or OFAS-3 were evenly divided into three bags, and anaerobic conditions were established by gas exchange. Bags were stored at 1 to 6°C in closed chambers under anaerobic conditions or ambient air, sampled weekly for up to 9 weeks for a panel of in vitro tests. A full metabolomics screening was conducted for the first 4 weeks of storage. Purging with Ar (AN) results in alkalization of the RBC and increased glucose consumption. The addition of 5% CO2 to the purging gas prevented CO2 loss with an equivalent starting and final pH and lactate to control bags (p > 0.5, Days 0-21). ATP levels are higher in AN[CO2 ] (p CO2 ] arms (p = 0.6). Maintenance of ATP in the AN[CO2 ] arm demonstrates that ATP production is not solely a function of the pH effect on glycolysis. CO2 in anaerobic storage prevented the maintenance of DPG, and DPG production appears to be pH dependent. CO2 as well as O2 depletion provides metabolic advantage for stored RBCs. © 2015 AABB.

  13. Mechanisms underlying food-drug interactions: inhibition of intestinal metabolism and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Christina S; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2012-11-01

    Food-drug interaction studies are critical to evaluate appropriate dosing, timing, and formulation of new drug candidates. These interactions often reflect prandial-associated changes in the extent and/or rate of systemic drug exposure. Physiologic and physicochemical mechanisms underlying food effects on drug disposition are well-characterized. However, biochemical mechanisms involving drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins remain underexplored. Several plant-derived beverages have been shown to modulate enzymes and transporters in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK) and potentially negative pharmacodynamic (PD) outcomes. Commonly consumed fruit juices, teas, and alcoholic drinks contain phytochemicals that inhibit intestinal cytochrome P450 and phase II conjugation enzymes, as well as uptake and efflux transport proteins. Whereas myriad phytochemicals have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, translation to the clinic has been deemed insignificant or undetermined. An overlooked prerequisite for elucidating food effects on drug PK is thorough knowledge of causative bioactive ingredients. Substantial variability in bioactive ingredient composition and activity of a given dietary substance poses a challenge in conducting robust food-drug interaction studies. This confounding factor can be addressed by identifying and characterizing specific components, which could be used as marker compounds to improve clinical trial design and quantitatively predict food effects. Interpretation and integration of data from in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies require collaborative expertise from multiple disciplines, from botany to clinical pharmacology (i.e., plant to patient). Development of more systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining drug-dietary substance interactions prospectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Microbiological Diversity Demonstrates the Potential which Collaboratively Metabolize Nitrogen Oxides ( NOx) under Smog Environmental Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. Z.; Zhao, X. H.; Chen, X. P.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, smoggy weather has become a daily in large part of China because of rapidly economic growth and accelerative urbanization. Stressed on the smoggy situation and economic growth, the green and environment-friendly technology is necessary to reduce or eliminate the smog and promote the sustainable development of economy. Previous studies had confirmed that nitrogen oxides ( NOx ) is one of crucial factors which forms smog. Microorganisms have the advantages of quickly growth and reproduction and metabolic diversity which can collaboratively Metabolize various NOx. This study will design a kind of bacteria & algae cultivation system which can metabolize collaboratively nitrogen oxides in air and intervene in the local nitrogen cycle. Furthermore, the nitrogen oxides can be transformed into nitrogen gas or assembled in protein in microorganism cell by regulating the microorganism types and quantities and metabolic pathways in the system. Finally, the smog will be alleviated or eliminated because of reduction of nitrogen oxides emission. This study will produce the green developmental methodology.

  15. Metabolic regulation of hematopoietic and leukemic stem/progenitor cells under homeostatic and stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karigane, Daiki; Takubo, Keiyo

    2017-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit multilineage differentiation and self-renewal activities that maintain the entire hematopoietic system during an organism's lifetime. These abilities are sustained by intrinsic transcriptional programs and extrinsic cues from the microenvironment or niche. Recent studies using metabolomics technologies reveal that metabolic regulation plays an essential role in HSC maintenance. Metabolic pathways provide energy and building blocks for other factors functioning at steady state and in stress. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of metabolic regulation in HSCs relevant to cell cycle quiescence, symmetric/asymmetric division, and proliferation following stress and lineage commitment, and discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting metabolic factors or pathways to treat hematological malignancies.

  16. Systematic Characterization of the Metabolism of Acetoin and Its Derivative Ligustrazine in Bacillus subtilis under Micro-Oxygen Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Youqiang; Jiang, Yuefeng; Li, Xiuting; Sun, Baoguo; Teng, Chao; Yang, Ran; Xiong, Ke; Fan, Guangsen; Wang, Wenhua

    2018-03-07

    Bacillus subtilis is an important microorganism for brewing of Chinese Baijiu, which contributes to the formation of flavour chemicals including acetoin and its derivative ligustrazine. The first stage of Baijiu brewing process is under the micro-oxygen condition; however, there are few studies about B. subtilis metabolism under this condition. Effects of various factors on acetoin and ligustrazine metabolism were investigated under this condition including key genes and fermentation conditions. Mutation of bdhA (encoding acetoin reductase) or overexpression of glcU (encoding glucose uptake protein) increased acetoin concentration. Addition of Vigna angularis powder to the culture medium also promoted acetoin production. The optimal culture conditions for ligustrazine synthesis were pH 6.0 and 42°C. Ammonium phosphate was shown to promote ligustrazine synthesis in situ. This is the first report of acetoin and ligustrazine metabolism in B. subtilis under micro-oxygen conditions, which will ultimately promote the application of B. subtilis for maintaining Baijiu quality.

  17. Title: Potassium application regulates nitrogen metabolism and osmotic adjustment in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) functional leaf under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Rizwan; Zhao, Wenqing; Abid, Muhammad; Dong, Haoran; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the role of potassium (K) in maintaining nitrogen metabolism and osmotic adjustment development of cotton functional leaves to sustain growth under soil drought and rewatering conditions, the plants of two cotton cultivars Siza 3 (low-K sensitive) and Simian 3 (low-K tolerant), were grown under three different K rates (K0, K1, and K2; 0, 150, and 300kgK 2 Oha -1 , respectively) and exposed to drought stress with 40±5% soil relative water content (SRWC). The drought stress was applied at flowering stage by withholding water for eight days followed by rewatering to a well-watered level (75±5% SRWC). The results showed that drought-stressed plants of both cultivars showed a decrease in leaf relative water content (RWC) and osmotic potential in the functional leaves and developed osmotic adjustment with an increase in the contents of free amino acids, soluble sugars, inorganic K, and nitrate as compared to well-watered plants. In drought-stressed plants, nitrogen-metabolizing enzyme activities of nitrogen reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) were diminished significantly (P≤0.05) along with decreased chlorophyll content and soluble proteins. However, drought-stressed plants under K application not only exhibited higher osmotic adjustment with greater accumulation of osmolytes but also regulated nitrogen metabolism by maintaining higher enzyme activities, soluble proteins, and chlorophyll content in functional leaves as compared to the plants without K application. Siza 3 showed better stability in enzyme activities and resulted in 89% higher seed cotton yield under K2 as compared to K0 in drought-stressed plants, whereas this increase was 53% in the case of Simian 3. The results of the study suggested that K application enhances cotton plants' potential for sustaining high nitrogen-metabolizing enzyme activities and related components to supplement osmotic adjustment under soil drought conditions. Copyright © 2017

  18. Intestinal IRE1 Is Required for Increased Triglyceride Metabolism and Longer Lifespan under Dietary Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Nuno Miguel; Wang, Lifen; Ortega, Mauricio; Deng, Hansong; Katewa, Subhash D; Li, Patrick Wai-Lun; Karpac, Jason; Jasper, Heinrich; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2016-10-25

    Dietary restriction (DR) is one of the most robust lifespan-extending interventions in animals. The beneficial effects of DR involve a metabolic adaptation toward increased triglyceride usage. The regulatory mechanism and the tissue specificity of this metabolic switch remain unclear. Here, we show that the IRE1/XBP1 endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling module mediates metabolic adaptation upon DR in flies by promoting triglyceride synthesis and accumulation in enterocytes (ECs) of the Drosophila midgut. Consistently, IRE1/XBP1 function in ECs is required for increased longevity upon DR. We further identify sugarbabe, a Gli-like zinc-finger transcription factor, as a key mediator of the IRE1/XBP1-regulated induction of de novo lipogenesis in ECs. Overexpression of sugarbabe rescues metabolic and lifespan phenotypes of IRE1 loss-of-function conditions. Our study highlights the critical role of metabolic adaptation of the intestinal epithelium for DR-induced lifespan extension and explores the IRE1/XBP1 signaling pathway regulating this adaptation and influencing lifespan. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Conservative fluid management prevents age-associated ventilator induced mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Joseph A; Valentine, Michael S; Saravanan, Nivi; Schneck, Matthew B; Pidaparti, Ramana; Fowler, Alpha A; Reynolds, Angela M; Heise, Rebecca L

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 800 thousand patients require mechanical ventilation in the United States annually with an in-hospital mortality rate of over 30%. The majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation are over the age of 65 and advanced age is known to increase the severity of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and in-hospital mortality rates. However, the mechanisms which predispose aging ventilator patients to increased mortality rates are not fully understood. Ventilation with conservative fluid management decreases mortality rates in acute respiratory distress patients, but to date there has been no investigation of the effect of conservative fluid management on VILI and ventilator associated mortality rates. We hypothesized that age-associated increases in susceptibility and incidence of pulmonary edema strongly promote age-related increases in ventilator associated mortality. 2month old and 20month old male C57BL6 mice were mechanically ventilated with either high tidal volume (HVT) or low tidal volume (LVT) for up to 4h with either liberal or conservative fluid support. During ventilation, lung compliance, total lung capacity, and hysteresis curves were quantified. Following ventilation, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for total protein content and inflammatory cell infiltration. Wet to dry ratios were used to directly measure edema in excised lungs. Lung histology was performed to quantify alveolar barrier damage/destruction. Age matched non-ventilated mice were used as controls. At 4h, both advanced age and HVT ventilation significantly increased markers of inflammation and injury, degraded pulmonary mechanics, and decreased survival rates. Conservative fluid support significantly diminished pulmonary edema and improved pulmonary mechanics by 1h in advanced age HVT subjects. In 4h ventilations, conservative fluid support significantly diminished pulmonary edema, improved lung mechanics, and resulted in significantly lower mortality rates in

  20. Vanillin production using metabolically engineered Escherichia coli under non-growing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghini, Paolo; Di Gioia, Diana; Fava, Fabio; Ruzzi, Maurizio

    2007-04-16

    Vanillin is one of the most important aromatic flavour compounds used in the food and cosmetic industries. Natural vanillin is extracted from vanilla beans and is relatively expensive. Moreover, the consumer demand for natural vanillin highly exceeds the amount of vanillin extracted by plant sources. This has led to the investigation of other routes to obtain this flavour such as the biotechnological production from ferulic acid. Studies concerning the use of engineered recombinant Escherichia coli cells as biocatalysts for vanillin production are described in the literature, but yield optimization and biotransformation conditions have not been investigated in details. Effect of plasmid copy number in metabolic engineering of E. coli for the synthesis of vanillin has been evaluated by the use of genes encoding feruloyl-CoA synthetase and feruloyl hydratase/aldolase from Pseudomonas fluorescens BF13. The higher vanillin production yield was obtained using resting cells of E. coli strain JM109 harbouring a low-copy number vector and a promoter exhibiting a low activity to drive the expression of the catabolic genes. Optimization of the bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin was accomplished by a response surface methodology. The experimental conditions that allowed us to obtain high values for response functions were 3.3 mM ferulic acid and 4.5 g/L of biomass, with a yield of 70.6% and specific productivity of 5.9 micromoles/g x min after 3 hours of incubation. The final concentration of vanillin in the medium was increased up to 3.5 mM after a 6-hour incubation by sequential spiking of 1.1 mM ferulic acid. The resting cells could be reused up to four times maintaining the production yield levels over 50%, thus increasing three times the vanillin obtained per gram of biomass. Ferulic acid can be efficiently converted to vanillin, without accumulation of undesirable vanillin reduction/oxidation products, using E. coli JM109 cells expressing genes from the ferulic

  1. Vanillin production using metabolically engineered Escherichia coli under non-growing conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fava Fabio

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vanillin is one of the most important aromatic flavour compounds used in the food and cosmetic industries. Natural vanillin is extracted from vanilla beans and is relatively expensive. Moreover, the consumer demand for natural vanillin highly exceeds the amount of vanillin extracted by plant sources. This has led to the investigation of other routes to obtain this flavour such as the biotechnological production from ferulic acid. Studies concerning the use of engineered recombinant Escherichia coli cells as biocatalysts for vanillin production are described in the literature, but yield optimization and biotransformation conditions have not been investigated in details. Results Effect of plasmid copy number in metabolic engineering of E. coli for the synthesis of vanillin has been evaluated by the use of genes encoding feruloyl-CoA synthetase and feruloyl hydratase/aldolase from Pseudomonas fluorescens BF13. The higher vanillin production yield was obtained using resting cells of E. coli strain JM109 harbouring a low-copy number vector and a promoter exhibiting a low activity to drive the expression of the catabolic genes. Optimization of the bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin was accomplished by a response surface methodology. The experimental conditions that allowed us to obtain high values for response functions were 3.3 mM ferulic acid and 4.5 g/L of biomass, with a yield of 70.6% and specific productivity of 5.9 μmoles/g × min after 3 hours of incubation. The final concentration of vanillin in the medium was increased up to 3.5 mM after a 6-hour incubation by sequential spiking of 1.1 mM ferulic acid. The resting cells could be reused up to four times maintaining the production yield levels over 50%, thus increasing three times the vanillin obtained per gram of biomass. Conclusion Ferulic acid can be efficiently converted to vanillin, without accumulation of undesirable vanillin reduction/oxidation products

  2. Turf algal epiphytes metabolically induce local pH increase, with implications for underlying coralline algae under ocean acidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Short, J.A.; Pedersen, Ole; Kendrick, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of epiphytic turf algae may modify the effects of ocean acidification on coralline algal calcification rates by altering seawater chemistry within the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) above coralline algal crusts. We used microelectrodes to measure the effects of turf algal epiphytes...... on seawater pH and the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) within the DBL at the surface of Hydrolithoideae coralline algal crusts under ambient (36 Pa) CO2 and an ocean acidification scenario with elevated CO2 (200 Pa). Turf algae significantly increased the mean diel amplitude of pH and pO2, and this effect...... was more pronounced under elevated CO2. We suggest that increases in seawater CO2 under ocean acidification conditions may drive an increase in the abundance of epiphytic turf algae, consequently modifying the chemistry within the DBL. Thus, the effect of epiphytic turf algae on microscale pH is striking...

  3. Metabolic Networks Underlying Cognitive Reserve in Prodromal Alzheimer Disease: A European Alzheimer Disease Consortium Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morbelli, S.; Perneczky, R.; Drzezga, A.; Frisoni, G. B.; Caroli, A.; van Berckel, B.N.M.; Ossenkoppele, R.; Guedj, E.; Didic, M.; Brugnolo, A.; Naseri, M.; Sambuceti, G.; Pagani, M.; Nobili, F.

    2013-01-01

    This project aimed to investigate the metabolic basis for resilience to neurodegeneration (cognitive reserve) in highly educated patients with prodromal Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: Sixty-four patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment who later converted to AD dementia during follow-up,

  4. The free NADH concentration is kept constant in plant mitochondria under different metabolic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasimova, M.R.; Grigiene, J.; Krab, K.

    2006-01-01

    The reduced coenzyme NADH plays a central role in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. However, reports on the amount of free NADH in mitochondria are sparse and contradictory. We first determined the emission spectrum of NADH bound to proteins using isothermal titration calorimetry combined wit...

  5. Dynamic Modelling under Uncertainty : The Case of Trypanosoma brucei Energy Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achcar, Fiona; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Barrett, Michael P.; Breitling, Rainer; Papin, Jason A.

    Kinetic models of metabolism require detailed knowledge of kinetic parameters. However, due to measurement errors or lack of data this knowledge is often uncertain. The model of glycolysis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei is a particularly well analysed example of a quantitative

  6. Glucose metabolism in Lactococcus lactis MG1363 under different aeration conditions: Requirement of acetate to sustain growth under microaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Mikkel; Jensen, N.B.S.; Villadsen, John

    2003-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363 was grown in batch cultures on a defined medium with glucose as the energy source under different aeration conditions, namely, anaerobic conditions, aerobic conditions, and microaerobic conditions with a dissolved oxygen tension of 5% (when saturation with ...

  7. Study of metabolic profile of Rhizopus oryzae to enhance fumaric acid production under low pH condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Qing; Lv, Chunwei; Yan, Caixia; Li, Shuang; Jiang, Ling; Huang, He; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2015-12-01

    Ensuring a suitable pH is a major problem in industrial organic acid fermentation. To circumvent this problem, we used a metabolic profiling approach to analyze metabolite changes in Rhizopus oryzae under different pH conditions. A correlation between fumaric acid production and intracellular metabolic characteristics of R. oryzae was revealed by principal component analysis. The results showed that to help cell survival in the presence of low pH, R. oryzae altered amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and promoted sugar or sugar alcohol synthesis, corresponding with a suppressing of energy metabolism, phenylalanine, and tyrosine synthesis and finally resulting in the low performance of fumaric acid production. Based on this observation, 1 % linoleic acid was added to the culture medium in pH 3.0 to decrease the carbon demand for cell survival, and the fumaric acid titer was enhanced by 39.7 % compared with the control (pH 3.0 without linoleic acid addition), reaching 18.3 g/L after 84 h of fermentation. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism by which R. oryzae responds to acidic stress and would be helpful for the development of efficient strategies for fumaric acid production at low pH.

  8. Increased heme synthesis in yeast induces a metabolic switch from fermentation to respiration even under conditions of glucose repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Bu, Pengli; Zeng, Joey; Vancura, Ales

    2017-10-13

    Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is a complex process that involves several signaling pathways and transcription factors as well as communication between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Under aerobic conditions, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolizes glucose predominantly by glycolysis and fermentation. We have recently shown that altered chromatin structure in yeast induces respiration by a mechanism that requires transport and metabolism of pyruvate in mitochondria. However, how pyruvate controls the transcriptional responses underlying the metabolic switch from fermentation to respiration is unknown. Here, we report that this pyruvate effect involves heme. We found that heme induces transcription of HAP4 , the transcriptional activation subunit of the Hap2/3/4/5p complex, required for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources, in a Hap1p- and Hap2/3/4/5p-dependent manner. Increasing cellular heme levels by inactivating ROX1 , which encodes a repressor of many hypoxic genes, or by overexpressing HEM3 or HEM12 induced respiration and elevated ATP levels. Increased heme synthesis, even under conditions of glucose repression, activated Hap1p and the Hap2/3/4/5p complex and induced transcription of HAP4 and genes required for the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, electron transport chain, and oxidative phosphorylation, leading to a switch from fermentation to respiration. Conversely, inhibiting metabolic flux into the TCA cycle reduced cellular heme levels and HAP4 transcription. Together, our results indicate that the glucose-mediated repression of respiration in budding yeast is at least partly due to the low cellular heme level. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Evaluation of hepatic metabolism and pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen in rats under chronic hypobaric hypoxia for targeted therapy at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Shefali; Gupta, Asheesh; Keshri, Gaurav K; Nath, Madhu; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2016-03-20

    With studies indicative of altered drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) under high altitude (HA)-induced hypobaric hypoxia, consideration of better therapeutic approaches has continuously been aimed in research for HA related illness management. DMPK of drugs like ibuprofen may get affected under hypoxia which establishes the requirement of different therapeutic dose regimen to ensure safe and effective therapy at HA. This study examined the effects of the chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) on hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen in rats. Experimental animals were exposed to simulated altitude of 7620 m (∼25,000 ft) for CHH exposure (7 or 14 days) in decompression chamber and administered with ibuprofen (80 mg/kg, body weight, p.o.). Results demonstrated that CHH significantly altered PK variables of ibuprofen and activities of both phase-I and II hepatic metabolic enzymes as compared to the animals under normoxic conditions. Hepatic histopathological observations also revealed marked alterations. Increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines viz. IL-1β, IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α exhibited close relevance with diminished CYP2C9 expression under CHH. Moreover, the down-regulated CYP2C9 level further supported the underlying mechanism for reduced metabolism of ibuprofen and as a result, increased retention of parent drug in the system. Increased mean retention time, Vd, T½ of ibuprofen, and decreased AUC, Cmax and clearance during CHH further strengthened the present findings. In conclusion, CHH exposure significantly affects hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen, which may further influence the usual therapeutic dose-regimen. Further, there is requirement of human studies to evaluate their susceptibility toward hypobaric hypoxia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Age-associated changes in human hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wendy W; Schrier, Stanley L; Weissman, Irving L

    2017-01-01

    Aging has a broad impact on the function of the human hematopoietic system. This review will focus primarily on the effect of aging on the human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) population. With age, even though human HSCs increase in number, they have decreased self-renewal capacity and reconstitution potential upon transplantation. As a population, human HSCs become more myeloid-biased in their differentiation potential. This is likely due to the human HSC population becoming more clonal with age, selecting for myeloid-biased HSC clones. The HSC clones that come to predominate with age may also contain disease-causing genetic and epigenetic changes that confer an increased risk of developing into an age-associated clonal hematopoietic disease, such as myelodysplastic syndrome, myeloproliferative disorders, or leukemia. The selection of these aged human HSC clones may be in part due to changes in the aging bone marrow microenvironment. While there have been significant advances in the understanding of the effect of aging on mouse hematopoiesis and mouse HSCs, we have comparatively less detailed analyses of the effect of aging on human HSCs. Continued evaluation of human HSCs in the context of aging will be important to determine how applicable the findings in mice and other model organisms are to the human clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aging-associated excess formaldehyde leads to spatial memory deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhiqian; Han, Chanshuai; Luo, Wenhong; Li, Hui; Luo, Hongjun; Qiang, Min; Su, Tao; Wu, Beibei; Liu, Ying; Yang, Xu; Wan, You; Cui, Dehua; He, Rongqiao

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that formaldehyde participates in DNA demethylation/methylation cycle. Emerging evidence identifies that neuronal activity induces global DNA demethylation and re-methylation; and DNA methylation is a critical step for memory formation. These data suggest that endogenous formaldehyde may intrinsically link learning-responsive DNA methylation status and memory formation. Here, we report that during spatial memory formation process, spatial training induces an initial global DNA demethylation and subsequent re-methylation associated with hippocampal formaldehyde elevation then decline to baseline level in Sprague Dawley rats. Scavenging this elevated formaldehyde by formaldehyde-degrading enzyme (FDH), or enhancing DNA demethylation by a DNA demethylating agent, both led to spatial memory deficits by blocking DNA re-methylation in rats. Furthermore, we found that the normal adult rats intrahippocampally injected with excess formaldehyde can imitate the aged-related spatial memory deficits and global DNA methylation decline. These findings indicate that aging-associated excess formaldheyde contributes to cognitive decline during aging. PMID:23657727

  12. Pharmaceutical Rejuvenation of Age-Associated Decline in Spatial Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2016-12-01

    Spatial memory and cognition decline during aging. Montelukast, an FDA approved drug for the treatment of asthma, can restore spatial memory in old rats to levels similar to those of young animals. Treatment improves three hallmarks of aging in the brain: reducing microglial-mediated neuroinflammation, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, and increasing neurogenesis in the hippocampus although not completely to youthful levels. Other aging-associated parameters, such as reduced synaptic density, are not affected, suggesting that anti-aging therapeutics may be further optimized. Montelukast targets leukotriene receptors GPR17 and CysLTR1 and appears to invert leukotriene signaling, converting an inflammatory signal into an anti-inflammatory signal. This acts as a dominant factor to overcome the dysfunctional effects of aging reportedly mediated, in part, by blood-borne factors such as beta-2 microglobulin that inhibit neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The key mechanism for cognitive improvement by montelukast may be restoration of BBB integrity, which would presumably decrease the amount of deleterious blood-borne factors to enter the brain. Whether or not this hypothesis is true for montelukast, drugs that restore or maintain BBB integrity may be useful in combating age-related loss of cognitive function.

  13. Metabolism of uniconazole-P in water-sediment systems under illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaka, Rika; Sugano, Terumi; Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2006-02-01

    Aerobic soil metabolism of uniconazole-P ([S]-E-1-[4-chlorophenyl]-4,4-dimethyl-2-[1,2,4-triazole-1-yl]-penten-3-ol) and the effect of illumination on metabolic profiles were studied in the water-sediment system when spiked to water. Uniconazole-P was gradually partitioned to the sediment with an aquatic half-life of 6.9 d in darkness with formation of bound residues. Illumination of the system from a xenon lamp (>290 nm) greatly accelerated the degradation of uniconazole-P via photoinduced isomerization between E- and Z-isomers with a subsequent intramolecular cyclization, and its aquatic half-life was greatly reduced to 0.6 d. Kinetic analysis based on compartment models suggested the possible contribution of photodegradation at the water-sediment interface, leading to more formation of the cyclized derivative in the sediment.

  14. Metabolic and functional phenotypic profiling of Drosophila melanogaster reveals reduced sex differentiation under stressful environmental conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, Michael; Malmendal, Anders; Muñoz, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    Strong sexual dimorphism is commonly observed across species and e.g. trade-offs between reproduction and maintenance are thought to explain this dimorphism. Here we test how the metabolic and functional phenotypic responses to varying types of environmental stress differ in male and female...... rearing regimes were investigated using NMR metabolomics and assessed for body mass and viability. Our results showed that environmental stress leads to reduced sexual dimorphism in both metabolic composition and body mass compared to the level of dimorphism observed at benign conditions. This reduced...... Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae), and how this impacts the magnitude of sexual dimorphism. Experimental stressors that we exposed flies to during development were heat stress, poor nutrition, high acidity, high levels of ammonia and ethanol. Emerged male and female flies from the different...

  15. Metabolic profiles in heart failure due to non?ischemic cardiomyopathy at rest and under exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller?Hennessen, Matthias; Sigl, Johanna; Fuhrmann, Jens C.; Witt, Henning; Reszka, Regina; Schmitz, Oliver; Kastler, J?rgen; Fischer, Jenny J.; M?ller, Oliver J.; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Weis, Tanja; Frey, Norbert; Katus, Hugo A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims Identification of metabolic signatures in heart failure (HF) patients and evaluation of their diagnostic potential to discriminate HF patients from healthy controls during baseline and exercise conditions. Methods Plasma samples were collected from 22 male HF patients with non?ischemic idiopathic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular systolic dysfunction and 19 healthy controls before (t0), at peak (t1) and 1?h after (t2) symptom?limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Two hundr...

  16. Information capacity and its approximations under metabolic cost in a simple homogeneous population of neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Košťál, Lubomír; Lánský, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 3 (2013), s. 265-275 ISSN 0303-2647 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GAP103/11/0282; GA ČR(CZ) GPP103/12/ P558 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : information capacity * metabolic cost * neuronal population Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2013

  17. Effects of melatonin on seedling growth, mineral nutrition, and nitrogen metabolism in cucumber under nitrate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruimin; Sun, Yunkuo; Liu, Zeyu; Jin, Wen; Sun, Yan

    2017-05-01

    In China, excessive use of nitrogen fertilizers in glasshouses leads to nitrate accumulations in soil and plants, which then limits productivity. Melatonin, an evolutionarily highly conserved molecule, has a wide range of functions in plants. We analyzed the effects of melatonin pretreatment on the growth, mineral nutrition, and nitrogen metabolism in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. "Jin You No. 1") when seedlings were exposed to nitrate stress. An application of 0.1 mmol/L melatonin significantly improved the growth of plants and reduced their susceptibility to damage due to high nitrate levels (0.6 mol/L) during the ensuing period of stress treatment. Although excess nitrate led to an increase in the concentrations of nitrogen, potassium, and calcium, as well as a decrease in levels of phosphorus and magnesium, exogenous melatonin generally had the opposite effect except for a further rise in calcium concentrations. Pretreatment also significantly reduced the accumulations of nitrate nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen and enhanced the activities of enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism. Expression of Cs-NR and Cs-GOGAT, two genes that function in that metabolism, was greatly down-regulated when plants were exposed to 0.6 mol/L nitrate, but was up-regulated in plants that had received the 0.1 mmol/L melatonin pretreatment. Our results are the first evidence that melatonin has an important role in modulating the composition of mineral elements and nitrogen metabolism, thereby alleviating the inhibitory effect on growth normally associated with nitrate stress. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita eGarcía-Calderón

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2 in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L .japonicus plants in response to stress.

  19. The Energy Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans under The Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Hui; Sun, Yongyan; Yang, Chuanjun; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2015-02-01

    A literal mountain of documentation generated in the past five decades showing unmistakable health hazards associated with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure. However, the relation between energy mechanism and ELF-EMF exposure is poorly understood. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at intensities of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mT, respectively. Their metabolite variations were analyzed by GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics. Although minimal metabolic variations and no regular pattern were observed, the contents of energy metabolism-related metabolites such as pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, and L-malic acid were elevated in all the treatments. The expressions of nineteen related genes that encode glycolytic enzymes were analyzed by using quantitative real-time PCR. Only genes encoding GAPDH were significantly upregulated (P enzyme activity of GAPDH was increased (P < 0.01), whereas the total intracellular ATP level was decreased. While no significant difference in lifespan, hatching rate and reproduction, worms exposed to ELF-EMF exhibited less food consumption compared with that of the control (P < 0.01). In conclusion, C. elegans exposed to ELF-EMF have enhanced energy metabolism and restricted dietary, which might contribute to the resistance against exogenous ELF-EMF stress.

  20. The effect of exogenous calcium on mitochondria, respiratory metabolism enzymes and ion transport in cucumber roots under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lizhong; Li, Bin; Lu, Xiaomin; Yuan, Lingyun; Yang, Yanjuan; Yuan, Yinghui; Du, Jing; Guo, Shirong

    2015-08-25

    Hypoxia induces plant stress, particularly in cucumber plants under hydroponic culture. In plants, calcium is involved in stress signal transmission and growth. The ultimate goal of this study was to shed light on the mechanisms underlying the effects of exogenous calcium on the mitochondrial antioxidant system, the activity of respiratory metabolism enzymes, and ion transport in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Jinchun No. 2) roots under hypoxic conditions. Our experiments revealed that exogenous calcium reduces the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes in mitochondria under hypoxia. Exogenous calcium also enhances the accumulation of enzymes involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. We utilized fluorescence and ultrastructural cytochemistry methods to observe that exogenous calcium increases the concentrations of Ca(2+) and K(+) in root cells by increasing the activity of plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase and tonoplast H(+)-ATPase and H(+)-PPase. Overall, our results suggest that hypoxic stress has an immediate and substantial effect on roots. Exogenous calcium improves metabolism and ion transport in cucumber roots, thereby increasing hypoxia tolerance in cucumber.

  1. Age-associated metabolic and morphologic changes in mitochondria of individual mouse and hamster oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Simsek-Duran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In human oocytes, as in other mammalian ova, there is a significant variation in the pregnancy potential, with approximately 20% of oocyte-sperm meetings resulting in pregnancies. This frequency of successful fertilization decreases as the oocytes age. This low proportion of fruitful couplings appears to be influenced by changes in mitochondrial structure and function. In this study, we have examined mitochondrial biogenesis in both hamster (Mesocricetus auratus and mouse (Mus musculus ova as models for understanding the effects of aging on mitochondrial structure and energy production within the mammalian oocyte. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Individual metaphase II oocytes from a total of 25 young and old mice and hamsters were collected from ovarian follicles after hormone stimulation and prepared for biochemical or structural analysis. Adenosine triphosphate levels and mitochondrial DNA number were determined within individual oocytes from young and old animals. In aged hamsters, oocyte adenosine triphosphate levels and mitochondrial DNA molecules were reduced 35.4% and 51.8%, respectively. Reductions of 38.4% and 44% in adenosine triphosphate and mitochondrial genomes, respectively, were also seen in aged mouse oocytes. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM analysis showed that aged rodent oocytes had significant alterations in mitochondrial and cytoplasmic lamellae structure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In both mice and hamsters, decreased adenosine triphosphate in aged oocytes is correlated with a similar decrease in mtDNA molecules and number of mitochondria. Mitochondria in mice and hamsters undergo significant morphological change with aging including mitochondrial vacuolization, cristae alterations, and changes in cytoplasmic lamellae.

  2. Metabolic flux of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway under low light conditions in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kentaro; Nakajima, Tsubasa; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Toya, Yoshihiro; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2018-02-27

    The role of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (oxPPP) in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under mixotrophic conditions was investigated by 13 C metabolic flux analysis. Cells were cultured under low (10 μmol m -2  s -1 ) and high light intensities (100 μmol m -2  s -1 ) in the presence of glucose. The flux of CO 2 fixation by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase under the high light condition was approximately 3-fold higher than that under the low light condition. Although no flux of the oxPPP was observed under the high light condition, flux of 0.08-0.19 mmol gDCW -1  h -1 in the oxPPP was observed under the low light condition. The balance between the consumption and production of NADPH suggested that approximately 10% of the total NADPH production was generated by the oxPPP under the low light condition. The growth phenotype of a mutant with deleted zwf, which encodes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the oxPPP, was compared to that of the parental strain under low and high light conditions. Growth of the Δzwf mutant nearly stopped during the late growth phase under the low light condition, whereas the growth rates of the two strains were identical under the high light condition. These results indicate that NADPH production in the oxPPP is essential for anabolism under low light conditions. The oxPPP appears to play an important role in producing NADPH from glucose and ATP to compensate for NADPH shortage under low light conditions. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolism of [3H]Gibberellin A20 by plants of Bryophyllum daigremontianum under long- and short-day conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durley, R.C.; Pharis, R.P.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1975-01-01

    [ 3 H]Gibberellin A 20 ([ 3 H]GA 20 ), a native gibberellin of this plant, was injected into mature leaves of Bryophyllum daigremontianum (Hamet et Perr.) Berg. under long- and short-day conditions. It was converted, in order of decreasing yields, to GA 29 , 3-epi-GA 1 (pseudo GA 1 ), C/D-ring-rearranged GA 20 , and two minor, unidentified metabolites. Identifications were made by gas-liquid chromatography with radioactive monitoring using three different phases. Metabolism to 3-epi-GA 1 was greater under short days, particularly in the treated leaf pair, although the absolute amount of GA 29 was greater than that of 3-epi-GA 1 under both photoperiods. The levels of radioactive metabolites in the shoots above the treated leaf pair gradually increased over a 51-day period, GA 29 reaching 5 times the content of 3-epi-GA 1 . (orig.) [de

  4. Nitrogen Metabolism in Adaptation of Photosynthesis to Water Stress in Rice Grown under Different Nitrogen Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Zhong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of nitrogen (N metabolism in the adaptation of photosynthesis to water stress in rice, a hydroponic experiment supplying with low N (0.72 mM, moderate N (2.86 mM, and high N (7.15 mM followed by 150 g⋅L-1 PEG-6000 induced water stress was conducted in a rainout shelter. Water stress induced stomatal limitation to photosynthesis at low N, but no significant effect was observed at moderate and high N. Non-photochemical quenching was higher at moderate and high N. In contrast, relative excessive energy at PSII level (EXC was declined with increasing N level. Malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 contents were in parallel with EXC. Water stress decreased catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities at low N, resulting in increased H2O2 content and severer membrane lipid peroxidation; whereas the activities of antioxidative enzymes were increased at high N. In accordance with photosynthetic rate and antioxidative enzymes, water stress decreased the activities of key enzymes involving in N metabolism such as glutamate synthase and glutamate dehydrogenase, and photorespiratory key enzyme glycolate oxidase at low N. Concurrently, water stress increased nitrate content significantly at low N, but decreased nitrate content at moderate and high N. Contrary to nitrate, water stress increased proline content at moderate and high N. Our results suggest that N metabolism appears to be associated with the tolerance of photosynthesis to water stress in rice via affecting CO2 diffusion, antioxidant capacity, and osmotic adjustment.

  5. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals new metabolic pathways of wheat seedling growth under hydrogen peroxide stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Pei; Hao, Pengchao; Cao, Min; Guo, Guangfang; Lv, Dongwen; Subburaj, Saminathan; Li, Xiaohui; Yan, Xing; Xiao, Jitian; Ma, Wujun; Yan, Yueming

    2013-10-01

    As an abundant ROS, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) plays pivotal roles in plant growth and development. In this work, we conducted for the first time an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of wheat seedling growth under different exogenous H2 O2 treatments. The growth of seedlings and roots was significantly restrained by increased H2 O2 concentration stress. Malondialdehyde, soluble sugar, and proline contents as well as peroxidase activity increased with increasing H2 O2 levels. A total of 3,425 proteins were identified by iTRAQ, of which 157 showed differential expression and 44 were newly identified H2 O2 -responsive proteins. H2 O2 -responsive proteins were mainly involved in stress/defense/detoxification, signal transduction, and carbohydrate metabolism. It is clear that up-regulated expression of signal transduction and stress/defence/detoxification-related proteins under H2 O2 stress, such as plasma membrane intrinsic protein 1, fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein, and superoxide dismutase, could contribute to H2 O2 tolerance of wheat seedlings. Increased gluconeogenesis (phosphoenol-pyruvate carboxykinase) and decreased pyruvate kinase proteins are potentially related to the higher H2 O2 tolerance of wheat seedlings. A metabolic pathway of wheat seedling growth under H2 O2 stress is presented. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Effects of grafting with pumpkin rootstock on carbohydrate metabolism in cucumber seedlings under Ca(NO3)2 stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wen-wen; Li, Lin; Gao, Pan; Li, He; Shao, Qiao-sai; Shu, Sheng; Sun, Jin; Guo, Shi-rong

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of grafting on the carbohydrate status and the enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in self-grafted and grafted cucumber seedlings using the salt-tolerant pumpkin rootstock 'Qingzhen 1' (Cucurbita maxima × Cucurbita moschata) under 80 mM Ca(NO3)2 stress for 6 d. The growth of self-grafted seedlings was significantly inhibited after the treatment of Ca(NO3)2 stress, whereas the inhibition of growth was alleviated in pumpkin rootstock-grafted seedlings. Ca(NO3)2 stress increased the contents of the total soluble sugar, sucrose and fructose, but decreased the starch content in rootstock-grafted leaves. However, compared with self-grafted plants, rootstock-grafted seedlings were observed with a higher content of sucrose and total soluble sugar (TSS) under salt stress. Rootstock-grafted seedlings exhibited higher activities of acid invertase (AI), neutral invertase (NI) and phosphate sucrose synthase (SPS) of sucrose metabolism in leaves than that of self-grafted seedlings under salinity. Moreover, the activities of fructokinase (FK), hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase (PFK) and pyruvate kinase (PK) of glycolysis were maintained at a higher level in leaves of rootstock-grafted seedlings after Ca(NO3)2 stress. Additionally, rootstock-grafting decrease the high percentage enhancement of key enzymes gene expression in glycolysis in the scion leaves of cucumber seedlings induced by salt stress. These results suggest that the rootstock-grafting improved salt tolerance, which might play a role in elevated sucrose metabolism and a glycolytic pathway regulated by the pumpkin rootstock. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of growth regulators on 'Brookfield' apple gas diffusion and metabolism under controlled atmosphere storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auri Brackmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of growth regulators on gas diffusion and on metabolism of 'Brookfield' apple, and to determine their correlation with quality characteristics of fruit stored in controlled atmosphere. A completely randomized design was used with four replicates. After eight months of storage, the effects of water (control, aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, AVG + ethephon, AVG + naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA, ethephon + NAA, sole NAA, 1-MCP, ethylene absorption by potassium permanganate (ABS, AVG + ABS, and of AVG + 1-MCP - applied at different rates and periods - were evaluated on: gas diffusion rate, ethylene production, respiratory rate, internal ethylene concentration, internal CO2 content, mealiness, and intercellular space. Fruit from the control and sole NAA treatments had the highest mealiness occurrence. Growth regulators significantly changed the gaseous diffusion through the pulp of 'Brookfield' apple, mainly in the treatment AVG + ABS, which kept the highest gas diffusion rate. NAA spraying in the field, with or without another growth regulator, increased ripening metabolism by rising ethylene production and respiration rate, and reduced gas diffusion during shelf life. AVG spraying cannot avoid the ethephon effect during the ripening process, and reduces both the internal space and mealiness incidence, but it is not able to induce ethylene production or to increase respiration rates.

  8. Studies of the transition cow under a pasture-based milk production system: metabolic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavestany, D; Blanc, J E; Kulcsar, M; Uriarte, G; Chilibroste, P; Meikle, A; Febel, H; Ferraris, A; Krall, E

    2005-02-01

    This study describes the effect of parity (multiparous versus primiparous) and body condition score (BCS) at calving ( or =3; scale 1-5) on variations of BCS, body weight (BW) and metabolic profiles in Holstein cows grazing on improved pastures. Forty-two cows were studied (21 multiparous and 21 primiparous) from 2 months before to 3 months after calving. BCS, BW and milk production were measured every 2 weeks. Blood samples were taken every 2 weeks to determine total protein, albumin, urea, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. Primiparous cows had lower BCS during the early postpartum (PP) period and produced less milk than multiparous. In primiparous cows NEFA concentrations were higher during the early postpartum period; BHB levels were similar in both categories during this period. Primiparous cows showed a more unbalanced metabolic profile than multiparous cows, reflecting that they are recovering from the loss of BCS after calving with less success.

  9. Disturbances in carbohydrate metabolism in radiation sickness and its repair under the effect of therapeutic preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dokshina, G.A.; Silaeva, T.Yu.; Yartsev, E.I.; Yakovlev, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of taurin (200mg/kg) in combination with insulin (0.2 IU/kg) on the repair of hormonal activity and of carbohydrate metabolism in an experimentally released radiation sickness was examined. White rats of both sexes weighting 180-200 g were irradiated with a gamma-unit GUM-Co-50 with 700 rad, that corresponds to LDsub(70/30). The preparations were simultaneously administered intraperitoneally every other day altogether 8 times from the 5th day after irradiation. Survival rate in the groups of treated animals was by about 27% higher than in the control. With the administration of therapeutic preparations a repair of the insulin-like plasma activity to the normal levels and a considerable inhibition of liver phosphorylase activity could be observed. Different from insulin action alone a combined use of insulin and taurin led to decrease in blood level of 11-oxycorticosteroids the metabolism of which being essentially impaired by irradiation to the normal value. The restoration of correlation between hormonal activity of adrenal cortex and of the insular apparatus favoured glycogen reproduction in the liver and the decrease in blood-sugar level. Experiments with intact animals as well as in vitro experiments reveal that taurin acts insulin-like

  10. Elucidating the global elapid (Squamata) richness pattern under metabolic theory of ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Rosana Talita; Oliveira de Grande, Thallita; de Souza Barreto, Bruno; Felizola Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre; Terribile, Levi Carina

    2014-04-01

    Environmental determinants of global patterns in species richness are still uncertain. The Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE) proposes that species richness patterns can be explained by environmental temperature acting on the metabolism of ectothermic organisms. However, the generality of this theory has been questioned due to its low fit to the geographic variation in species richness of different taxonomic groups. Here, we investigated whether the MTE drives elapid richness, testing the non-stationarity of the relationship between the natural logarithm of species richness (ln S) and the inverse function of temperature (1/kT) using a geographically weighted regression (GWR). The relationship between ln S and 1/kT varied systematically over space and showed non-stationarity. Few tropical locations were consistent with MTE predictions, whereas other regions fitted differently. Although the slope of the GWR model ranged from low to high, the temperature did not predict species richness strongly on average and did not limit the upper values of richness. The response of richness to temperature in some areas might reflect a recent history of colonization and diversification of species across tropical and subtropical regions. In regions not affected by temperature, species richness should be structured by other biotic and abiotic interactions. This scenario reveals that the non-stationarity of the relationship would be linked to idiosyncrasies in the sample sites, which can drift the magnitude or change the relationship between species richness and temperature throughout space.

  11. Effect of Exogenous Proline on Metabolic Response of Tetragenococcus halophilus under Salt Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guiqiang; Wu, Chongde; Hunag, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2017-09-28

    This study investigated the effect of proline addition on the salt tolerance of Tetragenococcus halophilus . Salt stress led to the accumulation of intracellular proline in T. halophilus . When 0.5 g/l proline was added to hyperhaline medium, the biomass increased 34.6% (12% NaCl) and 27.7% (18% NaCl) compared with the control (without proline addition), respectively. A metabolomic approach was employed to reveal the cellular metabolic responses and protective mechanisms of proline upon salt stress. The results showed that both the cellular membrane fatty acid composition and metabolite profiling responded by increasing unsaturated and cyclopropane fatty acid proportions, as well as accumulating some specific intracellular metabolites (environmental stress protector). Higher contents of intermediates involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the pentose phosphate pathway were observed in the cells supplemented with proline. In addition, addition of proline resulted in increased concentrations of many organic osmolytes, including glutamate, alanine, citrulline, N-acetyl-tryptophan, and mannitol, which may be beneficial for osmotic homeostasis. Taken together, results in this study suggested that proline plays a protective role in improving the salt tolerance of T. halophilus by regulating the related metabolic pathways.

  12. Maternal and fetal lipid metabolism under normal and gestational diabetic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Emilio; Desoye, Gernot

    2016-05-01

    Maternal lipids are strong determinants of fetal fat mass. Here we review the overall lipid metabolism in normal and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) pregnancies. During early pregnancy, the increase in maternal fat depots is facilitated by insulin, followed by increased adipose tissue breakdown and subsequent hypertriglyceridemia, mainly as a result of insulin resistance (IR) and estrogen effects. The response to diabetes is variable as a result of greater IR but decreased estrogen levels. The vast majority of fatty acids (FAs) in the maternal circulation are esterified and associated with lipoproteins. These are taken up by the placenta and hydrolyzed by lipases. The released FAs enter various metabolic routes and are released into fetal circulation. Although these determinants are modified in maternal GDM, the fetus does not seem to receive more FAs than in non-GDM pregnancies. Long-chain polyunsaturated FAs are essential for fetal development and are obtained from the mother. Mitochondrial FA oxidation occurs in fetal tissue and in placenta and contributes to energy production. Fetal fat accretion during the last weeks of gestation occurs very rapidly and is sustained not only by FAs crossing the placenta, but also by fetal lipogenesis. Fetal hyperinsulinemia in GDM mothers promotes excess accretion of adipose tissue, which gives rise to altered adipocytokine profiles. Fetal lipoproteins are low at birth, but the GDM effects are unclear. The increase in body fat in neonates of GDM women is a risk factor for obesity in early childhood and later life.

  13. Relationship between human respiratory reactivity and neutrophil metabolism under intermittent hypoxic influences in humans exposed to low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serebrovskaya, T.V.; Oberenko, O.A.; Guseva, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    The group of 18 men exposed to radiation during amelioration work in the Chernobyl NPP was examined in the course of adaptation to intermittent hypoxia (rebreathing technique during 10 days of three dayly 5-7 min sessions with 15 min break). The starting level of ventilatory response to hypoxic stimulus (HVR) did not differ from the one in persons living in non-contaminated areas. This hypoxic training (HT) caused the increase of HVR, activity of NADPH-oxidase and cationic protein content in neutrophyls as well as various changes in mieloperoxidase activity. The correlation between respiration reactivity and deviations in neutrophil metabolism under HT was found. 14 refs., 2 figs

  14. Loss of variation of state detected in soybean metabolic and human myelomonocytic leukaemia cell transcriptional networks under external stimuli

    KAUST Repository

    Sakata, Katsumi

    2016-10-24

    Soybean (Glycine max) is sensitive to flooding stress, and flood damage at the seedling stage is a barrier to growth. We constructed two mathematical models of the soybean metabolic network, a control model and a flooded model, from metabolic profiles in soybean plants. We simulated the metabolic profiles with perturbations before and after the flooding stimulus using the two models. We measured the variation of state that the system could maintain from a state–space description of the simulated profiles. The results showed a loss of variation of state during the flooding response in the soybean plants. Loss of variation of state was also observed in a human myelomonocytic leukaemia cell transcriptional network in response to a phorbol-ester stimulus. Thus, we detected a loss of variation of state under external stimuli in two biological systems, regardless of the regulation and stimulus types. Our results suggest that a loss of robustness may occur concurrently with the loss of variation of state in biological systems. We describe the possible applications of the quantity of variation of state in plant genetic engineering and cell biology. Finally, we present a hypothetical “external stimulus-induced information loss” model of biological systems.

  15. The key to acetate: metabolic fluxes of acetic acid bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Philipp; Frey, Lasse Jannis; Berger, Antje; Bolten, Christoph Josef; Hansen, Carl Erik; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-08-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role during cocoa fermentation, as their main product, acetate, is a major driver for the development of the desired cocoa flavors. Here, we investigated the specialized metabolism of these bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions. A carefully designed combination of parallel 13C isotope labeling experiments allowed the elucidation of intracellular fluxes in the complex environment of cocoa pulp, when lactate and ethanol were included as primary substrates among undefined ingredients. We demonstrate that AAB exhibit a functionally separated metabolism during coconsumption of two-carbon and three-carbon substrates. Acetate is almost exclusively derived from ethanol, while lactate serves for the formation of acetoin and biomass building blocks. Although this is suboptimal for cellular energetics, this allows maximized growth and conversion rates. The functional separation results from a lack of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzymes, typically present in bacteria to interconnect metabolism. In fact, gluconeogenesis is driven by pyruvate phosphate dikinase. Consequently, a balanced ratio of lactate and ethanol is important for the optimum performance of AAB. As lactate and ethanol are individually supplied by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the initial phase of cocoa fermentation, respectively, this underlines the importance of a well-balanced microbial consortium for a successful fermentation process. Indeed, AAB performed the best and produced the largest amounts of acetate in mixed culture experiments when lactic acid bacteria and yeasts were both present.

  16. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance: underlying causes and modification by exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christian K; Hevener, Andrea L; Barnard, R James

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a collection of cardiometabolic risk factors that includes obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Although there has been significant debate regarding the criteria and concept of the syndrome, this clustering of risk factors is unequivocally linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Regardless of the true definition, based on current population estimates, nearly 100 million have MS. It is often characterized by insulin resistance, which some have suggested is a major underpinning link between physical inactivity and MS. The purpose of this review is to: (i) provide an overview of the history, causes and clinical aspects of MS, (ii) review the molecular mechanisms of insulin action and the causes of insulin resistance, and (iii) discuss the epidemiological and intervention data on the effects of exercise on MS and insulin sensitivity.

  17. Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance: Underlying Causes and Modification by Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christian K.; Hevener, Andrea L.; Barnard, R. James

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a collection of cardiometabolic risk factors that includes obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Although there has been significant debate regarding the criteria and concept of the syndrome, this clustering of risk factors is unequivocally linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Regardless of the true definition, based on current population estimates, nearly 100 million have MS. It is often characterized by insulin resistance, which some have suggested is a major underpinning link between physical inactivity and MS. The purpose of this review is to: (i) provide an overview of the history, causes and clinical aspects of MS, (ii) review the molecular mechanisms of insulin action and the causes of insulin resistance, and (iii) discuss the epidemiological and intervention data on the effects of exercise on MS and insulin sensitivity. PMID:23720280

  18. Metabolic and behavioral effects of ractopamine at continuous low levels in rats under stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Lopes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the effect of ractopamine (RAC on metabolism, zootechnical performance, body composition, and behavior in Wistar rats submitted to acute and chronic restrain stress. The oral dose of 5 mg/kg of RAC was administered in periods of 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. The elevated plus-maze test (EPMT was used for behavioral assessment. Blood, carcass and viscera characteristics were evaluated. Insulin-dependent glucose transporters (GLUT-4 were semi-quantified by Western Blot in epididymal adipocytes. RAC periods associated with chronic stress increased the GLUT-4 protein expression in adipose tissue in a time-dependent manner (P=0.01, i.e., the longer the RAC addition period, the higher the GLUT-4 concentration in chronically stressed animals (0=1.42; 7=1.19; 14=2.03; 21=1.59; 28=2.35. The stress periods combined with RAC increased the time spent in the opened arms of the maze (Chronic stress: 0=10.6; 7=8.7; 14=5.9; 21=12.3; 28=4.0; Acute stress 0=3.1; 7= 4.7; 14=7.5; 21=0.0; 28=2.8 (P=0.04. Chronic (entries on the closed arms [ECA]=3.60 and acute (ECA=3.80 stress reduced locomotive activity in the maze (P=0.03. The results suggested that stress could negatively affect the possible benefits offered by the RAC, mainly impairing the adipose tissue metabolism and behavior in the animals.

  19. Metabolic and Regulatory Rearrangements Underlying Efficient d-Xylose Utilization in Engineered Pseudomonas putida S12*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijnen, Jean-Paul; de Winde, Johannes H.; Ruijssenaars, Harald J.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, an efficient d-xylose utilizing Pseudomonas putida S12 strain was obtained by introducing the d-xylose isomerase pathway from Escherichia coli, followed by evolutionary selection. In the present study, systemic changes associated with the evolved phenotype were identified by transcriptomics, enzyme activity analysis, and inverse engineering. A key element in improving the initially poor d-xylose utilization was the redistribution of 6-phospho-d-gluconate (6-PG) between the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and the oxidative pentose phosphate (PP) pathway. This redistribution increased the availability of 6-PG for oxidative decarboxylation to d-ribose-5-phosphate, which is essential for the utilization of d-xylose via the nonoxidative PP pathway. The metabolic redistribution of 6-PG was procured by modified HexR regulation, which in addition appeared to control periplasmic sugar oxidation. Because the absence of periplasmic d-xylonate formation was previously demonstrated to be essential for achieving a high biomass yield on d-xylose, the aberrant HexR control appeared to underlie both the improved growth rate and biomass yield of the evolved d-xylose utilizing P. putida strain. The increased oxidative PP pathway activity furthermore resulted in an elevated NADH/NAD+ ratio that caused the metabolic flux to be redirected from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate shunt, which was also activated transcriptionally. Clearly, these findings may serve as an important case in point to engineer and improve the utilization of non-natural carbon sources in a wide range of industrial microorganisms. PMID:22416130

  20. A gut microbiota-targeted dietary intervention for amelioration of chronic inflammation underlying metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuiming; Fei, Na; Pang, Xiaoyan; Shen, Jian; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Baorang; Zhang, Menghui; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Chenhong; Li, Min; Sun, Lifeng; Xue, Zhengsheng; Wang, Jingjing; Feng, Jie; Yan, Feiyan; Zhao, Naisi; Liu, Jiaqi; Long, Wenmin; Zhao, Liping

    2014-02-01

    Chronic inflammation induced by endotoxin from a dysbiotic gut microbiota contributes to the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders. Modification of gut microbiota by a diet to balance its composition becomes a promising strategy to help manage obesity. A dietary scheme based on whole grains, traditional Chinese medicinal foods, and prebiotics (WTP diet) was designed to meet human nutritional needs as well as balance the gut microbiota. Ninety-three of 123 central obese volunteers (BMI ≥ 28 kg m(-2) ) completed a self-controlled clinical trial consisting of 9-week intervention on WTP diet followed by a 14-week maintenance period. The average weight loss reached 5.79 ± 4.64 kg (6.62 ± 4.94%), in addition to improvement in insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and blood pressure. Pyrosequencing of fecal samples showed that phylotypes related to endotoxin-producing opportunistic pathogens of Enterobacteriaceae and Desulfovibrionaceae were reduced significantly, while those related to gut barrier-protecting bacteria of Bifidobacteriaceae increased. Gut permeability, measured as lactulose/mannitol ratio, was decreased compared with the baseline. Plasma endotoxin load as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein was also significantly reduced, with concomitant decrease in tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and an increase in adiponectin. These results suggest that modulation of the gut microbiota via dietary intervention may enhance the intestinal barrier integrity, reduce circulating antigen load, and ultimately ameliorate the inflammation and metabolic phenotypes. © 2013 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology pubished by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  1. Hepatically-metabolized and -excreted artificial oxygen carrier, hemoglobin vesicles, can be safely used under conditions of hepatic impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Kazuaki; Miyasato, Mayumi; Ujihira, Hayato; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kadowaki, Daisuke; Sakai, Hiromi; Tsuchida, Eishun; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Koichi; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    The hemoglobin vesicle (HbV) is an artificial oxygen carrier in which a concentrated Hb solution is encapsulated in lipid vesicles. Our previous studies demonstrated that HbV is metabolized by the mononuclear phagocyte system, and the lipid components are excreted from the liver. It is well-known that many hepatically-metabolized and -excreted drugs show altered pharmaceutics under conditions of liver impairment, which results in adverse effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether the administration of HbV causes toxicity in rats with carbon tetrachloride induced liver cirrhosis. Changes in plasma biochemical parameters, histological staining and the pharmacokinetic distribution of HbV were evaluated after an HbV injection of the above model rats at a putative clinical dose (1400 mgHb/kg). Plasma biochemical parameters were not significantly affected, except for a transient elevation of lipase, lipid components and bilirubin, which recovered within 14 days after an HbV infusion. Negligible morphological changes were observed in the kidney, liver, spleen, lung and heart. Hemosiderin, a marker of iron accumulation in organs, was observed in the liver and spleen up to 14 days after HbV treatment, but no evidence of oxidative stress in the plasma and liver were observed. HbV is mainly distributed in the liver and spleen, and the lipid components are excreted into feces within 7 days. In conclusion, even under conditions of hepatic cirrhosis, HbV and its components exhibit the favorable metabolic and excretion profile at the putative clinical dose. These findings provide further support for the safety and effectiveness of HbV in clinical settings.

  2. Estimation of metabolic heat production and methane emission in Sahiwal and Karan Fries heifers under different feeding regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was designed to estimate the metabolic heat production and methane emission in Sahiwal and Karan Fries (Holstein-Friesian X Tharparkar heifers under two different feeding regimes, i.e., feeding regime-1 as per the National Research Council (NRC (2001 and feeding regime-2 having 15% higher energy (supplementation of molasses than NRC (2001. Materials and Methods: Six (n = 6 healthy heifers of Sahiwal and Karan Fries with 18-24 months of age were selected from Indian Council of Agricultural Research-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal. An initial 15 days was maintained under feeding regime-1 and feeding regime-2 as adaptation period; actual experiment was conducted from 16th day onward for next 15 days. At the end of feeding regimes (on day 15th and 16th, expired air and volume were collected in Douglas bag for two consecutive days (morning [6:00 am] and evening [4:00 pm]. The fraction of methane and expired air volume were measured by methane analyzer and wet test meter, respectively. The oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured by iWorx LabScribe2. Results: The heat production (kcal/day was significantly (p0.05. The energy loss as methane (% from total heat production was significantly (p<0.05 higher in feeding regime-1. The body weight (kg, metabolic body weight (W0.75, and basal metabolic rate (kcal/kg0.75 were significantly (p<0.05 higher in feeding regime-2 in both breeds. Conclusions: This study indicates that higher energy diet by supplementing molasses may reduce energy loss as methane and enhance the growth of Sahiwal and Karan Fries heifers.

  3. Acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 promotes acetate utilization and maintains cancer cell growth under metabolic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Zachary T; Peck, Barrie; Jones, Dylan T; Zhang, Qifeng; Grosskurth, Shaun; Alam, Israt S; Goodwin, Louise M; Smethurst, Elizabeth; Mason, Susan; Blyth, Karen; McGarry, Lynn; James, Daniel; Shanks, Emma; Kalna, Gabriela; Saunders, Rebecca E; Jiang, Ming; Howell, Michael; Lassailly, Francois; Thin, May Zaw; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Stamp, Gordon; van den Broek, Niels J F; Mackay, Gillian; Bulusu, Vinay; Kamphorst, Jurre J; Tardito, Saverio; Strachan, David; Harris, Adrian L; Aboagye, Eric O; Critchlow, Susan E; Wakelam, Michael J O; Schulze, Almut; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-12

    A functional genomics study revealed that the activity of acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (ACSS2) contributes to cancer cell growth under low-oxygen and lipid-depleted conditions. Comparative metabolomics and lipidomics demonstrated that acetate is used as a nutritional source by cancer cells in an ACSS2-dependent manner, and supplied a significant fraction of the carbon within the fatty acid and phospholipid pools. ACSS2 expression is upregulated under metabolically stressed conditions and ACSS2 silencing reduced the growth of tumor xenografts. ACSS2 exhibits copy-number gain in human breast tumors, and ACSS2 expression correlates with disease progression. These results signify a critical role for acetate consumption in the production of lipid biomass within the harsh tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Proteome-wide analysis reveals an age-associated cellular phenotype of in situ aged human fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Kalfalah, Faiza; Florea, Ana-Maria; Sass, Steffen; Kruse, Fabian; Rieder, Vera; Tigges, Julia; Fritsche, Ellen; Krutmann, Jean; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Meyer, Helmut E.; Boege, Fritz; Theis, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed an ex vivo model of in situ aged human dermal fibroblasts, obtained from 15 adult healthy donors from three different age groups using an unbiased quantitative proteome-wide approach applying label-free mass spectrometry. Thereby, we identified 2409 proteins, including 43 proteins with an age-associated abundance change. Most of the differentially abundant proteins have not been described in the context of fibroblasts’ aging before, but the deduced biological processes confirmed known hallmarks of aging and led to a consistent picture of eight biological categories involved in fibroblast aging, namely proteostasis, cell cycle and proliferation, development and differentiation, cell death, cell organization and cytoskeleton, response to stress, cell communication and signal transduction, as well as RNA metabolism and translation. The exhaustive analysis of protein and mRNA data revealed that 77% of the age-associated proteins were not linked to expression changes of the corresponding transcripts. This is in line with an associated miRNA study and led us to the conclusion that most of the age-associated alterations detected at the proteome level are likely caused post-transcriptionally rather than by differential gene expression. In summary, our findings led to the characterization of novel proteins potentially associated with fibroblast aging and revealed that primary cultures of in situ aged fibroblasts are characterized by moderate age-related proteomic changes comprising the multifactorial process of aging. PMID:25411231

  5. Effect of physical training on metabolic responses of pregnant rats submitted to swimming under thermal stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Alexis Lazo-Osorio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to assess the effect of pre-pregnancy physical training on metabolic responses and its effects on offspring.
    • METHODS: Three groups of rats (n = 7 in each group: sedentary pregnant rats (PS, exercised during  regnancy (PE and pregnant rats trained before and during pregnancy (PT were compared. They were separated  nto three subgroups regarding water temperature: 28°C, 35°C or 39°C. Plasma triglycerides and glucose levels,  eight gain during pregnancy and rectal temperature pre and post exercise (swim, as well as the offspring size and weight were analysed.
    • RESULTS: Rectal temperature post exercise was lower than pre exercise at 28°C and 35°C, and higher at 39°C.  eight gain was lower at 39°C for the PT group and at 35°C for the PT and PE groups compared to the PS group. Plasma glucose, at 28°C and 39°C for PS and PE groups, was higher than those obtained at 35°C, while triglycerides  ere lower. For trained rats, plasma glucose and triglycerides were similar at all water temperatures.  rained rats presented lower triglyceride values at 35°C, and higher triglyceride values at 39°C compared to PS  roup. Glucose presented inverse results. None of the groups presented fetal reabsorption. However, in the PS group, the offspring presented lower weight gain at 28

    • Exploring the Metabolic and Perceptual Correlates of Self-Selected Walking Speed under Constrained and Un-Constrained Conditions

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      David T Godsiff, Shelly Coe, Charlotte Elsworth-Edelsten, Johnny Collett, Ken Howells, Martyn Morris, Helen Dawes

      2018-03-01

      Full Text Available Mechanisms underpinning self-selected walking speed (SSWS are poorly understood. The present study investigated the extent to which SSWS is related to metabolism, energy cost, and/or perceptual parameters during both normal and artificially constrained walking. Fourteen participants with no pathology affecting gait were tested under standard conditions. Subjects walked on a motorized treadmill at speeds derived from their SSWS as a continuous protocol. RPE scores (CR10 and expired air to calculate energy cost (J.kg-1.m-1 and carbohydrate (CHO oxidation rate (J.kg-1.min-1 were collected during minutes 3-4 at each speed. Eight individuals were re-tested under the same conditions within one week with a hip and knee-brace to immobilize their right leg. Deflection in RPE scores (CR10 and CHO oxidation rate (J.kg-1.min-1 were not related to SSWS (five and three people had deflections in the defined range of SSWS in constrained and unconstrained conditions, respectively (p > 0.05. Constrained walking elicited a higher energy cost (J.kg-1.m-1 and slower SSWS (p 0.05. SSWS did not occur at a minimum energy cost (J.kg-1.m-1 in either condition, however, the size of the minimum energy cost to SSWS disparity was the same (Froude {Fr} = 0.09 in both conditions (p = 0.36. Perceptions of exertion can modify walking patterns and therefore SSWS and metabolism/ energy cost are not directly related. Strategies which minimize perceived exertion may enable faster walking in people with altered gait as our findings indicate they should self-optimize to the same extent under different conditions.

    • Features of selenium metabolism in humans living under the conditions of North European Russia.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Parshukova, Olga; Potolitsyna, Natalya; Shadrina, Vera; Chernykh, Aleksei; Bojko, Evgeny

      2014-08-01

      Selenium supplementation and its effects on Northerners have been little studied. The aim of our study was to assess the selenium levels of the inhabitants of North European Russia, the seasonal aspects of selenium supplementation, and the interrelationships between selenium levels and the levels of thyroid gland hormones. To study the particular features of selenium metabolism in Northerners over the course of 1 year, 19 healthy male Caucasian volunteers (18-21 years old) were recruited for the present study. The subjects were military guards in a Northern European region of Russia (Syktyvkar, Russia, 62°N latitude) who spent 6-10-h outdoors daily. The study was conducted over a 12-month period. Selenium levels, glutathione peroxidase (GP) activity, as well as total triiodothyronine (T3), total thyroxin (T4), free thyroxin, free triiodothyronine, and thyrotropin (TSH) levels, were determined in the blood serum. The study subjects showed low levels of plasma selenium throughout the year. We observed a noticeable decrease in plasma selenium levels during the period from May to August, with the lowest levels in July. Selenium levels in the military guards correlated with the levels of selenium-dependent GP enzyme activity throughout the year. Additionally, we demonstrated a significant correlation between selenium and pituitary-thyroid axis hormones (total T3, free T4, and TSH) in periods in which plasma selenium levels were lower than the established normal ranges. Over the course of 1 year, low levels of plasma selenium affect GP activity and thyroid hormone levels in humans living in North European Russia.

    • β-Hydroxybutyrate Boosts Mitochondrial and Neuronal Metabolism but is not Preferred Over Glucose Under Activated Conditions.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Achanta, Lavanya B; Rowlands, Benjamin D; Thomas, Donald S; Housley, Gary D; Rae, Caroline D

      2017-06-01

      The ketone body, β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB), is metabolised by the brain alongside the mandatory brain fuel glucose. To examine the extent and circumstances by which βOHB can supplement glucose metabolism, we studied guinea pig cortical brain slices using increasing concentrations of [U- 13 C]D-βOHB in conjunction with [1- 13 C]D-glucose under conditions of normo- and hypoglycaemia, as well as under high potassium (40 mmol/L K + ) depolarization in normo- and hypoglycaemic conditions. The contribution of βOHB to synthesis of GABA was also probed by inhibiting the synthesis of glutamine, a GABA precursor, with methionine sulfoximine (MSO). [U- 13 C]D-βOHB at lower concentrations (0.25 and 1.25 mmol/L) stimulated mitochondrial metabolism, producing greater total incorporation of label into glutamate and GABA but did not have a similar effect in the cytosolic compartment where labelling of glutamine was reduced at 1.25 mmol/L [U- 13 C]D-βOHB. At higher concentrations (2.5 mmol/L) [U- 13 C]D-βOHB inhibited metabolism of [1- 13 C]D-glucose, and reduced total label incorporation and total metabolite pools. When glucose levels were reduced, βOHB was able to partially restore the loss of glutamate and GABA caused by hypoglycaemia, but was not able to supplement levels of lactate, glutamine or alanine or to prevent the increase in aspartate. Under depolarizing conditions glucose was the preferred substrate over βOHB, even in hypoglycaemic conditions where comparatively less βOHB was incorporated except into aspartate isotopomers. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis with MSO had no significant effect on incorporation of label from [U- 13 C]D-βOHB into GABA C2,1 indicating that the majority of this GABA was synthesized in GABAergic neurons from [U- 13 C]D-βOHB rather than from Gln C4,5 imported from astrocytes.

    • Comparative ionomics and metabolomics in extremophile and glycophytic Lotus species under salt stress challenge the metabolic pre-adaptation hypothesis.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sanchez, Diego H; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Escaray, Francisco; Erban, Alexander; Kraemer, Ute; Udvardi, Michael K; Kopka, Joachim

      2011-04-01

      The legume genus Lotus includes glycophytic forage crops and other species adapted to extreme environments, such as saline soils. Understanding salt tolerance mechanisms will contribute to the discovery of new traits which may enhance the breeding efforts towards improved performance of legumes in marginal agricultural environments. Here, we used a combination of ionomic and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolite profilings of complete shoots (pooling leaves, petioles and stems) to compare the extremophile Lotus creticus, adapted to highly saline coastal regions, and two cultivated glycophytic grassland forage species, Lotus corniculatus and Lotus tenuis. L. creticus exhibited better survival after exposure to long-term lethal salinity and was more efficient at excluding Cl⁻ from the shoots than the glycophytes. In contrast, Na+ levels were higher in the extremophile under both control and salt stress, a trait often observed in halophytes. Ionomics demonstrated a differential rearrangement of shoot nutrient levels in the extremophile upon salt exposure. Metabolite profiling showed that responses to NaCl in L. creticus shoots were globally similar to those of the glycophytes, providing little evidence for metabolic pre-adaptation to salinity. This study is the first comparing salt acclimation responses between extremophile and non-extremophile legumes, and challenges the generalization of the metabolic salt pre-adaptation hypothesis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

    • Effect of moderate intakes of different tea catechins and caffeine on acute measures of energy metabolism under sedentary conditions

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Gregersen, N.T.; Bitz, C.; Krog-Mikkelsen, I.

      2009-01-01

      Green tea may stimulate energy metabolism; however, it is unclear if acute effects are caused by specific catechins, caffeine or their combination. The objective of the present study was to examine the separate and combined effects of different catechins and caffeine on energy expenditure (EE......) and fat oxidation over a single day. Fifteen healthy, normal-weight males received capsules containing placebo, caffeine alone (150mg), or caffeine plus a catechin mixture (600 mg) enriched in either epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), epigallocatechin or a mix of catechins, in a randomised cross......-over double-blinded design. On each test day EE, respiratory quotient (RQ) and substrate oxidation were measured under sedentary conditions in a respiratory chamber for 13.5h. We found no significant treatment effect on EE (P=0.20) or RQ (P=0.68). EGCG with caffeine insignificantly raised EE and fat oxidation...

    • Photosynthetic and enzymatic metabolism of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi seedlings under water deficit

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Danieli Pieretti Nunes

      Full Text Available ABSTRACT Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi is a tree species that can be used in the recovery of degraded areas, as it exhibits rapid growth and has a very expansive root system, facilitating water uptake from the deeper layers of the soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate photosynthesis and enzymatic activity in S. terebinthifolius seedlings under conditions of water deficit and their potential to recover following re-irrigation. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse under a plastic covering where plants were distributed into two groups: Group 1 - control plants, where irrigation was maintained at 70% of the water retention capacity, and Group 2 - stressed plants, where irrigation was suspended until the photosynthetic rate neared zero, followed by rehydration for 12 days, then a further suspension of irrigation. At the beginning of the experiment and during the suspension of irrigation and rehydration, plants were evaluated for gas and antioxidant enzyme exchanges. Hydric stress significantly reduced photosynthesis, stomatal transpiration conductance, carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco, and the chlorophyll content of the S. terebinthifolius plants. Following rehydration, plants recovered the carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco, but not the photosynthetic rate. Antioxidant enzyme activity increased in both the aerial part and the root in response to water deficit.

    • Tudor Staphylococcal Nuclease plays two antagonistic roles in RNA metabolism under stress.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gutiérrez-Beltran, Emilio; Bozhkov, Peter V; Moschou, Panagiotis N

      2015-01-01

      Adaptation to stress entails a repertoire of molecular pathways that remodel the proteome, thereby promoting selective translation of pro-survival proteins. Yet, translation of other proteins, especially those which are harmful for stress adaptation is, on the contrary, transiently suppressed through mRNA decay or storage. Proteome remodeling under stress is intimately associated with the cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes called stress granules (SGs) and processing bodies (PBs). The molecular composition and regulation of SGs and PBs in plants remain largely unknown. Recently, we identified the Arabidopsis Tudor Staphylococcal Nuclease (TSN, Tudor-SN or SND1) as a SG- and PB-associated protein required for mRNA decapping under stress conditions. Here we show that SGs localize in close proximity to PBs within plant cells that enable the exchange of molecular components. Furthermore, we provide a meta-analysis of mRNA degradome of TSN-deficient plants suggesting that TSN might inhibit the degradation of mRNAs which are involved in stress adaptation. Our results establish TSN as a versatile mRNA regulator during stress.

    • Overexpression of Genes Encoding Glycolytic Enzymes in Corynebacterium glutamicum Enhances Glucose Metabolism and Alanine Production under Oxygen Deprivation Conditions

      Science.gov (United States)

      Yamamoto, Shogo; Gunji, Wataru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Toda, Hiroshi; Suda, Masako; Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki

      2012-01-01

      We previously reported that Corynebacterium glutamicum strain ΔldhAΔppc+alaD+gapA, overexpressing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding gapA, shows significantly improved glucose consumption and alanine formation under oxygen deprivation conditions (T. Jojima, M. Fujii, E. Mori, M. Inui, and H. Yukawa, Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 87:159–165, 2010). In this study, we employ stepwise overexpression and chromosomal integration of a total of four genes encoding glycolytic enzymes (herein referred to as glycolytic genes) to demonstrate further successive improvements in C. glutamicum glucose metabolism under oxygen deprivation. In addition to gapA, overexpressing pyruvate kinase-encoding pyk and phosphofructokinase-encoding pfk enabled strain GLY2/pCRD500 to realize respective 13% and 20% improved rates of glucose consumption and alanine formation compared to GLY1/pCRD500. Subsequent overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-encoding gpi in strain GLY3/pCRD500 further improved its glucose metabolism. Notably, both alanine productivity and yield increased after each overexpression step. After 48 h of incubation, GLY3/pCRD500 produced 2,430 mM alanine at a yield of 91.8%. This was 6.4-fold higher productivity than that of the wild-type strain. Intracellular metabolite analysis showed that gapA overexpression led to a decreased concentration of metabolites upstream of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, suggesting that the overexpression resolved a bottleneck in glycolysis. Changing ratios of the extracellular metabolites by overexpression of glycolytic genes resulted in reduction of the intracellular NADH/NAD+ ratio, which also plays an important role on the improvement of glucose consumption. Enhanced alanine dehydrogenase activity using a high-copy-number plasmid further accelerated the overall alanine productivity. Increase in glycolytic enzyme activities is a promising approach to make drastic progress in growth-arrested bioprocesses. PMID

    • Standard metabolic rate predicts growth trajectory of juvenile Chinese crucian carp (Carassius auratus under changing food availability

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Ling-Qing Zeng

      2017-09-01

      Full Text Available Phenotypic traits vary greatly within populations and can have a significant influence on aspects of performance. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of individual variation in standard metabolic rate (SMR on growth rate and tolerance to food deprivation in juvenile Chinese crucian carp (Carassius auratus under varying levels of food availability. To address this issue, 19 high and 16 low SMR individuals were randomly assigned to a satiation diet for 3 weeks, whereas another 20 high and 16 low SMR individuals were assigned to a restricted diet (approximately 50% of satiation for the same period. Then, all fish were completely food-deprived for another 3 weeks. High SMR individuals showed a higher growth rate when fed to satiation, but this advantage of SMR did not exist in food-restricted fish. This result was related to improved feeding efficiency with decreased food intake in low SMR individuals, due to their low food processing capacity and maintenance costs. High SMR individuals experienced more mass loss during food deprivation as compared to low SMR individuals. Our results here illustrate context-dependent costs and benefits of intraspecific variation in SMR whereby high SMR individuals show increased growth performance under high food availability but had a cost under stressful environments (i.e. food shortage.

    • Standard metabolic rate predicts growth trajectory of juvenile Chinese crucian carp (Carassius auratus) under changing food availability.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Zeng, Ling-Qing; Zhang, An-Jie; Killen, Shaun S; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Wang, Yu-Xiang; Fu, Shi-Jian

      2017-09-15

      Phenotypic traits vary greatly within populations and can have a significant influence on aspects of performance. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of individual variation in standard metabolic rate (SMR) on growth rate and tolerance to food deprivation in juvenile Chinese crucian carp ( Carassius auratus ) under varying levels of food availability. To address this issue, 19 high and 16 low SMR individuals were randomly assigned to a satiation diet for 3 weeks, whereas another 20 high and 16 low SMR individuals were assigned to a restricted diet (approximately 50% of satiation) for the same period. Then, all fish were completely food-deprived for another 3 weeks. High SMR individuals showed a higher growth rate when fed to satiation, but this advantage of SMR did not exist in food-restricted fish. This result was related to improved feeding efficiency with decreased food intake in low SMR individuals, due to their low food processing capacity and maintenance costs. High SMR individuals experienced more mass loss during food deprivation as compared to low SMR individuals. Our results here illustrate context-dependent costs and benefits of intraspecific variation in SMR whereby high SMR individuals show increased growth performance under high food availability but had a cost under stressful environments (i.e. food shortage). © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

    • Effects of hyperinsulinemia under the euglycemic condition on calcium and phosphate metabolism in non-obese normotensive subjects.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Shimamoto, K; Higashiura, K; Nakagawa, M; Masuda, A; Shiiki, M; Miyazaki, Y; Ise, T; Fukuoka, M; Hirata, A; Iimura, O

      1995-12-01

      The effect of acute insulin infusion on the metabolism of calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) was examined in 17 healthy subjects. They were hospitalized and kept on a constant diet for 5 days, and an euglycemic hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp was applied. Synthetic human insulin was infused at the rate of 40 mU/m2/min for 2 hr, and glucose was also infused to maintain basal glucose levels of each subject. The control study was performed in 8 of the 17 subjects, into whom 10% xylitol was infused for 2 hr at the rate of 100 ml/hr. The plasma insulin concentrations were 7.94 +/- 0.35 and 62.3 +/- 14.3 mU/liter before and after the glucose clamp technique, but serum free Ca ion was increased significantly (p UCaV) was significantly higher after the glucose clamp than the control study. Fractional excretion of Ca (FECa) was increased significantly (p < 0.05), and urinary excretion of P (UPV) and fractional excretion of P (FEP) were decreased significantly (p < 0.05) under the hyperinsulinemic condition. The results suggested that, under the conditions of euglycemic hyperinsulinemia by glucose clamp technique, insulin increased the serum free Ca ion, and as a result, PTH was suppressed. Decreased PTH might induce calciuresis and enhance tubular P reabsorption under hyperinsulinemia. Insulin increased serum free Ca ion might relate to the vasodilating action of insulin by its decrease of intracellular free Ca ion in vascular smooth muscle.

    • Metabolic Profiling of Lactococcus lactis Under Different Culture Conditions

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Normah Mohd Noor

      2012-07-01

      Full Text Available Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS and headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS/GC-MS were used to study metabolites produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 grown at a temperature of 30 °C with and without agitation at 150 rpm, and at 37 °C without agitation. It was observed that L. lactis produced more organic acids under agitation. Primary alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and polyols were identified as the corresponding trimethylsilyl (TMS derivatives, whereas amino acids and organic acids, including fatty acids, were detected through methyl chloroformate derivatization. HS analysis indicated that branched-chain methyl aldehydes, including 2-methylbutanal, 3-methylbutanal, and 2-methylpropanal are degdradation products of isoleucine, leucine or valine. Multivariate analysis (MVA using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA revealed the major differences between treatments were due to changes of amino acids and fermentation products.

    • Dissipation and metabolism of 14C-spiroxamine in soil under laboratory condition

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Sukul, Premasis; Zuehlke, Sebastian; Lamshoeft, Marc; Rosales-Conrado, Noelia; Spiteller, Michael

      2010-01-01

      Spiroxamine [SPX] belongs to a spiroketalamine group of substances. The biodegradation of [1,3-dioxolane-4- 14 C]-SPX has been examined in 2 soils of different physicochemical properties. The total recovery of radioactivity from soils was 98.6-103.5% of that applied. The total amount of extractable radioactivity declined with a simultaneous increase in non-extractable radioactivity. Volatile organics were detected at lower levels; however, mineralization played a marked effect on the route of SPX dissipation. The half-life ranges between 37 and 44 d. SPX does not undergo any enantioselective degradation. 4 metabolites: despropyl-SPX, desethyl-SPX, SPX N-oxide and SPX acid were identified, applying mass spectrometric technique. Sorption-desorption data fitted well with a Freundlich model in log form (r 2 , 0.99). K Dsorp ranged between 44 and 230, suggesting SPX ought to be considered as a substance with low leaching potential [groundwater ubiquity score (GUS), <1.8]. Furthermore, an overall low desorption of 1-11% indicates firm retention of SPX by the soils. - Behaviour of spiroxamine in soil under laboratory condition was studied for environmental risk assessment and its low leaching potential in soil has been established.

    • Radiation pre-treatment of seed imparts metabolic stability and quality protection during storage under accelerated aging

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Sumedha; Singh, Bhupinder; Singhal, R.K.

      2014-01-01

      Quality of seed is known to deteriorate due to unfavoured temperature and relative humidity during accelerated aging. Protecting the seed quality during storage is thus a priority challenge for the seed industry till the seeds end up with the end user. Gamma radiation treatment has been shown to improve source to sink transport of photosynthates during terminal heat stress in cereals. An experiment was conducted to measure seed irradiation induced biochemical changes in groundnut cultivar TG-37A stored under accelerated aging at 45±2 ℃ and 95-100 % humidity for 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 40 days to aging. The gamma irradiation doses were control (0), 0.005, 0.025, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 kGy. Seed samples were periodically evaluated for oil and fatty acid profile by the soxhlet extraction method and gas chromatography mass spectroscopy respectively. Here alike earlier studies variation in fatty acid profile of seed was used as an indicator of seed health under harsh storage conditions of accelerated aging. In the majority of plant species having oil rich seeds, the lipids that are at risk of auto-oxidation contain oleic (18:1), linoleic (18:2) and linolenic (18:3) fatty acid chain. Degree of unsaturation has a significant influence on degree of degradation. Decreased total lipid content in aged sunflower seeds have been reported. Auto-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids was noticed, especially for linoleic acid in seed of oil crop after seven years of storage. Our results showed radiation treatment did not cause any significant change in oleic (C18:1), linoleic acids (C18:2) and linolenic (C18:3) acid content of seeds. This shows that gamma radiation essentially slows down the lipid peroxidation which essentially protects membrane permeability and reduces the rate of seed deterioration at high temperature and RH. Radiation treatment imparts metabolic stability in seeds during storage under accelerated aging conditions. (author)

    • Lifelong Physical Activity Prevents Aging-Associated Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Myotubes via Increased Glucose Transporter Expression.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bunprajun, Tipwadee; Henriksen, Tora Ida; Scheele, Camilla; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Green, Charlotte Jane

      2013-01-01

      Both aging and physical inactivity are associated with increased development of insulin resistance whereas physical activity has been shown to promote increased insulin sensitivity. Here we investigated the effects of physical activity level on aging-associated insulin resistance in myotubes derived from human skeletal muscle satellite cells. Satellite cells were obtained from young (22 yrs) normally active or middle-aged (56.6 yrs) individuals who were either lifelong sedentary or lifelong active. Both middle-aged sedentary and middle-aged active myotubes had increased p21 and myosin heavy chain protein expression. Interestingly MHCIIa was increased only in myotubes from middle-aged active individuals. Middle-aged sedentary cells had intact insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation however, the same cell showed ablated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. On the other hand, middle-aged active cells retained both insulin-stimulated increases in glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. Middle-aged active cells also had significantly higher mRNA expression of GLUT1 and GLUT4 compared to middle-aged sedentary cells, and significantly higher GLUT4 protein. It is likely that physical activity induces a number of stable adaptations, including increased GLUT4 expression that are retained in cells ex vivo and protect, or delay the onset of middle-aged-associated insulin resistance. Additionally, a sedentary lifestyle has an impact on the metabolism of human myotubes during aging and may contribute to aging-associated insulin resistance through impaired GLUT4 localization.

  1. Triglyceride Metabolism under Attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, Sander

    2017-01-01

    Hydrolysis of circulating triglycerides is carried out by the enzyme lipoprotein lipase, which is transported and anchored to the capillary wall by the protein GPIHBP1. Recent evidence indicates that certain individuals develop autoantibodies against GPIHBP1, impairing lipoprotein lipase function

  2. PAI-1–regulated miR-21 defines a novel age-associated fibrogenic pathway in muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardite, Esther; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Vidal, Berta; Gutarra, Susana; Serrano, Antonio L.

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of skeletal muscle homeostasis by substitution with fibrotic tissue constitutes the principal cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, yet the implicated fibrogenic mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study identifies the extracellular PAI-1/urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) balance as an important regulator of microribonucleic acid (miR)–21 biogenesis, controlling age-associated muscle fibrosis and dystrophy progression. Genetic loss of PAI-1 in mdx dystrophic mice anticipated muscle fibrosis through these sequential mechanisms: the alteration of collagen metabolism by uPA-mediated proteolytic processing of transforming growth factor (TGF)–β in muscle fibroblasts and the activation of miR-21 expression, which inhibited phosphatase and tensin homologue and enhanced AKT signaling, thus endowing TGF-β with a remarkable cell proliferation–promoting potential. Age-associated fibrogenesis and muscle deterioration in mdx mice, as well as exacerbated dystrophy in young PAI-1−/− mdx mice, could be reversed by miR-21 or uPA-selective interference, whereas forced miR-21 overexpression aggravated disease severity. The PAI-1–miR-21 fibrogenic axis also appeared dysregulated in muscle of DMD patients, providing a basis for effectively targeting fibrosis and muscular dystrophies in currently untreatable individuals. PMID:22213800

  3. Molecular phenotyping of multiple mouse strains under metabolic challenge uncovers a role for Elovl2 in glucose-induced insulin secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Cruciani-Guglielmacci

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggest a role for Elovl2 in ensuring normal insulin secretory responses to glucose. Moreover, the large comprehensive dataset and integrative network-based approach provides a new resource to dissect the molecular etiology of β cell failure under metabolic stress.

  4. The Role of Underlying Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity in Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: A growing body of evidence indicates an association between air pollution exposure and metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We have recently demonstrated that an acute exposure to ozone in metabolically normal rat strains produces h...

  5. Dissecting the Variations of Ripening Progression and Flavonoid Metabolism in Grape Berries Grown under Double Cropping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Kai Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A double cropping system has been commercially adopted in southern China, where there is abundant sunshine and heat resources. In this viticulture system, the first growing season normally starts as a summer cropping cycle; then, the vine is pruned and forced, resulting in a second crop in winter. Due to climate differences between the summer and winter growing seasons, grape ripening progression and flavonoid metabolism vary greatly. Here, the metabolites and transcriptome of flavonoid pathways were analyzed in grapes grown under two growing seasons at different stages. Notably, the winter cropping cycle strongly increased flavonoid levels by several times in comparison to summer grapes, while the summer season took a major toll on anthocyanin and flavonol accumulation, since the winter cropping greatly triggered the expression of upstream genes in the flavonoid pathway in a coordinated expression pattern. Moreover, the ratio of VviF3′5′Hs (flavonoid 3′5′-hydroxylase to VviF3′Hs (flavonoid 3′-hydroxylase transcript levels correlated remarkably well with the ratio of 3′5′-substituted to 3′-substituted flavonoids, which was presumed to control the flux of intermediates into different flavonoid branches. On the other hand, the phenological phase also varied greatly in the two crops. Compared to summer cropping, winter growing season accelerated the duration from budburst to veraison, therefore advancing the onset of ripening, but also prolonging the duration of ripening progression due to the purposes to harvest high-quality grapes. The differential expression pattern of hormone-related genes between the two cropping cycles might explain this phenomenon.

  6. They live in the land down under: thyroid function and basal metabolic rate in the Blind Mole Rat, Spalax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avivi, Aaron; Nevo, Eviatar; Cohen, Keren; Sotnichenko, Nick; Hercbergs, Aleck; Band, Mark; Davis, Paul J; Ellis, Martin; Ashur-Fabian, Osnat

    2014-01-01

    The Israeli blind subterranean mole rat (Spalax ehrenbergi superspecies) lives in sealed underground burrows under extreme, hypoxic conditions. The four Israeli Spalax allospecies have adapted to different climates, the cool-humid (Spalax galili, 2 n = 52 chromosomes), semihumid (S. golani, 2 n = 54) north regions, warm-humid (S. carmeli, 2 n = 58) central region and the warm-dry S. judaei, 2 n = 60) southern regions. A dramatic interspecies decline in basal metabolic rate (BMR) from north to south, even after years of captivity, indicates a genetic basis for this BMR trait. We examined the possibility that the genetically-conditioned interspecies BMR difference was expressed via circulating thyroid hormone. An unexpected north to south increase in serum free thyroxine (FT4) and total 3, 5, 3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) (p BMR measurements. The increases in serum FT4 and T3 were symmetrical, so that the T3:FT4 ratio - interpretable as an index of conversion of T4 to T3 in nonthyroidal tissues - did not support relative decrease in production of T3 as a contributor to BMR. Increased north-to-south serum FT4 and T3 levels also correlated negatively with hemoglobin/hematocrit. North-to-south adaptations in spalacids include decreased BMR and hematocrit/hemoglobin in the face of increasing thyroid hormone levels, arguing for independent control of hormone secretion and BMR/hematocrit/hemoglobin. But the significant inverse relationship between thyroid hormone levels and BMR/hematocrit/hemoglobin is also consistent with a degree of cellular resistance to thyroid hormone action that protects against hormone-induced increase in oxygen consumption in a hostile, hypoxic environment.

  7. Effect of moderate intakes of different tea catechins and caffeine on acute measures of energy metabolism under sedentary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Nikolaj T; Bitz, Christian; Krog-Mikkelsen, Inger; Hels, Ole; Kovacs, Eva M R; Rycroft, Jane A; Frandsen, Erik; Mela, David J; Astrup, Arne

    2009-10-01

    Green tea may stimulate energy metabolism; however, it is unclear if acute effects are caused by specific catechins, caffeine or their combination. The objective of the present study was to examine the separate and combined effects of different catechins and caffeine on energy expenditure (EE) and fat oxidation over a single day. Fifteen healthy, normal-weight males received capsules containing placebo, caffeine alone (150 mg), or caffeine plus a catechin mixture (600 mg) enriched in either epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), epigallocatechin or a mix of catechins, in a randomised cross-over double-blinded design. On each test day EE, respiratory quotient (RQ) and substrate oxidation were measured under sedentary conditions in a respiratory chamber for 13.5 h. We found no significant treatment effect on EE (P = 0.20) or RQ (P = 0.68). EGCG with caffeine insignificantly raised EE and fat oxidation v. caffeine-only and placebo (EE 5.71 (SE 0.12) v. 5.68 (SE 0.14) v. 5.59 (SE 0.13) MJ/12.5 h, respectively; fat oxidation 84.8 (SE 5.2) v. 80.7 (SE 4.7) v. 76.8 (SE 4.0) g/12.5 h). Catechin/caffeine combinations at these dosages and mode of application had non-significant acute effects on EE and fat oxidation. The maximum observed effect on EE of about 2 % could still be meaningful for energy balance over much longer period of exposure. However, higher short-term effects reported in the literature may reflect variations in green tea extracts, added caffeine, or synergies with physical activity. The specific mechanisms and conditions that may underpin observed longer-term benefits of catechin-enriched green tea consumption on body composition remain to be confirmed.

  8. Chronic hyperinsulinemia contributes to insulin resistance under dietary restriction in association with altered lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Ippei; Tanimoto, Keiichi; Akiyama, Nobuteru; Naya, Noriyuki; Fujieda, Kumiko; Iwasaki, Takanori; Yukioka, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is widely thought to be a compensatory response to insulin resistance, whereas its potentially causal role in the progression of insulin resistance remains to be established. Here, we aimed to examine whether hyperinsulinemia could affect the progression of insulin resistance in Zucker fatty diabetic (ZDF) rats. Male ZDF rats at 8 wk of age were fed a diet ad libitum (AL) or dietary restriction (DR) of either 15 or 30% from AL feeding over 6 wk. Insulin sensitivity was determined by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. ZDF rats in the AL group progressively developed hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia by 10 wk of age, and then plasma insulin rapidly declined to nearly normal levels by 12 wk of age. Compared with AL group, DR groups showed delayed onset of hyperglycemia and persistent hyperinsulinemia, leading to weight gain and raised plasma triglycerides and free fatty acids by 14 wk of age. Notably, insulin sensitivity was significantly reduced in the DR group rather than the AL group and inversely correlated with plasma levels of insulin and triglyceride but not glucose. Moreover, enhanced lipid deposition and upregulation of genes involved in lipogenesis were detected in liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissues of the DR group rather than the AL group. Alternatively, continuous hyperinsulinemia induced by insulin pellet implantation produced a decrease in insulin sensitivity in ZDF rats. These results suggest that chronic hyperinsulinemia may lead to the progression of insulin resistance under DR conditions in association with altered lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues in ZDF rats. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Metabolic and proteomic adaptation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains during growth under cheese-like environmental conditions compared to de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Claudio Giorgio; De Angelis, Maria; Gatti, Monica; Calasso, Maria; Neviani, Erasmo; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the metabolic and proteomic adaptation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, which were isolated at different stages of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese ripening. Compared to de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) broth, cultivation under cheese-like conditions (cheese broth, CB) increased the number of free amino acids used as carbon sources. Compared with growth on MRS or pasteurized and microfiltrated milk, all strains cultivated in CB showed a low synthesis of d,l-lactic acid and elevated levels of acetic acid. The proteomic maps of the five representative strains, showing different metabolic traits, were comparatively determined after growth on MRS and CB media. The amount of intracellular and cell-associated proteins was affected by culture conditions and diversity between strains, depending on their time of isolation. Protein spots showing decreased (62 spots) or increased (59 spot) amounts during growth on CB were identified using MALDI-TOF-MS/MS or LC-nano-ESI-MS/MS. Compared with cultivation on MRS broth, the L. rhamnosus strains cultivated under cheese-like conditions had modified amounts of some proteins responsible for protein biosynthesis, nucleotide, and carbohydrate metabolisms, the glycolysis pathway, proteolytic activity, cell wall, and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis, cell regulation, amino acid, and citrate metabolism, oxidation/reduction processes, and stress responses. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effect of Underlying Renal Disease on Nutritional and Metabolic Profile of Older Adults with Reduced Renal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Silvia; Amabile, Maria Ida; Altieri, Silvia; Mastroluca, Daniela; Lai, Carlo; Aceto, Paola; Crudo, Massimiliano; D'Angelo, Anna Rita; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Molfino, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a common condition in the general population, particularly among older adults. Renal impairment is in turn associated with metabolic and nutritional derangements and with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To compare the metabolic, nutritional, and cardiovascular impact of reduced kidney function between patients with and without known renal disease. We enrolled consecutive outpatients (age ≥65 years) with reduced renal function who were divided into two groups: Group A with history of renal disease and Group B with unknown renal disease. Metabolic and nutritional parameters, including involuntary body weight loss (BWL) in the previous 6 months, mineral metabolism, inflammatory indices, and left ventricular mass index (LVMI), were evaluated. A total of 76 patients were enrolled. Group A ( n  = 39, M: 24, F: 15) showed greater BWL with a significant reduction of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, transferrin, cholinesterase, albumin, and LVMI with respect to Group B ( p  < 0.01). Conversely, Group B ( n  = 37, M: 23, F: 14) showed significantly increased intact parathyroid hormone, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein when compared to Group A ( p  < 0.05). The positive history of renal disease may negatively impact on several metabolic and nutritional parameters related to increased cardiovascular risk among older adults.

  11. The molecular mechanism underlying anthocyanin metabolism in apple using the MdMYB16 and MdbHLH33 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haifeng; Wang, Nan; Liu, Jingxuan; Qu, Changzhi; Wang, Yicheng; Jiang, Shenghui; Lu, Ninglin; Wang, Deyun; Zhang, Zongying; Chen, Xuesen

    2017-05-01

    MdMYB16 forms homodimers and directly inhibits anthocyanin synthesis via its C-terminal EAR repressor. It weakened the inhibitory effect of MdMYB16 on anthocyanin synthesis when overexpressing MdbHLH33 in callus overexpressing MdMYB16. MdMYB16 could interact with MdbHLH33. Anthocyanins are strong antioxidants that play a key role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes. The germplasm of Malus sieversii f. neidzwetzkyana is important for the study of anthocyanin metabolism. To date, only limited studies have examined the negative regulatory mechanisms underlying anthocyanin synthesis in apple. Here, we analyzed the relationship between anthocyanin levels and MdMYB16 expression in mature Red Crisp 1-5 apple (M. domestica) fruit, generated an evolutionary tree, and identified an EAR suppression sequence and a bHLH binding motif of the MdMYB16 protein using protein sequence analyses. Overexpression of MdMYB16 or MdMYB16 without bHLH binding sequence (LBSMdMYB16) in red-fleshed callus inhibited MdUFGT and MdANS expression and anthocyanin synthesis. However, overexpression of MdMYB16 without the EAR sequence (LESMdMYB16) in red-fleshed callus had no inhibitory effect on anthocyanin. The yeast one-hybrid assay showed that MdMYB16 and LESMdMYB16 interacted the promoters of MdANS and MdUFGT, respectively. Yeast two-hybrid, pull-down, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that MdMYB16 formed homodimers and interacted with MdbHLH33, however, the LBSMdMYB16 could not interact with MdbHLH33. We overexpressed MdbHLH33 in callus overexpressing MdMYB16 and found that it weakened the inhibitory effect of MdMYB16 on anthocyanin synthesis. Together, these results suggested that MdMYB16 and MdbHLH33 may be important part of the regulatory network controlling the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway.

  12. Growth kinetics, fatty acid composition and metabolic activity changes of Crypthecodinium cohnii under different nitrogen source and concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Waseem; Shamoon, Muhammad; Zan, Xinyi; Haider, Junaid; Sharif, Hafiz Rizwan; Shoaib, Muhammad; Song, Yuanda

    2017-12-01

    The effect of varying concentrations of the nitrogen source on the growth kinetics, lipid accumulation, lipid and DHA productivity, and fatty acid composition of C. cohnii was elucidated. Growth of C. cohnii was in three distinct growth stages: cell growth, lipid accumulation and a final lipid turnover stage. Most of lipids were accumulated in lipid accumulation stage (48-120 h) though, slow growth rate was observed during this stage. NaNO 3 supported significantly higher lipid content (26.9% of DCW), DHA content (0.99 g/L) and DHA yield (44.2 mg/g glucose) which were 2.5 to 3.3-folds higher than other N-sources. The maximum level of C16-C18 content (% TFA) was calculated as 43, 54 and 43% in lipid accumulation stage under low nitrogen (LN, 0.2 g/L), medium nitrogen (MN, 0.8 g/L) and high nitrogen (HN, 1.6 g/L) treatments, respectively. Cultures with LN, by down-regulating cell metabolism, trigger onset of lipogenic enzymes. Conversely, NAD + /NADP + -dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD + /NADP + -ICDH) were less active in LN than HN treatments which resulted in retardation of Kreb's Cycle and thereby divert citrate into cytoplasm as substrate for ATP-citrate lyase (ACL). Thereby, ACL and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were most active in lipid accumulation stage at LN treatments. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) was more active than malic enzyme (ME) in lipid accumulation stage and showed higher activities in NaNO 3 than other N-sources. This represents that G6PDH contributes more NADPH than ME in C. cohnii. However, G6PDH and ME together seems to play a dual role in offering NADPH for lipid biosynthesis. This concept of ME together with G6PD in offering NADPH for lipogenesis might be novel in this alga and needed to be explored.

  13. Mechanisms underlying metabolic and neural defects in zebrafish and human multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanquan Song

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In humans, mutations in electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF or electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH lead to MADD/glutaric aciduria type II, an autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by a broad spectrum of devastating neurological, systemic and metabolic symptoms. We show that a zebrafish mutant in ETFDH, xavier, and fibroblast cells from MADD patients demonstrate similar mitochondrial and metabolic abnormalities, including reduced oxidative phosphorylation, increased aerobic glycolysis, and upregulation of the PPARG-ERK pathway. This metabolic dysfunction is associated with aberrant neural proliferation in xav, in addition to other neural phenotypes and paralysis. Strikingly, a PPARG antagonist attenuates aberrant neural proliferation and alleviates paralysis in xav, while PPARG agonists increase neural proliferation in wild type embryos. These results show that mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to an increase in aerobic glycolysis, affects neurogenesis through the PPARG-ERK pathway, a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Short Telomeres Induce p53 and Autophagy and Modulate Age-Associated Changes in Cardiac Progenitor Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Collin; Jiang, Yan; Emathinger, Jacqueline; Quijada, Pearl; Nguyen, Nathalie; De La Torre, Andrea; Moshref, Maryam; Nguyen, Jonathan; Levinson, Aimee B; Shin, Minyoung; Sussman, Mark A; Hariharan, Nirmala

    2018-02-14

    Aging severely limits myocardial repair and regeneration. Delineating the impact of age-associated factors such as short telomeres is critical to enhance the regenerative potential of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). We hypothesized that short telomeres activate p53 and induce autophagy to elicit the age-associated change in CPC fate. We isolated CPCs and compared mouse strains with different telomere lengths for phenotypic characteristics of aging. Wild mouse strain Mus musculus castaneus (CAST) possessing short telomeres exhibits early cardiac aging with cardiac dysfunction, hypertrophy, fibrosis, and senescence, as compared with common lab strains FVB and C57 bearing longer telomeres. CAST CPCs with short telomeres demonstrate altered cell fate as characterized by cell cycle arrest, senescence, basal commitment, and loss of quiescence. Elongation of telomeres using a modified mRNA for telomerase restores youthful properties to CAST CPCs. Short telomeres induce autophagy in CPCs, a catabolic protein degradation process, as evidenced by reduced p62 and increased accumulation of autophagic puncta. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagosome formation reverses the cell fate to a more youthful phenotype. Mechanistically, cell fate changes induced by short telomeres are partially p53 dependent, as p53 inhibition rescues senescence and commitment observed in CAST CPCs, coincident with attenuation of autophagy. In conclusion, short telomeres activate p53 and autophagy to tip the equilibrium away from quiescence and proliferation toward differentiation and senescence, leading to exhaustion of CPCs. This study provides the mechanistic basis underlying age-associated cell fate changes that will enable identification of molecular strategies to prevent senescence of CPCs. Stem Cells 2018. © AlphaMed Press 2018.

  15. [Metabolic mechanisms underlying reparative action of metal-dependent spectral light flux from a hollow cathode lamp (experimental study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusyreva, G A; Frolkov, V K; Bobrovnitskiĭ, I P

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of serial irradiation of experimental animals with a visible light flow showing spectral lines of copper and manganese on the rate of reparative processes and the associated metabolic events. The cathode of the lamp that contained both microelements generated the light flux possessed of significant biological activity. Specifically, it accelerated reduction of the wound surface area and optimized regulation of carbohydrate metabolism in the lipid peroxidation system by insulin and cotisol. The light flux emitted by the cathode containing only one of the two elements (either copper or manganese) produced a similar but less pronounced effect.

  16. Responses of photosynthesis, nitrogen and proline metabolism to salinity stress in Solanum lycopersicum under different levels of nitrogen supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhulika; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, effect of different levels of nitrogen (N 0 , deprived; N 25 , sub-optimum; N 75 , optimum and N 150 , supra-optimum) in Solanum lycopersicum L. seedlings under NaCl (NaCl 1 , 0.3 g kg -1 sand and NaCl 2 , 0.5 g kg -1 sand) stress was investigated. Biomass accumulation, pigments, K + concentration, nitrate and nitrite contents were declined by NaCl in dose dependent manner. As compared to control (N 75 without NaCl), fresh weight declined by 4% and 11%, and dry weight by 7 and 13% when seedlings were grown under N 75 +NaCl 1 and N 75 +NaCl 2 combinations, respectively. Furthermore, fluorescence parameters (JIP-test): the size and number of active reaction centres of photosynthetic apparatus (F v /F 0 ), efficiency of water splitting complex (F 0 /F v ), quantum yield of primary photochemistry (φP 0 or Phi_P 0 ), yield of electron transport per trapped excitation (Ψ 0 or Psi_0), the quantum yield of electron transport (φE 0 ), and performance index of PS II (PI ABS ) and parameters related to energy fluxes per reaction centre (ABS/RC, TR 0 /RC, ET 0 /RC and DI 0 /RC) were also affected by NaCl. However, toxic effect of NaCl on photosystem II photochemistry was ameliorated by N. The lower dose (NaCl 1 ) of NaCl exerts damaging effect on oxidation side of PS II, while higher dose (NaCl 2 ) damages PS II reaction centre and its reduction side. Moreover, control seedlings (N 75 without NaCl) when exposed to NaCl 1 and NaCl 2 exhibited a significant enhancement in respiration rate by 6 and 16%, Na + accumulation by 111 and 169% in shoot, and 141 and 223% in root and ammonium contents by 19 and 34% respectively. Nitrate and ammonium assimilating enzymes such as nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) were adversely affected by NaCl stress while glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) showed reverse trend. N addition caused further enhancement in free proline, and activity of Δ 1

  17. Metabolic fates and effects of nitrite in brown trout under normoxic and hypoxic conditions: blood and tissue nitrite metabolism and interactions with branchial NOS, Na+/K+-ATPase and hsp70 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Gerber, Lucie; Hansen, Marie Niemann

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite secures essential nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in hypoxia at low endogenous concentrations, whereas it becomes toxic at high concentrations. We exposed brown trout to normoxic and hypoxic water in the absence and presence of added ambient nitrite to decipher the cellular metabolism...... and effects of nitrite at basal and elevated concentrations under different oxygen regimes. We also tested hypotheses concerning the influence of nitrite on branchial nitric oxide synthase (NOS), Na+/K+-ATPase (nka) and heat shock protein (hsp70) mRNA expression. Basal plasma and erythrocyte nitrite levels...... were higher in hypoxia than normoxia, suggesting increased NOS activity. Nitrite exposure strongly elevated nitrite concentrations in plasma, erythrocytes, heart tissue and white muscle, which was associated with an extensive metabolism of nitrite to nitrate and to iron-nitrosylated and S...

  18. Metabolomic Profiling of Soybeans (Glycine Max L.) Reveals Importance of Sugar and Nitogen Metabolisms under Drought and Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean, an important legume crop, is continually threatened by abiotic stresses, especially drought and heat stress. At molecular levels, reduced yields due to drought and heat stress can be seen in the alterations of metabolic homeostasis of vegetative tissues. A global metabolomics approach can b...

  19. A genome scale metabolic network for rice and accompanying analysis of tryptophan, auxin and serotonin biosynthesis regulation under biotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functional annotations of large plant genome projects mostly provide information on gene function and gene families based on the presence of protein domains and gene homology, but not necessarily in association with gene expression or metabolic and regulatory networks. These additional annotations a...

  20. Comparative iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Pelteobagrus vachelli Liver under Acute Hypoxia: Implications in Metabolic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guosong; Zhang, Jiajia; Wen, Xin; Zhao, Cheng; Zhang, Hongye; Li, Xinru; Yin, Shaowu

    2017-09-01

    More and more frequently these days, aquatic ecosystems are being stressed by nutrient enrichment, pollutants, and global warming, leading to a serious depletion in oxygen concentrations. Although a sudden, significant lack of oxygen will result in mortality, fishes can have an acute behavior (e.g., an increase in breathing rate, reduction in swimming frequency) and physiology responses (e.g., increase in oxygen delivery, and reduction in oxygen consumption) to hypoxia, which allows them to maintain normal physical activity. Therefore, in order to shed further light on the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation in fishes, the authors conduct comparative quantitative proteomics on Pelteobagrus vachelli livers using iTRAQ. The research identifies 511 acute hypoxia-responsive proteins in P. vachelli. Furthermore, comparison of several of the diverse key pathways studied (e.g., peroxisome pathway, PPAR signaling pathway, lipid metabolism, glycolysis/gluco-neogenesis, and amino acid metabolism) help to articulate the different mechanisms involved in the hypoxia response of P. vachelli. Data from proteome analysis shows that P. vachelli can have an acute reaction to hypoxia, including detoxification of metabolic by-products and oxidative stress in light of continued metabolic activity (e.g., peroxisomes), an activation in the capacity of catabolism to get more energy (e.g., lipolysis and amino acid catabolism), a depression in the capacity of biosynthesis to reduce energy consumption (e.g., biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids), and a shift in the aerobic and anaerobic contributions to total metabolism. The observed hypoxia-related changes in the liver proteome of the fish can help to understand or can be related to the hypoxia-related response that takes place in similar conditions in the liver or other proteomes of mammals. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The suppression of ghrelin signaling mitigates age-associated thermogenic impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with severe thermogenic impairment, which contributes to obesity and diabetes in aging. We previously reported that ablation of the ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), attenuates age-associated obesity and insulin resistance. Ghrelin and obestatin are ...

  2. Therapeutic Potential and Recent Advances of Curcumin in the Treatment of Aging-Associated Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Sundar Dhilip Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a low molecular weight, lipophilic, major yellow natural polyphenolic, and the most well-known plant-derived compound, is extracted from the rhizomes of the turmeric (Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been demonstrated as an effective therapeutic agent in traditional medicine for the treatment and prevention of different diseases. It has also shown a wide range of biological and pharmacological effects in drug delivery, and has actively been used for the treatment of aging-associated diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, ocular diseases, osteoporosis, diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney diseases, chronic inflammation and infection. The functional application and therapeutic potential of curcumin in the treatment of aging-associated diseases is well documented in the literature. This review article focuses mainly on the potential role of plant-derived natural compounds such as curcumin, their mechanism of action and recent advances in the treatment of aging-associated diseases. Moreover, the review briefly recaps on the recent progress made in the preparation of nanocurcumins and their therapeutic potential in clinical research for the treatment of aging-associated diseases.

  3. Senescence of the adaptive immune system in health and aging-associated autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, Kornelis Stephan Mario

    2015-01-01

    Aging of the immune system may contribute to the development of aging-associated autoimmune diseases, such as giant cell arteritis, polymyalgia rheumatica and rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this thesis was to identify aging-dependent changes of the adaptive immune system that promote autoimmunity

  4. Aging-associated DNA methylation changes in middle-aged individuals: the Young Finns study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananen, L; Marttila, S; Nevalainen, T; Jylhävä, J; Mononen, N; Kähönen, M; Raitakari, O T; Lehtimäki, T; Hurme, M

    2016-02-09

    Chronological aging-associated changes in the human DNA methylome have been studied by multiple epigenome-wide association studies (EWASs). Certain CpG sites have been identified as aging-associated in multiple studies, and the majority of the sites identified in various studies show common features regarding location and direction of the methylation change. However, as a whole, the sets of aging-associated CpGs identified in different studies, even with similar tissues and age ranges, show only limited overlap. In this study, we further explore and characterize CpG sites that show close relationship between their DNA methylation level and chronological age during adulthood and which bear the relationship regardless of blood cell type heterogeneity. In this study, with a multivariable regression model adjusted for cell type heterogeneity, we identified 1202 aging-associated CpG sites (a-CpGs, FDR age range (40 - 49 years). Repeatedly reported a-CpGs located in genes ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK and KLF14 were also identified. Regions with aging-associated hypermethylation were enriched regarding several gene ontology (GO) terms (especially in the cluster of developmental processes), whereas hypomethylated sites showed no enrichment. The genes with higher numbers of a-CpG hits were more often hypermethylated with advancing age. The comparison analysis revealed that of the 1202 a-CpGs identified in the present study, 987 were identified as differentially methylated also between nonagenarians and young adults in a previous study (The Vitality 90+ study), and importantly, the directions of changes were identical in the previous and in the present study. Here we report that aging-associated DNA methylation features can be identified in a middle-aged population with an age range of only 9 years. A great majority of these sites have been previously reported as aging-associated in a population aged 19 to 90 years. Aging is associated with different types of changes in DNA

  5. Ethephon increases photosynthetic-nitrogen use efficiency, proline and antioxidant metabolism to alleviate decrease in photosynthesis under salinity stress in mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Noushina; Umar, Shahid; Per, Tasir S; Khan, Nafees A

    2017-05-04

    Salinity is a serious threat to plant growth and development worldwide reducing agricultural productivity each year. Ethylene is an important phytohormone that affects plants performance under normal and abiotic stress conditions. In this study, role of ethylene was investigated in mitigating salinity stress (100 mM NaCl) effects on photosynthesis in mustard plants subjected to different nitrogen (N; 5 and 10 mM) levels. Plants under salinity stress exhibited marked increase in proline and reduced glutathione (GSH) content and activity of antioxidant enzymes. Nitrogen supplementation at 10 mM was better than 200 µl l -1 ethephon treatment under no stress. However, under salinity stress, both N and ethephon were equally effective. The combined application of 10 mM N and ethephon to salinity stressed plants produced greatest increase in photosynthesis by increasing proline and antioxidant metabolism. Ethylene evolution was high under salinity stress, but treatment of 10 mM N and 200 µl l -1 ethephon greatly decreased ethylene evolution that was equivalent to the 10 mM N treatment alone. This concentration of ethylene decreased the oxidative stress and increased the photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) maximally to increase photosynthesis. The use of ethylene action inhibitor, norbornadiene (NBD) showed reduction in ethylene mediated effects in alleviating salinity. Norbornadiene decreased the photosynthetic-NUE, proline and GSH content that resulted in decrease in photosynthesis under salinity stress. This study indicated that ethylene regulated the proline and antioxidant metabolism under salinity stress to increase photosynthetic functions of mustard grown with low and optimum N. The modulation of ethylene could be adopted in agricultural practices to increase photosynthesis under salinity stress.

  6. Metabolism-oriented amino acid requirement determination by means of the catabolic rates of 14C- and 15N-labelled lysine under maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, O.; Bergner, H.; Adam, K.

    1977-01-01

    Male Wistar rats (of 60 g live weight) allotted in 10 groups were fed diets with gradually increasing lysine levels ranging from 1.4 to 7.4 g lysine/16 g N. Feed intake was restricted so much that the experimental animals did not change their live weights during the last 3 days of the 8-day experimental period. On the 7the experimental day, 4 animals of each group were injected, i. p. 14 C-L-lysine, the 14 CO 2 -excretion being subsequently measured over a period of 2 hours. On the next day, 6 animals of each group were applied an i. p. injection of 15 N-L-lysine, the urine being collected over the following 24-hour period to measure the 15 N-frequency. Applying both labelling methods, an increased catabolisation of the amino acid was observed after the metabolically necessary lysine requirement had been covered. The methods are very sensitive and revealed, under the experimental conditions chosen, a lysine requirement coverage of about 3 g lysine/16 g N. The possibility of using also 15 N-labelled compounds in the metabolism-oriented amino acid requirement determination is likely to facilitate the transfer of the methodology to farm animals would thus allow to study the amino acid requirement of man. The metabolism-oriented amino acid requirement determination will likewise allow to estimate exact amino acid requirement data under conditions that cannot be rated on the basis of productive yields. (author)

  7. Ruminant Metabolic Systems Biology: Reconstruction and Integration of Transcriptome Dynamics Underlying Functional Responses of Tissues to Nutrition and Physiological Statea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bionaz, Massimo; Loor, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput ‘omics’ data analysis via bioinformatics is one key component of the systems biology approach. The systems approach is particularly well-suited for the study of the interactions between nutrition and physiological state with tissue metabolism and functions during key life stages of organisms such as the transition from pregnancy to lactation in mammals, ie, the peripartal period. In modern dairy cows with an unprecedented genetic potential for milk synthesis, the nature of the physiologic and metabolic adaptations during the peripartal period is multifaceted and involves key tissues such as liver, adipose, and mammary. In order to understand such adaptation, we have reviewed several works performed in our and other labs. In addition, we have used a novel bioinformatics approach, Dynamic Impact Approach (DIA), in combination with partly previously published data to help interpret longitudinal biological adaptations of bovine liver, adipose, and mammary tissue to lactation using transcriptomics datasets. Use of DIA with transcriptomic data from those tissues during normal physiological adaptations and in animals fed different levels of energy prepartum allowed visualization and integration of most-impacted metabolic pathways around the time of parturition. The DIA is a suitable tool for applying the integrative systems biology approach. The ultimate goal is to visualize the complexity of the systems at study and uncover key molecular players involved in the tissue’s adaptations to physiological state or nutrition. PMID:22807626

  8. Genotype influences sulfur metabolism in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.) under elevated CO2 and NaCl stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, María del Carmen; Moreno, Diego A; Carvajal, Micaela; Martínez-Ballesta, María del Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Climatic change predicts elevated salinity in soils as well as increased carbon dioxide dioxide [CO2] in the atmosphere. The present study aims to determine the effect of combined salinity and elevated [CO2] on sulfur (S) metabolism and S-derived phytochemicals in green and purple broccoli (cv. Naxos and cv. Viola, respectively). Elevated [CO2] involved the amelioration of salt stress, especially in cv. Viola, where a lower biomass reduction by salinity was accompanied by higher sodium (Na(+)) and chloride (Cl(-)) compartmentation in the vacuole. Moreover, salinity and elevated [CO2] affected the mineral and glucosinolate contents and the activity of biosynthetic enzymes of S-derived compounds and the degradative enzyme of glucosinolate metabolism, myrosinase, as well as the related amino acids and the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). In cv. Naxos, elevated [CO2] may trigger the antioxidant response to saline stress by means of increased GSH concentration. Also, in cv. Naxos, indolic glucosinolates were more influenced by the NaCl×CO2 interaction whereas in cv. Viola the aliphatic glucosinolates were significantly increased by these conditions. Salinity and elevated [CO2] enhanced the S cellular partitioning and metabolism affecting the myrosinase-glucosinolate system. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Metabolic Changes during Storage of Brassica napus Seeds under Moist Conditions and the Consequences for the Sensory Quality of the Resulting Virgin Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonte, Anja; Schweiger, Rabea; Pons, Caroline; Wagner, Claudia; Brühl, Ludger; Matthäus, Bertrand; Müller, Caroline

    2017-12-20

    Virgin rapeseed (Brassica napus) oil is a valuable niche product, if delivered with a high quality. In this study, the effects of moist storage of B. napus seeds for 1 to 4 days on the seed metabolome and the chemo-sensory properties of the produced oils were determined. The concentrations of several primary metabolites, including monosaccharides and amino acids, rapidly increased in the seeds, probably indicating the breakdown of storage compounds to support seed germination. Seed concentrations of indole glucosinolates increased with a slight time offset suggesting that amino acids may be used to modify secondary metabolism. The volatile profiles of the oils were pronouncedly influenced by moist seed storage, with the sensory quality of the oils decreasing. This study provides a direct time-resolved link between seed metabolism under moist conditions and the quality of the resulting oils, thereby emphasizing the crucial role of dry seed storage in ensuring high oil quality.

  10. Influence of dietary chromium yeast supplementation on apparent trace elements metabolism in growing camel (Camelus dromedarius) reared under hot summer conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhidary, Ibrahim A; Alsofi, M A; Abdoun, K A; Samara, E M; Okab, A B; Al-Haidary, A A

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of dietary chromium (Cr) supplementation on the apparent metabolism of some trace elements in camel calves reared under hot summer conditions. The study was conducted on a total of 15 male camel calves (5-6 months old) reared under hot summer conditions for 12 weeks. The animals were housed individually under shelter and divided into three dietary treatment groups (diets supplemented with 0.0, 0.5, or 1.0 mg Cr/kg DM), five animals each. At the end of the study, a metabolic trial was conducted on all camels for the evaluation of trace elements metabolism. Cr excretion, absorption, and retention showed an increasing trend with the increasing level of dietary Cr supplementation. Dietary Cr supplementation at 0.5 mg Cr/kg DM to camel calves resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) increase in Cu and an increasing trend in Zn and Mn excretion via urine and feces. However, Fe retention increased significantly (P < 0.05) in camel calves fed on diet supplemented with Cr. Dietary Cr supplementation to camel calves resulted in an increasing trend of plasma Cr concentration, while plasma concentration of Cu and Zn tended to decrease and without any effect on plasma Fe concentration. The results of the present study suggests that care should be taken for the negative interaction of Cr with the utilization of other trace elements, in cases where Cr is supplemented to the diet as a feed additive to promote growth and immunity under hot climatic conditions.

  11. Mouse Plasminogen Has Oxidized Phosphatidylcholine Adducts That Are Not Metabolized by Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 under Basal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo M. Scanu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We previously showed that plasminogen (Plg isolated from the plasma of normal human subjects contains 1–2 moles of oxidized phosphatidylcholine (oxPtdPC adducts/mole of protein. Moreover, we suggested that these species are generated at the hepatic site and speculated that they may play a role in the reported cardiovascular pathogenicity of Plg. We aimed to determine whether mouse Plg also harbors linked oxPtdPCs and whether these molecules are metabolized by lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2/PAF acetylhydrolase (Lp-PLA2/PAF-AH, an enzyme specific for hydrolysis of oxPtdPCs. We determined the total concentration of Plg in plasma samples from control (WT and Lp-PLA2-deficient (KO mice, we isolated Plg, and assessed its content of oxPtdPCs by immunoblot analyses. We also evaluated whether human recombinant Lp-PLA2 metabolized Plg-linked oxPtdPCs in vivo and in vitro. WT and KO mice expressed comparable levels (14.4–15.8 mg/dL of plasma Plg, as determined by ELISA. We observed no differences in the content of oxPtdPC in Plg isolated from the two mouse strains and in parallel no changes in oxPtdPC content in mouse Plg following incubation with pure recombinant Lp-PLA2. Plg from mouse plasma contains oxPtdPC adducts that are not affected by the action of Lp-PLA2, suggesting that linkage to Plg protects oxPtdPCs from metabolism during their transport in the plasma. This modification may have important physio-pathological implications related to the function of Plg, oxPtdPCs, or both.

  12. Expression pattern of glucose metabolism genes correlate with development rate of buffalo oocytes and embryos in vitro under low oxygen condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parveen; Verma, Arpana; Kumar, Manish; De, Sachinandan; Kumar, Rakesh; Datta, Tirtha Kumar

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluates the effect of low oxygen conditions (5 Vs 20%) on buffalo embryo development. Expression patterns of key glucose metabolism genes (HK, PFK, LDH, PDH, G6PDH and Glut1) were assessed in buffalo oocytes and embryos cultured at 5 and 20% oxygen and correlated with development rate. Maturation rate was observed by determining MII stages by Aceto-orcein method and blastocyst formation was observed at 7 day post insemination (dpi). Expression levels of genes were determined by real time PCR in oocytes / embryos at 5 and 20% O2. Oocyte maturation and blastocyst formation rates were significantly higher at 5% O2 as compared to 20% O2 (P embryos under 5% O2 tend to follow anaerobic glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways to support optimum embryo development. Under 20% O2, oocytes and embryos had high expression of PDH indicating higher oxidative phosphorylation. Further, less G6PDH expression at 20% O2 was indicative of lower pentose phosphate activity. Higher expression of LDH was observed in oocytes and embryos under 20% O2 indicating sub-optimal culture conditions. High Glut1 activity was observed in the oocytes / embryos at 5% O2, indicative of high glucose uptake correlating with high expression of glycolytic genes. The expression patterns of glucose metabolism genes could be a valuable indicator of the development potential of oocytes and embryos. The study indicates the importance of reduced oxygen conditions for production of good quality embryos.

  13. [The differential expression of the genes of the key enzymes involved in phenolic compound metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under different nitrogen supply].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jun; Wang, Hai-Bin; Fang, Chang-Xun; Qiu, Long; Wu, Wen-Xiang; He, Hai-Bin; Lin, Wen-Xiong

    2007-10-01

    Differential expression of the key genes controlling phenolic metabolism in allelopathic and non-allelopathic rice accessions was investigated under two nitrogen supply levels (lower and normal) using fluorescence quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) (Figs.2, 3). The results indicated that 9 key enzyme genes concerned were mediated by lower nitrogen level (Table 2). All of the nine genes (Table 1, Fig.4), were up-regulated by 1.9-5.4 times of the relative gene expression amounts in allelopathic rice accession, 'PI312777' under the lower nitrogen condition compared with their controls, of which PAL gene showed the highest relative gene expression amount with 5.4 times of the relative gene expressions compared with the control, while in non-allelopathic rice Lemont, seven genes were down-regulated by 29%-72% under lower nitrogen supplies compared with their controls and only two genes, i.e., phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and cinnamoyl-CoA genes were up-regulated, which however were a decrease of 22% and 74% over those in allelopathic rice accession (Table 2). These findings strongly suggest that the increase of allelopathic potential induced by 1/4 nutrient stress was responsible for enhanced phenolic compound synthesis metabolism.

  14. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex regulator (PdhR) gene deletion boosts glucose metabolism in Escherichia coli under oxygen-limited culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Soya; Shimizu, Kumiko; Kihira, Chie; Iwabu, Yuki; Kato, Ryuichi; Sugimoto, Makoto; Fukiya, Satoru; Wada, Masaru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2017-04-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex regulator (PdhR) is a transcriptional regulator that negatively regulates formation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), NADH dehydrogenase (NDH)-2, and cytochrome bo 3 oxidase in Escherichia coli. To investigate the effects of a PdhR defect on glucose metabolism, a pdhR deletion mutant was derived from the wild-type E. coli W1485 strain by λ Red-mediated recombination. While no difference in the fermentation profiles was observed between the two strains under oxygen-sufficient conditions, under oxygen-limited conditions, the growth level of the wild-type strain was significantly decreased with retarded glucose consumption accompanied by by-production of substantial amounts of pyruvic acid and acetic acid. In contrast, the mutant grew and consumed glucose more efficiently than did the wild-type strain with enhanced respiration, little by-production of pyruvic acid, less production yield and rates of acetic acid, thus displaying robust metabolic activity. As expected, increased activities of PDHc and NDH-2 were observed in the mutant. The increased activity of PDHc may explain the loss of pyruvic acid by-production, probably leading to decreased acetic acid formation, and the increased activity of NDH-2 may explain the enhanced respiration. Measurement of the intracellular NAD + /NADH ratio in the mutant revealed more oxidative or more reductive intracellular environments than those in the wild-type strain under oxygen-sufficient and -limited conditions, respectively, suggesting another role of PdhR: maintaining redox balance in E. coli. The overall results demonstrate the biotechnological advantages of pdhR deletion in boosting glucose metabolism and also improve our understanding of the role of PdhR in bacterial physiology. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of amino acid supplementations on metabolic and physiological parameters in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Marcelino; Herves, María Antonia; Giráldez, Inmaculada; Skar, Kristin; Mogren, Hanne; Mortensen, Atle; Puvanendran, Velmurugu

    2017-04-01

    The effects of tryptophan (Trp) and phenylalanine (Phe) diet supplementation on the stress and metabolism of the Atlantic cod have been studied. Fish were fed diet supplemented with Trp or Phe or control diet for 1 week. At the end of the feeding trial, fish were subjected to air exposure or heat shock. Following samples of blood, liver and muscle were taken from the fish and were analyzed for stress and metabolic indicators. After an air exposure, plasma cortisol levels in fish fed with Trp and Phe diets were lower compared to the fish fed the control diet. Diets containing both amino acids increased significantly the liver transaminase activities in juvenile cod. During thermal stress, high Trp contents had significant effects on fructose biphosphatase activity though Phe did not. Overall, activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and phosphofructokinase increased significantly for both amino acid diets. For the thermal stress, fish had the highest values of those activities for the 3Trp diet. Trp content in the diet had significant effects on the transaminase activity in muscle during air stress compared to fish fed control and Phe diets. Muscle alanine transaminase activity for thermal stress in fish fed any diet was not significantly different from the control. Both Trp and Phe supplementations reduced the stress markers in the cod; hence, they could be used as additives for the stress attenuation. However, they also raised the activity of key enzymes in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, mainly the Trp diets.

  16. Mnemonics usage and cognitive decline in age-associated memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, G W; La Rue, A; Komo, S; Kaplan, A; Mandelkern, M A

    1997-03-01

    To determine predictors of cognitive deterioration, the authors performed baseline and 1- to 5-year follow-up (mean +/- SD = 2.5 +/- 1.2 years) neuropsychological assessments on 36 persons (mean age +/- SD = 62.1 +/- 8.0; range = 50 to 81 years) with age-associated memory impairment. Subjects were recruited from a larger group of volunteers, had minimal medical comorbidity, and 25 of them had a family history of Alzheimer's disease. Baseline age and a subjective memory measure indicating reported frequency of mnemonics usage were significant decline predictors. Subjects reporting more frequent mnemonics use at baseline were more likely to show objective cognitive decline at follow-up. Baseline full-scale IQ, educational level, and family history of Alzheimer's disease failed to predict decline. These findings suggest that although age is the strongest decline predictor in some people with age-associated memory impairment, self-perception of memory function may also predict subsequent cognitive loss.

  17. Nutritional support in children under metabolic stress Soporte nutricional en el niño con estrés metabólico

    OpenAIRE

    María Elsy Sepúlveda Hincapié

    1999-01-01

    A review is presented on metabolic changes that occur in children under stress, and on the organs that are affected by the response to it; also considered are the different resources that are presently available in order to maintain nutrition in these children and to improve their probabilities of recovery. Se hace una revisión acerca de los cambios metabólicos que ocurren en el niño durante el estrés y los órganos que se afectan en su respuesta; se tienen en cuenta además, los diferentes rec...

  18. 31P-MR-spectroscopy of the skeletal muscles under load: demonstration of normal energy metabolism compared to different neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, W.; Traeber, F.; Kuhl, C.K.; Keller, E.; Rink, H.; Schild, H.H.; Karitzky, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: 31 P-MR spectroscopy of skeletal muscle under ecercise was used to obtain the range of normal variation and comparison was made for different neuromascular diseases. Methods: 41 examinations of 24 volunteers and 41 investigations in 35 patients were performed on 1.5 T MR systems (Gyroscan S15 und S15/ACSII, Philips). Localised 31 P-MR spectra of the calf muscle were obtained in time series with a resolution of 12 s. Results: Two types of muscle energy metabolism were identified from the pattern of spectroscopic time course in volunteers: While the first group was characterised by a remarkable decline to lower pH values during exercise, the second group showed only small pH shifts (minimum pH: 6.48±0.13 vs 6.87±0.07, p -6 ) although comparable workload conditions were maintained. The pH-values correlated well with blood lactate analysis. Patients with metabolic disorders and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) showed decreased resting values of PCr/(PCr+P i ) and increased pH levels during exercise. PCr recovery was significantly delayed (0.31 vs 0.65 min -1 , p i ), altered pH time courses, and decreased PCr recovery seem to be helpful indicators for diagnosis of metabolic muscle disorders. (orig./MG) [de

  19. [Resting metabolic rate, stress, testosterone, and induced immune response in "spring" and "fall" males of Campbell dwarf hamsters. Rearing under the long day conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogovin, K A; Bushuev, A V; Khrushchova, A M; Vasil'eva, N Iu

    2013-01-01

    We have studied morphological and physiological traits of even-young males of Campbell dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli Thomas, 1905) born at the end of summer ("fall males") and at the end of winter ("spring males") in a vivarium with constant 14-hour day length (14D:10N). After removal from parental cages at the age of one month, males were kept in isolation under the same light conditions. The results obained signify the statistical difference between "fall" and "spring" males in resting metabolic rate, morphological traits associated with sexual activity, some endocrine and immunologic characteristics. Spring males had higher resting metabolic rate, higher body mass in the middle of experiment, bigger testes, seminal vesicles, higher concentration of testosterone in blood and more intensive T-cell immune response to the intracutaneous injection of phytohemagglutinin. They did not differ significantly in basal level of blood cortisole and antibodies production in response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) antigen challenge, but possessed lower adrenocortical response to the social stressor and adrenocorticotropic hormone. GLM analysis showed that cortisol level in blood after 10 min encounter of males in the open arena, and resting metabolic rate were the only factors significantly influenced humoral immune response to SRBC. When intensity of T-cell immune response was considered as dependent variable, season turned out to be the only factor in the final model that caused a significant effect.

  20. A short period of fasting before surgery conserves basal metabolism and suppresses catabolism according to indirect calorimetry performed under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinichiro; Fujita, Yoshihito; Hirate, Hiroyuki; Kusama, Nobuyoshi; Azami, Takafumi; Sobue, Kazuya

    2015-06-01

    It is recommended that the period of fasting before elective surgery should be shortened to facilitate a rapid recovery by preventing catabolism. We examined the effects of a short period of fasting on metabolism by performing indirect calorimetry (IC) under general anesthesia. A prospective observational study involving 26 consecutive patients who underwent elective surgery and whose metabolism was evaluated using IC during anesthesia was conducted. The patients were divided into two groups, those who fasted for 10 h (group L). Oxygen consumption, the volume of carbon dioxide emissions (VCO2), the respiratory quotient (RQ), resting energy expenditure (REE), and basal energy expenditure (BEE) were compared. The REE, VCO2, and RQ of group L (17.7 ± 2.3 kcal/kg/day, 118.5 ± 20.8 ml/min, and 0.71 ± 0.12, respectively) were significantly lower than those of group S (19.7 ± 2.3 kcal/kg/day, 143.6 ± 30.9 ml/min, and 0.81 ± 0.09, respectively) (P basal metabolism.

  1. Impact of organic and mineral inputs onto soil biological and metabolic activities under a long-term rice-wheat cropping system in sub-tropical Indian Inceptisols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Nirmalendu; Datta, Ashim; Mitran, Tarik; Mandal, Biswapati; Mani, P K

    2016-01-01

    Long-term use of organic and mineral inputs has an overriding impact on soil biological and metabolic activities and crop management. Farm yard manure (FYM), paddy straw (PS) and green manure (GM, Sesbania sesban L.) were used for 24- years old rice (Oyza sativa L.) -wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cropping system in sub-tropical India to predict whether the screened soil biological and metabolic activities are correlated with system yield. The integrated approaches viz., NPK + FYM, NPK + PS and NPK + GM significantly increased both rice and wheat yield together by 67.5, 44.4 and 55.4%, respectively over control. However, for a few exceptions both soil microbial activity and metabolic activity were remarkably enhanced under integrated treatment NPK + FYM followed by NPK + PS, and NPK + GM, respectively. Among the studied attributes fluorescein diacetate hydrolyzing, dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase activity (β-glu) and microbial biomass C (C(mic)) were screened through principal component (PCA) and discriminate analysis (DA) that explained nearly 89% of total variations of the entire data set. Among the four identified attributes, only β-glu assay value could predict system yield (R2 = 0.65). Further, estimation of β-glu activity in soil can predict other soil biological properties (R2 = 0.96).

  2. Identification of Aging-Associated Gene Expression Signatures That Precede Intestinal Tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Okuchi

    Full Text Available Aging-associated alterations of cellular functions have been implicated in various disorders including cancers. Due to difficulties in identifying aging cells in living tissues, most studies have focused on aging-associated changes in whole tissues or certain cell pools. Thus, it remains unclear what kinds of alterations accumulate in each cell during aging. While analyzing several mouse lines expressing fluorescent proteins (FPs, we found that expression of FPs is gradually silenced in the intestinal epithelium during aging in units of single crypt composed of clonal stem cell progeny. The cells with low FP expression retained the wild-type Apc allele and the tissues composed of them did not exhibit any histological abnormality. Notably, the silencing of FPs was also observed in intestinal adenomas and the surrounding normal mucosae of Apc-mutant mice, and mediated by DNA methylation of the upstream promoter. Our genome-wide analysis then showed that the silencing of FPs reflects specific gene expression alterations during aging, and that these alterations occur in not only mouse adenomas but also human sporadic and hereditary (familial adenomatous polyposis adenomas. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of DNA methylation, which suppresses adenoma development in Apc-mutant mice, reverted the aging-associated silencing of FPs and gene expression alterations. These results identify aging-associated gene expression signatures that are heterogeneously induced by DNA methylation and precede intestinal tumorigenesis triggered by Apc inactivation, and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the signature genes could be a novel strategy for the prevention and treatment of intestinal tumors.

  3. Dietary (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate Supplementation Counteracts Aging-Associated Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance and Fatty Liver in Senescence-Accelerated Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hung-Wen; Chan, Yin-Ching; Wang, Ming-Fu; Wei, Chu-Chun; Chang, Sue-Joan

    2015-09-30

    Aging is accompanied by pathophysiological changes including insulin resistance and fatty liver. Dietary supplementation with (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) improves insulin sensitivity and attenuates fatty liver disease. We hypothesized that EGCG could effectively modulate aging-associated changes in glucose and lipid metabolism in senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) prone 8 (SAMP8). Higher levels of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid, inhibited Akt activity, and decreased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) expression were observed in SAMP8 mice compared to the normal aging group, SAM resistant 1 mice. EGCG supplementation for 12 weeks successfully decreased blood glucose and insulin levels via restoring Akt activity and GLUT4 expression and stimulating AMPKα activation in skeletal muscle. EGCG up-regulated genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and subsequently restored mitochondrial DNA copy number in skeletal muscle of SAMP8 mice. Decreased adipose triglyceride lipase and increased sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1c (SREBP-1c) and carbohydrate responsive element binding protein at mRNA levels were observed in SAMP8 mice in accordance with hepatocellular ballooning and excess lipid accumulation. The pevention of hepatic lipid accumulation by EGCG was mainly attributed to down-regulation of mTOR and SREBP-1c-mediated lipid biosynthesis via suppression of the positive regulator, Akt, and activation of the negative regulator, AMPKα, in the liver. EGCG beneficially modulates glucose and lipid homeostasis in skeletal muscle and liver, leading to alleviation of aging-associated metabolic disorders.

  4. Aging-associated oxidative stress inhibits liver progenitor cell activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiji; Wang, Xue; Wang, Bei; Zhou, Hong; Dang, Shipeng; Shi, Yufang; Hao, Li; Luo, Qingquan; Jin, Min; Zhou, Qianjun; Zhang, Yanyun

    2017-04-29

    Recent studies have discovered aging-associated changes of adult stem cells in various tissues and organs, which potentially contribute to the organismal aging. However, aging-associated changes of liver progenitor cells (LPCs) remain elusive. Employing young (2-month-old) and old (24-month-old) mice, we found diverse novel alterations in LPC activation during aging. LPCs in young mice could be activated and proliferate upon liver injury, whereas the counterparts in old mice failed to respond and proliferate, leading to the impaired liver regeneration. Surprisingly, isolated LPCs from young and old mice did not exhibit significant difference in their clonogenic and proliferative capacity. Later, we uncovered that the decreased activation and proliferation of LPCs were due to excessive reactive oxygen species produced by neutrophils infiltrated into niche, which was resulted from chemokine production from activated hepatic stellate cells during aging. This study demonstrates aging-associated changes in LPC activation and reveals critical roles for the stem cell niche, including neutrophils and hepatic stellate cells, in the negative regulation of LPCs during aging.

  5. Oxidative Stress andSalvia miltiorrhizain Aging-Associated Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Chun; Hu, Wen-Long; Hung, Yu-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Aging-associated cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have some risk factors that are closely related to oxidative stress. Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) has been used commonly to treat CVDs for hundreds of years in the Chinese community. We aimed to explore the effects of SM on oxidative stress in aging-associated CVDs. Through literature searches using Medicine, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, CINAHL, and Scopus databases, we found that SM not only possesses antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects but also exerts angiogenic and cardioprotective activities. SM may reduce the production of reactive oxygen species by inhibiting oxidases, reducing the production of superoxide, inhibiting the oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins, and ameliorating mitochondrial oxidative stress. SM also increases the activities of catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and coupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase. In addition, SM reduces the impact of ischemia/reperfusion injury, prevents cardiac fibrosis after myocardial infarction, preserves cardiac function in coronary disease, maintains the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, and promotes self-renewal and proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells in stroke. However, future clinical well-designed and randomized control trials will be necessary to confirm the efficacy of SM in aging-associated CVDs.

  6. Elucidation of rice rhizosphere metagenome in relation to methane and nitrogen metabolism under elevated carbon dioxide and temperature using whole genome metagenomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Das, M; Ray, S; Balachandar, D; Karthikeyan, S; Nayak, A K; Mohapatra, T

    2016-01-15

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) mineralization is one of the key processes of biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem in general and rice ecology in particular. Rice rhizosphere is a rich niche of microbial diversity influenced by change in atmospheric temperature and concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Structural changes in microbial communities in rhizosphere influence the nutrient cycling. In the present study, the bacterial diversity and population dynamics were studied under ambient CO2 (a-CO2) and elevated CO2+temperature (e-CO2T) in lowland rice rhizosphere using whole genome metagenomic approach. The whole genome metagenomic sequence data of lowland rice exhibited the dominance of bacterial communities including Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes. Interestingly, four genera related to methane production namely, Methanobacterium, Methanosphaera, Methanothermus and Methanothermococcus were absent in a-CO2 but noticed under e-CO2T. The acetoclastic pathway was found as the predominant pathway for methanogenesis, whereas, the serine pathway was found as the principal metabolic pathway for CH4 oxidation in lowland rice. The abundances of reads of enzymes in the acetoclastic methanogenesis pathway and serine pathways of methanotrophy were much higher in e-CO2T (328 and 182, respectively) as compared with a-CO2 (118 and 98, respectively). Rice rhizosphere showed higher structural diversities and functional activities in relation to N metabolism involving nitrogen fixation, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction and denitrification under e-CO2T than that of a-CO2. Among the three pathways of N metabolism, dissimilarity pathways were predominant in lowland rice rhizosphere and more so under e-CO2T. Consequently, under e-CO2T, CH4 emission, microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and dehydrogenase activities were 45%, 20% and 35% higher than a-CO2, respectively. Holistically, a high bacterial diversity and

  7. Molecular phylogenomic study and the role of exogenous spermidine in the metabolic adjustment of endogenous polyamine in two rice cultivars under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Jayita; Giri, Kalyan

    2017-04-20

    Compelling evidences anticipated the well acclamation of involvement of exogenous and endogenous polyamines (PAs) in conferring salt tolerance in plants. Intracellular PA's anabolism and catabolism should have contributed to maintain endogenous PAs homeostasis to induce stress signal networks. In this report, the evolutionary study has been conducted to reveal the phylogenetic relationship of genes encoding enzymes of the anabolic and catabolic pathway of PAs among the five plant lineages including green algae, moss, lycophyte, dicot and monocot along with their respective exon-intron structural patterns. Our results indicated that natural selection pressure had considerable influence on the ancestral PA metabolic pathway coding genes of land plants. PA metabolic genes have undergone gradual evolution by duplication and diversification process leading to subsequent structural modification through exon-intron gain and loss events to acquire specific function under environmental stress conditions. We have illuminated on the potential regulation of both the pathways by investigating the real-time expression analyses of PA metabolic pathway related enzyme coding genes at the transcriptional level in root and shoot tissues of two indica rice varieties, namely IR 36 (salt sensitive) and Nonabokra (salt-tolerant) in response to salinity in presence or absence of exogenous spermidine (Spd) treatment. Additionally, we have performed tissue specific quantification of the intracellular PAs and tried to draw probable connection between the PA metabolic pathway activation and endogenous PAs accumulation. Our results successfully enlighten the fact that how exogenous Spd in presence or absence of salt stress adjust the intracellular PA pathways to equilibrate the cellular PAs that would have been attributed to plant salt tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Changes in intestinal microbiota composition and metabolism coincide with increased intestinal permeability in young adults under prolonged physiological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, J Philip; Margolis, Lee M; Madslien, Elisabeth H; Murphy, Nancy E; Castellani, John W; Gundersen, Yngvar; Hoke, Allison V; Levangie, Michael W; Kumar, Raina; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Gautam, Aarti; Hammamieh, Rasha; Martini, Svein; Montain, Scott J; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2017-06-01

    The magnitude, temporal dynamics, and physiological effects of intestinal microbiome responses to physiological stress are poorly characterized. This study used a systems biology approach and a multiple-stressor military training environment to determine the effects of physiological stress on intestinal microbiota composition and metabolic activity, as well as intestinal permeability (IP). Soldiers ( n = 73) were provided three rations per day with or without protein- or carbohydrate-based supplements during a 4-day cross-country ski-march (STRESS). IP was measured before and during STRESS. Blood and stool samples were collected before and after STRESS to measure inflammation, stool microbiota, and stool and plasma global metabolite profiles. IP increased 62 ± 57% (mean ± SD, P Intestinal microbiota responses were characterized by increased α-diversity and changes in the relative abundance of >50% of identified genera, including increased abundance of less dominant taxa at the expense of more dominant taxa such as Bacteroides Changes in intestinal microbiota composition were linked to 23% of metabolites that were significantly altered in stool after STRESS. Together, pre-STRESS Actinobacteria relative abundance and changes in serum IL-6 and stool cysteine concentrations accounted for 84% of the variability in the change in IP. Findings demonstrate that a multiple-stressor military training environment induced increases in IP that were associated with alterations in markers of inflammation and with intestinal microbiota composition and metabolism. Associations between IP, the pre-STRESS microbiota, and microbiota metabolites suggest that targeting the intestinal microbiota could provide novel strategies for preserving IP during physiological stress. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Military training, a unique model for studying temporal dynamics of intestinal barrier and intestinal microbiota responses to stress, resulted in increased intestinal permeability concomitant with

  9. Expression profiling of Crambe abyssinica under arsenate stress identifies genes and gene networks involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandasamy Suganthi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic contamination is widespread throughout the world and this toxic metalloid is known to cause cancers of organs such as liver, kidney, skin, and lung in human. In spite of a recent surge in arsenic related studies, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of arsenic uptake, detoxification, and sequestration in plants. Crambe abyssinica, commonly known as 'abyssinian mustard', is a non-food, high biomass oil seed crop that is naturally tolerant to heavy metals. Moreover, it accumulates significantly higher levels of arsenic as compared to other species of the Brassicaceae family. Thus, C. abyssinica has great potential to be utilized as an ideal inedible crop for phytoremediation of heavy metals and metalloids. However, the mechanism of arsenic metabolism in higher plants, including C. abyssinica, remains elusive. Results To identify the differentially expressed transcripts and the pathways involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification, C. abyssinica plants were subjected to arsenate stress and a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization (SSH approach was employed. A total of 105 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced which were found to represent 38 genes. Those genes encode proteins functioning as antioxidants, metal transporters, reductases, enzymes involved in the protein degradation pathway, and several novel uncharacterized proteins. The transcripts corresponding to the subtracted cDNAs showed strong upregulation by arsenate stress as confirmed by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusions Our study revealed novel insights into the plant defense mechanisms and the regulation of genes and gene networks in response to arsenate toxicity. The differential expression of transcripts encoding glutathione-S-transferases, antioxidants, sulfur metabolism, heat-shock proteins, metal transporters, and enzymes in the ubiquitination pathway of protein degradation as well as several unknown

  10. Seagrass habitat metabolism increases short-term extremes and long-term offset of CO2 under future ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, Stephen R; Brown, Cheryl A; Waldbusser, George G; Labiosa, Rochelle G; Hales, Burke

    2018-04-10

    The role of rising atmospheric CO 2 in modulating estuarine carbonate system dynamics remains poorly characterized, likely due to myriad processes driving the complex chemistry in these habitats. We reconstructed the full carbonate system of an estuarine seagrass habitat for a summer period of 2.5 months utilizing a combination of time-series observations and mechanistic modeling, and quantified the roles of aerobic metabolism, mixing, and gas exchange in the observed dynamics. The anthropogenic CO 2 burden in the habitat was estimated for the years 1765-2100 to quantify changes in observed high-frequency carbonate chemistry dynamics. The addition of anthropogenic CO 2 alters the thermodynamic buffer factors (e.g., the Revelle factor) of the carbonate system, decreasing the seagrass habitat's ability to buffer natural carbonate system fluctuations. As a result, the most harmful carbonate system indices for many estuarine organisms [minimum pH T , minimum Ω arag , and maximum pCO 2(s.w.) ] change up to 1.8×, 2.3×, and 1.5× more rapidly than the medians for each parameter, respectively. In this system, the relative benefits of the seagrass habitat in locally mitigating ocean acidification increase with the higher atmospheric CO 2 levels predicted toward 2100. Presently, however, these mitigating effects are mixed due to intense diel cycling of CO 2 driven by aerobic metabolism. This study provides estimates of how high-frequency pH T , Ω arag , and pCO 2(s.w.) dynamics are altered by rising atmospheric CO 2 in an estuarine habitat, and highlights nonlinear responses of coastal carbonate parameters to ocean acidification relevant for water quality management.

  11. Capillary electrophoresis reveals polyamine metabolism modulation in Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis wild type and arginase knockout mutants under arginine starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho-Martins, Emerson A; Canuto, Gisele A B; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; da Silva, Maria Fernanda Laranjeira; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria; Del Aguila, Carmen; López-Gonzálvez, Ángeles; Barbas, Coral

    2015-07-23

    L-arginine is an essential amino acid in Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis metabolism. A key enzyme for parasite L-arginine metabolism is arginase (ARG) that uses arginine to produce urea and ornithine, a precursor of polyamine pathway guaranteeing parasite replication in both insect and mammal hosts. There is an alternative pathway to produce ornithine via L-proline and glutamate, but this mechanism is not described in Leishmania. In the mammal host, two enzymes can use L-arginine as substrate, the host ARG and the induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) that produces nitric oxide (NO). The competition between iNOS and both parasite and host ARG can favor the success of the infection or its control. Here, we established the metabolomic profile of the polyamine pathway of wild type (WT) L. (L.) amazonensis, submitted or not to L-arginine starvation, and compared to the ARG knockout mutant (arg - ). Our results indicated that arginine starvation induces a decrease in arginine, ornithine and putrescine, but we could not detect significative level changes of spermidine, spermidine or agmatine. However, the absence of ARG on the arg- mutant induced an increase of arginine and citrulline levels, but decreased the levels of ornithine and putrescine. Similarly to the WT arginine-starved parasites, the arg-parasites presented lower levels of proline when compared to the WT. This could be indicative of an alternative pathway to surpass the enzyme or its substrate absence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamics of Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolic Parameters under Complex Therapy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Combined with Primary Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Yu. Yuzvenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of work was to study dynamics of carbohydrate and lipid metabolic parameters under complex therapy in patients with the type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM combined with primary hypothyroidism. 173 persons (26 men and 147 women were examined. The first (basic group consisted of 52 patients with  type 2 DM combined with primary hypothyroidism. The second group was formed with 55 patients with type 2 DM without thyroid pathology, the third group included 48 patients with primary hypothyroidism without DM (groups of comparison. In the group of type 2 DM patients with primary hypothyroidism in 4 and 12 weeks of complex therapy there were found the improvement of indexes of fasting glucose, postprandial glycemia and glycated haemoglobin, and there was compensation of hypothyroidism in 12 weeks. In patients with the combined pathology there were registered more severe violations of lipid metabolism as an increased values of triglycerides, total holesterol, declined high density lipoproteins, than in the groups of comparison. Under a complex therapy the positive dynamics of lipid spectrum is educed as a declined level of total holesterol, low density lipoproteins, atherogenic coefficient. Levels of total holesterol, triglycerides, atherogenic coefficient positively correlate with the level of thyreotrophin in primary hypothyroidism.

  13. Effects of preoperative carprofen on cardio-respiratory, hormonal and metabolic stress response in calves during umbilical surgery under isoflurane inhalation anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, I; Poos, E M; Meyer, H; List, A K; Kaestner, S B R; Rehage, J

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of preoperative carprofen on the cardiorespiratory, hormonal and metabolic stress response during umbilical surgery under isoflurane anaesthesia combined with local anaesthesia, in calves. A randomised, blinded experimental study was conducted in 24 calves. Carprofen (n = 12; 1.4 mg/kg) or physiological saline solution (controls; n = 12) was administered 1 h prior to surgery. Anaesthesia was induced with xylazine (0.1 mg/kg, IM) and, after the onset of sedation (i.e. after 5-8 min), ketamine was administered (2 mg/kg, IV). Anaesthesia was then maintained with isoflurane (ISO) in oxygen to effect and completed by infiltration of the incision line with 20 mL of 2% procaine. Cardiorespiratory, endocrine and metabolic parameters were examined before, during and after surgery at short intervals. In both groups, anaesthesia appeared adequate for the surgical intervention. Heart rate, stroke index and arterial blood pressure were significantly elevated after the onset of surgery. Oxygen partial pressure and oxygen delivery increased, while the oxygen extraction ratio decreased intraoperatively, ensuring sufficient oxygen supply. In the control group, the mean surge in serum cortisol concentrations tended to be higher (P = 0.089) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was significantly greater (P stress response in calves undergoing umbilical surgery under ISO anaesthesia after administering carprofen preoperatively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Partitioning between primary and secondary metabolism of carbon allocated to roots in four maize genotypes under water deficit and its effects on productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyne Oliveira Lavinsky

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants may respond to drought by altering biomass allocation to shoots and roots or by changing the metabolic activities in these organs. To determine how drought changes the partitioning of carbon allocated to growth and secondary metabolism in maize roots and how it affects photosynthesis (A and productivity in maize, we evaluated leaf gas exchange, yield componentes, root morphology, and primary and secondary metabolites including total soluble sugars (TSS, starch (S, phenolics (PHE, and lignin (LIG. Data were collected from pot-grown plants of four maize genotypes: BRS 1010 and 2B710 (sensitive genotypes and DKB390 and BRS1055 (tolerant genotypes under two soil water tensions: field capacity (FC, − 18 kPa and water deficit (WD, − 138 kPa. WD was applied at the pre-flowering stage for 12 days and then the water supply was restored and maintained at optimum levels until the end of the cycle. For genotype BRS 1055 under FC, the greatest A did not result in greater grain biomass (DGB because the accumulated photoassimilates had already filled the cells, and thus the excessive TSS synthesized in leaves was allocated to roots in large amounts. However, the sharp decrease in A caused by WD imposition in this genotype did not affect the influx pressure of leaf TSS, which was due largely to conversion of primary metabolites to PHE compounds to increase the length of fine roots. In leaves of DKB390 under WD, both S and TSS were reduced, whereas PHE were increased to prevent excessive water loss and xylem cavitation. Under WD, both BRS1010 and 2B710 genotypes displayed reduced allocation of biomass to shoots and roots and LIG content in leaves, as well as lower A and DGB values. In BRS1010 this response was coupled to S decrease in leaves and TSS increase in roots, whereas in 2B710 there was a concomitant S increase in roots.

  15. Calcium and phosphate regulation of nitrogen metabolism in the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis under the high light stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D P; Singh, N

    2000-11-01

    High light stress (40 W/m(2))-induced alterations in the nitrogen assimilatory enzymes in Spirulina platensis were studied under the Ca(2+) and phosphate (Pi)-supplemented as well as starved conditions. Results revealed that activities of nitrate reductase (NR), amino acid transferases (AST/GOT and ALT/GPT), and protease enzymes in the high-light-incubated cells were relatively higher under the Ca(2+)- and Pi-starved conditions. On the contrary, relative rates of glutamine synthetase (GS) and ATPase activities were lower in the Ca(2+)- and Pi-starved cells. But the Spirulina cells under the Ca(2+)- and Pi-added conditions showed enhanced activity of both GS and ATPase enzymes. During the high-light stress, a decline in the GS activity, particularly under the Ca(2+)- and Pi-starved conditions, was indicative of a nitrogen starvation-like condition. This could be one of the reasons for induction of the NR and protease enzymes. A higher rate of GS activity was recorded under both the Ca(2+)- and Pi-supplemented conditions, perhaps owing to the enhanced rate of ATPase activity in such conditions. But a declining pattern of both NR and protease activities in the presence of Ca(2+) and Pi, despite the higher rate of ATPase activity, might involve some other mechanism like the protein-kinase system.

  16. Physiological and metabolic responses to rising temperature in Gammarus pulex (Crustacea) populations living under continental or Mediterranean climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucreau, N; Cottin, D; Piscart, C; Hervant, F

    2014-02-01

    Latitudinal thermal gradients offer the possibility of comparing the current performance of populations of a single species living in contrasting thermal conditions. The Rhône River Valley (France) presents a 5°C thermal gradient corresponding to the increase in temperature predicted by climatic models (IPCC, 2007). We studied the thermal tolerance to rising temperature (from 15 to 30°C) of five populations of the key species Gammarus pulex living either in the North (i.e. the cold part) or in the South (i.e. the warm part) of the river Valley. Individuals were acclimated at 18, 21, 24, 27 or 30°C during 10days. After this period, we here measured experimentally the populations' survival, ventilatory rate, oxygen consumption, and glycogen and triglyceride contents. Southern populations have a higher survival rate and higher oxygen consumption at higher temperatures (27 and 30°C) in comparison with northern populations. Southern individuals also presented a hyperventilation, and higher energy stores compared to northern individuals whatever the acclimation temperature considered. In a global change context, the rising temperatures during the next decades may differently impair the metabolism and the survival of populations of G. pulex from different geographical origins. These differences in ecophysiological responses of organisms must be taken into account to predict the consequences of climate change. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biotransformation of Isolan dyes by Aspergillus niger ES-5 under Co-metabolic Conditions for Glucose Oxidase Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, O.M.; Abd El Kareem, H.; Fathey, F.; Montaser, M.; Zaki, Sh.

    2008-01-01

    Aspergillus niger ES-5 isolated from Egyptian soil was chosen for its high decolorizing performance (90-98.8%) of 4 Isolan dyes (metal reactive azo group). The decolorisation profile was highly dependent on the presence or absence of co-substrates needed for glucose oxidase (GOD) production. The extracellular fluid (ECF), autoclaved mycelia and mycelia grown in dye solution with no supplements showed a sharp drop in decolorisation (0-7.3%) confirming the biological involvement of growth-linked enzymatic system. The metal content of Isolan dyes was analyzed by Energy Dispersive Xray Spectroscopy (EDS), Cr, Cu, Zn and S were found in cultures, and were below the detection limit after 72 hr incubation. A range of 8-50% decrease in decolorisation was obtained when gamma radiation (up to 8 KGy) was used in combination with fungal pellets. A. niger ES-5 showed over 80% decolorisation for a mixture of the 4 dyes, while decolorisation of real textile effluent showed 75%. All previous data suggest a metabolically mediated dye decolorisation mechanism for live A. niger ES- 5 and points to its potential use in dye decolorisation of real textile effluent

  18. Age-associated increase of the active zone protein Bruchpilot within the honeybee mushroom body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin B Gehring

    Full Text Available In honeybees, age-associated structural modifications can be observed in the mushroom bodies. Prominent examples are the synaptic complexes (microglomeruli, MG in the mushroom body calyces, which were shown to alter their size and density with age. It is not known whether the amount of intracellular synaptic proteins in the MG is altered as well. The presynaptic protein Bruchpilot (BRP is localized at active zones and is involved in regulating the probability of neurotransmitter release in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we explored the localization of the honeybee BRP (Apis mellifera BRP, AmBRP in the bee brain and examined age-related changes in the AmBRP abundance in the central bee brain and in microglomeruli of the mushroom body calyces. We report predominant AmBRP localization near the membrane of presynaptic boutons within the mushroom body MG. The relative amount of AmBRP was increased in the central brain of two-week old bees whereas the amount of Synapsin, another presynaptic protein involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release, shows an increase during the first two weeks followed by a decrease. In addition, we demonstrate an age-associated modulation of AmBRP located near the membrane of presynaptic boutons within MG located in mushroom body calyces where sensory input is conveyed to mushroom body intrinsic neurons. We discuss that the observed age-associated AmBRP modulation might be related to maturation processes or to homeostatic mechanisms that might help to maintain synaptic functionality in old animals.

  19. Age-associated intracellular superoxide dismutase deficiency potentiates dermal fibroblast dysfunction during wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Dohi, Teruyuki; Maan, Zeshaan N; Rustad, Kristine C; Kwon, Sun Hyung; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Whittam, Alexander J; Suga, Hirotaka; Duscher, Dominik; Rodrigues, Melanie; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2017-07-04

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) impair wound healing through destructive oxidation of intracellular proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Intracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD1) regulates ROS levels and plays a critical role in tissue homoeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that age-associated wound healing impairments may partially result from decreased SOD1 expression. We investigated the mechanistic basis by which increased oxidative stress links to age-associated impaired wound healing. Fibroblasts were isolated from unwounded skin of young and aged mice, and myofibroblast differentiation was assessed by measuring α-smooth muscle actin and collagen gel contraction. Excisional wounds were created on young and aged mice to study the healing rate, ROS levels and SOD1 expression. A mechanistic link between oxidative stress and fibroblast function was explored by assessing the TGF-β1 signalling pathway components in young and aged mice. Age-related wounds displayed reduced myofibroblast differentiation and delayed wound healing, consistent with a decrease in the in vitro capacity for fibroblast-myofibroblast transition following oxidative stress. Young fibroblasts with normal SOD1 expression exhibited increased phosphorylation of ERK in response to elevated ROS. In contrast, aged fibroblasts with reduced SOD1 expression displayed a reduced capacity to modulate intracellular ROS. Collectively, age-associated wound healing impairments are associated with fibroblast dysfunction that is likely the result of decreased SOD1 expression and subsequent dysregulation of intracellular ROS. Strategies targeting these mechanisms may suggest a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of chronic non-healing wounds in the aged population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Improvement of aging-associated cardiovascular dysfunction by the orally administered copper(II)-aspirinate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovits, Tamás; Gerö, Domokos; Lin, Li-ni; Loganathan, Sivakkanan; Hoppe-Tichy, Torsten; Szabó, Csaba; Karck, Matthias; Sakurai, Hiromu; Szabó, Gábor

    2008-10-01

    Aging-associated nitro-oxidative stress causes tissue injury and activates proinflammatory pathways that play an important role in the pathogenesis of aging-associated cardiovascular dysfunction. It has been recently reported, that the copper(II)-aspirinate complex (CuAsp) exerts not only the well-known anti-inflammatory and platelet antiaggregating effects of aspirin, but, due to its superoxide dismutase mimetic activity, it acts as a potent antioxidant as well. In this study we investigated the effects of CuAsp on aging-associated myocardial and endothelial dysfunction. Aging and young rats were treated for 3 weeks with vehicle, or with CuAsp (200 mg/kg per day per os). Left ventricular pressure-volume relations were measured by using a microtip pressure-volume conductance catheter, and indexes of contractility (e.g., slope of end-systolic pressure-volume relationships [ESPVR] [E(es)], and dP/dt(max) - end-diastolic volume [EDV]) were calculated. In organ bath experiments for isometric tension with isolated aortic rings, endothelium-dependent and -independent vasorelaxation were investigated by using acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. When compared to the young controls, aging rats showed impaired left ventricular contractility (E(es), 0.51 +/- 0.04 vs. 2.16 +/- 0.28 mmHg/microL; dP/dt(max) - EDV, 10.71 +/- 2.02 vs. 37.23 +/- 4.18 mmHg/sec per microL; p aging animals (94.83 +/- 0.73 vs. 66.66 +/- 1.30%; p cardiovascular functions of young rats. Our results demonstrate that oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular dysfunction in the aging organism, which can be reversed by CuAsp.

  1. Potassium up-regulates antioxidant metabolism and alleviates growth inhibition under water and osmotic stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanger, Mohammad Abass; Agarwal, R M

    2017-07-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to find out the effectivity of K on Triticum aestivum L cultivars. Polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000) was used as an osmoticum to induce osmotic stress under sand culture setting up the water potential of external solution at -3 and -5 bars. In pots, plants were raised under restricted and normal irrigation and K was applied in varying doses (0, 20, 40, 60 kg ha -1 ) and estimation of different physiological and biochemical parameters was done at two developmental stages, i.e., preflowering and flowering. Supplementation of K resulted in obvious increase in growth and activity of antioxidant enzymes in both normal and stressed plants. Added potassium increased total phenols and tannins thereby strengthening the components of both the enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant system. Under both normal and stressed conditions, K-fed plants experienced significant increase in the synthesis of osmolytes like free proline, amino acids, and sugars which assumes special significance in growth under water stress conditions. Wheat plants accumulating greater K were able to counteract the water stress-induced changes by maintaining lower Na/K ratio.

  2. Activation of the AMP activated protein kinase by short-chain fatty acids is the main mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of a high fiber diet on the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guo-Xin; Chen, Guo-Rong; Xu, Hui; Ge, Ren-Shan; Lin, Jing

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of conditions including abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and elevated blood pressure, is a natural consequence of over nutrition and a sedentary lifestyle. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome has increased to epidemic proportions in the world. The exact pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome remains unclear, but it is known to be a complex interaction between genetic, metabolic, and environmental factors. Promotion of physical activity and dietary management are still the main methods for the prevention and management of the metabolic syndrome. Numerous experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of high fiber diet on the metabolic syndrome. The principal beneficial effects of a fiber-rich diet in these patients are: prevention of obesity, improved glucose levels, and control of the profile of blood lipids. Dietary fiber may also favor the control of arterial blood pressure. How dietary fiber exerts its beneficial effects on the metabolic syndrome is not well understood. AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) functions as a major cellular fuel gauge and a master regulator of metabolic homeostasis. Several lines of evidence suggest that AMPK can be activated by short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) either directly or indirectly. It is our hypothesis that the main mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of a high fiber diet on the metabolic syndrome is the increased SCFA production in the colon leading to a higher concentration of SCFA in the portal vein, which activates the AMPK in the liver.

  3. Spearmint Extract Improves Working Memory in Men and Women with Age-Associated Memory Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Herrlinger, Kelli A.; Nieman, Kristin M.; Sanoshy, Kristen D.; Fonseca, Brenda A.; Lasrado, Joanne A.; Schild, Arianne L.; Maki, Kevin C.; Wesnes, Keith A.; Ceddia, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of supplementation with a spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) extract, high in polyphenols including rosmarinic acid, on cognitive performance, sleep, and mood in individuals with age-associated memory impairment (AAMI). Design: Subjects with AAMI (N = 90; 67% female; age = 59.4 ± 0.6 years) were randomly assigned (n = 30/group) to consume 900, 600, or 0 mg/day (two capsules, once daily) spearmint extract for 90 days, in t...

  4. Social hierarchies, growth and brain serotonin metabolism in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) kept under commercial rearing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, K Fiona; Winberg, Svante; Huntingford, Felicity A; Kadri, Sunil; Crampton, Vivian O; Overli, Oyvind

    2008-07-05

    Monitoring social interactions between individuals in large, high-density groups poses several challenges. Here we demonstrate that relative concentrations of serotonin (5-Hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and its principal catabolite 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in brain tissue of individual fish reflect social organisation in large groups of farmed Atlantic salmon. In the central nervous system of vertebrates, the monoamine neurotransmitter/neuromodulator 5-HT is critical for maintaining adaptive physiological, cognitive and emotional processes. In both teleost fish and mammals it has previously been shown that social interactions in small groups lead to elevated 5-HT release and/or metabolism in subordinate individuals, as indicated by the 5-HIAA/5-HT concentration ratio. In the current study, evidence is presented of non-linear dominance hierarchies in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) kept at high rearing densities. The physiological effect of these hierarchies was decreased when food resources were abundant, although some subordinate fish still showed altered brain serotonergic activity and failed to grow even feed was available in excess. The largest effect of decreased feed rations was seen in fish of intermediate size, where competition appeared to increase with reduced access to feed. The largest individuals in each rearing unit showed low 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios independent of feeding regime. A novel observation, with respect to previous studies, was that elevated brain 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios resulted from decreased 5-HT concentrations rather than elevated 5-HIAA in small fish. Thus, in light of the serotonin deficit hypothesis of depression, it cannot be excluded that social stress is important for animal welfare even in large, relatively homogenous groups of animals reared in captivity.

  5. Changes in metabolic rate and N excretion in the marine invertebrate Sipunculus nudus under conditions of environmental hypercapnia: identifying effective acid-base variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbuch, M; Pörtner, H O

    2002-04-01

    Increased CO(2) partial pressures (hypercapnia) as well as hypoxia are natural features of marine environments like the intertidal zone. Nevertheless little is known about the specific effects of CO(2) on metabolism, except for the well-described effects on acid-base variables and regulation. Accordingly, the sediment-dwelling worm Sipunculus nudus was used as an experimental model to investigate the correlation of acid-base-induced metabolic depression and protein/amino acid catabolism, by determining the rates of oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion and O/N ratios in non-perfused preparations of body wall musculature at various levels of extra- and intracellular pH, P(CO(2)) and [HCO(3)(-)]. A decrease in extracellular pH from control level (7.9) to 6.7 caused a reduction in aerobic metabolic rate of both normocapnic and hypercapnic tissues by 40-45 %. O/N ratios of 4.0-4.5 under control conditions indicate that amino acid catabolism meets the largest fraction of aerobic energy demand. A significant 10-15 % drop in ammonia excretion, a simultaneous reduction of O/N ratios and a transient accumulation of intracellular bicarbonate during transition to extreme acidosis suggest a reduction in net amino acid catabolism and a shift in the selection of amino acids used, favouring monoamino dicarboxylic acids and their amines (asparagine, glutamine, aspartic and glutamic acids). A drop in intracellular pH was identified as mediating this effect. In conclusion, the present data provide evidence for a regulatory role of intracellular pH in the selection of amino acids used by catabolism.

  6. Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 1 Overexpression Increases Yield in Nicotiana tabacum under Drought Stress by Improving Source and Sink Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Barreto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCPs sustain mitochondrial respiration independent of intracellular ATP concentration. Uncoupled respiration is particularly beneficial under stress conditions, during which both photosynthesis and respiration may be impaired. Sustaining carbon fixation during the reproductive phase is essential for plants to develop viable pollen grains and for seed setting. Here, we examined whether UCP1 overexpression (UCP1-oe would help tobacco plants cope with drought stress during reproductive development. We observed that WT and UCP1-oe plants lost water at the same rate under moderate drought stress, but that UCP1-oe lines regained water faster upon rewatering. UCP1-oe plants maintained higher levels of respiration and photosynthesis and decreased H2O2 content in the leaves during the drought stress period. We examined whether UCP1-oe impacts reproductive tissues and seed production by monitoring the progress of flower development, focusing on the early stages of pollen formation. UCP1-oe lines induced the expression of mitochondrial genes and increased mtDNA content in reproductive tissues, which increased the consumption of carbohydrates and reduced H2O2 content and pollen disturbances. Finally, the beneficial impact of UCP1-oe on the source and sink organs resulted in an increased seed size and number under both control conditions and drought stress.

  7. Similarities in acute phase protein response during hibernation in black bears and major depression in humans: A response to underlying metabolic depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouris, J.A.; Chauhan, V.P.S.; Sheikh, A.M.; Chauhan, A.; Malik, M.; Vaughan, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of hibernation with mild hypothermia and the stress of captivity on levels of six acute-phase proteins (APPs) in serial samples of serum from 11 wild and 6 captive black bears (Ursus americanus Pallas, 1780) during active and hibernating states. We hypothesize that during hibernation with mild hypothermia, bears would show an APP response similar to that observed in major depression. Enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay was used to measure alpha2-macroglobulin and C-reactive protein, and a nephelometer to measure alpha1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, and transferrin. Levels of all other proteins except ceruloplasmin were significantly elevated during hibernation in both wild and captive bears at the p bears in both active and hibernating states at the p hibernation with mild hypothermia, black bears do not show immunosuppression, but show an increased APP response similar to that in patients with major depression. This APP response is explained as an adaptive response to the underlying metabolic depression in both conditions. Metabolic depression in hibernating bears is suggested as a natural model for research to explain the neurobiology of depression.

  8. Age-associated changes in cardiovascular structure and function: a fertile milieu for future disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, James

    2015-01-01

    Important changes occur in the cardiovascular system with advancing age, even in apparently healthy individuals. Thickening and stiffening of the large arteries develop due to collagen and calcium deposition and loss of elastic fibers in the medial layer. These arterial changes cause systolic blood pressure to rise with age, while diastolic blood pressure generally declines after the sixth decade. In the left ventricle, modest concentric wall thickening occurs due to cellular hypertrophy, but cavity size does not change. Although left ventricular systolic function is preserved across the age span, early diastolic filling rate declines 30–50% between the third and ninth decades. Conversely, an age-associated increase in late diastolic filling due to atrial contraction preserves end-diastolic volume. Aerobic exercise capacity declines approximately 10% per decade in cross-sectional studies; in longitudinal studies, however, this decline is accelerated in the elderly. Reductions in peak heart rate and peripheral oxygen utilization but not stroke volume appear to mediate the age-associated decline in aerobic capacity. Deficits in both cardiac b-adrenergic receptor density and in the efficiency of postsynaptic b-adrenergic signaling contribute significantly to the reduced cardiovascular performance during exercise in older adults. Although these cardiovascular aging changes are considered “normative”, they lower the threshold for the development of cardiovascular disease, which affects the majority of older adults. PMID:21809160

  9. Rapamycin Attenuates Age-associated Changes in Tibialis Anterior Tendon Viscoelastic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaseck, Lauren Wood; Miller, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin extends mouse life span, but the extent to which rapamycin prevents aging-associated changes in specific tissues remains unclear. Stiffness increases and collagen turnover decreases in mouse tendon with aging; thus, our aim was to determine the effect of long-term rapamycin treatment on the mechanical and structural properties of tendons from old mice. Tendons were harvested from female UM-HET3 mice maintained on a standard chow diet for 4 (adult) or 22 (old) months or fed chow containing polymer-encapsulated rapamycin (eRAPA) from 9 to 22 months of age (old RAPA). Stiffness was twofold higher for tendons of old compared with adult mice, but in old RAPA mice, tendon stiffness was maintained at a value not different from that of adults. Additionally, expression of collagen decreased, expression of matrix metalloproteinase-8 increased, and total hydroxyproline content trended toward decreased levels in tendons of old eRAPA-fed mice compared with controls. Finally, age-associated calcification of Achilles tendons and accompanying elevations in expression of chondrocyte and osteoblast markers were all lower in old eRAPA-fed mice. These results suggest that long-term administration of rapamycin alters the molecular pathways responsible for aging of tendon extracellular matrix, resulting in tissue that is structurally and mechanically similar to tendons in adult mice. PMID:26809496

  10. Bioactive silica nanoparticles reverse age-associated bone loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzmann, M Neale; Ha, Shin-Woo; Vikulina, Tatyana; Roser-Page, Susanne; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Beck, George R

    2015-05-01

    We recently reported that in vitro, engineered 50nm spherical silica nanoparticles promote the differentiation and activity of bone building osteoblasts but suppress bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Furthermore, these nanoparticles promote bone accretion in young mice in vivo. We have now investigated the capacity of these nanoparticles to reverse bone loss in aged mice, a model of human senile osteoporosis. Aged mice received nanoparticles weekly and bone mineral density (BMD), bone structure, and bone turnover were quantified. Our data revealed a significant increase in BMD, bone volume, and biochemical markers of bone formation. Biochemical and histological examinations failed to identify any abnormalities caused by nanoparticle administration. Our studies demonstrate that silica nanoparticles effectively blunt and reverse age-associated bone loss in mice by a mechanism involving promotion of bone formation. The data suggest that osteogenic silica nanoparticles may be a safe and effective therapeutic for counteracting age-associated bone loss. Osteoporosis poses a significant problem in the society. Based on their previous in-vitro findings, the authors' group investigated the effects of spherical silica nanoparticles in reversing bone loss in a mouse model of osteoporosis. The results showed that intra-peritoneal injections of silica nanoparticles could increase bone mineral density, with little observed toxic side effects. This novel method may prove important in future therapy for combating osteoporosis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Age-associated changes in cardiovascular structure and function: a fertile milieu for future disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleg, Jerome L; Strait, James

    2012-09-01

    Important changes occur in the cardiovascular system with advancing age, even in apparently healthy individuals. Thickening and stiffening of the large arteries develop due to collagen and calcium deposition and loss of elastic fibers in the medial layer. These arterial changes cause systolic blood pressure to rise with age, while diastolic blood pressure generally declines after the sixth decade. In the left ventricle, modest concentric wall thickening occurs due to cellular hypertrophy, but cavity size does not change. Although left ventricular systolic function is preserved across the age span, early diastolic filling rate declines 30-50% between the third and ninth decades. Conversely, an age-associated increase in late diastolic filling due to atrial contraction preserves end-diastolic volume. Aerobic exercise capacity declines approximately 10% per decade in cross-sectional studies; in longitudinal studies, however, this decline is accelerated in the elderly. Reductions in peak heart rate and peripheral oxygen utilization but not stroke volume appear to mediate the age-associated decline in aerobic capacity. Deficits in both cardiac β-adrenergic receptor density and in the efficiency of postsynaptic β-adrenergic signaling contribute significantly to the reduced cardiovascular performance during exercise in older adults. Although these cardiovascular aging changes are considered "normative", they lower the threshold for the development of cardiovascular disease, which affects the majority of older adults.

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Two Rice Varieties Contrasting for Nitrogen Use Efficiency under Chronic N Starvation Reveals Differences in Chloroplast and Starch Metabolism-Related Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Kumar Sinha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen use efficiency (NUE of crop plants is limited and enhancing it in rice, a major cereal crop, would be beneficial for farmers and the environment alike. Here we report the genome-wide transcriptome analysis of two rice genotypes, IR 64 (IR64 and Nagina 22 (N22 under optimal (+N and chronic starvation (-N of nitrogen (N from 15-day-old root and shoot tissues. The two genotypes were found to be contrasting in their response to -N; IR64 root architecture and root dry weight remained almost equivalent to that under +N conditions, while N22 showed high foraging ability but a substantial reduction in biomass under -N. Similarly, the photosynthetic pigments showed a drastic reduction in N22 under low N, while IR64 was more resilient. Nitrate reductase showed significantly low specific activity under -N in both genotypes. Glutamate synthase (GOGAT and citrate synthase CS activity were highly reduced in N22 but not in IR64. Transcriptome analysis of these genotypes revealed nearly double the number of genes to be differentially expressed (DEGs in roots (1016 compared to shoots (571. The response of the two genotypes to N starvation was distinctly different reflecting their morphological/biochemical response with just two and eight common DEGs in the root and shoot tissues. There were a total of 385 nitrogen-responsive DEGs (106 in shoots and 279 in roots between the two genotypes. Fifty-two of the 89 DEGs identified as specific to N22 root tissues were also found to be differentially expressed between the two genotypes under -N. Most of these DEGs belonged to starch and chloroplast metabolism, followed by membrane and signaling proteins. Physical mapping of DEGs revealed 95 DEGs in roots and 76 in shoots to be present in quantitative trait loci (QTL known for NUE.

  13. Effects of cadmium-resistant fungi Aspergillus aculeatus on metabolic profiles of bermudagrass [Cynodondactylon (L.)Pers.] under Cd stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoning; Gitau, Margaret Mukami; Han, Shijuan; Fu, Jinmin; Xie, Yan

    2017-05-01

    Plants' tolerance to heavy metal stress may be induced by the exploitation of microbes. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of cadmium (Cd)-resistant fungus, Aspergillus aculeatus, on tolerance to Cd and alteration of metabolites in bermudagrass under Cd stress, and identify the predominant metabolites associated with Cd tolerance. Two genotypes of bermudagrass with contrasting Cd tolerance (Cd-sensitive 'WB92' and Cd-tolerant 'WB242') were exposed to 0, 50, 150 and 250 mg kg -1 Cd for 21 days. Physiological responses of bermudagrass to Cd stress were evaluated based on the relative growth rate (RGR) and normalized relative transpiration rate (NRT). Plants inoculated with A. aculeatus exhibited higher RGR and NRT under Cd stress than those of non-inoculated plants, regardless of genotypes. A total of 32 Cd-responsive metabolites in leaves and 21 in roots were identified in the two genotypes, including organic acids, amino acids, sugars, and fatty acids and others. Interestingly, under Cd stress, the leaves of inoculated 'WB92' accumulated less citric acid, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, sucrose, galactose, but more sorbose and glucose, while inoculated 'WB242' leaves had less citric acid, malic acid, sucrose, sorbose, but more fructose and glucose, compared to non-inoculated plants. In 'WB92' roots, the A. aculeatus reduced mannose content, but increased trehalose and citric acid content, while in 'WB242', it decreased sucrose, but enhanced citric acid content, compared to Cd regime. The results of this study suggest that A. aculeatus may induce accumulation of different metabolites associated with Cd tolerance in bermudagrass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Nutritional support in children under metabolic stress Soporte nutricional en el niño con estrés metabólico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elsy Sepúlveda Hincapié

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available A review is presented on metabolic changes that occur in children under stress, and on the organs that are affected by the response to it; also considered are the different resources that are presently available in order to maintain nutrition in these children and to improve their probabilities of recovery. Se hace una revisión acerca de los cambios metabólicos que ocurren en el niño durante el estrés y los órganos que se afectan en su respuesta; se tienen en cuenta además, los diferentes recursos que actualmente se pueden utilizar con el fin de mantener la nutrición del niño durante este tipo de situación, mejorando sus posibilidades de recuperación.

  15. Aminolevulinic acid and nitric oxide regulate oxidative defense and secondary metabolisms in canola (Brassica napus L.) under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Iqbal, Majid; Muhammad, Atta; Ashraf, Muhammad; Al-Qurainy, Fahad; Shafiq, Sidra

    2018-01-01

    To minimize the damaging effects of stresses, plant growth regulators (PGRs) are widely used to sustain the plant life under stress-prone environments. So, a study was carried out to evaluate the response of two canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars, Dunkeld and Cyclone, to foliar-applied two potential PGRs, nitric oxide (NO) and 5-aminolevulinic acid, under water deficit conditions. In this study, the levels of NO and ALA used were 0.02 and 0.895 mM, respectively. Plants of both canola cultivars were subjected to control (100% field capacity) and water deficit (60% field capacity). Drought stress significantly decreased growth, chlorophyll pigments, relative water contents (RWC), and soluble proteins, while it increased relative membrane permeability (RMP), proline, glycinebetaine (GB), malondialdehyde (MDA), total phenolics, and activities of catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) enzymes in both cultivars. Foliar application of PGRs improved growth, chlorophyll a, GB, total phenolics, CAT activity, and total soluble proteins, while it decreased RMP, MDA, and POD activity in both canola cultivars. Other physio-biochemical attributes such as chlorophyll b, RWC, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and proline contents as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity remained unaffected due to application of PGRs. So, the results of the present study suggest that exogenous application of NO and ALA could be useful to enhance the drought tolerance of canola plants by up-regulating the oxidative defense system, osmoprotectant accumulation, and minimizing the lipid peroxidation.

  16. Restoration of Impaired Metabolic Energy Balance (ATP Pool and Tube Formation Potential of Endothelial Cells under “high glucose”, Diabetic Conditions by the Bioinorganic Polymer Polyphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Micro-vascularization is a fast, energy-dependent process that is compromised by elevated glucose concentrations such as in diabetes mellitus disease. Here, we studied the effect of the physiological bioinorganic polymer, polyphosphate (polyP, on the reduced ATP content and impaired function of endothelial cells cultivated under “high glucose” (35 mM diabetes mellitus conditions concentrations. This high-energy biopolymer has been shown to provide a source of metabolic energy, stored in its phosphoanhydride bonds. We show that exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC cells to “high glucose” levels results in reduced cell viability, increased apoptotic cell death, and a decline in intracellular ATP level. As a consequence, the ability of HUVEC cells to form tube-like structures in the in vitro cell tube formation assay was almost completely abolished under “high glucose” conditions. Those cells were grown onto a physiological collagen scaffold (collagen/basement membrane extract. We demonstrate that these adverse effects of increased glucose levels can be reversed by administration of polyP to almost normal values. Using Na-polyP, complexed in a stoichiometric (molar ratio to Ca2+ ions and in the physiological concentration range between 30 and 300 µM, an almost complete restoration of the reduced ATP pool of cells exposed to “high glucose” was found, as well as a normalization of the number of apoptotic cells and energy-dependent tube formation. It is concluded that the adverse effects on endothelial cells caused by the metabolic energy imbalance at elevated glucose concentrations can be counterbalanced by polyP, potentially opening new strategies for treatment of the micro-vascular complications in diabetic patients.

  17. NMR and GC-MS Based Metabolic Profiling and Free-Radical Scavenging Activities of Cordyceps pruinosa Mycelia Cultivated under Different Media and Light Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Taek-Joo; Hyun, Sun-Hee; Lee, Seul-Gi; Chun, Young-Jin; Sung, Gi-Ho; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2014-01-01

    Variation of metabolic profiles in Cordyceps pruinosa mycelia cultivated under various media and light conditions was investigated using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with multivariate statistical analysis. A total of 71 metabolites were identified (5 alcohols, 21 amino acids, 15 organic acids, 4 purines, 3 pyrimidines, 7 sugars, 11 fatty acids, and 5 other metabolites) by NMR and GC-MS analysis. The mycelia grown in nitrogen media and under dark conditions showed the lowest growth and ergosterol levels, essential to a functional fungal cell membrane; these mycelia, however, had the highest levels of putrescine, which is involved in abiotic stress tolerance. In contrast, mycelia cultivated in sabouraud dextrose agar with yeast extract (SDAY) media and under light conditions contained relatively higher levels of fatty acids, including valeric acid, stearic acid, lignoceric acid, myristic acid, oleic acid, palmitoleic acid, hepadecenoic acid, and linoleic acid. These mycelia also had the highest phenolic content and antioxidant activity, and did not exhibit growth retardation due to enhanced asexual development caused by higher levels of linoleic acid. Therefore, we suggested that a light-enriched environment with SDAY media was more optimal than dark condition for cultivation of C. pruinosa mycelia as biopharmaceutical or nutraceutical resources. PMID:24608751

  18. Time-dependent movement and distribution of chlorpyrifos and its metabolism in bamboo forest under soil surface mulching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihua; Shen, Danyu; Zhong, Donglian; Mo, Runhong; Ni, Zhanglin; Tang, Fubin

    2014-07-16

    The dissipation and distribution of chlorpyrifos (CHP) granule formulation in bamboo forest under soil surface mulching conditions (CP) and noncovered cultivation conditions (NCP) from soil to product were investigated. In the CP treatment, the CHP granule with slow-release effect leached from the topsoil to the subsoil. Conversely, the CHP was fixed in the topsoil (0-5 cm layer) in the NCP treatment, and no obvious leaching effect could be observed. The residue of CHP could be found in bamboo shoots from CP treatment, mainly at the bottom part (5 cm length). CHP could be degraded into 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) in the soil and bamboo shoots. In addition, the straw used as the mulching material with higher OM and pH had some regulatory role in changing the pH and OM characteristics of the soil. Thus the straw could indirectly affect the adsorption and degradation behavior of CHP and TCP in the soil.

  19. Kinetics of organic transformations under mild aqueous conditions: implications for the origin of life and its metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2004-01-01

    The rates of thermal transformation of organic molecules containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were systematically examined in order to identify the kinetic constraints that governed origin-of-life organic chemistry under mild aqueous conditions. Arrhenius plots of the kinetic data were used to estimate the reaction of half-lifes at 50 degrees C. This survey showed that hydrocarbons and organic substances containing a single oxygenated group were kinetically the most stable; whereas organic substances containing two oxygenated groups in which one group was an alpha- or beta-positioned carbonyl group were the most reactive. Compounds with an alpha- or beta-positioned carbonyl group (aldehyde or ketone) had rates of reaction that were up to 10(24)-times faster than rates of similar molecules lacking the carbonyl group. This survey of organic reactivity, together with estimates of the molecular containment properties of lipid vesicles and liquid spherules, indicates that an origins process in a small domain that used C,H,O-intermediates had to be catalytic and use the most reactive organic molecules to prevent escape of its reaction intermediates.

  20. Clonal reversal of ageing-associated stem cell lineage bias via a pluripotent intermediate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlestedt, Martin; Erlandsson, Eva; Kristiansen, Trine

    2017-01-01

    Ageing associates with significant alterations in somatic/adult stem cells and therapies to counteract these might have profound benefits for health. In the blood, haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) ageing is linked to several functional shortcomings. However, besides the recent realization...... with the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This allows us to specifically focus on aged HSCs presenting with a pronounced lineage skewing, a hallmark of HSC ageing. Functional and molecular evaluations reveal haematopoiesis from these iPS clones to be indistinguishable from that associating...... that individual HSCs might be preset differentially already from young age, HSCs might also age asynchronously. Evaluating the prospects for HSC rejuvenation therefore ultimately requires approaching those HSCs that are functionally affected by age. Here we combine genetic barcoding of aged murine HSCs...

  1. Effects of Conservation Tillage on Topsoil Microbial Metabolic Characteristics and Organic Carbon within Aggregates under a Rice (Oryza sativa L.) –Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Cropping System in Central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian-Qi; Cao, Cou-Gui; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Investigating microbial metabolic characteristics and soil organic carbon (SOC) within aggregates and their relationships under conservation tillage may be useful in revealing the mechanism of SOC sequestration in conservation tillage systems. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregate fractions under conservation tillage. We hypothesized that close relationships can exist between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregates under conservation tillage. In this study, a field experiment was conducted from June 2011 to June 2013 following a split-plot design of a randomized complete block with tillage practices [conventional intensive tillage (CT) and no tillage (NT)] as main plots and straw returning methods [preceding crop residue returning (S, 2100−2500 kg C ha−1) and removal (NS, 0 kg C ha-1)] as subplots with three replications. The objective of this study was to reveal the effects of tillage practices and residue-returning methods on topsoil microbial metabolic characteristics and organic carbon (SOC) fractions within aggregates and their relationships under a rice–wheat cropping system in central China. Microbial metabolic characteristics investigated using the Biolog system was examined within two aggregate fractions (>0.25 and 0.25 aggregate, and 0.25 mm aggregate (11.3%), and 0.25 mm aggregate, and 0.25 mm aggregate, and tillage (NT and S) increased microbial metabolic activities and Shannon index in >0.25 and directly improved SOC by promoting DOC in >0.25 mm aggregate in the upper (0−5 cm) soil layer under conservation tillage systems, as well as directly and indirectly by promoting DOC and MBC in tillage increased SOC in aggregates in the topsoil by improving microbial metabolic activities. PMID:26731654

  2. Age-associated epigenetic upregulation of the FKBP5 gene selectively impairs stress resiliency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Sabbagh

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5 gene combine with traumatic events to increase risk for post-traumatic stress and major depressive disorders (PTSD and MDD. These SNPs increase FKBP51 protein expression through a mechanism involving demethylation of the gene and altered glucocorticoid signaling. Aged animals also display elevated FKBP51 levels, which contribute to impaired resiliency to depressive-like behaviors through impaired glucocorticoid signaling, a phenotype that is abrogated in FKBP5-/- mice. But the age of onset and progressive stability of these phenotypes remain unknown. Moreover, it is unclear how FKBP5 deletion affects other glucocorticoid-dependent processes or if age-associated increases in FKBP51 expression are mediated through a similar epigenetic process caused by SNPs in the FKBP5 gene. Here, we show that FKBP51-mediated impairment in stress resiliency and glucocorticoid signaling occurs by 10 months of age and this increased over their lifespan. Surprisingly, despite these progressive changes in glucocorticoid responsiveness, FKBP5-/- mice displayed normal longevity, glucose tolerance, blood composition and cytokine profiles across lifespan, phenotypes normally associated with glucocorticoid signaling. We also found that methylation of Fkbp5 decreased with age in mice, a process that likely explains the age-associated increases in FKBP51 levels. Thus, epigenetic upregulation of FKBP51 with age can selectively impair psychological stress-resiliency, but does not affect other glucocorticoid-mediated physiological processes. This makes FKBP51 a unique and attractive therapeutic target to treat PTSD and MDD. In addition, aged wild-type mice may be a useful model for investigating the mechanisms of FKBP5 SNPs associated with these disorders.

  3. Involvement of NF-κBIZ and related cytokines in age-associated renal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ki Wung; Jeong, Hyeong Oh; Lee, Bonggi; Park, Daeui; Kim, Dae Hyun; Choi, Yeun Ja; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Kyung Mok; Park, June Whoun; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2017-01-31

    Chronic inflammation is a major contributor to age-related nephropathic changes, including renal fibrosis. In this study, various experimental paradigms were designed to delineate the role played by NF-κBIZ (also known as IκBζ) in age-associated renal fibrosis. Analyses based on RNA-sequencing findings obtained by next generation sequencing (NGS) revealed the upregulations of NF-κBIZ and of IL-6 and MCP-1 (both known to be regulated by NF-κBIZ) during aging. The up-regulation of NF-κBIZ in aged rat kidneys coincided with increased macrophage infiltration. In LPS-treated macrophages, oxidative stress was found to play a pivotal role in NF-κBIZ expression, suggesting age-related oxidative stress is associated with NF-κBIZ activation. Furthermore, these in vitro findings were confirmed in LPS-treated old rats, which showed higher levels of oxidative stress and NF-κBIZ in kidneys than LPS-treated young rats. Additional in vitro experiments using macrophages and kidney fibroblasts demonstrated NF-κBIZ and related cytokines participate in fibrosis. In particular, increased levels of NF-κBIZ-associated cytokines in macrophages significantly up-regulated TGF-β induced kidney fibroblast activation. Moreover, experiments with NF-κBIZ knocked down macrophages showed reduced TGF-β-induced kidney fibroblast activation. The findings of the present study provide evidence regarding an involvement of NF-κBIZ in age-associated progressive renal fibrosis and provides potential targets for its prevention.

  4. Effects of chromium and chromium + vitamin C combination on metabolic, oxidative, and fear responses of broilers transported under summer conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perai, A. H.; Kermanshahi, H.; Moghaddam, H. Nassiri; Zarban, A.

    2015-04-01

    A total of 240 female broilers (42 days old) were randomly assigned to four groups with six replicates and fed either a basal diet (two control groups) or a basal diet supplemented with either 1,200 μg Cr+3 from chromium (Cr) methionine/kg (Cr group) or 1,200 μg Cr+3 from Cr methionine plus 800 mg vitamin C (Vit C)/kg of diet (Cr + Vit C group). After 7 days on the dietary treatment, all groups except one of the controls were transported for 3 h under the summer conditions. Performance parameters were not influenced by dietary treatments. The plasma concentrations of insulin, triiodothyronine, triglyceride, and the ratio of triiodothyronine/thyroxin were decreased and the ratio of glucose/insulin was increased due to transport process. Road transportation also increased the plasma concentrations of protein, cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatine kinase and decreased the concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the Cr + Vit C group. The pretransport concentrations of insulin and triiodothyronine were highest in the Cr + Vit C group. The concentration of phosphorous was lower in the Cr group than that in the other groups after transport. No significant effects of dietary treatments were observed on the other biochemical parameters. Transport increased malondialdehyde concentration in the control group and did not change plasma total antioxidant capacity and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity. Either in combination or alone, Cr increased plasma total antioxidant capacity (before transport P ≤ 0.05, after transport P = 0.07) but did not affect the concentration of malondialdehyde and activity of glutathione peroxidase. The duration of tonic immobility (TI) was similar between nontransported control chicks and transported chicks without any supplements. Pretreatment with Cr + Vit C significantly reduced the duration of TI.

  5. Increased Serotonin Signaling Contributes to the Warburg Effect in Pancreatic Tumor Cells Under Metabolic Stress and Promotes Growth of Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Heng; Li, Jun; Dong, Fang-Yuan; Yang, Jian-Yu; Liu, De-Jun; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Min-Wei; Fu, Xue-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Li, Qing; Pang, Xiu-Feng; Huo, Yan-Miao; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Jun-Feng; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Su-Jae; Qin, Wen-Xin; Gu, Jian-Ren; Sun, Yong-Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2017-07-01

    of 5-HT to be increased in human PDAC tissues compared with non-tumor pancreatic tissues, and PDAC cell lines compared with non-transformed pancreatic cells. Incubation of PDAC cell lines with 5-HT increased proliferation and prevented apoptosis. Agonists of HTR2B, but not other 5-HT receptors, promoted proliferation and prevented apoptosis of PDAC cells. Knockdown of HTR2B in PDAC cells, or incubation of cells with HTR2B inhibitors, reduced their growth as xenograft tumors in mice. We observed a correlation between 5-HT and glycolytic flux in PDAC cells; levels of metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, the phosphate pentose pathway, and hexosamine biosynthesis pathway increased significantly in PDAC cells following 5-HT stimulation. 5-HT stimulation led to formation of the HTR2B-LYN-p85 complex, which increased PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling and the Warburg effect by increasing protein levels of MYC and HIF1A. Administration of SB204741 to KPC mice slowed growth and metabolism of established pancreatic tumors and prolonged survival of the mice. Human PDACs have increased levels of 5-HT, and PDAC cells increase expression of its receptor, HTR2B. These increases allow for tumor glycolysis under metabolic stress and promote growth of pancreatic tumors and PDAC xenograft tumors in mice. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pre-sowing Seed Treatments in Direct-seeded Early Rice: Consequences for Emergence, Seedling Growth and Associated Metabolic Events under Chilling Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqin; Chen, Qian; Hussain, Saddam; Mei, Junhao; Dong, Huanglin; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-19

    Double direct-seeding for double rice cropping is a simplified, labor saving, and efficient cropping system to improve multiple-crop index and total rice production in central China. However, poor crop establishment of direct-seeded early rice due to chilling stress is the main obstacle to wide spread of this system. A series of experiments were conducted to unravel the effects of pre-sowing seed treatments on emergence, seedling growth and associated metabolic events of direct-seeded early rice under chilling stress. Two seed priming treatments and two seed coating treatments were used in all the experiments. A non-treated control treatment was also maintained for comparison. In both the field and growth chamber studies, seed priming with selenium or salicylic acid significantly enhanced the emergence and seedling growth of rice compared with non-treated control. Nevertheless, such positive effects were not apparent for seed coating treatments. Better emergence and vigorous seedling growth of rice after seed priming was associated with enhanced α-amylase activity, higher soluble sugars contents, and greater respiration rate in primed rice seedlings under chilling stress. Taking together, these findings may provide new avenues for understanding and advancing priming-induced chilling tolerance in direct-seeded early rice in double rice cropping system.

  7. Pre-sowing Seed Treatments in Direct-seeded Early Rice: Consequences for Emergence, Seedling Growth and Associated Metabolic Events under Chilling Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqin; Chen, Qian; Hussain, Saddam; Mei, Junhao; Dong, Huanglin; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-01

    Double direct-seeding for double rice cropping is a simplified, labor saving, and efficient cropping system to improve multiple-crop index and total rice production in central China. However, poor crop establishment of direct-seeded early rice due to chilling stress is the main obstacle to wide spread of this system. A series of experiments were conducted to unravel the effects of pre-sowing seed treatments on emergence, seedling growth and associated metabolic events of direct-seeded early rice under chilling stress. Two seed priming treatments and two seed coating treatments were used in all the experiments. A non-treated control treatment was also maintained for comparison. In both the field and growth chamber studies, seed priming with selenium or salicylic acid significantly enhanced the emergence and seedling growth of rice compared with non-treated control. Nevertheless, such positive effects were not apparent for seed coating treatments. Better emergence and vigorous seedling growth of rice after seed priming was associated with enhanced α-amylase activity, higher soluble sugars contents, and greater respiration rate in primed rice seedlings under chilling stress. Taking together, these findings may provide new avenues for understanding and advancing priming-induced chilling tolerance in direct-seeded early rice in double rice cropping system.

  8. Key mechanisms of metabolic changes in mountain pine and larch under drought in the Swiss National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churakova, Olga; Bigler, Christof; Bryukhanova, Marina; Siegwolf, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    intrinsic water use efficiency. Carbon isotopes ratios of specific sugar compounds such as sucrose, raffinose, fructose, ribose and pinitol in needle and wood samples will help to evaluate the impact of drought on the carbohydrate balance and carbon allocation. Analyzing the oxygen isotopic compositions of soil water, sap water (water in branches) and precipitation we will determine the role of the different water sources for tree growth under drought conditions. The proposed work will provide a unique opportunity to assess the survival potential of mountain pine and larch trees exposed to drought that will help to estimate risks of modern climatic changes and forest damage. This project was supported by Marie Heim-Vögtlin Programme PMPDP2_145507/1 granted to Olga Churakova (Sidorova). References: Allen CD et al. (2010) A global overview of drought and heat-induced tree mortality reveals emerging climate change risks for forests Forest Ecology and Management 259:660-684 Bigler C, Rigling A (2013) Precision and accuracy of tree-ring-based death dates of mountain pines in the Swiss National Park. Trees - Structure and Function. 27: 1703-1712 CH 2011 Swiss Climate Change Scenarios CH2011. In. C2SM, MeteoSwiss, ETH, NCCR Climate, and OcCC, p 88

  9. Effects of Conservation Tillage on Topsoil Microbial Metabolic Characteristics and Organic Carbon within Aggregates under a Rice (Oryza sativa L.-Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Cropping System in Central China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jin Guo

    Full Text Available Investigating microbial metabolic characteristics and soil organic carbon (SOC within aggregates and their relationships under conservation tillage may be useful in revealing the mechanism of SOC sequestration in conservation tillage systems. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregate fractions under conservation tillage. We hypothesized that close relationships can exist between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregates under conservation tillage. In this study, a field experiment was conducted from June 2011 to June 2013 following a split-plot design of a randomized complete block with tillage practices [conventional intensive tillage (CT and no tillage (NT] as main plots and straw returning methods [preceding crop residue returning (S, 2100-2500 kg C ha-1 and removal (NS, 0 kg C ha(-1] as subplots with three replications. The objective of this study was to reveal the effects of tillage practices and residue-returning methods on topsoil microbial metabolic characteristics and organic carbon (SOC fractions within aggregates and their relationships under a rice-wheat cropping system in central China. Microbial metabolic characteristics investigated using the Biolog system was examined within two aggregate fractions (>0.25 and 0.25 aggregate, and 0.25 mm aggregate (11.3%, and 0.25 mm aggregate, and 0.25 mm aggregate, and 0.25 and 0.25 mm aggregate in the upper (0-5 cm soil layer under conservation tillage systems, as well as directly and indirectly by promoting DOC and MBC in <0.25 mm aggregate. Our results suggested that conservation tillage increased SOC in aggregates in the topsoil by improving microbial metabolic activities.

  10. The suppression of ghrelin signaling mitigates age-associated thermogenic impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongmba, Odelia Y. N.; Ma, Xiaojun; Zhu, Xiongwei; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Sun, Yuxiang

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with severe thermogenic impairment, which contributes to obesity and diabetes in aging. We previously reported that ablation of the ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), attenuates age-associated obesity and insulin resistance. Ghrelin and obestatin are derived from the same preproghrelin gene. Here we showed that in brown adipocytes, ghrelin decreases the expression of thermogenic regulator but obestatin increases it, thus showing the opposite effects. We also found that during aging, plasma ghrelin and GHS-R expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) are increased, but plasma obestatin is unchanged. Increased plasma ghrelin and unchanged obestatin during aging may lead to an imbalance of thermogenic regulation, which may in turn exacerbate thermogenic impairment in aging. Moreover, we found that GHS-R ablation activates thermogenic signaling, enhances insulin activation, increases mitochondrial biogenesis, and improves mitochondrial dynamics of BAT. In addition, we detected increased norepinephrine in the circulation, and observed that GHS-R knockdown in brown adipocytes directly stimulates thermogenic activity, suggesting that GHS-R regulates thermogenesis via both central and peripheral mechanisms. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that ghrelin signaling is an important thermogenic regulator in aging. Antagonists of GHS-R may serve as unique anti-obesity agents, combating obesity by activating thermogenesis. PMID:25543537

  11. Aging associated changes in the motor control of ankle movements in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linortner, Patricia; Jehna, Margit; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Matthews, Paul; Schmidt, Reinhold; Fazekas, Franz; Enzinger, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Although age-related gait changes have been well characterized, little is known regarding potential functional changes in central motor control of distal lower limb movements with age. We hypothesized that there are age-related changes in brain activity associated with the control of repetitive ankle movements, an element of gait feasible for study with functional magnetic resonance imaging. We analyzed standardized functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 102 right-foot dominant healthy participants aged 20-83 years for age-associated effects using FSL and a meta-analysis using coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation. For the first time, we have confirmed age-related changes in brain activity with this gait-related movement of the lower limb in a large population. Increasing age correlated strongly with increased movement-associated activity in the cerebellum and precuneus. Given that task performance did not vary with age, we interpret these changes as potentially compensatory for other age-related changes in the sensorimotor network responsible for control of limb function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Age-associated chromatin relaxation is enhanced in Huntington's disease mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Kyuheum; Cho, Sunwha; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Jisun; Jeon, Jeha; Song, Jinhoi; Kim, Seokho; Jeong, Sangkyun; Seo, Hyemyung; Kang, Yong-Kook

    2017-01-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine stretch in the huntingtin (HTT) protein is a major cause of Huntington's disease (HD). The polyglutamine part in HTT interacts with various proteins implicated in epigenetic regulation of genes, suggesting that mutant HTT may disturb the integrity of the epigenetic system. Here, we used a PCRseq-based method to examine expression profile of 395 exonic segments from 260 “epi-driver” genes in splenic T lymphocytes from aged HD mice. We identified 67 exonic segments differentially expressed between young and aged HD mice, most of them upregulated in the aged. Polycomb-repressive complex (PRC)-regulated genes (PRGs) were markedly upregulated in aged HD mice, consistent with downregulation of PRC genes. Epi-driver gene categories of lysine-methylation, lysine-demethylation, arginine-methylation, and PRG showed differential age-associated changes between HD and control. Analyzing the pattern of change in epi-driver gene expressions hinted at an enhanced shift in HD chromatin to a more accessible state with age, which was experimentally demonstrated by DNase-I-hypersensitivity sequencing showing increased chromatin accessibility in HD cells compared to control. We suggest the global change can potentially relieve chromatin-induced repression of many genes, and the unintended expressions of some detrimental proteins could alter T cell function to a greater degree in aged HD mice. PMID:28288000

  13. L-Lactate Protects Skin Fibroblasts against Aging-Associated Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Mitohormesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Zelenka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A moderate elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS production and a mild inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain have been associated with a health promotion and a lifespan extension in several animal models of aging. Here, we tested whether this phenomenon called mitohormesis could be mediated by L-lactate. The treatment with 5 mM L-lactate significantly increased H2O2 production and slightly inhibited the respiration in cultured skin fibroblasts and in isolated mitochondria. The L-lactate exposure was associated with oxidation of intracellular glutathione, phosphorylation of 5′AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (PGC1α transcription. A replicative aging of fibroblasts (L0 with a constant (LC, or intermittent 5 mM L-lactate (LI in media showed that the high-passage LI fibroblasts have higher respiration, lower H2O2 release, and lower secretion of L-lactate compared to L0 and LC. This protection against mitochondrial dysfunction in LI cells was associated with lower activity of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, less signs of cellular senescence, and increased autophagy compared to L0 and LC. In conclusion, we demonstrated that intermittent but not constant exposure to L-lactate triggers mitohormesis, prevents aging-associated mitochondrial dysfunction, and improves other markers of aging.

  14. Age-associated changes in rich-club organisation in autistic and neurotypical human brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Rees, Geraint

    2015-11-05

    Macroscopic structural networks in the human brain have a rich-club architecture comprising both highly inter-connected central regions and sparsely connected peripheral regions. Recent studies show that disruption of this functionally efficient organisation is associated with several psychiatric disorders. However, despite increasing attention to this network property, whether age-associated changes in rich-club organisation occur during human adolescence remains unclear. Here, analysing a publicly shared diffusion tensor imaging dataset, we found that, during adolescence, brains of typically developing (TD) individuals showed increases in rich-club organisation and inferred network functionality, whereas individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) did not. These differences between TD and ASD groups were statistically significant for both structural and functional properties. Moreover, this typical age-related changes in rich-club organisation were characterised by progressive involvement of the right anterior insula. In contrast, in ASD individuals, did not show typical increases in grey matter volume, and this relative anatomical immaturity was correlated with the severity of ASD social symptoms. These results provide evidence that rich-club architecture is one of the bases of functionally efficient brain networks underpinning complex cognitive functions in adult human brains. Furthermore, our findings suggest that immature rich-club organisation might be associated with some neurodevelopmental disorders.

  15. Aging-associated changes in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis: what's the connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Curtis J; Marusyk, Andriy; DeGregori, James

    2011-06-01

    Aging is associated with a marked increase in a number of diseases, including many types of cancer. Due to the complex and multi-factorial nature of both aging and cancer, accurate deciphering of causative links between aging and cancer remains a major challenge. It is generally accepted that initiation and progression of cancers are driven by a process of clonal evolution. In principle, this somatic evolution should follow the same Darwinian logic as evolutionary processes in populations in nature: diverse heritable types arising as a result of mutations are subjected to selection, resulting in expansion of the fittest clones. However, prevalent paradigms focus primarily on mutational aspects in linking aging and cancer. In this review, we will argue that age-related changes in selective pressures are likely to be equally important. We will focus on aging-related changes in the hematopoietic system, where age-associated alterations are relatively well studied, and discuss the impact of these changes on the development of leukemias and other malignancies.

  16. Close and distant: Contrasting the metabolism of two closely related subspecies of Scots pine under the effects of folivory and summer drought

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Sardans, J.; Hodar, Jose A.; Garcia-Porta, Joan; Guenther, Alex B.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana; Oravec, Michal; Urban, Otmar; Penuelas, Josep

    2017-09-25

    The metabolome, the chemical phenotype of an organism, should be shaped by evolution. Metabolomes depend on genetic composition and expression, which can be sources of evolutionary inertia, so most aspects of metabolomes should be similar in closely related sympatric species. We examined the metabolomes of two sympatric subspecies of Pinus sylvestris in Sierra Nevada (southern Iberian Peninsula), one introduced (ssp. iberica) and one autochthonous (ssp. nevadensis), in summer and winter and exposed to folivory by the pine processionary moth. The overall metabolomes differed between the subspecies but both tended to respond more similarly to folivory. The metabolomes of the subspecies were more dissimilar in summer than in winter, and iberica trees had higher concentrations of metabolites directly related to drought stress. Our results suggest that certain plant metabolic responses associated with folivory have been conserved throughout evolutionary history. The larger divergence between subspecies metabolomes in summer is likely due to the warmer and drier conditions that the northern iberica subspecies experience in Sierra Nevada. Our results provide crucial insights into how iberica populations would respond to the predicted conditions of climate change under an increased defoliation, two recent severe issues in the Mediterranean Basin.

  17. The sirtuin family’s role in aging and age-associated pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Jessica A.; Dominy, John E.; Lee, Yoonjin; Puigserver, Pere

    2013-01-01

    The 7 mammalian sirtuin proteins compose a protective cavalry of enzymes that can be invoked by cells to aid in the defense against a vast array of stressors. The pathologies associated with aging, such as metabolic syndrome, neurodegeneration, and cancer, are either caused by or exacerbated by a lifetime of chronic stress. As such, the activation of sirtuin proteins could provide a therapeutic approach to buffer against chronic stress and ameliorate age-related decline. Here we review experi...

  18. Age-associated B cells (ABC) inhibit B lymphopoiesis and alter antibody repertoires in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Richard L; Khomtchouk, Kelly; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2017-11-01

    With old age (∼2y old), mice show substantial differences in B cell composition within the lymphoid tissues. In particular, a novel subset of IgM + CD21/35 lo/- CD23 - mature B cells, the age-associated B cells or ABC, increases numerically and proportionately. This occurs at the expense of other B cell subsets, including B2 follicular B cells in spleen and recirculating primary B cells in bone marrow. Our studies suggest that ABC have a distinctive antibody repertoire, as evidenced by relatively high reactivity to the self-antigens phosphorylcholine (PC) and malondialdehyde (MDA). While PC and MDA are found on apoptotic cells and oxidized lipoproteins, antibodies to these antigens are also cross-reactive with epitopes on bacterial species. In old mice, ABC express TNFα and are pro-inflammatory. ABC can inhibit growth and/or survival in pro-B cells as well as common lymphoid progenitors (CLP). In particular, ABC cause apoptosis in pro-B cells with relatively high levels of the surrogate light chain (SLC) and, consequently, promote an "SLC low" pathway of B cell differentiation in old mice. SLC together with μ heavy chain comprises the pre-B cell receptor (preBCR) critical for pre-B cell expansion and selection of the μ heavy chain Vh repertoire. The low level of SLC likely impairs normal preBCR driven proliferation and alters μ heavy chain Vh selection thereby affecting the antibody specificities of new B cells. In this manner, ABC may contribute to both qualitative and quantitative disruptions of normal B lymphopoiesis in old age. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Spearmint Extract Improves Working Memory in Men and Women with Age-Associated Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrlinger, Kelli A; Nieman, Kristin M; Sanoshy, Kristen D; Fonseca, Brenda A; Lasrado, Joanne A; Schild, Arianne L; Maki, Kevin C; Wesnes, Keith A; Ceddia, Michael A

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of supplementation with a spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) extract, high in polyphenols including rosmarinic acid, on cognitive performance, sleep, and mood in individuals with age-associated memory impairment (AAMI). Subjects with AAMI (N = 90; 67% female; age = 59.4 ± 0.6 years) were randomly assigned (n = 30/group) to consume 900, 600, or 0 mg/day (two capsules, once daily) spearmint extract for 90 days, in this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Assessments were completed for cognition (days 0, 45, and 90), sleep (days 0 and 90), and mood (days 0 and 90) by using the Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) System ™ , Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire (LSEQ), and Profile of Mood States (POMS ™ ), respectively. Quality of working memory and spatial working memory accuracy improved after supplementation with 900 mg/day spearmint extract by 15% (p = 0.0469) and 9% (p = 0.0456), respectively, versus placebo. Subjects consuming 900 mg/day spearmint extract reported improvement in their ability to fall asleep, relative to subjects consuming placebo (p = 0.0046). Overall treatment effects were evident for vigor-activity (p = 0.0399), total mood disturbance (p = 0.0374), and alertness and behavior following wakefulness (p = 0.0415), with trends observed for improvements after spearmint supplementation relative to placebo. These results suggest that the distinct spearmint extract may be a beneficial nutritional intervention for cognitive health in older subjects with AAMI.

  20. Age-associated sperm DNA methylation alterations: possible implications in offspring disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Timothy G; Aston, Kenneth I; Pflueger, Christian; Cairns, Bradley R; Carrell, Douglas T

    2014-07-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates a role for paternal aging on offspring disease susceptibility. It is well established that various neuropsychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, autism, etc.), trinucleotide expansion associated diseases (myotonic dystrophy, Huntington's, etc.) and even some forms of cancer have increased incidence in the offspring of older fathers. Despite strong epidemiological evidence that these alterations are more common in offspring sired by older fathers, in most cases the mechanisms that drive these processes are unclear. However, it is commonly believed that epigenetics, and specifically DNA methylation alterations, likely play a role. In this study we have investigated the impact of aging on DNA methylation in mature human sperm. Using a methylation array approach we evaluated changes to sperm DNA methylation patterns in 17 fertile donors by comparing the sperm methylome of 2 samples collected from each individual 9-19 years apart. With this design we have identified 139 regions that are significantly and consistently hypomethylated with age and 8 regions that are significantly hypermethylated with age. A representative subset of these alterations have been confirmed in an independent cohort. A total of 117 genes are associated with these regions of methylation alterations (promoter or gene body). Intriguingly, a portion of the age-related changes in sperm DNA methylation are located at genes previously associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. While our data does not establish a causative relationship, it does raise the possibility that the age-associated methylation of the candidate genes that we observe in sperm might contribute to the increased incidence of neuropsychiatric and other disorders in the offspring of older males. However, further study is required to determine whether, and to what extent, a causative relationship exists.

  1. Age-associated sperm DNA methylation alterations: possible implications in offspring disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy G Jenkins

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence demonstrates a role for paternal aging on offspring disease susceptibility. It is well established that various neuropsychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, autism, etc., trinucleotide expansion associated diseases (myotonic dystrophy, Huntington's, etc. and even some forms of cancer have increased incidence in the offspring of older fathers. Despite strong epidemiological evidence that these alterations are more common in offspring sired by older fathers, in most cases the mechanisms that drive these processes are unclear. However, it is commonly believed that epigenetics, and specifically DNA methylation alterations, likely play a role. In this study we have investigated the impact of aging on DNA methylation in mature human sperm. Using a methylation array approach we evaluated changes to sperm DNA methylation patterns in 17 fertile donors by comparing the sperm methylome of 2 samples collected from each individual 9-19 years apart. With this design we have identified 139 regions that are significantly and consistently hypomethylated with age and 8 regions that are significantly hypermethylated with age. A representative subset of these alterations have been confirmed in an independent cohort. A total of 117 genes are associated with these regions of methylation alterations (promoter or gene body. Intriguingly, a portion of the age-related changes in sperm DNA methylation are located at genes previously associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. While our data does not establish a causative relationship, it does raise the possibility that the age-associated methylation of the candidate genes that we observe in sperm might contribute to the increased incidence of neuropsychiatric and other disorders in the offspring of older males. However, further study is required to determine whether, and to what extent, a causative relationship exists.

  2. [Validation of a screening test for age associated cognitive impairment, in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Pilar; Albala, Cecilia; Klaasen, Gonzalo

    2004-04-01

    The real prevalence of dementia in a given population must be determined through prevalence studies, using validated screening tests. To validate and determine cutoff points for a cognitive impairment screening test composed by the Folstein Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Pfeffer Functional Activities Questionnaire (PFAQ). Validation of the diagnostic test in a sample of 100 subjects over 65 years old (85 from the project "Age associated dementias" and 15 with a confirmed diagnosis of dementia). All were subjected to a complete neuropsychological test by a trained neurologist, that constituted the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of dementia. An independent interviewer applied the MMSE to the subjects and the PFAQ to a next of kin informer. Cutoff points were calculated using ROC curves. The points with the better equilibrium between sensitivity and specificity were selected, considering differences in results between groups with low and high educational level. The cutoff point for MMSE was 21/22, with a sensitivity of 93.6% (95% CI 70.6-99.7%) and a specificity of 46.1% (95% CI 34.7-57.8%). The figure for PFAQ was 5/6, with a sensitivity of 89.2% (95% CI 70.6-99.7%) and a specificity of 70.7% (95% CI 58.9-80.3%). The combination of both instruments gave a sensitivity of 94.4% (95% CI 58.9-80.3%) and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI 72.3-90.7%). This screening test, using MMSE and PFAQ, has a good sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of dementia in Chile. Being simple and of low cost, it can be applied in primary health care.

  3. Intermittent bout exercise training down-regulates age-associated inflammation in skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Seok; Yi, Ho-Keun

    2015-12-01

    Aging is characterized by the progressive decline in mass and function of the skeletal muscle along with increased susceptibility to inflammation, oxidative stress, and atrophy. In this study, we investigate the effect of intermittent bout and single bout exercise training on inflammatory molecules in young (3 months) and old (22 months) male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were divided into 6 groups. Young and old rats were randomly assigned for control and two exercise training groups, single bout (S type): 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks and intermittent bout (I type): three times for 10 min/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks respectively. The exercise training was carried out by a treadmill at a speed of 15m/min (young) or 10 m/min (old) with a slope of 5°. After 48 h of the final exercise bout, muscle samples were collected for biochemical assay. I type exercise training reduced the serum levels of inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in old rats. By contrast, interleukin-4 (IL-4) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were elevated. Consequently in skeletal muscles, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were decreased significantly in the old group of I type. However, the matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) level had no positive effects. Also, phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) and myogenic differentiation (MyoD) were increased markedly in S and I types of old rats. These results suggest that I type exercise training appears more effective to reduce age-associated inflammatory molecules, and may recommend in regulating against chronic complicated disease induced by aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Myocardial metabolism of 123I-BMIPP under low-dose dobutamine infusion: implications for clinical SPECT imaging of ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Ryohei; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kambara, Naoshige; Ohba, Muneo; Tadamura, Eiji; Kimura, Takeshi; Kita, Toru; Nohara, Ryuji; Hirai, Taku; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2005-01-01

    123 I-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid ( 123 I-BMIPP) is a fatty acid analog for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging that is mainly stored in the triglyceride pool. Low-dose dobutamine infusion has been reported to improve BMIPP uptake in the stunned myocardium, but the mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the myocardial metabolism of 123 I-BMIPP in the stunned myocardium under low-dose dobutamine infusion, and to elucidate the mechanism by which dobutamine improves BMIPP uptake. Using open-chest dogs, stunned myocardium was induced by occlusion of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) for 30 min, with subsequent reperfusion (ischemia group, n=6). After direct injection of BMIPP into the LAD, myocardial extraction and retention were examined and metabolites evaluated (using high-performance liquid chromatography) during dobutamine infusion. The results in the ischemia group were compared with findings obtained in a control group under dobutamine infusion (n=6). Dobutamine infusion significantly increased both the rapid extraction (within 30 s) of BMIPP into the myocardium (control vs ischemia group: 48±19% vs 66±14%, p<0.05) and its subsequent retention (73±13% vs 85±8%, p<0.05). The metabolites from the myocardium consisted of back diffusion of nonmetabolized BMIPP, the alpha-oxidation metabolite, intermediate metabolites, and the full-oxidation metabolite. Among these metabolites, the full-oxidation metabolite decreased significantly (from 34.0±20.0% to 15.8±9.3%, p<0.05) in the stunned regions, though back diffusion of nonmetabolized BMIPP increased (from 51.3±21.9% to 71.3±10.1%, p<0.05). These results indicate that increased uptake of BMIPP in stunned myocardium is mainly due to decreased beta-oxidation in tissue and increased shunt retention of BMIPP in the triglyceride pool, and thereby provide further insight into the pathophysiology of

  5. Myocardial metabolism of {sup 123}I-BMIPP under low-dose dobutamine infusion: implications for clinical SPECT imaging of ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Ryohei; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kambara, Naoshige; Ohba, Muneo; Tadamura, Eiji; Kimura, Takeshi; Kita, Toru [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nohara, Ryuji [The Tazuke Kofukai Medical Research Institute, Department of Cardiology, Kitano Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Hirai, Taku [Kinki University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Nara Hospital, Nara (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Fukui Medical University, Molecular Imaging, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Fukui (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    {sup 123}I-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid ({sup 123}I-BMIPP) is a fatty acid analog for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging that is mainly stored in the triglyceride pool. Low-dose dobutamine infusion has been reported to improve BMIPP uptake in the stunned myocardium, but the mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the myocardial metabolism of {sup 123}I-BMIPP in the stunned myocardium under low-dose dobutamine infusion, and to elucidate the mechanism by which dobutamine improves BMIPP uptake. Using open-chest dogs, stunned myocardium was induced by occlusion of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) for 30 min, with subsequent reperfusion (ischemia group, n=6). After direct injection of BMIPP into the LAD, myocardial extraction and retention were examined and metabolites evaluated (using high-performance liquid chromatography) during dobutamine infusion. The results in the ischemia group were compared with findings obtained in a control group under dobutamine infusion (n=6). Dobutamine infusion significantly increased both the rapid extraction (within 30 s) of BMIPP into the myocardium (control vs ischemia group: 48{+-}19% vs 66{+-}14%, p<0.05) and its subsequent retention (73{+-}13% vs 85{+-}8%, p<0.05). The metabolites from the myocardium consisted of back diffusion of nonmetabolized BMIPP, the alpha-oxidation metabolite, intermediate metabolites, and the full-oxidation metabolite. Among these metabolites, the full-oxidation metabolite decreased significantly (from 34.0{+-}20.0% to 15.8{+-}9.3%, p<0.05) in the stunned regions, though back diffusion of nonmetabolized BMIPP increased (from 51.3{+-}21.9% to 71.3{+-}10.1%, p<0.05). These results indicate that increased uptake of BMIPP in stunned myocardium is mainly due to decreased beta-oxidation in tissue and increased shunt retention of BMIPP in the triglyceride pool, and thereby provide further insight

  6. The sirtuin family's role in aging and age-associated pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jessica A; Dominy, John E; Lee, Yoonjin; Puigserver, Pere

    2013-03-01

    The 7 mammalian sirtuin proteins compose a protective cavalry of enzymes that can be invoked by cells to aid in the defense against a vast array of stressors. The pathologies associated with aging, such as metabolic syndrome, neurodegeneration, and cancer, are either caused by or exacerbated by a lifetime of chronic stress. As such, the activation of sirtuin proteins could provide a therapeutic approach to buffer against chronic stress and ameliorate age-related decline. Here we review experimental evidence both for and against this proposal, as well as the implications that isoform-specific sirtuin activation may have for healthy aging in humans.

  7. Phospholipase A2 - nexus of aging, oxidative stress, neuronal excitability and functional decline of the aging nervous system? Insights from a snail model system of neuronal aging and age-associated memory impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Maria Hermann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available TThe aging brain can undergo a range of changes varying from subtle structural and physiological changes causing only minor functional decline under healthy normal aging conditions, to severe cognitive or neurological impairment associated with extensive loss of neurons and circuits due to age-associated neurodegenerative disease conditions. Understanding how biological aging processes affect the brain and how they contribute to the onset and progress of age-associated neurodegenerative diseases is a core research goal in contemporary neuroscience. This review focuses on the idea that changes in intrinsic neuronal electrical excitability associated with (peroxidation of membrane lipids and activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2 enzymes are an important mechanism of learning and memory failure under normal aging conditions. Specifically, in the context of this special issue on the Biology of cognitive aging we (1 portray the opportunities offered by the identifiable neurons and behaviorally characterized neural circuits of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis in neuronal aging research and (2 recapitulate recent insights indicating a key role of lipid peroxidation-induced PLA2 as instruments of aging, oxidative stress and inflammation in age-associated neuronal and memory impairment in this model system. The findings are discussed in view of accumulating evidence suggesting involvement of analogous mechanisms in the etiology of age-associated dysfunction and disease of the human and mammalian brain.

  8. [Age-associated peculiarities of microcirculation system in skeletal muscles and their role in muscle work capacity in human aging (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkusko, O V; Sarkisov, K G; Frajfel'd, V E

    1982-01-01

    The muscle blood flow was investigated at rest (MBFR) and after physical load under ischemia conditions (maximal muscle blood flow--MMBF) in 87 practically healthy persons (45 women and 42 men) aged 20--90. The state of muscle blood flow was evaluated by means of the clearance of 133xenon injected into M. tibialis anterior. The data obtained showed a decrease of MBFR and MMBF in older people as compared with younger subjects. In realization of this phenomenon a decrease in muscle capillarisation and a reduction in reactivity of microcirculatory link of vascular system plays an increasingly greater role with aging. The reduction in muscle blood flow forms a circulatory component of the age-associated hypoxia. This fact results in a decrease of muscle blood flow and limits the functional capacity of skeletal muscle under conditions of activity.

  9. Linking Metabolism, Elemental Cycles, and Environmental Conditions in the Deep Biosphere: Growth of a Model Extremophile, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Under High-Pressure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, G. C. M.; Cario, A.; Rogers, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    A majority of Earth's biosphere is hosted in subsurface environments where global-scale biogeochemical and energy cycles are driven by diverse microbial communities that operate on and are influenced by micro-scale environmental variables. While the subsurface hosts a variety of geochemical and geothermal conditions, elevated pressures are common to all subsurface ecosystems. Understanding how microbes adapt to and thrive in high-pressure environments is essential to linking microbial subsurface processes with global-scale cycles. Here we are using a model extremophile, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, to determine how elevated pressures affect the growth, metabolism, and physiology of subsurface microorganisms. A. fulgidus cycles carbon and sulfur via heterotrophic and autotrophic sulfate reduction in various high temperature and high-pressure niches including shallow marine vents, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, and deep oil reservoirs. Here we report the results of A. fulgidus growth experiments at optimum temperature, 83°C, and pressures up to 600 bars. Exponential growth was observed over the entire pressure range, though growth rates were diminished at 500 and 600 bars compared to ambient pressure experimental controls. At pressures up to 400 bars, cell density yields and growth rates were at least as high as ambient pressure controls. Elevated pressures and extended incubation times stimulated cell flocculation, a common stress response in this strain, and cellular morphology was affected at pressures exceeding 400 bars. These results suggest that A. fulgidus continues carbon, sulfur and energy cycling unaffected by elevated pressures up to 400 bars, representing a variety of subsurface environments. The ability of subsurface organisms to drive biogeochemical cycles at elevated pressures is a critical link between the surface and subsurface biospheres and understanding how species-scale processes operate under these conditions is a vital part of global

  10. Metabolic Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    A metabolic panel is a group of tests that measures different chemicals in the blood. These tests are usually done on ... and liver. There are two types: basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The BMP ...

  11. Key Aging-Associated Alterations in Primary Microglia Response to Beta-Amyloid Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Caldeira

    2017-08-01

    increased the number of CD86+ cells in 16 DIV microglia. Simultaneous M1 and M2 markers were found after Aβ treatment, but at lower expression in the in vitro aged microglia. Data show key-aging associated responses by microglia when incubated with Aβ, with a loss of reactivity from the 2 DIV to the 16 DIV cells, which course with a reduced phagocytosis, migration and lower expression of inflammatory miRNAs. These findings help to improve our understanding on the heterogeneous responses that microglia can have along the progression of AD disease and imply that therapeutic approaches may differ from early to late stages.

  12. The metabolic response of P. putida KT2442 producing high levels of polyhydroxyalkanoate under single- and multiple-nutrient-limited growth: Highlights from a multi-level omics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poblete-Castro Ignacio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas putida KT2442 is a natural producer of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs, which can substitute petroleum-based non-renewable plastics and form the basis for the production of tailor-made biopolymers. However, despite the substantial body of work on PHA production by P. putida strains, it is not yet clear how the bacterium re-arranges its whole metabolism when it senses the limitation of nitrogen and the excess of fatty acids as carbon source, to result in a large accumulation of PHAs within the cell. In the present study we investigated the metabolic response of KT2442 using a systems biology approach to highlight the differences between single- and multiple-nutrient-limited growth in chemostat cultures. Results We found that 26, 62, and 81% of the cell dry weight consist of PHA under conditions of carbon, dual, and nitrogen limitation, respectively. Under nitrogen limitation a specific PHA production rate of 0.43 (g·(g·h-1 was obtained. The residual biomass was not constant for dual- and strict nitrogen-limiting growth, showing a different feature in comparison to other P. putida strains. Dual limitation resulted in patterns of gene expression, protein level, and metabolite concentrations that substantially differ from those observed under exclusive carbon or nitrogen limitation. The most pronounced differences were found in the energy metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, as well as stress proteins and enzymes belonging to the transport system. Conclusion This is the first study where the interrelationship between nutrient limitations and PHA synthesis has been investigated under well-controlled conditions using a system level approach. The knowledge generated will be of great assistance for the development of bioprocesses and further metabolic engineering work in this versatile organism to both enhance and diversify the industrial production of PHAs.

  13. High-dimensional analysis of the aging immune system: verification of age-associated differences in immune signaling responses in healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Diane M; Louie, Brent; Ptacek, Jason; Friedland, Greg; Evensen, Erik; Putta, Santosh; Atallah, Michelle; Spellmeyer, David; Wang, Ena; Pos, Zoltan; Marincola, Francesco M; Schaeffer, Andrea; Lukac, Suzanne; Railkar, Radha; Beals, Chan R; Cesano, Alessandra; Carayannopoulos, Leonidas N; Hawtin, Rachael E

    2014-06-21

    Single-cell network profiling (SCNP) is a multiparametric flow cytometry-based approach that simultaneously measures evoked signaling in multiple cell subsets. Previously, using the SCNP approach, age-associated immune signaling responses were identified in a cohort of 60 healthy donors. In the current study, a high-dimensional analysis of intracellular signaling was performed by measuring 24 signaling nodes in 7 distinct immune cell subsets within PBMCs in an independent cohort of 174 healthy donors [144 elderly (>65 yrs); 30 young (25-40 yrs)]. Associations between age and 9 immune signaling responses identified in the previously published 60 donor cohort were confirmed in the current study. Furthermore, within the current study cohort, 48 additional immune signaling responses differed significantly between young and elderly donors. These associations spanned all profiled modulators and immune cell subsets. These results demonstrate that SCNP, a systems-based approach, can capture the complexity of the cellular mechanisms underlying immunological aging. Further, the confirmation of age associations in an independent donor cohort supports the use of SCNP as a tool for identifying reproducible predictive biomarkers in areas such as vaccine response and response to cancer immunotherapies.

  14. The Inflammatory Transcription Factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 Drive Age-Associated Transcriptional Changes in the Human Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brown, Zach K.; Van Nostrand, Eric L.; Higgins, John P.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Human kidney function declines with age, accompanied by stereotyped changes in gene expression and histopathology, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are largely unknown. To identify potential regulators of kidney aging, we compared age-associated transcriptional changes in the human kidney with genome-wide maps of transcription factor occupancy from ChIP-seq datasets in human cells. The strongest candidates were the inflammation-associated transcription factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3, the activities of which increase with age in epithelial compartments of the renal cortex. Stimulation of renal tubular epithelial cells with the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (a STAT3 activator), IFNγ (a STAT1 activator), or TNFα (an NFκB activator) recapitulated age-associated gene expression changes. We show that common DNA variants in RELA and NFKB1, the two genes encoding subunits of the NFκB transcription factor, associate with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in gene association studies, providing the first evidence that genetic variation in NFκB contributes to renal aging phenotypes. Our results suggest that NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 underlie transcriptional changes and chronic inflammation in the aging human kidney. PMID:26678048

  15. Age-associated disruption of molecular clock expression in skeletal muscle of the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunori Miyazaki

    Full Text Available It is well known that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR develop muscle pathologies with hypertension and heart failure, though the mechanism remains poorly understood. Woon et al. (2007 linked the circadian clock gene Bmal1 to hypertension and metabolic dysfunction in the SHR. Building on these findings, we compared the expression pattern of several core-clock genes in the gastrocnemius muscle of aged SHR (80 weeks; overt heart failure compared to aged-matched control WKY strain. Heart failure was associated with marked effects on the expression of Bmal1, Clock and Rora in addition to several non-circadian genes important in regulating skeletal muscle phenotype including Mck, Ttn and Mef2c. We next performed circadian time-course collections at a young age (8 weeks; pre-hypertensive and adult age (22 weeks; hypertensive to determine if clock gene expression was disrupted in gastrocnemius, heart and liver tissues prior to or after the rats became hypertensive. We found that hypertensive/hypertrophic SHR showed a dampening of peak Bmal1 and Rev-erb expression in the liver, and the clock-controlled gene Pgc1α in the gastrocnemius. In addition, the core-clock gene Clock and the muscle-specific, clock-controlled gene Myod1, no longer maintained a circadian pattern of expression in gastrocnemius from the hypertensive SHR. These findings provide a framework to suggest a mechanism whereby chronic heart failure leads to skeletal muscle pathologies; prolonged dysregulation of the molecular clock in skeletal muscle results in altered Clock, Pgc1α and Myod1 expression which in turn leads to the mis-regulation of target genes important for mechanical and metabolic function of skeletal muscle.

  16. Serum under-carboxylated osteocalcin levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: weight-dependent relationships with endocrine and metabolic traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepene Carmen E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under-carboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC, the precursor substrate of bone biomarker OC is a potent regulator of energy metabolism by promoting insulin production and adiponectin synthesis and decreasing fat stores. The aim of the present study was to point out the potential role of ucOC in the physiopathology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, a common disorder defined by the constellation of anovulation, insulinresistance, hyperinsulinemia, obesity and androgen excess. Methods In this prospective case–control investigation, 78 young premenopausal women, i.e. 52 PCOS patients and 26 age- and body mass index (BMI-matched healthy controls, were successively enrolled. Recruitment of PCOS patients was performed according to Androgen Excess-Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (AE-PCOS Society 2006 criteria. All study participants were subjected to clinical examination, whole-body composition assessment and measurements of serum ucOC, OC (1-49, glucose and lipids, insulin, total testosterone (TT, estradiol, sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP and β-CrossLaps. Results BMI-stratified multivariate analysis revealed significantly higher ucOC levels in PCOS vs. controls in lean (p = 0.001 but not overweight and obese study participants (p = 0.456. Notably, a positive correlation between ucOC and TT (p = 0.018, calculated free testosterone (cFT, p = 0.028 and serum insulin (p = 0.036, respectively, was found to be confined to the lean analysis subgroup. Furthermore, in stepwise multiple regression models, β-CrossLaps and cFT were able to predict 46.71% of serum ucOC variability. (1-43/49OC failed to be significantly associated to any PCOS trait. Conclusions Circulating ucOC concentration is related to key endocrine PCOS characteristics in a weight-dependent manner. Within the bone-pancreas loop, high ucOC may favor insulin release in lean hyperandrogenic women to compensate for

  17. Influence of natural and synthetic vitamin C (ascorbic acid) on primary and secondary metabolites and associated metabolism in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) plants under water deficit regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Aniqa; Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2018-02-01

    Phytoextracts are being widely used these days as a source of bioactive compounds for mitigating the harmful effects of abiotic stresses including drought stress. In this study, it was assessed how far foliar applied pure synthetic ascorbic acid (AsA) or natural sweet orange juice (OJ) enriched with AsA could mitigate the drought stress induced adverse effects on growth and some key metabolic processes in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.; cultivar V 9 ) plants. Two weeks old quinoa seedlings were subjected to varying irrigation regimes as control [100% field capacity (FC)] and drought stress (60% FC, 40% FC and 20% FC). After one month of water deficit treatments, various levels of ascorbic acid (150 mg L -1 AsA or 25% OJ) besides control [distilled water (DW) and no spray (NS)] were applied as a foliar spray. After 15 days of AsA application, different physio-biochemical attributes were measured. The results showed that water deficit markedly decreased plant growth, relative water content (RWC), photosynthetic rate, total carotenoids (CAR) and total flavonoids, while it increased relative membrane permeability (RMP), intrinsic AsA content, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), malondialdehyde (MDA), glycinebetaine (GB), total phenolics, total soluble proteins (TSP), total free amino acids, activities of key antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD)], total soluble sugars (TSS), reducing (RS) and non-reducing sugars (NRS). Most obvious results of most of these parameters were observed at 40% and 20% FC. Foliar-applied pure 150 mg L -1 AsA and 25% OJ were found to be very effective in improving plant growth, RMP, photosynthetic rate, CAR, proline, AsA, MDA, GB, TSP, free amino acids, SOD, POD, TSS, RS, NRS and total flavonoids. It was noticed that 25% OJ enriched with AsA and other essential nutrients and biomolecules was as efficient as 150 mg L -1 AsA in reducing the adverse effects of drought stress on quinoa plants. So, it was concluded

  18. Age-associated repression of type 1 inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor impairs muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bora; Lee, Seung-Min; Bahn, Young Jae; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Kang, Moonkyung; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Woo, Sun-Hee; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Eunhee; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and power decrease with age, leading to impairment of mobility and metabolism in the elderly. Ca2+ signaling is crucial for myoblast differentiation as well as muscle contraction through activation of transcription factors and Ca2+-dependent kinases and phosphatases. Ca2+ channels, such as dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), two-pore channel (TPC) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (ITPR), function to maintain Ca2+ homeostasis in myoblasts. Here, we observed a significant decrease in expression of type 1 IP3 receptor (ITPR1), but not types 2 and 3, in aged mice skeletal muscle and isolated myoblasts, compared with those of young mice. ITPR1 knockdown using shRNA-expressing viruses in C2C12 myoblasts and tibialis anterior muscle of mice inhibited myotube formation and muscle regeneration after injury, respectively, a typical phenotype of aged muscle. This aging phenotype was associated with repression of muscle-specific genes and activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. ERK inhibition by U0126 not only induced recovery of myotube formation in old myoblasts but also facilitated muscle regeneration after injury in aged muscle. The conserved decline in ITPR1 expression in aged human skeletal muscle suggests utility as a potential therapeutic target for sarcopenia, which can be treated using ERK inhibition strategies. PMID:27658230

  19. The Citrus Flavanone Naringenin Protects Myocardial Cells against Age-Associated Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Da Pozzo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the health-promoting effects of the citrus flavanone naringenin have been examined. The results have provided evidence for the modulation of some key mechanisms involved in cellular damage by this compound. In particular, naringenin has been revealed to have protective properties such as an antioxidant effect in cardiometabolic disorders. Very recently, beneficial effects of naringenin have been demonstrated in old rats. Because aging has been demonstrated to be directly related to the occurrence of cardiac disorders, in the present study, the ability of naringenin to prevent cardiac cell senescence was investigated. For this purpose, a cellular model of senescent myocardial cells was set up and evaluated using colorimetric, fluorimetric, and immunometric techniques. Relevant cellular senescence markers, such as X-gal staining, cell cycle regulator levels, and the percentage of cell cycle-arrested cells, were found to be reduced in the presence of naringenin. In addition, cardiac markers of aging-induced damage, including radical oxidative species levels, mitochondrial metabolic activity, mitochondrial calcium buffer capacity, and estrogenic signaling functions, were also modulated by the compound. These results suggested that naringenin has antiaging effects on myocardial cells.

  20. Effects of introducing heterologous pathways on microbial metabolism with respect to metabolic optimality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Byoungjin; Seung, Do Young

    2014-01-01

    Although optimality of microbial metabolism under genetic and environmental perturbations is well studied, the effects of introducing heterologous reactions on the overall metabolism are not well understood. This point is important in the field of metabolic engineering because heterologous reacti...

  1. Human drug metabolism: an introduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    ..., both under drug pressure and during inhibition. Factors affecting drug metabolism, such as genetic polymorphisms, age and diet are discussed and how metabolism can lead to toxicity is explained. The book concludes with the role of drug metabolism in the commercial development of therapeutic agents as well as the pharmacology of some illicit drugs.

  2. Lifelong Physical Activity Prevents Aging-Associated Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Myotubes via Increased Glucose Transporter Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunprajun, Tipwadee; Henriksen, Tora Ida; Scheele, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Both aging and physical inactivity are associated with increased development of insulin resistance whereas physical activity has been shown to promote increased insulin sensitivity. Here we investigated the effects of physical activity level on aging-associated insulin resistance in myotubes......, and significantly higher GLUT4 protein. It is likely that physical activity induces a number of stable adaptations, including increased GLUT4 expression that are retained in cells ex vivo and protect, or delay the onset of middle-aged-associated insulin resistance. Additionally, a sedentary lifestyle has an impact...... chain protein expression. Interestingly MHCIIa was increased only in myotubes from middle-aged active individuals. Middle-aged sedentary cells had intact insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation however, the same cell showed ablated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma...

  3. Blood-based biomarkers of age-associated epigenetic changes in human islets associate with insulin secretion and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacos, Karl; Gillberg, Linn; Volkov, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Aging associates with impaired pancreatic islet function and increased type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Here we examine whether age-related epigenetic changes affect human islet function and if blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect these changes and associate with future T2D. We analyse DNA...... methylation genome-wide in islets from 87 non-diabetic donors, aged 26-74 years. Aging associates with increased DNA methylation of 241 sites. These sites cover loci previously associated with T2D, for example, KLF14. Blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect age-related methylation changes in 83 genes...... identified in human islets (for example, KLF14, FHL2, ZNF518B and FAM123C) and some associate with insulin secretion and T2D. DNA methylation correlates with islet expression of multiple genes, including FHL2, ZNF518B, GNPNAT1 and HLTF. Silencing these genes in β-cells alter insulin secretion. Together, we...

  4. The TWEAK–Fn14 dyad is involved in age-associated pathological changes in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Sato, Shuichi; Shin, Jonghyun [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Zheng, Timothy S.; Burkly, Linda C. [Department of Immunology, Biogen Idec, 14 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Kumar, Ashok, E-mail: ashok.kumar@louisville.edu [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • The levels of TWEAK receptor Fn14 are increased in skeletal muscle during aging. • Deletion of Fn14 attenuates age-associated skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. • Deletion of Fn14 inhibits proteolysis in skeletal muscle during aging. • TWEAK–Fn14 signaling activates transcription factor NF-κB in aging skeletal muscle. • TWEAK–Fn14 dyad is involved in age-associated fibrosis in skeletal muscle. - Abstract: Progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) is a major clinical problem in the elderly. Recently, proinflammatory cytokine TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 were identified as key mediators of muscle wasting in various catabolic states. However, the role of the TWEAK–Fn14 pathway in pathological changes in skeletal muscle during aging remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the levels of Fn14 are increased in skeletal muscle of 18-month old (aged) mice compared with adult mice. Genetic ablation of Fn14 significantly increased the levels of specific muscle proteins and blunted the age-associated fiber atrophy in mice. While gene expression of two prominent muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases MAFBx and MuRF1 remained comparable, levels of ubiquitinated proteins and the expression of autophagy-related molecule Atg12 were significantly reduced in Fn14-knockout (KO) mice compared with wild-type mice during aging. Ablation of Fn14 significantly diminished the DNA-binding activity of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), gene expression of various inflammatory molecules, and interstitial fibrosis in skeletal muscle of aged mice. Collectively, our study suggests that the TWEAK–Fn14 signaling axis contributes to age-associated muscle atrophy and fibrosis potentially through its local activation of proteolytic systems and inflammatory pathways.

  5. Cadmium exposure and age-associated DNA methylation changes in non-smoking women from northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demanelis, Kathryn; Virani, Shama; Colacino, Justin A; Basu, Niladri; Nishijo, Muneko; Ruangyuttikarn, Werawan; Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Nambunmee, Kowit; Rozek, Laura S

    2017-05-01

    DNA methylation changes with age, and may serve as a biomarker of aging. Cadmium (Cd) modifies cellular processes that promote aging and disrupts methylation globally. Whether Cd modifies aging processes by influencing establishment of age-associated methylation marks is currently unknown. In this pilot study, we characterized methylation profiles in > 450 000 CpG sites in 40 non-smoking women (age 40-80) differentially exposed to environmental Cd from Thailand. Based on specific gravity adjusted urinary Cd, we classified them as high (HE) and low (LE) exposed and age-matched within 5 years. Urinary Cd was defined as below 2 µg/l in the LE group. We predicted epigenetic age (DNAm-age) using two published methods by Horvath and Hannum and examined the difference between epigenetic age and chronologic age (Δage). We assessed differences by Cd exposure using linear mixed models adjusted for estimated white blood cell proportions, BMI, and urinary creatinine. We identified 213 age-associated CpG sites in our population ( P LE (Hannum: 3.6 vs. 7.6 years, P = 0.0093; Horvath: 2.4 vs. 4.5 years, P = 0.1308). The Cd exposed group was associated with changes in methylation ( P < 0.05) at 12, 8, and 20 age-associated sites identified in our population, Hannum, and Horvath. From the results of this pilot study, elevated Cd exposure is associated with methylation changes at age-associated sites and smaller differences between DNAm-age and chronologic age, in contrast to expected age-accelerating effects. Cd may modify epigenetic aging, and biomarkers of aging warrant further investigation when examining Cd and its relationship with chronic disease and mortality.

  6. The TWEAK–Fn14 dyad is involved in age-associated pathological changes in skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Sato, Shuichi; Shin, Jonghyun; Zheng, Timothy S.; Burkly, Linda C.; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The levels of TWEAK receptor Fn14 are increased in skeletal muscle during aging. • Deletion of Fn14 attenuates age-associated skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. • Deletion of Fn14 inhibits proteolysis in skeletal muscle during aging. • TWEAK–Fn14 signaling activates transcription factor NF-κB in aging skeletal muscle. • TWEAK–Fn14 dyad is involved in age-associated fibrosis in skeletal muscle. - Abstract: Progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) is a major clinical problem in the elderly. Recently, proinflammatory cytokine TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 were identified as key mediators of muscle wasting in various catabolic states. However, the role of the TWEAK–Fn14 pathway in pathological changes in skeletal muscle during aging remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the levels of Fn14 are increased in skeletal muscle of 18-month old (aged) mice compared with adult mice. Genetic ablation of Fn14 significantly increased the levels of specific muscle proteins and blunted the age-associated fiber atrophy in mice. While gene expression of two prominent muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases MAFBx and MuRF1 remained comparable, levels of ubiquitinated proteins and the expression of autophagy-related molecule Atg12 were significantly reduced in Fn14-knockout (KO) mice compared with wild-type mice during aging. Ablation of Fn14 significantly diminished the DNA-binding activity of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), gene expression of various inflammatory molecules, and interstitial fibrosis in skeletal muscle of aged mice. Collectively, our study suggests that the TWEAK–Fn14 signaling axis contributes to age-associated muscle atrophy and fibrosis potentially through its local activation of proteolytic systems and inflammatory pathways

  7. Effect of procysteine on aging-associated changes in hepatic GSH and SMase: evidence for transcriptional regulation of smpd3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevska, Gergana; Sunkara, Manjula; Karakashian, Claudia; Peppers, Benjamin; Morris, Andrew J; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N

    2014-10-01

    In hepatocytes, aging-associated decline in GSH has been linked to activation of neutral SMase (nSMase), accumulation of bioactive ceramide, and inflammation. In this study, we seek to test whether dietary supplementation with the cysteine precursor, L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC), would correct the aging-associated differences in hepatic GSH, nSMase, and ceramide. Young and aged mice were placed on a diet that either lacked sulfur-containing amino acids (SAAs) or had 0.5% OTC for 4 weeks. Mice fed standard chow were used as an additional control. SAA-deficient mice exhibited significant aging-associated differences in hepatic GSH, GSH/GSSG, ceramide, and nSMase. C24:1 ceramide, the major ceramide species in liver, was affected the most by aging, followed by the less abundant C16:0 ceramide. OTC supplementation eliminated the aging-associated differences in hepatic GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio. Surprisingly, however, instead of decreasing, the nSMase activity and ceramide increased in the OTC-fed mice irrespective of their age. These effects were due to elevated nSMase-2 mRNA and protein and appeared to be direct. Similar increases were seen in HepG2 cells following treatment with OTC. The OTC-fed aged mice also exhibited hepatic steatosis and triacylglyceride accumulation. These results suggest that OTC is a potent stimulant of nSMase-2 expression and that there may be unanticipated complications of OTC supplementation.

  8. Pineal Calcification, Melatonin Production, Aging, Associated Health Consequences and Rejuvenation of the Pineal Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun Xian; Xu, Bing; Zhou, Xinjia; Reiter, Russel J

    2018-01-31

    The pineal gland is a unique organ that synthesizes melatonin as the signaling molecule of natural photoperiodic environment and as a potent neuronal protective antioxidant. An intact and functional pineal gland is necessary for preserving optimal human health. Unfortunately, this gland has the highest calcification rate among all organs and tissues of the human body. Pineal calcification jeopardizes melatonin's synthetic capacity and is associated with a variety of neuronal diseases. In the current review, we summarized the potential mechanisms of how this process may occur under pathological conditions or during aging. We hypothesized that pineal calcification is an active process and resembles in some respects of bone formation. The mesenchymal stem cells and melatonin participate in this process. Finally, we suggest that preservation of pineal health can be achieved by retarding its premature calcification or even rejuvenating the calcified gland.

  9. Pineal Calcification, Melatonin Production, Aging, Associated Health Consequences and Rejuvenation of the Pineal Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dun Xian Tan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The pineal gland is a unique organ that synthesizes melatonin as the signaling molecule of natural photoperiodic environment and as a potent neuronal protective antioxidant. An intact and functional pineal gland is necessary for preserving optimal human health. Unfortunately, this gland has the highest calcification rate among all organs and tissues of the human body. Pineal calcification jeopardizes melatonin’s synthetic capacity and is associated with a variety of neuronal diseases. In the current review, we summarized the potential mechanisms of how this process may occur under pathological conditions or during aging. We hypothesized that pineal calcification is an active process and resembles in some respects of bone formation. The mesenchymal stem cells and melatonin participate in this process. Finally, we suggest that preservation of pineal health can be achieved by retarding its premature calcification or even rejuvenating the calcified gland.

  10. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  11. Diagnostic value of daily fluctuations in the free form of testosterone and cortisol in men with obesity and metabolic syndrome under the age of 50 years

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Kuznetsova; A. S. Adamchik; N. P. Goncharov; G. V. Katsiya

    2016-01-01

    The important pathogenetic link of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) in men are disorders of testosterone production in the testes and adrenal adrenal cortisol production. Тestosterone deficiency and functional hypercortisolism have a mutual influence on each other. Comprehensive assessment of testosterone and cortisol balance and identify their daily variability in the saliva may improve the diagnosis of hormonal disorders in men with obesity and MS. In the present study, by comparative an...

  12. Metabolically active extracellular vesicles released from hepatocytes under drug-induced liver-damaging conditions modify serum metabolome and might affect different pathophysiological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo, Felix; Palomo, Laura; Mleczko, Justyna; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Alonso, Cristina; Martínez, Ibon; Pérez-Cormenzana, Miriam; Castro, Azucena; Falcon-Perez, Juan M

    2017-02-15

    Hepatocytes are involved in the endogenous and drug metabolism; many of the enzymes involved in those processes are incorporated into extracellular vesicles and secreted into the bloodstream. Liver-damaging conditions modify the molecular cargo of those vesicles significantly. However, no information about the effect of these hepatic vesicles on the extracellular environment is available. Drug-induced liver damage increases the number of circulating extracellular vesicles and affects the release and content of hepatocyte-derived vesicles. In this work, we evaluated the metabolic effect of these vesicles on the composition of the serum. We performed a targeted ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) metabolomics analysis of serum samples. The samples had been first incubated with hepatic extracellular vesicles from hepatocytes challenged with acetaminophen or diclofenac. The incubation affected the serum levels of 67 metabolites, such as amino acids and different species of lipids. The metabolites included various species of phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines. These compounds are the components of biological membranes; our observations suggest that the vesicles might take part in remodelling and maintenance of the membranes. Alterations in the levels of some other serum metabolites might have deleterious consequences, for example, the tetracosanoic acid with its cardiovascular effects. However, some of the metabolites whose levels were increased, including alpha-linoleic and tauroursodeoxycholic acids, have been reported to have a protective effect. Our targeted metabolomics analysis indicated that the hepatic extracellular vesicles act as nano-metabolic machines supplying the extracellular environment with the means to integrate diverse tissue responses. In conclusion, we show that the hepatic extracellular vesicles are metabolically active and might play a role in the physiopathological response to hepatic insults

  13. Searching iron sensors in plants by exploring the link among 2’-OG-dependent dioxygenases, the iron deficiency response and metabolic adjustments occurring under iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIANPIERO eVIGANI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge accumulated on the regulation of iron (Fe homeostasis, its intracellular trafficking and transport across various cellular compartments and organs in plants; storage proteins, transporters and transcription factors involved in Fe metabolism have been analysed in detail in recent years. However, the key sensor(s of cellular plant Fe status triggering the long-distance shoot-root signalling and leading to the root Fe-deficiency responses is (are still unknown. Local Fe sensing is also a major task for roots, for adjusting the internal Fe requirements to external Fe availability: how such sensing is achieved and how it leads to metabolic adjustments in case of nutrient shortage, is mostly unknown. Two proteins belonging to the 2′-OG dependent dioxygenases family accumulate several folds in Fe-deficient Arabidopsis roots. Such proteins require Fe(II as enzymatic cofactor; one of their subgroups, the HIF-P4H (Hypoxia Inducible Factor- Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase, is an effective oxygen sensor in animal cells. We envisage here the possibility that some members of the 2′-OG dioxygenase family may be involved in the Fe-deficiency response and in the metabolic adjustments to Fe deficiency or even in sensing Fe, in plant cells.

  14. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and metabolic analysis uncover multiple molecular responses of the grass species Lolium perenne under low-intensity xenobiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Antonella eSerra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lolium perenne, which is a major component of pastures, lawns, and grass strips, can be exposed to xenobiotic stresses due to diffuse and residual contaminations of soil. L. perenne was recently shown to undergo metabolic adjustments in response to sub-toxic levels of xenobiotics. To gain insight in such chemical stress responses, a de novo transcriptome analysis was carried out on leaves from plants subjected at the root level to low levels of xenobiotics, glyphosate, tebuconazole, and a combination of the two, leading to no adverse physiological effect. Chemical treatments influenced significantly the relative proportions of functional categories and of transcripts related to carbohydrate processes, to signalling, to protein-kinase cascades, as Serine/Threonine-protein kinases, to transcriptional regulations, to responses to abiotic or biotic stimuli and to responses to phytohormones. Transcriptomics-based expressions of genes encoding different types of SNF1 (sucrose non-fermenting 1-related kinases involved in sugar and stress signalling or encoding key metabolic enzymes were in line with specific qRT-PCR analysis or with the important metabolic and regulatory changes revealed by metabolomic analysis. The effects of pesticide treatments on metabolites and gene expression strongly suggest that pesticides at low levels, as single molecule or as mixture, affect cell signalling and functioning even in the absence of major physiological impact. This global analysis of L. perenne therefore highlighted the interactions between molecular regulation of responses to xenobiotics, and also carbohydrate dynamics, energy dysfunction, phytohormones and calcium signalling.

  15. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Chemistry of Drug Metabolism. Drug metabolism is a chemical process, where enzymes play a crucial role in the conversion of one chemical species to another. The major family of enzymes associated with these metabolic reactions is the cytochrome P450 family. The structural features and functional activity of these ...

  16. Changes in Structural-Mechanical Properties and Degradability of Collagen during Aging-associated Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Preety; Lamour, Guillaume; Mackenzie, Neil C W; Yang, Heejae; Ko, Frank; Li, Hongbin; Brömme, Dieter

    2015-09-18

    During aging, changes occur in the collagen network that contribute to various pathological phenotypes in the skeletal, vascular, and pulmonary systems. The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of age-related modifications on the mechanical stability and in vitro proteolytic degradation of type I collagen. Analyzing mouse tail and bovine bone collagen, we found that collagen at both fibril and fiber levels varies in rigidity and Young's modulus due to different physiological changes, which correlate with changes in cathepsin K (CatK)-mediated degradation. A decreased susceptibility to CatK-mediated hydrolysis of fibrillar collagen was observed following mineralization and advanced glycation end product-associated modification. However, aging of bone increased CatK-mediated osteoclastic resorption by ∼27%, and negligible resorption was observed when osteoclasts were cultured on mineral-deficient bone. We observed significant differences in the excavations generated by osteoclasts and C-terminal telopeptide release during bone resorption under distinct conditions. Our data indicate that modification of collagen compromises its biomechanical integrity and affects CatK-mediated degradation both in bone and tissue, thus contributing to our understanding of extracellular matrix aging. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism in man V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyhan, W.L.; Thompson, L.F.; Watts, R.W.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book comprises the proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on Human Purine and Pyrimidine Metabolism. Its papers are organized under the following categories: adenosine receptors; purine receptors and the central nervous system; nucleoside and base transport; studies with antimetabolites; deoxynucleotide and nucleoside toxicity and metabolism; enzymes; purine and pyrimidine metabolism during lymphocyte differentiation; purine metabolism in skeletal muscle; purine nucleotide metabolism in the heart; purine and pyrimidine metabolism in primary cell cultures and in parasites; nucleoside kinases and drug activation; phosphoribosylpyrophosphate; S-adenosylmethionine metabolism; and the metabolic effects of interferon

  18. [The specific features of the development of metabolic and regenerative processes under the action of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation in radiation exposure conditions (an experimental study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Yu N; Mihajlik, L V; Nikulina, L A; Geniatulina, M S

    The experiments on male white rats with the use of biochemical, photo-optical, and electron-microscopic techniques have demonstrated that the use of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation of ultrahigh frequency (EMR UHF) and low-intensity low-frequency magnetic field (MF) during the post-irradiation period (within 21 days after exposure to radiation) enhanced the metabolic and regenerative processes in the testes and liver. It was shown that the application of MF largely intensified the antioxidant activity whereas EMR UHF preferentially stimulated the biosynthetic processes as well as the processes of cellular and intracellular regeneration.

  19. The drought-tolerant Solanum pennellii regulates leaf water loss and induces genes involved in amino acid and ethylene/jasmonate metabolism under dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Isabel; Albaladejo, Irene; Meco, Victoriano; Morales, Belén; Sevilla, Angel; Bolarin, Maria C; Flores, Francisco B

    2018-02-12

    Breeding for drought-tolerant crops is a pressing issue due to the increasing frequency and duration of droughts caused by climate change. Although important sources of variation for drought tolerance exist in wild relatives, the mechanisms and the key genes controlling tolerance in tomato are little known. The aim of this study is to determine the drought response of the tomato wild relative Solanum pennellii (Sp) compared with the cultivated tomato Solanum lycopersicum (Sl). The paper investigates the physiological and molecular responses in leaves of Sp and Sl plants without stress and moderate drought stress. Significant physiological differences between species were found, with Sp leaves showing greater ability to avoid water loss and oxidative damage. Leaf transcriptomic analysis carried out when leaves did not as yet show visual dehydration symptoms revealed important constitutive expression differences between Sp and Sl species. Genes linked to different physiological and metabolic processes were induced by drought in Sp, especially those involved in N assimilation, GOGAT/GS cycle and GABA-shunt. Up-regulation in Sp of genes linked to JA/ET biosynthesis and signaling pathways was also observed. In sum, genes involved in the amino acid metabolism together with genes linked to ET/JA seem to be key actors in the drought tolerance of the wild tomato species.

  20. Comparative analysis of changes in protein and lipid metabolism, lipid peroxidation, and hemostasis under the effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuntsevich, A.D.; Baulin, S.I.; Golovkov, V.F.; Rembovskii, V.R.; Smirnova, L.A.; Troshkin, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and ionizing radiation are among the most hazardous environmental factors causing ecological catastrophes and mass afflications in various accidents involving nuclear power plants and chemical industrial enterprises. The authors previously established that the simultaneous action of a toxic dose of PCDD and ionizing radiation increases the combined toxic effect. The effects of these chemical and physical factors were superadditive (the biological potentiation effect). Here, the authors compare the effects of PCDD and irradiation on protein and lipid metabolism, lipid peroxidation, and hemostasis in order to learn more about biochemical mechanisms mediating the potentiation effect. The experimental evidence suggests that PCDD can modify the biological effects of ionizing radiation through the generation of free radicals and activation of the chain reactions of free-radical lipid peroxidation, such as the formation of peroxides or malonic dialdehyde. The toxic effects of PCDD and ionizing radiation are based on free-radical reactions and chemical pathology. In other words, the chemical and physical factors directly and selectively hit the same biological target, thereby increasing their combined toxic effects. The results can partially explain the observed potentiating effect of the combined action of ionizing radiation and PCDD on the body. This phenomenon is based on biochemical processes generating an abundance of products of lipid peroxidation and the decrease in the body's defenses caused by disorders in protein and lipid metabolism and blood coagulation

  1. Diagnostic value of daily fluctuations in the free form of testosterone and cortisol in men with obesity and metabolic syndrome under the age of 50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kuznetsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The important pathogenetic link of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS in men are disorders of testosterone production in the testes and adrenal adrenal cortisol production. Тestosterone deficiency and functional hypercortisolism have a mutual influence on each other. Comprehensive assessment of testosterone and cortisol balance and identify their daily variability in the saliva may improve the diagnosis of hormonal disorders in men with obesity and MS. In the present study, by comparative and correlation analysis assessed the circadian rhythm of cortisol and testosterone production in young and middle age men, finding the relationship between the concentration of these hormones in the morning and evening portions of saliva with the changes of anthropometric, hemodynamic and metabolic parameters. The study involved 35 patients with MS, 16 – with overweight and obesity without the MS and 19 – with normal body weight. In men with obesity and MS found a violation of the circadian rhythm of testosterone production. Evening saliva testosterone showed a close correlation with the parameters of the MSome and clinical symptoms of androgen deficiency, as well as a more pronounced decrease with age. Circadian rhythm of cortisol production was not violated, but cortisol was significantly increased in the evening portion of saliva in patients with obesity and MS. MS was associated not only with an increase in the concentration of free salivary cortisol in the evening hours, but with lower cortisol levels in the batch of saliva collected in the morning, which is consistent with other studies.

  2. Dose- and time-related changes in aerobic metabolism, chorionic disruption, and oxidative stress in embryonic medaka (Oryzias latipes): Underlying mechanisms for silver nanoparticle developmental toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yuan, E-mail: uyuan@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Department of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing (China); Zhou Qunfang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing (China)

    2012-11-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely employed in commercial products, and are thus inevitably released into the aquatic environment. Many studies have indicated that AgNPs could induce toxicological effects on embryonic fish. To understand the mechanism of AgNP developmental toxicity, we determined the effects of AgNPs on the egg membrane, aerobic metabolism, antioxidant system, lipid peroxidation, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and singlet oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) generation in early-life medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). AgNP treatment at 62.5-1000 {mu}g/L caused significant increase in retarded development and abnormalities. Destruction of the surface ornamentation and egg envelope was observed at a higher AgNP concentration ({>=}125 {mu}g/L) using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A dose-dependent increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity, an indicator of anaerobic metabolism, and superoxide dismutase activity was observed in the treated embryos. In contrast, the total reduced glutathione level decreased. A high thiobarbituric acid reactive substance concentration was generated upon AgNP exposure from day 1 to day 7 postfertilisation. The biochemical parameters suggested that oxidative stress was induced by the AgNPs. Unexpectedly, a dose-dependent reduction in ROS and {sup 1}O{sub 2} generation upon high AgNP exposure ({>=}250 {mu}g/L) was observed. Although the morphological damages induced by the AgNPs were irreversible, restorable antioxidant defenses were noted in the well-developed embryos. This finding supported the idea that the stage of morphogenesis and organogenesis is a critical window to chemical exposure or environmental stress. Overall, the results suggested that hypoxia, disturbed egg chorion, and oxidative stress are mechanistically associated with AgNP toxicity in embryonic fish.

  3. A fase estrogênica altera a resposta do osso e do metabolismo mineral de ratas com hipertireoidismo? Does the estrogenic phase modify the bone and mineral metabolism response in rats under hyperthyroidism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Ocarino

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the estrogenic phase in the bone and in the mineral metabolism was studied in Wistar adult female rats kept under euthyroidism or hyperthyroidism for 60 days. The rats were divided, according to the stage of the estrous cycle, into four groups: 1 euthyroid (proestrus-estrus, 2 euthyroid (metaestrus-diestrus, 3 hyperthyroid (proestrus-estrus, and 4 hyperthyroid (metaestrus-diestrus. After 60 days the blood plasma was collected and the concentrations of free T4, estradiol, progesterone, calcium, phosphorus, and of alkaline phosphatase were determined. The bones (femur and tibia were analysed microscopically. Despite of the functional state of the thyroid, the levels of estrogen were significantly higher in the proestrus-estrus. The estrogenic phase increased the plasmatic concentration of calcium significantly in the euthyroid rats but it did not alter the levels of phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase. In the hyperthyroid state no significant differences in the plasmatic concentrations of calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase throughout the cycle were found. The phases of the cycle did not also influence the bone morphology in the euthyroid and hyperthyroid states. It was concluded that the estrogenic phase increases the plasmatic concentration of calcium, even without altering the bone morphology of the euthyroid rats. In addition the estrogenic phase does not increase the plasmatic calcium and it does not modify the response of the bone as well as of the mineral metabolism under effect of the hyperthyroidism.

  4. Iron metabolism in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Drygalski, Annette; Adamson, John W

    2013-09-01

    Iron metabolism in man is a highly regulated process designed to provide iron for erythropoiesis, mitochondrial energy production, electron transport, and cell proliferation. The mechanisms of iron handling also protect cells from the deleterious effects of free iron, which can produce oxidative damage of membranes, proteins, and lipids. Over the past decade, several important molecules involved in iron homeostasis have been discovered, and their function has expanded our understanding of iron trafficking under normal and pathological conditions. Physiologic iron metabolism is strongly influenced by inflammation, which clinically leads to anemia. Although hepcidin, a small circulating peptide produced by the liver, has been found to be the key regulator of iron trafficking, molecular pathways of iron sensing that control iron metabolism and hepcidin production are still incompletely understood. With this review, we provide an overview of the current understanding of iron metabolism, the recently discovered regulators of iron trafficking, and a focus on the effects of inflammation on the process.

  5. Indicadores metabólicos en razas lecheras especializadas en condiciones tropicales en Colombia Metabolic profile in dairy cows under tropical conditions in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rómulo Campos G

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Se ha seleccionado un alto número de razas bovinas para producción de leche, sin embargo, las de origen Bos taurus no han logrado adaptarse a las condiciones tropicales. El objetivo del trabajo fue analizar el comportamiento metabólico de siete razas (Ayrshire, Girolando, Holstein Friesian, Jersey, Lucerna, Pardo Suizo y Simenthal a través de 15 metabolitos. Se emplearon 28 animales por raza, distribuidos en cuatro grupos fisiológicos: novillas, inicio y final de lactancia y vacas secas (final de gestación. Los valores medios de los indicadores metabólicos fueron: BOH 0.5 mmol/l; glucosa 2.8 mmol/l; colesterol 2.5 mmol/l; potasio 4.1 mmol/l; calcio 2.0 mmol/l; fósforo inorgánico 1.7 mmol/l; magnesio 1.1 mmol/l; proteínas totales 66.2 mg/dl; albúmina 25.8 mg/dl; globulinas 40.2 mg/dl; creatinina 109 µmol/l; BUN 3.8 mmol/l; ALT 32.2 UI/l; AST 56.6 UI/l; GGT 12.3 UI/l; bilirrubina total 0.2 µmol/l; bilirrubina conjugada 0.08 µmol/l. Los valores medios de la condición corporal y el hematocrito fueron 3.25% y 27.0% respectivamente. Se encontraron diferencias estadísticas significativas entre grupos raciales y entre grupos de producción. Los animales de menor peso metabólico (Jersey presentaron mejor homeostasis que los de pesos mayores (Simenthal, Holstein.High numbers of bovine breeds have been selected as milk producers, but those derived from the Bos taurus breeds have been unable to adapt to tropical conditions. The aim of this work was to analyze the metabolic profile of the seven breeds (Ayrshire, Girolando, Holstein Friesian, Jersey , Lucerna, Brown Swiss and Simmental through the use of 15 metabolites. For each breed, 28 animals were used, divided into four physiological different groups: heifers, cows from the first stages and last stages of the lactation process and dry cows. The mean values of metabolites indicators were as follow: BOH 0.5 mmol/l; glucose 2.8 mmol/l; cholesterol 2.5 mmol/l; potassium 4.1 mmol/l; calcium 2

  6. Metabolic profile in dairy cows under tropical Indicadores metabólicos en razas lecheras especializadas en condiciones tropicales en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos G. Rómulo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available High numbers of bovine breeds have been selected as milk producers, but those derived from the Bos taurus breeds have been unable to adapt to tropical conditions. The aim of this work was to analyze the metabolic profile of the seven breeds (Ayrshire, Girolando, Holstein Friesian, Jersey, Lucerna, Brown Swiss and Simmental through the use of 15 metabolites. For each breed, 28 animals were used, divided into four physiological different groups: heifers, cows from the first stages and last stages of the lactation process and dry cows. The mean values of metabolites indicators were as follow: BOH 0.5 mmol/l; glucose 2.8 mmol/l; cholesterol 2.5 mmol/l; potassium 4.1 mmol/l; calcium 2.0 mmol/l; inorganic phosphorus 1.7 mmol/l; magnesium 1.1 mmol/l; total protein 66.2 mg/dl; albumin 25.8 mg/dl; globulin 40.2 mg/dl; creatinine 109 µmol/l; BUN 3.8 mmol/l; ALT 32.2 UI/l; AST 56.6 UI/l; GGT 12.3 UI/l; total bilirubin 0.2 µmol/L; conjugate bilirubin Additionally, body condition and PCV were determined with average values of 3.25 and 27% respectively. A significant statistical difference was found among breeding groups and physiological groups for production. It was observed that those animals with a low metabolic weight (Jersey demonstrate better homeostasis than those of high metabolic weight (Simmental, Holstein.Se ha seleccionado un alto número de razas bovinas para producción de leche, sin embargo, las de origen Bos taurus no han logrado adaptarse a las condiciones tropicales. El objetivo del trabajo fue analizar el comportamiento metabólico de siete razas (Ayrshire, Girolando, Holstein Friesian, Jersey, Lucerna, Pardo Suizo y Simenthal a través de 15 metabolitos. Se emplearon 28 animales por raza, distribuidos en cuatro grupos fisiológicos: novillas, inicio y final de lactancia y vacas secas (final de gestación. Los valores medios de los indicadores metabólicos fueron: BOH 0.5 mmol/l; glucosa 2.8 mmol/l; colesterol 2.5 mmol/l; potasio 4

  7. Robustness of metabolic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the robustness of cellular metabolism by simulating the system-level computational models, and also performed the corresponding experiments to validate our predictions. We address the cellular robustness from the ``metabolite''-framework by using the novel concept of ``flux-sum,'' which is the sum of all incoming or outgoing fluxes (they are the same under the pseudo-steady state assumption). By estimating the changes of the flux-sum under various genetic and environmental perturbations, we were able to clearly decipher the metabolic robustness; the flux-sum around an essential metabolite does not change much under various perturbations. We also identified the list of the metabolites essential to cell survival, and then ``acclimator'' metabolites that can control the cell growth were discovered. Furthermore, this concept of ``metabolite essentiality'' should be useful in developing new metabolic engineering strategies for improved production of various bioproducts and designing new drugs that can fight against multi-antibiotic resistant superbacteria by knocking-down the enzyme activities around an essential metabolite. Finally, we combined a regulatory network with the metabolic network to investigate its effect on dynamic properties of cellular metabolism.

  8. Nucleotide Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolism...

  9. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III a...

  10. Expression of ABA synthesis and metabolism genes under different irrigation strategies and atmospheric VPDs is associated with stomatal conductance in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv Cabernet Sauvignon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speirs, Jim; Binney, Allan; Collins, Marisa; Edwards, Everard; Loveys, Brian

    2013-04-01

    The influence of different levels of irrigation and of variation in atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) on the synthesis, metabolism, and transport of abscisic acid (ABA) and the effects on stomatal conductance were examined in field-grown Cabernet Sauvignon grapevines. Xylem sap, leaf tissue, and root tissue were collected at regular intervals during two seasons in conjunction with measurements of leaf water potential (Ψleaf) and stomatal conductance (gs). The different irrigation levels significantly altered the Ψleaf and gs of the vines across both seasons. ABA abundance in the xylem sap was correlated with gs. The expression of genes associated with ABA synthesis, NCED1 and NCED2, was higher in the roots than in the leaves throughout and highest in the roots in mid January, a time when soil moisture declined and VPD was at its highest. Their expression in roots was also inversely related to the levels of irrigation and correlated with ABA abundance in the roots, xylem sap, and leaves. Three genes encoding ABA 8'-hydroxylases were isolated and their identities confirmed by expression in yeast cells. The expression of one of these, Hyd1, was elevated in leaves when VPD was below 2.0-2.5 kPa and minimal at higher VPD levels. The results provide evidence that ABA plays an important role in linking stomatal response to soil moisture status and that changes in ABA catabolism at or near its site of action allows optimization of gas exchange to current environmental conditions.

  11. Characterization of fat metabolism in the fatty liver caused by a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet: A study under equal energy conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosaka, Yuka; Shiroya, Yoko; Yamauchi, Hideki; Kitamura, Hiromi; Minato, Kumiko

    2017-05-20

    The pathology of fatty liver due to increased percentage of calories derived from fat without increased overall caloric intake is largely unclear. In this study, we aimed to characterize fat metabolism in rats with fatty liver resulting from consumption of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate (HFLC) diet without increased caloric intake. Four-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the control (Con) and HFLC groups, and rats were fed the corresponding diets ad libitum. Significant decreases in food intake per gram body weight were observed in the HFLC group compared with that in the Con group. Thus, there were no significant differences in body weights or caloric intake per gram body weight between the two groups. Marked progressive fat accumulation was observed in the livers of rats in the HFLC group, accompanied by suppression of de novo lipogenesis (DNL)-related proteins in the liver and increased leptin concentrations in the blood. In addition, electron microscopic observations revealed that many lipid droplets had accumulated within the hepatocytes, and mitochondrial numbers were reduced in the hepatocytes of rats in the HFLC group. Our findings confirmed that consumption of the HFLC diet induced fatty liver, even without increased caloric intake. Furthermore, DNL was not likely to be a crucial factor inducing fatty liver with standard energy intake. Instead, ultrastructural abnormalities found in mitochondria, which may cause a decline in β-oxidation, could contribute to the development of fatty liver. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in mango fruit by modulating proline metabolism and energy status under chilling stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peiyan; Zheng, Xiaolin; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Yuyan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of oxalic acid on chilling injury, proline metabolism and energy status in mango fruit were investigated after mango fruit (Mangifera indica L. cv. Zill) were dipped in 5mM oxalic acid solution for 10min at 25°C and then stored at low temperature (10±0.5°C) for 49days thereafter transferred to 25°C for 4days. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid apparently inhibited the development of chilling injury, notably elevated proline accumulation actually associated with increase in Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) activity and decrease in proline dehydrogenase (PDH) activity in the peel and the flesh, without activation of ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT) activity, and maintained high ATP level and energy charge in the flesh during storage. It was suggested that these effects of oxalic acid might collectively contribute to improving chilling tolerance, thereby alleviating chilling injury and maintaining quality of mango fruit in long term cold storage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolic and transcriptomic response of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain EC1118 after an oxygen impulse under carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited fermentative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Marcelo; Aceituno, Felipe F; Slater, Alex W; Almonacid, Leonardo I; Melo, Francisco; Agosin, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    During alcoholic fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to continuously changing environmental conditions, such as decreasing sugar and increasing ethanol concentrations. Oxygen, a critical nutrient to avoid stuck and sluggish fermentations, is only discretely available throughout the process after pump-over operation. In this work, we studied the physiological response of the wine yeast S. cerevisiae strain EC1118 to a sudden increase in dissolved oxygen, simulating pump-over operation. With this aim, an impulse of dissolved oxygen was added to carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited anaerobic continuous cultures. Results showed that genes related to mitochondrial respiration, ergosterol biosynthesis, and oxidative stress, among other metabolic pathways, were induced after the oxygen impulse. On the other hand, mannoprotein coding genes were repressed. The changes in the expression of these genes are coordinated responses that share common elements at the level of transcriptional regulation. Beneficial and detrimental effects of these physiological processes on wine quality highlight the dual role of oxygen in 'making or breaking wines'. These findings will facilitate the development of oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality of Life and Functional Status Across the Life Course. Project 2: Investigating Mechanisms to Explain Age Associated Differences in Quality of Life Among Breast Cancer Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naughton, Michelle

    2002-01-01

    .... The study will examine psychosocial factors such as social support, coping strategies, resiliency, and the impact of cancer on life responsibilities as explanations of age-associated factors affecting HRQL...

  15. Resolving the Role of Plant NAD-Glutamate Dehydrogenase: III. Overexpressing Individually or Simultaneously the Two Enzyme Subunits Under Salt Stress Induces Changes in the Leaf Metabolic Profile and Increases Plant Biomass Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Clément, Gilles; Marchi, Laura; Restivo, Francesco M; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) of higher plants has a central position at the interface between carbon and nitrogen metabolism due to its ability to carry out the deamination of glutamate. In order to obtain a better understanding of the physiological function of NAD-GDH under salt stress conditions, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that overexpress two genes from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia individually (GDHA and GDHB) or simultaneously (GDHA/B) were grown in the presence of 50 mM NaCl. In the different GDH overexpressors, the NaCl treatment induced an additional increase in GDH enzyme activity, indicating that a post-transcriptional mechanism regulates the final enzyme activity under salt stress conditions. A greater shoot and root biomass production was observed in the three types of GDH overexpressors following growth in 50 mM NaCl, when compared with the untransformed plants subjected to the same salinity stress. Changes in metabolites representative of the plant carbon and nitrogen status were also observed. They were mainly characterized by an increased amount of starch present in the leaves of the GDH overexpressors as compared with the wild type when plants were grown in 50 mM NaCl. Metabolomic analysis revealed that overexpressing the two genes GDHA and GDHB, individually or simultaneously, induced a differential accumulation of several carbon- and nitrogen-containing molecules involved in a variety of metabolic, developmental and stress-responsive processes. An accumulation of digalactosylglycerol, erythronate and porphyrin was found in the GDHA, GDHB and GDHA/B overexpressors, suggesting that these molecules could contribute to the improved performance of the transgenic plants under salinity stress conditions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. d-Allulose supplementation normalized the body weight and fat-pad mass in diet-induced obese mice via the regulation of lipid metabolism under isocaloric fed condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngji; Han, Hye Jin; Kim, Ae-Hyang; Choi, Ji-Young; Cho, Su-Jung; Park, Yong Bok; Jung, Un Ju; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-07-01

    A number of findings suggest that zero-calorie d-allulose, also known as d-psicose, has beneficial effects on obesity-related metabolic disturbances. However, it is unclear whether d-allulose can normalize the metabolic status of diet-induced obesity without having an impact on the energy density. We investigated whether 5% d-allulose supplementation in a high fat diet(HFD) could normalize body fat in a diet-induced obesity animal model under isocaloric pair-fed conditions. Mice were fed an HFD with or without various sugar substitutes (d-glucose, d-fructose, erytritol, or d-allulose, n = 10 per group) for 16 wk. Body weight and fat-pad mass in the d-allulose group were dramatically lowered to that of the normal group with a simultaneous decrease in plasma leptin and resistin concentrations. d-allulose lowered plasma and hepatic lipids while elevating fecal lipids with a decrease in mRNA expression of CD36, ApoB48, FATP4, in the small intestine in mice. In the liver, activities of both fatty acid synthase and β-oxidation were downregulated by d-allulose to that of the normal group; however, in WAT, fatty acid synthase was decreased while β-oxidation activity was enhanced. Taken together, our findings suggest that 5% dietary d-allulose led to the normalization of the metabolic status of diet-induced obesity by altering lipid-regulating enzyme activities and their gene-expression level along with fecal lipids. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Sarcopenic obesity or obese sarcopenia: A cross talk between age-associated adipose tissue and skeletal muscle inflammation as a main mechanism of the pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinkovich, Alexander; Livshits, Gregory

    2017-05-01

    Sarcopenia, an age-associated decline in skeletal muscle mass coupled with functional deterioration, may be exacerbated by obesity leading to higher disability, frailty, morbidity and mortality rates. In the combination of sarcopenia and obesity, the state called sarcopenic obesity (SOB), some key age- and obesity-mediated factors and pathways may aggravate sarcopenia. This review will analyze the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of SOB. In obese adipose tissue (AT), adipocytes undergo hypertrophy, hyperplasia and activation resulted in accumulation of pro-inflammatory macrophages and other immune cells as well as dysregulated production of various adipokines that together with senescent cells and the immune cell-released cytokines and chemokines create a local pro-inflammatory status. In addition, obese AT is characterized by excessive production and disturbed capacity to store lipids, which accumulate ectopically in skeletal muscle. These intramuscular lipids and their derivatives induce mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by impaired β-oxidation capacity and increased reactive oxygen species formation providing lipotoxic environment and insulin resistance as well as enhanced secretion of some pro-inflammatory myokines capable of inducing muscle dysfunction by auto/paracrine manner. In turn, by endocrine manner, these myokines may exacerbate AT inflammation and also support chronic low grade systemic inflammation (inflammaging), overall establishing a detrimental vicious circle maintaining AT and skeletal muscle inflammation, thus triggering and supporting SOB development. Under these circumstances, we believe that AT inflammation dominates over skeletal muscle inflammation. Thus, in essence, it redirects the vector of processes from "sarcopenia→obesity" to "obesity→sarcopenia". We therefore propose that this condition be defined as "obese sarcopenia", to reflect the direction of the pathological pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  18. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Drug Metabolism: A Fascinating Link Between Chemistry and Biology. Nikhil Taxak Prasad V Bharatam. General Article Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 259-282 ...

  19. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Drug metabolism may be defined as the biochemical modifica- tion of one chemical form to another, occurring usually through ..... Endogenous. Enzyme. Drugs. Cofactor. Glucuronidation. UDP glucoronic. UDP-. Chloramphenicol, acid glucuronosyltransferase morphine, paracetamol, salicylic acid, fenoprofen, desipramine,.

  20. Novel insights into E. coli's hexuronate metabolism: KduI facilitates the conversion of galacturonate and glucuronate under osmotic stress conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Rothe

    Full Text Available Using a gnotobiotic mouse model, we previously observed the upregulation of 2-deoxy-D-gluconate 3-dehydrogenase (KduD in intestinal E. coli of mice fed a lactose-rich diet and the downregulation of this enzyme and of 5-keto 4-deoxyuronate isomerase (KduI on a casein-rich diet. The present study aimed to define the role of the so far poorly characterized E. coli proteins KduD and KduI in vitro. Galacturonate and glucuronate induced kduD and kduI gene expression 3-fold and 7 to 11-fold, respectively, under aerobic conditions as well as 9 to 20-fold and 19 to 54-fold, respectively, under anaerobic conditions. KduI facilitated the breakdown of these hexuronates. In E. coli, galacturonate and glucuronate are normally degraded by UxaABC and UxuAB. However, osmotic stress represses the expression of the corresponding genes in an OxyR-dependent manner. When grown in the presence of galacturonate or glucuronate, kduID-deficient E. coli had a 30% to 80% lower maximal cell density and 1.5 to 2-fold longer doubling times under osmotic stress conditions than wild type E. coli. Growth on lactose promoted the intracellular formation of hexuronates, which possibly explain the induction of KduD on a lactose-rich diet. These results indicate a novel function of KduI and KduD in E. coli and demonstrate the crucial influence of osmotic stress on the gene expression of hexuronate degrading enzymes.

  1. Metabolic Myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic myopathies are genetic disorders that impair intermediary metabolism in skeletal muscle. Impairments in glycolysis/glycogenolysis (glycogen-storage disease), fatty acid transport and oxidation (fatty acid oxidation defects), and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (mitochondrial myopathies) represent the majority of known defects. The purpose of this review is to develop a diagnostic and treatment algorithm for the metabolic myopathies. The metabolic myopathies can present in the neonatal and infant period as part of more systemic involvement with hypotonia, hypoglycemia, and encephalopathy; however, most cases present in childhood or in adulthood with exercise intolerance (often with rhabdomyolysis) and weakness. The glycogen-storage diseases present during brief bouts of high-intensity exercise, whereas fatty acid oxidation defects and mitochondrial myopathies present during a long-duration/low-intensity endurance-type activity or during fasting or another metabolically stressful event (eg, surgery, fever). The clinical examination is often normal between acute events, and evaluation involves exercise testing, blood testing (creatine kinase, acylcarnitine profile, lactate, amino acids), urine organic acids (ketones, dicarboxylic acids, 3-methylglutaconic acid), muscle biopsy (histology, ultrastructure, enzyme testing), MRI/spectroscopy, and targeted or untargeted genetic testing. Accurate and early identification of metabolic myopathies can lead to therapeutic interventions with lifestyle and nutritional modification, cofactor treatment, and rapid treatment of rhabdomyolysis.

  2. Animal metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walburg, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    Studies on placental transport included the following: clearance of tritiated water as a baseline measurement for transport of materials across perfused placentas; transport of organic and inorganic mercury across the perfused placenta of the guinea pig in late gestation; and transport of cadmium across the perfused placenta of the guinea pig in late gestation. Studies on cadmium absorption and metabolism included the following: intestinal absorption and retention of cadmium in neonatal rats; uptake and distribution of an oral dose of cadmium in postweanling male and female, iron-deficient and normal rats; postnatal viability and growth in rat pups after oral cadmium administration during gestation; and the effect of calcium and phosphorus on the absorption and toxicity of cadmium. Studies on gastrointestinal absorption and mineral metabolism included: uptake and distribution of orally administered plutonium complex compounds in male mice; gastrointestinal absorption of 144 Ce in the newborn mouse, rat, and pig; and gastrointestinal absorption of 95 Nb by rats of different ages. Studies on iodine metabolism included the following: influence of thyroid status and thiocyanate on iodine metabolism in the bovine; effects of simulated fallout radiation on iodine metabolism in dairy cattle; and effects of feeding iodine binding agents on iodine metabolism in the calf

  3. The identification of age-associated cancer markers by an integrative analysis of dynamic DNA methylation changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihan; Zhang, Jingyu; Xiao, Xingjun; Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Fang; Li, Song; Wen, Yanhua; Wei, Yanjun; Su, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yunming; Zhang, Yan

    2016-03-07

    As one of the most widely studied epigenetic modifications, DNA methylation has an important influence on human traits and cancers. Dynamic variations in DNA methylation have been reported in malignant neoplasm and aging; however, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. By constructing an age-associated and cancer-related weighted network (ACWN) based on the correlation of the methylation level and the protein-protein interaction, we found that DNA methylation changes associated with age were closely related to the occurrence of cancer. Additional analysis of 102 module genes mined from the ACWN revealed discrimination based on two main patterns. One pattern involved methylation levels that increased with aging and were higher in cancer patients compared with normal controls (HH pattern). The other pattern involved methylation levels that decreased with aging and were lower in cancer compared with normal (LL pattern). Upon incorporation with gene expression levels, 25 genes were filtered based on negative regulation by DNA methylation. These genes were regarded as potential cancer risk markers that were influenced by age in the process of carcinogenesis. Our results will facilitate further studies regarding the impact of the epigenetic effects of aging on diseases and will aid in the development of tailored cancer preventive strategies.

  4. Age-Associated Decline in Thymic B Cell Expression of Aire and Aire-Dependent Self-Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cepeda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Although autoimmune disorders are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in older individuals, the mechanisms governing age-associated increases in susceptibility remain incompletely understood. Central T cell tolerance is mediated through presentation of self-antigens by cells constituting the thymic microenvironment, including epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and B cells. Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs and B cells express distinct cohorts of self-antigens, including tissue-restricted self-antigens (TRAs, such that developing T cells are tolerized to antigens from peripheral tissues. We find that expression of the TRA transcriptional regulator Aire, as well as Aire-dependent genes, declines with age in thymic B cells in mice and humans and that cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic mechanisms contribute to the diminished capacity of peripheral B cells to express Aire within the thymus. Our findings indicate that aging may diminish the ability of thymic B cells to tolerize T cells, revealing a potential mechanistic link between aging and autoimmunity.

  5. Pax6 interacts with Iba1 and shows age-associated alterations in brain of aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Shashank Kumar; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2017-07-01

    The Pax6, a transcriptional regulator and multifunctional protein, has been found critical for neurogenesis, neuro-degeneration, mental retardation, neuroendocrine tumors, glioblastoma and astrocytomas. The age-associated alteration in the expression of Pax6 in neuron and glia has also been observed in the immunologically privileged brain. Therefore, it is presumed that Pax6 may modulate brain immunity by activation of microglia either directly interacting with genes or proteins of microglia or indirectly though inflammation associated with neurodegeneration. This report describes evaluation of expression, co-localization and interactions of Pax6 with Ionized binding protein1 (Iba1) in brain of aging mice by Immunohistochemistry, Chromatin Immuno-precipitation (ChIP) and Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), respectively. The co-localization of Pax6 with Iba1 was observed in the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, midbrain and olfactory lobe. The Pax6 and Iba1 also interact physically. The age-dependent alteration in their expression and co-localization were also observed in mice. Results indicate Pax6-dependent activities of Iba1 in the remodelling of microglia during immunological surveillance of the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Riluzole partially rescues age-associated, but not LPS-induced, loss of glutamate transporters and spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Holly M; Bardou, Isabelle; Hopp, Sarah C; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Corona, Angela W; Fenn, Ashley M; Godbout, Jonathan P; Wenk, Gary L

    2013-12-01

    Impaired memory may result from synaptic glutamatergic dysregulation related to chronic neuroinflammation. GLT1 is the primary excitatory amino acid transporter responsible for regulating extracellular glutamate levels in the hippocampus. We tested the hypothesis that if impaired spatial memory results from increased extracellular glutamate due to age or experimentally induced chronic neuroinflammation in the hippocampus, then pharmacological augmentation of the glutamate transporter GLT1 will attenuate deficits in a hippocampal-dependent spatial memory task. The profile of inflammation-related genes and proteins associated with normal aging, or chronic neuroinflammation experimentally-induced via a four-week LPS infusion into the IV(th) ventricle, were correlated with performance in the Morris water maze following treatment with Riluzole, a drug that can enhance glutamate clearance by increasing GLT1 expression. Age-associated inflammation was qualitatively different from LPS-induced neuro-inflammation in young rats. LPS produced a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by increased IL-1ß expression in the hippocampus, whereas aging was not associated with a strong central pro-inflammatory response but with a mixed peripheral immune phenotype. Riluzole attenuated the spatial memory impairment, the elevation of serum cytokines and the decrease in GLT1 gene expression in Aged rats, but had no effect on young rats infused with LPS. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of reducing glutamatergic function upon memory impairment in neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging.

  7. Age-Associated Impairments in Mitochondrial ADP Sensitivity Contribute to Redox Stress in Senescent Human Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham P. Holloway

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: It remains unknown if mitochondrial bioenergetics are altered with aging in humans. We established an in vitro method to simultaneously determine mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 emission in skeletal muscle tissue across a range of biologically relevant ADP concentrations. Using this approach, we provide evidence that, although the capacity for mitochondrial H2O2 emission is not increased with aging, mitochondrial ADP sensitivity is impaired. This resulted in an increase in mitochondrial H2O2 and the fraction of electron leak to H2O2, in the presence of virtually all ADP concentrations examined. Moreover, although prolonged resistance training in older individuals increased muscle mass, strength, and maximal mitochondrial respiration, exercise training did not alter H2O2 emission rates in the presence of ADP, the fraction of electron leak to H2O2, or the redox state of the muscle. These data establish that a reduction in mitochondrial ADP sensitivity increases mitochondrial H2O2 emission and contributes to age-associated redox stress. : Holloway et al. show that an inability of ADP to decrease mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emission contributes to redox stress in skeletal muscle tissue of older individuals and that this process is not recovered following prolonged resistance-type exercise training, despite the general benefits of resistance training for muscle health. Keywords: mitochondria, aging, muscle, ROS, H2O2, ADP, respiration, bioenergetics, exercise, resistance training

  8. Age-associated differences in motor output variability and coordination during the simultaneous dorsiflexion of both feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchini, Amanda; Pereira, Rafael; Pedroso, Wellington; Christou, Evangelos; Neto, Osmar Pinto

    2017-06-01

    Older adults are more variable than young adults on tasks that demand the simultaneous control of more than one effector, and the difference between age groups may be related to their different capacity of coordinating the force output of the involved effectors. The goal of this study was to determine whether age-associated differences in motor output variability during tasks involving the simultaneous dorsiflexion of two feet can be partially explained by differences in coordination and possibly attenuated by physical training. Ten young and 22 old adults (10 trained and 12 untrained old adults) volunteered to participate in the study. Trained older adults had experience in a high-intensity mixed modality training (MMT) regime for a minimum of 1 year. Volunteers performed successive trials of a constant force task and a goal-directed task, with and without visual feedback. Within- and between-trial variability were calculated and coordination was quantified using the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) approach (i.e., co-variation of the force outputs of both feet were used to quantify a motor synergy index). Older adults exhibited greater variability and lower synergy (p motor output variability in tasks involving the simultaneous dorsiflexion of both feet possibly due to a lack of coordination between the feet.

  9. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome What Is Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  10. Real time PCR expression analysis of gene encoding p5cs enzyme and proline metabolism under NaCI salinity in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdi, D L; Shaw, B P; Sahu, B B; Purohit, G K

    2015-07-01

    Regulation of proline accumulation in seedlings of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Lunishree) was investigated. The increasing concentration of NaCl from 85 mM to 425 mM NaCl progressively increased proline content in rice. The maximum increase in proline content was recorded at 425 mM NaCl concentration as compared to control and other concentrations of NaCl. The highest significant activity of proline synthesizing enzymes, delta1-Pyrrolline-5-carboxylate synthetase, delta1-Pyrrolline-5-carboxylate reductase and Ornithine-δ- aminotransferase with lowest activity of proline hydrolysis enzymes;Proline dehydrogenase was also recorded at 425 mM NaCl salinity over control and other concentrations of NaCI with insignificant increase in the activity of delta1-Pyrrolline-5-carboxylate synthetase and Ornithine-δ-aminotransferase at 85 mM NaCI over control. It was found that the transcript of gene encoded with p5cs is up regulated about 1.35 folds under salinity stress. This gene synthesis an osmo protectant to help the plant resist the change in osmotic imbalances. Externally addition of MnCl2 at 300 mg/220 ml 1/2 strength Hoagland solution, having 1% NaCI, was also seen to increase 893.9% proline content of this variety as compared to control.

  11. [Metabolic myopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazian, Óscar; Rivas-Chacón, Rafael

    2013-09-06

    To review the metabolic myopathies manifested only by crisis of myalgias, cramps and rigidity of the muscles with decreased voluntary contractions and normal inter crisis neurologic examination in children and adolescents. These metabolic myopathies are autosomic recessive inherited enzymatic deficiencies of the carbohydrates and lipids metabolisms. The end result is a reduction of intra muscle adenosine triphosphate, mainly through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with decrease of available energy for muscle contraction. The one secondary to carbohydrates intra muscle metabolism disorders are triggered by high intensity brief (fatty acids metabolism disorders are triggered by low intensity prolonged (> 10 min) exercises. The conditions in the first group in order of decreasing frequency are the deficiencies of myophosforilase (GSD V), muscle phosphofructokinase (GSD VII), phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (GSD X) and beta enolase (GSD XIII). The conditions in the second group in order of decreasing frequency are the deficiencies of carnitine palmitoyl transferase II and very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase. The differential characteristics of patients in each group and within each group will allow to make the initial presumptive clinical diagnosis in the majority and then to order only the necessary tests to achieve the final diagnosis. Treatment during the crisis includes hydration, glucose and alkalinization of urine if myoglobin in blood and urine are elevated. Prevention includes avoiding exercise which may induce the crisis and fasting. The prognosis is good with the exception of rare cases of acute renal failure due to hipermyoglobinemia because of severe rabdomyolisis.

  12. One-carbon metabolic pathway rewiring in Escherichia coli reveals an evolutionary advantage of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (Fhs) in survival under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Shivjee; Aluri, Srinivas; Rex, Kervin; Varshney, Umesh

    2015-02-15

    In cells, N(10)-formyltetrahydrofolate (N(10)-fTHF) is required for formylation of eubacterial/organellar initiator tRNA and purine nucleotide biosynthesis. Biosynthesis of N(10)-fTHF is catalyzed by 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase/cyclohydrolase (FolD) and/or 10-formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (Fhs). All eubacteria possess FolD, but some possess both FolD and Fhs. However, the reasons for possessing Fhs in addition to FolD have remained unclear. We used Escherichia coli, which naturally lacks fhs, as our model. We show that in E. coli, the essential function of folD could be replaced by Clostridium perfringens fhs when it was provided on a medium-copy-number plasmid or integrated as a single-copy gene in the chromosome. The fhs-supported folD deletion (ΔfolD) strains grow well in a complex medium. However, these strains require purines and glycine as supplements for growth in M9 minimal medium. The in vivo levels of N(10)-fTHF in the ΔfolD strain (supported by plasmid-borne fhs) were limiting despite the high capacity of the available Fhs to synthesize N(10)-fTHF in vitro. Auxotrophy for purines could be alleviated by supplementing formate to the medium, and that for glycine was alleviated by engineering THF import into the cells. The ΔfolD strain (harboring fhs on the chromosome) showed a high NADP(+)-to-NADPH ratio and hypersensitivity to trimethoprim. The presence of fhs in E. coli was disadvantageous for its aerobic growth. However, under hypoxia, E. coli strains harboring fhs outcompeted those lacking it. The computational analysis revealed a predominant natural occurrence of fhs in anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Testosterone Treatment and Cognitive Function in Older Men With Low Testosterone and Age-Associated Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Susan M; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J; Ellenberg, Susan S; Gill, Thomas M; Shumaker, Sally A; Pleasants, Debbie D; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Bhasin, Shalender; Cauley, Jane A; Cella, David; Crandall, Jill P; Cunningham, Glenn R; Ensrud, Kristine E; Farrar, John T; Lewis, Cora E; Molitch, Mark E; Pahor, Marco; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Cifelli, Denise; Anton, Stephen; Basaria, Shehzad; Diem, Susan J; Wang, Christina; Hou, Xiaoling; Snyder, Peter J

    2017-02-21

    Most cognitive functions decline with age. Prior studies suggest that testosterone treatment may improve these functions. To determine if testosterone treatment compared with placebo is associated with improved verbal memory and other cognitive functions in older men with low testosterone and age-associated memory impairment (AAMI). The Testosterone Trials (TTrials) were 7 trials to assess the efficacy of testosterone treatment in older men with low testosterone levels. The Cognitive Function Trial evaluated cognitive function in all TTrials participants. In 12 US academic medical centers, 788 men who were 65 years or older with a serum testosterone level less than 275 ng/mL and impaired sexual function, physical function, or vitality were allocated to testosterone treatment (n = 394) or placebo (n = 394). A subgroup of 493 men met criteria for AAMI based on baseline subjective memory complaints and objective memory performance. Enrollment in the TTrials began June 24, 2010; the final participant completed treatment and assessment in June 2014. Testosterone gel (adjusted to maintain the testosterone level within the normal range for young men) or placebo gel for 1 year. The primary outcome was the mean change from baseline to 6 months and 12 months for delayed paragraph recall (score range, 0 to 50) among men with AAMI. Secondary outcomes were mean changes in visual memory (Benton Visual Retention Test; score range, 0 to -26), executive function (Trail-Making Test B minus A; range, -290 to 290), and spatial ability (Card Rotation Test; score range, -80 to 80) among men with AAMI. Tests were administered at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Among the 493 men with AAMI (mean age, 72.3 years [SD, 5.8]; mean baseline testosterone, 234 ng/dL [SD, 65.1]), 247 were assigned to receive testosterone and 246 to receive placebo. Of these groups, 247 men in the testosterone group and 245 men in the placebo completed the memory study. There was no significant mean

  14. Age-Associated Decline in Dendritic Cell Function and the Impact of Mediterranean Diet Intervention in Elderly Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Clements

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAging is accompanied by increased susceptibility to infection and age-associated chronic diseases. It is also associated with reduced vaccine responses, which is often attributed to immunosenescence and the functional decline of the immune system. Immunosenescence is characterized by a chronic, low-grade, inflammatory state termed inflammaging. Habitants of Mediterranean (MED regions maintain good health into old age; often attributed to MED diets.HypothesisAdoption of a MED-diet by elderly subjects, in Norfolk (UK, may improve immune responses of these individuals and in particular, dendritic cell (DC function.Experimental approachA total of 120 elderly subjects (65–79 years old recruited onto the Nu-AGE study, a multicenter European dietary study specifically addressing the needs of the elderly, across five countries, and were randomized to the control or MED-diet groups, for one year. Blood samples were taken pre- and post-intervention for DC analysis and were compared with each other, and to samples obtained from 45 young (18–40 years old subjects. MED-diet compliance was assessed using high performance liquid chromatography-with tandem mass spectrometry analysis of urine samples. Immune cell and DC subset numbers and concentrations of secreted proteins were determined by flow cytometric analysis.ResultsAs expected, reduced myeloid DC numbers were observed in blood samples from elderly subjects compared with young. The elevated secretion of the adipokine, resistin, after ex vivo stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from elderly subjects, was significantly reduced after MED-diet intervention.ConclusionThis study provides further evidence of numerical and functional effects of aging on DCs. The MED-diet showed potential to impact on the aging immune cells investigated and could provide an economical approach to address problems associated with our aging population.

  15. The deep cerebral stimulation of the under thalamic nucleus modifies the cerebral metabolism in {sup 18}FDG-Tep of obsessive compulsive patients; La stimulation cerebrale profonde du noyau sous thalamique modifie le metabolisme cerebral en 18FDG-TEP des patients obsessionnels compulsifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Jeune, F.; Garin, E. [Service de medecine nucleaire, centre Eugene-Marquis, Rennes, (France); Verin, M.; Peron, J. [service de neurologie, CHU Pontchaillou, Rennes, (France); Mallet, L.; Yelnik, J. [Inserm, Avenir Team, Behavior, Emotion and Basal Ganglia, IFR 70, Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris, (France); Kreps, M.O. [Inserm U796, service de psychiatrie, hopital Sainte-Anne, Paris, (France); Drapier, D.; Millet, B. [service de psychiatrie adulte, centre hospitalier Guillaume-Regnier, Rennes, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this work was to find again this orbito-frontal hyper metabolism among the resistant obsessive compulsive disorder patients that are going to benefit of a deep cerebral stimulation of the under thalamus nucleus and to demonstrate that this new therapy approach leads a reduction of the metabolism in this area in correlation with the clinical improvement. It is about the first study realized in isotopic functional imaging on ten resistant compulsive disorder patients treated by bilateral deep cerebral stimulation of the under thalamus nucleus. It shows that the treatment efficiency is in relation with a reduction of the glucide metabolism in the right orbito-frontal cortex. It suggests equally that the under thalamus nucleus would be functionally linked to the orbito-frontal cortex. (N.C.)

  16. PGC-1alpha is required for training-induced prevention of age-associated decline in mitochondrial enzymes in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Lyngby, Stine Secher; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that exercise training prevents an age-associated decline in skeletal muscle mitochondrial enzymes through a PGC-1alpha dependent mechanism. Whole body PGC-1alpha knock-out (KO) and littermate wildtype (WT) mice were submitted to long term...... running wheel exercise training or a sedentary lifestyle from 2 to 13 month of age. Furthermore, a group of approximately 4-month-old mice was used as young untrained controls. There was in both genotypes an age-associated approximately 30% decrease in citrate synthase (CS) activity and superoxide...... dismutase (SOD)2 protein content in 13-month-old untrained mice compared with young untrained mice. However, training prevented the age-associated decrease in CS activity and SOD2 protein content only in WT mice, but long term exercise training did increase HKII protein content in both genotypes...

  17. Body composition and basal metabolic rate in Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, I M; Rytgaard, Helene Charlotte; Mogensen, U B

    2016-01-01

    composition (e.g. abdominal fat) may be more so. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is an expression of resting metabolism and may serve as a complementary tool when assessing the possibly underlying metabolism behind a persons' body composition. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the body composition and basal metabolic rate.......70-105.56) (P basal metabolic rate (BMR) in HS patients may reflect...... a dysfunctional metabolism contributing to the high-fat-body composition....

  18. Stomatal regulation, structural acclimation and metabolic shift towards defensive compounds reduce O3 load in birch under chronic O3 stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksanen, E.; Riikonen, J.; Kontunen-Soppela, S.; Maenpaa, M.; Rousi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Northern forests are encountering new threats due to continuously increasing load of oxidative stress, e.g. due to rising tropospheric O3 levels, and simultaneous climate warming, which is more intense in northern latitudes as compared to global means. The proportion of silver birch (Betula pendula) in Finnish forests is expected to increase with climate warming. Unfortunately, we have growing evidence that the vitality and the carbon sink strength of birch trees are weakened under chronic O3 stress. In this study we investigated the effects of slightly elevated O3 concentration (1.3 x the ambient), temperature (T) and their combination on the antioxidant defense, gas exchange and leaf growth of Betula pendula saplings (clone 12) growing in open-field conditions over two growing seasons. The plants were measured for SLA (specific leaf area), total leaf area, net photosynthesis (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs), maximum rate of carboxylation (Vc,max), maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax), relative stomatal limitation to photosynthesis (ls), dark respiration (Rd), apoplastic concentrations of AA (ascorbic acid), DHA (dehydroascobate) and total ascorbate, the redox state of apoplastic ascorbate, and total antioxidant capacity. Elevated O3 enhanced the total antioxidant capacity in the apoplast in the first year of the experiment at the ambient T. However, during the second year of the experiment, the saplings responded to elevated O3 level by closing the stomata and by developing leaves with a lower leaf area per mass, rather than by accumulating ascorbate in the apoplast. O3 did not affect the total leaf area, whereas Pn was slightly and gs significantly reduced in the second year. Elevated T enhanced the total leaf area, Pn and Vc,max, redox state of ascorbate and total antioxidant capacity in the apoplast. The effects of T and O3 on total leaf area and net photosynthesis were counteractive. We were not able to detect significant differences in Rd between the

  19. Metabolic Engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    and in vitro to be able to alter properties of the encoded enzyme, and (6) assemble an array of genes for their expression inside the host cell. Although bacteria and yeast are the pioneering hosts for metabolic engineering, other organisms such as fungi, animal as well as plant cells are also used nowadays for similar experi ...

  20. Metabolic Engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Metabolic engineering is a process for modulating the me- tabolism of the organisms so as to produce the required amounts of the desired metabolite through genetic manipula- tions. Considering its advantages over the other chemical synthesis routes, this area of biotechnology is likely to revolu- tionize the way in which ...

  1. Metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/pubmed/26718656 . Ruderman NB, Shulman GI. Metabolic syndrome. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 43. Review ... NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more Health ...

  2. Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's ...

  3. Metabolic alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, A; Kurtzman, N A

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic alkalosis is a primary pathophysiologic event characterized by the gain of bicarbonate or the loss of nonvolatile acid from extracellular fluid. The kidney preserves normal acid-base balance by two mechanisms: bicarbonate reclamation mainly in the proximal tubule and bicarbonate generation predominantly in the distal nephron. Bicarbonate reclamation is mediated mainly by a Na-H antiporter and to a smaller extent by the H-ATPase. The principal factors affecting HCO 3 reabsorption include effective arterial blood volume, glomerular filtration rate, chloride, and potassium. Bicarbonate regeneration is primarily affected by distal Na delivery and reabsorption, aldosterone, arterial pH, and arterial pCO2. To generate metabolic alkalosis, either a gain of base or a loss of acid, must occur. The loss of acid may be via the GI tract or by the kidney. Excess base may be gained by oral or parenteral HCO 3 administration or by lactate, acetate, or citrate administration. Factors that help maintain metabolic alkalosis include decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), volume contraction, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, and aldosterone excess. Clinical states associated with metabolic alkalosis are vomiting, mineralocorticoid excess, the adrenogenital syndrome, licorice ingestion, diuretic administration, and Bartter's and Gitelma's Syndromes. The effects of metabolic alkalosis on the body are varied and include effects on the central nervous system, myocardium, skeletal muscle, and the liver. Treatment of this disorder is simple, once the pathophysiology of the cause is delineated. Therapy consists of reversing the contributory factors promoting alkalosis and in severe cases, administration of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, acid infusion, and low bicarbonate dialysis.

  4. Pathological changes in hippocampal neuronal circuits underlie age-associated neurodegeneration and memory loss: positive clue toward SAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthi, P; Premkumar, P; Priyanka, R; Jayachandran, K S; Anusuyadevi, M

    2015-08-20

    defect in neuronal-circuits of hippocampus (DG-CA4-CA1-Sub) that were significantly damaged leading to memory impairment. Interestingly, RSV was observed to culminate pathological events in the hippocampal neuronal circuit during aging, proving them as potent therapeutic drug against age-associated neurodegeneration and memory loss. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Age-associated DNA methylation changes in naive CD4+T cells suggest an evolving autoimmune epigenotype in aging T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Coit, Patrick; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; Sawalha, Amr H

    2017-04-01

    We sought to define age-associated DNA methylation changes in naive CD4 + T cells. Naive CD4 + T cells were collected from 74 healthy individuals (age 19-66 years), and age-related DNA methylation changes were characterized. We identified 11,431 age-associated CpG sites, 57% of which were hypermethylated with age. Hypermethylated sites were enriched in CpG islands and repressive transcription factor binding sites, while hypomethylated sites showed T cell specific enrichment in active enhancers marked by H3K27ac and H3K4me1. Our data emphasize cancer-related DNA methylation changes with age, and also reveal age-associated hypomethylation in immune-related pathways, such as T cell receptor signaling, FCγR-mediated phagocytosis, apoptosis and the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. The MAPK signaling pathway was hypermethylated with age, consistent with a defective MAPK signaling in aging T cells. Age-associated DNA methylation changes may alter regulatory mechanisms and signaling pathways that predispose to autoimmunity.

  6. Metabolic depression in fish measured by direct calorimetry: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, van V.J.T.; Thillart, van den G.

    2009-01-01

    In nature under adverse conditions like low oxygen conditions or starvation fish often lower their metabolism: `metabolic depression¿. This strategy of lowering the metabolic rate is a survival strategy and is used to save energy stores and diminish end-product accumulation. The overall metabolic

  7. Under Under Under / Merit Kask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kask, Merit

    2006-01-01

    20. nov. esietendub Kumu auditooriumis MTÜ Ühenduse R.A.A.A.M teatriprojekt "Under" poetess Marie Underist. Lavastajad Merle Karusoo ja Raimo Pass, kunstnik Jaagup Roomet, helilooja Urmas Lattikas, peaosas Katrin Saukas

  8. Metabolic syndrome in Tunisian bipolar I patients | Ezzaher | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender, age, illness episode and treatment were not significantly associated with metabolic syndrome, while patients under lithium had higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than those under valproic acid, carbamazepine or antipsychotics. Patients with metabolic syndrome had significant higher levels of HOMA-IR and ...

  9. Quality of Life and Functional Status Across the Life Course. Project 2: Investigating Mechanisms to Explain Age Associated Differences in Quality of Life Among Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    4.3.7 Symptoms Questionnaire 4.3.8 Quality of Life Form....... 4.3.9 Spirituality ....................... 4.3.10 BriefCOPE Scale...AD Award Nuimber: DAMD17-01-1-0447 TITLE: Quality of Life and Functional Status Across the Life Course Project 2: Investigating Mechanisms to...Explain Age Associated Differences in Quality of Life Among Breast Cancer Patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michelle J. Naughton, Ph.D. Nancy E

  10. Experimental results concerning the metabolism of ingested iodine-131 in adult sheep under lactation; Resultats experimentaux relatifs au metabolisme de l'iode 131 ingere chez la brebis adulte en lactation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daburon, F.; Capelle, A.; Tricaud, Y.; Nizza, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Departement de la Protection Sanitaire, Laboratoire-etable de Radiobiologie Appliquee

    1967-07-01

    The authors give the results of a series of experiments on metabolism of ingested iodine-131 in adult sheep under lactation; the measurement were carried out over a number of years from 1961 to 1966. The work was concerned initially with the fixation of iodine 131 in the thyroid gland, with the calculation of radiation doses absorbed and with ways of showing up any possible radiation damage in the gland. The modes of absorption of iodine 131 and its elimination through milk, urine and the faeces were then considered. Finally, a last chapter is devoted to changes in the radioactivity of the blood and of the milk, to variations of the PBI level of the blood serum as to different methods for measuring this level. (authors) [French] Les auteurs rapportent les resultats d'une serie d'experimentations relatives au metabolisme de l'iode 131 ingere chez la brebis adulte en lactation, et qui se sont etalees sur plusieurs annees, de 1961 a 1966. Les etudes ont porte d'abord sur les aspects de la fixation de l'iode 131 dans la thyroide, avec le calcul des doses de rayonnements absorbees et les moyens de mettre en evidence les radiolesions eventuelles de la glande. Ensuite ont ete traitees les modalites de l'absorption de l'iode 131 et de son elimination par le lait, les urines et les feces. Enfin un dernier chapitre a ete consacre a l'evolution de la radioactivite du sang et du lait, aux variations ainsi qu'aux divers moyens d'evaluation du taux de PBI du serum sanguin. (auteurs)

  11. Sex-specific age associations of ankle proprioception test performance in older adults: results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seung-Uk; Simonsick, Eleanor; Deshpande, Nandini; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-05-01

    this study was aimed to test the hypothesis that ankle proprioception assessed by custom-designed proprioception testing equipment changes with ageing in men and women. ankle proprioception was assessed in 289 participants (131 women) of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA); the participants aged 51-95 years and were blinded during testing. the average minimum perceived ankle rotation was 1.11° (SE = 0.07) in women and 1.00° (SE = 0.06) in men, and it increased with ageing in both sexes (P proprioception was introduced in this study using a customized test instrument, software and test protocol. Age-associated reduction in ankle proprioception was confirmed from two subtests of threshold and tracking separately for women and men. Findings in this study prompt future studies to determine whether these age-associated differences in the threshold for passive motion detection and movement tracking are evident in longitudinal study and how these specific deficits in ankle proprioception are related to age-associated chronic conditions such as knee or hip osteoarthritis and type II diabetes and affect daily activities such as gait. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. In silico analysis of human metabolism: Reconstruction, contextualization and application of genome-scale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Jun; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The arising prevalence of metabolic diseases calls for a holistic approach for analysis of the underlying nature of abnormalities in cellular functions. Through mathematic representation and topological analysis of cellular metabolism, GEnome scale metabolic Models (GEMs) provide a promising fram...

  13. Metal metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Whelton, B.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Peterson, D.P.; Oldham, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    This research focuses on the role of pregnancy and lactation in susceptibility to the toxic effects of cadmium and lead. Responses under investigation include lead-induced changes in pathways for vitamin D and calcium metabolism and cadmium-induced alterations in kidney function and skeletal structure. The second area focuses on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium and other actinide elements. Studies currently being conducted in nonhuman primates to develop a procedure to determine GI absorption values of uranium and plutonium that does not require sacrifice of the animal. 6 refs

  14. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. ...

  15. Interaction between stress responses and circadian metabolism in metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao; Kim, Hyunbae; Ali, Arushana; Zheng, Ze; Zhang, Kezhong

    2017-09-01

    Circadian rhythms play crucial roles in orchestrating diverse physiological processes that are critical for health and disease. Dysregulated circadian rhythms are closely associated with various human metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Modern lifestyles are frequently associated with an irregular circadian rhythm, which poses a significant risk to public health. While the central clock has a set periodicity, circadian oscillators in peripheral organs, particularly in the liver, can be entrained by metabolic alterations or stress cues. At the molecular level, the signal transduction pathways that mediate stress responses interact with, and are often integrated with, the key determinants of circadian oscillation, to maintain metabolic homeostasis under physiological or pathological conditions. In the liver, a number of nuclear receptors or transcriptional regulators, which are regulated by metabolites, hormones, the circadian clock, or environmental stressors, serve as direct links between stress responses and circadian metabolism. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the interactions between stress responses (the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, the oxidative stress response, and the inflammatory response) and circadian metabolism, and the role of these interactions in the development of metabolic diseases.

  16. Spermidine Suppresses Age-Associated Memory Impairment by Preventing Adverse Increase of Presynaptic Active Zone Size and Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun K Gupta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Memories are assumed to be formed by sets of synapses changing their structural or functional performance. The efficacy of forming new memories declines with advancing age, but the synaptic changes underlying age-induced memory impairment remain poorly understood. Recently, we found spermidine feeding to specifically suppress age-dependent impairments in forming olfactory memories, providing a mean to search for synaptic changes involved in age-dependent memory impairment. Here, we show that a specific synaptic compartment, the presynaptic active zone (AZ, increases the size of its ultrastructural elaboration and releases significantly more synaptic vesicles with advancing age. These age-induced AZ changes, however, were fully suppressed by spermidine feeding. A genetically enforced enlargement of AZ scaffolds (four gene-copies of BRP impaired memory formation in young animals. Thus, in the Drosophila nervous system, aging AZs seem to steer towards the upper limit of their operational range, limiting synaptic plasticity and contributing to impairment of memory formation. Spermidine feeding suppresses age-dependent memory impairment by counteracting these age-dependent changes directly at the synapse.

  17. SU-F-J-07: Evaluating the Adequacy of Biopsy Specimens for Genetic Signature Assessment by Measuring the Metabolic Activity in Specimens Obtained Under 18F-FDG PET/CT Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanchon, L; Russell, J; Dogan, S; Carlin, S; Pinker-Domenig, K; Yorke, E; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Fujisawa, S; Manova-Todorova, K; Zanzonico, P; Deasy, J O; Humm, J L; Solomon, S; Kirov, A S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Genetic profiling of biopsied tissue is the basis for personalized cancer therapy. However biopsied materials may not contain sufficient amounts of DNA needed for analysis. We propose a method to determine the adequacy of specimens for performing genetic profiling by quantifying metabolic activity. Methods: We measured the response of two radiation detectors to the activity contained in the minimum amount of tumor cells needed for genetic profiling in biopsy specimens obtained under 2-deoxy-2-({sup 18}F)fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET/CT guidance. The expected tumor cell concentration in biopsy specimens was evaluated from the amount of DNA needed (∼100 µg) and the number of pathology sections typically used for the analysis. The average {sup 18}F-FDG uptake per cell was measured by incubating KPC-4662 pancreatic tumor cells and HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma tumor cells in {sup 18}F-FDG containing solution (activity concentrations between 0.0122 and 1.51 MBq/mL and glucose concentrations of 3.1 and 1 g/L) for 1 to 1.75 hours and then measuring the activity of a known number of cells. Measurements of surrogate specimens obtained using 18G needle biopsies of gels containing these cells in expected concentrations (∼10{sup 4} µL{sup −1}) were performed using an autoradiography CCD based device (up to 20 min exposure) and a scintillation well counter (∼1 min measurements) about 3 and 5 hours after the end of incubation respectively. Results: At start of autoradiography there were between 0.16 and 1.5 {sup 18}F-FDG molecules/cell and between 1.14 and 5.43×10{sup 7} {sup 18}F-FDG molecules/mL. For the scintillation well counter, sample to minimum-detectable-count rate ratios were greater than 7 and the counting error was less than 25% for ≤80 s measurement times. Images of the samples were identifiable on the autoradiograph for ∼10 min and longer exposure times. Conclusion: Scintillation well counter measurements and CCD based

  18. SU-F-J-07: Evaluating the Adequacy of Biopsy Specimens for Genetic Signature Assessment by Measuring the Metabolic Activity in Specimens Obtained Under 18F-FDG PET/CT Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanchon, L; Russell, J; Dogan, S; Carlin, S; Pinker-Domenig, K; Yorke, E; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Fujisawa, S; Manova-Todorova, K; Zanzonico, P; Deasy, J O; Humm, J L; Solomon, S; Kirov, A S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Genetic profiling of biopsied tissue is the basis for personalized cancer therapy. However biopsied materials may not contain sufficient amounts of DNA needed for analysis. We propose a method to determine the adequacy of specimens for performing genetic profiling by quantifying metabolic activity. Methods: We measured the response of two radiation detectors to the activity contained in the minimum amount of tumor cells needed for genetic profiling in biopsy specimens obtained under 2-deoxy-2-( 18 F)fluoro-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET/CT guidance. The expected tumor cell concentration in biopsy specimens was evaluated from the amount of DNA needed (∼100 µg) and the number of pathology sections typically used for the analysis. The average 18 F-FDG uptake per cell was measured by incubating KPC-4662 pancreatic tumor cells and HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma tumor cells in 18 F-FDG containing solution (activity concentrations between 0.0122 and 1.51 MBq/mL and glucose concentrations of 3.1 and 1 g/L) for 1 to 1.75 hours and then measuring the activity of a known number of cells. Measurements of surrogate specimens obtained using 18G needle biopsies of gels containing these cells in expected concentrations (∼10 4 µL −1 ) were performed using an autoradiography CCD based device (up to 20 min exposure) and a scintillation well counter (∼1 min measurements) about 3 and 5 hours after the end of incubation respectively. Results: At start of autoradiography there were between 0.16 and 1.5 18 F-FDG molecules/cell and between 1.14 and 5.43×10 7 18 F-FDG molecules/mL. For the scintillation well counter, sample to minimum-detectable-count rate ratios were greater than 7 and the counting error was less than 25% for ≤80 s measurement times. Images of the samples were identifiable on the autoradiograph for ∼10 min and longer exposure times. Conclusion: Scintillation well counter measurements and CCD based autoradiography have adequate sensitivity to detect the

  19. Metabolic management of brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael A; Marsh, Jeremy; Shelton, Laura M; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Mukherjee, Purna

    2011-06-01

    Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults. Conventional therapeutic approaches have been largely unsuccessful in providing long-term management. As primarily a metabolic disease, malignant brain cancer can be managed through changes in metabolic environment. In contrast to normal neurons and glia, which readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate) for energy under reduced glucose, malignant brain tumors are strongly dependent on glycolysis for energy. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies as a major energy source is an evolutionary conserved adaptation to food deprivation that permits the survival of normal cells during extreme shifts in nutritional environment. Only those cells with a flexible genome and normal mitochondria can effectively transition from one energy state to another. Mutations restrict genomic and metabolic flexibility thus making tumor cells more vulnerable to energy stress than normal cells. We propose an alternative approach to brain cancer management that exploits the metabolic flexibility of normal cells at the expense of the genetically defective and metabolically challenged tumor cells. This approach to brain cancer management is supported from recent studies in mice and humans treated with calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. Issues of implementation and use protocols are presented for the metabolic management of brain cancer. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Drug treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altabas, Velimir

    2013-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases including: abdominal obesity, a decreased ability to metabolize glucose (increased blood glucose levels and/or presence of insulin resistance), dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Patients who have developed this syndrome have been shown to be at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Genetic factors and the environment both are important in the development of the metabolic syndrome, influencing all single components of this syndrome. The goals of therapy are to treat the underlying cause of the syndrome, to reduce morbidity, and to prevent complications, including premature death. Lifestyle modification is the preferred first-step treatment of the metabolic syndrome. There is no single effective drug treatment affecting all components of the syndrome equally known yet. However, each component of metabolic syndrome has independent goals to be achieved, so miscellaneous types of drugs are used in the treatment of this syndrome, including weight losing drugs, antidiabetics, antihypertensives, antilipemic and anticlothing drugs etc. This article provides a brief insight into contemporary drug treatment of components the metabolic syndrome.

  1. Evolution of metabolic network organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonchev Danail

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of metabolic networks across species is a key to understanding how evolutionary pressures shape these networks. By selecting taxa representative of different lineages or lifestyles and using a comprehensive set of descriptors of the structure and complexity of their metabolic networks, one can highlight both qualitative and quantitative differences in the metabolic organization of species subject to distinct evolutionary paths or environmental constraints. Results We used a novel representation of metabolic networks, termed network of interacting pathways or NIP, to focus on the modular, high-level organization of the metabolic capabilities of the cell. Using machine learning techniques we identified the most relevant aspects of cellular organization that change under evolutionary pressures. We considered the transitions from prokarya to eukarya (with a focus on the transitions among the archaea, bacteria and eukarya, from unicellular to multicellular eukarya, from free living to host-associated bacteria, from anaerobic to aerobic, as well as the acquisition of cell motility or growth in an environment of various levels of salinity or temperature. Intuitively, we expect organisms with more complex lifestyles to have more complex and robust metabolic networks. Here we demonstrate for the first time that such organisms are not only characterized by larger, denser networks of metabolic pathways but also have more efficiently organized cross communications, as revealed by subtle changes in network topology. These changes are unevenly distributed among metabolic pathways, with specific categories of pathways being promoted to more central locations as an answer to environmental constraints. Conclusions Combining methods from graph theory and machine learning, we have shown here that evolutionary pressures not only affects gene and protein sequences, but also specific details of the complex wiring of functional modules

  2. Profiling metabolic networks to study cancer metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Karsten; Metallo, Christian M

    2013-02-01

    Cancer is a disease of unregulated cell growth and survival, and tumors reprogram biochemical pathways to aid these processes. New capabilities in the computational and bioanalytical characterization of metabolism have now emerged, facilitating the identification of unique metabolic dependencies that arise in specific cancers. By understanding the metabolic phenotype of cancers as a function of their oncogenic profiles, metabolic engineering may be applied to design synthetically lethal therapies for some tumors. This process begins with accurate measurement of metabolic fluxes. Here we review advanced methods of quantifying pathway activity and highlight specific examples where these approaches have uncovered potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Aging-associated changes in microRNA expression profile of internal anal sphincter smooth muscle: Role of microRNA-133a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagmohan; Boopathi, Ettickan; Addya, Sankar; Phillips, Benjamin; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Penn, Raymond B; Rattan, Satish

    2016-11-01

    A comprehensive genomic and proteomic, computational, and physiological approach was employed to examine the (previously unexplored) role of microRNAs (miRNAs) as regulators of internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle contractile phenotype and basal tone. miRNA profiling, genome-wide expression, validation, and network analyses were employed to assess changes in mRNA and miRNA expression in IAS smooth muscles from young vs. aging rats. Multiple miRNAs, including rno-miR-1, rno-miR-340-5p, rno-miR-185, rno-miR-199a-3p, rno-miR-200c, rno-miR-200b, rno-miR-31, rno-miR-133a, and rno-miR-206, were found to be upregulated in aging IAS. qPCR confirmed the upregulated expression of these miRNAs and downregulation of multiple, predicted targets (Eln, Col3a1, Col1a1, Zeb2, Myocd, Srf, Smad1, Smad2, Rhoa/Rock2, Fn1, Tagln v2, Klf4, and Acta2) involved in regulation of smooth muscle contractility. Subsequent studies demonstrated an aging-associated increase in the expression of miR-133a, corresponding decreases in RhoA, ROCK2, MYOCD, SRF, and SM22α protein expression, RhoA-signaling, and a decrease in basal and agonist [U-46619 (thromboxane A 2 analog)]-induced increase in the IAS tone. Moreover, in vitro transfection of miR-133a caused a dose-dependent increase of IAS tone in strips, which was reversed by anti-miR-133a. Last, in vivo perianal injection of anti-miR-133a reversed the loss of IAS tone associated with age. This work establishes the important regulatory effect of miRNA-133a on basal and agonist-stimulated IAS tone. Moreover, reversal of age-associated loss of tone via anti-miR delivery strongly implicates miR dysregulation as a causal factor in the aging-associated decrease in IAS tone and suggests that miR-133a is a feasible therapeutic target in aging-associated rectoanal incontinence. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Competact, a fixed combination of pioglitazone and metformin, improves metabolic markers in type 2 diabetes patients with insufficient glycemic control by metformin alone--results from a post-marketing surveillance trial under daily routine conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöndorf, Thomas; Karagiannis, Efstrathios; Posseldt, Richard E K; Forst, Thomas; Pfützner, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes, glycemic control to target goals can only be achieved for a while by single-drug treatment. Antidiabetes therapy has to be adapted according to the individual course of the disease. This trial investigates the impact of Competact (Takeda Pharma, Aachen, Germany) (marketed as ActoplusMet in the United States)-a fixed combination of 850 mg of metformin with 15 mg of pioglitazone-for diabetes treatment in patients with insufficient glycemic control by metformin alone. This observational drug monitoring trial was performed at 1,480 study sites in Germany, and 4,866 complete patient data sets were included into the final analyses. Mean +/- SD age was 60.8 +/- 9.6 years (2,171 women, 2,691 men; disease duration, 6.7 +/- 4.7 years; body mass index [BMI], 31.0 +/- 5.2 kg/m(2)). In total, 43.8% of the patients received lipid-lowering drugs (antihypertensive medication, 74.3%). Main inclusion criteria were type 2 diabetes, metformin monotherapy, and an initial hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) value between 6.6% and 9.9%. Parameters of glycemic control (HbA1c, fasting blood glucose [FBG]), blood pressure (BP), inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP]), and lipid metabolism (total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein [HDL]-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides) were collected at baseline and after 4 months. All investigated parameters improved significantly (all P 2.0 mm Hg; diastolic BP, 83.1 +/- 8.9 vs. 80.5 +/- 7.5 mm Hg; HbA1c, 7.8 +/- 1.0% vs. 7.0 +/- 0.8%; FBG, 9.0 +/- 2.6 vs. 7.0 +/- 1.7 mM; cholesterol, 5.7 +/- 1.1 mM vs. 5.3 +/- 0.9 mM; HDL-cholesterol, 1.2 +/- 0.4 mM vs. 1.3 +/- 0.4 mM; non-HDL-cholesterol, 4.5 +/- 1.2 mM vs. 4.0 +/- 0.9 mM; triglycerides, 2.5 +/- 1.0 mM vs. 2.1 +/- 0.8 mM; hsCRP, 3.2 +/- 2.6 mg/L vs. 2.7 +/- 2.3 mg/L). It is noteworthy that the BMI was not affected by Competact (31.0 +/- 5.2 kg/m(2) vs. 31.1 +/- 6.1 kg/m(2), P = 0.221). These observational results, obtained from a non

  5. Metabolism Disrupting Chemicals and Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, Jerrold J.; Blumberg, Bruce; Cave, Mathew; Machtinger, Ronit; Mantovani, Alberto; Mendez, Michelle A.; Nadal, Angel; Palanza, Paola; Panzica, Giancarlo; Sargis, Robert; Vandenberg, Laura N.; Saal, Frederick vom

    2016-01-01

    The recent epidemics of metabolic diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes(T2D), liver lipid disorders and metabolic syndrome have largely been attributed to genetic background and changes in diet, exercise and aging. However, there is now considerable evidence that other environmental factors may contribute to the rapid increase in the incidence of these metabolic diseases. This review will examine changes to the incidence of obesity, T2D and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the contribution of genetics to these disorders and describe the role of the endocrine system in these metabolic disorders. It will then specifically focus on the role of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the etiology of obesity, T2D and NAFLD while finally integrating the information on EDCs on multiple metabolic disorders that could lead to metabolic syndrome. We will specifically examine evidence linking EDC exposures during critical periods of development with metabolic diseases that manifest later in life and across generations. PMID:27760374

  6. Macrophage Polarization in Metabolism and Metabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is now recognized as the main cause of the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Obesity-associated chronic inflammation is a contributing key factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Numbers of studies have clearly demonstrated that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. CONTENT: Macrophages are an essential component of innate immunity and play a central role in inflammation and host defense. Moreover, these cells have homeostatic functions beyond defense, including tissue remodeling in ontogenesis and orchestration of metabolic functions. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to interferons (IFNs, toll-like receptor (TLR, or interleukin (IL-4/IL-13 signals, macrophages undergo M1 (classical or M2 (alternative activation. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1, M2 or M2-like polarized activation. SUMMARY: In response to various signals, macrophages may undergo classical M1 activation (stimulated by TLR ligands and IFN-γ or alternative M2 activation (stimulated by IL-4/IL-13; these states mirror the T helper (Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells. Pathology is frequently associated with dynamic changes in macrophage activation, with classically activated M1 cells implicate in initiating and sustaining inflammation, meanwhile M2 or M2-like activated cells associated with resolution or smoldering chronic inflammation. Identification of the mechanisms and molecules that are associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipose tissue, inflammation, macrophage polarization.

  7. Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, and Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Fujihara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities and is defined as the presence of three or more of the following factors: increased waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high fasting glucose. Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifested in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Adipose tissue, particularly visceral fat, is an important metabolic tissue as it secretes systemic factors that alter the immunologic, metabolic, and endocrine milieu and also promotes insulin resistance. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross-talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, adipocytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and progression. This paper synthesizes the evidence on key molecular mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link.

  8. Analog regulation of metabolic demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muskhelishvili Georgi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 3D structure of the chromosome of the model organism Escherichia coli is one key component of its gene regulatory machinery. This type of regulation mediated by topological transitions of the chromosomal DNA can be thought of as an analog control, complementing the digital control, i.e. the network of regulation mediated by dedicated transcription factors. It is known that alterations in the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA lead to a rich pattern of differential expressed genes. Using a network approach, we analyze these expression changes for wild type E. coli and mutants lacking nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs from a metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network perspective. Results We find a significantly higher correspondence between gene expression and metabolism for the wild type expression changes compared to mutants in NAPs, indicating that supercoiling induces meaningful metabolic adjustments. As soon as the underlying regulatory machinery is impeded (as for the NAP mutants, this coherence between expression changes and the metabolic network is substantially reduced. This effect is even more pronounced, when we compute a wild type metabolic flux distribution using flux balance analysis and restrict our analysis to active reactions. Furthermore, we are able to show that the regulatory control exhibited by DNA supercoiling is not mediated by the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN, as the consistency of the expression changes with the TRN logic of activation and suppression is strongly reduced in the wild type in comparison to the mutants. Conclusions So far, the rich patterns of gene expression changes induced by alterations of the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA have been difficult to interpret. Here we characterize the effective networks formed by supercoiling-induced gene expression changes mapped onto reconstructions of E. coli's metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network. Our

  9. Metabolic acceleration in Mediterranean Perciformes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lika, Konstadia; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.; Papandroulakis, Nikos

    2014-11-01

    Larval stages are considered the most critical of fish development. During a very short period of time (2 to 3 months), larvae undergo major morphoanatomical and functional changes in order to transform into juveniles while remaining functioning (developing, eating, surviving). Depending on species and environmental conditions, patterns in larval development may vary. We study the patterns of larval development for nine fish species of Perciformes reared under aquaculture conditions and compare them in terms of species-specific parameters derived from DEB theory. We extended the standard DEB model to include metabolic acceleration during the larval period, where maximum specific assimilation and energy conductance increase with length between birth and metabolic metamorphosis. Metabolic acceleration has as a consequence that larvae initially grow slower than juveniles and adults. Our results indicate that the species with higher acceleration have lower growth rates at birth and they also suggest that metabolic acceleration is related to spawning season. High metabolic acceleration of demersal species is associated with summer-autumn spawning in the Mediterranean, where temperature is high and food availability is low.

  10. Metabolic Adaptation to Nutritional Stress in Human Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Miyo, Masaaki; Konno, Masamitsu; Nishida, Naohiro; Sueda, Toshinori; Noguchi, Kozo; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Colvin, Hugh; Kawamoto, Koichi; Koseki, Jun; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Gotoh, Noriko; Matsuda, Fumio; Satoh, Taroh

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells respond to their microenvironment, which can include hypoxia and malnutrition, and adapt their metabolism to survive and grow. Some oncogenes are associated with cancer metabolism via regulation of the related enzymes or transporters. However, the importance of metabolism and precise metabolic effects of oncogenes in colorectal cancer remain unclear. We found that colorectal cancer cells survived under the condition of glucose depletion, and their resistance to such conditions dep...

  11. Oncogene-directed alterations in cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Malvi, Parmanand; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-07-01

    Oncogenes are key drivers of tumor growth. Although several cancer-driving mechanisms have been identified, the role of oncogenes in shaping metabolic patterns in cancer cells is only beginning to be appreciated. Recent studies show that oncogenes directly regulate critical metabolic enzymes and metabolic signaling pathways. Here, we present evidence for oncogene-directed cancer metabolic regulation and discuss the importance of identifying underlying mechanisms that can be targeted for developing precision cancer therapies.

  12. Age-Associated Methylation Suppresses SPRY1, Leading to a Failure of Re-quiescence and Loss of the Reserve Stem Cell Pool in Elderly Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bigot

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms by which aging affects stem cell number and function are poorly understood. Murine data have implicated cellular senescence in the loss of muscle stem cells with aging. Here, using human cells and by carrying out experiments within a strictly pre-senescent division count, we demonstrate an impaired capacity for stem cell self-renewal in elderly muscle. We link aging to an increased methylation of the SPRY1 gene, a known regulator of muscle stem cell quiescence. Replenishment of the reserve cell pool was modulated experimentally by demethylation or siRNA knockdown of SPRY1. We propose that suppression of SPRY1 by age-associated methylation in humans inhibits the replenishment of the muscle stem cell pool, contributing to a decreased regenerative response in old age. We further show that aging does not affect muscle stem cell senescence in humans.

  13. Targeting glucose metabolism in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, Shannon E; Chen, Jing

    2014-03-15

    Nearly a century ago, Otto Warburg made the astute observation that the metabolic properties of cancer cells differ markedly from those of normal cells. Several decades passed before the concept of exploiting cancer cell metabolism came into clinical practice with the advent of chemotherapy, the underlying principle of which is to target rapidly dividing cells by interfering with critical processes that are all, on some level, driven by cell metabolism. Although chemotherapy can be quite effective, success rates are highly variable and the adverse effects associated with treatment often outweigh the benefits due to the fact that chemotherapy is indiscriminately cytotoxic against all rapidly dividing cells, cancerous or healthy. During the past several years, a more intricate understanding of cancer cell metabolism has permitted the development of targeted therapies that aim to specifically target cancer cells and spare healthy tissue by exploiting the altered metabolism of cancer cells. The identification of new metabolic targets and the subsequent development of small-molecule inhibitors of metabolic enzymes have demonstrated the utility and promise of targeting cancer cell metabolism as an anticancer strategy. This review summarizes recent advances in the identification and characterization of several metabolic enzymes as emerging anticancer targets. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  14. Aging-associated changes in oxidative stress, cell proliferation, and apoptosis are prevented in the prostate of transgenic rats overexpressing regucalcin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Cátia V; Marques, Ricardo; Maia, Cláudio J; Socorro, Sílvia

    2015-12-01

    Regucalcin (RGN) is a calcium (Ca(2+))-binding protein that displays a characteristic downregulated expression with aging in several tissues. Besides its role in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, RGN has been associated with the control of oxidative stress, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Thus, the diminished expression of RGN with aging may contribute to the age-associated deterioration of cell function. In the present study, we hypothesized that the maintenance of high expression levels of RGN may prevent age-related alterations in the processes mentioned previously. First, we confirmed that RGN expression is significantly diminished in the prostate of 8-, 9-, 12-, and 24-months wild-type rats. Then, the effect of aging on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant defenses, cell proliferation, and apoptosis in the prostate of wild-type controls and transgenic rats overexpressing RGN (Tg-RGN) was investigated. The activity of glutathione and the antioxidant capacity were increased in Tg-RGN rats in response to the age-associated increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels, an effect not seen in wild type. Overexpression of RGN also counteracted the effect of aging increasing prostate cell proliferation. In contrast to wild-type animals, the prostate weight of Tg-RGN did not change with aging and was underpinned by the diminished expression of stem cell factor and c-kit, and increased expression of p53. In addition, aged Tg-RGN animals displayed increased expression (activity) of apoptosis regulators, therefore not showing the age-induced resistance to apoptosis observed in wild type. Altogether, these findings indicate the protective role of RGN against the development of age-related pathologies, such as, for example, prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. AGE-ASSOCIATED CHANGES IN VO2 AND POWER OUTPUT - A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY OF ENDURANCE TRAINED NEW ZEALAND CYCLISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Brown

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Age-associated changes in power and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max were studied in a cross section of endurance trained cyclists. Subjects (n = 56 performed incremental cycling exercise, during which capillary blood lactate [La-] was measured. Power output increased by 30 Watts during each 5 minutes stage, with initial power output based on individual ability. When [La-] was >4.5 mmol·L-1, subjects were given a 10 min recovery at a power output approximately 50% below estimated power at [La-]4mmol. Subjects then performed an incremental test (1 minute stages to VO2max. Decline in VO2max was 0.65 ml·kg-1·min-1·year-1 (r = -0.72, p < 0.01 for males, and 0.39 ml·kg-1·min-1·year-1 (r = -0.54, p < 0.05 for females. Power at VO2max decreased by 0.048 W kg-1·year-1 (r = -0.72, p < 0.01 in males. Power at [La-]4mmol decreased by 0.044 W kg-1 year-1 (r = -0.76, p < 0.01 in males, and by 0.019 W kg-1·year-1 (r = -0.53, p < 0.05 in females. Heart rate at VO2max (HRmax showed a weaker correlation with age in males (r = -0.36, p < 0.05. The age-associated changes in maximum aerobic power and sub-maximal power were gender- specific, thus suggesting different age-related effects on the systems which support exercise in males and females

  16. Cerebral blood flow of patients with age-associated memory impairment and the early stage of Alzheimer`s disease. A study by SPECT using the ARG method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwata, Akiko; Kitamura, Shin; Nagazumi, Atushi; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    In order to further understand the pathology of Alzheimer`s disease (AD), we have utilized image analysis in diagnosing the early stages of AD in patients with cognitive disorders. CT and MRI, however, have not been feasible since only atrophy is seen and it is difficult to differentiate the changes in AD from age associated changes. In this study we tried to determine whether regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements using single photon emission CT (SPECT) are feasible for the early diagnosis of AD. Regional CBF (rCBF) was measured using SPECT in three subject groups: Age-associated memory impairment (AAMI, n=9), mild AD (n=16), and normal aged patients (mean age=68.3; n=20). The subjects were then observed for three years. The region of interest (ROI) for the medial temporal lobe was set at OM-30deg to cover the maximum area of the hippocampus. The absolute values of rCBF in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes and the cerebellum were significantly lower in the mild AD subjects than in the normal aged subjects. A significant decrease in rCBF was also seen in the medial temporal lobe in both the AD and the AAMI subjects compared to the normal controls. During the three years of follow up, no cases of dementia were seen in the AAMI subjects. However, there were two patients who appeared to have difficulty in adapting to daily life due to amnesia, one with a decrease in rCBF of the medial temporal lobe on the second SPECT, and the other showing a low rCBF the first time. This study suggests that AAMI subjects may comprise both AD and normal subjects. Therefore a more prospective study is needed. (author)

  17. Cerebral blood flow of patients with age-associated memory impairment and the early stage of Alzheimer's disease. A study by SPECT using the ARG method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Akiko; Kitamura, Shin; Nagazumi, Atushi; Terashi, Akiro

    1998-01-01

    In order to further understand the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we have utilized image analysis in diagnosing the early stages of AD in patients with cognitive disorders. CT and MRI, however, have not been feasible since only atrophy is seen and it is difficult to differentiate the changes in AD from age associated changes. In this study we tried to determine whether regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements using single photon emission CT (SPECT) are feasible for the early diagnosis of AD. Regional CBF (rCBF) was measured using SPECT in three subject groups: Age-associated memory impairment (AAMI, n=9), mild AD (n=16), and normal aged patients (mean age=68.3; n=20). The subjects were then observed for three years. The region of interest (ROI) for the medial temporal lobe was set at OM-30deg to cover the maximum area of the hippocampus. The absolute values of rCBF in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes and the cerebellum were significantly lower in the mild AD subjects than in the normal aged subjects. A significant decrease in rCBF was also seen in the medial temporal lobe in both the AD and the AAMI subjects compared to the normal controls. During the three years of follow up, no cases of dementia were seen in the AAMI subjects. However, there were two patients who appeared to have difficulty in adapting to daily life due to amnesia, one with a decrease in rCBF of the medial temporal lobe on the second SPECT, and the other showing a low rCBF the first time. This study suggests that AAMI subjects may comprise both AD and normal subjects. Therefore a more prospective study is needed. (author)

  18. Spontaneous emergence of a metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagley, R.J.; Farmer, J.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Santa Fe Inst., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Networks of catalyzed reactions with nonlinear feedback have been proposed to play an important role in the origin of life. We investigate this possibility in a polymer chemistry with catalyzed cleavage and condensation reactions. We study the properties of a well-stirred reactor driven away from equilibrium by the flow of mass. Under appropriate non-equilibrium conditions. The nonlinear feedback of the reaction network focuses the material of the system into a few specific polymer species. The network of catalytic reactions digests'' the material of its environment, incorporating it into its own form. We call the result an autocatalytic metabolism. Under some variations it persists almost unchanged, while in other cases it dies. We argue that the dynamical stability of autocatalytic metabolisms gives them regenerative properties that allow them to repair themselves and to propagate through time. 43 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Inborn errors of metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolism - inborn errors of ... Bodamer OA. Approach to inborn errors of metabolism. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 205. Rezvani I, Rezvani GA. An ...

  20. Lipid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Lipid metabolism disorders, such as Gaucher disease and Tay-Sachs disease, involve lipids. Lipids are fats or fat-like substances. They ...

  1. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic

  2. Investigation of metabolic encephalopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , and. Table 1. Confirmed IMD cases associated with metabolic encephalopathy diagnosed at Red Cross Children's Hospital Metabolic Disease. Laboratory, 2006 - 2012. Name of disorder. Number of cases. Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1)*. 23.

  3. Dissecting the energy metabolism in Mycoplasma pneumoniae through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wodke, J.A.; Puchalka, J.; Lluch-Senar, M.; Marcos, J.; Yus, E.; Godinho, M.; Gutierrez-Gallego, R.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.; Serrano, L.; Klipp, E.; Maier, T.

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a threatening pathogen with a minimal genome, is a model organism for bacterial systems biology for which substantial experimental information is available. With the goal of understanding the complex interactions underlying its metabolism, we analyzed and characterized the

  4. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Shoots and Roots of TNG67 and TCN1 Rice Seedlings under Cold Stress and Following Subsequent Recovery: Insights into Metabolic Pathways, Phytohormones, and Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Wei; Chen, Hung-Chi; Jen, Wei-Fu; Liu, Li-Yu; Chang, Men-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cold stress affects rice growth, quality and yield. The investigation of genome-wide gene expression is important for understanding cold stress tolerance in rice. We performed comparative transcriptome analysis of the shoots and roots of 2 rice seedlings (TNG67, cold-tolerant; and TCN1, cold-sensitive) in response to low temperatures and restoration of normal temperatures following cold exposure. TNG67 tolerated cold stress via rapid alterations in gene expression and the re-establishment of homeostasis, whereas the opposite was observed in TCN1, especially after subsequent recovery. Gene ontology and pathway analyses revealed that cold stress substantially regulated the expression of genes involved in protein metabolism, modification, translation, stress responses, and cell death. TNG67 takes advantage of energy-saving and recycling resources to more efficiently synthesize metabolites compared with TCN1 during adjustment to cold stress. During recovery, expression of OsRR4 type-A response regulators was upregulated in TNG67 shoots, whereas that of genes involved in oxidative stress, chemical stimuli and carbohydrate metabolic processes was downregulated in TCN1. Expression of genes related to protein metabolism, modification, folding and defense responses was upregulated in TNG67 but not in TCN1 roots. In addition, abscisic acid (ABA)-, polyamine-, auxin- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related genes were preferentially regulated in TNG67 shoots and roots and were closely associated with cold stress tolerance. The TFs AP2/ERF were predominantly expressed in the shoots and roots of both TNG67 and TCN1. The TNG67-preferred TFs which express in shoot or root, such as OsIAA23, SNAC2, OsWRKY1v2, 24, 53, 71, HMGB, OsbHLH and OsMyb, may be good candidates for cold stress tolerance-related genes in rice. Our findings highlight important alterations in the expression of cold-tolerant genes, metabolic pathways, and hormone-related and TF-encoding genes in TNG67 rice during cold

  5. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Shoots and Roots of TNG67 and TCN1 Rice Seedlings under Cold Stress and Following Subsequent Recovery: Insights into Metabolic Pathways, Phytohormones, and Transcription Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Wei Yang

    Full Text Available Cold stress affects rice growth, quality and yield. The investigation of genome-wide gene expression is important for understanding cold stress tolerance in rice. We performed comparative transcriptome analysis of the shoots and roots of 2 rice seedlings (TNG67, cold-tolerant; and TCN1, cold-sensitive in response to low temperatures and restoration of normal temperatures following cold exposure. TNG67 tolerated cold stress via rapid alterations in gene expression and the re-establishment of homeostasis, whereas the opposite was observed in TCN1, especially after subsequent recovery. Gene ontology and pathway analyses revealed that cold stress substantially regulated the expression of genes involved in protein metabolism, modification, translation, stress responses, and cell death. TNG67 takes advantage of energy-saving and recycling resources to more efficiently synthesize metabolites compared with TCN1 during adjustment to cold stress. During recovery, expression of OsRR4 type-A response regulators was upregulated in TNG67 shoots, whereas that of genes involved in oxidative stress, chemical stimuli and carbohydrate metabolic processes was downregulated in TCN1. Expression of genes related to protein metabolism, modification, folding and defense responses was upregulated in TNG67 but not in TCN1 roots. In addition, abscisic acid (ABA-, polyamine-, auxin- and jasmonic acid (JA-related genes were preferentially regulated in TNG67 shoots and roots and were closely associated with cold stress tolerance. The TFs AP2/ERF were predominantly expressed in the shoots and roots of both TNG67 and TCN1. The TNG67-preferred TFs which express in shoot or root, such as OsIAA23, SNAC2, OsWRKY1v2, 24, 53, 71, HMGB, OsbHLH and OsMyb, may be good candidates for cold stress tolerance-related genes in rice. Our findings highlight important alterations in the expression of cold-tolerant genes, metabolic pathways, and hormone-related and TF-encoding genes in TNG67 rice

  6. Psychosocial risk factors for the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jolene Masters; Lund, Rikke; Andersen, Ingelise

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Metabolic deregulations and development of metabolic syndrome may be an important pathway underlying the relationship between stress and cardiovascular disease. We aim to estimate the effect of a comprehensive range of psychosocial factors on the risk of developing metabolic...... syndrome in men and women. Methods: The study population consisted of 3621 men and women from the Copenhagen City Heart Study who were free of metabolic syndrome at baseline and reexamined after 10 years. The data was analyzed by multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for age, education, income.......11) to be risk factors for developing the metabolic syndrome in women, while vital exhaustion (OR 2.09, 95% CI 0.95 to 4.59) and intake of sleep medications (OR 2.54, 95% CI 0.92 to 5.96) may play a more important role in men. Conclusions: Experiencing major life events in work and adult life and...

  7. Neuroendocrine Regulation of Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Cornejo, Maria P.; Hentges, Shane T.; Maliqueo, Manuel; Coirini, Hector; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia; Elias, Carol F.

    2016-01-01

    Given the current environment in most developed countries, it is a challenge to maintain a good balance between calories consumed and calories burned, although maintenance of metabolic balance is key to good health. Therefore, understanding how metabolic regulation is achieved and how the dysregulation of metabolism affects health is an area of intense research. Most studies are focused on the hypothalamus, which is a brain area that acts as a key regulator of metabolism. Among the nuclei tha...

  8. Genome scale metabolic reconstruction of Chlorella variabilis for exploring its metabolic potential for biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneja, Ankita; Chaplen, Frank W R; Murthy, Ganti S

    2016-08-01

    A compartmentalized genome scale metabolic network was reconstructed for Chlorella variabilis to offer insight into various metabolic potentials from this alga. The model, iAJ526, was reconstructed with 1455 reactions, 1236 metabolites and 526 genes. 21% of the reactions were transport reactions and about 81% of the total reactions were associated with enzymes. Along with gap filling reactions, 2 major sub-pathways were added to the model, chitosan synthesis and rhamnose metabolism. The reconstructed model had reaction participation of 4.3 metabolites per reaction and average lethality fraction of 0.21. The model was effective in capturing the growth of C. variabilis under three light conditions (white, red and red+blue light) with fair agreement. This reconstructed metabolic network will serve an important role in systems biology for further exploration of metabolism for specific target metabolites and enable improved characteristics in the strain through metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, Evan [American Institute of Chemical Engineers

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  10. Metabolic learning and memory formation by the brain influence systemic metabolic homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Jingqi; Zhang, Yalin; Li, Bo; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-04-07

    Metabolic homeostasis is regulated by the brain, but whether this regulation involves learning and memory of metabolic information remains unexplored. Here we use a calorie-based, taste-independent learning/memory paradigm to show that Drosophila form metabolic memories that help in balancing food choice with caloric intake; however, this metabolic learning or memory is lost under chronic high-calorie feeding. We show that loss of individual learning/memory-regulating genes causes a metabolic learning defect, leading to elevated trehalose and lipid levels. Importantly, this function of metabolic learning requires not only the mushroom body but also the hypothalamus-like pars intercerebralis, while NF-κB activation in the pars intercerebralis mimics chronic overnutrition in that it causes metabolic learning impairment and disorders. Finally, we evaluate this concept of metabolic learning/memory in mice, suggesting that the hypothalamus is involved in a form of nutritional learning and memory, which is critical for determining resistance or susceptibility to obesity. In conclusion, our data indicate that the brain, and potentially the hypothalamus, direct metabolic learning and the formation of memories, which contribute to the control of systemic metabolic homeostasis.

  11. Metabolic learning and memory formation by the brain influence systemic metabolic homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Jingqi; Zhang, Yalin; Li, Bo; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is regulated by the brain, whether this regulation involves learning and memory of metabolic information remains unexplored. Here we use a calorie-based, taste-independent learning/memory paradigm to show that Drosophila form metabolic memories that help balancing food choice with caloric intake; however, this metabolic learning or memory is lost under chronic high-calorie feeding. We show that loss of individual learning/memory-regulating genes causes a metabolic learning defect, leading to elevated trehalose and lipids levels. Importantly, this function of metabolic learning requires not only the mushroom body but the hypothalamus-like pars intercerebralis, while NF-κB activation in the pars intercerebralis mimics chronic overnutrition in that it causes metabolic learning impairment and disorders. Finally, we evaluate this concept of metabolic learning/memory in mice, suggesting the hypothalamus is involved in a form of nutritional learning and memory, which is critical for determining resistance or susceptibility to obesity. In conclusion, our data indicate the brain, and potentially the hypothalamus, direct metabolic learning and the formation of memories, which contribute to the control of systemic metabolic homeostasis. PMID:25848677

  12. A comprehensive definition for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Paul L

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome refers to the co-occurrence of several known cardiovascular risk factors, including insulin resistance, obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia and hypertension. These conditions are interrelated and share underlying mediators, mechanisms and pathways. There has been recent controversy about its definition and its utility. In this article, I review the current definitions for the metabolic syndrome and why the concept is important. It identifies a subgroup of patients with shared pathophysiology who are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. By considering the central features of the metabolic syndrome and how they are related, we may better understand the underlying pathophysiology and disease pathogenesis. A comprehensive definition for the metabolic syndrome and its key features would facilitate research into its causes and hopefully lead to new insights into pharmacologic and lifestyle treatment approaches.

  13. Identification of genetic elements in metabolism by high-throughput mouse phenotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozman, Jan; Rathkolb, Birgit; Oestereicher, Manuela A.

    2018-01-01

    Metabolic diseases are a worldwide problem but the underlying genetic factors and their relevance to metabolic disease remain incompletely understood. Genome-wide research is needed to characterize so-far unannotated mammalian metabolic genes. Here, we generate and analyze metabolic phenotypic da...

  14. Principles for circadian orchestration of metabolic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurley, Kevin; Herbst, Christopher; Wesener, Felix; Koller, Barbara; Wallach, Thomas; Maier, Bert; Kramer, Achim

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms govern multiple aspects of animal metabolism. Transcriptome-, proteome- and metabolome-wide measurements have revealed widespread circadian rhythms in metabolism governed by a cellular genetic oscillator, the circadian core clock. However, it remains unclear if and under which conditions transcriptional rhythms cause rhythms in particular metabolites and metabolic fluxes. Here, we analyzed the circadian orchestration of metabolic pathways by direct measurement of enzyme activities, analysis of transcriptome data, and developing a theoretical method called circadian response analysis. Contrary to a common assumption, we found that pronounced rhythms in metabolic pathways are often favored by separation rather than alignment in the times of peak activity of key enzymes. This property holds true for a set of metabolic pathway motifs (e.g., linear chains and branching points) and also under the conditions of fast kinetics typical for metabolic reactions. By circadian response analysis of pathway motifs, we determined exact timing separation constraints on rhythmic enzyme activities that allow for substantial rhythms in pathway flux and metabolite concentrations. Direct measurements of circadian enzyme activities in mouse skeletal muscle confirmed that such timing separation occurs in vivo. PMID:28159888

  15. Altered metabolism in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locasale Jason W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer cells have different metabolic requirements from their normal counterparts. Understanding the consequences of this differential metabolism requires a detailed understanding of glucose metabolism and its relation to energy production in cancer cells. A recent study in BMC Systems Biology by Vasquez et al. developed a mathematical model to assess some features of this altered metabolism. Here, we take a broader look at the regulation of energy metabolism in cancer cells, considering their anabolic as well as catabolic needs. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1752-0509/4/58/

  16. Cancer stem cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-05-24

    Cancer is now viewed as a stem cell disease. There is still no consensus on the metabolic characteristics of cancer stem cells, with several studies indicating that they are mainly glycolytic and others pointing instead to mitochondrial metabolism as their principal source of energy. Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes. Determining the role of cancer stem cell metabolism in carcinogenesis has become a major focus in cancer research, and substantial efforts are conducted towards discovering clinical targets.

  17. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  18. Systems Biology of Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2017-06-20

    Metabolism is highly complex and involves thousands of different connected reactions; it is therefore necessary to use mathematical models for holistic studies. The use of mathematical models in biology is referred to as systems biology. In this review, the principles of systems biology are described, and two different types of mathematical models used for studying metabolism are discussed: kinetic models and genome-scale metabolic models. The use of different omics technologies, including transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and fluxomics, for studying metabolism is presented. Finally, the application of systems biology for analyzing global regulatory structures, engineering the metabolism of cell factories, and analyzing human diseases is discussed.

  19. Dynamics of pyruvate metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchiorsen, Claus Rix; Jensen, Niels B.S.; Christensen, Bjarke

    2001-01-01

    The pyruvate metabolism in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis was studied in anaerobic cultures under transient conditions. During growth of L. lactis in continuous culture at high dilution rate, homolactic product formation was observed, i.e., lactate was produced as the major end...... product. At a lower dilution rate, the pyruvate metabolism shifted towards mixed acid-product formation where formate, acetate, and ethanol were produced in addition to lactate. The regulation of the shift in pyruvate metabolism was investigated by monitoring the dynamic behavior of L. lactis...

  20. A comprehensive definition for metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome refers to the co-occurrence of several known cardiovascular risk factors, including insulin resistance, obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia and hypertension. These conditions are interrelated and share underlying mediators, mechanisms and pathways. There has been recent controversy about its definition and its utility. In this article, I review the current definitions for the metabolic syndrome and why the concept is important. It identifies a subgroup of patients with sh...

  1. Metabolic disorders with typical alterations in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmuth-Metz, M.

    2010-01-01

    The classification of metabolic disorders according to the etiology is not practical for neuroradiological purposes because the underlying defect does not uniformly transform into morphological characteristics. Therefore typical MR and clinical features of some easily identifiable metabolic disorders are presented. Canavan disease, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease, Alexander disease, X-chromosomal adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenomyeloneuropathy, mitochondrial disorders, such as MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) and Leigh syndrome as well as L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria are presented. (orig.) [de

  2. [Nutrition and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matía Martín, Pilar; Lecumberri Pascual, Edurne; Calle Pascual, Alfonso L

    2007-01-01

    Sufficient evidence exists in relation to the association in clinical practice between disorders in the metabolism of glucose, lipoproteins, insulin action, arterial hypertension and centrally-distributed obesity. This association is named Metabolic Syndrome. Despite the existence thereof had been questioned by the ADA and EASD, it is a useful tool affording the possibility of identifying individuals at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Metabolic syndrome and/or its individual components are associated with a high incidence rate of cardiovascular disease. Obesity and a sedentary lifestyle are underlying risk factors along this syndrome's pathway to disease, changes in living habits therefore being a first-line intervention in the prevention and treatment of insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, aterogenic dyslipemia and arterial hypertension. Weight loss and exercise are the keys to the overall plan, one of the most important non-pharmacological cardiovascular risk reduction strategies however still being diet. Epidemiological studies have found a high intake of simple sugars, of foods having a glycemic index and of diets with a high glycemic load to be associated to insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol figures. Los saturated fat intake in favor of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids has been implied in a reduction of the incidence of type II diabetes mellitus and dyslipemia, although the debate is ongoing. Unrefined grain fiber in the diet has been beneficial in reducing the risk of diabetes. Among the diet patterns, the Mediterranean diet has been related to a lower incidence of diabetes and a reduction in the risk of death. Studies for intervention in the prevention of type II diabetes have suggested low-fat diets (reducing saturated and trans-fats), with a high degree of fiber and low glycemic index. Clinical trials have shown diets with small amounts of carbohydrates, low glycemic

  3. Late gestation under- and overnutrition have differential impacts when combined with a post-natal obesogenic diet on glucose-lactate-insulin adaptations during metabolic challenges in adolescent sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanal, Prabhat; Axel, Anne Marie Dixen; Kongsted, Anna Hauntoft

    2015-01-01

    for the last 6 weeks of gestation (term = 147 days) assigned to HIGH (N = 13; 150 and 110% of energy and protein requirements, respectively), NORM (N = 9; 100% of requirements) or LOW (N = 14; 50% of requirements) diets. The twin offspring were raised on high-carbohydrate-high-fat (HCHF; N = 35......: Prenatal malnutrition differentially impacted adaptations of particularly plasma lactate followed by glucose, cholesterol and insulin. This was most clearly expressed during PTT in fasted lambs and much less during ITT and GTT. In fasted lambs, propionate induced more dramatic increases in lactate than...... the greatest glucose-induced insulin secretory responses. CONCLUSION: Prenatal malnutrition differentially programmed glucose-lactate metabolic pathways and cholesterol homeostasis. Prenatal overnutrition predisposed for hyperglycaemia and hyperlactataemia, whereas undernutrition predisposed...

  4. Immune activation in HIV-infected aging women on antiretrovirals--implications for age-associated comorbidities: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Alcaide

    Full Text Available Persistent immune activation and microbial translocation associated with HIV infection likely place HIV-infected aging women at high risk of developing chronic age-related diseases. We investigated immune activation and microbial translocation in HIV-infected aging women in the post-menopausal ages.Twenty-seven post-menopausal women with HIV infection receiving antiretroviral treatment with documented viral suppression and 15 HIV-negative age-matched controls were enrolled. Levels of immune activation markers (T cell immune phenotype, sCD25, sCD14, sCD163, microbial translocation (LPS and biomarkers of cardiovascular disease and impaired cognitive function (sVCAM-1, sICAM-1 and CXCL10 were evaluated.T cell activation and exhaustion, monocyte/macrophage activation, and microbial translocation were significantly higher in HIV-infected women when compared to uninfected controls. Microbial translocation correlated with T cell and monocyte/macrophage activation. Biomarkers of cardiovascular disease and impaired cognition were elevated in women with HIV infection and correlated with immune activation.HIV-infected antiretroviral-treated aging women who achieved viral suppression are in a generalized status of immune activation and therefore are at an increased risk of age-associated end-organ diseases compared to uninfected age-matched controls.

  5. Comparison of captive lifespan, age-associated liver neoplasias and age-dependent gene expression between two annual fish species: Nothobranchius furzeri and Nothobranchius korthause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Mario; Di Cicco, Emiliano; Rossi, Giacomo; Cellerino, Alessandro; Tozzini, Eva Terzibasi

    2015-02-01

    Nothobranchius is a genus of annual fish broadly distributed in South-Eastern Africa and found into temporary ponds generated during the rain seasons and their lifespan is limited by the duration of their habitats. Here we compared two Nothobranchius species from radically different environments: N. furzeri and N. korthausae. We found a large difference in life expectancy (29- against 71-weeks of median life span, 40- against 80-weeks of maximum lifespan, respectively), which correlates with a diverse timing in the onset of several age dependent processes: our data show that N. korthause longer lifespan is associated to retarded onset of age-dependent liver-neoplasia and slower down-regulation of collagen 1 alpha 2 (COL1A2) expression in the skin. On the other hand, the expression of cyclin B1 (CCNB1) in the brain was strongly age-regulated, but with similar profiles in N. furzeri and N. korthausae. In conclusion, our data suggest that the different ageing rate of two species of the same genus could be used as novel tool to investigate and better understand the genetic bases of some general mechanism leading to the complex ageing process, providing a strategy to unravel some of the genetic mechanisms regulating longevity and age-associate pathologies including neoplasias.

  6. The phenomenon of the switching of estrogen effects and joker function of glucose: similarities and relation to age-associated pathology and approaches to correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstein, Lev M; Tsyrlina, Evgenia V; Vasilyev, Dmitry A; Poroshina, Tatjana E; Kovalenko, Rina G

    2005-12-01

    Estrogens and glucose are characterized by a myriad of functions that can be reduced to a small number of principal actions. In aging there is a simultaneous increase in the prevalence of diseases connected with estrogen deficiency as well as with estrogenic excess and associated with the phenomenon of the switching of estrogen effects (PSEE). Estrogens possess hormonal and genotoxic properties. An increase in genotoxic effect (isolated or combined with a decrease in hormonal effect) can influence the course of age-associated diseases that, contrary to the situation with adaptive hypersensitivity to estrogens, may become less favorable or more aggressive. Inductors of PSEE include smoking, irradiation, and aging. Yet with "glycemic load" and the endocrine effect of glucose (the stimulation of insulin secretion), reactive oxygen species are formed in multiple sites, including adipose tissue. The ratio between hormonal and genotoxic effects reflects a "joker" function of glucose and can be conditioned by endogenous (perhaps including genetic) and exogenous factors. The shift in this glucose-associated ratio may selectively encourage some chronic non-communicable diseases. Several groups of treatments can be distinguished including alleviators of PSEE and insulin resistance syndrome (biguanides, glitazones, statins, modifiers of adipocytokines secretion, etc.) as well as other compounds aimed to optimally orchestrate the balance between endocrine and DNA-damaging effects of estrogens and glucose.

  7. [FETAL PROGRAMMING OF METABOLIC DISORDERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadinova, M R; Metodieva, R; Boyadzhieva, N

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of fetal programming has developed notably over the years and recent data suggest that an unbalanced diet prior and during pregnancy can have early-onset and long-lasting consequences on the health of the offspring. Specific negative influences of high dietary glucose and lipid consumption, as well as undernutrition, are associated with development of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and diabetes in the offspring. The mechanisms underlying the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on the fetus may involve structural, metabolic and epigenetic changes. The aim of this review is to illustrate how adverse intrauterine environment may influence molecular modifications in the fetus and cause epigenetic alterations in particular. It has been demonstrated that prenatal epigenetic modifications may be linked to the pathogenesis and progression of the adult chronic disorders. Studies on epigenetic alterations will contribute to a better understanding of the long-term effects of in utero exposure and may open new perspectives for disease prevention and treatment.

  8. Characterizing acetogenic metabolism using a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Clostridium ljungdahlii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Harish; Sahin, Merve; Nogales, Juan; Latif, Haythem; Lovley, Derek R; Ebrahim, Ali; Zengler, Karsten

    2013-11-25

    The metabolic capabilities of acetogens to ferment a wide range of sugars, to grow autotrophically on H2/CO2, and more importantly on synthesis gas (H2/CO/CO2) make them very attractive candidates as production hosts for biofuels and biocommodities. Acetogenic metabolism is considered one of the earliest modes of bacterial metabolism. A thorough understanding of various factors governing the metabolism, in particular energy conservation mechanisms, is critical for metabolic engineering of acetogens for targeted production of desired chemicals. Here, we present the genome-scale metabolic network of Clostridium ljungdahlii, the first such model for an acetogen. This genome-scale model (iHN637) consisting of 637 genes, 785 reactions, and 698 metabolites captures all the major central metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, in particular pathways involved in carbon fixation and energy conservation. A combination of metabolic modeling, with physiological and transcriptomic data provided insights into autotrophic metabolism as well as aided the characterization of a nitrate reduction pathway in C. ljungdahlii. Analysis of the iHN637 metabolic model revealed that flavin based electron bifurcation played a key role in energy conservation during autotrophic growth and helped identify genes for some of the critical steps in this mechanism. iHN637 represents a predictive model that recapitulates experimental data, and provides valuable insights into the metabolic response of C. ljungdahlii to genetic perturbations under various growth conditions. Thus, the model will be instrumental in guiding metabolic engineering of C. ljungdahlii for the industrial production of biocommodities and biofuels.

  9. DREAMS of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Keng Cher; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2010-10-01

    Metabolic networks have been studied for several decades, and sophisticated computational frameworks are needed to augment experimental approaches to harness these complex networks. BNICE (Biochemical Network Integrated Computational Explorer), a computational approach for the discovery of novel biochemical pathways that is based on biochemical transformations, overcomes many of the current limitations. BNICE and similar frameworks can be used in several different areas: (i) 'Design' of novel pathways for metabolic engineering; (ii) 'Retrosynthesis' of metabolic compounds; (iii) 'Evolution' analysis between metabolic pathways of different organisms; (iv) 'Analysis' of metabolic pathways; (v) 'Mining' of omics data; and (vi) 'Selection' of targets for enzyme engineering. Here, we discuss the issues and challenges in building such frameworks as well as the gamut of applications in biotechnology, metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Jouyandeh, Zahra; Nayebzadeh, Farnaz; Qorbani, Mostafa; Asadi, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3) criteria t...

  12. Nutrition and metabolic syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Albornoz López, Raúl; Pérez Rodrigo, Iciar

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The exact etiology is unclear, although it is known thatthere is a complex interaction between genetic, metabolic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, dietary habits play an important role in the treatment and prevention of this condition. General classic recommendations include control of obesity, increased physical activ...

  13. Age-associated and deslorelin-induced declines in serum anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations in female cheetahs, Acinonyx jubatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Ned J; Crosier, Adrienne E; Comizzoli, Pierre; Nagashima, Jennifer B; Haefele, Holly; Schmidt-Küntzel, Anne; Marker, Laurie L

    2017-09-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is widely used in human medicine to non-invasively estimate the size of the ovarian follicle reserve and to predict the ovarian response to gonadotropin stimulation in the context of assisted reproductive technologies (e.g., IVF). These applications of AMH testing have recently expanded to non-human mammals, with production animals, such as cows, goats and sheep being the primary focus of AMH research. However, few investigations have involved exotic species, and in particular carnivores. In this study, we measured AMH concentrations (0.078-3.078ng/mL) in archived serum samples that had been collected from 36 adult female cheetahs across their reproductive lifespan (2-15years of age). Similar to other mammals, AMH concentration in cheetahs declined with age, and its variability among females of the same age was considerable. The rates at which AMH declined over time in individual cheetahs were also highly variable. Five cheetahs had been contracepted with the long-acting GnRH agonist deslorelin for 6-18months prior to sample collection, and their AMH concentrations were relatively low compared to untreated females. In this first study of AMH in an exotic carnivore, the findings demonstrate that the age-associated decline in AMH is highly variable and that deslorelin appears to suppress AMH concentration in serum. Owing to the increased use of assisted reproductive technologies in ex situ populations of threatened and endangered species, such as cheetahs, the present study's findings will need to be taken into consideration if AMH is to be used successfully to optimize breeding management decisions in exotic species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Phytochemicals in Morinda citrifolia fruit selectively modulate age-associated immunity and antioxidant enzyme activities through ERK pathway in splenic lymphocytes of male F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Uday P; Anand, Krithika; Yasmine, Fariya; Hima, Lalgi; Priyanka, Hannah P; Thyagarajan, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of immunomodulatory effects of Morinda citrifolia (Noni) were examined through intracellular signaling pathways in the splenocytes and their modulation by phytochemicals using bioinformatics tools. Noni fruit juices without seeds (NSL) and with seeds (NWS) were co-incubated in vitro with splenocytes from young, middle-aged and old F344 male rats and proliferation of lymphocytes, cytokine production, antioxidant enzyme activities and intracellular signaling markers were measured. NSL decreased lymphoproliferation in early middle-aged rats, and IL-2 and IFN-γ production in old rats. In contrast, NWS enhanced lymphoproliferation in young and old rats, IL-2 and IFN-γ production in middle-aged and old rats. The activities of antioxidant enzymes were augmented by NWS and NSL in old rats. NWS reversed age-related increase in lipid peroxidation in all age-groups, while NSL increased lipid peroxidation in old rats. NSL increased p-ERK in old rats and decreased p-CREB in young and middle-aged rats. In contrast, NWS decreased p-ERK in all age groups and increased p-CREB in old rats. Both NSL and NWS increased p-Akt expression in middle-aged and old rats. Both NSL and NWS suppressed p-NF-κB expression in middle-aged and old rats. Docking studies demonstrated that Noni phytochemicals, damnacanthal, myricetin and ursolic acid, are potent inhibitors of ERK with binding sites in the catalytic and phosphorylation sites of the molecule. These results suggest that Noni fruit juices with or without seeds modulate cell-mediated immunity and antioxidant enzyme activities based on the phytochemicals that may differentially influence cell signaling and therefore, age-associated immunity.

  15. Mathematical modelling of metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gombert, Andreas Karoly; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Mathematical models of the cellular metabolism have a special interest within biotechnology. Many different kinds of commercially important products are derived from the cell factory, and metabolic engineering can be applied to improve existing production processes, as well as to make new processes...... available. Both stoichiometric and kinetic models have been used to investigate the metabolism, which has resulted in defining the optimal fermentation conditions, as well as in directing the genetic changes to be introduced in order to obtain a good producer strain or cell line. With the increasing...... availability of genomic information and powerful analytical techniques, mathematical models also serve as a tool for understanding the cellular metabolism and physiology....

  16. Engineering of Secondary Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Secondary (specialized) metabolites, produced by bacteria, fungi, plants, and other organisms, exhibit enormous structural variation, and consequently display a wide range of biological activities. Secondary metabolism improves and modulates the phenotype of the host producer. Furthermore, these biological activities have resulted in the use of secondary metabolites in a variety of industrial and pharmaceutical applications. Metabolic engineering presents a powerful strategy to improve access to these valuable molecules. A critical overview of engineering approaches in secondary metabolism is presented, both in heterologous and native hosts. The recognition of the increasing role of compartmentalization in metabolic engineering is highlighted. Engineering approaches to modify the structure of key secondary metabolite classes are also critically evaluated.

  17. The Metabolic Phenotype of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Eidelman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer in men in the United States. Cancer metabolism has emerged as a contemporary topic of great interest for improved mechanistic understanding of tumorigenesis. Prostate cancer is a disease model of great interest from a metabolic perspective. Prostatic tissue exhibits unique metabolic activity under baseline conditions. Benign prostate cells accumulate zinc, and this excess zinc inhibits citrate oxidation and metabolism within the citric acid cycle, effectively resulting in citrate production. Malignant cells, however, actively oxidize citrate and resume more typical citric acid cycle function. Of further interest, prostate cancer does not exhibit the Warburg effect, an increase in glucose uptake, seen in many other cancers. These cellular metabolic differences and others are of clinical interest as they present a variety of potential therapeutic targets. Furthermore, understanding of the metabolic profile differences between benign prostate versus low- and high-grade prostate cancers also represents an avenue to better understand cancer progression and potentially develop new diagnostic testing. In this paper, we review the current state of knowledge on the metabolic phenotypes of prostate cancer.

  18. Modeling cancer metabolism on a genome scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhak, Keren; Chaneton, Barbara; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-06-30

    Cancer cells have fundamentally altered cellular metabolism that is associated with their tumorigenicity and malignancy. In addition to the widely studied Warburg effect, several new key metabolic alterations in cancer have been established over the last decade, leading to the recognition that altered tumor metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Deciphering the full scope and functional implications of the dysregulated metabolism in cancer requires both the advancement of a variety of omics measurements and the advancement of computational approaches for the analysis and contextualization of the accumulated data. Encouragingly, while the metabolic network is highly interconnected and complex, it is at the same time probably the best characterized cellular network. Following, this review discusses the challenges that genome-scale modeling of cancer metabolism has been facing. We survey several recent studies demonstrating the first strides that have been done, testifying to the value of this approach in portraying a network-level view of the cancer metabolism and in identifying novel drug targets and biomarkers. Finally, we outline a few new steps that may further advance this field. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. Metabolism and virulence in Neisseria meningitidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eSchoen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A longstanding question in infection biology addresses the genetic basis for invasive behaviour in commensal pathogens. A prime example for such a pathogen is Neisseria meningitidis. On the one hand it is a harmless commensal bacterium exquisitely adapted to humans, and on the other hand it sometimes behaves like a ferocious pathogen causing potentially lethal disease such as sepsis and acute bacterial meningitis. Despite the lack of a classical repertoire of virulence genes in N. meningitidis separating commensal from invasive strains, molecular epidemiology suggests that carriage and invasive strains belong to genetically distinct populations. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that metabolic adaptation enables meningococci to exploit host resources, supporting the concept of nutritional virulence as a crucial determinant of invasive capability. Here, we discuss the contribution of core metabolic pathways in the context of colonization and invasion with special emphasis on results from genome-wide surveys. The metabolism of lactate, the oxidative stress response, and, in particular, glutathione metabolism as well as the denitrification pathway provide examples of how meningococcal metabolism is intimately linked to pathogenesis. We further discuss evidence from genome-wide approaches regarding potential metabolic differences between strains from hyperinvasive and carriage lineages and present new data assessing in vitro growth differences of strains from these two populations. We hypothesize that strains from carriage and hyperinvasive lineages differ in the expression of regulatory genes involved particularly in stress responses and amino acid metabolism under infection conditions.

  20. Bariatric surgery, lipoprotein metabolism and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailleux, Anne; Rouskas, Konstantinos; Pattou, François; Staels, Bart

    2015-08-01

    To summarize recent epidemiological, preclinical and clinical studies on the effects of Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass (RYGBP) surgery on cardiovascular risk factors and the underlying mechanisms. Although RYGBP has mechanical effects on the gastrointestinal tract, the reduced gastric pouch and intestinal calorie absorption cannot fully explain the metabolic improvements. Obesity predisposes to cardiovascular risk factors such as dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hypertension. In contrast to the limited success of pharmacological and lifestyle interventions, RYGBP induces sustained weight loss, metabolic improvements and decreases morbidity/mortality. In line, RYGBP reduces cardiovascular risk factors. Although the mechanisms are not entirely understood, RYGBP induces complex changes in the gut affecting other organs through endocrine and metabolic signals from the intestine to all key metabolic organs, which can link RYGBP and decreased cardiovascular risk. Here, we discuss the roles of changes in lipid absorption and metabolism, bile acid metabolism, gut hormones and the microbiote as potential mechanisms in the decreased cardiovascular risk and metabolic improvement after RYGBP.

  1. Fluoroacetylcarnitine: metabolism and metabolic effects in mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer, J.; Davis, E.J.

    1973-01-01

    The metabolism and metabolic effects of fluoroacetylcarnitine have been investigated. Carnitineacetyltransferase transfers the fluoro-acetyl group of fluoroacetylcarnitine nearly as rapidly to CoA as the acetyl group of acetylcarnitine. Fluorocitrate is then formed by citrate synthase, but this second reaction is relatively slow. The fluorocitrate formed intramitochondrially inhibits the metabolism of citrate. In heart and skeletal muscle mitochondria the accumulated citrate inhibits citrate synthesis and the ..beta..-oxidation of fatty acids. Free acetate is formed, presumably because accumulated acetyl-CoA is hydrolyzed. In liver mitochondria the accumulation of citrate leads to a relatively increased rate of ketogenesis. Increased ketogenesis is obtained also upon the addition of citrate to the reaction mixture.

  2. Alterations in cancer cell metabolism: the Warburg effect and metabolic adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Yazdan; Zabihinpour, Zahra; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2015-05-01

    The Warburg effect means higher glucose uptake of cancer cells compared to normal tissues, whereas a smaller fraction of this glucose is employed for oxidative phosphorylation. With the advent of high throughput technologies and computational systems biology, cancer cell metabolism has been reinvestigated over the last decades toward identifying various events underlying "how" and "why" a cancer cell employs aerobic glycolysis. Significant progress has been shaped to revise the Warburg effect. In this study, we have integrated the gene expression of 13 different cancer cells with the genome-scale metabolic network of human (Recon1) based on the E-Flux method, and analyzed them based on constraint-based modeling. Results show that regardless of significant up- and down-regulated metabolic genes, the distribution of metabolic changes is similar in different cancer types. These findings support the theory that the Warburg effect is a consequence of metabolic adaptation in cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitrogen metabolism meets phytopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagard, Mathilde; Launay, Alban; Clément, Gilles; Courtial, Julia; Dellagi, Alia; Farjad, Mahsa; Krapp, Anne; Soulié, Marie-Christine; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) is essential for life and is a major limiting factor of plant growth. Because soils frequently lack sufficient N, large quantities of inorganic N fertilizers are added to soils for crop production. However, nitrate, urea, and ammonium are a major source of global pollution, because much of the N that is not taken up by plants enters streams, groundwater, and lakes, where it affects algal production and causes an imbalance in aquatic food webs. Many agronomical data indicate that the higher use of N fertilizers during the green revolution had an impact on the incidence of crop diseases. In contrast, examples in which a decrease in N fertilization increases disease severity are also reported, indicating that there is a complex relationship linking N uptake and metabolism and the disease infection processes. Thus, although it is clear that N availability affects disease, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this review is to describe current knowledge of the mechanisms that link plant N status to the plant's response to pathogen infection and to the virulence and nutritional status of phytopathogens. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Adaptive Evolution of Phosphorus Metabolism in Prochlorococcus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casey, John R; Mardinoglu, Adil; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic phosphorus is scarce in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, where the high-light-adapted ecotype HLI of the marine picocyanobacterium Prochlorococcus marinus thrives. Physiological and regulatory control of phosphorus acquisition and partitioning has been observed in HLI both in culture...... and in the field; however, the optimization of phosphorus metabolism and associated gains for its phosphorus-limited-growth (PLG) phenotype have not been studied. Here, we reconstructed a genome-scale metabolic network of the HLI axenic strain MED4 (iJC568), consisting of 568 metabolic genes in relation to 794...... reactions involving 680 metabolites distributed in 6 subcellular locations. iJC568 was used to quantify metabolic fluxes under PLG conditions, and we observed a close correspondence between experimental and computed fluxes. We found that MED4 has minimized its dependence on intracellular phosphate, not only...

  5. Host–Microbiota Mutualism in Metabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Fabbiano

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota is a plastic ecosystem that is shaped by environmental and genetic factors, interacting with virtually all tissues of the host. Many signals result from the interplay between the microbiota with its mammalian symbiont that can lead to altered metabolism. Disruptions in the microbial composition are associated with a number of comorbidities linked to the metabolic syndrome. Promoting the niche expansion of beneficial bacteria through diet and supplements can improve metabolic disorders. Reintroducing bacteria through probiotic treatment or fecal transplant is a strategy under active investigation for multiple pathological conditions. Here, we review the recent knowledge of microbiota’s contribution to host pathology, the modulation of the microbiota by dietary habits, and the potential therapeutic benefits of reshaping the gut bacterial landscape in context of metabolic disorders such as obesity.

  6. Nitric oxide and mitochondria in metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, Larisa; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Fattakhov, Nikolai; Vasilenko, Mariia; Zatolokin, Pavel; Kirienkova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders that collectively increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in the pathogeneses of MS components and is involved in different mitochondrial signaling pathways that control respiration and apoptosis. The present review summarizes the recent information regarding the interrelations of mitochondria and NO in MS. Changes in the activities of different NO synthase isoforms lead to the formation of metabolic disorders and therefore are highlighted here. Reduced endothelial NOS activity and NO bioavailability, as the main factors underlying the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in MS, are discussed in this review in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction. We also focus on potential therapeutic strategies involving NO signaling pathways that can be used to treat patients with metabolic disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The article may help researchers develop new approaches for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:25741283

  7. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Host–Microbiota Mutualism in Metabolic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiano, Salvatore; Suárez-Zamorano, Nicolas; Trajkovski, Mirko

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is a plastic ecosystem that is shaped by environmental and genetic factors, interacting with virtually all tissues of the host. Many signals result from the interplay between the microbiota with its mammalian symbiont that can lead to altered metabolism. Disruptions in the microbial composition are associated with a number of comorbidities linked to the metabolic syndrome. Promoting the niche expansion of beneficial bacteria through diet and supplements can improve metabolic disorders. Reintroducing bacteria through probiotic treatment or fecal transplant is a strategy under active investigation for multiple pathological conditions. Here, we review the recent knowledge of microbiota’s contribution to host pathology, the modulation of the microbiota by dietary habits, and the potential therapeutic benefits of reshaping the gut bacterial landscape in context of metabolic disorders such as obesity. PMID:29056925

  9. Fatty acid metabolism: target for metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wakil, Salih J.; Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi A.

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acids are a major energy source and important constituents of membrane lipids, and they serve as cellular signaling molecules that play an important role in the etiology of the metabolic syndrome. Acetyl-CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 (ACC1 and ACC2) catalyze the synthesis of malonyl-CoA, the substrate for fatty acid synthesis and the regulator of fatty acid oxidation. They are highly regulated and play important roles in the energy metabolism of fatty acids in animals, including humans. They...

  10. Metabolic memory: Evolving concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Anoop; Bloomgarden, Zachary

    2018-03-01

    to standard control. However, the UKPDS blood pressure control trial showed a reduction in complications, but no difference between the intervention and control groups was seen during the follow-up of this portion of the study, suggesting that no such "memory" exists for these interventions. The molecular mechanisms underlying these long-term effects of prior periods of better or worse glycemic control continue to be investigated. Extended periods of exposure to high glucose levels persistently dysregulated fibrotic and inflammatory genes in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, epigenetic processes may contribute to metabolic memory, with evidence that post-translational histone methylation and changes in microRNA may persist after exposure to high glucose levels is terminated. In this context, it is of note that the zebrafish model of T1D exhibits regeneration of the pancreas, becoming euglycemic after a period of hyperglycemia, but with evidence in this model that delay in skin wound healing persists indefinitely even after multiple rounds of fin regeneration, suggesting a long-lasting adverse effect of prior hyperglycemia. Such epigenetic differences were reported in genes related to the nuclear factor-κB inflammatory pathway and to diabetes complications in a study of intensive versus conventional treatment patients followed from the DCCT. A further mechanism that has been suggested is a role of dysregulated mitochondrial biogenesis contributing to deterioration of retinopathy even after a period of good glycemic control continues. Interestingly, in this issue of the Journal, Pantalone et al. present a study that touches upon our first question, failing to find a relationship between the HbA1c level measured at the time of diabetes diagnosis and subsequent outcome. The study analyzed relationships between glycemic control and complications among >30 000 people with newly diagnosed T2D followed for the subsequent decade. Might the level of

  11. PPARa governs glycerol metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patsouris, D.A.; Mandard, S.J.; Voshol, P.J.; Escher, P.; Tan, N.S.; Havekes, L.M.; Koenig, W.; März, W.; Müller, M.R.; Kersten, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    Glycerol, a product of adipose tissue lipolysis, is an important substrate for hepatic glucose synthesis. However, little is known about the regulation of hepatic glycerol metabolism. Here we show that several genes involved in the hepatic metabolism of glycerol, i.e., cytosolic and mitochondrial

  12. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouyandeh Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3 criteria to classify subjects as having metabolic syndrome. Results Total prevalence of metabolic syndrome among our subjects was 30.1%. Waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, diastolic blood pressure ,Systolic blood pressure, and triglyceride were significantly higher among women with metabolic syndrome (P-value Conclusions Our study shows that postmenopausal status is associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, to prevent cardiovascular disease there is a need to evaluate metabolic syndrome and its components from the time of the menopause.

  13. Circadian Systems and Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    1999-01-01

    Circadian systems direct many metabolic parameters and, at the same time, they appear to be exquisitely shielded from metabolic variations. Although the recent decade of circadian research has brought insights into how circadian periodicity may be generated at the molecular level, little is known

  14. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic panel - comprehensive; Chem-20; SMA20; Sequential multi-channel analysis with computer-20; SMAC20; Metabolic panel 20 ... Normal values for the panel tests are: Albumin : 3.4 to 5.4 g/dL (34 to 54 g/L) Alkaline phosphatase : 44 to 147 ...

  15. Acute metabolic and physiologic response of goats to narcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatte, C. L.; Bennett, P. B.

    1973-01-01

    Assessment of the metabolic consequences of exposure to elevated partial pressures of nitrogen and helium under normobaric and hyperbaric conditions in goats. The results include the finding that hyperbaric nitrogen causes and increase in metabolic rate and a general decrease in blood constituent levels which is interpreted as reflecting a shift toward fatty acid metabolism at the expense of carbohydrates. A similar but more pronounced pattern was observed with hyperbaric helium.

  16. A network perspective on metabolic inconsistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnenschein Nikolaus

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrating gene expression profiles and metabolic pathways under different experimental conditions is essential for understanding the coherence of these two layers of cellular organization. The network character of metabolic systems can be instrumental in developing concepts of agreement between expression data and pathways. A network-driven interpretation of gene expression data has the potential of suggesting novel classifiers for pathological cellular states and of contributing to a general theoretical understanding of gene regulation. Results Here, we analyze the coherence of gene expression patterns and a reconstruction of human metabolism, using consistency scores obtained from network and constraint-based analysis methods. We find a surprisingly strong correlation between the two measures, demonstrating that a substantial part of inconsistencies between metabolic processes and gene expression can be understood from a network perspective alone. Prompted by this finding, we investigate the topological context of the individual biochemical reactions responsible for the observed inconsistencies. On this basis, we are able to separate the differential contributions that bear physiological information about the system, from the unspecific contributions that unravel gaps in the metabolic reconstruction. We demonstrate the biological potential of our network-driven approach by analyzing transcriptome profiles of aldosterone producing adenomas that have been obtained from a cohort of Primary Aldosteronism patients. We unravel systematics in the data that could not have been resolved by conventional microarray data analysis. In particular, we discover two distinct metabolic states in the adenoma expression patterns. Conclusions The methodology presented here can help understand metabolic inconsistencies from a network perspective. It thus serves as a mediator between the topology of metabolic systems and their dynamical

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism underpins the physiology and pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, although experimental mycobacteriology has provided key insights into the metabolic pathways that are essential for survival and pathogenesis, determining the metabolic status of bacilli during different stages of infection and in different cellular compartments remains challenging. Recent advances—in particular, the development of systems biology tools such as metabolomics—have enabled key insights into the biochemical state of M. tuberculosis in experimental models of infection. In addition, their use to elucidate mechanisms of action of new and existing antituberculosis drugs is critical for the development of improved interventions to counter tuberculosis. This review provides a broad summary of mycobacterial metabolism, highlighting the adaptation of M. tuberculosis as specialist human pathogen, and discusses recent insights into the strategies used by the host and infecting bacillus to influence the outcomes of the host–pathogen interaction through modulation of metabolic functions. PMID:25502746

  18. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  19. Metabolic activity, experiment M171. [space flight effects on human metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, E. L.; Rummel, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab metabolic activity experiment determines if man's metabolic effectiveness in doing mechanical work is progressively altered by a simulated Skylab environment, including environmental factors such as slightly increased pCO2. This test identified several hardware/procedural anomalies. The most important of these were: (1) the metabolic analyzer measured carbon dioxide production and expired water too high; (2) the ergometer load module failed under continuous high workload conditions; (3) a higher than desirable number of erroneous blood pressure measurements were recorded; (4) vital capacity measurements were unreliable; and (5) anticipated crew personal exercise needs to be more structured.

  20. Inborn Errors of Metabolism with Acidosis: Organic Acidemias and Defects of Pyruvate and Ketone Body Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Lori-Anne P; DeBrosse, Suzanne D; McCandless, Shawn E

    2018-04-01

    When a child presents with high-anion gap metabolic acidosis, the pediatrician can proceed with confidence by recalling some basic principles. Defects of organic acid, pyruvate, and ketone body metabolism that present with acute acidosis are reviewed. Flowcharts for identifying the underlying cause and initiating life-saving therapy are provided. By evaluating electrolytes, blood sugar, lactate, ammonia, and urine ketones, the provider can determine the likelihood of an inborn error of metabolism. Freezing serum, plasma, and urine samples during the acute presentation for definitive diagnostic testing at the provider's convenience aids in the differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CACODYLIC ACID (DMAV): METABOLISM AND ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cacodylic acid (DMAV) issue paper discusses the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the various arsenical chemicals; evaluates the appropriate dataset to quantify the potential cancer risk to the organic arsenical herbicides; provides an evaluation of the mode of carcinogenic action (MOA) for DMAV including a consideration of the key events for bladder tumor formation in rats, other potential modes of action; and also considers the human relevance of the proposed animal MOA. As part of tolerance reassessment under the Food Quality Protection Act for the August 3, 2006 deadline, the hazard of cacodylic acid is being reassessed.

  2. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L

    2016-05-13

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area, there is ≈50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area there is an approximate 50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  4. Age-associated declines in muscle mass, strength, power, and physical performance: impact on fear of falling and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetti, A; Reid, K F; Hars, M; Herrmann, F R; Pasha, E; Phillips, E M; Fielding, R A

    2016-02-01

    This 3-year longitudinal study among older adults showed that declining muscle mass, strength, power, and physical performance are independent contributing factors to increased fear of falling, while declines of muscle mass and physical performance contribute to deterioration of quality of life. Our findings reinforce the importance of preserving muscle health with advancing age. The age-associated loss of skeletal muscle quantity and function are critical determinants of independent physical functioning in later life. Longitudinal studies investigating how decrements in muscle components of sarcopenia impact fear of falling (FoF) and quality of life (QoL) in older adults are lacking. Twenty-six healthy older subjects (age, 74.1 ± 3.7; Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) score ≥10) and 22 mobility-limited older subjects (age, 77.2 ± 4.4; SPPB score ≤9) underwent evaluations of lower extremity muscle size and composition by computed tomography, strength and power, and physical performance at baseline and after 3-year follow-up. The Falls Efficacy Scale (FES) and Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) were also administered at both timepoints to assess FoF and QoL, respectively. At 3-year follow-up, muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) (p < 0.013) and power decreased (p < 0.001), while intermuscular fat infiltration increased (p < 0.001). These decrements were accompanied with a longer time to complete 400 m by 22 ± 46 s (p < 0.002). Using linear mixed-effects regression models, declines of muscle CSA, strength and power, and SPPB score were associated with increased FES score (p < 0.05 for each model). Reduced physical component summary score of SF-36 over follow-up was independently associated with decreased SPPB score (p < 0.020), muscle CSA (p < 0.046), and increased 400 m walk time (p < 0.003). In older adults with and without mobility limitations, declining muscle mass, strength, power, and physical

  5. A high-salt diet further impairs age-associated declines in cognitive, behavioral, and cardiovascular functions in male Fischer brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugh, Gaurav; Asghar, Mohammad; Patki, Gaurav; Bohat, Ritu; Jafri, Faizan; Allam, Farida; Dao, An T; Mowrey, Christopher; Alkadhi, Karim; Salim, Samina

    2013-09-01

    Aging-associated declines in cognitive, emotional, and cardiovascular function are well known. Environmental stress triggers critical changes in the brain, further compromising cardiovascular and behavioral health during aging. Excessive dietary salt intake is one such stressor. Here, we tested the effect of high salt (HS) on anxiety, learning-memory function, and blood pressure (BP) in male Fischer brown Norway (FBN) rats. Adult (A; 2 mo) and old (O; 20 mo) male rats were fed normal-salt (NS; 0.4% NaCl) or HS (8% NaCl) diets for 4 wk after being implanted with telemeter probes for conscious BP measurement. Thereafter, tests to assess anxiety-like behavior and learning-memory were conducted. The rats were then killed, and samples of plasma, urine, and brain tissue were collected. We found that systolic BP was higher in O-NS (117 ± 1.2 mm Hg) than in A-NS (105 ± 0.8 mm Hg) rats (P < 0.05). Furthermore, BP was higher in O-HS (124 ± 1.4 mm Hg) than in O-NS (117 ± 1.2 mm Hg) rats (P < 0.05). Moreover, anxiety-like behavior (light-dark and open-field tests) was not different between A-NS and O-NS rats but was greater in O-HS rats than in A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05). Short-term memory (radial arm water maze test) was similar in A-NS and O-NS rats but was significantly impaired in O-HS rats compared with A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05). Furthermore, oxidative stress variables (in plasma, urine, and brain) as well as corticosterone (plasma) were greater in O-HS rats when compared with A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05). The antioxidant enzyme glyoxalase-1 expression was selectively reduced in the hippocampus and amygdala of O-HS rats compared with A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05), whereas other antioxidant enzymes, glutathione reductase 1, manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD), and Cu/Zn SOD remained unchanged. We suggest that salt-sensitive hypertension and behavioral derangement are associated with a redox imbalance in the brain of aged FBN rats.

  6. Vida útil e metabolismo de carboidratos em raízes de mandioquinha-salsa sob refrigeração e filme de PVC Shelf life and carbohydrate metabolism of arracacha roots stored under refrigeration and PVC film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosilene Antonio Ribeiro

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência da temperatura de armazenamento e do uso do filme de cloreto de polivinila (PVC sobre a perda de matéria fresca e água, incidência de danos causados por frio e metabolismo pós-colheita dos carboidratos, em raízes tuberosas de mandioquinha-salsa (Arracacia xanthorrhiza. O filme de PVC reduziu a perda de matéria fresca e manteve o teor de água das raízes, durante o armazenamento por 60 dias a 5 e 10ºC. Os danos causados por frio foram inibidos nas raízes embaladas em filme de PCV, em ambas as temperaturas de armazenamento. As baixas temperaturas induziram o acúmulo de açúcares solúveis e a degradação de amido e, para as raízes armazenadas sem PVC, o aumento do conteúdo dos açúcares solúveis foi transiente e a taxa de degradação de amido foi superior à das raízes armazenadas com PVC.The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of the storage temperature and stretch polyvinylchloride (PVC film on the loss of fresh weight and water, on the development of chilling injury symptoms, and on the postharvest metabolism of carbohydrates, in arracacha tuber roots (Arracacia xanthorrhiza. The PVC film reduced the fresh weight loss and kept water content in the roots during 60-day storage period at 5 and 10ºC. PVC film in both storage temperatures inhibited the development of external and internal chilling injury symptoms. The low temperatures induced the increase of soluble sugar content and decrease of starch concentration, where the increase in soluble sugar was transient in roots stored without PVC film, and the rate of starch degradation was higher compared to the roots stored with PVC.

  7. METABOLISM OF 3 PHARMACOLOGICALLY ACTIVE-DRUGS IN ISOLATED HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES - ANALYSIS OF INTERSPECIES VARIABILITY AND COMPARISON WITH METABOLISM IN-VIVO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SANDKER, GW; VOS, RME; DELBRESSINE, LPC; SLOOFF, MJH; MEIJER, DKF; GROOTHUIS, GMM

    1. The metabolism of the three drugs (Org GB 94, Org 3770 and Org OD 14) was studied in isolated human and rat hepatocytes. The metabolic profiles in rat and human hepatocytes were compared with the available in vivo data in both species. 2. All three drugs were metabolized extensively under the

  8. Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Akhlaq A; Farooqui, Tahira; Panza, Francesco; Frisardi, Vincenza

    2012-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of common pathologies: abdominal obesity linked to an excess of visceral fat, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. At the molecular level, metabolic syndrome is accompanied not only by dysregulation in the expression of adipokines (cytokines and chemokines), but also by alterations in levels of leptin, a peptide hormone released by white adipose tissue. These changes modulate immune response and inflammation that lead to alterations in the hypothalamic 'bodyweight/appetite/satiety set point,' resulting in the initiation and development of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for neurological disorders such as stroke, depression and Alzheimer's disease. The molecular mechanism underlying the mirror relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders is not fully understood. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that all cellular and biochemical alterations observed in metabolic syndrome like impairment of endothelial cell function, abnormality in essential fatty acid metabolism and alterations in lipid mediators along with abnormal insulin/leptin signaling may represent a pathological bridge between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the involvement of brain in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, but also to link the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome with neurochemical changes in stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression to a wider audience of neuroscientists with the hope that this discussion will initiate more studies on the relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders. © Springer Basel AG 2011

  9. Gut microbiome and lipid metabolism : from associations to mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Zheng; Koonen, Debby; Hofker, Marten; Fu, Jingyuan

    Purpose of review The gut microbiome has now been convincingly linked to human metabolic health but the underlying causality and mechanisms remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the recent progress in establishing the associations between gut microbiome species and lipid metabolism in

  10. Altered calcium metabolism: the probable major biochemical lesion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These data are suggestive of altered calcium metabolism impairing cell membrane stabilization, the vasorelaxing effect of calcium and cell signaling. Altered calcium metabolism may be the major biochemical lesion underlying many pathological and clinical states of lead toxicity. Journal of Biomedical Investigation Vol.

  11. Occasional seizures, epilepsy, and inborn errors of metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulac, O.; Plecko, B.; Gataullina, S.; Wolf, N.I.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are a common paediatric problem, with inborn errors of metabolism being a rare underlying aetiology. The clinical presentation of inborn errors of metabolism is often associated with other neurological symptoms, such as hypotonia, movement disorders, and cognitive disturbances. However, the

  12. Metabolic disorders in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Grzegorz; Pertyński, Tomasz; Pertyńska-Marczewska, Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance - IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus - T2DM) or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women's life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases) in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT). According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy). Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  13. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Stachowiak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women’s life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT. According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy. Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  14. Urban metabolism in Syracuse, NY – introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of Urban Ecosystems contains a series of papers related to assessing urban metabolism in Syracuse, NY. These papers were developed under the Urban Long-Term Research Area Exploratory Awards Program funded by the National Science Foundation. Objectives of this two-year project (2009–2011) in Syracuse, NY were to investigate: a)...

  15. Carbohydrate metabolism in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-27

    Jun 27, 2011 ... In order to clarify carbohydrate content and enzymes activities involved in sugar metabolism in tomato seedling leaves and yield and fruit quality under low night temperature and subsequent recovery, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Liaoyuanduoli) were grown in different climatic controlled-.

  16. Fundamentals of cancer metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Tumors reprogram pathways of nutrient acquisition and metabolism to meet the bioenergetic, biosynthetic, and redox demands of malignant cells. These reprogrammed activities are now recognized as hallmarks of cancer, and recent work has uncovered remarkable flexibility in the specific pathways activated by tumor cells to support these key functions. In this perspective, we provide a conceptual framework to understand how and why metabolic reprogramming occurs in tumor cells, and the mechanisms linking altered metabolism to tumorigenesis and metastasis. Understanding these concepts will progressively support the development of new strategies to treat human cancer. PMID:27386546

  17. VRML metabolic network visualizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdestvenski, Igor

    2003-03-01

    A successful date collection visualization should satisfy a set of many requirements: unification of diverse data formats, support for serendipity research, support of hierarchical structures, algorithmizability, vast information density, Internet-readiness, and other. Recently, virtual reality has made significant progress in engineering, architectural design, entertainment and communication. We experiment with the possibility of using the immersive abstract three-dimensional visualizations of the metabolic networks. We present the trial Metabolic Network Visualizer software, which produces graphical representation of a metabolic network as a VRML world from a formal description written in a simple SGML-type scripting language.

  18. Enhanced Neuroplasticity by the Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Associated with Improved Mitochondrial Dynamics and Altered Permeability Transition Pore Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Stockburger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cascade hypothesis of dementia assumes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to reduced energy supply, impaired neuroplasticity, and finally cell death as one major pathomechanism underlying the continuum from brain aging over mild cognitive impairment to initial and advanced late onset Alzheimer’s disease. Accordingly, improving mitochondrial function has become an important strategy to treat the early stages of this continuum. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been proposed as possible prototype for those compounds by increasing impaired mitochondrial function and related aspects like mechanisms of neuroplasticity. We here report that piracetam at therapeutically relevant concentrations improves neuritogenesis in the human cell line SH-SY5Y over conditions mirroring the whole spectrum of age-associated cognitive decline. These effects go parallel with improvement of impaired mitochondrial dynamics shifting back fission and fusion balance to the energetically more favorable fusion site. Impaired fission and fusion balance can also be induced by a reduction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP function as atractyloside which indicates the mPTP has similar effects on mitochondrial dynamics. These changes are also reduced by piracetam. These findings suggest the mPTP as an important target for the beneficial effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function.

  19. Enhanced Neuroplasticity by the Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Associated with Improved Mitochondrial Dynamics and Altered Permeability Transition Pore Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockburger, Carola; Miano, Davide; Pallas, Thea; Friedland, Kristina; Müller, Walter E

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial cascade hypothesis of dementia assumes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to reduced energy supply, impaired neuroplasticity, and finally cell death as one major pathomechanism underlying the continuum from brain aging over mild cognitive impairment to initial and advanced late onset Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, improving mitochondrial function has become an important strategy to treat the early stages of this continuum. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been proposed as possible prototype for those compounds by increasing impaired mitochondrial function and related aspects like mechanisms of neuroplasticity. We here report that piracetam at therapeutically relevant concentrations improves neuritogenesis in the human cell line SH-SY5Y over conditions mirroring the whole spectrum of age-associated cognitive decline. These effects go parallel with improvement of impaired mitochondrial dynamics shifting back fission and fusion balance to the energetically more favorable fusion site. Impaired fission and fusion balance can also be induced by a reduction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) function as atractyloside which indicates the mPTP has similar effects on mitochondrial dynamics. These changes are also reduced by piracetam. These findings suggest the mPTP as an important target for the beneficial effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function.

  20. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Quynh Trang Pham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics.