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Sample records for underlie inflammatory bowel

  1. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Primary Immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2017-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is most often a polygenic disorder with contributions from the intestinal microbiome, defects in barrier function, and dysregulated host responses to microbial stimulation. There is, however, increasing recognition of single gene defects that underlie a subset of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly those with early-onset disease, and this review focuses on the primary immunodeficiencies associated with early-onset inflammatory bowel disease. The advent of next-generation sequencing has led to an improved recognition of single gene defects underlying some cases of inflammatory bowel disease. Among single gene defects, immune response genes are the most frequent category identified. This is also true of common genetic variants associated with inflammatory bowel disease, supporting a pivotal role for host responses in the pathogenesis. This review focuses on practical aspects related to diagnosis and management of children with inflammatory bowel disease who have underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

  2. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Children)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Kids / Inflammatory Bowel Disease Print en español Enfermedad inflamatoria del intestino What Is Inflammatory Bowel Disease? ... of IBD? There are two kinds of IBD: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (say: UL-sur-uh- ...

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide, yet the reasons remain unknown. New therapeutic approaches have been introduced in medical IBD therapy, but their impact on the natural history of IBD remains uncertain. This review will summarize the recent findings in t...... in the epidemiology of IBD....

  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehkamp, Jan; Götz, Martin; Herrlinger, Klaus; Steurer, Wolfgang; Stange, Eduard F

    2016-02-05

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are common in Europe, with prevalences as high as 1 in 198 persons (ulcerative colitis) and 1 in 310 persons (Crohn's disease). This review is based on pertinent articles retrieved by a search in PubMed and in German and European guidelines and Cochrane reviews of controlled trials. Typically, the main clinical features of inflammatory bowel diseases are diarrhea, abdominal pain, and, in the case of ulcerative colitis, peranal bleeding. These diseases are due to a complex immunological disturbance with both genetic and environmental causes. A defective mucosal barrier against commensal bowel flora plays a major role in their pathogenesis. The diagnosis is based on laboratory testing, ultrasonography, imaging studies, and, above all, gastrointestinal endoscopy. Most patients with Crohn's disease respond to budesonide or systemic steroids; aminosalicylates are less effective. Refractory exacerbations may be treated with antibodies against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or, more recently, antibodies against integrin, a protein of the cell membrane. In ulcerative colitis, aminosalicylates are given first; if necessary, steroids or antibodies against TNF-α or integrin are added. Maintenance therapy to prevent further relapses often involves immunosuppression with thiopurines and/or antibodies. Once all conservative treatment options have been exhausted, surgery may be necessary. The treatment of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases requires individually designed therapeutic strategies and the close interdisciplinary collaboration of internists and surgeons.

  5. Heritability in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Hannah; Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    estimation regard genetic and environmental variance as separate entities, although it is now understood that there is a complex multidirectional interplay between genetic are environmental factors mediated by the microbiota, the epigenome, and the innate and acquired immune systems. Due to the limitations......Since Tysk et al's pioneering analysis of the Swedish twin registry, twin and family studies continue to support a strong genetic basis of the inflammatory bowel diseases. The coefficient of heritability for siblings of inflammatory bowel disease probands is 25 to 42 for Crohn's disease and 4 to 15...... of heritability estimates, it is unlikely that a true value for heritability will be reached. Further work aimed at quantifying the variance explained across GWAS, epigenome-wide, and microbiota-wide association studies will help to define factors leading to inflammatory bowel disease....

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Future Therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deventer, Sander J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Current medical therapies for people with inflammatory bowel disease are not satisfactory, and it is unlikely that improvement of traditional drugs will have a major clinical impact. The immunopathogensis of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are rapidly being deciphered, which is providing

  7. [Inflammatory bowel diseases: conservative therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansky, G

    1991-07-01

    Recent advances in the medical treatment of the inflammatory bowel diseases are reviewed with emphasizes on controlled clinical trials. The newly developed mesalazine contains the active moiety of sulfasalazine, the 5-aminosalicylic acid. In ulcerative colitis mesalazine appears to be as efficacious as the time-honored sulfasalazine; it has however less adverse effects. Corticosteroids remain the most effective drugs in severe attacks of all forms of inflammatory bowel diseases. The immunosuppressive agents 6-mercoptopurine and azathioprine are useful second-line drugs in otherwise refractory Crohn's disease. The place of cyclosporin is at present uncertain. Metronidazole is the only efficient antibiotics in the treatment of Crohn's disease. The relative merits of various diets are discussed.

  8. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T

    2015-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets-such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet-have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data.

  9. Does bowel preparation for inflammatory bowel disease surgery matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwaartz, C; Fields, A C; Sobrero, M; Divino, C M

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if bowel preparation influences outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease undergoing surgery. The database of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, Procedure Targeted Colectomy, from 2012 to 2014 was analyzed. Inflammatory bowel disease patients undergoing colorectal resection with or without bowel preparation were included in the study. In all, 3679 patients with inflammatory bowel disease were identified. 42.5% had no bowel preparation, 21.5% had mechanical bowel preparation only, 8.8% had oral antibiotic bowel preparation only and 27.2% had combined mechanical and oral antibiotic preparation. Combined mechanical and oral antibiotic preparation is associated with lower rates of anastomotic leak, ileus, surgical site infection, organ space infection, wound dehiscence and sepsis/septic shock. Combined mechanical and oral antibiotic preparation for inflammatory bowel disease patients undergoing colectomy is associated with decreased rates of surgical site infection, anastomotic leak, ileus. Combined bowel preparation should be the standard of care for inflammatory bowel disease patients undergoing colorectal resection. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Immunotherapy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder P

    2012-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease affects an increasing number of patients worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity. The dysregulation of the immune system with increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and increased mucosal expression of vascular adhesion molecules play an important role in its pathogenesis. Strategies targeting TNF-alpha and alpha4-integrin have led to the development of novel therapies for treatment of patients with IBD. This article discusses the efficacy of immunologic agents currently approved for treating Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis and reviews the risks and challenges associated with their use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Munkholm, P; Langholz, E

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: We assessed the familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease in Copenhagen County, where there has been a long-term interest in the epidemiology of such disorders. In 1987 we interviewed 662 patients in whom inflammatory bowel disease had been diagnosed before 1979, a...

  12. Surgical perspectives on inflammatory bowel disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VikasC

    Xia B, Crusius JBA, Meuwissen SGM, Pena AS. Inflammatory bowel disease: Definition, epidemiology, etiologic aspects, and immunologic studies. World J. Gastroentero 1998;4:44658. 2. Fry DR, Mahmood N, Maron DJ, Ross HM, Rombeau. J. Inflammatory bowel disease in Towsend: Sabiston. Textbook of Surgery.

  13. Infections in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez de Santiago, Enrique; Albillos Martínez, Agustín; López-Sanromán, Antonio

    2017-05-10

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease constitute a population with a special predisposition to develop bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Iatrogenic immunosuppression, frequent contact with healthcare facilities and surgical interventions are some of the risk factors that explain why these infections are one of the main causes of morbi-mortality in this disease. Some of these infections follow a subtle and paucisymptomatic evolution; their diagnosis and management may become a real challenge for the attending physician if their screening is not systematized or they are not considered in the differential diagnosis. The objective of this review is to provide an update from a practical and concise perspective on the knowledge regarding the epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the most common infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue; Birkelund, Svend; Stensballe, Allan

    2014-01-01

    or stool later can be screened for. When considering the protein complexity encountered in intestinal biopsy-samples and the recent development within the field of mass spectrometry driven quantitative proteomics, a more thorough and accurate biomarker discovery endeavor could today be performed than ever......Unambiguous diagnosis of the two main forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD): Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), represents a challenge in the early stages of the diseases. The diagnosis may be established several years after the debut of symptoms. Hence, protein biomarkers...... for early and accurate diagnostic could help clinicians improve treatment of the individual patients. Moreover, the biomarkers could aid physicians to predict disease courses and in this way, identify patients in need of intensive treatment. Patients with low risk of disease flares may avoid treatment...

  15. MRI for chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, H.J.; Hess, T.; Hahmann, M.; Erb, G.; Richter, G.M.; Duex, M.; Elsing, C.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory bowel disease is diagnosed and monitored by the combination of colonoscopy and small bowel enteroklysis. Magnetic resonance imaging has become the gold standard for the imaging of perirectal and pelvic fistulas. With the advent of ultrafast MRI small and large bowel imaging has become highly attractive and is being advocated more and more in the diagnostic work up of inflammatory bowel disease. Imaging protocols include fast T 1 -weighted gradient echo and T 2 -weighted TSE sequences and oral or rectal bowel distension. Furthermore, dedicated imaging protocols are based on breath-hold imaging under pharmacological bowel paralysis and gastrointestinal MR contrast agents (Hydro-MRI). High diagnostic accuracy can be achieved in Crohn's disease with special reference to the pattern of disease, depth of inflammation, mesenteric reaction, sinus tract depiction and formation of abscess. In ulcerative colitis, the mucosa-related inflammation causes significantly less bowel wall thickening compared to Crohn's disease. Therefore with MRI, the extent of inflammatory changes is always underestimated compared to colonoscopy. According to our experience in more than 200 patients as well as the results in other centers, Hydro-MRI possesses the potential to replace enteroklysis in the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and most of the follow-up colonoscopies in Crohn's disease. Further technical improvements in 3D imaging will allow interactive postprocessing of the MR data. (orig.) [de

  16. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  17. Cannabis for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, Timna; Mechulam, Raphael; Lev, Lihi Bar; Konikoff, Fred M

    2014-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries as a treatment for a variety of ailments. It contains over 60 different cannabinoid compounds. Studies have revealed that the endocannabinoid system is involved in almost all major immune events. Cannabinoids may, therefore, be beneficial in inflammatory disorders. In murine colitis, cannabinoids decrease histologic and microscopic inflammation. In humans, cannabis has been used to treat a plethora of gastrointestinal problems, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and diabetic gastroparesis. Despite anecdotal reports on medical cannabis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there are few controlled studies. In an observational study in 30 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), we found that medical cannabis was associated with improvement in disease activity and reduction in the use of other medications. In a more recent placebo-controlled study in 21 chronic CD patients, we showed a decrease in the CD activity index >100 in 10 of 11 subjects on cannabis compared to 4 of 10 on placebo. Complete remission was achieved in 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group and 1 of 10 in the placebo group. Yet, in an additional study, low-dose cannabidiol did not have an effect on CD activity. In summary, evidence is gathering that manipulating the endocannabinoid system can have beneficial effects in IBD, but further research is required to declare cannabinoids a medicine. We need to establish the specific cannabinoids, as well as appropriate medical conditions, optimal dose, and mode of administration, to maximize the beneficial effects while avoiding any potential harmful effects of cannabinoid use. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Antibiotics and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Maria Lia; Prantera, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by an altered composition of gut microbiota (dysbiosis) that may contribute to their development. Antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora, and a link between antibiotic use and onset of Crohn's disease (CD), but not ulcerative colitis, has been reported. The hypothesis that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) could be an etiologic agent of CD has not been confirmed by a large study on patients treated by an association of antibiotics active against MAP. The observations supporting a role of intestinal microbiota in CD pathogenesis provide the rationale for a therapeutic manipulation of the intestinal flora through the employment of antibiotics. However, current data do not strongly support a therapeutic benefit from antibiotics, and there is still controversy regarding their use as primary therapy for treatment of acute flares of CD, and for postoperative recurrence prevention. Nevertheless, clinical practice and some studies suggest that a subgroup of patients with colonic involvement, early disease, and abnormal laboratory test of inflammation may respond better to antibiotic treatment. Since their long-term use is frequently complicated by a high rate of side effects, the use of antibiotics that work locally appears to be promising.

  19. [Treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomollón, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    In addition to immunosuppressive drugs and anti-TNF, there are a number of new options in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. Vedolizumab has been approved by the FDA and EMA and has demonstrated utility both in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), even in anti-TNF refractory patients. Other monoclonal antibodies with different targets such as PF-005447659 (antiMAd-CAM1), ustekinumab (anti-IL23/IL12) or MEDI2070 (anti-IL23) have shown promising results in distinct clinical scenarios. Mongersen (antisense oligonucleotide anti-Smad7) and oznimod (an SP-1 modulator) are new alternatives with proven efficacy in clinical trials in CD and UC, respectively. Some data suggest that faecal microbiota transplantation could be efficacious in individual patients, although controlled data do not show clear differences with placebo. Autologous stem-cell transplantation has shown long-term efficacy in "ultra-refractory" CD. The number of possible treatments is constantly increasing, and future research should focus both on the selection of the most appropriate treatment for any given patient and on comparative trials between options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Exercise and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Narula

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are both idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs that affect 0.5% of Canadians. As yet, there is no known cure for either disease, and symptoms are treated with an array of medicines. The objective of the present review was to present the role of exercise and its impact on all facets of IBD. Exercise has been speculated to be protective against the onset of IBD, but the literature is inconsistent and weak. Preliminary studies reveal that exercise training may be beneficial to reduce stress and symptoms of IBD. Current research also recommends exercise to help counteract some IBD-specific complications by improving bone mineral density, immunological response, psychological health, weight loss and stress management ability. However, the literature advises that some patients with IBD may have limitations to the amount and intensity of exercise that they can perform. In summary, exercise may be beneficial to IBD patients, but further research is required to make a convincing conclusion regarding its role in the management of IBD and to help establish exercise regimens that can account for each IBD patient’s unique presentation.

  1. Exercise and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Neeraj; Fedorak, Richard N

    2008-05-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are both idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) that affect 0.5% of Canadians. As yet, there is no known cure for either disease, and symptoms are treated with an array of medicines. The objective of the present review was to present the role of exercise and its impact on all facets of IBD. Exercise has been speculated to be protective against the onset of IBD, but the literature is inconsistent and weak. Preliminary studies reveal that exercise training may be beneficial to reduce stress and symptoms of IBD. Current research also recommends exercise to help counteract some IBD-specific complications by improving bone mineral density, immunological response, psychological health, weight loss and stress management ability. However, the literature advises that some patients with IBD may have limitations to the amount and intensity of exercise that they can perform. In summary, exercise may be beneficial to IBD patients, but further research is required to make a convincing conclusion regarding its role in the management of IBD and to help establish exercise regimens that can account for each IBD patient's unique presentation.

  2. Nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gómez, María Josefa; Melián Fernández, Cristóbal; Romeo Donlo, María

    2016-07-12

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic pathology that has an outbreaks course that in recent years have seen an increase in incidence, especially at younger ages. Malnutrition is frequently associated with this condition, therefore, it is very important to ensure a right nutritional intervention, especially in pediatric patients, to ensure an optimal growth and also an improvement in the clinic. Our goal will be updated the role of nutrition in this disease and in its treatment based on the published evidence. Malnutrition in these patients is frequent and is influenced by various factors such as, decreased food intake, increased nutrient requirements, increased protein loss and malabsorption of nutrients. Therefore there should be a nutritional monitoring of all of them, in which anthropometric measurements, laboratory tests and densitometry were made to establish the needs and sufficient caloric intake tailored to each patient. The use of enteral nutrition as a treatment in Crohn’s disease with mild to moderate outbreak in child population, is amply demonstrated, has even shown to be superior to the use of corticosteroids. Therefore we can conclude by stressing that nutritional intervention is a mainstay in the management of patients with IBD, which aims to prevent and / or control disease-related malnutrition to decrease morbidity and mortality and improve quality of life.

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease: potential therapeutic strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Bregenholt, S

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with potential and possibly primary therapeutics that, through insight into the inflammatory cascade, result in more rational treatment principles replacing the classical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These ne...

  4. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Riis, Lene Buhl

    2015-01-01

    included. Next, eligible studies were analysed with respect to several parameters, such as technique and clinical aim and definitions of outcomes. RESULTS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy has been used for a wide range of purposes in inflammatory bowel disease, covering assessment of inflammatory severity...... of confocal laser endomicroscopy for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Available literature was searched systematically for studies applying confocal laser endomicroscopy in Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Relevant literature was reviewed and only studies reporting original clinical data were...... of histological features such as colonic crypts, epithelial gaps and epithelial leakiness to fluorescein. CONCLUSIONS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy remains an experimental but emerging tool for assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is the only method that enables in vivo functional assessment...

  5. Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Library were searched for studies on diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Results: Established non-diet risk factors include family predisposition, smoking, appendectomy, and antibiotics. Retrospective case–control studies are encumbered with methodological problems. Prospective studies...... on European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty...... dioxide and aluminium silicate). Conclusions: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect...

  6. Neuroimmune regulation of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnierse, Anneke

    2006-01-01

    The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients suffer from abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding and a substantial personal burden. The etiology of IBD is gradually being unraveled but remains a complex

  7. The molecular biology of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfield, Anthony P; Wallace, Heather M; Probert, Chris S J

    2011-08-01

    IBDs (inflammatory bowel diseases) are a group of diseases affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The diseases are multifactorial and cover genetic aspects: susceptibility genes, innate and adaptive responses to inflammation, and structure and efficacy of the mucosal protective barrier. Animal models of IBD have been developed to gain further knowledge of the disease mechanisms. These topics form an overlapping background to enable an improved understanding of the molecular features of these diseases. A series of articles is presented based on the topics covered at the Biochemical Society Focused Meeting The Molecular Biology of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

  8. Intestinal barrier integrity and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eric Olof; Pedersen, Jannie; Jørgensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    of antimicrobial peptides. Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with life-long morbidity for affected patients, and both the incidence and prevalence is increasing globally, resulting in substantial economic strain for society. Mucosal healing and re-establishment of barrier integrity is associated......, novel treatment strategies to accomplish mucosal healing and to re-establish normal barrier integrity in inflammatory bowel disease are warranted, and luminal stem cell-based approaches might have an intriguing potential. Transplantation of in vitro expanded intestinal epithelial stem cells derived...

  9. Innovative therapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesus K

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, which clinically present as one of two disorders, Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Mainstays of drug treatments for IBD include aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclosporin. Advances in basic research of the pathophysiological process in IBD have been applied to generate a variety of new therapeutics targeting at different le...

  10. Future directions in inflammatory bowel disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Haens, Geert R.; Sartor, R. Balfour; Silverberg, Mark S.; Petersson, Joel; Rutgeerts, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Clinical management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), new treatment modalities and the potential impact of personalised medicine remain topics of intense interest as our understanding of the pathophysiology of IBD expands. Potential future strategies for IBD management are discussed, based on

  11. Vedolizumab in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledder, Oren; Assa, Amit; Levine, Arie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vedolizumab, an anti-integrin antibody, has proven to be effective in adults with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), but the data in pediatrics are limited. We describe the short-term effectiveness and safety of vedolizumab in a European multi-center pediatric IBD cohort. Method: Retro...

  12. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course o...

  13. Cancer surveillance in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, C N

    1999-12-01

    This article reviews the rationale and approach to dysplasia surveillance colonoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease. Recent developments in the field are also highlighted, including approaches to polyps that arise in patients with colitis and new diagnostic markers that may complement morphologic assessment for dysplasia.

  14. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, B; Dutta, A K; Chacko, A

    2009-07-01

    Among 34 children diagnosed to have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) over past 8 years, 23 had Crohns disease and 11 had ulcerative colitis. Pediatric patients accounted for 7% of new cases of IBD seen annually. Median delay in diagnosis was 15 months. Nutritional impairment was significantly more common in Crohns disease.

  15. Childhood Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Libya: Epidemiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim is to determine the prevalence of juvenile onset inflammatory bowel disease in Libya. Setting: Al-Fateh childrens' hospital, Benghazi, Libya. Methods: This is a retrospective study of all cases diagnosed over 10 years (1997-2006) with either ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease or indeterminate colitis. Inclusion criteria ...

  16. The Changing Face of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Etiology, Physiopathology, Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Actis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD classically includes ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD. An abnormally increased mucosal permeability seems to underlie UC, whereas CD is thought to be the result of an immune deficiency state. Evidence Acquisition While these phenomena may well be labeled as genetic factors, the environment has its role as well. Drugs (chiefly, antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory molecules, with proton pump inhibitors recently joining the list and smoking habits are all being scrutinized as IBD causative factors. Results Once almost unknown, the prevalence of IBD, in the Eastern World and China, is now increasing by manifold, therefore arousing warning signals. Conclusions A multidisciplinary approach will soon be necessary, to face the tenacious behavior of IBD, on a global perspective.

  17. Leukocyte migration in experimental inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Van Rees

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Emigration of leukocytes from the circulation into tissue by transendothelial migration, is mediated subsequently by adhesion molecules such as selectins, chemokines and integrins. This multistep paradigm, with multiple molecular choices at each step, provides a diversity in signals. The influx of neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes into inflamed tissue is important in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The importance of each of these groups of adhesion molecules in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, either in human disease or in animal models, will be discussed below. Furthermore, the possibilities of blocking these different steps in the process of leukocyte extravasation in an attempt to prevent further tissue damage, will be taken into account.

  18. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal antigens. MSCs have the capacity to differentiate into a wide variety of distinct cell lineages and to suppress immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The main goal of this thesis was to study the s...

  19. Novel targeted therapies for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Vermeire, Severine; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2017-01-01

    Our growing understanding of the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has opened new avenues for developing targeted therapies. These advances in treatment options targeting different mechanisms of action offer new hope for personalized management. In this review we highlight...... to intestinal sites of inflammation (e.g., sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulators). We also provide an update on the current status in clinical development of these new classes of therapeutics....

  20. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  1. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Ocepek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries and Slovenia, and the incidence is still rising. Groups of people with higher risk for colorectal cancer are well defined. Among them are patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk is highest in patients in whom whole large bowel is affected by inflammation, it rises after 8 to 10 years and increases with the duration of the disease. Precancerous lesion is a displastic, chronically inflammed mucosa and not an adenoma as in cases of sporadic colorectal carcinoma.Conclusions: Many studies suggest that the influence of genetic factors differs between sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease related colorectal cancer. Symptomatic patients at the time of diagnosis have a much worse prognosis. The goal of prevention programes is therefore discovering early precancerous lesions. Established screening protocols are based on relatively frequent colonoscopies which are inconvinient for the patient as well as the endoscopist. Use of specific genetic markers, mutations of candidate genes, as a screening method and a prognostic predictor could greatly lighten therapeutic decisions.

  3. The Immunological Basis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca A. R. Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs are chronic ailments, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis being the most important. These diseases present an inflammatory profile and they differ according to pathophysiology, the affected area in the gastrointestinal tract, and the depth of the inflammation in the intestinal wall. The immune characteristics of IBD arise from abnormal responses of the innate and adaptive immune system. The number of Th17 cells increases in the peripheral blood of IBD patients, while Treg cells decrease, suggesting that the Th17/Treg proportion plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammation. The purpose of this review was to determine the current state of knowledge on the immunological basis of IBD. Many studies have shown the need for further explanation of the development and maintenance of the inflammatory process.

  4. Inflammatory pathways of importance for management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie; Coskun, Mehmet; Soendergaard, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Their etiologies are unknown, but they are characterised by an imbalanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators, e.g., tumor necrosis factor...... includes the TNF inhibitors (TNFi), designed to target and neutralise the effect of TNF-α. TNFi have shown to be efficient in treating moderate to severe CD and UC. However, convenient alternative therapeutics targeting other immune pathways are needed for patients with IBD refractory to conventional...

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2014-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are classically viewed as dichotomous conditions. The former is perceived as a typical organic disease, and the latter is regarded as a disorder of gut function driven by mood. Recent research identified some shared contributing factors, which will be discussed here. Mounting evidence shows the importance in both IBD and IBS of genetic, microbiological, epithelial, and immunological factors. In some instances, these factors overlap in the two conditions as shown by: involvement of brain-gut axis dysfunction in IBD, implication of TNFSF gene in Crohn's disease and IBS, evidence of abnormal microbiota and its impact on host functions, identification of low-grade inflammation in subsets of IBS patients, and development of IBS symptoms in patients with IBD in remission. IBD and IBS remain separate conditions although there are some overlapping mechanisms. Both research and clinical management would benefit from considering a functional approach for certain manifestations of IBD and accepting an organic view in subsets of IBS patients.

  6. Dysplasia and Cancer in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lyen C; Merchea, Amit

    2017-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an increased risk of dysplasia and cancer. Improvements in medical management and endoscopic surveillance have reduced these risks. Patients can develop cancer even in the absence of dysplasia or with indefinite or low-grade dysplasia. Most guidelines recommend starting surveillance colonoscopy 6 to 10 years after initial diagnosis with interval surveillance afterward every 1 to 5 years depending on risk and/or individual characteristics. Most patients should undergo total proctocolectomy with end ileostomy or reconstruction with ileal pouch anal anastomosis because segmental and subtotal resections carry a higher risk of metachronous cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Environment and the inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A; Barkema, Herman W; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Fedorak, Richard N; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2013-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge of the association between environmental risk factors and IBD. A number of environmental risk factors were investigated including smoking, hygiene, microorganisms, oral contraceptives, antibiotics, diet, breastfeeding, geographical factors, pollution and stress. Inconsistent findings among the studies highlight the complex pathogenesis of IBD. Additional studies are necessary to identify and elucidate the role of environmental factors in IBD etiology.

  8. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  9. Ocular Complications of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mady, Rana; Grover, Will; Butrus, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Though inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has a specific predilection for the intestinal tract, it is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple organs, including the eye. Ocular complications directly related to IBD are categorized as primary and secondary. Primary complications are usually temporally associated with IBD exacerbations and tend to resolve with systemic treatment of the intestinal inflammation. These include keratopathy, episcleritis, and scleritis. Secondary complications arise from primary complications. Examples include cataract formation due to treatment with corticosteroids, scleromalacia due to scleritis, and dry eye due to hypovitaminosis A following gut resection. Some ocular manifestations of IBD can lead to significant visual morbidity and temporally associated complications can also be a herald of disease control. Furthermore, ocular manifestations of IBD can occasionally manifest before the usual intestinal manifestations, leading to an earlier diagnosis. Thus, it is important to understand the clinical presentation of possible ocular manifestations in order to initiate appropriate treatment and to help prevent significant visual morbidity. PMID:25879056

  10. Environment and the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Frolkis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gas-trointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge of the association between environmental risk factors and IBD. A number of environmental risk factors were investigated including smoking, hygiene, microorganisms, oral contraceptives, antibiotics, diet, breast-feeding, geographical factors, pollution and stress. Inconsistent findings among the studies highlight the complex pathogenesis of IBD. Additional studies are necessary to identify and elucidate the role of environmental factors in IBD etiology.

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease in children. Current trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikhare, G.; Kugathasan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Once considered rare in the East, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is now recognized to be an emerging entity in that region. East or West, the clinical features of and treatment options for IBD are the same, but it is possible that the exact pathogeneses or the initiating events differ. In this review, existing knowledge of IBD and new discoveries in the epidemiology, genetics and treatment of IBD are discussed in detail. The diagnosis and management of IBD in children has changed dramatically over the last decade, mainly due to increased awareness, the availability of newer diagnostic modalities such as MRI and video capsule endoscopy, and newer, more powerful treatments such as biologics. It is hoped that the combination of innovative research and advances in drug discoveries will change the natural history of IBD and make a major difference in children who are suffering from this unfortunate lifelong chronic inflammatory disorder. (author)

  12. Risk indicators for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, P G; Leijonmarck, C E; Bernell, O; Hellers, G; Ahlbom, A

    1993-04-01

    We investigated the association between different risk indicators and inflammatory bowel disease in a case-control study based on the population of Stockholm County during 1980-1984. Information on physical activity, oral contraceptives, some previous diseases and childhood characteristics was collected using a postal questionnaire for 152 cases of Crohn's disease, 145 cases of ulcerative colitis, and 305 controls. The relative risk (RR) of Crohn's disease was inversely related to regular physical activity and estimated at 0.6 (95% CI: 0.4-0.9) and 0.5 (95% CI: 0.3-0.9) for weekly and daily exercise, respectively. Having psoriasis prior to the inflammatory bowel disease was associated with an increased relative risk of Crohn's disease (RR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.1-7.9). Use of oral contraceptives was associated with an increased RR of 1.7 for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Crohn's disease confined to the colon and total ulcerative colitis at diagnosis were most strongly associated with oral contraceptives.

  13. Zinc absorption in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valberg, L.S.; Flanagan, P.R.; Kertesz, A.; Bondy, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 29 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and a wide spectrum of disease activity to determine its relationship to disease activity, general nutritional state, and zinc status. Patients with severe disease requiring either supplementary oral or parenteral nutrition were excluded. The mean 65ZnCl2 absorption, in the patients, determined using a 65Zn and 51Cr stool-counting test, 45 +/- 17% (SD), was significantly lower than the values, 54 +/- 16%, in 30 healthy controls, P less than 0.05. Low 65ZnCl2 absorption was related to undernutrition, but not to disease activity in the absence of undernutrition or to zinc status estimated by leukocyte zinc measurements. Mean plasma zinc or leukocyte zinc concentrations in patients did not differ significantly from controls, and only two patients with moderate disease had leukocyte zinc values below the 5th percentile of normal. In another group of nine patients with inflammatory bowel disease of mild-to-moderate severity and minimal nutritional impairment, 65Zn absorption from an extrinsically labeled turkey test meal was 31 +/- 10% compared to 33 +/- 7% in 17 healthy controls, P greater than 0.1. Thus, impairment in 65ZnCl2 absorption in the patients selected for this study was only evident in undernourished persons with moderate or severe disease activity, but biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency was uncommon, and clinical features of zinc depletion were not encountered

  14. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana Sofía; Martínez-Reyes, Cynthia; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús Kazúo

    2009-11-28

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation, aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis, with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur, including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis, and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones. Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability, and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine, methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  15. Small bowel intussusception in 2 adults caused by inflammatory polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Carvalho, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory fibroid polyps are rare, benign pseudotumors of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology, which may rarely present as bowel intussusception and obstruction. The authors describe the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of 2 patients with ileal inflammatory fibroid polyps presenting as small bowel intussusception.

  16. Solar radiation is inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Francisca; Riutort, Maria C; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Hoyos-Bachiloglu, Rodrigo; Camargo, Carlos A; Borzutzky, Arturo

    To explore the associations between latitude and solar radiation with inflammatory bowel disease admission rates in Chile, the country with the largest variation in solar radiation in the world. This is an ecological study, which included data on all hospital-admitted population for inflammatory bowel disease between 2001 and 2012, according to different latitudes and solar radiation exposures in Chile. The data were acquired from the national hospital discharge database from the Department of Health Statistics and Information of the Chilean Ministry of Health. Between 2001 and 2012 there were 12,869 admissions due to inflammatory bowel disease (69% ulcerative colitis, 31% Crohn's disease). Median age was 36 years (IQR: 25-51); 57% were female. The national inflammatory bowel disease admission rate was 6.52 (95% CI: 6.40-6.63) per 100,000 inhabitants with increasing rates over the 12-year period. In terms of latitude, the highest admission rates for pediatric ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, as well as adult ulcerative colitis, were observed in the southernmost region with lowest annual solar radiation. Linear regression analysis showed that regional solar radiation was inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admissions in Chile (β: -.44, p = .03). Regional solar radiation was inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admission rates in Chile; inflammatory bowel disease admissions were highest in the southernmost region with lowest solar radiation. Our results support the potential role of vitamin D deficiency on inflammatory bowel disease flares.

  17. Vitamin D, immune regulation, the microbiota, and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantorna, Margherita T; McDaniel, Kaitlin; Bora, Stephanie; Chen, Jing; James, Jamaal

    2014-11-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases are complex diseases caused by environmental, immunological, and genetic factors. Vitamin D status is low in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, and experimental inflammatory bowel diseases are more severe in vitamin D-deficient or vitamin D receptor knockout animals. Vitamin D is beneficial in inflammatory bowel diseases because it regulates multiple checkpoints and processes essential for homeostasis in the gut. Vitamin D inhibits IFN-γ and IL-17 production while inducing regulatory T cells. In addition, vitamin D regulates epithelial cell integrity, innate immune responses, and the composition of the gut microbiota. Overall, vitamin D regulates multiple pathways that maintain gastrointestinal homeostasis. The data support improving vitamin D status in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Balding

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE mechanisms responsible for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD have not been fully elucidated, although the main cause of disease pathology is attributed to up-regulated inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of polymorphisms in genes encoding pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in IBD patients and controls. We determined genotypes of patients with IBD (n=172 and healthy controls (n=389 for polymorphisms in genes encoding various cytokines (interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF, IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist. Association of these genotypes to disease incidence and pathophysiology was investigated. No strong association was found with occurrence of IBD. Variation was observed between the ulcerative colitis study group and the control population for the TNF-α-308 polymorphism (p=0.0135. There was also variation in the frequency of IL-6-174 and TNF-α-308 genotypes in the ulcerative colitis group compared with the Crohn's disease group (p=0.01. We concluded that polymorphisms in inflammatory genes are associated with variations in IBD phenotype and disease susceptibility. Whether the polymorphisms are directly involved in regulating cytokine production, and consequently pathophysiology of IBD, or serve merely as markers in linkage disequilibrium with susceptibility genes remains unclear.

  19. Primary Care of the Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jean R; Pfeil, Sheryl A

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease involves 2 major disorders, ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease, both of which are due to inflammatory dysregulation in the gastrointestinal tract. Although these disorders have many overlapping features in pathophysiology and management, our current understanding of inflammatory bowel disease has illuminated several distinguishing features of the 2 diseases. This article highlights similarities and differences most applicable to a primary care physician's practice. Also detailed are disease-related and treatment-related complications, and routine health maintenance practices for the patient with inflammatory bowel disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Wohlfarht, Jan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Estimates of familial risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are needed for counseling of patients and could be used to target future prevention. We aimed to provide comprehensive population-based estimates of familial risk of IBD....... METHODS: The study encompassed the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (N=8,295,773; 200 million person-years). From national registries, we obtained information on diagnosis date of IBD (N=45,780) and family ties. Using Poisson regression, we estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of IBD...... pronounced in relatives of CD cases. IRRs increased with two or more IBD-affected relatives and were modified by age, with the highest family-related IRR observed in early life. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of IBD is significantly increased in first -, second-, and third-degree relatives of IBD-affected cases...

  1. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezza, Teresa; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; Utrilla, Maria Pilar; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects. PMID:27070642

  2. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishfaq Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD or Ulcerative Colitis (UC, two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis.

  3. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Jess, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Background The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) – ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) - are caused by complex gene-environment interactions. This study provides updated familial aggregation patterns in a large population-based Danish IBD cohort. Methods: Our cohort study was based...... on the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (n=8,295,773). Through a unique personal identification number assigned to each Danish citizen, sex, date and location of birth, identity of parents, and information on vital status and emigration were available. This information was used to establish kinship...... in the entire population. Individuals receiving at least 2 diagnoses of IBD during the time period (n=45,780) were identified using the Danish National Registry of Patients. Risk of IBD in family members to individuals with IBD was assessed by Poisson regression analysis. Results: The overall proportion...

  4. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M A; Sanderson, J D

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects body image, relationships, family planning, fertility and pregnancy outcomes. However, the common misconception that IBD is a contraindication, or serious concern, in pregnancy is essentially a myth. Most patients with IBD can expect to have uneventful pregnancies. We present an overview of the management of IBD during pregnancy, including management in those planning pregnancy, the suitability of relevant medication during pregnancy and breast feeding, investigation and monitoring of IBD during pregnancy, surgical management and considerations relating to delivery. While there are some definite alterations required in the management of IBD during pregnancy, management is essentially unchanged. With close attention to aspects such as nutrition and smoking cessation, and optimal disease control in the run-up to and during pregnancy, we have an opportunity to help our patients with IBD achieve good pregnancy outcomes.

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Ørskov; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Andersson, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    . Among patients with PSC and Crohn's disease (CD) 91% had colonic involvement. The PSC-IBD patients had a significantly higher probability of receiving resective surgery (HR; 2.13, 95% CI: 1.50-3.03); of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) (HR; 21.4, 95% CI: 9.6-47.6), of cholangiocarcinoma (HR; 190, 95......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be complicated by primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We aimed to assess the characteristics of Danish PSC-IBD patients and to compare their prognosis with IBD patients without PSC. METHODS: A retrospective nationwide population......-based cohort of 257 PSC-IBD patients was assessed through Danish national registries and manual scrutiny of patient files. RESULTS: For all PSC-IBD patients diagnosed after 1976 (n = 222) and 8231 IBD controls (ie, without PSC), the cumulative probability of resective surgery, liver transplantation, cancer...

  6. Surgical treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerst, H.; Schildberg, F.W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To summarize current knowledge on surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and diverticulitis). Material and methods: To discuss surgical indications and strategies, we reviewed major peer review publications of the last 10 years, and we also analysed data from patients with Crohn's disease who were treated in our institution between 1978 and 1994. Results: With Crohn's disease (305 patients), emergency surgery should be avoided as much as possible, since morbidity (50% vs 8.8%) and mortality (11% vs 0.6%) rise significantly in comparison to elective procedures. With ulcerative colitis, operative therapy is indicated in patients with secondary malignoma, and urgent surgery is requested in cases with associated perforation, toxic megacolon or massive bleeding. With diverticulitis, the first episode should be managed conservatively. Surgery is indicated in patients with recurrent episodes or with secondary complications. (orig.) [de

  7. Immunological pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hoon Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic inflammatory state of the gastrointestinal tract and can be classified into 2 main clinical phenomena: Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. The pathogenesis of IBD, including CD and UC, involves the presence of pathogenic factors such as abnormal gut microbiota, immune response dysregulation, environmental changes, and gene variants. Although many investigations have tried to identify novel pathogenic factors associated with IBD that are related to environmental, genetic, microbial, and immune response factors, a full understanding of IBD pathogenesis is unclear. Thus, IBD treatment is far from optimal, and patient outcomes can be unsatisfactory. As result of massive studying on IBD, T helper 17 (Th17 cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are investigated on their effects on IBD. A recent study of the plasticity of Th17 cells focused primarily on colitis. ILCs also emerging as novel cell family, which play a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. IBD immunopathogenesis is key to understanding the causes of IBD and can lead to the development of IBD therapies. The aim of this review is to explain the pathogenesis of IBD, with a focus on immunological factors and therapies.

  8. Osteomyelitis and Osteonecrosis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis are skeletal disorders seen in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Osteomyelitis usually occurs in the pelvic bones, especially in complicated Crohn's disease, presumably by direct extension from a pelvic inflammatory mass, abscess or fistulous tract. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis may be difficult and can lead to spinal extension of the septic process with a resultant neurological deficit, including paraplegia. Osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis has been reported in patients with either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, often, but not exclusively, during or following steroid treatment. The disease is often multifocal, but its natural history is unknown, especially if diagnosed early with modern imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance. In IBD patients, the relationship between osteonecrosis and steroid use is unknown. An adverse steroid effect on bones, especially the femoral heads, may develop in some patients with IBD but, to date, this hypothesis remains unproven. Critical evaluation of published data reveals no consistent association between osteonecrosis and steroid treatment in IBD patients.

  9. Medication adherence in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webber Chan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory condition with intestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Medications are the cornerstone of treatment of IBD. However, patients often adhere to medication poorly. Adherence to medications is defined as the process by which patients take their medications as prescribed. Treatment non-adherence is a common problem among chronic diseases, averaging 50% in developed countries and is even poorer in developing countries. In this review, we will examine the adherence data in IBD which vary greatly depending on the study population, route of administration, and methods of adherence measurement used. We will also discuss the adverse clinical outcomes related to non-adherence to medical treatment including increased disease activity, flares, loss of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy, and so forth. There are many methods to measure medication adherence namely direct and indirect methods, each with their advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we will explore different intervention strategies to improve adherence to medications.

  10. [Coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiec, Paulina; Pawłowska-Kamieniak, Agnieszka; Pac-Kożuchowska, Elżbieta; Mroczkowska-Juchkiewcz, Agnieszka; Kominek, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease are chronic inflammatory conditions of gastrointestinal tract with complex aetiology with genetic, environmental and immunological factors contributing to its pathogenesis. It was noted that immune-mediated disorders often coexist. There is well-known association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes and ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. However, growing body of literature suggests the association between coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, particularly ulcerative colitis. This is an extremely rare problem in paediatric gastroenterology. To date there have been reported several cases of children with coexisting coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Herewith we present review of current literature on coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  11. CT of complicated inflammatory bowel disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddlesberger, M.M. Jr.

    1985-09-01

    Most children with inflammatory bowel disease do not need a CT scan. However, when the course becomes complicated if often is necessary to evaluate what is happening outside the bowel lumen. CT is the examination of choice for that evaluation. With CT, the presence and extent of an abscess can be diagnosed and followed; fistulae can be detected; bowel wall and mesenteric thickening can generally be differentiated from an abscess.

  12. Noninvasive Tests for Inflammatory Bowel Disease : A Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtman, Gea A; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Reitsma, Johannes B; Berger, Marjolein Y

    BACKGROUND: The clinical presentation of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is often nonspecific and overlaps with functional gastrointestinal disorders. OBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms, signs, noninvasive tests, and test combinations that can assist the clinician

  13. Noninvasive Tests for Inflammatory Bowel Disease : A Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtman, Gea A; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Berger, Marjolein Y

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical presentation of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is often nonspecific and overlaps with functional gastrointestinal disorders. OBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms, signs, noninvasive tests, and test combinations that can assist the clinician

  14. Steroid allergy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M

    2007-11-01

    Background: Contact allergy to a steroid enema leading to worsening of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has recently been reported. This study was designed to look for evidence of steroid allergy in patients with IBD.

  15. Indium-111 granulocyte scintigraphy in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, A.; Moisan, A.; Heresbach, D.; Darnault, P.; Bretagne, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper reports our experience since 1963 concerning 111-indium labeled autologous granulocytes scanning in the assessment of inflammatory bowel diseases and in the assessment of activity in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. (authors). 94 refs., 3 figs

  16. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Jess, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Background The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) – ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) - are caused by complex gene-environment interactions. This study provides updated familial aggregation patterns in a large population-based Danish IBD cohort. Methods: Our cohort study was based.......92(5.28-9.06) 2.62(1.63-4.23) 1.15(0.29-4.62) One CD relative 2.57(2.28-2.90) 1.51(1.22-1.86) 1.47(1.00-2.17) One UC relative 4.09(3.81-4.38) 1.85(1.60-2.13) 1.51(1.07-2.13) Conclusion: This large-scale population-based study provides updated numbers of familial aggregation of IBD. Familial exposure to CD...... in the entire population. Individuals receiving at least 2 diagnoses of IBD during the time period (n=45,780) were identified using the Danish National Registry of Patients. Risk of IBD in family members to individuals with IBD was assessed by Poisson regression analysis. Results: The overall proportion...

  17. Quality Improvement Initiatives in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Sameer K; Siegel, Corey A; Melmed, Gil Y

    2017-08-01

    This article serves as an overview of several quality improvement initiatives in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is associated with significant variation in care, suggesting poor quality of care. There have been several efforts to improve the quality of care for patients with IBD. Quality improvement (QI) initiatives in IBD are intended to be patient-centric, improve outcomes for individuals and populations, and reduce costs-all consistent with "the triple aim" put forth by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). Current QI initiatives include the development of quality measure sets to standardize processes and outcomes, learning health systems to foster collaborative improvement, and patient-centered medical homes specific to patients with IBD in shared risk models of care. Some of these programs have demonstrated early success in improving patient outcomes, reducing costs, improving patient satisfaction, and facilitating patient engagement. However, further studies are needed to evaluate and compare the effects of these programs over time on clinical outcomes in order to demonstrate long-term value and sustainability.

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, R J; Lee, S P; Tasman-Jones, C

    1982-04-01

    Four-hundred-and-fifty-six patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 137 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) attended public hospitals within Auckland between 1969 and 1978. Polynesians comprised 15% of the population at risk but accounted for only 0.4% of UC cases and no CD cases. Annual incidence rates were 5.4/100,000 Caucasians for UC and 1.75 for CD. CD was significantly less common in Auckland than in European and North American centres. For patients presenting for the first time between 1969 and 1978, the cumulative probability of surviving 10 years was 93.9% for UC and 89.1% for CD. An excess of observed over expected mortality was limited to the first year of observation in UC and did not occur in CD. Clinical features and local complications of UC and CD have been correlated with the anatomic location of disease. In this first clinical study of inflammatory bowel disease of New Zealand, 61% of CD and 23% of UC patients required at least one surgical resection.

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease, to personalized nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ortiz-Suárez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is increasing in countries that acquire a Western lifestyle. Its pathogenesis is not well defined but is associated with multifactorial causes. In genetically predisposed people, different environmental factors trigger alterations in the immune response; as a result, tolerance is lost towards commensal gut microbiota, with tissues damage and chronic inflammation. Among the environmental risk factors identified is diet. Diets high in sucrose, refined carbohydrates, omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and low in fruit, vegetables, and fiber are associated with an increased risk of IBD, particularly Crohn disease (CD. Nutritional recommendations in IBD cannot be generalized because patients respond differently. The emergence of disciplines such as nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and epigenetics allow a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, and at the same time, it opens up the possibility to an individualized approach from the nutritional standpoint. An example of this is found in carriers of the polymorphism 857C/T in the gene TNF (Tumor Necrosis Factor, in which a diet high in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids is harmful and is associated with a more active disease phenotype. This paper reviews the latest scientific articles in these disciplines in relation to IBD and nutritional potential therapeutic applications, like antioxidants application or the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids v-6/v-3. It was used the database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI to search for articles, including selecting the most interest from 2007 to 2012.

  20. Ramadan fasting and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakkoli, Hamid; Haghdani, Saeid; Emami, Mohammad Hassan; Adilipour, Haideh; Tavakkoli, Mahbobeh; Tavakkoli, Monireh

    2008-01-01

    Ramadan fasting may induce changes in gastrointestinal physiology. The effect of this fasting on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not known. We conducted a cohort study in the month of Ramadan in 2006 to assess the effect of Ramadan fasting on IBD. Sixty patients with IBD, who were in remission and undertook fasting according to their own free will underwent assessment of quality-of-life (QoL) parameters, psychological state and the severity of symptoms before and after Ramadan. There was no correlation between the number of fasting days and the severity of the disease, QoL and psychological state of the patients. QoL did not change after Ramadan. Younger patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) fasted for a greater number of days (p=0.01) compared to older patients. The mean score of anxiety, using a modified version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was 12.7 (6.0) before Ramadan in women with UC, and decreased to 9.8 (4.4) afterfasting (p=0.026). Men with UC had a mean score of colitis activity index of 3.5 before Ramadan, which decreased to 1.7 after fasting (p=0.008). It appears that Ramadan fasting does not impose serious risks on patients with IBD.

  1. Environmental risk factors in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroubakis, I; Manousos, O N; Meuwissen, S G; Pena, A S

    1996-01-01

    Besides a genetic predisposition, a causal role of various environmental factors have been taken into consideration in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The most consistent association of environmental factors so far identified is the association between non smoking and ulcerative colitis (UC) as well a between smoking and Crohn's disease (CD). Other factors such as oral contraceptives, refined sugar, perinatal events, childhood infections, microbial agents, and domestic hygiene have been found to be associated with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease but further evaluation is required to confirm the consistency and to define the strength of the association. Recent data also suggest that measles virus may persist in intestinal tissue and early exposure to the virus may be a risk factor for development of CD. The further investigation of environmental factors on IBD and the explanation of their role is expected to open new avenues for basic scientific research and may lead to the development of a more rational approach to the prevention and treatment of IBD. The available data suggest that UC and CD are heterogeneous disorders of multifactorial etiology in which hereditary and environmental factors interact to produce the disease.

  2. Preventing disability in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Patrick B; Gower-Rousseau, Corinne; Danese, Silvio; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2017-11-01

    Disability is a common worldwide health challenge and it has been increasing over the past 3 decades. The treatment paradigm has changed dramatically in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) from control of symptoms towards full control of disease (clinical and endoscopic remission) with the goal of preventing organ damage and disability. These aims are broadly similar to rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Since the 1990s, our attention has focused on quality of life in IBD, which is a subjective measure. However, as an objective end-point in clinical trials and population studies, measures of disability in IBD have been proposed. Disability is defined as '…any restriction or lack (resulting from an impairment) of ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being.' Recently, after 10 years of an international collaborative effort with the World Health Organization (WHO), a disability index was developed and validated. This index ideally would assist with the assessment of disease progression in IBD. In this review, we will provide the evidence to support the use of disability in IBD patients, including experience from rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. New treatment strategies, and validation studies that have underpinned the interest and quantification of disability in IBD, will be discussed.

  3. The exposome in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is an immunologically mediated chronic disease. The key underlying pathology is a deregulated immune response to commensal flora in a genetically susceptible host. Advances in genomics, epigenomics and understanding of the microbiome have brought forth the role of these spheres in the pathogenesis of IBD. Yet these factors explain only a small fraction of disease risk and our ability to predict relapses and response to treatment remains dismal. The external environment plays an important role in modifying the risk of IBD and in precipitating relapses in patients with established disease. The term 'exposome' was proposed to reflect a life-course of environmental influences beginning in-utero and proceeding right through childhood to adulthood. While the exposome is still a concept which needs practical perspective to enable better patient care, this review examines the gaps in our understanding that the IBD exposome helps explain. We further highlight the definition and parameters of this metric which can be incorporated for its application in research and clinical practice.

  4. Smell and taste in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Silke; Reindl, Wolfgang; Dempfle, Astrid; Schuster, Anna; Wolf, Petra; Hundt, Walter; Huber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the olfactory/gustatory functions of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by smell/taste tests, and to determine if disease activity or medication might influence the olfactory/gustatory functions of patients. In total, 59 IBD patients (37 Crohn's disease (CD) and 22 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients) were studied using "Sniffin' sticks" and "taste strips" for olfactory and gustatory tests, respectively, and compared to healthy controls and published normative data. Among IBD (CD and UC) patients, the values for odor threshold, but not for odor identification or discrimination, were significantly lower than that of the normative data. Further, these patients showed lower values than the normative taste values and the control group for all tastes, except sour; 57.6% of the IBD patients were hyposmic, while 30.5% were hypogeusic. Subjective self-assessments showed that the patients were not aware of their reduced olfactory/gustatory functions. There were no relevant differences in taste and smell abilities between the CD and UC patients. Disease activity and treatment did not influence the olfactory/gustatory functions. IBD (CD and UC) patients exhibited significant reductions in the olfactory and gustatory functions. Therefore, patients should be tested by smell/taste tests, in order to be adequately informed of their olfactory/gustatory functions and provided an understanding of how to overcome their limitations, and thus improve their quality of life.

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease: immunodiagnostics, immunotherapeutics, and ecotherapeutics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    Treatment options for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) reflect a continuing shift from empiricism to strategies based on improved understanding of the pathophysiology of disease. In susceptible individuals, IBD appears to be the result of defective regulation of mucosal immune interactions with the enteric microflora. This has prompted research directed at the interface of the traditional disciplines of immunology, microbiology, and epithelial cell biology. Whereas immunodiagnostics have been of limited clinical value in IBD, assessments of mucosal rather than systemic immune function are promising. Therapeutically, there is an increasing trend toward more aggressive and earlier use of immunomodulatory agents, particularly for prevention of relapse, with cytokine manipulation as a bridge therapy to achieve remission in patients with acute severe disease. Although most drug treatments are directed toward altering the host response, the rationale for manipulating the enteric flora appears sound and will be the basis of additional future therapeutic strategies. Notwithstanding the widening range of options for drug therapy in IBD, other outcome modifiers and well-established principles of managing chronic disease are as important as ever.

  6. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  7. Pelvic floor dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondurri, A; Maffioli, A; Danelli, P

    2015-12-01

    Advances in tailored medical therapy and introduction of biologic agents for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment have ensured long-term disease remission. Some patients, however, still report defecatory symptoms. Patients present with a wide spectrum of conditions - anal incontinence, obstructed defecation and pelvic pain among the most frequent - that have a great impact on their quality of life. Due to IBD diagnosis, little relevance is attributed to this type of symptoms and their epidemiologic distribution is unknown. Pathogenetic hypotheses are currently under investigation. Routine diagnostic workflow and therapeutic options in pelvic floor service are often underused. The evaluation of these disorders starts with an endoscopy to rule out ongoing disease; the following diagnostic workflow is the same as in patients without IBD. For fecal incontinence and obstructed defecation, simple conservative therapy with dietary modifications and appropriate fluid intake is effective in most cases. In non-responding patients, anorectal physiology tests and imaging are required to select patients for pelvic floor muscle training and biofeedback. These treatments have been proven effective in IBD patients. Some new minimally invasive alternative strategies are available for IBD patients, as sacral nerve and posterior tibial nerve stimulation; for other ones (e.g., bulking agent implantation) IBD still remains an exclusion criterion. In order to preserve anatomical areas that could be useful for future reconstructive techniques, surgical options to cure pelvic floor dysfunction are indicated only in a small group of IBD patients, due to the high risk of failure in wound healing and to the possible side effects of surgery, which can lead to anal incontinence or to a possible proctectomy. A particular issue among defecatory symptoms in patients with IBD is paradoxical puborectalis contraction after restorative proctocolectomy: if this disorder is properly diagnosed, a

  8. Globalisation of inflammatory bowel disease: perspectives from the evolution of inflammatory bowel disease in the UK and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Gilaad G; Ng, Siew C

    2016-12-01

    The UK and China provide unique historical perspectives on the evolution of the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease, which might provide insight into its pathogenesis. Historical records from the UK document the emergence of ulcerative colitis during the mid-1800s, which was later followed by the recognition of Crohn's disease in 1932. During the second half of the 20th century, the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease rose dramatically in high-income countries. Globalisation at the turn of the 21st century led to rapid economic development of newly industrialised countries such as China. In China, the modernisation of society was accompanied by the recognition of a sharp rise in the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease. The prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease is expected to continue to rise in high-income countries and is also likely to accelerate in the developing world. An understanding of the shared and different environmental determinants underpinning the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease in western and eastern countries is essential to implement interventions that will blunt the rising global burden of inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fine-mapping inflammatory bowel disease loci to single-variant resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Hailiang; Fang, Ming; Jostins, Luke; Umićević Mirkov, Maša; Boucher, Gabrielle; Anderson, Carl A; Andersen, Vibeke; Cleynen, Isabelle; Cortes, Adrian; Crins, François; D'Amato, Mauro; Deffontaine, Valérie; Dmitrieva, Julia; Docampo, Elisa; Elansary, Mahmoud; Farh, Kyle Kai-How; Franke, Andre; Gori, Ann-Stephan; Goyette, Philippe; Halfvarson, Jonas; Haritunians, Talin; Knight, Jo; Lawrance, Ian C; Lees, Charlie W; Louis, Edouard; Mariman, Rob; Meuwissen, Theo; Mni, Myriam; Momozawa, Yukihide; Parkes, Miles; Spain, Sarah L; Théâtre, Emilie; Trynka, Gosia; Satsangi, Jack; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Vermeire, Severine; Xavier, Ramnik J; Weersma, Rinse K; Duerr, Richard H; Mathew, Christopher G; Rioux, John D; McGovern, Dermot P B; Cho, Judy H; Georges, Michel; Daly, Mark J; Barrett, Jeffrey C

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have identified 200 inflammatory bowel disease-associated loci, but few have been conclusively resolved to specific functional variants. Here we

  10. Biologic therapies for chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Martínez-Montiel

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC make up the so-called chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Advances in the understanding of IBD pathophysiologic mechanisms in the last few years have allowed the development of novel therapies such as biologic therapies, which at least theoretically represent a more specific management of this disease with fewer side effects. Currently, the only effective and widely accepted biologic therapy for the treatment of intraluminal, fistulizing CD, both for remission induction and maintenance, is infliximab. The role of other monoclonal antibodies such as adalimumab is not clearly established. It could be deemed an alternative for patients with allergic reactions to infliximab, and for those with lost response because of anti-infliximab antibody development. However, relevant issues such as dosage and administration regimen remain to be established. Anti-integrin α4 therapies, despite encouraging results in phase-3 studies, are still unavailable, as their marketing authorization was held back in view of a number of reports regarding progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy cases. Immunostimulating therapy may be highly relevant in the near future, as it represents a novel strategy against disease with the inclusion of granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factors. Regarding ulcerative colitis, results from the ACT-1 and ACT-2 studies showed that infliximab is also useful for the management of serious UC flare-ups not responding to standard treatment, which will lead to a revision of therapeutic algorithms, where this drug should be given preference before intravenous cyclosporine. In the next few years, the role of anti-CD3 drugs (vilisilizumab, T-cell inhibiting therapies, and epithelial repair and healing stimulating factors will be established.

  11. Role of Diet in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruemmele, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is steadily in the rise in Western as well as in developing countries paralleling the increase of westernized diets, characterized by high protein and fat as well as excessive sugar intake, with less vegetables and fiber. An interesting hypothesis is that environmental (food-) triggered changes of the intestinal microbiome might cause a proinflammatory state preceding the development of IBD. Indeed, an intact intestinal epithelial barrier assuring a normal bacterial clearance of the intestinal surface is crucial to guarantee intestinal homeostasis. Any factors affecting the epithelial barrier function directly or indirectly may impact on this homeostasis, as well as any changes of the intestinal microbial composition. It is intriguing to learn that some frequently used food components impact on the quality of the intestinal barrier, as well as on the composition of the intestinal microbiome. This highlights the close interaction between living conditions, hygiene, food habits and food quality with the bacterial composition of the intestinal microbiome and the activation status of the intestinal immune system. There is clear evidence that nutritional therapy is highly successful in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD). Exclusive enteral nutrition is well established as induction therapy of CD. New diets, such as a CD exclusion diet or defined diets (specific carbohydrate diets, FODMAP diet, Paleolithic diet) are being discussed as treatment options for IBD. Well-designed clinical trials in IBD are urgently required to define the precise role of each of these diets in the prevention or management of IBD. Up to now, the role of diet in IBD is highly undermined by lay and anecdotal reports without sufficient scientific proof. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Genetics, Epigenetics and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italia eLoddo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBDs are complex, multifactorial disorders characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. Although aetiology remains largely unknown, recent research has suggested that genetic factors, environment, microbiota and immune response are involved in the pathogenesis.Epidemiological evidence for a genetic contribution is defined: 15% of patients with Crohn’s Disease (CD have an affected family member with IBD, and twin studies for CD have shown 50% concordance in monozygotic twins compared to less than 10% in dizygotics. The most recent and largest genetic association studies, which employed genome-wide association data for over 75,000 patients and controls, identified 163 susceptibility loci for IBD. More recently, a trans-ethnic analysis, including over 20,000 individuals, identified an additional 38 new IBD loci.Although most cases are correlated with polygenic contribution toward genetic susceptibility, there is a spectrum of rare genetic disorders that can contribute to early onset IBD (before 5 years or very early IBD (before 2 years. Genetic variants that cause these disorders have a wide effect on gene function. These variants are so rare in allele frequency that the genetic signals are not detected in genome-wide association studies of patients with IBD. With recent advances in sequencing techniques, approximately 50 genetic disorders have been identified and associated with IBD-like immunopathology. Monogenic defects have been found to alter intestinal immune homeostasis through many mechanisms. Candidate gene resequencing should be carried out in early-onset patients in clinical practice.The evidence that genetic factors contribute in small part to disease pathogenesis confirms the important role of microbial and environmental factors. Epigenetic factors can mediate interactions between environment and genome. Epigenetic mechanisms could affect development and progression of IBD. Epigenomics is

  13. Skin Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuter, Thomas; Navarini, Alexander; Vavricka, Stephan R

    2017-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with its two main subtypes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis is not restricted to the gastrointestinal tract. Indeed, so-called extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) are frequent and considerably affect morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of EIMs ranges from 6 to 47%. In up to one quarter of the patients, EIMs can present even before an IBD diagnosis is established. The pathophysiology of EIMs remains elusive, although data from clinical trials demonstrating anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) efficacy suggest a common pathogenic link between intestinal and extraintestinal disease activity. However, not all EIMs parallel intestinal disease. Skin lesions are usually classified based on their pathophysiological association with the underlying intestinal disease into four categories: (1) specific, (2) reactive, (3) associated, and (4) treatment-induced manifestations. Cutaneous manifestations include erythema nodosum (EN), pyoderma gangrenosum (PG), Sweet's syndrome, and oral lesions, with EN being the most commonly reported and PG showing the most debilitating disease course. Anti-TNF-induced skin reactions are a new, but increasingly recognized phenomenon, which can be eventually misinterpreted as psoriatic lesions. Medical treatment modalities are limited with topical and systemic steroids being the most frequently employed agents. If EIMs parallel intestinal disease activity, the therapeutic cornerstone usually is the management of underlying intestinal disease activity rather than direct treatment of the EIMs. However, increasing evidence for anti-TNF agents' efficacy in EIM management has changed the approach to complicating and debilitating disease courses. In the case of anti-TNF-induced lesions, topical steroids are usually sufficient and discontinuation of anti-TNF is seldom warranted. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on cutaneous EIMs, their diagnostic criteria and clinical presentation, natural history

  14. New strategies for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), of which ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are the two most prevailing entities, is unknown. However, IBD is characterized by an imbalanced synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators of the inflamed intestine, and for more than a decade...

  15. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: from a translational perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Damen (Gerard)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCrohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the two main subtypes of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract that have a peak age of onset in the second decade of life in children. There is strong evidence to

  16. Growth Hormone Resistance—Special Focus on Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffer Soendergaard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH plays major anabolic and catabolic roles in the body and is important for regulating several aspects of growth. During an inflammatory process, cells may develop a state of GH resistance during which their response to GH stimulation is limited. In this review, we will emphasize specific mechanisms governing the formation of GH resistance in the active phase of inflammatory bowel disease. The specific molecular effects mediated through individual inflammatory mediators and processes will be highlighted to provide an overview of the transcriptional, translational and post-translational inflammation-mediated impacts on the GH receptor (GHR along with the impacts on GH-induced intracellular signaling. We also will review GH’s effects on mucosal healing and immune cells in the context of experimental colitis, human inflammatory bowel disease and in patients with short bowel syndrome.

  17. T Cell Repertoire and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Croitoru

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of the T cell receptor repertoire is generated through rearrangement of the variable, junctional and constant region genes. Selection processes in the thymus and periphery serve to eliminate self-reacting T cells, thereby preventing autoimmune disease. The possibility that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an autoimmune disease has led to the search for an auto-antigen. In addition, studies are exploring the T cell receptor repertoire in IBD patients for changes that may provide clues regarding etiopathogenesis. Using monoclonal antibodies to T cell receptor variable-gene products or polymerase chain reaction analysis of variable-gene mRNA expression, the mucosal T cell repertoire has been examined in humans. The intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes show a significant degree of oligoclonal expansion that may represent local antigen exposure or unique selection processes. This is in keeping with studies that show that murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes undergo positive and possibly negative selection independent of the thymus. In the inflamed human gut, shifts in the T cell receptor repertoire may also reflect recruitment of peripheral T cells to the gut. In one study, a subset of Crohn’s disease patients was shown to have an increase in the proportion of variable β8 peripheral blood lymphocyte and mesenteric lymph node cells, suggesting a superantigen effect. The authors hypothesized that changes in the functional T cell receptor repertoire can also occur which might be independent of changes in the distribution of T cells expressing variable β T cell receptors. In fact, the authors have shown there is a selective decrease in the cytotoxic function of peripheral variable β8 T cells in Crohn’s disease. Furthermore, stimulation with the variable β8 selective bacterial enterotoxin staphylococcal enterotoxin E failed to increase the cytotoxic function in this subset of Crohn’s disease patients compared with

  18. 99mTc-sucralfate scintigraphy in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortensen, P.B.; Lech, Y.; Moeller-Petersen, J.; Vilien, M.; Fallingborg, J.; Ekelund, S.

    1989-01-01

    Technetium-99m-labelled albumin-sucralfate was orally administered to 11 patients (Crohn's disease, 8; ulcerative colitis, 3) and 3 healthy volunteers. Serial scintigraphy was performed, and scintigraphic interpretations were compared with radiographic end endoscopic findings in an open study. It was not possible in any patient to relate the scintigraphic findings to the localizations of inflammatory bowel disease, nor was it possible to distinguish the scans in the patients from the scans of the healthy volunteers. It is concluded the 99m Tc-albumin-sucralfate scintigraphy is of no value in the detection of inflammatory bowel disease. 8 refs

  19. Recent advances in inflammatory bowel disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-12

    May 12, 2009 ... virus, mycobacteria and paromyxoviruses remain unproved, but a recent ... colonoscopy with ileoscopy, computer tomography enterography and push ... A history of an appendicectomy is rare in patients with UC. A recent meta-analysis comparing capsule endoscopy with small- bowel barium radiology,.

  20. What People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know About Osteoporosis What Is Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Crohn’s disease and ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  1. Place of phosphatidylcholine in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Dorofeev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the pathogenesis of most diseases of the intestine, inflammation is important, and, often, critical. Its pathogenetic role in the inflammatory bowel disease was studied broadly and comprehensively. In recent years, research has begun on its contribution to intestinal damage in functional pathology — irritable bowel syndrome. The participation of inflammation in the development of erosive and ulcerative lesions of the lower gastrointestinal tract on the background of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID-enterocolopathy seems paradoxical. The role of phospholipids in the construction of cell membranes is well known. One of the main membrane phospholipids of most living organisms (with the exception of microbes is phosphatidylcholine (PC. In membranes of the intestinal epithelium, the content of PC increases from 10 to 50 % in the direction from the apical surface to the basal one, and the maximum amount of PC is located on the outside of the cell membranes. Phosphatidylcholine showed its high efficacy and safety in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as non-specific ulcerative colitis. People taking NSAIDs have demonstrated the protective role of PC in preventing damage to the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Given the common pathogenetic mechanisms between these diseases and irritable bowel syndrome, the use of PC in patients with irritable bowel syndrome seems promising, especially in its post-infection variant.

  2. Management of Musculoskeletal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Sheth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal manifestations are the most common extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel diseases. Some appendicular manifestations are independent of gut inflammation and are treated with standard anti-inflammatory strategies. On the other hand, axial involvement is linked to gut inflammatory activity; hence, there is a considerable amount of treatment overlap. Biological therapies have revolutionized management of inflammatory bowel diseases as well as of associated articular manifestations. Newer mechanisms driving gut associated arthropathy have surfaced in the past decade and have enhanced our interests in novel treatment targets. Introduction of biosimilar molecules is expected in the US market in the near future and will provide an opportunity for considerable cost savings on healthcare. A multidisciplinary approach involving a gastroenterologist, rheumatologist, and physical therapist is ideal for these patients.

  3. Pneumococcal Vaccination Rates in VHA Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Case, David J.; Copeland, Laurel A.; Stock, Eileen M.; Herrera, Henry R.; Pfanner, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract not caused by infectious agents. Symptoms of IBD, such as diarrhea and pain, diminish one's quality of life. Underlying immune dysregulation may put IBD patients at risk for severe infectious disease making preventative vaccination highly recommended. Therefore, this study sought to assess rates of pneumococcal vaccination in patients with IBD. A cross-sectional observational study was employed utili...

  4. Projective personality tests of children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, V; Szajnberg, N M; Hyams, J S; Treem, W P; Davis, P

    1995-06-01

    15 children with inflammatory bowel disease were given projective tests after initial diagnosis. Analysis of responses suggested affective constriction, abandonment anxiety, and depression. The children were of good intelligence with good object relationships and psychosexual differentiation for their ages. Severe psychopathology and bizarre slippage were absent.

  5. Recent advances using immunomodulators for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Herfarth, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Use of the immunomodulators thiopurines and methotrexate (MTX) in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC), is considered to be good clinical practice. However, despite being administered to a considerable number of IBD patients over the...

  6. High frequency of early colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M. W. M. D.; Vleggaar, F. P.; Schipper, M. E. I.; Stokkers, P. C. F.; van der Woude, C. J.; Hommes, D. W.; de Jong, D. J.; Dijkstra, G.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; Oldenburg, B.; Samsom, M.

    Background and aim: To detect precancerous dysplasia or asymptomatic cancer, patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease often undergo colonoscopic surveillance based on American or British guidelines. It is recommended that surveillance is initiated after 8-10 years of extensive colitis, or

  7. High frequency of early colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M. W. M. D.; Vleggaar, F. P.; Schipper, M. E. I.; Stokkers, P. C. F.; van der Woude, C. J.; Hommes, D. W.; de Jong, D. J.; Dijkstra, G.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; Oldenburg, B.; Samsom, M.

    2008-01-01

    To detect precancerous dysplasia or asymptomatic cancer, patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease often undergo colonoscopic surveillance based on American or British guidelines. It is recommended that surveillance is initiated after 8-10 years of extensive colitis, or after 15-20 years

  8. Immunoglobulin coating of faecal bacteria in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waaij, Laurens A.; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Visser, Annie; Nelis, Gerardus F.; Westerveld, Bram D.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Hunter, John O.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: An inappropriate mucosal immune response to the commensal bacterial flora may play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study we determined the percentage of immunoglobulin-coated bacteria in the stools of patients and controls. METHODS: Faecal samples

  9. Perceptions of medication safety among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Garret

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess attitudes towards and knowledge of medication safety in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients frequently require long-term treatment with potentially toxic medications. Techniques are employed to improve patient awareness of medication safety, but there are sparse data on their effectiveness.

  10. Fibre intake and the development of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Chan, Simon; Luben, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Background and Aims: Population-based prospective cohort studies investigating fibre intake and development of inflammatory bowel disease are lacking. Our aim was to investigate the association between fibre intake and the development of Crohn's disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC] in a large...

  11. Tuberculosis in an inflammatory bowel disease cohort from South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Potent immunosuppressive therapy is standard treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but carries a risk of reactivating latent tuberculosis (TB). No data exist on the burden of TB in South African patients with IBD. Objective. To evaluate the burden of TB in IBD patients attending a large tertiary IBD clinic.

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease in Nigerians: Still a rare diagnosis?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by nonspecific chronic relapsing inflammation of the intestine and extra-intestinal manifestations of unknown aetiology and partly understood pathogenesis. Two clinical forms are recognized, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's. Access this article online.

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease Cape Town, 1975-1980

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-02-12

    Feb 12, 1983 ... all patients with inflammatory bowel disease seen in the Gastro- intestinal Clinic of Groote Schuur Hospital between 1975 and. 1980, to establish the incidence of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's'. Gastro-intestinal Clinic, Groote Schuur Hospital, and. Departments ofMedicine and Radiology, University ofCape.

  14. Maternal inflammatory bowel disease and offspring body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajslev, Teresa Adeltoft; Sorensen, Thorkild I A; Jess, Tine

    2012-01-01

    Maternal inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may influence intrauterine growth and hence size at birth, but the consequences for offspring in later life remain uncertain. This study investigated the growth of children of mothers with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC)....

  15. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and disease distribution in inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between site of intestinal inflammation and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) development in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been studied extensively, but may be important in understanding the pathogenesis of PSC. We aimed to determine patterns of disease distribution in IBD patients with and without PSC.

  16. Association of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Maunoo; Krishnamurthy, Jayasree; Susi, Apryl; Sullivan, Carolyn; Gorman, Gregory H.; Hisle-Gorman, Elizabeth; Erdie-Lalena, Christine R.; Nylund, Cade M.

    2018-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) both have multifactorial pathogenesis with an increasing number of studies demonstrating gut-brain associations. We aim to examine the association between ASD and IBD using strict classification criteria for IBD. We conducted a retrospective case-cohort study using records from…

  17. Malignancy and mortality in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Ridder, Lissy; Turner, Dan; Wilson, David C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The combination of the severity of pediatric-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) phenotypes and the need for intense medical treatment may increase the risk of malignancy and mortality, but evidence regarding the extent of the problem is scarce. Therefore, the Porto Pediatric IBD w...

  18. Pharmacokinetics of mesalazine pellets in children with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, Heleen; Escher, Johanna C.; Dilger, Karin; Trenk, Dietmar; Benninga, Marc A.; van Boxtel, Chris J.; Taminiau, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Mesalazine is a first-line drug in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and is customarily used to induce and maintain remission in mild to moderate disease. In children, pharmacokinetic data are scarce, and dosage recommendations are largely extrapolated from studies in adults. Aim of the

  19. Changing Infliximab Prescription Patterns in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lone; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Broberg, Marie Christine Hede

    2018-01-01

    Background: Long-term data on real life use of infliximab (IFX) for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are lacking. We studied prescription patterns during the first 16 years following marketing authorization. Methods: In a population-based cohort from the North Denmark Region, all IBD patients...

  20. [Inflammatory bowel disease and quality of life: psychopathological variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisco, Vincenzo; Iannaccone, Teresa

    2017-02-01

    Purpose of the study was to analyze the quality of life and psychiatric symptomatology in patients suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. In this study were enrolled 108 patients: 67 cases (Ulcerative Colitis in 39 patients, Crohn's Disease in 28 cases) and 41 controls (patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome). Patients were subjected to Self-Report Symptom Inventory-Revised (SCL-90-R) to analyze general psychiatric symptomatology; Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) to analyze depressive symptomatology; Short Form-36 (SF-36) to evaluate the quality of life. Patients suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease have major limitations in phisical activities; they complain about daily activities; they consider their general health as the most poor and destined to deteriorate further in time. Patients suffering from Ulcerative Colitis have greater impairment if compared with Crohn's disease patients. Patients suffering with inflammatory bowel disease have a significant impairment in several areas of life quality and a psychiatric symptomatology that shows emotional - psycological discomfort due to the underlying disease.

  1. Ultrasonographic imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiorean, Liliana; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Braden, Barbara; Cui, Xin-Wu; Buchhorn, Reiner; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases in pediatric patients. Choosing the optimal imaging modality for the assessment of gastrointestinal disease in pediatric patients can be challenging. The invasiveness and patient acceptance, the radiation exposure and the quality performance of the diagnostic test need to be considered. By reviewing the literature regarding imaging in inflammatory bowel disease the value of ultrasound in the clinical management of pediatric patients is highlighted. Transabdominal ultrasound is a useful, noninvasive method for the initial diagnosis of IBD in children; it also provides guidance for therapeutic decisions and helps to characterize and predict the course of the disease in individual patients. Ultrasound techniques including color Doppler imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound are promising imaging tools to determine disease activity and complications. Comparative studies between different imaging methods are needed. PMID:25954096

  2. [New advances in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, María

    2013-10-01

    Several studies on conventional drugs and new treatments in inflammatory bowel disease were presented in Digestive Disease Week 2013. Various studies have compared infliximab and cyclosporin in corticosteroid-refractory ulcerative colitis in clinical practice, providing complementary information to the CYSIF clinical trial. For the first time, a clinical trial has evaluated the efficacy of adalimumab in preventing recurrence of Crohn's disease after surgery. The results of some studies suggest that thiopurines improve response to infliximab, in both Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. Finally, several studies were presented on new drugs with new therapeutic targets, such as vedolizumab, in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The preliminary results of the ASTIC trial were reported, which evaluated the safety and efficacy of bone marrow transplantation in Crohn's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Joint Management in Gastroenterology and Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martínez, M A; Garcia-Planella, E; Laiz, A; Puig, L

    2017-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex entity that includes Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. It is characterized by a chronic proinflammatory state of varying intensity that often leads to considerable morbidity. In the last decade, several therapeutic targets have been identified that are susceptible to the use of biological agents, including anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies, which are associated with paradoxical psoriasiform reactions in 5% of patients. Decision-making in the management of these cases requires close collaboration between the dermatologist and gastroenterologist. Inflammatory bowel disease is also associated with various other dermatologic and rheumatologic manifestations, and presents a genetic and pathogenic association with psoriasis that justifies both the interdisciplinary approach to these patients and the present review. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. What Are the Targets of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lega, Sara; Dubinsky, Marla C

    2018-04-25

    With recent evidence suggesting that keeping the inflammatory process under tight control prevents long-term disability, the aim of treatments in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has shifted from symptom control toward the resolution of bowel inflammation. Mucosal healing is currently recognized as the principal treatment target to be used in a "treat to target" paradigm, whereas histologic healing and normalization of biomarkers are being evaluated as potential future targets. Although symptom relief is no longer a sufficient target, patient experience with the disease is of unquestionable importance and should be assessed in the form of patient-reported outcomes, to be used as a co-primary target with an objective measure of disease activity. IBD in is a heterogeneous disease; thus besides defining common treatment targets, every effort should be made to deliver a personalized treatment plan based on the risk factors for disease progression and individual drug metabolism to improve treatment success.

  5. Job Strain and the Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Madsen, Ida E H; Nyberg, Solja T

    2014-01-01

    the association between work-related stress and incident Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis using individual-level data from 95,000 European adults. METHODS: We conducted individual-participant data meta-analyses in a set of pooled data from 11 prospective European studies. All studies are a part of the IPD......-Work Consortium. Work-related psychosocial stress was operationalised as job strain (a combination of high demands and low control at work) and was self-reported at baseline. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis were ascertained from national hospitalisation and drug reimbursement registers. The associations...... between job strain and inflammatory bowel disease outcomes were modelled using Cox proportional hazards regression. The study-specific results were combined in random effects meta-analyses. RESULTS: Of the 95,379 participants who were free of inflammatory bowel disease at baseline, 111 men and women...

  6. Treatment of the Pregnant Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Rachel; Nørgård, Bente M; Friedman, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Research regarding fertility, medication safety, and pregnancy outcomes is increasing, but there are still many knowledge gaps in these areas. Women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease may have decreased fertility because of voluntary childlessness and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) sur...... with experience in caring for children of mothers with IBD. By integrating expertise from these disciplines, women with even very complex IBD should be able to have a healthy pregnancy and delivery....

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease and anxiety: links, risks, and challenges faced

    OpenAIRE

    Bannaga AS; Selinger CP

    2015-01-01

    Ayman S Bannaga,1 Christian P Selinger2 1Department of Gastroenterology, Doncaster Royal Infirmary, Doncaster, UK; 2Department of Gastroenterology, St James University Hospital, Leeds, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) causes severe physical symptoms and is also associated with psychological comorbidities. Abnormal anxiety levels are found in up to 40% of patients with IBD. Anxiety symptoms are often related to flares of IBD but may persist in times of remission. Detection of anx...

  8. Fertility and Contraception in Women With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Jason; Kane, Sunanda V.; Feagins, Linda A.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) carries a high burden in women during their reproductive years, and family planning issues are often a significant cause of concern. Fertility is normal in women with nonsurgically treated ulcerative colitis and similar or slightly reduced in women with Crohn’s disease. Women who undergo ileal pouch anastomosis have reduced fertility. Fertility is likely worsened by disease activity but unaffected by medications used to treat IBD. Infertile patients with IBD r...

  9. Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the Oral Contraceptive Pill and Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, Robert N

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes our current knowledge of the role of the oral contraceptive pill in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBO), followed by a review of fertility in women and men. IBD and pregnancy, including the impact on the fetus and the mother with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, is considered. The safety of drug treatment during pregnancy, the outcome of surgical treatment during pregnancy and the problems that may be encountered during pregnancy in patients with a...

  10. Understanding Microbial Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Scale bars, 20 µm. e, Flow cytometry histogram plots of luminal contents from mice given HADA or HALA orally demonstrate decay of fluorescent signal over...Software) and were based on normally distributed data sets with equal variance (Bartlett’s test). Gender- and age-matched mice were randomly assigned to...18643 (2012). 30. Elson, C. O. et al. Experimental models of inflammatory bowel disease reveal innate, adaptive , and regulatory mechanisms of host

  11. Maintenance Therapy for Inflammatory Bowel Disease: What Really Works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd R Sutherland

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The propensity of inflammatory bowel disease sufferers to experience recurrent episodes or disease flares is well documented. Until a cure can be found, strategies to lengthen the period of remission offer the greatest opportunity to reduce morbidity and enhance patient quality of life. Therapies that have been shown in randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trials to either lengthen the time of remission or improve the odds of staying in remission during a set time interval are required.

  12. MicroRNA expression patterns in indeterminate inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingmei; Cao, Qi; Zhang, Jianjun; Li, Yong; Shen, Bo; Zhao, Zijin; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Bronner, Mary P

    2013-01-01

    A diagnosis of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease requires synthesis of clinical, radiographic, endoscopic, surgical, and histologic data. While most cases of inflammatory bowel disease can be specifically classified as either ulcerative colitis or Crohns disease, 5-10% of patients have equivocal features placing them into the indeterminate colitis category. This study examines whether microRNA biomarkers assist in the classification of classically diagnosed indeterminate inflammatory bowel disease. Fresh frozen colonic mucosa from the distal-most part of the colectomy from 53 patients was used (16 indeterminate colitis, 14 Crohns disease, 12 ulcerative colitis, and 11 diverticular disease controls). Total RNA extraction and quantitative reverse-transcription-PCR was performed using five pairs of microRNA primers (miR-19b, miR-23b, miR-106a, miR-191, and miR-629). Analysis of variance was performed assessing differences among the groups. A significant difference in expressions of miR-19b, miR-106a, and miR-629 was detected between ulcerative colitis and Crohns disease groups (PCrohns disease groups (PCrohns disease-like microRNA pattern. MicroRNA expression patterns in indeterminate colitis are far more similar to those of ulcerative colitis than Crohns disease. MicroRNA expression patterns of indeterminate colitis provide molecular evidence indicating that most cases are probably ulcerative colitis-similar to the data from long-term clinical follow-up studies. Validation of microRNA results by additional long-term outcome data is needed, but the data presented show promise for improved classification of indeterminate inflammatory bowel disease.

  13. ANTI-CYTOKINE THERAPY FOR CHILDREN WITH INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Potapov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the findings of a pilot research devoted to the estimation of the efficiency of a therapy with TNF α inhibitors for children with inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods: we carried out the retrospective analysis for a therapy with Infliximab in 15 children with a nonspecific ulcerative colitis and Сrohn's disease. Results: 66% of the children with inflammatory bowel diseases react to the first injection of Infliximab, whereas 13% of the children demonstrate a clinical remission of their diseases. After the third injection, a positive response to the used therapy is shown by 60% of the children with inflammatory bowel diseases, and 33% of the children are diagnosed with a clinical remission. Conclusion: The use of Infliximab allowed the children with a refractory course of nonspecific ulcerative colitis and Сrohn's disease to make their inflammation significantly less active and improve the quality of their life.Key words: nonspecific ulcerative colitis, Сrohn's disease, treatment, TNF α inhibitors, children

  14. Immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease and mechanisms of biological therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Bani; Moraes, Luiza; Magnusson, Maria K; Öhman, Lena

    2018-03-09

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract with a multifactorial pathophysiology. Full comprehension of IBD pathology is still out of reach and, therefore, treatment is far from ideal. Nevertheless, components involved in IBD pathogenesis including environmental, genetic, microbial, and immunological factors are continuously being investigated and the improved knowledge contributes to the development of new therapies. In this article we review the aspects of the immunopathogenesis of IBD, with focus on mucosal immunity, and discuss mechanisms of action for current and emerging biological therapies.

  15. Association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Mallbris, L; Warren, R B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis, Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory disorders with overlapping genetic architecture. However, data on the frequency and risk of CD and UC in psoriasis are scarce and poorly understood. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between CD...... and UC in patients with psoriasis. METHODS: All Danish individuals aged ≥ 18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2012 were linked in nationwide registers. Psoriasis severity was defined in two models: hospital visits and medication. Incidence rates per 10 000 person-years were calculated......, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: In the total cohort (n = 5 554 100) there were 75 209 incident cases of psoriasis, 11 309 incident cases of CD and 30 310 incident cases of UC, during follow-up. The adjusted IRRs (95% confidence intervals) of CD were 1·28 (1...

  16. Prevalence and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Patients with Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Jemec, Gregor B.E.; Kimball, Alexa B.

    2017-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. In small studies, inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with the increased prevalence of HS, but the data on the concurrence of inflammatory bowel disease in patients with HS are limited. We therefore investigated the ...

  17. FEATURES OF BOWEL CYTOPROTECTION IN INFANTS WITH FUNCTIONAL AND CHRONIC INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marushko RV

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Over past years, considerable attention is paid to the role of fatty acids, especially polyunsaturated, in the development of various gastrointestinal diseases, among which the most common are functional and inflammatory bowel diseases. The need for studies of fatty acid disorders is to clarify the pathogenetic mechanisms in which fatty acids participate in the development intestinal pathology. The aim of this study to elaborate the optimal preventive and therapeutic measures to reduce the incidence of these diseases and provide the effective treatment, especially in early childhood . Objective: To study the profile features of fatty acids in infants with functional and inflammatory bowel diseases. Patients and methods: Were examined 149 children aged from 6 months to 3 years, divided into 3 groups: 52 children with chronic nonulcerative nonspecific colitis, 49 children with functional constipation and 47 children with functional diarrhea. Verification of diagnoses was provided in accordance with the «Standardised clinical protocols of medical care for children with digestive diseases.»Analysis of fatty acid's profile was evaluated by the method blood gas chromatography. Results: All the examined children had fatty acid disorders. The level of saturated fatty acids was decreased and the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids was increased in the expence of omega6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, in partiular, linoleic and arachidonic acids. The greatest changes were observed in patients with chronic nonulcerative nonspecific colitis which can be considered as important links in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation. In functional bowel disorders imbalance of fatty acids is likely to be a risk factor in development significant lesions in the intestinal mucosa. Conclusions: Given the presence of lipid imbalance in inflammatory bowel disease as well as in intestinal functional disorders, which is characterized by a significant

  18. Cytomegalovirus infection in inflammatory bowel disease is not associated with worsening of intestinal inflammatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Medeiros do Carmo

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent virus and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. The pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease often induce a state of immunosuppression. Because this, there are still doubts and controversies about the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and cytomegalovirus.Evaluate the frequency of cytomegalovirus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and identify correlations.Patients with inflammatory bowel disease underwent an interview, review of records and collection of blood and fecal samples. The search for cytomegalovirus was performed by IgG and IgM blood serology, by real-time PCR in the blood and by qualitative PCR in feces. Results were correlated with red blood cell levels, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and fecal calprotectin levels for each patient.Among the 400 eligible patients, 249 had Crohn's disease, and 151 had ulcerative colitis. In the group of Crohn's disease, 67 of the patients had moderate or severe disease, but 126 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. In patients with ulcerative colitis, only 21 patients had moderate disease, but 76 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. A large majority of patients had positive CMV IgG. Overall, 10 patients had positive CMV IgM, and 9 patients had a positive qualitative detection of CMV DNA by PCR in the feces. All 400 patients returned negative results after the quantitative detection of CMV DNA in blood by real-time PCR. Analyzing the 19 patients with active infections, we only found that such an association occurred with the use of combined therapy (anti-TNF-alpha + azathioprine.The findings show that latent cytomegalovirus infections are frequent and active cytomegalovirus infection is rare. We did not find any association between an active infection of CMV and inflammatory bowel

  19. Review article: the potential role of nitric oxide in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Rask-Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    The aetiology of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases-ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease-as well as 'microscopic colitis'-both collagenous (COC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)-remains unknown. Autoimmune mechanisms, cytokine polymorphism, commensal bacteria, infectious agents and vascular......-a condition which is never associated with injurious inflammation. The latter observation favours the notion that NO promotes mucosal integrity. Further evidence for a protective role of NO in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders is provided by the observation of increased susceptibility to the induction...... diarrhoea in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders. Clearly, further experimental work needs to be done before testing topical L-arginine in human inflammatory bowel disease....

  20. [Classical medications in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvnjak, Marko; Bilić, Ante; Barsić, Neven; Tomasić, Vedran; Stojsavljević, Sanja

    2013-04-01

    The treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases is complex and requires individual approach to every single patient. Traditionally, the approach is based on introduction of so called "classical" medication into the treatment regimen, from ones less potent and with fewer side effects to the ones more toxic but also therapeutically more effective. Aminosalicylates were the first choice of treatment for a long time. However, the role of aminosalicylates is becoming more and more diminished, although they are still the drug of choice in the treatment of mild to moderate ulcerative colitis. Corticosteroids are the therapy of choice in treatment of active IBD for achieving remission in moderate to severe disease. Azathioprine and 6- mercaptopurine belong to a group of thiopurines with an immunomodulatory effect which, in Crohn's disease as well as in ulcerative colitis, primarily have a role in a steroid dependant or steroid refractory type of disease and in maintenance of remission. Lately, early introduction of these medications is proposed to enhance the number of patients that remain in remission. Methotrexate is used for the therapy of active and relapsing Crohn's disease and represents an alternative in patients who do not tolerate or do not respond to azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine therapy. Cyclosporine is used in treating steroid refractory ulcerative colitis and in some patients can postpone the need for colectomy. Antibiotics do not have a proven effect on the course of inflammatory bowel diseases and their primary role is to treat septic complications. Classic medications today represent a standard in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, and the combination of the previously mentioned drugs often has a more potent effect on the course of the disease than any medication on its own and their combination is still an object of investigations and clinical studies.

  1. Nephrolithiasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cury DB

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dídia Bismara Cury,1,2 Alan C Moss,2 Nestor Schor3 1Scope Clinic, Campo Grande, Brazil; 2Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has been associated with renal stone formation. The objective of this study was to determine prospectively the prevalence of nephrolithiasis in a community-based population of patients with IBD and to analyze factors associated with renal calculus formation. Methods: Screening renal ultrasound was performed in a well characterized cohort of patients seen between 2009 and 2012 at an IBD clinic. We enrolled 168 patients, including 93 with Crohn’s disease and 75 with ulcerative colitis. Clinical and phenotypic variables associated with asymptomatic nephrolithiasis were determined. Results: Nephrolithiasis was detected in 36 patients with Crohn’s disease and in 28 patients with ulcerative colitis (38% for both. Although none of the patients had been previously hospitalized for symptomatic nephrolithiasis, nine with Crohn’s disease and five with ulcerative colitis had recurrent urinary tract infections or hydronephrosis. In patients with Crohn’s disease, ileocolonic (L3 disease was associated with a greater risk of nephrolithiasis than was ileal (L1 or colonic (L2 disease (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8–7. Active ulcerative colitis (regardless of severity represented a significant risk factor for formation of renal calculi (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.1–15, P = 0.02. Conclusion: In surgery-naïve patients with IBD in the community, asymptomatic nephrolithiasis is common and should be considered when renal dysfunction or infection is detected. Keywords: clinical activity indices, Crohn’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease, nephrolithiasis, ulcerative colitis

  2. Biologic targeting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases [Retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosani M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bosani M, Ardizzone S, Porro GB. Biologics: Targets and Therapy. 2009;3:77–97.This paper has been retracted after we were made aware that it contains a large amount of reused, and uncited material that was not placed within quotation marks.The following statement has been supplied by Dr Sandro Ardizzone:The review entitled "Biologic targeting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease" has been commissioned by this journal and published in 2009 (Matteo Bosani, Sandro Ardizzone, Gabriele Bianchi Porro. Biologics: Targets & Therapy 2009;3:77–97. The paper was written by our young coworker (Dr M Bosani. He has consulted many papers, including our previous reviews published years before. The not perfect knowledge of English language has greatly influenced the writing of the paper itself. So he saved in word file several parts of our previous papers (Ardizzone S, Bianchi Porro G. Inflammatory bowel disease: new insights into pathogenesis and treatment. J Intern Med 2002;252:475–496 – Ardizzone S, Bianchi Porro G. Biologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease. Drugs 2005:2253–2286, and then transferred to the final paper. He was unaware as we are, of the fact that he could not reuse previously published material in other journals. The reuse of this material was made in good faith.Taking our responsibility for what happened, we intend to apologize for this inconvenience to the Editor (Dr Doris Benbrook and Publisher (Dr Tim Hill. Moreover, for the reasons mentioned above, I consider appropriate to retract the paper itself.This retraction relates to this paper.

  3. Cannabis use amongst patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Simon; Prasad, Neeraj; Ryan, Manijeh; Tangri, Sabrena; Silverberg, Mark S; Gordon, Allan; Steinhart, Hillary

    2011-10-01

    Experimental evidence suggests the endogenous cannabinoid system may protect against colonic inflammation, leading to the possibility that activation of this system may have a therapeutic role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Medicinal use of cannabis for chronic pain and other symptoms has been reported in a number of medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate cannabis use in patients with IBD. One hundred patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 191 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) attending a tertiary-care outpatient clinic completed a questionnaire regarding current and previous cannabis use, socioeconomic factors, disease history and medication use, including complimentary alternative medicines. Quality of life was assessed using the short-inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire. A comparable proportion of UC and CD patients reported lifetime [48/95 (51%) UC vs. 91/189 (48%) CD] or current [11/95 (12%) UC vs. 30/189 (16%) CD] cannabis use. Of lifetime users, 14/43 (33%) UC and 40/80 (50%) CD patients have used it to relieve IBD-related symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhoea and reduced appetite. Patients were more likely to use cannabis for symptom relief if they had a history of abdominal surgery [29/48 (60%) vs. 24/74 (32%); P=0.002], chronic analgesic use [29/41 (71%) vs. 25/81 (31%); Puse [36/66 (55%) vs. 18/56 (32%); P=0.01] and a lower short inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire score (45.1±2.1 vs. 50.3±1.5; P=0.03). Patients who had used cannabis [60/139 (43%)] were more likely than nonusers [13/133 (10%); Ptherapeutic trial of cannabis for IBD. Cannabis use is common amongst patients with IBD for symptom relief, particularly amongst those with a history of abdominal surgery, chronic abdominal pain and/or a low quality of life index. The therapeutic benefits of cannabinoid derivatives in IBD may warrant further exploration.

  4. The microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease: current and therapeutic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane ER

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Erin R Lane,1 Timothy L Zisman,2 David L Suskind1 1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Seattle Children’s Hospital, 2Division of Gastroenterology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease is a heterogeneous group of chronic disorders that result from the interaction of the intestinal immune system with the gut microbiome. Until recently, most investigative efforts and therapeutic breakthroughs were centered on understanding and manipulating the altered mucosal immune response that characterizes these diseases. However, more recent studies have highlighted the important role of environmental factors, and in particular the microbiota, in disease onset and disease exacerbation. Advances in genomic sequencing technology and bioinformatics have facilitated an explosion of investigative inquiries into the composition and function of the intestinal microbiome in health and disease and have advanced our understanding of the interplay between the gut microbiota and the host immune system. The gut microbiome is dynamic and changes with age and in response to diet, antibiotics and other environmental factors, and these alterations in the microbiome contribute to disease onset and exacerbation. Strategies to manipulate the microbiome through diet, probiotics, antibiotics or fecal microbiota transplantation may potentially be used therapeutically to influence modulate disease activity. This review will characterize the factors involved in the development of the intestinal microbiome and will describe the typical alterations in the microbiota that are characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, this manuscript will summarize the early but promising literature on the role of the gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease with implications for utilizing this data for diagnostic or therapeutic application in the clinical management of patients with these diseases. Keywords

  5. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE WITH A VERY EARLY ONSET

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    E. A. Kornienko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis has a tendency to manifest at earlier age. In childhood (< 6 years of age it has an especially severe course and is characterized by high grade inflammation, predominantly in the colon, by complication and extra-intestinal autoimmune injury. At younger age, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis require more aggressive treatment with frequently poor results. From genetic point of view, monogenic mutations controlling the immune response are characteristic for these diseases with an early onset; therefore, they are frequently associated with primary immunodeficiency. This implies various immunologic deficits, such as breakdown of the epithelial barrier, phagocytic dysfunction and dysfunction of Т and В lymphocytes and regulatory Т cells. Depending on this, a number of primary immunodeficiencies are identified associated with monogenic mutations of more than 50 genes. There some age-related specific features at manifestation. Thus, defects in interleukin 10 and FOXP3 manifest in the first months of life, whereas severe combined immunodeficiencies and phagocytosis defects become evident somewhat later. Virtually all 24 children with very early onset of inflammatory bowel disease, whom we examined, had immunologic defects and one child had a XIAP gene mutation. After identification of a specific immunologic defect, one can understand the mechanism of the disease and suspect one or another genetic defect with subsequent reasonable assessment of mutations in candidate genes. Detection of immunologic and genetic defects in children with a very early onset of inflammatory bowel disease allows for choosing an adequate strategy of non-conventional treatment that may differ depending on the mechanism of the disease.

  6. Azathioprine in inflammatory bowel disease, a safe alternative?

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    A. A. Tanis

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Azathioprine and its metabolite 6-mercaptopurine are effective in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. They are mostly used for reduction of the use of steroids, maintenance therapy after remission induction by cyclosporin and treatment of fistulae in Crohn's disease. Adverse effects occur in about 15% of patients. The main side effects are pancreatitis, allergic reactions, fever and bone marrow suppression. Symptoms, management and prevention are discussed. A blood monitoring schedule is suggested. Azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine seem to be safe in pregnancy. There may be a slight increased risk for developing a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  7. Microbiota regulation of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanju; Cao, Anthony T; Cong, Yingzi

    2013-12-01

    The host and microbiota have evolved mechanisms for coexistence over millions of years. Accumulating evidence indicates that a dynamic mutualism between the host and the commensal microbiota has important implications for health, and microbial colonization contributes to the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis. However, alterations in communication between the mucosal immune system and gut microbial communities have been implicated as the core defect that leads to chronic intestinal inflammation and cancer development. We will discuss the recent progress on how gut microbiota regulates intestinal homeostasis and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Jonathan; Hart, Alisa

    2013-12-01

    The diverse and complex community of microorganisms that has co-evolved with the human gut is vital to intestinal functioning, and disturbances in the microbiota and its relationship with the host immune system have been linked to inflammatory bowel diseases, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This has suggested several treatment options, including antibiotics, probiotics and faecal transplantation. The human microbiome project has been established to enable comprehensive characterisation of the human microbiota and in the coming years, knowledge in this area is expected to continue to expand.

  9. The burden of inflammatory bowel disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Jess, Tine; Martinato, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disabling gastrointestinal disorders impacting every aspect of the affected individual's life and account for substantial costs to the health care system and society. New epidemiological data suggest that the incidence and prevalence of the diseases...... are increasing and medical therapy and disease management have changed significantly in the last decade. An estimated 2.5-3million people in Europe are affected by IBD, with a direct healthcare cost of 4.6-5.6bn Euros/year. Therefore, the aim of this review is to describe the burden of IBD in Europe...

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Li, Yuan; Lindbom, Bengt Johansson

    2017-01-01

    primary non-responders or lose responsiveness during maintenance treatment. A new class of small molecules, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulators, has recently shown efficacy in IBD. Here we provide an overview of the mechanism of action of this novel treatment principle in the context......An unmet medical need exists for the development of targeted therapies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with easily administered and stable oral drugs, particularly as most patients on biologics [i.e., tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors and anti-integrins] are either...

  11. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Small Bowel Cancer Risk, Clinical Characteristics, and Histopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Rasmus Dahlin; Riis, Lene Buhl; Høgdall, Estrid

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may increase risk of small bowel cancer (SBC). However, little is known of the characteristics and features of IBD-SBC, due to a low number of cases worldwide. We performed a population-based study of IBD and SBC to calculate risk and increase our...... understanding of clinical characteristics and histopathological and molecular features. METHODS: The study population consisted of all individuals aged 16 years or older living in Denmark during 1978-2010. Through linkage between national registers and subsequent scrutiny of medical records and pathology...... descriptions, we identified 40 cases of IBD-SBC. Risk was calculated by standardized incidence ratio (SIR) (observed/expected); patient characteristics were derived from medical files, and surgery specimens were obtained from hospitals nationwide for histopathological and molecular analyses. RESULTS: During...

  12. Low-FODMAP diet reduces irritable bowel symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Natalia; Ankersen, Dorit Vedel; Felding, Maria

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of a low-FODMAP diet on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: This was a randomised controlled open-label trial of patients with IBD in remission or with mild-to-moderate disease and coexisting IBS......-like symptoms (Rome III) randomly assigned to a Low-FODMAP diet (LFD) or a normal diet (ND) for 6 wk between June 2012 and December 2013. Patients completed the IBS symptom severity system (IBS-SSS) and short IBD quality of life questionnaire (SIBDQ) at weeks 0 and 6. The primary end-point was response rates......; inter-quartile range [IQR] 33-169) than ND group (median 170, IQR 91-288), P = 0.02. Furthermore, the LFD group had a significantly greater increase in SIBDQ (median 60, IQR 51-65) than the ND group (median 50, IQR 39-60), P diet reduced IBS...

  13. Detection And Identification Of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Electronic Nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, J. A.; Ouaret, N.; Gardner, J. W.; Nwokolo, C.; Bardhan, K. D.; Arasaradnam, R. P.

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammation of the lining of the human bowel and a major health issue in Europe. IBD carries with it significant morbidity from toxic treatment, surgery and a risk of developing bowel cancer. Thus there is a need for early identification of the disease using non-invasive tests. Present diagnostic techniques are based around invasive tests (i.e. endoscopy) and laboratory culture; the latter is limited as only 50% of the gut bacteria can be identified. Here we explore the use of an e-nose as a tool to detect and identify two IBDs (i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) & Ulcerative Colitis (UC)) based on headspace analysis from urine samples. We believe that the gut bacterial flora is altered by disease (due to fermentation) that in-turn modulates the gas composition within urine samples. 24 samples (9 CD, 6 UC, 9 controls) were analysed with an in-house e-nose and an Owlstone IMS instrument. Data analysis was performed using linear discriminant analysis (LDA and principal components analysis (PCA). Using the e-nose, LDA separates both disease groups and control, whilst PCA shows a small overlap of classes. The IMS data are more complex but shows some disease/control separation. We are presently collecting further samples for a larger study using more advanced data processing methods.

  14. Plain abdominal radiographs in children with inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G.A.; Nancarrow, P.A.; Hernanz-Schulman, M.; Teele, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    The value of plain abdominal radiography in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been ascertained. We reviewed the scout radiographs prior to first barium examination in 100 children with IBD (53 Crohn, 47 ulcerative colitis (UC) and scout films prior to excretory urography in 50 patients who had no clinical evidence of intestinal disease (controls)). The films were reviewed without clinical information, and the abnormalities on each film scored according to severity and location. Criteria included: mural thickening, dilatation and mucosal abnormalities of the small bowel and colon, as well as abnormal quantity and/or distribution of feces in the colon. Eighty percent (40/50) of the films in the control group were interpreted as normal. Abnormalities suggestive of IBD were presented in 73% of the IBD group (76% Crohn and 72% UC). Thirty-one percent of the films in the IBD group had a moderately abnormal score (>=3) or markedly abnormal score (>=5) at presentation. The most reliable radiographic findings were: mucosal abnormality in the colon and small bowel and an abnormal stool pattern (feces completely absent or only present in one colonic segment). The clinical presentation of IBD in childhood is often vague and nonspecific. Abnormalities in plain films of the abdomen are common in these patients and may be helpful in suggesting the presence and, to a great degree, the severity of disease in these children.

  15. Resveratrol and inflammatory bowel disease: the evidence so far.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Sandra; Danesi, Francesca; Del Rio, Daniele; Silva, Paula

    2017-12-01

    Despite the fact that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has still no recognised therapy, treatments which have proven at least mildly successful in improving IBD symptoms include anti-inflammatory drugs and monoclonal antibodies targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines. Resveratrol, a natural (poly)phenol found in grapes, red wine, grape juice and several species of berries, has been shown to prevent and ameliorate intestinal inflammation. Here, we discuss the role of resveratrol in the improvement of inflammatory disorders involving the intestinal mucosa. The present review covers three specific aspects of resveratrol in the framework of inflammation: (i) its content in food; (ii) its intestinal absorption and metabolism; and (iii) its anti-inflammatory effects in the intestinal mucosa in vitro and in the very few in vivo studies present to date. Actually, if several studies have shown that resveratrol may down-regulate mediators of intestinal immunity in rodent models, only two groups have performed intervention studies in human subjects using resveratrol as an agent to improve IBD conditions. The effects of resveratrol should be further investigated by conducting well-designed clinical trials, also taking into account different formulations for the delivery of the bioactive compound.

  16. The Role of Physical Exercise in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bilski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed and analyzed the relationship between physical exercise and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD which covers a group of chronic, relapsing, and remitting intestinal disorders including Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis. The etiology of IBD likely involves a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. Physical training has been suggested to be protective against the onset of IBD, but there are inconsistencies in the findings of the published literature. Hypertrophy of the mesenteric white adipose tissue (mWAT is recognized as a characteristic feature of CD, but its importance for the perpetuation of onset of this intestinal disease is unknown. Adipocytes synthesize proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Hypertrophy of mWAT could play a role as a barrier to the inflammatory process, but recent data suggest that deregulation of adipokine secretion is involved in the pathogenesis of CD. Adipocytokines and macrophage mediators perpetuate the intestinal inflammatory process, leading to mucosal ulcerations along the mesenteric border, a typical feature of CD. Contracting skeletal muscles release biologically active myokines, known to exert the direct anti-inflammatory effects, and inhibit the release of proinflammatory mediators from visceral fat. Further research is required to confirm these observations and establish exercise regimes for IBD patients.

  17. Plain magnetic resonance imaging as an alternative in evaluating inflammation and bowel damage in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jesuratnam-Nielsen, Kayalvily; Løgager, Vibeke B; Rezanavaz-Gheshlagh, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    -52%, 83-94% and 76-92% for DWI, respectively. The κ values for bowel wall thickening, DWI, and mural hyperenhancement were detected with fair agreement (κ = 0.26-0.39) at both MRI examinations, whereas only bowel wall thickening in MRFT were detected with moderate agreement (κ = 0.47) Conclusion. Plain......), and other inflammatory changes in each bowel segments. Further, hyperenhancement of the bowel was also evaluated in MRFT. RESULTS: A total of 100 patients (40 males and 60 females; median age: 38.5; range: 19-90) were enrolled; 44 with Crohn's disease (CD), 25 with ulcerative colitis (UC), 24 with IBD...

  18. [Changes in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2007-02-04

    Significant changes have been observed in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in the last two decades. Traditionally, the incidence of IBD was higher in the developed, industrialized countries, in contrast, nowadays it became more prevalent in the previously low incidence areas. In particular, the incidence of ulcerative colitis (UC) is similar to that observed in North America and Western Europe, while the incidence of Crohn's disease (CD) in developing countries is still low, suggesting that the environmental factors may act faster or differently in UC than in CD. In Europe, the North to South gradient disappeared, and also the West to East gradient is diminishing. Smoking and appendectomy may be considered as important environmental factors in both UC and CD, however, with opposite effects. In addition, the use of oral contraceptives is associated to disease susceptibility in both diseases. The role of diet, perinatal events, stress and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the pathogenesis is still controversial.

  19. Interleukin-33 and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Lessons from Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin- (IL- 33 is a widely expressed cytokine present in different cell types, such as epithelial, mesenchymal, and inflammatory cells, supporting a predominant role in innate immunity. IL-33 can function as a proinflammatory cytokine inducing Th2 type of immune response being involved with the defense against parasitic infections of the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, it has been proposed that IL-33 can act as a signaling molecule alerting the immune system of danger or tissue damage. Recently, in the intestinal mucosa, overexpression of IL-33 has been reported in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. This review highlights the available data regarding IL-33 in human IBD and discusses emerging roles for IL-33 as a key modulator of intestinal inflammation.

  20. Research Progress of Intestinal Microbiota in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-shun YE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disseases (IBD are chronic recurrent diseases occurring in the gastrointestinal tract, mainly including ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD. At present, the etiological factors and mechanism of IBD are still unclear yet. However, it is widely believed that IBD is caused by immune dysfunction, genetic factors, gut barrier dysfuction and dysbacteriosis, change of dietary structure, use of antibiotics, smoking, and environment. Studies suggest that breaking the accurate balance between host and intestinal microbiota in patients with IBD can trigger immuno-inflammatory responses in genetically susceptible individuals. Therefore, regulating intestinal microbiota disturbance and recovery of intestinal homeostasis between host and intestinal microbiota become a new treatment direction for IBD. This article mainly reviewed research progress of intestinal microbiota in pathogenetic mechanism and treatment of IBD.

  1. Phytochemicals and their potential usefulness in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Sahil J; Modi, Ketan P; Majumdar, Anuradha S; Sadarani, Bhakti N

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract with unclear etiology, namely ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Various drug therapies including aminosalicylates and immunomodulators have been approved for use; they have shown to produce diverse side effects. To overcome these limitations of the current therapeutics for IBD, extensive research is underway to identify drugs that are effective and free of undesirable side effects. Recently, various naturally occurring phytochemicals that cover a wide range of chemical entities such as polyphenols, terpeniods, flavonoids, and alkaloids have received attention as alternative candidates for IBD therapy. These phytochemicals act by modulating the immune response, various transcription factors, or reduce cytokine secretion. This review summarizes the findings of recent studies on phytochemicals as therapeutic agents in the management of IBD. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. ANEMIA IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE MORE THAN AN EXTRAINTESTINAL COMPLICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeş, Roxana Maria; Pop, Corina Silvia; Calagiu, Dorina; Dobrin, Denisa; Chetroiu, Diana; Jantea, Petruta; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2016-01-01

    The most common hematologic complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease is anemia. Anemia in patients with IBD may be a result of iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency; anemia of chronic disease and hemolytic anemia are other causes in these patients. Factors contributing to the development of anemia include chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, vitamin B12 malabsorption secondary to terminal ileitis, folate deficiency as a result of sulfasalazine therapy. Approximately 30% of patients with IBD have hemoglobin levels below 12 g/dl. The risk of developing anemia relates to disease activity, given that blood loss and inflammatory anemia are triggered by intestinal inflammation. In the management strategy of IBD patients with anemia it is important to distinguish between the different types of anemia in order to decide an appropriate manner of treatment.

  3. 111In autologous leucocytes in the diagnosis and assessment of inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saverymuttu, S.H.; Peters, A.M.; Reavy, H.J.; Danpure, H.J.; Osman, S.; Chadwick, V.S.; Hodgson, H.J.; Lavender, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    111 In-labelled leucocytes were used to obtain gamma camera images of inflamed of bowel in a wide variety of inflammatory bowel disease. No false positive scans were observed in the irritable bowel syndrome and in bowel malignancy. All patients with moderate or severely active disease had positive scans. Faecal excretion of 111 Indium increased with disease severity. 111 In-tropolone labelling appeared to offer the advantage over 111 In-acac labelling in localising inflamed bowel earlier. In many cases the bowel was imaged within 40 min of re-injection of the leucocytes. 111 In-leucocyte scanning provides a novel approach to the problem of diagnosis and assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is non-invasive, requires no bowel preparation and thus is safe in the acutely sick patient where conventional radiological imaging methods may be hazardous. 111 Indium faecal excretion provides an objective assessment of disease activity which should prove useful in evaluating treatment regimes

  4. Role of Rifaximin in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Maria Lia

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by an altered composition of the intestinal microbiota, which may contribute to their development and maintenance in susceptible hosts. The involvement of bacteria in the inflammation has provided the rationale for a therapeutic manipulation of the gut flora through the use of antibiotics. However, the role of antibiotics has not been clearly demonstrated and their long-term employment is often restricted by an elevated number of adverse events. The use of rifaximin, which is characterised by an excellent safety profile thanks to its negligible intestinal absorption, appears to have some promise. Study results suggest that rifaximin could be useful in Crohn's disease, and a new gastroresistant formulation (rifaximin-extended intestinal release) has recently shown its efficacy in patients with moderate Crohn's disease. Less consistent data support the use of rifaximin in ulcerative colitis and in pouchitis, although the results of some studies have been encouraging. Further large controlled trials are warranted to confirm the role of rifaximin in inflammatory bowel disease treatment.

  5. [Developments in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: 2014 overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomollón, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    The way we treat inflammatory bowel disease is rapidly changing. Biologics have accounted for the biggest change in recent years, and they are being used on a more regular basis, on more indications and at earlier stages. However, primary response failure and, above all, secondary response failure and cost represent serious limitations for their use. Combination immunosuppressant therapy, individualization depending on levels and response, increasing compliance and a more suitable choice of cases can all enhance effectiveness. However in many cases, new alternatives will be necessary. Recently, 2 new antibodies have been approved: golimumab is a new option for ulcerative colitis and with another more selective mechanism of action; vedolizumab could be useful for ulcerative colitis as well as Crohn's disease. Ustekinumab is an alternative treatment option for refractory Crohn's disease. In addition to biologics, autologous bone marrow transplants and, anecdotally, the use of immunoglobulins have been suggested as alternatives in some carefully selected cases. Although effective for Clostridium difficile infection, the potential role of fecal transplants in inflammatory bowel disease is still to be determined, without initially observing very promising results. The use of probiotics has not produced significant positive results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease at the korle bu teaching hospital, accra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, Kn

    2008-03-01

    SummaryCase files of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) managed by the author in the Medical Department over the period 1997 - 2004 have been reviewed to identify some features of the disease that may aid improved diagnosis and management. The findings indicate that IBD may not be rare in the country and that there is usually a long delay in establishing the diagnosis. It appears that, in Ghana, more males than females are affected and that most are fifty years of age or below. Malignant colonic change is uncommon but there is a high default rate among the patients. Five patients (29%) died. Cases managed in an Arab country, between 1987 and 1996, have been compared. In that group more female than male patients were affected but the commonest age group affected was similar. The diagnosis was similarly delayed but no deaths were recorded as opposed to the Ghana patients. Since Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a potentially treatable condition medical practitioners need increased awareness to avoid undue delay in diagnosis.

  7. Managing inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinder M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Matthew Pinder,1 Katie Lummis,1 Christian P Selinger1,2 1Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, 2University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD affects many women of childbearing age. The course of IBD is closely related to pregnancy outcomes with poorly controlled IBD increasing the risk of prematurity, low weight for gestation, and fetal loss. As such, women with IBD face complex decision making weighing the risks of active disease versus those of medical treatments. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of IBD treatments during pregnancy and lactation aiming to provide up-to-date guidance for clinicians. Over 50% of women have poor IBD- and pregnancy-related knowledge, which is associated with views contrary to medical evidence and voluntary childlessness. This review highlights the effects of poor patient knowledge and critically evaluates interventions for improving patient knowledge and outcomes. Keywords: pregnancy, breast feeding, nursing, inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis

  8. Microbiome Heterogeneity Characterizing Intestinal Tissue and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrea D; Kirsch, Richard; Milgrom, Raquel; Stempak, Joanne M; Kabakchiev, Boyko; Silverberg, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with differential abundance of numerous organisms when compared to healthy controls (HCs); however, few studies have investigated variability in the microbiome across intestinal locations and how this variability might be related to disease location and phenotype. In this study, we have analyzed the microbiome of a large cohort of individuals recruited at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Biopsies were taken from subjects with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and HC, and also individuals having undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for treatment of ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. Microbial 16S rRNA was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We observed a great deal of variability in the microbiome characterizing different sampling locations. Samples from pouch and afferent limb were comparable in microbial composition. When comparing sigmoid and terminal ileum samples, more differences were observed. The greatest number of differentially abundant microbes was observed when comparing either pouch or afferent limb samples to sigmoid or terminal ileum. Despite these differences, we were able to observe modest microbial variability between inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes and HCs, even when controlling for sampling location and additional experimental factors. Most detected associations were observed between HCs and Crohn's disease, with decreases in specific genera in the families Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae characterizing tissue samples from individuals with Crohn's disease. This study highlights important considerations when analyzing the composition of the microbiome and also provides useful insight into differences in the microbiome characterizing these seemingly related phenotypes.

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease and anxiety: links, risks, and challenges faced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bannaga AS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ayman S Bannaga,1 Christian P Selinger2 1Department of Gastroenterology, Doncaster Royal Infirmary, Doncaster, UK; 2Department of Gastroenterology, St James University Hospital, Leeds, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD causes severe physical symptoms and is also associated with psychological comorbidities. Abnormal anxiety levels are found in up to 40% of patients with IBD. Anxiety symptoms are often related to flares of IBD but may persist in times of remission. Detection of anxiety disorder (AD in patients with IBD can be challenging. Patients with anxiety may also exhibit symptoms in keeping with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID. Evidence for the effectiveness of pharmacological and psychological therapies for anxiety stems from patients without IBD. Studies in patients with IBD have either been small or shown negative results. In light of this, a combined approach involving IBD physicians to improve disease control and psychologists or psychiatrists to treat anxiety is advised. This review examines the evidence of anxiety issues in IBD with a focus on extent of the problem, risk factors for anxiety, and the effectiveness of interventions. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, anxiety

  10. Ophthalmic manifestations in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troncoso, Leandro Lopes; Biancardi, Ana Luiza; de Moraes Jr, Haroldo Vieira; Zaltman, Cyrla

    2017-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not locally restricted to the gastrointestinal tract, and a significant portion of patients have involvement of other organs and systems. The visual system is one of the most frequently affected, mainly by inflammatory disorders such as episcleritis, uveitis and scleritis. A critical review of available literature concerning ocular involvement in IBD, as it appears in PubMed, was performed. Episcleritis, the most common ocular extraintestinal manifestation (EIM), seems to be more associated with IBD activity when compared with other ocular EIMs. In IBD patients, anterior uveitis has an insidious onset, it is longstanding and bilateral, and not related to the intestinal disease activity. Systemic steroids or immunosuppressants may be necessary in severe ocular inflammation cases, and control of the underlying bowel disease is important to prevent recurrence. Our review revealed that ocular involvement is more prevalent in Crohn’s disease than ulcerative colitis, in active IBD, mainly in the presence of other EIMs. The ophthalmic symptoms in IBD are mainly non-specific and their relevance may not be recognized by the clinician; most ophthalmic manifestations are treatable, and resolve without sequel upon prompt treatment. A collaborative clinical care team for management of IBD that includes ophthalmologists is central for improvement of quality care for these patients, and it is also cost-effective. PMID:28932076

  11. The Role of Diet in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivashankar, Raina; Lewis, James D

    2017-05-01

    Diet may play both a causal and therapeutic role for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Physicians caring for patients with IBD are often asked to make dietary recommendations. However, there are no well-established guidelines on the use of diet as a treatment of IBD. In this review, we describe the evidence supporting diet as a potential cause for IBD, patient-perceived symptoms based on diet, current research on various diets as a treatment for IBD, and areas of future research. New studies in murine models suggest that dietary emulsifiers may trigger the gut inflammatory cascade. New studies of restriction diets in patients have shown a relationship between dietary intake, symptoms, and bowel inflammation. Until several ongoing clinical trials are completed, a reasonable approach to dietary recommendations for patients with IBD is to propose a well-balanced, healthy (low-fat, low-sugar) diet prepared from fresh ingredients, such as the Mediterranean diet, with exclusions of self-identified foods that worsen or trigger IBD-related symptoms.

  12. Probiotics in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Kevin P; Fedorak, Richard N

    2006-03-01

    The demonstration that immune and epithelial cells can discriminate between different microbial species has extended our understanding of the actions of probiotics beyond simple antimicrobial concepts. Several probiotic mechanisms of action, relative to inflammatory bowel disease, have been elucidated: (1) competitive exclusion, whereby probiotics compete with microbial pathogens; (2) immunomodulation and/or stimulation of an immune response; (3) antimicrobial activity and suppression of pathogen growth; (4) enhancement of barrier activity; and (5) induction of T cell apoptosis. The unraveling of these mechanisms of action has led to new support for the use of probiotics in the management of clinical inflammatory bowel disease. While level 1 evidence now supports the therapeutic use of some probiotics in the maintenance treatment of pouchitis, only level 2 and 3 evidence are currently available in support of the use of probiotics in the treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Nevertheless, one significant and consistent finding has emerged over the course of research in the past year: not all probiotic bacteria have similar therapeutic effects. Rigorously designed, controlled clinical trials, to investigate the unresolved issues related to efficacy, dose, duration of use, single or multistrain formulation, and the concomitant use of prebiotics, synbiotics or antibiotics, are vital.

  13. Cytomegalovirus in inflammatory bowel disease: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römkens, Tessa EH; Bulte, Geert J; Nissen, Loes HC; Drenth, Joost PH

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify definitions of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and intestinal disease, in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), to determine the prevalence associated with these definitions. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and interrogated PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane for literature on prevalence and diagnostics of CMV infection and intestinal disease in IBD patients. As medical headings we used “cytomegalovirus” OR “CMV” OR “cytomegalo virus” AND “inflammatory bowel disease” OR “IBD” OR “ulcerative colitis” OR “colitis ulcerosa” OR “Crohn’s disease”. Both MeSH-terms and free searches were performed. We included all types of English-language (clinical) trials concerning diagnostics and prevalence of CMV in IBD. RESULTS: The search strategy identified 924 citations, and 52 articles were eligible for inclusion. We identified 21 different definitions for CMV infection, 8 definitions for CMV intestinal disease and 3 definitions for CMV reactivation. Prevalence numbers depend on used definition, studied population and region. The highest prevalence for CMV infection was found when using positive serum PCR as a definition, whereas for CMV intestinal disease this applies to the use of tissue PCR > 10 copies/mg tissue. Most patients with CMV infection and intestinal disease had steroid refractory disease and came from East Asia. CONCLUSION: We detected multiple different definitions used for CMV infection and intestinal disease in IBD patients, which has an effect on prevalence numbers and eventually on outcome in different trials. PMID:26811669

  14. Inflammatory bowel disease and mutations affecting the interleukin-10 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocker, Erik-Oliver; Kotlarz, Daniel; Boztug, Kaan; Gertz, E Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Noyan, Fatih; Perro, Mario; Diestelhorst, Jana; Allroth, Anna; Murugan, Dhaarini; Hätscher, Nadine; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Sauer, Martin; Kreipe, Hans; Lacher, Martin; Nustede, Rainer; Woellner, Cristina; Baumann, Ulrich; Salzer, Ulrich; Koletzko, Sibylle; Shah, Neil; Segal, Anthony W; Sauerbrey, Axel; Buderus, Stephan; Snapper, Scott B; Grimbacher, Bodo; Klein, Christoph

    2009-11-19

    The molecular cause of inflammatory bowel disease is largely unknown. We performed genetic-linkage analysis and candidate-gene sequencing on samples from two unrelated consanguineous families with children who were affected by early-onset inflammatory bowel disease. We screened six additional patients with early-onset colitis for mutations in two candidate genes and carried out functional assays in patients' peripheral-blood mononuclear cells. We performed an allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in one patient. In four of nine patients with early-onset colitis, we identified three distinct homozygous mutations in genes IL10RA and IL10RB, encoding the IL10R1 and IL10R2 proteins, respectively, which form a heterotetramer to make up the interleukin-10 receptor. The mutations abrogate interleukin-10-induced signaling, as shown by deficient STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) phosphorylation on stimulation with interleukin-10. Consistent with this observation was the increased secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha and other proinflammatory cytokines from peripheral-blood mononuclear cells from patients who were deficient in IL10R subunit proteins, suggesting that interleukin-10-dependent "negative feedback" regulation is disrupted in these cells. The allogeneic stem-cell transplantation performed in one patient was successful. Mutations in genes encoding the IL10R subunit proteins were found in patients with early-onset enterocolitis, involving hyperinflammatory immune responses in the intestine. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation resulted in disease remission in one patient. 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society

  15. Value-based health care for inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deen, Welmoed K; Esrailian, Eric; Hommes, Daniel W

    2015-05-01

    Increasing healthcare costs worldwide put the current healthcare systems under pressure. Although many efforts have aimed to contain costs in medicine, only a few have achieved substantial changes. Inflammatory bowel diseases rank among the most costly of chronic diseases, and physicians nowadays are increasingly engaged in health economics discussions. Value-based health care [VBHC] has gained a lot of attention recently, and is thought to be the way forward to contain costs while maintaining quality. The key concept behind VBHC is to improve achieved outcomes per encountered costs, and evaluate performance accordingly. Four main components need to be in place for the system to be effective: [1] accurate measurement of health outcomes and costs; [2] reporting of these outcomes and benchmarking against other providers; [3] identification of areas in need of improvement based on these data and adjusting the care delivery processes accordingly; and [4] rewarding high-performing participants. In this article we will explore the key components of VBHC, we will review available evidence focussing on inflammatory bowel diseases, and we will present our own experience as a guide for other providers. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. MINERALIZATION DISORDER OF OSSEOUS TISSUE AMONG THE CHILDREN, SUFFERING FROM INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Yablokova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth rate of inflammatory bowel diseases among children actualizes early detection of this pathology form and its aftera effects, including secondary osteoporosis. The research purpose is to study the characteristics of osseous tissue mineralization, disorder of physical growth and sexual maturity of children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases. The researchers have examined 116 children, including 33 children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases; 26 children, suffering from persistent colitis; 29 children, suffering from gasatroduodenitis; and 28 children with no GI tract pathologies. The study deals with estimate of level of mineral osseous tissue density, biochemical rates of osseous metabolism, as well as physical growth and sexual maturity. reduction of mineral osseous tissue density was found among 48,5% of children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases, 23% of children, suffering from persistent colitis, 31% of children, suffering from chronic gastritis and 18% of almost healthy children, at the same time, it was more apparent among children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases. The lowest rates of mineral osseous tissue density were among girls. Calcium phosphoric metabolism did not change apart from calcium creatinine coefficient, if osteopenia was observed. Thus, reduction of mineral osseous tissue density is often observed among children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases, especially among adolescent girls. Therefore, it conditions the necessity to include densimetry into the conventional examination plan for children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases. Authors also find it advisable to monitor physical growth and sexual maturity of children.Key words: children, inflammatory bowel diseases, osteoporosis.

  17. Identifying the inflammatory and fibrotic bowel stricture: MRI diffusion-weighted imaging in Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: Decreased ADC values in inflammatory stricture bowel may be resulted from multiple factors, including an increase in cellularity, presence of edema, micro-abscesses and increased perfusion. Meanwhile, fibrotic tissue deposition was indicated to lead to restrictions in diffusion. Distinguishable ADCs were observed between inflammatory and fibrotic bowel stricture, where DWI sequence could contribute to the identification.

  18. Disease severity and treatment requirements in familial inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, María Pilar; Martí, David; Tosca, Joan; Bosca-Watts, Marta Maia; Sanahuja, Ana; Navarro, Pablo; Pascual, Isabel; Antón, Rosario; Mora, Francisco; Mínguez, Miguel

    2017-08-01

    Several studies demonstrate an increased prevalence and concordance of inflammatory bowel disease among the relatives of patients. Other studies suggest that genetic influence is over-estimated. The aims of this study are to evaluate the phenotypic expression and the treatment requirements in familial inflammatory bowel disease, to study the relationship between number of relatives and degree of kinship with disease severity and to quantify the impact of family aggregation compared to other environmental factors. Observational analytical study of 1211 patients followed in our unit. We analyzed, according to the existence of familial association, number and degree of consanguinity, the phenotypic expression, complications, extraintestinal manifestations, treatment requirements, and mortality. A multivariable analysis considering smoking habits and non-steroidal-anti-inflammatory drugs was performed. 14.2% of patients had relatives affected. Median age at diagnosis tended to be lower in the familial group, 32 vs 29, p = 0.07. In familial ulcerative colitis, there was a higher proportion of extraintestinal manifestations: peripheral arthropathy (OR = 2.3, p = 0.015) and erythema nodosum (OR = 7.6, p = 0.001). In familial Crohn's disease, there were higher treatment requirements: immunomodulators (OR = 1.8, p = 0.029); biologics (OR = 1.9, p = 0.011); and surgery (OR = 1.7, p = 0.044). The abdominal abscess increased with the number of relatives affected: 5.1% (sporadic), 7.0% (one), and 14.3% (two or more), p=0.039. These associations were maintained in the multivariate analysis. Familial aggregation is considered a risk factor for more aggressive disease and higher treatment requirements, a tendency for earlier onset, more abdominal abscess, and extraintestinal manifestations, remaining a risk factor analyzing the influence of some environmental factors.

  19. Environmental factors and risk of developing paediatric inflammatory bowel disease - A population based study 2007-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Christian; Paerregaard, Anders; Munkholm, Pia

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To identify environmental risk factors for developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To identify environmental risk factors for developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children...

  20. Faecal S100A12 as a non-invasive marker distinguishing inflammatory bowel disease from irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, T; Langhorst, J; Wittkowski, H; Becker, K; Friedrich, A W; Rueffer, A; Dobos, G J; Roth, J; Foell, D

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: S100A12 is a pro-inflammatory protein that is secreted by granulocytes. S100A12 serum levels increase during inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We performed the first study analysing faecal S100A12 in adults with signs of intestinal inflammation. METHODS: Faecal S100A12 was determined by

  1. [Changes of fecal flora and its correlation with inflammatory indicators in patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Ye; Wang, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Youlian; Zhang, Shaoheng; Wang, Pu; Xie, Shan; Jiang, Bo

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the changes in fecal flora and its correlation with the occurrence and progression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We collected fresh fecal specimens from 167 IBD patients (including 113 with ulcerative colitis and 54 with Crohn's disease) and 54 healthy volunteers. The fecal flora was analyzed by gradient dilution method and the data of inflammatory markers including WBC, PLT, CRP and ESR were collected to assess the association between the fecal flora and the inflammatory markers. The species Enterrococcus (6.60∓0.23, Pflora. The changes in fecal flora did not show a significant correlation with these inflammatory markers. IBD patients have fecal flora imbalance compared with the healthy controls, and this imbalance may contribute to the occurrence and progression of IBD. The decline of Eubacterium contributes to the occurrence and development of IBD.

  2. Probiotic bacteria in the prevention and the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorak, Richard; Demeria, Denny

    2012-12-01

    Definitive curative strategies for inflammatory bowel disease remain challenging for physicians and patients. For decades, probiotic organisms have been used in various gastrointestinal diseases. Only recently has comprehension of the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease developed to the point where the significance of the host gastrointestinal microbial population is seen to have marked influence on the initiation and ongoing inflammatory processes of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. Well-designed, large randomized controlled trials using probiotics in patients with inflammatory bowel disease are required for probiotics to become mainstream therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Therapeutic Use of Cannabis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Seymour

    2016-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa and its derivatives, cannabinoids, have grown increasingly popular as a potential therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Studies have shown that modulation of the endocannabinoid system, which regulates various functions in the body and has been shown to play a key role in the pathogenesis of IBD, has a therapeutic effect in mouse colitis. Epidemiologic data and human therapy studies reveal a possible role for cannabinoids in the symptomatic treatment of IBD, although it has yet to be determined in human populations whether cannabinoids have therapeutic anti-inflammatory effects in IBD or are simply masking its many debilitating symptoms. Large, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials using serial inflammatory markers, biopsy findings, and endoscopic disease severity to demonstrate objective improvement in IBD are necessary before cannabis can be empirically accepted and recommended as an IBD treatment option. Questions concerning its safety profile and adverse effects prompt the need for further research, particularly in regard to dosing and route of administration to maximize benefits and limit potential harms. Cannabis use should be reserved for symptomatic control in patients with severe IBD refractory to the currently available standard-of-care and complementary and alternative medicines. PMID:28035196

  4. Therapeutic Use of Cannabis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Waseem; Katz, Seymour

    2016-11-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa and its derivatives, cannabinoids, have grown increasingly popular as a potential therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Studies have shown that modulation of the endocannabinoid system, which regulates various functions in the body and has been shown to play a key role in the pathogenesis of IBD, has a therapeutic effect in mouse colitis. Epidemiologic data and human therapy studies reveal a possible role for cannabinoids in the symptomatic treatment of IBD, although it has yet to be determined in human populations whether cannabinoids have therapeutic anti-inflammatory effects in IBD or are simply masking its many debilitating symptoms. Large, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials using serial inflammatory markers, biopsy findings, and endoscopic disease severity to demonstrate objective improvement in IBD are necessary before cannabis can be empirically accepted and recommended as an IBD treatment option. Questions concerning its safety profile and adverse effects prompt the need for further research, particularly in regard to dosing and route of administration to maximize benefits and limit potential harms. Cannabis use should be reserved for symptomatic control in patients with severe IBD refractory to the currently available standard-of-care and complementary and alternative medicines.

  5. Probiotics in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Associated Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Mack

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A complex set of interactions between the human genes encoding innate protective functions and immune defenses and the environment of the intestinal mucosa with its microbiota is currently considered key to the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Probiotics offer a method to potentially alter the intestinal microbiome exogenously or may provide an option to deliver microbial metabolic products to alter the chronicity of intestinal mucosal inflammation characterizing IBD. At present, there is little evidence for the benefit of currently used probiotic microbes in Crohn’s disease or associated conditions affecting extra-intestinal organs. However, clinical practice guidelines are now including a probiotic as an option for recurrent and relapsing antibiotic sensitive pouchitis and the use of probiotics in mild ulcerative colitis is provocative and suggests potential for benefit in select patients but concerns remain about proof from trials.

  6. Osteodensitometry in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, C.; Kahn, T.; Borte, G.; Borte, M.; Richter, T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the quantity and severity of bone disorders in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and to examine the correlation to whole body growth. Materials and methods: in this study 89 bone mineral density measurements were performed and retrospectively analyzed. Results: under consideration of growth retardation, over 65.2% of the patients with Cohn's disease showed a reduced bone mineral density. Osteopenia/Osteoporosis is seldom seen in patients with ulcerative colitis, i.e., only 34.8% showed a reduction in bone mineral density. Growth retardation and reduced bone mineral density are correlated. Patients with cohn's disease and a body length below the 25th height percentile showed a reduced bone mineral density in 78.1% of the cases. Patients with a body length below the 10th height percentile had a reduced bone mineral density in 83.3% of the cases. (orig.)

  7. Toll-like Receptors and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is one relapsing and lifelong disease that affects millions of patients worldwide. Increasing evidence has recently highlighted immune-system dysfunction, especially toll-like receptors (TLRs-mediated innate immune dysfunction, as central players in the pathogenesis of IBD. TLRs and TLR-activated signaling pathways are involved not only in the pathogenesis but also in the efficacy of treatment of IBD. By understanding these molecular mechanisms, we might develop a strategy for relieving the experience of long-lasting suffering of those patients and improving their quality of life. The purpose of this review article is to summarize the potential mechanisms of TLR signaling pathways in IBD and the novel potential therapeutic strategies against IBD.

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease in relation to contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engkilde, Kåre; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2007-01-01

    number. The patients were patch tested at a dermatology department with a long history of research in CA. By record linking with the Danish National Patient Registry, patients were identified who had either an International Classification of Disease (ICD) code for Crohn's disease (CD) or an ICD code......OBJECTIVE: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has previously been investigated with relation to allergic conditions; however, diverging results were found and there are only a few small studies focusing on delayed hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether.......71 (CI 95% 0.53-0.94), which is mainly the result of an inverse association between CA and CD, odds ratio adjusted for age and gender 0.42 (CI 95% 0.23-0.76). CONCLUSIONS: The association found between CA and IBD might be related to shared genetic factors or common environmental determinates. It may also...

  9. Outcomes After Primary Infliximab Treatment Failure in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Sine; Steenholdt, Casper; Rasmussen, Maria

    2017-01-01

    primary infliximab treatment failure, the majority of patients (n = 51, 63%) had inflammatory bowel disease-related surgery (Crohn's disease n = 19, 58%; ulcerative colitis n = 32, 67%; P = 0.49). There was a markedly increased risk of surgery in patients with primary infliximab treatment failure...... treated with infliximab as first-line anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment at a tertiary center. Primary infliximab treatment failure was defined as no clinical improvement during infliximab induction therapy resulting in discontinuation of infliximab therapy. RESULTS: A total of 560 patients (Crohn...... as compared to initial responders: odds ratio 6.3 (3.8-10.6), P disease 1 year after primary infliximab treatment failure. CONCLUSIONS: Primary infliximab treatment failure is associated with poor outcome including high risk...

  10. Oral contraceptive use and the risk of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, R S; Wurzelmann, J I; Lyles, C M

    1992-07-01

    We used rosters of the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America to identify potential cases and peer-nominated controls to explore the reported association between oral contraceptives and inflammatory bowel disease. Overall, women who used oral contraceptives were at increased risk of developing Crohn's disease (odds ratio = 1.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.99-2.26). The findings persisted after adjustment for age at symptom onset, decade of onset, education, marital status, and location of disease. There was an interaction with cigarette smoking; the risk associated with oral contraceptives was elevated in current smokers (odds ratio = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.22-5.75), but not in former smokers or never-smokers. The risk was not elevated for ulcerative colitis (odds ratio = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.65-1.85).

  11. Diet as a Therapeutic Option for Adult Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakodkar, Samir; Mutlu, Ece A

    2017-12-01

    There are many mechanisms to explain how food may drive and ameliorate inflammation. Although there are no consistent macronutrient associations inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) development, many exclusion diets have been described: IgG-4 guided exclusion diet; semivegetarian diet; low-fat, fiber-limited exclusion diet; Paleolithic diet; Maker's diet; vegan diet; Life without Bread diet; exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN), the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) and the low FODMAP diet. The literature on diet and IBD is reviewed with a particular focus on EEN, SCD, and low FODMAP diets. Lessons learned from the existing observations and strengths and shortcomings of existing data are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder......, be disease specific, mirror the disease activity and, finally, be easily applicable for routine clinical purposes. However, no such disease markers have yet been identified for IBD. In this article, classical disease markers including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins (especially...... orosomucoid and CRP), leukocyte and platelet counts, albumin, neopterin, and beta2-microglobulin will be reviewed together with emerging disease markers such as antibodies of the ANCA/ASCA type, cytokines (e.g., IL-1, IL-2Ralpha, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, and TNF-alpha receptors) and with various adhesion...

  13. Pharmacological treatments and infectious diseases in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipasquale, Valeria; Romano, Claudio

    2018-03-01

    The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is rising, as is the employment of immunosuppressive and biological drugs. Most patients with IBD receive immunosuppressive therapies during the course of the disease. These molecules are a double-edged sword; while they can help control disease activity, they also increase the risk of infections. Therefore, it is important that pediatricians involved in primary care, pediatric gastroenterologists, and infectious disease physicians have a thorough knowledge of the infections that can affect patients with IBD. Areas covered: A broad review of the major infectious diseases that have been reported in children and adolescents with IBD was performed, and information regarding surveillance, diagnosis and management were updated. The possible correlations with IBD pharmacological tools are discussed. Expert commentary: Opportunistic infections are possible in pediatric IBD, and immunosuppressive and immunomodulator therapy seems to play a causative role. Heightened awareness and vigilant surveillance leading to prompt diagnosis and treatment are important for optimal management.

  14. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement...... available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library......, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia...

  15. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians...... affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD...... is conducted. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one such chronic disease. Despite specialist care being essential, much IBD care could and probably should be delivered in primary care with continued collaboration between all stakeholders. Whilst most primary care physicians only have few patients currently...

  16. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M

    2000-01-01

    orosomucoid and CRP), leukocyte and platelet counts, albumin, neopterin, and beta2-microglobulin will be reviewed together with emerging disease markers such as antibodies of the ANCA/ASCA type, cytokines (e.g., IL-1, IL-2Ralpha, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, and TNF-alpha receptors) and with various adhesion......Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder......, be disease specific, mirror the disease activity and, finally, be easily applicable for routine clinical purposes. However, no such disease markers have yet been identified for IBD. In this article, classical disease markers including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins (especially...

  17. Impact of exome sequencing in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Christopher J; Kelsen, Judith R; Baldassano, Robert N; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2013-01-01

    Approaches to understanding the genetic contribution to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have continuously evolved from family- and population-based epidemiology, to linkage analysis, and most recently, to genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The next stage in this evolution seems to be the sequencing of the exome, that is, the regions of the human genome which encode proteins. The GWAS approach has been very fruitful in identifying at least 163 loci as being associated with IBD, and now, exome sequencing promises to take our genetic understanding to the next level. In this review we will discuss the possible contributions that can be made by an exome sequencing approach both at the individual patient level to aid with disease diagnosis and future therapies, as well as in advancing knowledge of the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:24187447

  18. [Natural history, complications, safety and pregnancy in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, María

    2015-09-01

    Numerous studies were presented in Digestive Disease Week 2015 (DDW 2015) on the natural history, complications, and safety of treatments in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as novel findings on fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding. The present article reviews presentations on the natural history of IBD, the risk of complications and their prevention, treatment safety, aspects related to fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding, as well as the risk of cancer and its association with IBD and with drugs used in its treatment. In the next few years, more data will become available on treatment safety and the possible complications that can develop in IBD patients due to the disease itself and the drugs employed in its treatment, which will allow measures to be adopted to improve prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. [Infectious gastroenteritis in relapses of inflammatory bowel disease. Therapeutic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliellas, C; Xiol, X; Barenys, M; Saavedra, J; Casanovas, T; Iborra, M; Sesé, E

    1996-06-01

    The incidence and clinical importance of infectious gastroenteritis was studied in 67 consecutive relapses of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A stool culture was done in every case before starting treatment. Stool culture was positive in 6 relapses (8.9%): Four were exacerbations of ulcerative colitis and two of Crohn's disease (8.8% in ulcerative colitis vs 9% in Crohn's disease; NS). The microorganisms isolated were Campylobacter jejuni in three cases, Salmonella enteritidis in two and Staphylococcus aureus in one case. There were not clinical differences between patients with positive and negative stool culture. Treated with antibiotics, stool cultures became negative in all of them but only in three the disease was controlled. The other three had to be treated with corticosteroids to achieve remission. We conclude that stool culture should be practised in all relapses of IBD and in case of positivity, antibiotic therapy should be started. With this approach the use of corticosteroids can be avoided in some patients.

  20. Exercise in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engels M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael Engels,1 Raymond K Cross,1 Millie D Long2 1Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA, 2Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs, including both Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, are chronic autoimmune diseases. Both CD and UC have relapsing and remitting courses. Although effective medical treatments exist for these chronic conditions, some patients do not respond to these traditional therapies. Patients are often left frustrated with incomplete resolution of symptoms and seek alternative or complementary forms of therapy. Patients often search for modifiable factors that could improve their symptoms or help them to maintain periods of remission. In this review, we examine both the published evidence on the benefits of exercise clinically and the pathophysiological changes associated with exercise. We then describe data on exercise patterns in patients with IBDs, potential barriers to exercise in IBDs, and the role of exercise in the development and course of IBDs. While some data support physical activity as having a protective role in the development of IBDs, the findings have not been robust. Importantly, studies of exercise in patients with mild-to-moderate IBD activity show no danger of disease or symptom exacerbation. Exercise has theoretical benefits on the immune response, and the limited available data suggest that exercise may improve disease activity, quality of life, bone mineral density, and fatigue levels in patients with IBDs. Overall, exercise is safe and probably beneficial in patients with IBDs. Evidence supporting specific exercise recommendations, including aspects such as duration and heart rate targets, is needed in order to better counsel patients with IBDs. Keywords: inflammatory bowel

  1. Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg ND

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neil D Goldberg Emeritus Chief of Gastroenterology, University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, MD, USA Abstract: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%–76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. Keywords: anemia, inflammatory bowel disease, intravenous iron, iron deficiency, oral iron, therapy

  2. Impact of sleep disturbances in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Ziba; Keefer, Laurie; Farhadi, Ashkan; Stepanski, Edward; Sedghi, Shahriar; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2007-11-01

    Normal sleep is paramount for a healthy lifestyle and high quality of life. Sleep modulates the immune system and thus affects the course of several chronic inflammatory conditions. There are no reported studies that address the role of sleep disturbance in the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to characterize sleep disturbance in IBD using validated measures of sleep and quality of life. A self-administered, mail-in questionnaire package was sent to 205 subjects after a brief instruction. The questionnaire package was composed of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a measure of disease severity and the IBD-Quality of Life Questionnaire. A total of 119 subjects were recruited (58% response rate): 80 with inactive IBD, 24 with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 15 healthy controls. The IBD subjects reported significantly prolonged sleep latency, frequent sleep fragmentation, higher rate of using sleeping pills, decreased day-time energy, increased tiredness and poor overall sleep quality compared to healthy controls. The abnormal sleep patterns in IBD subjects were similar to IBS subjects. The reported sleep quality was correlated with IBD disease severity score (r(2) = 0.55, P = 0.02). Both IBD and IBS subjects thought that sleep and their disease status were correlated. The results show that IBD patients have significant sleep disturbance even when their disease is not active. This problem might affect quality of life, gastrointestinal symptoms and coping ability, and might potentially modify disease severity or increase risk of flare-up. Regardless of the primary or secondary origin of this problem, sleep disturbance should be addressed in the clinical management of patients with IBD.

  3. Effect of Alternanthera brasiliana in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease in albino rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shivashankar P.; Purushotham K.; Mangala Lahkar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the gastrointestinal tract with limited therapeutic options. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of methanolic extract of Alternanthera brasiliana in acetic acid-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in albino rats. Methods: A total of 36 animals were included in the study. Animals were divided into six groups (n = 6 ): group I - control (normal saline), group II-AA+ normal saline, g...

  4. Increased prevalence of Methanosphaera stadtmanae in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Blais Lecours

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is associated with the modulation of mucosal immunity and the etiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Previous studies focused on the impact of bacterial species on IBD but seldom suspected archaea, which can be a major constituent of intestinal microbiota, to be implicated in the diseases. Recent evidence supports that two main archaeal species found in the digestive system of humans, Methanobrevibacter smithii (MBS and Methanosphaera stadtmanae (MSS can have differential immunogenic properties in lungs of mice; with MSS but not MBS being a strong inducer of the inflammatory response. We thus aimed at documenting the immunogenic potential of MBS and MSS in humans and to explore their association with IBD.To validate the immunogenicity of MBS and MSS in humans, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy subjects were stimulated with these two microorganisms and the production of inflammatory cytokine TNF was measured by ELISA. To verify MBS and MSS prevalence in IBD, stool samples from 29 healthy control subjects and 29 patients suffering from IBD were collected for DNA extraction. Plasma was also collected from these subjects to measure antigen-specific IgGs by ELISA. Quantitative PCR was used for bacteria, methanogens, MBS and MSS quantification.Mononuclear cells stimulated with MSS produced higher concentrations of TNF (39.5 ng/ml compared to MBS stimulation (9.1 ng/ml. Bacterial concentrations and frequency of MBS-containing stools were similar in both groups. However, the number of stool samples positive for the inflammatory archaea MSS was higher in patients than in controls (47% vs 20%. Importantly, only IBD patients developed a significant anti-MSS IgG response.The prevalence of MSS is increased in IBD patients and is associated with an antigen-specific IgG response.

  5. Adiponectin and adiponectin receptor 1 overexpression enhance inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu-Ju; Shen, Tang-Long; Chen, Yu-Shan; Mersmann, Harry John; Liu, Bing-Hsien; Ding, Shih-Torng

    2018-03-14

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipokine derived from adipocytes. It binds to adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 (AdipoR1 and R2) to exert its function in regulating whole-body energy homeostasis and inflammatory responses. However, the role of ADN-AdipoR1 signaling in intestinal inflammation is controversial, and its role in the regulation of neutrophils is still unclear. Our goal was to clarify the role of AdipoR1 signaling in colitis and the effects on neutrophils. We generated porcine AdipoR1 transgenic mice (pAdipoR1 mice) and induced murine colitis using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to study the potential role of AdipoR1 in inflammatory bowel disease. We also treated a THP-1 macrophage and a HT-29 colon epithelial cell line with ADN recombinant protein to study the effects of ADN on inflammation. After inducing murine colitis, pAdipoR1 mice developed more severe symptoms than wild-type (WT) mice. Treatment with ADN increased the expression of pro-inflammatory factors in THP-1 and HT-29 cells. Moreover, we also observed that the expression of cyclooxygenase2 (cox2), neutrophil chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL5), and the infiltration of neutrophils were increased in the colon of pAdipoR1 mice. Our study showed that ADN-AdipoR1 signaling exacerbated colonic inflammation through two possible mechanisms. First, ADN-AdipoR1 signaling increased pro-inflammatory factors. Second, AdipoR1 enhanced neutrophil chemokine expression and recruited neutrophils into the colonic tissue to increase inflammation.

  6. [Depressive and anxiety symptoms, coping strategies in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Zoltán; Kovács, Ferencs

    2007-01-01

    Psychological factors play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders, like irritable bowel syndrome. In our study we compared certain psychological characteristics of patients suffering from functional and organic gastrointestinal disorders and healthy subjects. Age and gender matched irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease patients and healthy subjects were compared on their depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), anxiety symptoms (Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and coping strategies (Folkman-Lazarus Ways of Coping Questionnaire). GI patients groups were characterized by significantly more severe depressive and anxiety symptoms and by the prevalence of passive coping strategies. On the Beck Depression Inventory "Performance Difficulty" and "Somatic Symptoms" subscales, significant differences were observed between patients and healthy subjects, while on the "Negative affect" subscale, only IBS patients but not IBD patients scored significantly higher compared to healthy subjects. The functional GI group showed significantly more severe depressive and also more severe anxiety symptoms, but this latter did not reach statistical significance. No differences were detected regarding the use of coping strategies. Psychological screening and psychological and/or pharmacological interventions are recommended for GI patients, at least in the most severe and treatment resistant cases. Differences between IBS and IBD groups underline the importance of the increased psychic vulnerability of functional GI patients and emphasize the role of affective components in the etiopathogenesis of the disorder. Future studies should be directed toward the assessment of disease-specific psychic characteristics (e.g. pain-coping strategies, cognitive schemas), subjective symptom experience and illness-behavior.

  7. An observational study of cognitive function in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrill, J W; Gallacher, J; Hood, K; Green, J T; Matthews, S B; Campbell, A K; Smith, A

    2013-11-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are associated with several risk factors for developing cognitive impairment. These include altered cytokine levels, concurrent mood disorders, and the presence of chronic pain. This observational study aimed to explore the cognitive profile of patients with these conditions. Participants completed the Cardiff Cognitive Battery, a series of computerized neuropsychological performance tests that examine a range of cognitive function including psychomotor speed, memory, and intelligence. A progressive analysis of covariance model was used with demographic details, anxiety and depression scores entered as covariates. Fecal calprotectin levels were measured in IBD patients to determine disease activity. In total 231 participants were recruited (150 IBD patients, 40 IBS patients, and 41 healthy controls). IBD patients had significantly lower scores on fluid (p = 0.01) and crystalline intelligence tests (p = 0.028) compared to healthy volunteers, however, this reflected differences in concurrent mood disorder and level of education. When these factors were added as covariates, there was no significant difference between the groups. Duration and activity of disease did not affect cognitive function in IBD patients. Severity of symptoms had no impact on cognition in patients with IBS. The results of this observational study do not support the hypothesis that IBS or IBD have an intrinsic disease process that is associated with cognitive dysfunction. It is possible that concurrent mood disorders, in particular depression, may affect the cognitive performance of patients with IBD in specific tasks. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Thrombospondin-1 and VEGF in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Alkim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is an important process in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation. We aimed to study the angiogeneic balance in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD by evaluating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 on colonic epithelial cells, together with the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS.Twenty-one ulcerative colitis (UC, 14 Crohn's disease (CD, 11 colorectal cancer patients, and 11 healthy controls colonic biopsy samples were evaluated immunohistochemically.The expressions of TSP-1, VEGF, and iNOS in UC and CD groups were higher than expression in healthy control group, all with statistical significance. However, in colorectal cancer group, VEGF and iNOS expressions were increased importantly, but TSP-1 expression was not statistically different from healthy control group's expression. Both TSP-1 and VEGF expressions were correlated with iNOS expression distinctly but did not correlate with each other.Both pro-angiogeneic VEGF and antiangiogeneic TSP-1 expressions were found increased in our IBD groups, but in colorectal cancer group, only VEGF expression was increased. TSP-1 increases in IBD patients as a response to inflammatory condition, but this increase was not enough to suppress pathologic angiogenesis and inflammation in IBD.

  9. From Inflammation to Cancer in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Molecular Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Maurizio; DE Francesco, Francesco; Zarantonello, Laura; Ruffolo, Cesare; Ferraro, Giuseppe A; Zanus, Giacomo; Giordano, Antonio; Bassi, Nicolò; Cillo, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of colitis-associated colorectal carcinoma (CAC). CAC is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The aim of the present review was to discuss the most important signaling pathways and genetic alterations involved in carcinogenesis related to IBD, focusing on the molecular aspects of cancer stem cell physiology and the impact of the inflammatory microenvironment. Molecular mechanisms involved in CAC development differ from those in sporadic colorectal cancer, reflecting the prominent role of inflammation-induced carcinogenesis in the development of CAC. The alteration of the physiological microenvironment is thought to be responsible for the initiation of carcinogenesis in IBD. Furthermore, cancer stem cells seem to have a fundamental role in the generation and growth of CAC. We also address prevention and treatment modalities of CAC and its involvement in IBD. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Probiotics in inflammatory bowel disease--therapeutic rationale and role.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    The intestinal flora has a conditioning effect on intestinal homeostasis, delivering regulatory signals to the epithelium, the mucosal immune system and to the neuromuscular activity of the gut. Beneficial metabolic activities of the enteric flora include nutrient production, metabolism of dietary carcinogens, conversion of prodrugs to active drugs. However, increasing evidence suggests that some components of the enteric flora are essential ingredients in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); this has prompted interest in therapeutic manipulation of the flora with probiotics. Probiotics are biologic control agents-described as live microbial food supplements which confer a health benefit beyond inherent basic nutrition. Multiple potential beneficial effects have been attributed to the probiotic use of lactic acid bacteria, bifidobacteria and other non-pathogenic commensals. At present, much of the promise of probiotics remains outside the realm of evidence-based medicine and awaits the results of prospective trials, now underway. No reliable in vitro predictors of in vivo efficacy of putative probiotics have been identified. Rigorous comparisons of probiotic performance have not been performed and the suitability of a given probiotic for different individuals is largely unexplored. Notwithstanding, an improved understanding of the normal commensal flora and host-flora interactions has the potential to open up new therapeutic strategies for inflammatory disorders of the gut.

  11. Diet as a Trigger or Therapy for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James D; Abreu, Maria T

    2017-02-01

    The most common question asked by patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is, "Doctor, what should I eat?" Findings from epidemiology studies have indicated that diets high in animal fat and low in fruits and vegetables are the most common pattern associated with an increased risk of IBD. Low levels of vitamin D also appear to be a risk factor for IBD. In murine models, diets high in fat, especially saturated animal fats, also increase inflammation, whereas supplementation with omega 3 long-chain fatty acids protect against intestinal inflammation. Unfortunately, omega 3 supplements have not been shown to decrease the risk of relapse in patients with Crohn's disease. Dietary intervention studies have shown that enteral therapy, with defined formula diets, helps children with Crohn's disease and reduces inflammation and dysbiosis. Although fiber supplements have not been shown definitively to benefit patients with IBD, soluble fiber is the best way to generate short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate, which has anti-inflammatory effects. Addition of vitamin D and curcumin has been shown to increase the efficacy of IBD therapy. There is compelling evidence from animal models that emulsifiers in processed foods increase risk for IBD. We discuss current knowledge about popular diets, including the specific carbohydrate diet and diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols. We present findings from clinical and basic science studies to help gastroenterologists navigate diet as it relates to the management of IBD. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical and Sociodemographic Aspects of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmondes, Leda Maria; Nunes, Marcelo Oliveira; Azevedo, Arthur Rangel; Oliveira, Murilo Matos de Santana; Coelho, Lorena Eugenia Rosa; Torres-Neto, Juvenal da Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Background In Brazil, there are few epidemiological studies available about the demographic and clinical aspects of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with IBD treated at the University Hospital (HU) of the Sergipe Federal University (UFS). Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in HU/UFS from October 2011 to January 2014. The sample consisted of 87 patients with IBD, who registered in the coloproctology clinic. We applied a questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables. Results Of the 87 patients, 40 (46%) had Crohn’s disease (CD) and 47 (54%) had ulcerative colitis (UC). Women had a higher prevalence of IBD. Data obtained were significant (P 25 years old), with rural origin, bloody diarrhea and rectal bleeding. Location and initial behavior of CD were ileum-colic (L3), inflammatory behavior and penetrating form of the disease. There is higher prevalence of proctitis and mild and severe forms of the UC among women. Osteoarticular and systemic manifestations predominated in both diseases. Conclusions IBD affected more women than men. The age, origin and level of education can interfere with early diagnosis. Demographic and clinical aspects were similar to the literature. Data differ in the time interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, smoking habit, appendectomy and severity of UC for age and gender. PMID:27785298

  13. Current concepts of the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    Although the cause of inflammatory bowel disease is not known, the pathogenesis involves an immune-mediated tissue damage that is the result of an interaction among genetic predisposing factors, exogenous triggers and endogenous modifying influences. Multiple genes are involved and operate at the level of the immune response and at the target organ. Exogenous triggers include the enteric microflora which might stimulate the mucosal immune system in genetically predisposed individuals. Endogenous modifying factors such as the psychoneuroendocrine system have regulatory effects on the immune system and the inflammatory response, and may influence the course of the disease. While autoimmune phenomena do occur, particularly in ulcerative colitis, there is no evidence that they are directly responsible for the tissue damage. It appears more likely, particularly in Crohn\\'s disease, that tissue injury may occur as an indirect or "bystander" effect of mucosal T-cell hyperactivation, perhaps in response to a normal enteric microbial antigen. Most of the immunologic and histologic features of Crohn\\'s disease can be explained by the effects of T-cell derived and other cytokines on the epithelium, the local immune system, the microvasculature, and the recruitment of auxiliary effector cells such as neutrophils.

  14. Role of Incretin Axis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Duan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs, including Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract and involve a complicated reciprocity of environmental, genetic, and immunologic factors. Despite substantial advances in the foundational understanding of the immunological pathogenesis of IBD, the detailed mechanism of the pathological progression in IBD remains unknown. In addition to Th1/Th2 cells, whose role in IBD has been previously well defined, recent evidence indicates that Th17 cells and Tregs also play a crucial role in the development of IBD. Diets which contain excess sugars, salt, and fat may also be important actors in the pathogenesis of IBD, which may be the cause of high IBD incidence in western developed and industrialized countries. Up until now, the reason for the variance in prevalence of IBD between developed and developing countries has been unknown. This is partly due to the increasing popularity of western diets in developing countries, which makes the data harder to interpret. The enterocrinins glucagon-like peptides (GLPs, including GLP-1 and GLP-2, exhibit notable benefits on lipid metabolism, atherosclerosis formation, plasma glucose levels, and maintenance of gastric mucosa integrity. In addition to the regulation of nutrient metabolism, the emerging role of GLPs and their degrading enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 in gastrointestinal diseases has gained increasing attention. Therefore, here we review the function of the DPP-4/GLP axis in IBD.

  15. Probiotics in the treatment of human inflammatory bowel diseases: update 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorak, Richard Neil; Dieleman, Levinus Albert

    2008-07-01

    Probiotic research and clinical trials have been forging ahead over the last decade. Although much has been learnt in relation to probiotic intestinal epithelial-mucosal immune interactions, the evidence for substantial clinical efficacy of probiotics continues to progress much slower. This review outlines the probiotic clinical studies before 2005 that formed the foundation of probiotic clinical trials in inflammatory bowel disease and then examines indepth those inflammatory bowel disease probiotic clinical trials published after 2005 that are leading to new understanding of the role of probiotics in the induction and remission of inflammatory bowel disease in humans.

  16. Catechins and Their Therapeutic Benefits to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Yan Fan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Catechins are natural polyphenolic phytochemicals that exist in food and medicinal plants, such as tea, legume and rubiaceae. An increasing number of studies have associated the intake of catechins-rich foods with the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases in humans, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Some studies have demonstrated that catechins could significantly inhibit the excessive oxidative stress through direct or indirect antioxidant effects and promote the activation of the antioxidative substances such as glutathione peroxidases (GPO and glutathione (GSH, reducing the oxidative damages to the colon. In addition, catechins can also regulate the infiltration and proliferation of immune related-cells, such as neutrophils, colonic epithelial cells, macrophages, and T lymphocytes, helping reduce the inflammatory relations and provide benefits to IBD. Perhaps catechins can further inhibit the deterioration of intestinal lesions through regulating the cell gap junctions. Furthermore, catechins can exert their significant anti-inflammatory properties by regulating the activation or deactivation of inflammation-related oxidative stress-related cell signaling pathways, such as nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs, transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2, signal transducer and the activator of transcription 1/3 (STAT1/3 pathways. Finally, catechins can also stabilize the structure of the gastrointestinal micro-ecological environment via promoting the proliferation of beneficial intestinal bacteria and regulating the balance of intestinal flora, so as to relieve the IBD. Furthermore, catechins may regulate the tight junctions (TJ in the epithelium. This paper elaborates the currently known possible molecular mechanisms of catechins in favor of IBD.

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease in Bahrain: single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Maheeba Abdulla,1 Mahmood Al Saeed,1 Rawdha Hameed Fardan,1 Hawra Faisal Alalwan,1 Zahra S Ali Almosawi,1 Amal Fuad Almahroos,1 Jehad Al Qamish2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Salmaniya Medical Complex, Manama, Bahrain, 2Ibn Al Nafees Hospital, Manama, Bahrain Purpose: The number of newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD cases such as ulcerative colitis (UC, Crohn’s disease (CD, and indeterminate colitis (IC is rapidly increasing in Gulf countries and Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and prevalence of IBD in patients who have attended the Salmaniya Medical Complex, Bahrain, between the years 1984 and 2014.Patients and methods: All patients who had attended the Salmaniya Medical Complex, Bahrain, and had been diagnosed with UC, CD, or IC, between the years 1984 and 2014, were included in the analysis. Data collected were: patient demographics, symptoms, clinical signs, complications, surgical interventions, extent of disease, endoscopic findings, histopathology, and lab measurements.Results: A total of 187 cases were included; 61 had CD, 123 had UC, and a further 3 cases presented with IC. A clear increase in the incidence and prevalence of IBD can be seen in this cohort. The prevalence of IBD was calculated to be 26.25/105 cases. The average number of IBD cases increased from 3 cases (average for the years 1984–2001 to 12 cases (average for the years 2002–2014. A number of factors correlate positively or negatively with CD and UC. In the current study, a link between gastrointestinal complications in CD cases and the use of steroids as a treatment was noted (p-value −0.02. Age also had a significant influence on the need for surgery in CD cases (p-value −0.04, and a family history of UC was statistically linked to surgical intervention (p-value −0.05.Conclusions: IBD can no longer be considered a rare disease in Bahrain. The incidence of both UC and CD is steadily increasing. There is a

  18. Epidemiology of hidradenitis suppurativa and inflammatory bowel disease: are these two disease associated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Boquete, L; Romaní, J; Carrión, L; Marín-Jiménez, I

    2016-09-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa and inflammatory bowel disease are chronic inflammatory diseases mainly affecting young people. Their aetiology is complex and multifactorial and numerous case series have shown that the two diseases can manifest concurrently, although the strength of this association varies widely among distinct reports. An additional problem is the difficulty of distinguishing between cutaneous Crohn disease and hidradenitis. In the last few years, epidemiological cohort studies have revealed that 1.2%-23% of inflammatory bowel disease patients also have hidradenitis suppurativa. This wide variability is influenced by geographical variables and the biases inherent in the distinct data collection methods, among other factors. There is a clear predominance of Crohn disease over ulcerative colitis. When hidradenitis suppurativa and inflammatory bowel disease manifest concurrently, the bowel disease is more severe and shows a predominance of colon involvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimizing biologic therapies for inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrante, Marc; D'Haens, Geert; Rutgeerts, Paul; Vermeire, Séverine; van Assche, Gert

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of biologic agents and particularly of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies dramatically changed the therapeutic algorithm in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Although the efficacy of these agents has been demonstrated clearly, optimal treatment strategies are debated.

  20. Filiform serrated adenomatous polyposis arising in a diverted rectum of an inflammatory bowel disease patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Mogensen, Anne Mellon; Jespersen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Klarskov L, Mogensen AM, Jespersen N, Ingeholm P, Holck S. Filiform serrated adenomatous polyposis arising in a diverted rectum of an inflammatory bowel disease patient. APMIS 2011; 119: 393-8. A 54-year-old man, previously colectomized for inflammatory bowel disease, developed carcinoma in the i......Klarskov L, Mogensen AM, Jespersen N, Ingeholm P, Holck S. Filiform serrated adenomatous polyposis arising in a diverted rectum of an inflammatory bowel disease patient. APMIS 2011; 119: 393-8. A 54-year-old man, previously colectomized for inflammatory bowel disease, developed carcinoma...... during the adenoma carcinoma sequence included the acquisition of CK7 expression in the malignant portion. Gastric mucin may play a role in the initial step of the neoplastic evolution and CK7 may denote neoplastic progression. This case confirms the notion of a widely variegated morphology of precursor...

  1. Pharmacology and optimization of thiopurines and methotrexate in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Steenholdt, Casper; de Boer, Nanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Improving the efficacy and reducing the toxicity of thiopurines and methotrexate (MTX) have been areas of intense basic and clinical research. An increased knowledge on pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of these immunomodulators has optimized treatment strategies in inflammatory bowel disease...

  2. Alternative specimen extraction techniques after laparoscopic emergency colectomy in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardenbroek, Tjibbe J.; Eshuis, Emma J.; van Acker, Gijs J. D.; Tanis, Pieter J.; Bemelman, Willem A.

    2012-01-01

    Omitting the extraction site incision potentially further decreases the abdominal wall trauma in laparoscopic surgery. The purpose of this study was to report the results of alternative specimen extraction techniques after laparoscopic emergency colectomy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

  3. Overlap, common features, and essential differences in pediatric granulomatous inflammatory bowel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, G.M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Hoppenreijs, E.P.A.H.; Os, E. van; Tolboom, J.J.M.; Warris, A.; Yntema, J.L.; Nieuwenhuis, E.E.; Escher, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Overlap in the clinical presentation of pediatric granulomatous inflammatory bowel disease may be substantial, depending on the mode of presentation. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) may present with granulomatous colitis, perianal abscesses, hepatic abscesses or granulomas, failure to thrive,

  4. Dyadic confirmatory factor analysis of the inflammatory bowel disease family responsibility questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, Rachel Neff; Reed-Knight, Bonney; Blount, Ronald L; Wilson, Helen W

    2013-09-01

    Evaluate the factor structure of youth and maternal involvement ratings on the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Family Responsibility Questionnaire, a measure of family allocation of condition management responsibilities in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. Participants included 251 youth aged 11-18 years with inflammatory bowel disease and their mothers. Item-level descriptive analyses, subscale internal consistency estimates, and confirmatory factor analyses of youth and maternal involvement were conducted using a dyadic data-analytic approach. Results supported the validity of 4 conceptually derived subscales including general health maintenance, social aspects, condition management tasks, and nutrition domains. Additionally, results indicated adequate support for the factor structure of a 21-item youth involvement measure and strong support for a 16-item maternal involvement measure. Additional empirical support for the validity of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Family Responsibility Questionnaire was provided. Future research to replicate current findings and to examine the measure's clinical utility is warranted.

  5. The association between the gut microbiota and the inflammatory bowel disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosberg, Michelle V; Bendtsen, Flemming; Vind, Ida

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) involves complex interactions between the microbiome and the immune system. We evaluated the association between the gut microbiota and disease activity in IBD patients. METHODS: Systematic review of clinical studies based...

  6. Extraintestinal Manifestations and Complications in Inflammatory Bowel Disease : From Shared Genetics to Shared Biological Pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sommeren, Suzanne; Janse, Marcel; Karjalainen, Juha; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Franke, Lude; Fu, Jingyuan; Weersma, Rinse K.

    Background: The clinical presentation of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is extremely heterogenous and is characterized by various extraintestinal manifestations and complications (EIM). Increasing genetic insight for IBD and EIM shows multiple shared susceptibility loci. We hypothesize that,

  7. Contrasting Pattern of Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Primary and Autoimmune Sclerosing Cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingvar Bjarnason

    2015-10-01

    Interpretation: Collectively these findings lend support to the suggestion that the chronic inflammatory bowel disease associated with PSC and in particular AISC may represent a distinct nosologic entity different from classic ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

  8. A clinical audit of inflammatory bowel disease in a South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A clinical audit of inflammatory bowel disease in a South African tertiary institution. L Indiveri, R Berman, M Bhagowat, K Govender, W Meier, A Payne, P Poncana, C Pryce, S Seetahal, M Selela, AD Mahomed ...

  9. Evaluation of a psychoeducational intervention for adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, M.A.; Maurice-Stam, H.; Derkx, B.H.; Last, B.F.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), comprising Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and indeterminate colitis, often has its onset in adolescence. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a psychoeducational group intervention (aiming to enhance information seeking and giving about

  10. Patients’ Diets and Preferences in a Pediatric Population with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Green

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the dietary practices of the pediatric inflammatory bowel disease population at the Children's Hospital of the Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation and the reported effectiveness of those diets.

  11. Unusual B cell morphology in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defendenti, Caterina; Grosso, Silvia; Atzeni, Fabiola; Croce, Annamaria; Senesi, Olivia; Saibeni, Simone; Bollani, Simona; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Bruno, Savino; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2012-07-15

    B lymphocytes express various different types of surface immunoglobulins that are largely unrelated to other hematological lines, although some reports have described a relationship between malignant B cells and other cells such as macrophages. Multiple genes of hematopoietic lineage, including transcription factors, are co-expressed in hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors, a phenomenon referred to as "lineage priming". Changes in the expression levels and timing of transcription factors can induce the lineage conversion of committed cells, which indicates that the regulation of transcription factors might be particularly critical for maintaining hierarchical hematopoietic development. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface markers of particular IgM-positive and irregularly nucleated cells detected in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to assess their association with diagnosis and inflammatory cell recruitment. Small intestine, colon and rectal biopsy specimens of 96 IBD patients were studied. Immunoglobulin-producing cells (IPCs) were analyzed by means of immunofluorescence using polyclonal rabbit anti-human Ig and goat anti-human IgM. The specimens positive for B cells with irregular nuclei were assessed using monoclonal antibodies specific for CD79, and λ and κ chains in order to confirm their B cell nature. CD15+ cells, an important marker of inflammatory cell recruitment, were also evaluated. Statistical correlations were sought between the histological findings and clinical expression. 34 (35.4%) of the 96 patients (64 with ulcerative colitis and 32 with Crohn's disease) presented a periglandial localization of IPCs with irregular nuclei, which showed surface markers specific for the B cell subset, such as IgM and CD79, but quantitative differences in λ and κ chains. These specimens also contained CD15-positive cells, which are usually absent in healthy controls. The quantitative aspects and localization of the CD15

  12. Exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors: Fact or fiction?

    OpenAIRE

    Guslandi, Mario

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a possible link between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been repeatedly suggested. Recently, a few studies have addressed the issue of a possible, similar effect by selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (COXIBs). The present article reviews the available scientific evidence for this controversial subject.

  13. Psychological adjustment and autonomic disturbances in inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellissier, Sonia; Dantzer, Cécile; Canini, Fréderic; Mathieu, Nicolas; Bonaz, Bruno

    2010-06-01

    Psychological factors and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study aimed to assess, firstly the way IBS and IBD patients cope with their pathology according to their affective adjustment and secondly the possible links between these affective adjustments and ANS reactivity. Patients with Crohn's disease (CD; n=26), ulcerative colitis (UC; n=22), or IBS (n=27) were recruited and compared to 21 healthy subjects based on psychological variables (trait- and state anxiety, depressive symptomatology, negative mood, perceived stress, coping, health locus of control) and sympatho-vagal balance through heart-rate variability monitored at rest. A principal component analysis, performed on all affective variables, isolated a leading factor labelled as "affective adjustment". In each disease, patients were distributed into positive and negative affective adjustment. In all the diseases, a positive affect was associated with problem-focused coping, and a negative affect with emotion-focused coping and external health locus of control. Results show that the sympatho-vagal balance varied according to the disease. In CD presenting positive affectivity, an adapted high sympathetic activity was observed. In UC, a parasympathetic blunt was observed in the presence of negative affectivity and an equilibrated sympatho-vagal balance in the presence of positive affectivity. In contrast, in IBS, an important dysautonomia (with high sympathetic and low parasympathetic tone) was constantly observed whatever the affective adjustment. In conclusion, this study suggests that the equilibrium of the ANS is differentially adapted according to the disease. This equilibrium is conjugated with positive affective and cognitive adjustment in IBD (CD and UC) but not in IBS. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Are Probiotics or Prebiotics useful in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eGuandalini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are notoriously either inadequate (IBS or loaded with potentially serious side effects and risks (IBD. In recent years a growing interest for effective and safer alternatives has focused on the potential role of probiotics and their metabolic substrates, prebiotics. It is in fact conceivable that the microbiome might be targeted by providing the metabolic fuel needed for the growth and expansion of beneficial microorganisms (prebiotics or by administering to the host such microorganisms (probiotics. This review presents a concise update on currently available data, with a special emphasis on children.Data for prebiotics in IBS are scarce. Low doses have shown a beneficial effect, while high doses are counterproductive. On the contrary, several controlled trials of probiotics have yielded encouraging results. A meta-analysis including 9 randomized clinical trials in children showed an improvement in abdominal pain for Lactobacillus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and the probiotic mixture VSL#3. The patients most benefitting from probiotics were those with predominant diarrhea or with a post-infectious IBS. In IBD, the use of prebiotics has been tested only rarely and in small scale clinical trials, with mixed results. As for probiotics, data in humans from about 3 dozens clinical trials offer mixed outcomes. So far none of the tested probiotics has proven successful in Crohn’s disease, while in ulcerative colitis a recent meta-analysis on 12 clinical trials (1 of them in children showed efficacy for the probiotic mixture VSL#3 in contributing to induce and to maintain remission. It is evident that this is a rapidly evolving and promising field; more data are very likely to yield a better understanding on what strains and in what doses should be used in different specific clinical settings.

  15. Prebiotics and probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guandalini, S; Cernat, E; Moscoso, D

    2015-01-01

    Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a common disorder characterized by abdominal pain associated to a change in stool consistency or frequency, include low-grade inflammation and intestinal microbiota changes. Few and disappointing data are available for prebiotics. A few controlled trials (RCTs) of probiotics are instead available with favourable effects, although most are limited by suboptimal design and small sample size. A recent report from the Rome foundation group included 32 RCTs of probiotics, most of which showed an overall modest improvement in symptoms, with the patients most benefitting from probiotics being those with predominant diarrhoea and those having a post-infectious IBS. A review focusing only on children with functional gastrointestinal disorders concluded that probiotics are more effective than placebo in the treatment of patients with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders, although no effect on constipation was evident. The role for probiotics in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) appears logical: the endogenous intestinal microbiota plays a central role in their development, and various probiotics have been found effective in animal models of IBD. However, research in humans has been overall quite limited, and it would seem that after a phase of intense research in the first decade of this century, the pace has slowed down, with fewer clinical trials been published in the past 2-3 years. To summarize current evidence: no probiotic has proven successful in Crohn's disease. In ulcerative colitis, on the other hand, data are more promising, and a very recent meta-analysis, that included 23 randomized controlled trials, concluded that there is evidence of efficacy for the probiotic mixture VSL#3 in helping inducing and maintaining remission, as well as in maintaining remission in patients with pouchitis. It is fair to state that for both IBD and IBS, more well-designed, rigorous

  16. Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases: epidemiological features in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Stepanov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. The number of registered patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD that is characterized by systemic manifestations and polymorbidal course is increasing nowadays. IBD, which include ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD, represent one of the most serious problems in modern gastroenterology and coloproctology. The purpose of our work was to examine the prevalence and incidence of UC and CD in chronic digestive diseases (CDD structure, their dynamics for the last 2 years (2014–2015 in Ukraine and its individual regions. Materials and methods. The situation in epidemiology of UC and CD was analyzed using the data officially submitted to the medical statistic center of the Ministry of Health of Ukraine. To assess the epidemiological pattern, we used such indicators: prevalence (absolute and per 100 thousand of population — the number of total registered diseases, and incidence — the number of first ill patients in current year. This study was conducted using the data of appealing to the health care facilities for a 2-year period, from 2014 to 2015, to assess the epidemiological picture in children for a 3-year period. We used the rate of growth/reduction to determine general trends and the nature of changes. Results were processed with the use of Statistics software package, version 6.0, Microsoft Excel, version 7.0. Results. In Ukraine since 2013, in the official statistics for the group of CDD such nosological forms, as UC, CD and irritable bowel syndrome, were recorded separately. That made possible to analyze health indicators for these diseases in the whole Ukraine, and in some regions. However, the current government statistics do not allow obtaining detailed information on the characteristics of the prevalence and incidence of IBD, because does not contain information on the age and gender composition of patients, and, most importantly, does not provide information on the effectiveness of the existing system

  17. Familial empirical risks for inflammatory bowel disease: differences between Jews and non-Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; McElree, C; Roth, M P; Shanahan, F; Targan, S R; Rotter, J I

    1993-01-01

    The Jewish population has an increased frequency of inflammatory bowel disease compared with their non-Jewish neighbours. Genetic factors have been implicated in the aetiology of this disorder and may contribute to ethnic differences. This study determined the familial empirical risks for inflammatory bowel disease in the first degree relatives of inflammatory bowel disease probands (for both Jews and non-Jews) for the purpose of accurate genetic counselling and genetic analysis. A total of 527 inflammatory bowel disease patients from Southern California (291 Jews and 236 non-Jews) were questioned about inflammatory bowel disease in their first degree relatives (a total of 2493 individuals). Since inflammatory bowel disease has a variable and late age of onset, age specific incidence data were used to estimate the life time risks and to make valid comparisons between the different groups. In the first degree relatives of non-Jewish probands, the life time risks for inflammatory bowel disease were 5.2% and 1.6% when probands had Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis respectively. These values were consistently lower than the corresponding risks for relatives of Jewish patients -7.8% and 4.5% for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis probands respectively (p value for comparison between Jews and non-Jews: 0.028; between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease: 0.005). These data provide the requisite basis for genetic counselling for these disorders in the white American population. In addition, these different empirical risks for relatives of Jewish and non-Jewish probands allow rejection of single Mendelian gene models for inflammatory bowel disease, but are consistent with several alternative genetic models. PMID:8491401

  18. The experience of stigma in inflammatory bowel disease: an interpretive (hermeneutic) phenomenological study

    OpenAIRE

    Dibley, Lesley; Norton, Christine; Whitehead, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Aim:\\ud To explore experiences of stigma in people with inflammatory bowel disease\\ud \\ud Background:\\ud Diarrhoea, urgency and incontinence are common symptoms in inflammatory bowel disease. Social rules stipulate full control of bodily functions in adulthood: poor control may lead to stigmatisation, affecting patients’ adjustment to disease. Disease-related stigma is associated with poorer clinical outcomes but qualitative evidence is minimal.\\ud \\ud Design:\\ud An interpretive (hermeneutic)...

  19. Pneumococcal vaccination rates in VHA patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, David J; Copeland, Laurel A; Stock, Eileen M; Herrera, Henry R; Pfanner, Timothy P

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract not caused by infectious agents. Symptoms of IBD, such as diarrhea and pain, diminish one's quality of life. Underlying immune dysregulation may put IBD patients at risk for severe infectious disease making preventative vaccination highly recommended. Therefore, this study sought to assess rates of pneumococcal vaccination in patients with IBD.A cross-sectional observational study was employed utilizing administrative data extracts from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to identify patients diagnosed with IBD per International Classification of Diseases, Version 9, Clinical Modification codes. Their pneumococcal vaccine histories were determined from Common Procedural Terminology codes. Data were aggregated to the patient level and subjected to multivariable logistic regression to assess factors associated with receipt of the vaccination and 1-year mortality; survival analyses extended follow-up to as much as 4 years following IBD diagnosis.From October 2004 to September 2009, 49,350 patients were diagnosed with IBD in the VHA. Incidence was approximately 6000 cases/y. Patients averaged 62 years (±15, range 19-98) with 45% aged 65 or older. Approximately 6% were women, 21% were highly disabled from a military service-connected condition, 46% had hypertension, 38% dyslipidemia, and 18% diabetes. Only 20% of the cohort received pneumococcal vaccination including 5% vaccinated prior to IBD diagnosis, 2% on the date of diagnosis, and 13% subsequently. Being married, living outside the Northeast, and having more comorbidities were associated with vaccination before IBD diagnosis; models of vaccination at or after diagnosis demonstrated poor fit: little better than chance. Vaccinations before, after, and at diagnosis were protective against 1-year mortality adjusting for clinical and demographic covariates. Living in the South was an independent risk factor for death among IBD

  20. Aedes aegypti salivary gland extract ameliorates experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales-Campos, Helioswilton; de Souza, Patricia Reis; Basso, Paulo José; Ramos, Anderson Daniel; Nardini, Viviani; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Capurro, Margareth Lara; Sá-Nunes, Anderson; de Barros Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro

    2015-05-01

    Current therapies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not totally effective, resulting in persistent and recurrent disease for many patients. Mosquito saliva contains immunomodulatory molecules and therein could represent a novel therapy for IBD. Here, we demonstrated the therapeutic activity of salivary gland extract (SGE) of Aedes aegypti on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. For this purpose, C57BL/6 male mice were exposed to 3% DSS in drinking water and treated with SGE at early (days 3-5) or late (days 5-8) time points, followed by euthanasia on days 6 and 9, respectively, for sample collection. The results showed an improvement in clinical disease outcome and postmortem scores after SGE treatment, accompanied by the systemic reduction in peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no impact on bone marrow and mesenteric lymph nodes cellularity or macrophages toxicity. Moreover, a local diminishment of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-5 cytokines together with a reduction in the inflammatory area were observed in the colon of SGE-treated mice. Strikingly, early treatment with SGE led to mice protection from a late DSS re-challenging, as observed by decreased clinical and postmortem scores, besides reduced circulating lymphocytes, indicating that the mosquito saliva may present components able to prevent disease relapse. Indeed, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiments pointed to a major SGE pool fraction (F3) able to ameliorate disease signs. In conclusion, SGE and its components might represent a source of important immunomodulatory molecules with promising therapeutic activity for IBD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Lifestyle Issues in Inflammatory Bowel Disease – Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Benoni

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available During the pa t decade, smoking habit has been identified as a major exogenous factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. It is associated not only with the development of the disease but al o with the clinical course in established disease. IBD combines absolute opposites as smoking is associated with Crohn’s disease and nonsmoking or former smoking with ulcerative colitis. The first reports of a negative association between smoking and ulcerative colitis were based on independent, clinical observations; from those studies a positive association was found between smoking and Crohn’s disease. Epidemiological studies that followed consistently showed that smokers have a reduced risk of ulcerative colitis and an increased risk of Crohn’s disease and that exsmokers have an increased risk of ulcerative colitis. In ulcerative colitis, but not in Crohn’s disease, a dose-response pattern has been demonstrated. Changes in clinical course, in disease severity and extension, and in recurrence rate indicate substantial clinical effects of smoking with a protective effect of smoking in ulcerative colitis and an aggravating effect in Crohn’s disease. There are also indications of smoking’s effects on changes in IBD epidemiology and sex distribution. The biological explanation to the finding is unknown. Smoking may aggravate Crohn’s disease by vascular effects. Theories on the protective effect in ulcerative colitis include effects on immune and inflammatory response, on mucus and on intestinal permeability. Possibly, beneficial effects in ulcerative colitis are exerted by nicotine but further studies are needed. Due to overall negative effects of smoking, IBD patients should not smoke. It seems, however, reasonable to give individual advice in patients with ulcerative colitis who have experienced a beneficial effect of ·making considering both current health status and life situation.

  2. T-lymphocyte-expressing inflammatory cytokines underlie persistence of proteinuria in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Fábio Tadeu Lourenço; Melo, Gustavo Eustáquio Brito Alvim de; Cordeiro, Thiago Macedo; Feracin, Victor; Vieira, Etel Rocha; Pereira, Wagner de Fátima; Pinheiro, Sérgio Veloso Brant; Miranda, Aline Silva; Simões-E-Silva, Ana Cristina

    2017-09-28

    There is evidence of an important role of immune system changes in the triggering and maintenance of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of cytokines in lymphocyte populations of patients with INS in comparison to healthy individuals, according to proteinuria. This cross-sectional study included 44 patients with INS and eight healthy children, matched for age and sex (controls). Patients were subdivided according to proteinuria: persistent proteinuria or partial remission (PP≥300mg/24h, n=17) and low proteinuria or complete remission (LP<300mg/24h, n=27). Ex vivo analysis of peripheral blood leukocytes by flow cytometry was performed using surface markers for T-lymphocytes, TCD4, TCD8, natural killer (NK) cells, NKT, and B-lymphocytes. Frequencies of intracellular cytokines were analyzed in these cells. The frequencies of B-lymphocytes, NK cells, and NKT cells were lower in INS than in controls, whereas INS patients had a higher frequency of CD4 + tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α + cells than controls. Cytotoxic-T-lymphocytes expressing IFN-γ were lower in INS than in controls. Patients with PP showed higher frequencies of CD4-T-lymphocytes expressing IFN-γ and TNF-α than controls. CD8-lymphocytes expressing TNF-α were increased in PP group when compared with LP and controls, while CD8 + interferon (IFN)-γ + cells were lower than in LP and in controls. Regardless the level of proteinuria, INS patients had increased expression of TNF-α in CD4-lymphocytes and reduced expression of IFN-γ in CD8-lymphocytes. Persistence of proteinuria was associated with higher levels of inflammatory markers. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. News and controversy in inflammatory bowel disease treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Straforini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment of Inflammatory bowel disease comes from many years of esperience, clinical trials and mistakes. Discussion: In patients with active Crohn disease steroids are considerated the first choice, but recently, the introduction of anti-TNF alfa agents (infliximab and adalimumab has changed the protocols. Anti-TNF are also used for closing fistula after surgical curettage. An efficently preventive treatment of Crohn disease still has not been found but hight dose of oral salicylates, azatioprine or 6-MP and antibiotics might be useful. In severe attacks of ulcerative colitis, high dose iv treatment of steroids are required for a few days. Later on, a further treatment with anti- TNF might delay the need of surgery. In patients with mild to moderate attacks of ulcerative colitis, topical treatment is preferred, it consists of enemas, suppositories or foams containing 5-aminosalycilic acid, traditional steroids, topical active steroids. Topical treatment can be associated with oral steroids or oral salicylates. Oral salicylates or azatioprine are used for prevention of relaps.

  4. Immunization history of children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Ing Shian; deBruyn, Jennifer C C; Wrobel, Iwona

    2013-04-01

    Protection against vaccine-preventable diseases is important in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) due to frequent immunosuppressive therapy use. The chronic relapsing nature and treatment regimen of IBD may necessitate modified timing of immunizations. To evaluate the completeness of immunizations in children with IBD. Immunization records of all children with IBD followed at the Alberta Children's Hospital (Calgary, Alberta) were reviewed. For children with incomplete immunization according to the province of Alberta schedule, the reasons for such were clarified. Demographic data and age at diagnosis were also collected. Immunization records were obtained from 145 (79%) children with IBD. Fifteen children had incomplete routine childhood immunizations, including two with no previous immunizations. The most common incomplete immunizations included hepatitis B (n=9), diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis at 14 to 16 years of age (n=7), and diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, inactivated polio at four to six years of age (n=6). The reasons for incomplete immunization included use of immunosuppressive therapy at time of scheduled immunization; IBD-related symptoms at time of scheduled immunization; parental refusal; recent move from elsewhere with different immunization schedule; unawareness of routine immunization; and needle phobia. Although the majority of children with IBD had complete childhood immunizations, suboptimal immunizations were present in 10%. With increasing use of immunosuppressive therapy in IBD, physicians caring for children with IBD must periodically evaluate immunization status and ensure the completeness of childhood immunizations.

  5. [New molecules in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, María; Gisbert, Javier P

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disorder of unknown aetiology that provokes chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs have represented a major advance in the treatment of IBD patients in the last few years and also have a good safety profile. Nevertheless, these treatments are not effective in all patients and, in initial responders, there can be a loss of response in the long-term. Consequently, new treatments are needed for IBD, aimed at distinct therapeutic targets. In the last few years, new molecules have been incorporated into the therapeutic armamentarium of IBD patients. Golimumab is an anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibody with demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. The use of CT-P13 (biosimilar infliximab) has been approved in Europe for the same indications as the original infliximab. More recently, vedolizumab, an anti-α4β7 integrin monoclonal antibody, has been approved for the treatment of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. A large number of molecules are currently under development, some of which will, in the future, broaden the therapeutic options available in the treatment of IBD patients. Finally, in the next few years, studies should aim to identify factors predictive of response to the distinct biological agents for IBD in order to allow personalized selection of the best therapeutic alternative for each patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamics of the human gut microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halfvarson, Jonas; Brislawn, Colin J.; Lamendella, Regina; Vázquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; Walters, William A.; Bramer, Lisa M.; D' Amato, Mauro; Bonfiglio, Ferdinando; McDonald, Daniel; Gonzalez, Antonio; McClure, Erin E.; Dunklebarger, Mitchell F.; Knight, Rob; Jansson, Janet K.

    2017-02-13

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by flares of inflammation with periodic need for increased medication and sometimes even surgery. IBD etiology is partly attributed to a deregulated immune response to gut microbiome dysbiosis. Cross-sectional studies have revealed microbial signatures for different IBD diseases, including ulcerative colitis (UC), colonic Crohn’s Disease (CCD), and ileal CD (ICD). Although IBD is dynamic, microbiome studies have primarily focused on single timepoints or few individuals. Here we dissect the long-term dynamic behavior of the gut microbiome in IBD and differentiate this from normal variation. Microbiomes of IBD subjects fluctuate more than healthy individuals, based on deviation from a newly-defined healthy plane (HP). ICD subjects deviated most from the HP, especially subjects with surgical resection. Intriguingly, the microbiomes of some IBD subjects periodically visited the HP then deviated away from it. Inflammation was not directly correlated with distance to the healthy plane, but there was some correlation between observed dramatic fluctuations in the gut microbiome and intensified medication due to a flare of the disease. These results help guide therapies that will re-direct the gut microbiome towards a healthy state and maintain remission in IBD.

  7. Marijuana use patterns among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikoff Allegretti, Jessica; Courtwright, Andrew; Lucci, Matthew; Korzenik, Joshua R; Levine, Jonathan

    2013-12-01

    The prevalence and perceived effectiveness of marijuana use has not been well studied in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) despite increasing legal permission for its use in Crohn's disease. Health care providers have little guidance about the IBD symptoms that may improve with marijuana use. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence, sociodemographic characteristics, and perceived benefits of marijuana use among patients with IBD. Prospective cohort survey study of marijuana use patterns in patients with IBD at an academic medical center. A total of 292 patients completed the survey (response rate = 94%); 12.3% of patients were active marijuana users, 39.0% were past users, and 48.6% were never users. Among current and past users, 16.4% of patients used marijuana for disease symptoms, the majority of whom felt that marijuana was "very helpful" for relief of abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea. On multivariate analysis, age and chronic abdominal pain were associated with current marijuana use (odds ratio [OR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89-0.97; P marijuana (OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.89-0.97; P marijuana for abdominal pain, were it legally available. A significant number of patients with IBD currently use marijuana. Most patients find it very helpful for symptom control, including patients with ulcerative colitis, who are currently excluded from medical marijuana laws. Clinical trials are needed to determine marijuana's potential as an IBD therapy and to guide prescribing decisions.

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease: an increased risk factor for neurologic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morís, Germán

    2014-02-07

    Only a very few systematic studies have investigated the frequency of neurologic disorders in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), which are the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results have been inconsistent and variable, owing to differences in case-finding methods and evaluated outcomes in different studies. The most frequent neurologic manifestations reported in CD and UC populations are cerebrovascular disease (with either arterial or venous events), demyelinating central nervous system disease, and peripheral neuropathy (whether axonal or demyelinating); however, the literature describes numerous nervous system disorders as being associated with IBD. The pathogenesis of nervous system tissue involvement in IBD has yet to be elucidated, although it seems to be related to immune mechanisms or prothrombotic states. The recently-introduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors have proven successful in controlling moderate to severe IBD activity. However, severe neurologic disorders associated with TNF inhibitors have been reported, which therefore raises concerns regarding the effect of anti-TNF-α antibodies on the nervous system. Although neurological involvement associated with IBD is rarely reported, gastroenterologists should be aware of the neurologic manifestations of IBD in order to provide early treatment, which is crucial for preventing major neurologic morbidity.

  9. Disease Course and Surgery Rates in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Marianne K; Prosberg, Michelle V; Jess, Tine

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this population-based 7-year follow-up of incident patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD), we aimed to describe disease progression and surgery rates in an era influenced by the increased use of immunosuppressants and the introduction of biological therapy......, immunomodulators, and anti-tumor necrosis factor agents in CD was 86.4%, 64.3%, and 23.5%, respectively. The rate of first-time intestinal resection in CD was 29.1% (n=62), and the 7-year cumulative risk was 28.5%. The cumulative risk of colectomy in UC was 12.5% at 7 years. CONCLUSIONS: UC and CD are dynamic....... METHODS: From 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2004, all incident cases (562) of patients diagnosed with UC, CD, or inflammatory bowel disease unclassified in a well-defined Copenhagen area were registered. Medical records were reviewed from 1 November 2011 to 30 November 2012, and clinical data were...

  10. [Smoking and ovulation inhibitor in inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katschinski, B

    1993-02-15

    In a case-control study the effects of smoking and the use of oral contraceptives were examined in 83 patients with Crohn's disease and 37 patients with ulcerative colitis in comparison with members of the general population who served as controls. After controlling for oral contraceptives, smokers were found to have a significantly elevated relative risk of contracting Crohn's disease of 3.0 (1.3 to 6.8). Patients on oral contraceptives for more than three years had an elevated risk for Crohn's disease of 4.3 (1.3 to 14.4); this elevated risk was, however, found only in the non-smoking group. In the case of ulcerative colitis, the relative risk in smokers was significantly lower (0.21 [0.04 to 0.91]) than in non-smokers. The use of oral contraceptives does not represent a risk factor for ulcerative colitis. While smoking has been established as a risk factor in the development of inflammatory bowel disease, the role of oral contraceptives in the aetiology of this condition remains unclear.

  11. Profiles of Patients Who Use Marijuana for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlin, Ann Marie; Long, Millie; Kappelman, Michael; Martin, Christopher; Sandler, Robert S

    2018-03-29

    Marijuana is legal in a number of states for indications that include inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and patients are interested in its potential benefits. We aimed to describe the legal use of marijuana in individuals with IBD in the USA who participate within the CCFA Partners internet-based cohort. A total of 2357 participants who lived in states where prescription or recreational marijuana was legal, were offered the opportunity to complete a survey on marijuana use and IBD symptoms including perceived benefits of therapy. Bivariate statistics and logistic regression models were used to determine factors associated with marijuana use. Surveys were completed by 1666 participants (71%) with only 214 (12.8%) indicating they had asked their medical doctor about its use and 73 actually using prescribed marijuana (4.4%). Within the respondent group (N = 1666), 234 participants lived where both medical and recreational marijuana is legal and 49 (20.9%) reported recreational marijuana use specifically for IBD. Users reported positive benefits (80.7%), but users also reported more depression, anxiety, pain interference, and lower social satisfaction than non-users. Those prescribed marijuana reported more active disease, and more use of steroids, narcotics, and zolpidem. Few IBD patients consulted their medical doctors about marijuana use or used prescription marijuana. Where recreational marijuana was available, usage rates were higher. Users reported benefits but also more IBD symptoms, depression, anxiety, and pain. Marijuana use may be higher in patients with IBD symptoms not well treated by conventional medical approaches.

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease in the Western Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawaja, Azhar Q; Sawan Ali S

    2009-01-01

    To observe the pattern of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) among the people of Western region of Saudi Arabia, and to correlate the findings with published data. This is a retrospective study. All colonic biopsies were reviewed which were received, and processed at the Histopathology Department of King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from January 2002 to July 2007. Ethical approval was obtained from the Bioethical and Research Committee. There were 711 colonic biopsies received during this period. One hundred and twenty-two patients were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC). There were 65 males and 57 females. The age ranged between 4-73 years. Most of the UC patients presented in adolescence, and in the adult age. Crohn's disease (CD) was diagnosed in 15 patients, 7 males and 8 females. The age ranged from 1-40 years. Most of the cases were seen in the adult age group. We conclude that IBD is certainly one of the major serious colonic lesions in our society, which should be thoroughly investigated by the combined efforts of clinicians and pathologists. We also conclude that gastrointestinal tuberculosis and infective colitis should always be investigated before suggesting the specific diagnosis of IBD. We recommend a broad based epidemiological study, simultaneously involving clinicians, and pathologists, to document the characteristics of this disease in our society. (author)

  13. Ophthalmologic manifestations in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Jin Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, including Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, has been reported to have various ophthalmologic manifestations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of ophthalmologic manifestations associated with IBD in Korea.Methods: Sixty-one patients were examined between May 2013 and October 2014. We performed complete ophthalmologic examinations.Results: Findings included 36 patients with CD and 25 with UC. The mean age of the patients was 34±16 years and disease duration was 45.3±23.9 months. Ophthalmologic manifestations were positive in 44 cases. Primary complication was diagnosed in 5 cases, as follows; iritis in 2 cases, episcleritis in one case, iritis with optic neuritis in 1 case, and serous retinal detachment in 1 case, without secondary complications. The most common coincidental complication was dry eye syndrome (DES, in 35 patients (57.4%. The prevalence of DES in the control group was 21.3%. The proportion of DES in patients with IBD was significantly higher than in the control group (P=0.002.Conclusions: Ophthalmologic manifestations were high (72.1% in IBD patients. Clinically significant primary ocular inflammation occurred in 8.2% of patients. The most common complication was DES. There was a higher rate of DES in patients with IBD compared to the control group. Evaluation of the eye should be a routine component in patients with IBD.

  14. Diet, gut microbes, and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Kyle T; Chang, Eugene B

    2017-01-01

    The rising incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases in recent decades has notably paralleled changing lifestyle habits in Western nations, which are now making their way into more traditional societies. Diet plays a key role in IBD pathogenesis, and there is a growing appreciation that the interaction between diet and microbes in a susceptible person contributes significantly to the onset of disease. In this review, we examine what is known about dietary and microbial factors that promote IBD. We summarize recent findings regarding the effects of diet in IBD epidemiology from prospective population cohort studies, as well as new insights into IBD-associated dysbiosis. Microbial metabolism of dietary components can influence the epithelial barrier and the mucosal immune system, and understanding how these interactions generate or suppress inflammation will be a significant focus of IBD research. Our knowledge of dietary and microbial risk factors for IBD provides important considerations for developing therapeutic approaches through dietary modification or re-shaping the microbiota. We conclude by calling for increased sophistication in designing studies on the role of diet and microbes in IBD pathogenesis and disease resolution in order to accelerate progress in response to the growing challenge posed by these complex disorders. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. EHealth Technologies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Belinda D; Gray, Kathleen; Knowles, Simon R; De Cruz, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Electronic-health technologies (eHealth) such as Web-based interventions, virtual clinics, smart-phone applications, and telemedicine are being used to manage patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to: (1) Evaluate the impact of eHealth technologies on conventional clinical indices and patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) in IBD; (2) assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and feasibility of using eHealth technologies to facilitate the self-management of individuals with IBD, and; (3) provide recommendations for their design and optimal use for patient care. Relevant publications were identified via a literature search, and 17 publications were selected based on predefined quality parameters. Six randomized controlled trials and nine observational studies utilizing eHealth technologies in IBD were identified. Compared with standard outpatient-led care, eHealth technologies have led to improvements in: Relapse duration [(n = 1) 18 days vs 77 days, p eHealth studies include heterogeneity of outcome measures, lack of clinician/patient input, lack of validation against conventional clinical indices and PROs, and limited cost-benefit analyses. EHealth technologies have the potential for promoting self-management and reducing the impact of the growing burden of IBD on health care resource utilization. A theoretical framework should be applied to the development, implementation, and evaluation of eHealth interventions. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients' Participation, Attitude and Preferences Toward Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, J; Yang, H I; Kim, B; Park, S J; Jeon, J Y

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the level of exercise participation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to investigate their intention, attitude and preference toward exercise. The data of 158 IBD patients that participated in a self-administered survey at Severance Hospital between March 2013 and November 2013 were included in this cross sectional and descriptive analysis. Questionnaires included 3 sections to determine the IBD patient's current exercise participation, attitude toward exercise, and exercise preferences. This study investigated IBD patients both collectively, and according to their specific disease: Crohn's disease (CD) (n=62), Ulcerative colitis (UC) (n=73) and intestinal Behçet's disease (BD) (n=23). IBD patients currently participate in 103 min/week of exercise including mild, moderate and strenuous intensity, with BD patients being the least active, followed by CD, and UC being most active. The majority of IBD patients found exercise to be pleasant (57.7%), beneficial (80.5%), sensible (71.8%), uplifting (61%) and good (70.5%), and 44.4% found exercise to be enjoyable. This study shows the IBD patients' participation, attitude and preferences toward exercise and provides much needed information for the development of evidence based exercise programs that are specific to IBD. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease and self-esteem in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfred, H; Saalman, R; Nilsson, S; Reichenberg, K

    2008-02-01

    To compare the self-esteem of adolescents suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with that of healthy adolescents, and to identify factors affecting self-esteem in the presence of IBD. A self-assessment questionnaire, 'I think I am' (ITIA), was completed by 71 (41 boys) out of 77 adolescents (10-16 years) with IBD. Of the participating adolescents, 23 had Crohn's disease, 44 had ulcerative colitis and 4 had indeterminate colitis. The self-esteem of adolescents with IBD was compared with that of 1037 school children. In this population-based study, children with IBD estimated their self-esteem in the same range as healthy adolescents. Using a multiple regression analysis, the self-esteem of adolescents with IBD was related to disease course severity and cohabitation status of parents. Children with severe disease and children of single parents were found to be most at risk of low self-esteem. This study shows that, as a group, adolescents with IBD have self-esteem in the same range as their healthy peers, but that there are some adolescents with IBD who are at risk of low self-esteem. Special attention should be given to adolescents with a severe disease course and to those with separated parents.

  18. Differential patterns of histone acetylation in inflammatory bowel diseases

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    Adcock Ian M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Post-translational modifications of histones, particularly acetylation, are associated with the regulation of inflammatory gene expression. We used two animal models of inflammation of the bowel and biopsy samples from patients with Crohn's disease (CD to study the expression of acetylated histones (H 3 and 4 in inflamed mucosa. Acetylation of histone H4 was significantly elevated in the inflamed mucosa in the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of colitis particularly on lysine residues (K 8 and 12 in contrast to non-inflamed tissue. In addition, acetylated H4 was localised to inflamed tissue and to Peyer's patches (PP in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-treated rat models. Within the PP, H3 acetylation was detected in the mantle zone whereas H4 acetylation was seen in both the periphery and the germinal centre. Finally, acetylation of H4 was significantly upregulated in inflamed biopsies and PP from patients with CD. Enhanced acetylation of H4K5 and K16 was seen in the PP. These results demonstrate that histone acetylation is associated with inflammation and may provide a novel therapeutic target for mucosal inflammation.

  19. Antidepressants in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macer, Benjamin J D; Prady, Stephanie L; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina

    2017-04-01

    Antidepressants are commonly used to treat symptoms of anxiety and depression in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent studies suggest a link between IBD activity and an individual's emotional state which raises the possibility that antidepressants may potentially modify the disease course of IBD. This systematic review thus primarily aims to evaluate the efficacy of antidepressants on IBD activity, and secondarily, on anxiety and depression. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane (IBD Group), CINAHL, AMED, PsycINFO, and OpenGrey were searched from 1990 onward with no restrictions on study design. A quality appraisal was conducted using several scales as appropriate for each study design. A narrative synthesis was also conducted. Fifteen eligible studies included in the review (1 randomized controlled trial, 2 cohorts, 1 case-control, 1 cross-sectional survey, 1 qualitative, 2 audits, 1 case series, and 6 case reports) examined a range of antidepressants. Twelve studies suggested that antidepressants have a positive impact on IBD course. Nine studies reported anxiety and depression as an outcome, of these 8 reported beneficial effects of antidepressants. Most of the studies were deemed to be at low risk of bias, apart from the case reports, which were at high risk of bias. This research indicates that antidepressants may have a beneficial effect on IBD course. However, it is currently not possible to determine their efficacy for certain because of the lack of randomized trials. Further trials using objective measures of IBD activity, longer follow-up periods, and larger sample sizes are needed.

  20. Effects of inflammatory bowel disease on students' adjustment to college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadani, S Bashar; Adler, Jeremy; Browning, Jeff; Green, Elan H; Helvie, Karla; Rizk, Rafat S; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2014-12-01

    Successful adjustment to college is required for academic success. We investigated whether inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) activity affects this adjustment process. We created an online survey that included a Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire (SACQ), a general quality of life survey (SF-12), a disease-specific short IBD quality of life survey (SIBDQ), and disease activity indices. Undergraduate students across the United States were recruited via social media. Surveys were completed by 65 students with Crohn's disease (CD), 28 with ulcerative colitis, and 214 healthy students (controls). Disease-specific quality of life (SIBDQ results) correlated with IBD disease activity (rho = -0.79; P academic work (P academic challenges (P academically successful (P academics-especially among students with CD. Successful adjustment is important for academic success, affecting graduation rates and future economic success. Strategies to increase disease control and provide social and emotional support during college could improve adjustment to college and academic performance, and increase patients' potential. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Exercise in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Michael; Cross, Raymond K; Long, Millie D

    2018-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including both Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic autoimmune diseases. Both CD and UC have relapsing and remitting courses. Although effective medical treatments exist for these chronic conditions, some patients do not respond to these traditional therapies. Patients are often left frustrated with incomplete resolution of symptoms and seek alternative or complementary forms of therapy. Patients often search for modifiable factors that could improve their symptoms or help them to maintain periods of remission. In this review, we examine both the published evidence on the benefits of exercise clinically and the pathophysiological changes associated with exercise. We then describe data on exercise patterns in patients with IBDs, potential barriers to exercise in IBDs, and the role of exercise in the development and course of IBDs. While some data support physical activity as having a protective role in the development of IBDs, the findings have not been robust. Importantly, studies of exercise in patients with mild-to-moderate IBD activity show no danger of disease or symptom exacerbation. Exercise has theoretical benefits on the immune response, and the limited available data suggest that exercise may improve disease activity, quality of life, bone mineral density, and fatigue levels in patients with IBDs. Overall, exercise is safe and probably beneficial in patients with IBDs. Evidence supporting specific exercise recommendations, including aspects such as duration and heart rate targets, is needed in order to better counsel patients with IBDs.

  2. Hypnotherapy for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Across the Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigethy, Eva

    2015-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by lifelong relapsing gastrointestinal symptoms and associated with high rates of chronic pain, depression, and anxiety. In this review the author covers the existing literature including randomized controlled studies, open trials, and case reports as well as expert opinion in evaluating how hypnotherapy can be most beneficial in adolescents and adults with IBD. Hypnotherapy evidence for functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) is also reviewed as many of the gut-focused hypnotherapy (GHT) approaches used in IBD trials were developed for this latter population. Collectively, the strongest evidence of use of hypnotherapy is its association with reduced IBD-related inflammation and improved health-related quality of life with mixed results in terms of its effects on psychological and pain outcomes in adults with IBD. Studies of hypnotherapy for FGID symptoms show consistently more positive results. Post-operative hypnotherapy may also be helpful based on findings in other surgical samples. Adolescents with IBD have not been as systematically studied but small case series support the use of hypnotherapy to improve inflammation and pain. Future studies are needed to better delineate the specific brain-gut pathways which are most influenced by hypnotherapy in the IBD population and to investigate the longer-term course of the positive short-term findings.

  3. Thrombophilic Risk Factors in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Ayten; Senturk, Omer; Aygun, Cem; Celebi, Altay; Caglayan, Cigdem; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk for thromboembolism. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of thrombophilic risk factors in IBD patients and to assess the associations of these factors with disease activity. Forty-eight patients with IBD (24 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn's disease) and 40 matched healthy control individuals were enrolled. In addition to routine biochemical analysis, fasting blood samples were studied for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, protein-C, protein-S, antithrombin III, factor VII, factor VIII, D-dimer, vitamin B 12 , folic acid and homocysteine. Levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, D-dimer and the number of platelets were significantly higher in patients with IBD. When compared to control group, in patients with Crohn's disease serum homocystein levels were significantly higher (p = 0.025) while serum folic acid levels were significantly lower (p homocystein and the number of platelets were found to be significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients who were in active period of the disease. Thrombophilic defects are multifactorial and might be frequently seen in IBD patients. They might contribute to thrombotic complications of this disease.

  4. Incidence rate of anemia in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atuğ, Özlen; Kani, Haluk Tarık; Banzragch, Munkhtsetseg; İmeryüz, Neşe; Akın, Hakan

    2016-03-01

    To determine the incidence rate and distribution of anemia types over time from an Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patient cohort spanning 18 years. Between January 1995 and November 2013, the University Hospital digital databases as well as hard copies of patients' files were reviewed retrospectively. IBD patients with at least one complete blood count (CBC) report were included in this study. We obtained 941 IBD patients' records; 375 (39.9%) patients were diagnosed with Crohn's disease (CD), and 566 (60.1%) patients had ulcerative colitis (UC). Anemia was detected in 548 (58.2%) patients. Female patients were more frequently anemic than male patients (68.4% vs. 49.7%, p=0.001). The frequency of anemia was slightly higher in patients with CD (62.1%) than in patients with UC (55.7%) (p=0.04). The incidence rate of anemia for the entire IBD patient cohort was calculated as 103.45 per 1,000 patient-years. The correlation between the age of the IBD disease and the presence of anemia exhibited a high correlation coefficient of Pearson's r=0.702. This is the first study to report the incidence rate of anemia (103.45 per 1,000 patient-years) in a long-term cohort of IBD patients.

  5. Update of Immunomodulatory Therapy for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Bernstein

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available For several decades corticosteroids were the only potent immunomodulatory agents effective and available for active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. The past decade ha seen an enhanced knowledge of the immune response in lBD and a better understanding of how common immunomodulatory agents work. Furthermore, more specific mediators of the abnormal immune response have been identified, so that therapy can be more targeted. Purine analogues have proven efficacy in achieving and maintaining remission in both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Methotrexate has proven efficacy in active Crohn’s disease. Both of these classes of drugs requires weeks to months of treatment before any benefit is seen. Intravenous cyclosporine is efficacious in acute severe ulcerative colitis and can settle active disease within days of administration. It is unclear whether oral cyclosporine offers any advantage at maintaining remission, once achieved. Oral cyclosporine in Crohn’s disease has been proven to be ineffective at either achieving or maintaining remission; however, intravenous cyclosporine in Crohn’s disease has not been rigorously tested. Newer immunomodulatory agents have been designed for specific targets. and in particular monoclonal antibodies that block the effects of interleukin-1, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and the T cell receptor are available for clinical trials. We are in an era of expanding therapeutic approaches to these diseases, including the refined use of readily available agent, the development of newer, more targeted agents and a broader understanding of how agents may be effectively used simultaneously or sequentially.

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Autoimmune or Immune-mediated Pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui Wen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, is still unclear, but both autoimmune and immune-mediated phenomena are involved. Autoimmune phenomena include the presence of serum and mucosal autoantibodies against intestinal epithelial cells in either form of IBD, and against human tropomyosin fraction five selectively in UC. In addition, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA are common in UC, whereas antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA are frequently found in CD. Immune-mediate phenomena include a variety of abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and a generalized enhanced reactivity against intestinal bacterial antigens in both CD and UC. It is currently believed that loss of tolerance against the indigenous enteric flora is the central event in IBD pathogenesis. Various complementary factors probably contribute to the loss of tolerance to commensal bacteria in IBD. They include defects in regulatory T-cell function, excessive stimulation of mucosal dendritic cells, infections or variants of proteins critically involved in bacterial antigen recognition, such as the products of CD-associated NOD2/CARD15 mutations.

  7. /sup 67/Ga citrate scintiscanning in active inflammatory bowel disease

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    Rheingold, O.J.; Tedesco, F.J.; Block, F.E.; Maldonado, A.; Miale, A. Jr.

    1979-05-01

    Twenty-five hospitalized patients were studied prospectively with /sup 67/Ga citrate (GA) abdominal scintillation scanning in an attempt to define its role in the evaluation of patients with active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There were nine patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), seven with Crohn's disease (CD), and nine controls. In four patients, two with UC and two with CD, a tissue/plasma radioactivity ratio was obtained and compared to normals. All the UC patients had positive GA scans and only one of seven of the CD patients had a positive scan. There were no false positive scans. Scans performed after a 3- or 5-day delay were more accurate than 6-hr scans alone. Well-delineated colinic radioactivity 6 hr after injection which persists for 3 to 5 days indicates the presence of UC in patients with IBD, while a negative scan is more consistent with active CD. Colonic uptake at 6 hr which clears by 48 or 72 hr is not indicative of UC. This procedure aided in following the course of UC, delineating the extent of disease, and in differentiating active CD from an intraabdominal abscess. Tissues from UC patients had increased tissue/plasma ratioactivity ratios while tissues from CD patients had normal or decreased ratios which were consistent with the imaging data.

  8. Immunoregulation of Inflammatory and Inhibitory Cytokines by Vitamin D3 in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan Mohammed, H; Mirshafiey, A; Vahedi, H; Hemmasi, G; Moussavi Nasl Khameneh, A; Parastouei, K; Saboor-Yaraghi, A A

    2017-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of idiopathic, chronic and relapsing inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, caused by an aberrant and exaggerated immunological response in the gut. Supplementation of vitamin D3 in patients with IBD exerts both direct and indirect regulatory roles on the naïve T cells, thereby maintaining a balance between inflammatory and inhibitory cytokines. The direct actions of vitamin D3 on naïve T cells result in the proliferation of more regulatory T cells and inhibitory cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10 and IL-5. The binding of vitamin D to dendritic cells (DCs) through vitamin D receptors inhibits the action of IL-12 on DCs, resulting in the downregulation of Th1 and Th17. On the other hand, this interaction favours Th2 and Treg upregulation and facilitates the maintenance of immune homoeostasis between inflammatory and inhibitory cytokines which is essentially significant in the management of patients with IBD. The aim of this review was to explore the current and mounting scientific evidence on the roles of vitamin D3 in immunoregulation of inflammatory and inhibitory cytokines in patients with IBDs. An extensive literature search was conducted using keywords such as Vitamin D3*, IBD*, inflammatory cytokines*, inhibitory cytokines*, naïve-T-cells* and antigen presenting cells* through PubMed, SCOPUS and MEDLINE search engines. The results of the accumulated bodies of research that have been conducted demonstrate that vitamin D3 plays a major role not only in the immunoregulation of cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of IBDs but also in many other inflammatory disorders. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  9. Is cytomegalovirus infection related to inflammatory bowel disease, especially steroid-resistant inflammatory bowel disease? A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ya-li Lv, Fei-fei Han, Yang-jie Jia, Zi-rui Wan, Li-li Gong, He Liu, Li-hong Liu Department of Pharmacy, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Numerous studies have been conducted to analyze the association between HCMV infection and risk of IBD and steroid-resistant IBD, but no clear consensus had been reached. Objectives: The aim of this study was to confirm this relationship precisely by doing a systematic review and meta-analysis. Study design: We identified relevant studies through a search of PubMed and Embase. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they 1 evaluated the association between HCMV infection and IBD disease; 2 evaluated the association between HCMV infection and steroid-resistant IBD disease; 3 were case–control studies or nested case–control studies; 4 provided the numbers (or percentage of positivity for HCMV infection in cases and controls, respectively. Data were extracted and analyzed independently by two investigators. Results and conclusion: A total of 18 studies including 1,168 patients and 951 health groups was identified, and HCMV infection was distinctly confirmed as a risk factor for the occurrence and development of IBD. When involving 17 studies including 1,306 IBD patients, a total of 52.9% of patients in the cytomegalovirus (CMV-positive groups were observed to have steroid resistance, compared with 30.2% of patients in the CMV-negative groups. There was a significant difference in the risk of steroid resistance between people exposed to HCMV infection and those not exposed HCMV infection in IBD patients. This meta-analysis suggested that HCMV infection is associated with an increased risk for IBD and steroid-resistant IBD. Keywords: cytomegalovirus, infection, inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, meta-analysis

  10. Impact of restless legs syndrome in patients with inflammatory bowel disease on sleep, fatigue, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindlbeck, Katharina A; Becker, Janek; Berger, Felix; Mehl, Arne; Rewitzer, Charlotte; Geffe, Sarah; Koch, Peter M; Preiß, Jan C; Siegmund, Britta; Maul, Jochen; Marzinzik, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with neurological symptoms including restless legs syndrome. Here, we investigated the impact of restless legs syndrome in patients with inflammatory bowel disease on sleep, fatigue, mood, cognition, and quality of life. Two groups of inflammatory bowel disease patients, with and without restless legs syndrome, were prospectively evaluated for sleep disorders, fatigue, daytime sleepiness, depression, anxiety, and health-related quality of life. Furthermore, global cognitive function, executive function, attention, and concentration were assessed in both groups. Disease activity and duration of inflammatory bowel disease as well as current medication were assessed by interview. Inflammatory bowel disease patients with and without restless legs syndrome were matched for age, education, severity, and duration of their inflammatory bowel disease. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease and clinically relevant restless leg syndrome suffered significantly more frequent from sleep disturbances including sleep latency and duration, more fatigue, and worse health-related quality of life as compared to inflammatory bowel disease patients without restless legs syndrome. Affect and cognitive function including cognitive flexibility, attention, and concentration showed no significant differences among groups, indicating to be not related to restless legs syndrome. Sleep disorders including longer sleep latency, shorter sleep duration, and fatigue are characteristic symptoms of restless legs syndrome in inflammatory bowel disease patients, resulting in worse health-related quality of life. Therefore, clinicians treating patients with inflammatory bowel disease should be alert for restless legs syndrome.

  11. An unusual white blood cell scan in a child with inflammatory bowel disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porn, U; Howman-Giles, R; O'Loughlin, E; Uren, R; Chaitow, J

    2000-10-01

    Technetium-99m-labeled leukocyte (WBC) imaging is a valuable screening method for inflammatory bowel disease, especially in children, because of its high rate of sensitivity, low cost, and ease of preparation. A 14-year-old girl is described who had juvenile arthritis and iritis complicated by inflammatory bowel disease. She was examined for recurrent abdominal pain. A Tc-99m stannous colloid WBC scan was performed, and tracer accumulation was seen in the small bowel in the region of the distal ileum on the initial 1-hour image. Delayed imaging at 3 hours also revealed tracer accumulation in the cecum and ascending colon, which was not seen on the early image. A biopsy of the colon during endoscopy showed no evidence of active inflammation in the colon. The small bowel was not seen. Computed tomography revealed changes suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease in the distal ileum. The appearance on the WBC study was most likely a result of inflammatory bowel disease involving the distal ileum, with transit of luminal activity into the large bowel.

  12. Diet and nutritional factors in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarek, Danuta; Rodacki, Tomasz; Domagała-Rodacka, Renata; Cibor, Dorota; Mach, Tomasz

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) development is affected by complex interactions between environmental factors, changes in intestinal flora, various predisposing genetic properties and changes in the immune system. Dietary factors seem to play an underestimated role in the etiopathogenesis and course of the disease. However, research about food and IBD is conflicting. An excessive consumption of sugar, animal fat and linoleic acid is considered a risk factor for IBD development, whereas a high fiber diet and citrus fruit consumption may play a protective role. Also, appropriate nutrition in particular periods of the disease may facilitate achieving or prolonging remissions and most of all, improve the quality of life for patients. During disease exacerbation, a low fiber diet is recommended for most patients. In the remission time, an excessive consumption of alcohol and sulfur products may have a negative effect on the disease course. Attempts are also made at employing diets composed in detail in order to supplement IBD therapy. A diet with a modified carbohydrate composition, a semi-vegetarian diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols are under investigation. Due to chronic inflammation as well as side effects of chronically used medications, patients with IBD are also at increased risk of nutritional factor deficiencies, including iron, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin B12, folic acid, zinc, magnesium and vitamin A. It should also be remembered that there is no single common diet suitable for all IBD patients; each of them is unique and dietary recommendations must be individually developed for each patient, depending on the course of the disease, past surgical procedures and type of pharmacotherapy.

  13. Risk factors of anxiety and depression in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahon, Stéphane; Lahmek, Pierre; Durance, Christelle; Olympie, Alain; Lesgourgues, Bruno; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Gendre, Jean-Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Little is known in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regarding risk factors for psychological distress. The aim of this work was to study the disease characteristics and socioeconomic factors associated with anxiety and depression in IBD. From December 2008 to June 2009, 1663 patients with IBD (1450 were members of the Association Francois Aupetit, French association of IBD patients) answered a questionnaire about psychological and socioeconomic factors and adherence to treatment. In this study we focused the analysis on the characteristics of IBD (type, location, severity, treatment) and socioeconomic factors (professional, educational, and marital status and Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centers [EPICES] score of socioeconomic deprivation; score established in medical centers in France; http://www.cetaf.asso.fr) associated with depression and anxiety. Anxiety and depression were assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Comparison between groups according to the existence of depression or anxiety was carried out using univariate and multivariate analysis. In all, 181 patients (11%) were depressed; 689 patients (41%) were anxious. By multivariate analysis, factors associated with anxiety were: severe disease (P = 0.04), flares (P = 0.05), nonadherence to treatment (P = 0.03), disabled or unemployed status (P = 0.002), and socioeconomic deprivation (P < 0.0001). Factors associated with depression were: age (P = 0.004), flares (P = 0.03), disabled or unemployed status (P = 0.03), and socioeconomic deprivation (P < 0.0001). In this large cohort of IBD patients, risk factors for anxiety and depression were severe and active disease and socioeconomic deprivation. Psychological interventions would be useful when these factors are identified. Copyright © 2012 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  14. [Follow-up of patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, Santiago

    2013-10-01

    Multiple data were presented on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Digestive Disease Week (DDW). Of particular interest to gastroenterologists were those on novel treatments and information on safety. Other data, such as those relating to disease "follow-up", were possibly of lesser interest. However, the information reported this year was, in my opinion, highly important, because it could lead to significant changes in clinical practice. Thus, results presented strongly suggest that patients with asymptomatic IBD, specifically Crohn's disease (CD), often develop complications during their clinical course. Moreover, this is especially true in patients with CD and biological signs of inflammation, despite being asymptomatic. In addition, it seems clear that the absence of symptoms does not imply an absence of inflammation. These observations indicate a dual practical message: patients should be followed-up and objectively evaluated. Multiple data were presented on how to objectively evaluate disease activity in IBD. The prognostic value and objectivity of endoscopy has been reaffirmed, specifically with new data on the only validated index, the UCEIS, in ulcerative colitis. Together with endoscopy, the role of less invasive techniques such as imaging tests (magnetic resonance enterography, computed tomography enterography and even echography, with and without contrast agent) and fecal markers has been reaffirmed in several conditions and these techniques have a certain predictive value. Finally, many studies were reported that confirm the therapeutic activity of levels of anti-TNF and its antibodies in certain conditions and with some limitations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases; Chirurgische Behandlung entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen

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    Fuerst, H.; Schildberg, F.W. [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Ludwig Maximilians Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To summarize current knowledge on surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn`s disease, ulcerative colitis and diverticulitis). Material and methods: To discuss surgical indications and strategies, we reviewed major peer review publications of the last 10 years, and we also analysed data from patients with Crohn`s disease who were treated in our institution between 1978 and 1994. Results: With Crohn`s disease (305 patients), emergency surgery should be avoided as much as possible, since morbidity (50% vs 8.8%) and mortality (11% vs 0.6%) rise significantly in comparison to elective procedures. With ulcerative colitis, operative therapy is indicated in patients with secondary malignoma, and urgent surgery is requested in cases with associated perforation, toxic megacolon or massive bleeding. With diverticulitis, the first episode should be managed conservatively. Surgery is indicated in patients with recurrent episodes or with secondary complications. (orig.) [Deutsch] In dieser Uebersichtsarbeit wird die operative Behandlung der entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen M. Crohn, Colitis ulcerosa und Divertikulitis dargestellt. Anhand einer Literaturuebersicht wird sowohl die Operationsindikation als auch das operative Vorgehen besprochen, wobei beim M. Crohn auch Daten des eigenen Patientengutes zwischen 1978-1994 eingehen. Anhand der Daten von 305 Patienten wird deutlich, dass eine Notfalloperation bei M. Crohn vermieden werden muss, da darunter die Komplikationsrate (50% vs. 8,8%) und die Letalitaet (11% vs. 0,6%) deutlich steigen. Absolute Operationsindikationen bei Colitis ulcerosa sind die Perforation, das toxische Megakolon, Blutungen und das Auftreten eines Karzinoms. Der erste Schub einer Divertikulitis wird konservativ behandelt, bei Rezidivschueben sowie bei Kompliktionen besteht eine Operationsindikation. Wesentlich ist die rechtzeitige Operationsindikation bei M. Crohn und Divertikulitis, um Notfallsituationen zu vermeiden. Ziel

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease in Accra: what new trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archampong, T N; Nkrumah, K N

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been more common in Western Europe and North America. Initially IBD had been thought to be low in incidence among Sub-Saharan Africans. However, it is now being increasingly recognised in patients of African descent. A comparative assessment of the patterns of IBD in Accra from 1997 to 2011. This study used a retrospective design to access clinical details of follow-up patients attending the Gastroenterology Unit of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra between February, 1997 and May, 2011. It was a comparative seven-year review of clinical presentations of IBD between April, 2004 -August, 2011 (t2) and February, 1997 - March, 2004 (t1) for changing patterns of disease in tertiary care. Twenty-eight (28) new IBD patients were seen in the Gastroenterology Clinic, KBTH with IBD during 2004 - 2011 (t2) in comparison to 17 patients over 1997 - 2004 (t1). Presentations of severe diarrhoea were 70.4% and 55.6% in (t1) and (t2) respectively. Eighty-two percent (82%) of patients with IBD in (t2) had a severely inflamed colon on the index colonoscopy. Most patients (70-80%) responded to medical therapy (steroids, sulfasalazine) with no colon resections for steroid-refractory colitis. Although relatively uncommon, IBD recorded a 65% rise in incidence over the study periods with a male preponderance. Most patients with IBD were presenting late with severe clinical and endoscopic features of disease yet medically responsive. Non-specific (indeterminate) colitis gained prominence in (t2).

  17. CEACAM6 gene variants in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, Jürgen; Seiderer, Julia; Fries, Christoph; Tillack, Cornelia; Pfennig, Simone; Weidinger, Maria; Beigel, Florian; Olszak, Torsten; Lass, Ulrich; Göke, Burkhard; Ochsenkühn, Thomas; Wolf, Christiane; Lohse, Peter; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Diegelmann, Julia; Czamara, Darina; Brand, Stephan

    2011-04-29

    The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) acts as a receptor for adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) and its ileal expression is increased in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Given its contribution to the pathogenesis of CD, we aimed to investigate the role of genetic variants in the CEACAM6 region in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In this study, a total of 2,683 genomic DNA samples (including DNA from 858 CD patients, 475 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), and 1,350 healthy, unrelated controls) was analyzed for eight CEACAM6 SNPs (rs10415946, rs1805223 = p.Pro42Pro, rs4803507, rs4803508, rs11548735 = p.Gly239Val, rs7246116 = pHis260His, rs2701, rs10416839). In addition, a detailed haplotype analysis and genotype-phenotype analysis were performed. Overall, our genotype analysis did not reveal any significant association of the investigated CEACAM6 SNPs and haplotypes with CD or UC susceptibility, although certain CEACAM6 SNPs modulated CEACAM6 expression in intestinal epithelial cell lines. Despite its function as receptor of AIEC in ileal CD, we found no association of the CEACAM6 SNPs with ileal or ileocolonic CD. Moreover, there was no evidence of epistasis between the analyzed CEACAM6 variants and the main CD-associated NOD2, IL23R and ATG16L1 variants. This study represents the first detailed analysis of CEACAM6 variants in IBD patients. Despite its important role in bacterial attachment in ileal CD, we could not demonstrate a role for CEACAM6 variants in IBD susceptibility or regarding an ileal CD phenotype. Further functional studies are required to analyze if these gene variants modulate ileal bacterial attachment.

  18. Micronutrients in Chilean Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients: Crosssectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Ibáñez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD patients often present with nutritional disorders that affect both macronutrient and micronutrient levels. Vitamin and mineral deficiencies are typically more frequent in Crohn's disease (CD patients than other IBD patients. However, some studies have shown that these deficiencies can also be present in ulcerative colitis (UC patients, even in those in remission. Aims To describe the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies in patients diagnosed with IBD and to correlate these micronutrient deficiencies with demographic, clinical and disease characteristics. Methods A cross-sectional study of patients in the IBD program who were 18 years and older was completed. Clinical characteristics and disease activity indexes were assessed. Body Mass Index (BMI, haematocrit, serum albumin, serum iron profile, serum 25(OH D, vitamin B12, folate, zinc and copper were measured. Results Ninety-one patients with IBD were included: 46 patients (50.5 per cent with UC and 45 patients (49.5 per cent with CD. At least one micronutrient deficiency was found in 39.5 per cent of patients, 35.1 per cent had two deficiencies, and 12 per cent had three or more deficiencies. Iron, zinc, copper, and vitamin B12 deficiencies were found in 33 per cent, 22 per cent, 11 per cent and 10 per cent of patients, respectively. No folate deficiencies were found. Low levels of serum 25(OH D were detected in 76 per cent of patients. The mean BMI was 24.3 (SD 3.4, and the mean serum albumin level was 4.0g/l (SD 0.4. Conclusion Micronutrient deficiencies were frequent in our study cohort and did not correlate with macronutrient status. Measurement of macronutrients and micronutrients should become a routine assessment in IBD patients to improve patient care and to avoid negative repercussions on disease activity

  19. Thromboembolism as an important complication of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Lize; Vande Casteele, Niels; Ballet, Vera; van Assche, Gert; Ferrante, Marc; Vermeire, Séverine; Gils, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a higher risk of developing thromboembolic events (TE) compared with the healthy population. This study aimed to describe a cohort of IBD patients with a history of TE focusing on recurrence of TE, disease activity and IBD medication at the time of TE and surgery before TE. In a retrospective monocentric cohort study, we included IBD patients in whom an arterial and/or venous TE occurred. Eighty-four IBD patients with a history of TE (63% Crohn's disease, 44% men) and a mean age of 45±15 years were included; 25/84 patients (30%) were identified to have recurrent TE. Seventy out of 84 (83%) developed a venous TE, with a deep vein thrombosis as the major manifestation (28/70, 40%), followed by a pulmonary embolism (16/70, 23%). At the time of TE, 60/84 (71%) patients were diagnosed with active disease. In all, 23% patients were on 5-aminosalicylic acids, 36% on steroids, 18% on azathioprine, 5% on methotrexate, 12% on biologicals and 23% were not receiving specific IBD treatment. Moreover, within a 6-month period preceding the TE, 28/84 (33%) patients underwent surgery, of whom 17% received thromboprophylaxis at hospital discharge. We confirm the association between disease activity and the occurrence of TE. A substantial number of patients had additional risk factors such as recurrence of TE. In all, 36% received steroids at the time of TE and 33% underwent recent surgery, of whom only a minority received thromboprophylaxis at hospital discharge. Further efforts are required to increase thromboprophylaxis in at-risk patients.

  20. Vaccination in inflammatory bowel disease patients: attitudes, knowledge, and uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Gurtej; Rumman, Amir; Thanabalan, Reka; Croitoru, Kenneth; Silverberg, Mark S; Hillary Steinhart, A; Nguyen, Geoffrey C

    2015-06-01

    Immunomodulators and biological agents, used to treat inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], are associated with an increased risk of infection, including vaccine-preventable infections. We assessed patient attitudes towards vaccination, knowledge of vaccine recommendations, and uptake of recommended vaccines. Patients attending IBD clinics completed a self-administered, structured, paper-based questionnaire. We collected demographic data, medical and immunisation history, self-reported patient uptake, knowledge, and perceptions of childhood and adult vaccinations. The prevalence of treatment with biologicals, steroids, thiopurines, and methotrexate among the 300 respondents were 37.3%, 16.0%, 16.0%, and 5.7%, respectively. Self-reported vaccine completion was reported by 45.3% of patients. Vaccination uptake rates were 61.3% for influenza, 10.3% for pneumococcus, 61.0% for hepatitis B, 52.0% for hepatitis A, 26.0% for varicella, 20.7% for meningococcus, 5.3% for herpes zoster, and 11.0% for herpes papilloma virus [females only]. Significant predictors of vaccine completion were annual vaccination review by family physician (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82) or gastroenterologist [OR = 1.72], current steroid use [OR = 1.28], and current or prior treatment with biologicals [OR = 1.42]. The majority of patients reported that the primary responsibility to ensure vaccine completion lies with the patient [41.7%] and the family physician [32.3%]. Uncertainty about indications, fears of side effects, and concerns regarding vaccine safety were the most commonly reported reasons for non-uptake [22.0%, 20.7%, and 5.3%, respectively]. Uptake of recommended vaccines among IBD patients is suboptimal. Annual vaccination reviews by both family physician and gastroenterologist may improve vaccine uptake. Interventions targeted at improving vaccination uptake in IBD patients are needed. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All

  1. Characteristics and Progression of Preclinical Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lago, Iago; Merino, Olga; Azagra, Irene; Maiz, Ainara; Zapata, Eva; Higuera, Rebeca; Montalvo, Isabel; Fernández-Calderón, María; Arreba, Paz; Carrascosa, Juan; Iriarte, Ainara; Portillo, Isabel; Aguirre, Urko; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Muñoz-Navas, Miguel; Cabriada, José Luis

    2017-11-11

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease usually diagnosed after the appearance of gastrointestinal symptoms. Little is known about IBD progression during its early and even preclinical phases. We aimed to determine the number of new incidental diagnoses of IBD in an older population, and evaluate disease progression from its early stages. We performed a retrospective analysis of 31,005 colonoscopies performed during colorectal cancer screening of patients with positive results from fecal immunochemical tests, at 11 centers in the Basque Country (Spain) from 2009 through 2014. We collected clinical and laboratory data from all asymptomatic individuals suspected to have IBD during screening colonoscopies, with histologic confirmation. Colonoscopy screening led to 79 new diagnoses of ulcerative colitis, 24 of Crohn's disease, and 7 of unclassified colitis (average patient age, 57 y; interquartile range, 52-62 y; 57% male). Eleven patients had symptoms before colonoscopy and were excluded from the analysis. Among those patients who were asymptomatic at diagnosis, 36% developed symptoms after a follow-up period of 25 months (interquartile range, 10.5-42 mo), mostly rectal bleeding and diarrhea. Treatment was prescribed for 81 patients (88%), and 2 cases required surgery. We analyzed data from a large cohort of patients with IBD diagnosed at early or even preclinical stages, from an older population. New incidental diagnoses of IBD were made in 0.35% of individuals undergoing a population-based screening colonoscopy-most were classified as ulcerative colitis. Approximately one third of patients developed symptoms during the follow-up period. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Heather A.; Basit, Saima; Harpsøe, Maria C.; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Jess, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Existing data on pregnancy complications in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are inconsistent. To address these inconsistencies, we investigated potential associations between IBD, IBD-related medication use during pregnancy, and pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery, Apgar score, and congenital abnormalities. Methods We conducted a cohort study in >85,000 Danish National Birth Cohort women who were pregnant in the period 1996-2002 and had information on IBD, IBD-related medication use (systemic or local corticosteroids, 5-aminosalicylates), pregnancy outcomes and potential confounders. We evaluated associations between IBD and adverse pregnancy/birth outcomes using Cox regression and log-linear binomial regression. Results IBD was strongly and significantly associated with severe pre-eclampsia, preterm premature rupture of membranes and medically indicated preterm delivery in women using systemic corticosteroids during pregnancy (hazard ratios [HRs] >7). IBD was also associated with premature preterm rupture of membranes in women using local corticosteroid medications (HR 3.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33-8.20) and with medically indicated preterm delivery (HR 1.91, 95% CI 0.99-3.68) in non-medicated women. Furthermore, IBD was associated with low 5-minute Apgar score in term infants (risk ratio [RR] 2.19, 95% CI 1.03-4.66). Finally, Crohn’s disease (but not ulcerative colitis) was associated with major congenital abnormalities in the offspring (RR 1.85, 95% CI 1.06-3.21). No child with a congenital abnormality born to a woman with IBD was exposed to systemic corticosteroids in utero. Conclusion Women with IBD are at increased risk of severe pre-eclampsia, medically indicated preterm delivery, preterm premature rupture of membranes, and delivering infants with low Apgar score and major congenital malformations. These associations are only partly explained by severe disease as reflected by systemic corticosteroid use

  3. CEACAM6 gene variants in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Glas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6 acts as a receptor for adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC and its ileal expression is increased in patients with Crohn's disease (CD. Given its contribution to the pathogenesis of CD, we aimed to investigate the role of genetic variants in the CEACAM6 region in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. METHODOLOGY: In this study, a total of 2,683 genomic DNA samples (including DNA from 858 CD patients, 475 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC, and 1,350 healthy, unrelated controls was analyzed for eight CEACAM6 SNPs (rs10415946, rs1805223 = p.Pro42Pro, rs4803507, rs4803508, rs11548735 = p.Gly239Val, rs7246116 = pHis260His, rs2701, rs10416839. In addition, a detailed haplotype analysis and genotype-phenotype analysis were performed. Overall, our genotype analysis did not reveal any significant association of the investigated CEACAM6 SNPs and haplotypes with CD or UC susceptibility, although certain CEACAM6 SNPs modulated CEACAM6 expression in intestinal epithelial cell lines. Despite its function as receptor of AIEC in ileal CD, we found no association of the CEACAM6 SNPs with ileal or ileocolonic CD. Moreover, there was no evidence of epistasis between the analyzed CEACAM6 variants and the main CD-associated NOD2, IL23R and ATG16L1 variants. CONCLUSIONS: This study represents the first detailed analysis of CEACAM6 variants in IBD patients. Despite its important role in bacterial attachment in ileal CD, we could not demonstrate a role for CEACAM6 variants in IBD susceptibility or regarding an ileal CD phenotype. Further functional studies are required to analyze if these gene variants modulate ileal bacterial attachment.

  4. Thromboembolic tendency (TE) in IBD (Inflammatory bowel disease) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canero, Antonio; Parmeggiani, Domenico; Avenia, Nicola; Atelli, Pietro Francesco; Goffredi, Luigi; Peltrini, Roberto; Madonna, Imma; Ambrosino, Pasquale; Apperti, Sarah; Apperti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of TE events in IBD patients is higher then in population control. The main reason of it, is the hypercoaugulable state. Our aim was to detect serum markers related to TE, that can assume preventing and prognostic meanings. We performed a 3 years study on 71 patients with IBD, evaluating hypercoaugulability, and then we compared the results with a 71 patients non IBD group control. We also investigated patients of both groups concerning TE events occurred already. In IBD group we found out that 16 patients (22.5%) had history of TE versus >1% of group control. Nineteen of them, already had knowledge of their previous hypercoaugulating condition. 48 (67%) had increased markers value versus less then 6% detected in group control. In IBD group 43% ,20% and 4.2% had respectively 1, 1-3 or > 3 markers higher levels then normal range. Among the markers investigated, we detected increased levels of plated in 33%, homocysteine in 26.7%, d-dimero 25.3%, c3 in 15.4%, apcr in 5.6%. From our study we detected highest incidence of TE events, and hypercoaugulating status in IBD group. In our previous investigations, plated, homocysteine, d-dimero, c3, and apcr, seems to be the TE markers with higher sensibility. It seems reasonable, according our experience, to propose a new TE risk score index for IBD patients: low, mild and high risk respectively for patients with 1, 1-3 and >3 markers with higher serum levels then normal range. Inflammatory bowel disease, Thromboembolism risk score.

  5. Nutritional problems in inflammatory bowel disease: the patient perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Alexis; Whelan, Kevin; Moosa, Arifa; Lomer, Miranda C E; Reidlinger, Dianne P

    2011-10-01

    Crohn's Disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which may result in nutrition problems that impact on patient health, nutritional status and quality of life. Subjective reports of how IBD patients experience these problems as part of their disease process, including comparisons between patient groups, or the need for tailored nutrition advice as perceived by these patients, have not been widely studied. This survey aimed to identify and explore nutritional problems that are important to CD and UC patients and to investigate their views on the IBD health services provided to help them with these. Eighty-seven IBD patients were invited to take part in a nutrition survey using face-to-face questionnaire interviews. The survey asked about food and nutrition problems that patients have experienced, identifying which were most significant and the extent to which they had been addressed by the clinical service. Seventy-two IBD patients completed the evaluation (47 CD, 25 UC). Of these, 45 (62.5%) felt that food and nutrition were either 'important' or 'extremely important' in their experience of IBD, and 59 (82%) reported problems with food and nutrition. Patients with CD and UC reported similar frequencies of most nutritional problems. However, 44 (94%) CD vs. 16 (64%) UC patients reported problems with weight (p=0.002). Less than half of patients had seen a dietitian for tailored nutritional advice to address these problems. Nutritional problems experienced and reported by IBD patients are numerous and varied. They are considered important by patients with CD and UC, both of whom would generally value specific dietary counselling, highlighting a need for further research in this area and adequate and equal provision of services for both groups. Copyright © 2011 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical Fitness in Adolescence and Subsequent Inflammatory Bowel Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinder, Carren; Hiyoshi, Ayako; Hussein, Oula; Halfvarson, Jonas; Ekbom, Anders; Montgomery, Scott

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Physical fitness may reduce systemic inflammation levels relevant to the risk of symptomatic Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC); we assessed if fitness in adolescence is associated with subsequent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) risk, independent of markers of risk and prodromal disease activity. METHODS: Swedish registers provided information on a cohort of 240,984 men (after exclusions) who underwent military conscription assessments in late adolescence (1969–1976). Follow-up started at least 4 years after the conscription assessment until 31 December 2009 (up to age 57 years). Cox's regression assessed the association of physical fitness with CD (n=986) and UC (n=1,878) in separate models, with adjustment including: socioeconomic conditions in childhood; physical fitness, height, body mass index, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in adolescence; and subsequent diagnoses of IBD. RESULTS: Low fitness was associated with a raised risk of IBD, with unadjusted hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of 1.62 (1.31–2.00) for CD and 1.36 (1.17–1.59) for UC. The results were attenuated by adjustment, particularly for markers of prodromal disease activity to 1.32 (1.05–1.66) and 1.25 (1.06–1.48), respectively. Raised ESR in adolescence was associated with increased risks for subsequent CD (5.95 (4.47–7.92)) and UC (1.92 (1.46–2.52)). CONCLUSIONS: The inverse association of physical fitness with IBD risk is consistent with a protective role for exercise. However, evidence of disease activity before diagnosis was already present in adolescence, suggesting that some or all of the association between fitness and IBD may be due to prodromal disease activity reducing exercise capacity and therefore fitness. PMID:26540026

  7. Vedolizumab Therapy in Severe Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Máire A; Stein, Ronen E; Maxwell, Elizabeth C; Albenberg, Lindsey; Baldassano, Robert N; Dawany, Noor; Grossman, Andrew B; Mamula, Petar; Piccoli, David A; Kelsen, Judith R

    2016-10-01

    Vedolizumab is effective for inducing and maintaining remission in adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, there is limited pediatric data. This study aimed to describe the adverse events and clinical response to vedolizumab in refractory pediatric IBD. Disease activity indices, clinical response, concomitant medication use, and adverse events were measured over 22 weeks in an observational prospective cohort study of children with refractory IBD who had failed anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy and subsequently initiated vedolizumab therapy. Twenty-one subjects, 16 with Crohn disease, received vedolizumab. Clinical response was observed in 6/19 (31.6%) of the evaluable subjects at week 6 and in 11/19 (57.9%) by week 22. Before induction, 15/21 (71.4%) participants were treated with systemic corticosteroids, as compared with 7/21 (33.3%) subjects at 22 weeks. Steroid-free remission was seen in 1/20 (5.0%) subjects at 6 weeks, 3/20 (15.0%) at 14 weeks, and 4/20 (20.0%) at 22 weeks. There was statistically significant improvement in serum albumin and hematocrit; however, C-reactive protein increased by week 22 (P < 0.05). There were no infusion reactions. Vedolizumab was discontinued in 2 patients because of severe colitis, requiring surgical intervention. There is limited experience with vedolizumab therapy in pediatric IBD. There seems to be a marked number of subjects with clinical response in the first 6 weeks that increases further by week 22 despite the severity of disease in this cohort. Adverse events may not be directly related to vedolizumab. This study is limited by small sample size, and larger prospective studies are warranted.

  8. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and the Risk of Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J Claire; Furlano, Raoul I; Jick, Susan S; Meier, Christoph R

    2016-02-01

    An increased risk of autoimmune disease has been reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]. Using data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink [CPRD], this study set out to further examine this relationship. Patients with a first-time IBD diagnosis were randomly matched to an equal-sized IBD-free comparison group. Incidence rates for new-onset autoimmune diseases were estimated. A nested case-control analysis comprising IBD patients was conducted, using conditional logistic regression to assess whether IBD severity, duration, or treatment influences the risk of developing autoimmune diseases. During follow-up, 1069 IBD and 585 IBD-free patients developed an incident autoimmune disease. An increased incidence of autoimmune disease was observed in IBD patients (incidence rate [IR] 9.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.09-10.24) compared with the non-IBD comparison group [IR 5.22, 95% CI 4.82-5.66]. In IBD patients, increased disease severity was associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease development (odds ratio [OR] 1.62, 95% CI 1.28-2.05). Current antibiotic use was also associated with an increased risk [adjusted OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.07-2.78]. A reduced risk of incident autoimmune diseases was observed for current long-term users of aminosalicylates [adjusted OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.57-0.91]. Individuals with IBD had an increased risk of developing an autoimmune disease. Increased disease severity and current antibiotic use were associated with an increased relative risk of developing additional autoimmune diseases in IBD patients. Long-term current aminosalicylate use was associated with a reduced risk. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Nitric oxide as a potential biomarker in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesina Avdagić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate changes in serum nitric oxide (NO concentration in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD patients and its use as potential biomarker in differential diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn's disease (CD and in disease activity assessment. In 60 patients of both genders - 30 with ulcerative colitis and 30 with Crohn's disease - and 30 controls serum nitric oxide concentration was determined by measuring nitrite concentration, a stable metabolic product of NO with oxygen. Conversion of nitrates (NO3- to nitrites (NO2- was done with elementary zinc. The nitrite concentration was determined by classic colorimetrical Griess reaction. Median serum NO concentration was statistically different (p=0,0005 between UC patients (15.25 µmol/L; 13.47 - 19.88 µmol/L, CD patients (14.54 µmol/L; 13.03 -16.32 µmol/L and healthy controls (13.29 µmol/L; 12.40 - 13.92 µmol/L. When active UC and CD patients were compared with inactive UC and CD patients respectively a significant difference in serum NO level was found (p=0.0005. With a cut-off level of 17.39 µmol/L NO had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% in discriminating between active and inactive UC patients. With cut-off value of 14.01 µmol/L serum NO level had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 69% in distinguishing between patients with active CD and inactive CD. Serum NO concentration is a minimally invasive and rapid tool for discriminating between active and inactive IBD patients and could be used as useful biomarker in monitoring of disease activity in IBD patients.

  10. Bone mineral density and inflammatory bowel disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Lima

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is associated with low bone mineral density (BMD. In this study, the association between disease severity and BMD in patients with IBD was evaluated. Associations between BMD and the Montreal classification, disease activity and drug therapy were also tested. A cross-sectional prevalence study with a comparison group was conducted. One hundred and twenty-eight patients were evaluated: 68 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC, and 60 with Crohn's disease (CD. The control group consisted of 67 healthy subjects. All patients and controls had BMD measured and in IBD patients, current medications, hospitalization, and disease location, extent and phenotype, according to the Montreal classification, were recorded. Multiple correspondence analysis was applied to evaluate categorical variables. In the CD group, most patients were diagnosed between 17–40 years of age. Ileocolonic and non-stricturing non-penetrating disease were the most frequent disease location and behavior, respectively. In UC patients, extensive colitis was the most frequent disease location. UC and CD patients were more likely to have osteopenia than controls (OR=14.93/OR=24.38, respectively. In the CD group, male patients, perianal disease, penetrating behavior and age at diagnosis >40 years were associated with low BMD. Taking azathioprine and infliximab also seemed to be associated with osteopenia. In the UC group, we observed an association between low BMD and male patients, left colitis, corticosteroid use and hospitalization. Disease activity was not associated with osteopenia or osteoporosis in CD and UC patients. Disease severity seems to be associated with osteopenia in IBD patients.

  11. Health care as perceived by persons with inflammatory bowel disease - a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnovska, Katarina Pihl; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla; Hjortswang, Henrik; Hjelm, Katarina; Börjeson, Sussanne

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of health care among persons living with inflammatory bowel disease. The quality of care plays an important role in the life of persons with a chronic disease. To define what persons with inflammatory bowel disease perceive as high-quality care, greater focus must be placed on the individual's own perspective of living with the condition. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted based on focus groups. Five focus groups were conducted with adult persons living with inflammatory bowel disease, 14 men and 12 women aged 19-76 years. The interviews were performed between January-June 2014. The perceptions of health care from the perspective of persons living with inflammatory bowel disease were summarised in two categories: 'professional attitudes of healthcare staff' and 'structure of the healthcare organisation'. Persons with inflammatory bowel disease want to be encountered with respect, experience trust and obtain information at the right time. They also expect shared decision-making, communication and to encounter competent healthcare professionals. Furthermore, the expectations on and perceptions of the structure of the healthcare organisation comprise access to care, accommodation, continuity of care, as well as the pros and cons of specialised care. The findings show the importance of establishing a respectful and trusting relationship, facilitating healthcare staff and persons with inflammatory bowel disease to work as a team in fulfilling individual care needs - but there is room for improvement in terms of quality of care. A person-centred approach, which places the individual and her/his family at the centre, considering them experts on their own health and enabling them to collaborate with healthcare staff, seems important to reach a high-quality healthcare organisation for patients with Inflammatory bowel disease. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. How will insights from genetics translate to clinical practice in inflammatory bowel disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Festen, E. A. M.; Weersma, R. K.

    Inflammatory bowel disease, consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gut, which arises through an excessive immune response to the normal gut flora in a genetically susceptible host. The disease affects predominantly young adults and due to its

  13. Five genetic markers in the interleukin 1 family in relation to inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokkers, P. C.; van Aken, B. E.; Basoski, N.; Reitsma, P. H.; Tytgat, G. N.; van Deventer, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    An imbalance between the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) has been postulated as a pathogenic factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To study allelic frequencies of novel polymorphisms in the genes for

  14. Role of the Innate Immune System in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lierop, Pieter P. E.; Samsom, Janneke N.; Escher, Johanna C.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.

    Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract commonly denoted as inflammatory bowel diseases. It has been proposed that these diseases result from aberrant mucosal immune responses to nonpathogenic microbial residents of the intestines. Recently, it

  15. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have increased risk of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Morten L; Kjeldsen, Jens; Knudsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    were significantly increased (P celiac disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D), sarcoidosis, asthma, iridocyclitis, psoriasis, pyoderma gangrenosum, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Restricted to UC (P ...AIM: To investigate whether immune mediated diseases (IMD) are more frequent in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: In this population based registry study, a total of 47325 patients with IBD were alive and registered in the Danish National Patient Registry on December 16, 2013....... Controls were randomly selected from the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) and matched for sex, age, and municipality. We used ICD 10 codes to identify the diagnoses of the included patients. The IBD population was divided into three subgroups: Ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD) and Both...

  16. Does the level of reproductive knowledge specific to inflammatory bowel disease predict childlessness among women with inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Vivian W; Chang, Hsiu-Ju; Kroeker, Karen I; Goodman, Karen J; Hegadoren, Kathleen M; Dieleman, Levinus A; Fedorak, Richard N

    2015-03-01

    Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may choose to remain childless due to a lack of IBD-specific reproductive knowledge. To examine the effects of IBD-specific reproductive knowledge and discussion of family planning with a physician on childlessness among women with IBD. Female IBD patients 18 to 45 years of age completed the Crohn's and Colitis Pregnancy Knowledge questionnaire (CCPKnow), and answered questions regarding reproductive history, plans to have children and discussion of family planning with a physician. CCPKnow scores were grouped according to poor (0 to 7), adequate (8 to 10), good (11 to 13) and very good (14 to 17). Of 434 eligible women, 248 (57.1%) completed the questionnaires. Of these 248 women, 51.6% were childless and, among these, 12.9% were voluntarily childless and 12.1% were trying to become pregnant. Childless women had a lower median CCPKnow score than women with children (6.0 versus 8.0; P=0.001). After adjusting for current age and marital status, each one point increase in the CCPKnow score corresponded to 8% lower odds of childlessness (OR 0.92 [95% CI 0.86 to 0.99]), 9% lower odds of voluntary childlessness (OR 0.91 [95% CI 0.79 to 1.0]) and 20% higher odds of trying to become pregnant (OR 1.2 [95% CI 1.0 to 1.4]). Discussion of family planning with a gastroenterologist corresponded to 72% lower odds of a poor CCPKnow score (OR 0.28 [95% CI 0.15 to 0.53]) and of voluntary childlessness (OR 0.28 [95% CI 0.057 to 1.3]). In the present study, higher IBD-specific reproductive knowledge lowered the odds of childlessness among women with IBD. Discussion of family planning with a physician was associated with higher CCPKnow scores and lower odds of voluntary childlessness.

  17. The epidemiology and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlinger, Kinga; Gyoerke, Tamas; Makoe, Erno; Mester, Adam; Tarjan, Zsolt

    2000-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unknown. However, a satisfactory solution cannot be far away. IBD actually encompasses two diseases, i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerous colitis (UC). These diseases resemble each other so closely that they cannot be distinguished even pathologically, but differ from each other sufficiently to regard them as independent entities. Epidemiological observations may be helpful in identifying the true causative factors of this evasive disease. Geographically, the prevalence of the disease has a slope from North to South and, to a lesser degree, from West to East. The Western-Eastern discrepancy can be attributed to a difference in Western life styles. The incidence of the disease has been increasing world-wide of late, but its spread has been slowing down in highly affected countries. Racial and ethnic relations in different populations and immigration studies offer interesting data which can reflect genetic, inherited, environmental and behavioural factors. The disease seems to have a characteristic racial-ethnic distribution: the Jewish population is highly susceptible everywhere, but its prevalence in that population nears that of the domestic society in which they live. In Hungary, the Roma (Gypsies) have a considerably lower prevalence than the average population. This can be attributed to a genetic or environmental influence. According to age, the onset of the disease occurs more often in the second or the third decade of life, but there also is another peak in the 60s. Regarding sexual distribution, there is a slight preponderance of colitis ulcerosa in men and of Crohn's disease in women. It may correspond to the stronger auto-immune affection in the process of Crohn's disease. Environmental factors and behavioural influences also are investigated. Diet, the role of the early ages, smoking habits and the influence of hormonal status and drugs are viewed as useful contributing factors in the

  18. The epidemiology and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlinger, Kinga E-mail: karlking@radi.sote.hu; Gyoerke, Tamas; Makoe, Erno; Mester, Adam; Tarjan, Zsolt

    2000-09-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unknown. However, a satisfactory solution cannot be far away. IBD actually encompasses two diseases, i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerous colitis (UC). These diseases resemble each other so closely that they cannot be distinguished even pathologically, but differ from each other sufficiently to regard them as independent entities. Epidemiological observations may be helpful in identifying the true causative factors of this evasive disease. Geographically, the prevalence of the disease has a slope from North to South and, to a lesser degree, from West to East. The Western-Eastern discrepancy can be attributed to a difference in Western life styles. The incidence of the disease has been increasing world-wide of late, but its spread has been slowing down in highly affected countries. Racial and ethnic relations in different populations and immigration studies offer interesting data which can reflect genetic, inherited, environmental and behavioural factors. The disease seems to have a characteristic racial-ethnic distribution: the Jewish population is highly susceptible everywhere, but its prevalence in that population nears that of the domestic society in which they live. In Hungary, the Roma (Gypsies) have a considerably lower prevalence than the average population. This can be attributed to a genetic or environmental influence. According to age, the onset of the disease occurs more often in the second or the third decade of life, but there also is another peak in the 60s. Regarding sexual distribution, there is a slight preponderance of colitis ulcerosa in men and of Crohn's disease in women. It may correspond to the stronger auto-immune affection in the process of Crohn's disease. Environmental factors and behavioural influences also are investigated. Diet, the role of the early ages, smoking habits and the influence of hormonal status and drugs are viewed as useful contributing factors in

  19. Measles vaccination and inflammatory bowel disease: controversy laid to rest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R L; Bohlke, K

    2001-01-01

    The increasing incidence of Crohn's disease has lead to speculation about changes in exposures to environmental or infectious agents. Considerable attention has focused on the role of measles infection and/or vaccination in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Current evidence regarding the association between measles vaccination and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises analytic epidemiological studies, a case-series report and ecological studies. The first of these, a 1995 cohort study, found an association between measles vaccination and Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, but was widely questioned on methodological grounds. This was followed by a 1997 case-control study showing no association between measles vaccination and IBD. In 1998, public concern was rekindled by a report of 12 children with nonspecific colitis, ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, and developmental disorders largely attributed to measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, but the nature of the report limited its scientific conclusions. Two additional studies, one case-control and one cohort, then followed and neither found an association with measles vaccination. Of the several ecological studies of measles vaccine coverage or measles schedule changes, none found an association with rates of IBD. The role of measles infection in IBD has been examined more extensively with studies of in utero measles exposure, measles infection early in life, and laboratory based investigations. An initial report of high rates of Crohn's disease among pregnancies affected by measles infection was followed by negative studies. Numerous case-control and ecological studies of children with measles infections early in life have also had discordant findings. Of three recent cohort studies, two showed no relationship between infection with early measles exposure and risk for IBD, while one found an approximate 3-fold elevation in risk. Laboratory investigations into persistent measles

  20. Performance of the Montreal classification for inflammatory bowel diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spekhorst, Lieke M; Visschedijk, Marijn C; Alberts, Rudi; Festen, Eleonora A; van der Wouden, Egbert-Jan; Dijkstra, Gerard; Weersma, Rinse K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To validate the Montreal classification system for Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) within the Netherlands. METHODS: A selection of 20 de-identified medical records with an appropriate representation of the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) sub phenotypes were scored by 30 observers with different professions (gastroenterologist specialist in IBD, gastroenterologist in training and IBD-nurses) and experience level with IBD patient care. Patients were classified according to the Montreal classification. In addition, participants were asked to score extra-intestinal manifestations (EIM) and disease severity in CD based on their clinical judgment. The inter-observer agreement was calculated by percentages of correct answers (answers identical to the “expert evaluation”) and Fleiss-kappa (κ). Kappa cut-offs: 0.8 excellent. RESULTS: The inter-observer agreement was excellent for diagnosis (κ = 0.96), perianal disease (κ = 0.92) and disease location in CD (κ = 0.82) and good for age of onset (κ = 0.67), upper gastrointestinal disease (κ = 0.62), disease behaviour in CD (κ = 0.79) and disease extent in UC (κ = 0.65). Disease severity in UC was scored poor (κ = 0.23). The additional items resulted in a good inter-observer agreement for EIM (κ = 0.68) and a moderate agreement for disease severity in CD (κ = 0.44). Percentages of correct answers over all Montreal items give a good reflection of the inter-observer agreement (> 80%), except for disease severity (48%-74%). IBD-nurses were significantly worse in scoring upper gastrointestinal disease in CD compared to gastroenterologists (P = 0.008) and gastroenterologists in training (P = 0.040). Observers with less than 10 years of experience were significantly better at scoring UC severity than observers with 10-20 years (P = 0.003) and more than 20 years (P = 0.003) of experience with IBD patient care. Observers with 10-20 years of experience with IBD patient care were significantly

  1. Inverse Association Between Poor Oral Health and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weiyao; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Liu, Zhiwei; Roosaar, Ann; Axéll, Tony; Ye, Weimin

    2017-04-01

    The hygiene hypothesis (a lack of childhood exposure to microorganisms increases susceptibility to allergic diseases by altering immune development) has been proposed as an explanation for the increasing incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, there are few data on the relationship between oral hygiene and development of IBD, and study results have been inconsistent. We investigated the association between poor oral health and risks of IBD, ulcerative colitis (UC), and Crohn's disease (CD). We performed a population-based cohort study of 20,162 individuals followed for 40 years (from 1973 to 2012). Residents of 2 municipalities of Uppsala County, Sweden (N = 30,118), 15 years or older, were invited, and among them 20,333 were examined for tooth loss, dental plaques, and oral mucosal lesions at the time of study entry. Other exposure data were collected from questionnaires. Patients who later developed IBD (UC or CD) were identified by international classification codes from Swedish National Patient and Cause of Death Registers. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for IBD, UC, and CD. From National Patient and Cause of Death Registers, we identified 209 individuals who developed IBD (142 developed UC and 67 developed CD), with an incidence rate of 37.3 per 100,000 person-years. We found an inverse relationship between poor oral health and IBD, especially in individuals with severe oral problems. Loss of 5-6 teeth of the 6 teeth examined was associated with a lower risk of IBD (hazard ratio, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.98). Having dental plaques that covered more than 33% of tooth surface was negatively associated with CD (hazard ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.97). In a population-based cohort study of more than 20,000 people in Sweden, we associated poor oral health with reduced risk of future IBD. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease associations with HLA Class II genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yang, H.; Targan, S. [Roche Molecular Systems, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A PCR-SSOP assay has been used to analyze HLA-Class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles in 378 Caucasians from a population in Southern California. The data has been analyzed separately for the Ashkenasi Jews and non-Jewish patients (n=286) and controls (n=92). Two common clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn`s disease (CD). In CD, we observed a susceptible effect with the rare DR1 allele - DRB*0103 [O.R.=4.56; 95% CI (0.96, 42.97); p=0.03]; a trend for an increase in DRB1*0103 was also observed in UC patients. A susceptible effect with DRB1*1502 [O.R.=5.20; 95% CI (1.10, 48.99); p=0.02] was observed in non-Jewish UC patients. This susceptible effect was restricted to UC ANCA-positive (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) patients. In addition, a significant association with DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301 [O.R.=9.46; 95% CI (1.30, 413.87); p=0.01] was seen with UC among non-Jewish patients: this haplotype was increased with CD among non-Jewish patients. Two protective haplotypes were detected among CD non-Jewish patients: DRB1*1301-DQB1*0603 [O.R.=0.34; 95% CI (0.09, 1.09); p=0.04], and DRB*0404-DQB1*0302 [O.R.=<0.08; 95% CI (0.0, 0.84); p=0.01]. When the same data were analyzed at the serology level, we observed a positive association in UC with DR2 [O.R.6.77; 95% CI (2.47, 22.95); p=2 x 10{sup -4}], and a positive association in CD with DR1 [O.R.=2.63; 95% CI (1.14, 6.62); p=0.01] consistent with previous reports. Thus, some IBD disease associations appear to be common to both UC and CD, while some are unique to one disease.

  3. Functional consequences of the macrophage stimulating protein 689C inflammatory bowel disease risk allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Kauder

    Full Text Available Macrophage stimulating protein (MSP is a serum growth factor that binds to and activates the receptor tyrosine kinase, Recepteur d'Origine Nantais (RON. A non-synonymous coding variant in MSP (689C has been associated with genetic susceptibility to both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD characterized by chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. We investigated the consequences of this polymorphism for MSP-RON pathway activity and IBD pathogenesis.RON expression patterns were examined on mouse and human cells and tissues under normal and disease conditions to identify cell types regulated by MSP-RON. Recombinant MSP variants were tested for their ability to bind and stimulate RON and undergo proteolytic activation. MSP concentrations were quantified in the serum of individuals carrying the MSP 689R and 689C alleles.In intestinal tissue, RON was primarily expressed by epithelial cells under normal and disease conditions. The 689C polymorphism had no impact on the ability of MSP to bind to or signal through RON. In a cohort of normal individuals and IBD patients, carriers of the 689C polymorphism had lower concentrations of MSP in their serum.By reducing the quantities of circulating MSP, the 689C polymorphism, or a variant in linkage disequilibrium with this polymorphism, may impact RON ligand availability and thus receptor activity. Given the known functions of RON in regulating wound healing and our analysis of RON expression patterns in human intestinal tissue, these data suggest that decreased RON activity may impact the efficiency of epithelial repair and thus underlie the increased IBD susceptibility associated with the MSP 689C allele.

  4. Role of wireless capsule endoscopy in reclassifying inflammatory bowel disease in children

    OpenAIRE

    Jodie Ouahed; Mohammad Shagrani; Ana Sant’Anna

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of wireless capsule endoscopy in identifying small bowel lesions in pediatric patients with newly diagnosed colonic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) type unclassified (IBDU), and to assess whether capsule endoscopy findings result in altered patient management. Methods: Ten pediatric patients recently diagnosed with IBDU through standard investigations were recruited from the pediatric gastroenterology clinic at McMaster Children's Hospital to undergo capsul...

  5. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: what's new in Digestive Disease Week 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, María

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic disorder of unknown aetiology that results from a pathologic response from both the innate and acquired immune systems, leading to chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. New drugs have been introduced into the therapeutic armamentarium of inflammatory bowel disease but are not effective in all patients; moreover, among initial responders, there have been reports of loss of response over time. In addition, these drugs sometimes have adverse effects and are often expensive. The present article reviews the studies presented at Digestive Disease Week 2016 that provided new data on the optimisation of currently approved treatments for inflammatory bowel disease, experience with recently approved drugs in clinical practice, and some studies on molecules that are under development for the treatment of these diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The Social Construction of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Social Media Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Dennis Owen

    2016-11-01

    Many people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), sometimes lacking adequate face-to-face sources of support, turn to online communities to meet others with the disease. These online communities are places of support and education, but through the use of social media communication technologies, people with IBD are redefining what it means to live with the disease. This ethnographic study followed 14 online communities to understand how people with IBD used social media technologies to construct their own meanings about living with the disease. The following redefinitions were observed: the refiguring of the body is beautiful; inflammatory bowel disease is serious and deadly; inflammatory bowel disease is humorous; the disease makes one stronger; and the disease is invisible, but needs to be made visible. This study will help health communication scholars understand how technology is appropriated by patients, and will help practitioners understand how their patients conceptualize their disease.

  7. Review article: the potential role of nitric oxide in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Rask-Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    by the generation of superoxide with reduced L-arginine availability. In active ulcerative colitis, and to a lesser extent in Crohn's disease, a greatly increased production of NO has been demonstrated by indirect and direct measurements. Surprisingly, even higher rates of production have been observed in COC...... of experi mental colitis in 'knock-out' mice deficient in iNOS. Selective inhibitors of iNOS activity, as well as topical L-arginine, may therefore prove beneficial in inflammatory bowel disease by reducing the production of superoxide by iNOS, while only the former option may be expected to reduce...... diarrhoea in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders. Clearly, further experimental work needs to be done before testing topical L-arginine in human inflammatory bowel disease....

  8. Are adipocytokines inflammatory or metabolic mediators in patients with inflammatory bowel disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahraman R

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Resul Kahraman,1 Turan Calhan,1 Abdurrahman Sahin,1 Kamil Ozdil,1 Zuhal Caliskan,1 Elif Sinem Bireller,2 Bedia Cakmakoglu3 1Department of Gastroenterology, Umraniye Education and Training Hospital, Health Sciences University, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Istanbul Yeni Yuzyil University, 3Department of Molecular Medicine, Aziz Sancar Institute of Experimental Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract: This study examined the adiponectin and leptin levels and insulin resistance (IR in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and the associations between these factors and IBD characteristics. Fasting serum leptin, adiponectin, glucose, and insulin levels, as well as inflammatory parameters, were measured in 105 patients with IBD (49 patients with Crohn’s disease [CD], 56 patients with ulcerative colitis [UC] and 98 healthy controls [HC]. IR was evaluated using the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR. Disease activity and severity in patients with UC were evaluated using the Truelove–Witts index, and patients with CD were evaluated using the Crohn’s Disease Activity Index. Serum adiponectin levels were found to be significantly lower in patients with CD and UC (p<0.001. Serum leptin levels were also found to be significantly higher in both the UC and CD groups (p<0.001. When HOMA-IR levels were compared, no significant difference was detected for either the CD or UC groups compared with the controls. In conclusion, it was shown that leptin levels increased and adiponectin levels decreased in patients with IBD, which is thought to be related to chronic inflammation. The effects of adipocytokines in patients with IBD with inflammatory and metabolic processes need to be investigated in further broader studies. Keywords: ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, insulin resistance, adiponectin, leptin

  9. Treating beyond symptoms with a view to improving patient outcomes in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandborn, William J; Hanauer, Stephen; Van Assche, Gert; Panés, Julián; Wilson, Stephanie; Petersson, Joel; Panaccione, Remo

    2014-09-01

    Treatment goals in inflammatory bowel diseases are evolving beyond the control of symptoms towards the tight control of objectively-measured gastrointestinal inflammation. This review discusses the progress and challenges in adopting a treat-to-target approach in inflammatory bowel diseases. Evidence from the literature that highlights current thinking in terms of treating-to-target in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases is discussed. Monitoring for objective evidence of inflammation using endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging or laboratory biomarkers may be a useful approach in inflammatory bowel diseases; however, setting the appropriate treatment goal remains a challenge. Deep remission (a composite of symptom control and mucosal healing) may now be a realistic target in Crohn's disease; however, it remains to be proven that achieving deep remission will modify the long-term disease course. Assessing prognosis at an early stage of the disease course is essential for the development of an appropriate management plan, with the rationale of adapting treatment to disease severity. An algorithm has been proposed for the treatment of early Crohn's disease that involves early treatment with immunosuppressants and tumour necrosis factor antagonists, in the hope of preventing structural bowel damage. Treating beyond symptoms will require a clear management plan influenced by disease severity at presentation, clinical and biological prognostic factors, achievement and maintenance of clinical and biological remission and pharmacoeconomics. Copyright © 2014 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Interactions between infections and immune-inflammatory cells in type 1 diabetes mellitus and inflammatory bowel diseases: evidences from animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Nicoletti, F; Stosic-Grujicic, S

    2008-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are multifactorial disorders of autoimmune origin.Several microbial agents have been reported to be associated with the development of type 1 diabetes and inflammatory bowel diseases in animal models by different mechanisms...

  11. Solid lipid nanoparticles as anti-inflammatory drug delivery system in a human inflammatory bowel disease whole-blood model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpe, Loredana; Canaparo, Roberto; Daperno, Marco; Sostegni, Raffaello; Martinasso, Germana; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Ippolito, Laura; Vivenza, Nicoletta; Pera, Angelo; Eandi, Mario; Gasco, Maria Rosa; Zara, Gian Paolo

    2010-03-18

    Standard treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) necessitates frequent intake of anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive drugs, leading to significant adverse events. To evaluate the role solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) play as drug delivery system in enhancing anti-inflammatory activity for drugs such as dexamethasone and butyrate in a human inflammatory bowel diseases whole-blood model. ELISA assay and the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine mRNA expression levels were evaluated by quantitative SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR to determine the IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-10 secretion in inflammatory bowel diseases patients' PBMC culture supernatants. There was a significant decrease in IL-1beta (p<0.01) and TNF-alpha (p<0.001) secretion, whilst IL-10 (p<0.05) secretion significantly increased after cholesteryl butyrate administration, compared to that of butyrate alone at the highest concentration tested (100 microM), at 24h exposure. There was a significant decrease in IL-1beta (p<0.01), TNF-alpha (p<0.001) and IL-10 (p<0.001) secretion after dexamethasone loaded SLN administration, compared to dexamethasone alone at the highest concentration tested (250 nM) at 24h exposure. No IFN-gamma was detected under any conditions and no cytotoxic effects observed even at the highest concentration tested. The incorporation of butyrate and dexamethasone into SLN has a significant positive anti-inflammatory effect in the human inflammatory bowel disease whole-blood model. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mucormycosis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheen Z. Abidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare and often fatal invasive fungal infection mostly seen in immune-compromised individuals. A high index of clinical suspicion is necessary, so that effective preemptive therapy can be started, as timely intervention is crucial. In this series we present three cases of invasive mucormycosis in patients with underlying inflammatory bowel disease that had received therapy with immunomodulators prior to the infection. All three had varied clinical manifestations. We also review the literature of invasive mucormycosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  13. Cell Death and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Autophagy in the Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell death mechanisms have been associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases in humans and mice. Recent studies suggested that a complex crosstalk between autophagy/apoptosis, microbe sensing, and enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress in the epithelium could play a critical role in these diseases. In addition, necroptosis, a relatively novel programmed necrosis-like pathway associated with TNF receptor activation, seems to be also present in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease and in specific animal models for intestinal inflammation. This review attempts to cover new data related to cell death mechanisms and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  14. A Rare Form of Chronic Granulomatous Disease (Type Iva Presenting as Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A Sylvester

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil dysfunction syndromes can sometimes mimic the clinical and pathological features of inflammatory bowel disease. The case of a 3.5-year-old boy with chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, poor growth since infancy and microcytic, hypochromic anemia is presented. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation, he was found to have a rare variant (type IVA of chronic granulomatous disease. His gastrointestinal symptoms markedly improved during therapy with gamma-interferon. Chronic granulomatous disease can present initially with a clinical picture suggestive of chronic intestinal inflammation. Therefore it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical inflammatory bowel disease, both in children and young adults.

  15. Natural product-derived drugs for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young-Eun

    2014-04-01

    Natural products have been used as drugs for millennia, and the therapeutic potential of natural products has been studied for more than a century. Since the mid-1880s, approximately 60% of drugs have originated from natural products. Recently, the importance of using natural products has increased, as has interest in discovering efficient new drugs. Natural drugs are desirable for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. This review discusses the discovery and development of drugs derived from natural products for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  16. Appendiceal mucocele diagnosed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease using endoscopic ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Uni; Darwin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    When a bulging appendiceal orifice is observed during surveillance colonoscopy, the possibility of appendiceal mucocele must be considered. Appendiceal mucocele is a rare group of lesions characterized by mucinous distension of the appendiceal lumen with the dangerous potential to rupture, resulting in the development of pseudomyxoma peritonei. Early recognition and diagnosis of appendiceal mucocele can prevent the dreaded complication of pseudomyxoma peritonei but it requires a high index of suspicion. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk for colorectal neoplasm but neoplasm of the appendix is infrequently reported. We report two of the first cases of appendiceal mucoceles diagnosed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease using endoscopic ultrasound.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel in children with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease: evaluation of disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Loggitsi, Dimitra; Economopoulos, Nikos; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Kelekis, Nikolaos L. [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, General University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Roma, Eleftheria; Panagiotou, Ioanna; Pahoula, Ioanna [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aghia Sofia Children' s Hospital, First Department of Paediatrics, Athens (Greece)

    2009-08-15

    Examinations using ionizing radiation are frequently used in the evaluation of disease activity in children affected by idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an MR imaging protocol without the need for fluoroscopic insertion of an enteral tube and to assess the disease activity in children with IBD. Included in the study were 37 children (22 girls and 15 boys; age range 7-15 years, mean 11.67 years) with IBD who underwent MR imaging of the small bowel. Of these 37 children, 32 had Crohn disease and 5 had indeterminate colitis. A water solution containing herbal fibres was administered orally or through a nasogastric tube. Patients were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner with T1-weighted and {tau}2-weighted sequences followed by a dynamic study using 3-D T1-W images after intravenous administration of gadolinium. The percentage enhancement of the bowel wall was significantly increased in patients with abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) values compared to patients with CRP values in the normal range (P<0.001). A relatively weak but significant correlation between percentage enhancement of the bowel wall and CRP values was noted during all phases of enhancement. This MR imaging protocol is a safe and well-tolerated method for evaluating disease activity and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD in children. (orig.)

  18. Cancer in inflammatory bowel disease 15 years after diagnosis in a population-based European Collaborative follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Tatsioni, Athina; Pedersen, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    To determine the occurrence of intestinal and extraintestinal cancers in the 1993-2009 prospective European Collaborative Inflammatory Bowel Disease (EC-IBD) Study Group cohort.......To determine the occurrence of intestinal and extraintestinal cancers in the 1993-2009 prospective European Collaborative Inflammatory Bowel Disease (EC-IBD) Study Group cohort....

  19. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Child with Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Alqoaer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia (SCA is a chronic haemoglobinopathy that can affect many organs in the body including gastrointestinal tract. However, colonic involvement is very rare and usually in the form of ischemic colitis. We are reporting an 11-year-old Saudi girl with SCA who presented with persistent diarrhea and was found to have inflammaftory bowel disease.

  20. Safety of treatments for inflammatory bowel disease: Clinical practice guidelines of the Italian Group for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IG-IBD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancone, Livia; Annese, Vito; Ardizzone, Sandro; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Calabrese, Emma; Caprioli, Flavio; Castiglione, Fabiana; Comberlato, Michele; Cottone, Mario; Danese, Silvio; Daperno, Marco; D'Incà, Renata; Frieri, Giuseppe; Fries, Walter; Gionchetti, Paolo; Kohn, Anna; Latella, Giovanni; Milla, Monica; Orlando, Ambrogio; Papi, Claudio; Petruzziello, Carmelina; Riegler, Gabriele; Rizzello, Fernando; Saibeni, Simone; Scribano, Maria Lia; Vecchi, Maurizio; Vernia, Piero; Meucci, Gianmichele

    2017-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic conditions of unknown etiology, showing a growing incidence and prevalence in several countries, including Italy. Although the etiology of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis is unknown, due to the current knowledge regarding their pathogenesis, effective treatment strategies have been developed. Several guidelines are available regarding the efficacy and safety of available drug treatments for inflammatory bowel diseases. Nevertheless, national guidelines provide additional information adapted to local feasibility, costs and legal issues related to the use of the same drugs. These observations prompted the Italian Group for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IG-IBD) to establish Italian guidelines on the safety of currently available treatments for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. These guidelines discuss the use of aminosalicylates, systemic and low bioavailability corticosteroids, antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, rifaximin), thiopurines, methotrexate, cyclosporine A, TNFα antagonists, vedolizumab, and combination therapies. These guidelines are based on current knowledge derived from evidence-based medicine coupled with clinical experience of a national working group. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fecal calprotectin as a biomarker of inflammatory lesions of the small bowel seen by videocapsule endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Egea-Valenzuela

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The levels of calprotectin in the stools are proportional to neutrophil activity in the enteric lumen, so fecal calprotectin is a useful intestinal inflammatory biomarker. It is an extended tool as predictor of colonic pathology but there is scare evidence about its utility in the small bowel. Objective: To test the yield of fecal calprotectin to detect lesions in the small bowel. Material and methods: We have retrospectively included 71 patients sent for small bowel capsule endoscopy in study for suspected inflammatory bowel disease. All of them had a determination of fecal calprotectin and had been sent to colonoscopy with no findings. Patients have been divided in groups: A, fecal calprotectin 100 µg/g, and we have analyzed which of them presented inflammatory lesions in capsule endoscopy studies. Results: The rate of patients with signi ficative lesions was 1 out of 10 (10% in group A, 6 out of 24 (25% in group B, and 21 out of 34 (62% in group C. If we consider levels over 50 µg/g pathologic, fecal calprotectin presents sensitivity: 96%, specificity: 23%, NPV: 90% and PPV: 56%. If we consider levels over 100 µg/g pathologic these values are sensitivity: 75%, specificity: 67%, NPV: 79% and PPV: 62%. Conclusions: Fecal calprotectin has high sensitivity but not so good specificity for predicting small bowel lesions after a normal colonoscopy. In daily practice it will be more useful to establish in 100 µg/g the limit to indicate capsule endoscopy studies.

  2. Lymphoproliferative disorders in inflammatory bowel disease patients on immunosuppression: Lessons from other inflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Grace Y; Halloran, Brendan P; Peters, Anthea C; Fedorak, Richard N

    2015-11-15

    Immunosuppressive agents, such as thiopurines, methotrexate, and biologics, have revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, a number of case reports, case control studies and retrospective studies over the last decade have identified a concerning link between immunosuppression and lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), the oncological phenomenon whereby lymphocytes divide uncontrollably. These LPDs have been associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the virus provides the impetus for malignant transformation while immunosuppression hampers the immune system's ability to detect and clear these malignant cells. As such, the use of immunosuppressive agents may come at the cost of increased risk of developing LPD. While little is known about the LPD risk in IBD, more is known about immunosuppression in the post-transplantation setting and the development of EBV associated post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). In review of the PTLD literature, evidence is available to demonstrate that certain immune suppressants such as cyclosporine and T-lymphocyte modulators in particular are associated with an increased risk of PTLD development. As well, high doses of immunosuppressive agents and multiple immunosuppressive agent use are also linked to increased PTLD development. Here, we discuss these findings in context of IBD and what future studies can be taken to understand and reduce the risk of EBV-associated LPD development from immunosuppression use in IBD.

  3. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have increased risk of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling, Morten L; Kjeldsen, Jens; Knudsen, Torben; Nielsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Koch

    2017-09-07

    To investigate whether immune mediated diseases (IMD) are more frequent in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this population based registry study, a total of 47325 patients with IBD were alive and registered in the Danish National Patient Registry on December 16, 2013. Controls were randomly selected from the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) and matched for sex, age, and municipality. We used ICD 10 codes to identify the diagnoses of the included patients. The IBD population was divided into three subgroups: Ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD) and Both the latter referring to those registered with both diagnoses. Subsequently, odds-ratios (OR) and 95%CI were obtained separately for each group and their respective controls. The use of Bonferoni post-test correction adjusted the significance level to P disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D), sarcoidosis, asthma, iridocyclitis, psoriasis, pyoderma gangrenosum, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Restricted to UC ( P disease, polymyalgia rheumatica, temporal arteritis , and atrophic gastritis. Restricted to CD ( P disease restricted to men ( P diseases were significantly more frequent in patients with IBD. Our results strengthen the hypothesis that some IMDs and IBD may have overlapping pathogenic pathways.

  4. Immunopathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease: how genetics link barrier dysfunction and innate immunity to inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Minesh; Ahmed, Shifat; Dryden, Gerald

    2017-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) comprise a distinct set of clinical symptoms resulting from chronic or relapsing immune activation and corresponding inflammation within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Diverse genetic mutations, encoding important aspects of innate immunity and mucosal homeostasis, combine with environmental triggers to create inappropriate, sustained inflammatory responses. Recently, significant advances have been made in understanding the interplay of the intestinal epithelium, mucosal immune system, and commensal bacteria as a foundation of the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Complex interactions between specialized intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal immune cells determine different outcomes based on the environmental input: the development of tolerance in the presence of commensal bacterial or the promotion of inflammation upon recognition of pathogenic organisms. This article reviews key genetic abnormalities involved in inflammatory and homeostatic pathways that enhance susceptibility to immune dysregulation and combine with environmental triggers to trigger the development of chronic intestinal inflammation and IBD.

  5. The impact of helical computed tomography on the diagnosis of unsuspected inflammatory bowel disease in the large bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markose, G.; Freeman, A.H. [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ng, C.S. [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s NHS Trust and the University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2003-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are diagnoses that can be easily overlooked clinically. The aim of this study was to investigate if CT is able to make a contribution to the identification of previously unsuspected cases of IBD. We retrospectively identified cases in which the possibility of an IBD was raised in CT reports (over a 4-year period), by utilising a keyword search of the radiology database. Cases with a previously known or suspected IBD were rigorously excluded by review of case notes, and endoscopic, radiological, histological and microbiological findings. The CT images of the identified cases were reviewed by a blinded observer to document the extent of bowel wall thickening, the location of lesion(s), and presence of peri-colic fat abnormality, ascites and/or collections. The observer also attempted to corroborate the presence, and to identify the type, of IBD based on the CT appearances alone. Thirty-five cases (out of approximately 19,000 body CTs performed) of clinically unsuspected IBD were identified, of which 27 underwent further investigation. An IBD was confirmed in 48% (13 of 27): Crohn's disease (n=6), ulcerative colitis (n=2), pseudomembranous colitis (n=3) and other (n=2), of which 70% (9 of 13) were correctly typed by the reviewer. Inflammatory bowel disease was not substantiated in the remainder (14 of 27), although 7 of these had other bowel pathologies: diverticular disease (n=4); and carcinoma (n=3). Prospectively determining the presence, and furthermore type, of IBD on CT is challenging largely because of the considerable overlap in the appearances of the individual IBDs and indeed of normality. Nevertheless, CT is able to identify clinically unsuspected cases and radiologists should be alert to this treatable and not infrequently elusive diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. The impact of helical computed tomography on the diagnosis of unsuspected inflammatory bowel disease in the large bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markose, G.; Freeman, A.H.; Ng, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are diagnoses that can be easily overlooked clinically. The aim of this study was to investigate if CT is able to make a contribution to the identification of previously unsuspected cases of IBD. We retrospectively identified cases in which the possibility of an IBD was raised in CT reports (over a 4-year period), by utilising a keyword search of the radiology database. Cases with a previously known or suspected IBD were rigorously excluded by review of case notes, and endoscopic, radiological, histological and microbiological findings. The CT images of the identified cases were reviewed by a blinded observer to document the extent of bowel wall thickening, the location of lesion(s), and presence of peri-colic fat abnormality, ascites and/or collections. The observer also attempted to corroborate the presence, and to identify the type, of IBD based on the CT appearances alone. Thirty-five cases (out of approximately 19,000 body CTs performed) of clinically unsuspected IBD were identified, of which 27 underwent further investigation. An IBD was confirmed in 48% (13 of 27): Crohn's disease (n=6), ulcerative colitis (n=2), pseudomembranous colitis (n=3) and other (n=2), of which 70% (9 of 13) were correctly typed by the reviewer. Inflammatory bowel disease was not substantiated in the remainder (14 of 27), although 7 of these had other bowel pathologies: diverticular disease (n=4); and carcinoma (n=3). Prospectively determining the presence, and furthermore type, of IBD on CT is challenging largely because of the considerable overlap in the appearances of the individual IBDs and indeed of normality. Nevertheless, CT is able to identify clinically unsuspected cases and radiologists should be alert to this treatable and not infrequently elusive diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Acute pelvic inflammatory disease as a rare cause of acute small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haumann, Alexandre; Ongaro, Sarah; Detry, Olivier; Meunier, Paul; Meurisse, Michel

    2018-03-21

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common presentation to emergency abdominal surgery. The most frequent causes of SBO are congenital, postoperative adhesions, abdominal wall hernia, internal hernia and malignancy. A 27-year-old woman was hospitalized because of acute abdominal pain, blockage of gases and stools associated with vomiting. Abdominal computed tomography showed an acute small bowel obstruction without any obvious etiology. In view of important abdominal pain and the lack of clear diagnosis, an explorative laparoscopy was performed. Diagnostic of pelvic inflammatory disease was established and was comforted by positive PCR for Chlamydia Trachomatis. Acute small bowel obstruction resulting from acute pelvic inflammatory disease, emerging early after infection, without any clinical or X-ray obvious signs was not described in the literature yet. This infrequent acute SBO etiology but must be searched especially when there is no other evident cause of obstruction in female patients. Early laparoscopy is mostly advised when there are some worrying clinical or CT scan signs.

  8. Cogan's Syndrome in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease--A Case Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Greuter, Thomas; Scharl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cogan's syndrome (CSy) is a very rare autoimmune disorder, mainly affecting the inner ear and the eye, and is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: This was a European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) retrospective observational study, performed as part of ...

  9. [Evaluation of the concordance between biological markers and clinical activity in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda García, Pablo; Chaparro, María; Gisbert, Javier P

    2015-01-06

    Endoscopy is the gold standard to assess disease severity in inflammatory bowel disease, although it is an invasive procedure. Clinical activity and biological markers have been routinely used to determine disease activity in a non-invasive manner. The aim of this study was to determine concordance between common biological markers (C reactive protein, orosomucoid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, fibrinogen, platelets, leukocytes, neutrophils and haemoglobin) and clinical activity in inflammatory bowel disease. Consecutive patients with inflammatory bowel disease were included. Clinical activity was evaluated according to the Harvey-Bradshaw index in Crohn's disease and to the partial Mayo score in ulcerative colitis. Serum concentrations of the different biomarkers were analysed. Concordance between clinical activity and elevation of the serological biomarkers was determined using the kappa statistic. In total, 350 patients were included (median age 46 years, Crohn's disease 59%). Eleven percent of patients had clinical activity. Crohn's disease patients had mild clinical activity in 44% of cases, moderate disease in 44% and only 12% of patients had severe clinical activity. In ulcerative colitis, patients had mild, moderate and severe clinical activity in 50, 42 and 8% of cases, respectively. None of the biomarkers included had an acceptable concordance with clinical activity (kappa statistic ≤ 0.30). Concordance between serological biomarkers and clinical activity in inflammatory bowel disease is remarkably low. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. [What useful developments for my inflammatory bowel disease practice have come from Digestive Disease Week 2014?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, María

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize reports presented at Digestive Disease Week 2014 that relate to fertility and pregnancy, inflammatory bowel disease in elderly patients, the risk of cancer and its relationship to treatment and finally, developments regarding psychological aspects that may affect patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Studies were selected at the discretion of the author, mainly considering those with conclusions that can be applied immediately to clinical practice. Using anti-TNF drugs during pregnancy is safe in the short term. This currently seems to be true for the medium and the long term. To limit fetal exposure, the mother can safely stop taking the anti-TNF drugs in the second trimester of the pregnancy if she is in remission. Elderly patients with inflammatory bowel disease require stricter monitoring than younger patients due to the risk of complications, especially infections associated with the disease and treatments. The effect of inflammatory bowel disease and the drugs for its treatment on the risk of development is still not well established, but the magnitude of the effect seems possibly lower than previously described. The causal link between psychological factors and the occurrence of IBD relapse is by no means established. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Culturing human intestinal stem cells for regenerative applications in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eo; Seidelin, Jakob B; Yin, Xiaolei

    2017-01-01

    Both the incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally; in the industrialized world up to 0.5% of the population are affected and around 4.2 million individuals suffer from IBD in Europe and North America combined. Successful engraftment in experimental colit...

  12. Self-managed eHealth Disease Monitoring in Children and Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Katrine; Jakobsen, Christian; Houen, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of eHealth on disease activity, the need for hospital contacts, and medical adherence in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Furthermore, to assess eHealth's influence on school attendance and quality of life (QoL). METHODS: Patients ...

  13. Illness perceptions and outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease : Is coping a mediator?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erp, Sanne J. H.; Brakenhoff, Lianne K. P. M.; Vollmann, M.; van der Heijde, Désirée M.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Fidder, Herma H.; Hommes, D.W.; Kaptein, Ad A.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Scharloo, Margreet

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often experience severe impairment in different life domains. Psychological factors, such as illness perceptions and coping, may play a role in the adjustment to IBD as indicated by mental and physical health, activity and work impairment. The

  14. The role and advances of immunomodulator therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Steenholdt, Casper

    2015-01-01

    Immune modulating drugs such as thiopurines (azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine) and methotrexate has been a mainstay for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) for decades. However, despite widely used in IBD, questions still remain concerning the most rational treatment regimens of these ...

  15. Comparative analysis of colonic gene expression of three experimental colitis models mimicking inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Velde, Anje A.; de Kort, Floor; Sterrenburg, Ellen; Pronk, Inge; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Hommes, Daniel W.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mouse models of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are used to unravel the pathophysiology of IBD and to study new treatment modalities, but their relationship to Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) is speculative. METHODS: Using Agilent mouse TOX oligonucleotide microarrays,

  16. Colonoscopy surveillance for dysplasia and colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalykke, Claus; Jensen, Michael Dam; Fallingborg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been highly debated as risk estimates from different studies vary greatly. The present national Danish guideline on colonoscopy surveillance for dysplasia and colorectal cancer in patients...

  17. Inflammatory bowel diseases in Faroese-born Danish residents and their offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, T.; Lophaven, S. N.; Nielsen, K. R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is record high in the Faroe Islands, and many Faroese emigrate to Denmark, where the IBD incidence is considerably lower. Aim: To study the IBD incidence in first-, second- and third-generation immigrants from the Faroe Islands to Denm...

  18. Differences in phenotype and disease course in adult and paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Christian; Bartek, Jiri; Wewer, Anne Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have compared phenotype and disease course in children and adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim To compare phenotype, treatment and disease course in children (<15 years) and adults (=18 years) with IBD. Methods Two population-based cohorts comprising paediatri...

  19. Review article: the incidence and prevalence of colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, P

    2003-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC), complicating ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, only accounts for 1-2% of all cases of CRC in the general population, it is considered a serious complication of the disease and accounts for approximately 15% of all deaths in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) ...

  20. The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease in Denmark 1980-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lophaven, S. N.; Lynge, E.; Burisch, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Globally, the incidence rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasing; however, data from high-incidence areas are conflicting. Previous studies in Denmark have assessed incidence rates of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) using short observation periods. Aim...

  1. Severe infusion reactions to infliximab: aetiology, immunogenicity and risk factors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenholdt, Casper; Svenson, M; Bendtzen, K

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infliximab (IFX) elicits acute severe infusion reactions in about 5% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). AIM: To investigate the role of anti-IFX antibodies (Ab) and other risk factors. METHODS: The study included all IBD patients treated with IFX at a Danish university...

  2. The Efficacy of Assisted Reproduction in Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and the Impact of Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedman, S; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Fedder, Jens

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, we analyze the chance of a live birth and the impact of inflammatory bowel disease surgery in women with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) who have undergone assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments. METHODS: This is a nationwide cohort study based...

  3. Review article: the potential role of nitric oxide in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Rask-Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    of experi mental colitis in 'knock-out' mice deficient in iNOS. Selective inhibitors of iNOS activity, as well as topical L-arginine, may therefore prove beneficial in inflammatory bowel disease by reducing the production of superoxide by iNOS, while only the former option may be expected to reduce...

  4. Host-microbe interactions have shaped the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jostins, Luke; Ripke, Stephan; Weersma, Rinse K.; Duerr, Richard H.; McGovern, Dermot P.; Hui, Ken Y.; Lee, James C.; Schumm, L. Philip; Sharma, Yashoda; Anderson, Carl A.; Essers, Jonah; Mitrovic, Mitja; Ning, Kaida; Cleynen, Isabelle; Theatre, Emilie; Spain, Sarah L.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Goyette, Philippe; Wei, Zhi; Abraham, Clara; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Ahmad, Tariq; Amininejad, Leila; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Andersen, Vibeke; Andrews, Jane M.; Baidoo, Leonard; Balschun, Tobias; Bampton, Peter A.; Bitton, Alain; Boucher, Gabrielle; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Cohain, Ariella; Cichon, Sven; D'Amato, Mauro; de Jong, Dirk; Devaney, Kathy L.; Dubinsky, Marla; Edwards, Cathryn; Ellinghaus, David; Ferguson, Lynnette R.; Franchimont, Denis; Fransen, Karin; Gearry, Richard; Georges, Michel; Gieger, Christian; Glas, Jürgen; Haritunians, Talin; Hart, Ailsa; Hawkey, Chris; Hedl, Matija; Hu, Xinli; Karlsen, Tom H.; Kupcinskas, Limas; Kugathasan, Subra; Latiano, Anna; Laukens, Debby; Lawrance, Ian C.; Lees, Charlie W.; Louis, Edouard; Mahy, Gillian; Mansfield, John; Morgan, Angharad R.; Mowat, Craig; Newman, William; Palmieri, Orazio; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Potocnik, Uros; Prescott, Natalie J.; Regueiro, Miguel; Rotter, Jerome I.; Russell, Richard K.; Sanderson, Jeremy D.; Sans, Miquel; Satsangi, Jack; Schreiber, Stefan; Simms, Lisa A.; Sventoraityte, Jurgita; Targan, Stephan R.; Taylor, Kent D.; Tremelling, Mark; Verspaget, Hein W.; de Vos, Martine; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wilson, David C.; Winkelmann, Juliane; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Zeissig, Sebastian; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Clarence K.; Zhao, Hongyu; Silverberg, Mark S.; Annese, Vito; Hakonarson, Hakon; Brant, Steven R.; Radford-Smith, Graham; Mathew, Christopher G.; Rioux, John D.; Schadt, Eric E.; Daly, Mark J.; Franke, Andre; Parkes, Miles; Vermeire, Severine; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Cho, Judy H.; Barclay, Murray; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Chamaillard, Mathias; Colombel, Jean-Frederick; Cottone, Mario; Croft, Anthony; D'Incà, Renata; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hanigan, Katherine; Henderson, Paul; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Karban, Amir; Kennedy, Nicholas A.; Khan, Mohammed Azam; Lémann, Marc; Levine, Arie; Massey, Dunecan; Milla, Monica; Montgomery, Grant W.; Ng, Sok Meng Evelyn; Oikonomou, Ioannis; Peeters, Harald; Proctor, Deborah D.; Rahier, Jean-Francois; Roberts, Rebecca; Rutgeerts, Paul; Seibold, Frank; Stronati, Laura; Taylor, Kirstin M.; Törkvist, Leif; Ublick, Kullak; van Limbergen, Johan; van Gossum, Andre; Vatn, Morten H.; Zhang, Hu; Zhang, Wei; Florin, Timothy H.; Krishnaprasad, Krupa; Roberts, Rebecca L.; Amininijad, Leila; Dewit, Olivier; van Gossum, André; Aumais, Guy; Barrie, Arthur M.; Beck, Karen; Bernard, Edmond-Jean; Binion, David G.; Brant, Steve R.; Cohen, Albert; Croitoru, Kenneth; Datta, Lisa W.; Deslandres, Colette; Dutridge, Debra; Ferguson, John; Fultz, Joann; Greenberg, Gordon R.; Jobin, Gilles; Katz, Seymour; Lahaie, Raymond G.; Nelson, Linda; Ng, Sok Meng; Paré, Pierre; Regueiro, Miguel D.; Ruggiero, Elizabeth; Schwartz, Marc; Scott, Regan; Spears, Denise; Steinhart, A. Hillary; Stempak, Joanne M.; Swoger, Jason M.; Tsagarelis, Constantina; Zhang, Clarence; Aerts, Jan; Arbury, Hazel; Attwood, Anthony; Auton, Adam; Ball, Stephen G.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barnes, Chris; Barroso, Inês; Barton, Anne; Bennett, Amanda J.; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Blaszczyk, Katarzyna; Bowes, John; Brand, Oliver J.; Braund, Peter S.; Bredin, Francesca; Breen, Gerome; Brown, Morris J.; Bruce, Ian N.; Bull, Jaswinder; Burren, Oliver S.; Burton, John; Byrnes, Jake; Caesar, Sian; Cardin, Niall; Clee, Chris M.; Coffey, Alison J.; Connell, John M. C.; Conrad, Donald F.; Cooper, Jason D.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Downes, Kate; Drummond, Hazel E.; Dudakia, Darshna; Dunham, Andrew; Ebbs, Bernadette; Eccles, Diana; Edkins, Sarah; Elliot, Anna; Emery, Paul; Evans, David M.; Evans, Gareth; Eyre, Steve; Farmer, Anne; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Flynn, Edward; Forbes, Alistair; Forty, Liz; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Gibbs, Polly; Gilbert, Paul; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Gray, Emma; Green, Elaine; Groves, Chris J.; Grozeva, Detelina; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hall, Anita; Hammond, Naomi; Hardy, Matt; Harrison, Pile; Hassanali, Neelam; Hebaishi, Husam; Hines, Sarah; Hinks, Anne; Hitman, Graham A.; Hocking, Lynne; Holmes, Chris; Howard, Eleanor; Howard, Philip; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Hughes, Debbie; Hunt, Sarah; Isaacs, John D.; Jain, Mahim; Jewell, Derek P.; Johnson, Toby; Jolley, Jennifer D.; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa A.; Kirov, George; Langford, Cordelia F.; Lango-Allen, Hana; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lee, James; Lee, Kate L.; Lees, Charlie; Lewis, Kevin; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Maisuria-Armer, Meeta; Maller, Julian; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Martin, Paul; Massey, Dunecan C. O.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McGuffin, Peter; McLay, Kirsten E.; McVean, Gil; Mentzer, Alex; Mimmack, Michael L.; Morgan, Ann E.; Morris, Andrew P.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Myers, Simon; Nimmo, Elaine R.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Ovington, Nigel R.; Owen, Michael J.; Palin, Kimmo; Palotie, Aarno; Parnell, Kirstie; Pearson, Richard; Pernet, David; Perry, John R. B.; Phillips, Anne; Plagnol, Vincent; Prokopenko, Inga; Quail, Michael A.; Rafelt, Suzanne; Rayner, Nigel W.; Reid, David M.; Renwick, Anthony; Ring, Susan M.; Robertson, Neil; Robson, Samuel; Russell, Ellie; St Clair, David; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Schuilenburg, Helen; Scott, Carol E.; Scott, Richard; Seal, Sheila; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Shields, Beverley M.; Simmonds, Matthew J.; Smyth, Debbie J.; Somaskantharajah, Elilan; Spanova, Katarina; Steer, Sophia; Stephens, Jonathan; Stevens, Helen E.; Stirrups, Kathy; Stone, Millicent A.; Strachan, David P.; Su, Zhan; Symmons, Deborah P. M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Wendy; Tobin, Martin D.; Travers, Mary E.; Turnbull, Clare; Vukcevic, Damjan; Wain, Louise V.; Walker, Mark; Walker, Neil M.; Wallace, Chris; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Watkins, Nicholas A.; Webster, John; Weedon, Michael N.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Woodburn, Matthew; Wordsworth, B. Paul; Yau, Chris; Young, Allan H.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Brown, Matthew A.; Burton, Paul R.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Compston, Alastair; Farrall, Martin; Gough, Stephen C. L.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Pembrey, Marcus; Stratton, Michael R.; Worthington, Jane; Hurles, Matthew E.; Duncanson, Audrey; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Rahman, Nazneen; Todd, John A.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Craddock, Nick; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Pirinen, Matti; Strange, Amy; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), affect over 2.5 million people of European ancestry, with rising prevalence in other populations(1). Genome-wide association studies and subsequent meta-analyses of these two diseases(2,3) as separate

  5. Fecal Microbiota in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Its Relation to Inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolho, K.L.; Korpela, K.; Jaakkola, T.; Pichai, M.V.A.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Salonen, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is considered to result from interplay between host and intestinal microbiota. While IBD in adults has shown to be associated with marked changes in the intestinal microbiota, there are only a few studies in children, and particularly studies focusing on

  6. Assessing Self-reported Medication Adherence in Inflammatory Bowel Disease : A Comparison of Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severs, Mirjam; Zuithoff, Peter N P A; Mangen, Marie-Josée J; van der Valk, Mirthe E; Siersema, Peter D; Fidder, Herma H; Oldenburg, Bas

    BACKGROUND: Capturing (non)-adherence to medical prescriptions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is challenging. We aimed to compare 3 different tools to measure self-assessed medication adherence of patients with IBD. METHODS: Adult patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative

  7. Sex-dimorphic adverse drug reactions to immune suppressive agents in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Zelinkova (Zuzana); E. Bultman (Evelien); L. Vogelaar (Lauran); C. Bouziane (Cheima); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAIM: To analyze sex differences in adverse drug reactions (ADR) to the immune suppressive medication in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: All IBD patients attending the IBD outpatient clinic of a referral hospital were identifed through the electronic diagnosis

  8. Effects of Formal Education for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara M Waters

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD suffer physical dysfunction and impaired quality of life (QOL, and need frequent health care. They often lack knowledge about their disease and desire more education. Educational interventions for other chronic diseases have demonstrated reduced health care use and increased knowledge, medication adherence and QOL.

  9. Challenges to the Design, Execution, and Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Haens, Geert; Feagan, Brian; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Sandborn, William J.; Reinisch, Walter; Rutgeerts, Paul; Carbonnel, Frank; Mary, Jean-Yves; Danese, Silvio; Fedorak, Richard N.; Hanauer, Steven; Lémann, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease has greatly improved with the development of targeted, monoclonal antibody-based therapies. Tumor necrosis factor antagonists are frequently used to treat patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, but they have side effects and their efficacy often

  10. Development and Validation of an Administrative Case Definition for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rezaie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A population-based database of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients is invaluable to explore and monitor the epidemiology and outcome of the disease. In this context, an accurate and validated population-based case definition for IBD becomes critical for researchers and health care providers.

  11. Parental Distress and Quality of Life in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Implications for the Outpatient Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diederen, Kay; Haverman, Lotte; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    The interrelation between the course of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in children and parent's distress, and the subsequent impact this may have on Health-Related Quality Of Life (HRQOL) of the child is unclear. Therefore, we investigated (I) patient's HRQOL and parental distress, and (II) the

  12. Risk of inflammatory bowel disease according to self-rated health, pregnancy course, and pregnancy complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Maria C; Jørgensen, Kristian Tore; Frisch, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Poor self-rated health (SRH) has been connected to immunological changes, and pregnancy complications have been suggested in the etiology of autoimmune diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We evaluated the impact of self-rated pre-pregnancy health and pregnancy course, hyperemesis...

  13. Coagulation factor Xa signaling : the link between coagulation and inflammatory bowel disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borensztajn, Keren; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by activation of the coagulation cascade and it has long been suspected that coagulation is an essential component of this still largely idiopathic group of diseases. The realization that coagulation factors are not only passive mediators in the

  14. Coagulation factor Xa signaling: the link between coagulation and inflammatory bowel disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borensztajn, Keren; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by activation of the coagulation cascade and it has long been suspected that coagulation is an essential component of this still largely idiopathic group of diseases. The realization that coagulation factors are not only passive mediators in the

  15. Avoid Endoscopy in Children With Suspected Inflammatory Bowel Disease Who Have Normal Calprotectin Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Anke; Holtman, Gea A.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Berger, Marjolein Y.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.

    In children with suspected inflammatory bowel disease, adding calprotectin stool testing to the screening strategy has been recommended to distinguish organic from nonorganic disease. In this cohort study with historical controls, we could not confirm that screening with stool calprotectin improves

  16. Immunosuppression after liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis influences activity of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristin Kaasen; Lindström, Lina; Cvancarova, Milada

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results regarding the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after liver transplantation in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We studied the progression of IBD in patients with PSC who have undergone liver transplantation. We also...

  17. Evolution of Costs of Inflammatory Bowel Disease over Two Years of Follow-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Mirthe E.; Mangen, Marie-Josée J.; Severs, Mirjam; van der Have, Mike; Dijkstra, Gerard; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Fidder, Herma H.; de Jong, Dirk J.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; Romberg-Camps, Mariëlle J. L.; Clemens, Cees H. M.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; van de Meeberg, Paul C.; Mahmmod, Nofel; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Bolwerk, Clemens; Vermeijden, J. Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D.; Leenders, Max; Oldenburg, Bas

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing use of anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a shift of costs has been observed with medication costs replacing hospitalization and surgery as major cost driver. We aimed to explore the evolution of IBD-related costs over two years of follow-up. In total 1,307

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine in inflammatory bowel disease patients: frequency and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Alberto; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Vallejo, Nicolau; Iglesias, Marta; Carmona, Amalia; González-Portela, Carlos; Lorenzo, Aurelio; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2012-11-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine in inflammatory bowel disease patients is progressively increased. To evaluate the use of complementary and alternative medicine in inflammatory bowel disease patients and to know potential risk factors for their use. The subjective response of these therapies and the impact on treatment adherence were also evaluated. Prospective, descriptive and transversal study. Inflammatory bowel disease patients were classified according to demographic and clinical characteristics. A questionnaire about the use of complementary and alternative medicine was collected. 705 patients were included. 126 patients (23%) had used complementary and alternative medicine. The most commonly used was herbal remedies (n=61), homoeopathy (n=36), acupuncture (n=31), kefir (n=31) and aloe vera (n=25). Factors associated with its use were extraintestinal manifestations (OR 1.69, CI 95% 1.11-2.57) and long-term evolution of the disease (OR 2.08, CI 95% 1.44-2.99). Most patients (74%) had the subjective feeling that use of complementary and alternative medicine had not improved their condition, 11 had adverse events related to its use and 11% of patients discontinued their conventional drugs. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in inflammatory bowel disease patients is frequent, especially in those with extraintestinal manifestations and long-term evolution. The use of these therapies was not perceived as a benefit for patients. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ferric carboxymaltose prevents recurrence of anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evstatiev, Rayko; Alexeeva, Olga; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common systemic complication of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Iron-deficiency anemia recurs frequently and rapidly after iron-replacement therapy in patients with IBD. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine if administration...... of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) prevents anemia in patients with IBD and low levels of serum ferritin....

  20. Family planning and inflammatory bowel disease: the patient and the practitioner.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, Desmond

    2013-02-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are commonly in their child-bearing years. Maintainance medication, as recommended by international guidelines, is an emotive topic and an anxiety source. This study measures the awareness of patients and primary practitioners of the issues involved.

  1. Colorectal Cancer in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: towards an improved surveillance guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M.W.M.D.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, is a group of chronic disorders with varying phenotypes and disease severity. The worldwide incidence and prevalence rates are rising. It has been estimated that around 90,000 Dutch inhabitants had IBD by the end of

  2. F-calprotectin and Blood Markers Correlate to Quality of Life in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Katrine; Jakobsen, Christian; Kallemose, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to investigate predictors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) with respect to changes in disease parameters over time in children with inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: This was a prospective longitudinal study examining the association between HRQoL (IMPACT III...

  3. Infectious proctitis: when to suspect it is not inflammatory bowel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoentjen, F.; Rubin, D.T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proctitis is a common problem and is most frequently associated with inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the incidence of infectious proctitis appears to be rising, especially in men who have sex with men. This may be due to the rise of people participating in receptive anal sex as

  4. Presenteeism in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Hidden Problem with Significant Economic Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zand, Aria; van Deen, Welmoed K.; Inserra, Elizabeth K.; Hall, Laurin; Kane, Ellen; Centeno, Adriana; Choi, Jennifer M.; Ha, Christina Y.; Esrailian, Eric; Dʼhaens, Geert R.; Hommes, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    Indirect costs associated with impaired productivity at work (presenteeism) due to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are a major contributor to health expenditures. Studies estimating indirect costs in the United States did not take presenteeism into account. We aimed to quantify work limitations and

  5. Host-microbe interactions have shaped the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jostins, Luke; Ripke, Stephan; Weersma, Rinse K

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), affect over 2.5 million people of European ancestry, with rising prevalence in other populations. Genome-wide association studies and subsequent meta-analyses of these two diseases as separate phenot...

  6. Evaluation of a psychoeducational intervention for adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Derkx, Bert H.; Last, Bob F.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), comprising Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and indeterminate colitis, often has its onset in adolescence. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a psychoeducational group intervention (aiming to enhance information seeking and giving about the disease,

  7. The experience of stigma in inflammatory bowel disease: An interpretive (hermeneutic) phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibley, Lesley; Norton, Christine; Whitehead, Elizabeth

    2018-04-01

    To explore experiences of stigma in people with inflammatory bowel disease. Diarrhoea, urgency and incontinence are common symptoms in inflammatory bowel disease. Social rules stipulate full control of bodily functions in adulthood: poor control may lead to stigmatization, affecting patients' adjustment to disease. Disease-related stigma is associated with poorer clinical outcomes, but qualitative evidence is minimal. An interpretive (hermeneutic) phenomenological study of the lived experience of stigma in inflammatory bowel disease. Forty community-dwelling adults with a self-reported diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease were recruited purposively. Participants reported feeling stigmatized or not and experiencing faecal incontinence or not. Unstructured interviews took place in participants' homes in the United Kingdom (September 2012 - May 2013). Data were analysed using Diekelmann's interpretive method. Three constitutive patterns-Being in and out of control, Relationships and social Support and Mastery and mediation-reveal the experience of disease-related stigma, occurring regardless of continence status and because of name and type of disease. Stigma recedes when mastery over disease is achieved through development of resilience-influenced by humour, perspective, mental well-being and upbringing (childhood socialization about bodily functions). People travel in and out of stigma, dependent on social relationships with others including clinicians and tend to feel less stigmatized over time. Emotional control, social support and mastery over disease are key to stigma reduction. By identifying less resilient patients, clinicians can offer appropriate support, accelerating the patient's path towards disease acceptance and stigma reduction. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Patient Age, Sex, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype Associate With Course of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weismueller, Tobias J.; Trivedi, Palak J; Bergquist, Annika; Imam, Mohamad; Lenzen, Henrike; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Holm, Kristian; Gotthardt, Daniel; Faerkkilae, Martti A.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Thorburn, Douglas; Weersma, Rinse K.; Fevery, Johan; Mueller, Tobias; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Schulze, Kornelius; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Almer, Sven; Pereira, Stephen P.; Levy, Cynthia; Mason, Andrew L.; Naess, Sigrid; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Floreani, Annarosa; Halilbasic, Emina; Yimam, Kidist K.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Beuers, Ulrich; Huynh, Dep K.; Pares, Albert; Manser, Christine N.; Dalekos, George N.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Berg, Christoph P.; Kirchner, Gabi I.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zimmer, Vincent; Fabris, Luca; Braun, Felix; Marzioni, Marco; Juran, Brian D.; Said, Karouk; Rupp, Christian; Jokelainen, Kalle; de Valle, Maria Benito; Saffioti, Francesca; Cheung, Angela; Trauner, Michael; Schramm, Christoph; Chapman, Roger W.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Schrumpf, Erik; Strassburg, Christian P.; Manns, Michael P.; Lindor, Keith D; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Boberg, Kirsten M.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an orphan hepatobiliary disorder associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to estimate the risk of disease progression based on distinct clinical phenotypes in a large international cohort of patients with PSC. METHODS: We

  9. Patient Age, Sex, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype Associate With Course of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weismuller, Tobias J.; Trivedi, Palak J.; Bergquist, Annika; Imam, Mohamad; Lenzen, Henrike; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Holm, Kristian; Gotthardt, Daniel; Farkkila, Martti A.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Thorburn, Douglas; Weersma, Rinse K.; Fevery, Johan; Mueller, Tobias; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Schulze, Kornelius; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Almer, Sven; Pereira, Stephen P.; Levy, Cynthia; Mason, Andrew; Naess, Sigrid; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Floreani, Annarosa; Halilbasic, Emina; Yimam, Kidist K.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Beuers, Ulrich; Huynh, Dep K.; Pares, Albert; Manser, Christine N.; Dalekos, George N.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Berg, Christoph P.; Kirchner, Gabi I.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zimmer, Vincent; Fabris, Luca; Braun, Felix; Marzioni, Marco; Juran, Brian D.; Said, Karouk; Rupp, Christian; Jokelainen, Kalle; Benito de Valle, Maria; Saffioti, Francesca; Cheung, Angela; Trauner, Michael; Schramm, Christoph; Chapman, Roger W.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Schrumpf, Erik; Strassburg, Christian P.; Manns, Michael P.; Lindor, Keith D.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Boberg, Kirsten M.

    2017-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an orphan hepatobiliary disorder associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to estimate the risk of disease progression based on distinct clinical phenotypes in a large international cohort of patients with PSC. We performed a retrospective

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents: mental health and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, I

    1999-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents often leads to an extremely complex somatic and psychiatric situation. The psychological effect of inflammatory bowel disease warrants further investigation, especially concerning salutogenetic factors that may lead to good mental health despite bad somatic conditions. These studies used a multimethod design comprising both semiquantitative measures, such as rating scales and questionnaires, and qualitative in-depth interviews with both the child and his or her parents. Clinical comparison groups of matched children with diabetes and chronic tension headaches and matched children without chronic physical disease were examined. Inflammatory bowel disease often leads to psychiatric sequelae. Emotional disorders, especially depression and anxiety symptoms, were found to be common. Self-esteem was lowered. A subgroup of children with good mental health despite bad somatic conditions was found. They exhibited certain characteristics, including good knowledge of the disease, an internal locus of control, a good family climate, and an open social network. This study shows that the well-being of a chronically ill child depends not only on the course of the physical disease but also on the psychological and social complications that often seem to accompany a disease of this kind. The importance of taking good care of the psychosocial aspects of inflammatory bowel disease within the comprehensive treatment program is discussed.

  11. Adherence to Oral Maintenance Treatment in Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekhorst, Lieke M.; Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Kindermann, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the rates of nonadherence to oral maintenance treatment in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to describe perceived barriers to adherence and psychosocial factors involved. The article considered studies published in MEDLINE,

  12. Adherence to Oral Maintenance Treatment in Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekhorst, Lieke M.; Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Kindermann, Angelika

    Objectives:The aim of this study was to systematically review the rates of nonadherence to oral maintenance treatment in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to describe perceived barriers to adherence and psychosocial factors involved.Methods:The article considered studies

  13. Bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism is associated with inflammatory bowel diseases in the Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Güray; Akın, Hakan; Özdemir, Filiz T; Can, Hatice; Yılmaz, Bülent; Eren, Fatih; Atuğ, Özlen; Ünsal, Belkıs; Hamzaoğlu, Hülya O

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, a chronic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology, affects the small and large bowel at different levels. It is increasingly considered that innate immune system may have a central position in the pathogenesis of the disease. As a part of the innate immune system, bactericidal permeability increasing protein has an important role in the recognition and neutralization of gram-negative bacteria. The aim of our study was to investigate the involvement of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism (bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu) in inflammatory bowel disease in a large group of Turkish patients. The present study included 528 inflammatory bowel disease patients, 224 with Crohn's disease and 304 with ulcerative colitis, and 339 healthy controls. Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism was found to be associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (P = 0.0001). The frequency of the Glu/Glu genotype was significantly lower in patients using steroids and in those with steroid dependence (P = 0.012, OR, 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68-0.94; P = 0.0286, OR, 0.75; 95% CI: 0.66-0.86, respectively). There was no other association between bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism and phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease. Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism is associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This is the first study reporting the association of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism with steroid use and dependence in Crohn's disease.

  14. THE POTENTIAL OF RADIOLOGIC PROCEDURES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Dubrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, there is no "golden standard" of diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Each and every individual case requires a thorough analysis of clinical symptoms in their association with endoscopic, histological, radiological and laboratory data. This review paper analyzes both conventional and novel methods of radiological investigations. Some of them have changed their significance from the "golden standard" to rare and limited application and from promising, then frequent and currently sporadic use of small bowel enema. Traditional ileocolonoscopy maintains its diagnostic potential, especially as a tool for follow up of patients with colonic and ileac disorders. The state-of-the-art non-invasive (ultrasound examination and limitedly non-invasive (computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging procedures are considered to be the most accurate methods for assessment of inflammatory bowel disorders in patient with already confirmed diagnosis and those with suspected cases of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The paper describes preparation of patient for each method, assessment technique, advantages and limitations for use, diagnostic criteria for intestinal wall thickness, accuracy of methods and discusses the perspectives of their use. The main sign of inflammatory bowel disease is thickening of intestinal wall. Usually its mean thickness in Crohn's disease (11 to 13 mm is higher than that in ulcerative colitis (7 to 8 mm. This may provide a diagnostic key during differential diagnosis of an isolated colon disease. The amount of the contrast cumulated by the intestinal wall directly correlates with inflammation activity. Intensive contract cumulation in the intestinal wall after intravenous contrast enhancement is a symptom of active inflammatory process. However, despite progression in the technologies, initial signs of inflammatory bowel diseases are quite superficial and remain hardly visible, being below the resolution

  15. Risk factors for tuberculosis in inflammatory bowel disease: anti-tumor necrosis factor and hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabino Riestra

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine risk factors for active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods: Retrospective, case-control study at 4 referral hospitals in Spain. Cases developed tuberculosis after a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Controls were inflammatory bowel disease patients who did not develop tuberculosis. For each case, we randomly selected 3 controls matched for sex, age (within 5 years and time of inflammatory bowel disease diagnosis (within 3 years. Inflammatory bowel disease characteristics, candidate risk factors for tuberculosis and information about the tuberculosis episode were recorded. Multivariate analysis and a Chi-squared automatic interaction detector were used. Results: Thirty-four cases and 102 controls were included. Nine of the 34 cases developed active tuberculosis between 1989 and 1999, and 25 became ill between 2000 and 2012. Multivariate regression showed an association between active tuberculosis and anti-TNF (tumor necrosis factor therapy in the previous 12 months (OR 7.45; 95% CI, 2.39-23.12; p = 0.001; hospitalization in the previous 6 months (OR 4.38; 95% CI, 1.18-16.20; p = 0.027; and albumin levels (OR 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95; p = 0.001. The median time between the start of biologic therapy and the onset of active tuberculosis was 13 (interquartile range, 1-58 months. Tuberculosis developed after a year of anti-TNF therapy in 53%, and late reactivation occurred in at least 3 of 8 patients. Conclusions: The main risks factors for developing tuberculosis were anti-TNF therapy and hospitalization. Over half the cases related to anti-TNF treatment occurred after a year.

  16. The role of hepcidin in iron metabolism in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Krawiec

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is a 25-amino-acid peptide synthesized predominantly in hepatocytes, which plays an essential role in the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis. As a result of inflammation, hepcidin binds to ferroportin resulting in its internalization and degradation in enterocytes and macrophages. Thus iron is trapped in both enterocytes and macrophages, leading to functional hypoferremia. In iron deficiency or enhanced erythropoiesis, hepcidin expression is reduced. That fact results in increase of iron absorption and releasing iron storage from macrophages. The discovery of the biological properties of hepcidin clarified the relationship between iron homeostasis, immune response, and anaemia of chronic disease. Anaemia is the most common extra intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease. Anaemia significantly reduces the quality-of-life among patients and can lead to a number of serious complications, even life-threatening. The main types of anaemia in inflammatory bowel diseases are iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disease. These two types of anaemia coexist commonly. The key issue is differentiation these types of anaemia to implement a proper management. Commonly used parameters as iron concentration, ferritin and transferrin, are rather unreliable indices for the evaluation of anaemia in inflammatory bowel diseases. In recent studies the important role of hepcidin as a potential alternative marker of anemia and iron status has been shown. Moreover, there are data that antihepcidin treatment may be an effective treatment of anaemia of chronic disease in inflammatory bowel disease. This paper presents hepcidin structure, mechanism of action and regulation, and highlights hepcidin function in anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. Small bowel obstruction due to inflammatory fibroid polyp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S; Mandal, T S; Sinhababu, A K; Chatterjee, T K; Khamrui, T K; Bhattacharya, H

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyp is a benign and non-neoplastic condition of the intestinal tract, commonly affecting the gastric antrum, though it can affect any part of the gastro-intestinal tract. It is a submucosal, sessile, poypoid mass composed of myofibroblast like mesenchymal cells, numerous small blood vessels and marked inflammatory cell infiltrate mainly eosinophils. It commonly presents as intestinal obstruction or intussusception. A case of recurrent partial small intestinal obstruction due to intermittent intussusception associated with inflammatory fibroid polyp of jejunum is being reported.

  18. Endoscopic assessment of inflammatory bowel disease: colonoscopy/esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Grace

    2012-06-01

    Endoscopy plays an important role in the initial diagnosis of IBD, including the evaluation of disease severity, activity, and extent. The implications of complete mucosal healing further confirm the function of endoscopy in the follow-up of IBD patients. The use of therapeutic endoscopy, for example stricture dilatation, can avoid the need for bowel resection. Modalities such as capsule endoscopy, EUS, NBI, CE, and other emerging techniques are likely to have an increasing role in the management of IBD, particularly in the area of dysplasia surveillance and treatment.

  19. Onset of psoriasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease treated with anti-TNF agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Iván; Gisbert, Javier P

    2013-01-01

    Anti-TNF agents are widely used in the treatment of some inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. Their use has led to a significant advance in the treatment of these diseases. Paradoxically, the onset of psoriatic lesions has been observed in patients on anti-TNF treatment. The cause of this side effect has not yet been clearly identified. In recent years, an increasing number of cases of psoriasis related to anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease patients have been reported. Although withdrawal of anti-TNF was usually implemented in the first reports, in more recent series the maintenance of the drug with topical therapy, with the exception of the most severe or extensive forms of skin lesions, appears to be the treatment of choice. This article summarizes the relevant literature, discusses the etiopathology, epidemiology, location and phenotypes of psoriatic lesions and the management of this side effect.

  20. Bowel wall thickening in patients with Crohn's disease: CT patterns and correlation with inflammatory activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dongil; Jin Lee, Soon; Ah Cho, Young; Lim, Hyo K.; Hoon Kim, Seung; Jae Lee, Won; Hoon Lim, Jae; Park, Haewon; Rae Lee, Young

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess CT patterns of bowel wall thickening in patients with Crohn's disease and to correlate these patterns with inflammatory activity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of 58 helical abdominal CT scans of 53 patients with pathologically proven Crohn's disease. CT patterns of thickened bowel wall were divided into four types based on patterns of mural stratification and enhancement: type A, multilayered mural stratification; type B, two layers with strong mucosal enhancement and prominent low-density submucosa; type C, two layers without strong mucosal enhancement; and type D, homogeneous enhancement. We evaluated CT findings of the bowel and adjacent structures. We also reviewed pathologic features and clinical data to determine inflammatory activity. RESULTS: Fifty-five (95%) of 58 CT examinations showed bowel wall thickening. Of these 55 CT scans, type A pattern was found in 33 (60%), type B in 10 (18%), type C in five (9%), and type D in seven (13%). CT scans with type A showed significantly more wall thickening than those with either type C or type D. Histology revealed 43 cases with active disease and 12 with quiescent appearance. Thirty of 33 CT scans with type A and all 10 with type B were classified as acute disease, and three of five with type C and six of seven with type D as quiescent. CONCLUSION: In patients with Crohn's disease, CT patterns of bowel wall thickening correlated with inflammatory activity. Thickened bowel wall with layering enhancement is predictive of acute disease, and that of homogeneous enhancement suggests quiescence. Choi, D., et al. (2003)Clinical Radiology,58, 68--74

  1. The application of RNAi-based treatments for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten Tobias Jarlstad; Gonzalez, Borja Ballarin; Howard, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, relapsing, idiopathic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract with no permanent cure. Present immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies are often ineffective and associated with severe side effects. An RNA interference (RNAi)-based approach...... in which small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediates specific downregulation of key molecular targets of the IBD inflammatory process may offer a precise, potent and safer alternative to conventional treatments. This review describes the aetiology of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis and the cellular...

  2. Risk of cancer, with special reference to extra-intestinal malignancies, in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algaba, Alicia; Guerra, Iván; Castaño, Angel; de la Poza, Gema; Castellano, Víctor M; López, Montserrat; Bermejo, Fernando

    2013-12-28

    To determine the incidence and characteristics of intestinal and extra-intestinal cancers among patients with inflammatory bowel disease in a Spanish hospital and to compare them with those of the local population. This was a prospective, observational, 7-year follow-up, cohort study. Cumulative incidence, incidence rates based on person-years of follow-up and relative risk were calculated for patients with inflammatory bowel disease and compared with the background population. The incidence of cancer was determined using a hospital-based data registry from Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada. Demographic data and details about time from diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease to occurrence of cancer, disease extent, inflammatory bowel disease treatment, cancer therapy and cancer evolution were also collected in the inflammatory bowel disease cohort. Eighteen of 590 patients with inflammatory bowel disease developed cancer [cumulative incidence = 3% (95%CI: 1.58-4.52) vs 2% (95%CI: 1.99-2.11) in the background population; RR = 1.5; 95%CI: 0.97-2.29]. The cancer incidence among inflammatory bowel disease patients was 0.53% (95%CI: 0.32-0.84) per patient-year of follow-up. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease had a significantly increased relative risk of urothelial carcinoma (RR = 5.23, 95%CI: 1.95-13.87), appendiceal mucinous cystadenoma (RR = 36.6, 95%CI: 7.92-138.4), neuroendocrine carcinoma (RR = 13.1, 95%CI: 1.82-29.7) and rectal carcinoid (RR = 8.94, 95%CI: 1.18-59.7). Colorectal cancer cases were not found. The overall risk of cancer did not significantly increase in our inflammatory bowel disease patients. However, there was an increased risk of urinary bladder cancer and, with less statistical power, an increased risk of appendiceal mucinous cystadenoma and of neuroendocrine tumors. Colorectal cancer risk was low in our series.

  3. De novo inflammatory bowel disease after pediatric orthotopic liver transplant: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Eshraghian, Ahad; Bahador, Ali; Kakaei, Farzad; Geramizadeh, Bita; Malek-Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2009-09-01

    The improvement of pre-existing inflammatory bowel disease after orthotopic liver transplant might be anticipated. However, both the exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease and de novo inflammatory bowel disease after orthotopic liver transplant (despite sufficient allograft immunosuppressive therapy) have been described. We present a case of ulcerative colitis in a pediatric liver transplant recipient. A 13-year-old boy with cryptogenic liver cirrhosis received an orthotopic liver transplant from a deceased donor. Five months later, he presented with watery diarrhea and abdominal distention. He was treated with the immunosuppressive agents tacrolimus (0.15 mg/kg/d) and mycophenolate mofetil (20 mg/kg/d). A general physical examination revealed a boy with stable vital signs and without fever. The only positive finding was enlargement of the abdomen without tenderness. Many pus cells and a few red blood cells were detected in the patient's stool, but the results of a stool culture for bacteria were negative. Because of his chronic diarrhea, this patient underwent colonoscopy, which revealed diffuse erythematous mucosa, multiple ulcers, exudate, and pseudopolyps with a diffuse loss of vascularity. Those findings are indicators of colitis. The results of histopathologic examination of the colonic mucosa suggested ulcerative colitis. The patient was treated with mesalamine and prednisolone, and a repeat colonoscopy revealed an improvement in his bowel disease. De novo inflammatory bowel disease should be considered in patients in whom chronic diarrhea develops after an orthotopic liver transplant. We suggest that colonoscopy and biopsy should always be performed if other causes of diarrhea have been excluded.

  4. Clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells in liver diseases and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Kojima, Yuichi; Ikarashi, Shunzo; Seino, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kawata, Yuzo; Terai, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapies have been used in clinical trials in various fields. These cells are easily expanded, show low immunogenicity, can be acquired from medical waste, and have multiple functions, suggesting their potential applications in a variety of diseases, including liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease. MSCs help prepare the microenvironment, in response to inflammatory cytokines, by producing immunoregulatory factors that modulate the progression of inflammation by affecting dendritic cells, B cells, T cells, and macrophages. MSCs also produce a large amount of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, including exosomes that stimulate angiogenesis, prevent apoptosis, block oxidation reactions, promote remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and induce differentiation of tissue stem cells. According to ClinicalTrials.gov, more than 680 clinical trials using MSCs are registered for cell therapy of many fields including liver diseases (more than 40 trials) and inflammatory bowel diseases (more than 20 trials). In this report, we introduce background and clinical studies of MSCs in liver disease and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  5. Colonic inflammation in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: detection with magnetic resonance enterography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campari, Alessandro [E. Bassini Hospital - ASST Nord Milano, Radiology Department, Milan (Italy); V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital - ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Pediatric Radiology Department, Milan (Italy); Napolitano, Marcello [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital - ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Pediatric Radiology Department, Milan (Italy); Zuin, Giovanna [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital - ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Pediatric Department, Milan (Italy); Maestri, Luciano [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital - ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Pediatric Surgery Department, Milan (Italy); Di Leo, Giovanni [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, Milan (Italy)

    2017-06-15

    Colonic involvement in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is common. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography is considered the best imaging modality for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease evaluation. It is unclear whether the lack of a dedicated large bowel preparation prevents a reliable colonic assessment. To determine the diagnostic performance of standard MR enterography in detecting and grading colonic inflammatory activity. We retrospectively evaluated children who underwent both MR enterography and ileocolonoscopy with biopsies <4 weeks apart. Two radiologists independently reviewed MR examinations and quantified inflammation in each of the five colonic segments using a standardized MR score system. Findings were compared with histological examination of the corresponding segment. Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, Jonckheere-Terpstra and Bland-Altman statistics were used. One hundred seventy-five segments from 37 examinations were included. MR enterography diagnostic performance for inflammation was as follows: sensitivity 94% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 90-97%), specificity: 64% (95% CI: 57-71%). A significant positive correlation was found between MR score and inflammatory activity histologically graded (P<0.001, Jonckheere-Terpstra test). The interobserver agreement was good (mean difference between MR enterography scores was -0.03; limits of agreement -2.8 to 2.7). Standard MR enterography is sensitive for the detection of actively inflamed colonic segments. MR enterography might provide useful information for guiding biopsies and its role as an alternative to ileocolonoscopy in monitoring colonic disease activity in children should be further investigated. (orig.)

  6. Fine-mapping inflammatory bowel disease loci to single-variant resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hailiang; Fang, Ming; Jostins, Luke; Umićević Mirkov, Maša; Boucher, Gabrielle; Anderson, Carl A; Andersen, Vibeke; Cleynen, Isabelle; Cortes, Adrian; Crins, François; D'Amato, Mauro; Deffontaine, Valérie; Dmitrieva, Julia; Docampo, Elisa; Elansary, Mahmoud; Farh, Kyle Kai-How; Franke, Andre; Gori, Ann-Stephan; Goyette, Philippe; Halfvarson, Jonas; Haritunians, Talin; Knight, Jo; Lawrance, Ian C; Lees, Charlie W; Louis, Edouard; Mariman, Rob; Meuwissen, Theo; Mni, Myriam; Momozawa, Yukihide; Parkes, Miles; Spain, Sarah L; Théâtre, Emilie; Trynka, Gosia; Satsangi, Jack; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Vermeire, Severine; Xavier, Ramnik J; Weersma, Rinse K; Duerr, Richard H; Mathew, Christopher G; Rioux, John D; McGovern, Dermot P B; Cho, Judy H; Georges, Michel; Daly, Mark J; Barrett, Jeffrey C

    2017-07-13

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have identified 200 inflammatory bowel disease-associated loci, but few have been conclusively resolved to specific functional variants. Here we report fine-mapping of 94 inflammatory bowel disease loci using high-density genotyping in 67,852 individuals. We pinpoint 18 associations to a single causal variant with greater than 95% certainty, and an additional 27 associations to a single variant with greater than 50% certainty. These 45 variants are significantly enriched for protein-coding changes (n = 13), direct disruption of transcription-factor binding sites (n = 3), and tissue-specific epigenetic marks (n = 10), with the last category showing enrichment in specific immune cells among associations stronger in Crohn's disease and in gut mucosa among associations stronger in ulcerative colitis. The results of this study suggest that high-resolution fine-mapping in large samples can convert many discoveries from genome-wide association studies into statistically convincing causal variants, providing a powerful substrate for experimental elucidation of disease mechanisms.

  7. Colonic inflammation in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: detection with magnetic resonance enterography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campari, Alessandro; Napolitano, Marcello; Zuin, Giovanna; Maestri, Luciano; Di Leo, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Colonic involvement in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is common. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography is considered the best imaging modality for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease evaluation. It is unclear whether the lack of a dedicated large bowel preparation prevents a reliable colonic assessment. To determine the diagnostic performance of standard MR enterography in detecting and grading colonic inflammatory activity. We retrospectively evaluated children who underwent both MR enterography and ileocolonoscopy with biopsies <4 weeks apart. Two radiologists independently reviewed MR examinations and quantified inflammation in each of the five colonic segments using a standardized MR score system. Findings were compared with histological examination of the corresponding segment. Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, Jonckheere-Terpstra and Bland-Altman statistics were used. One hundred seventy-five segments from 37 examinations were included. MR enterography diagnostic performance for inflammation was as follows: sensitivity 94% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 90-97%), specificity: 64% (95% CI: 57-71%). A significant positive correlation was found between MR score and inflammatory activity histologically graded (P<0.001, Jonckheere-Terpstra test). The interobserver agreement was good (mean difference between MR enterography scores was -0.03; limits of agreement -2.8 to 2.7). Standard MR enterography is sensitive for the detection of actively inflamed colonic segments. MR enterography might provide useful information for guiding biopsies and its role as an alternative to ileocolonoscopy in monitoring colonic disease activity in children should be further investigated. (orig.)

  8. Can inflammatory bowel disease be permanently treated with short-term interventions on the microbiome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Dana; Clemente, Jose C; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    2015-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is a chronic, relapsing and remitting set of conditions characterized by an excessive inflammatory response leading to the destruction of the gastrointestinal tract. While the exact etiology of inflammatory bowel disease remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that the human gastrointestinal microbiome plays a critical role in disease pathogenesis. Manipulation of the gut microbiome has therefore emerged as an attractive alternative for both prophylactic and therapeutic intervention against inflammation. Despite its growing popularity among patients, review of the current literature suggests that the adult microbiome is a highly stable structure resilient to short-term interventions. In fact, most evidence to date demonstrates that therapeutic agents targeting the microflora trigger rapid changes in the microbiome, which then reverts to its pre-treatment state once the therapy is completed. Based on these findings, our ability to treat inflammatory bowel disease through short-term manipulations of the human microbiome may only have a transient effect. Thus, this review is intended to highlight the use of various therapeutic options, including diet, pre- and probiotics, antibiotics and fecal microbiota transplant, to manipulate the microbiome, with specific attention to the alterations made to the microflora along with the duration of impact.

  9. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Sheryl; Stock, Richard; Greenstein, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSES/OBJECTIVE: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer treated over a 34 year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty five patients had Ulcerative Colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's Disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In 2 of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent post-operative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median - 24 months). RESULTS: The 5 year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5 year rate of 86% for patients with Tis - T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p ) were noted in 3 patients (20%) receiving radiation therapy and these included two cases of grade 3 skin reactions and one case of grade

  10. Cigarette smoking and quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. South Limburg IBD Study Group.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russel, M.G.V.M.; Nieman, F.H.M.; Bergers, J.M.M.; Stockbrugger, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Cigarette smoking and quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. South Limburg IBD Study Group. Russel MG, Nieman FH, Bergers JM, Stockbrugger RW. Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Maastricht, The Netherlands. OBJECTIVE: Smoking has been reported as influencing

  11. Transition of adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease from pediatric to adult care: a survey of adult gastroenterologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hait, Elizabeth J.; Barendse, Renée M.; Arnold, Janis H.; Valim, Clarissa; Sands, Bruce E.; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Fishman, Laurie N.

    2009-01-01

    Transition of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from pediatric to adult providers requires preparation. Gastroenterologists for adult patients ("adult gastroenterologists") may have expectations of patients that are different from those of pediatric patients. We sought to explore the

  12. The Natural History of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis after Liver Transplantation – a Single-Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karli J Moncrief

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the natural history of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD after liver transplant, the predictors of PSC and IBD recurrence, and the interaction of these disease processes.

  13. Self-reported disability in patients with inflammatory bowel disease largely determined by disease activity and illness perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, M. van der; Fidder, H.H.; Leenders, M.; Kaptein, A.A.; Valk, M.E. van der; Bodegraven, A.A. van; Dijkstra, G.; Jong, D.J. de; Pierik, M.; Ponsioen, C.Y.; Meulen-de Jong, A.E. van der; Woude, C.J. van der; Meeberg, P.C. van de; Romberg-Camps, M.J.; Clemens, C.H.; Jansen, J.M.; Mahmmod, N.; Bolwerk, C.J.; Vermeijden, J.R.; Siersema, P.D.; Oldenburg, B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) disability index has recently been introduced to measure patients' physical, psychological, familial, and social limitations associated with IBD. We assessed factors related to self-reported disability and the relationship between disability and

  14. Self-reported disability in patients with inflammatory bowel disease largely determined by disease activity and illness perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Have, Mike; Fidder, Herma H; Leenders, Max; Kaptein, Ad A; van der Valk, Mirthe E; van Bodegraven, Ad A; Dijkstra, Gerard; de Jong, Dirk J; Pierik, Marieke; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; van der Woude, C Janneke; van de Meeberg, Paul C; Romberg-Camps, Mariëlle J L; Clemens, Cees H M; Jansen, Jeroen M; Mahmmod, Nofel; Bolwerk, Clemens J M; Vermeijden, J Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D; Oldenburg, Bas

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) disability index has recently been introduced to measure patients' physical, psychological, familial, and social limitations associated with IBD. We assessed factors related to self-reported disability and the relationship between disability and

  15. Psychological distress, somatization, and defense mechanisms associated with quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyphantis, Thomas N; Tomenson, Barbara; Bai, Marina; Tsianos, Epameinondas; Mavreas, Venetsanos; Creed, Francis

    2010-03-01

    Clinical parameters predict health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but some patients have impaired HRQOL despite being in clinical remission. To identify personality and psychological distress variables associated with HRQOL in IBD. In a cross-sectional study of 185 IBD patients, the General Health Questionnaire, the Hopkins' Symptoms Distress Checklist, the Defense Style Questionnaire and the Life Style Index were administered. The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire was used for the assessment of HRQOL. Psychological distress was associated with impaired HRQOL in a dose-response fashion. Somatization mediated the relationships of anxiety and depression with HRQOL. Few years of education, more extensive use of the reaction-formation defense mechanism and higher rates of somatization were the variables most closely and independently associated with impaired HRQOL. Somatization and reaction-formation are independent correlates of disease-specific HRQOL in IBD patients, and this could be relevant to psychological interventions.

  16. Leukocytapheresis: An “Out-of-Body” Experience in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Leukocytapheresis has reemerged as a novel “nondrug” approach in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The technique involves the extracorporeal passage of peripheral blood through a column of cellulose diacetate beads (Adacolumn) or a nonwoven polyester fiber filter (Cellsorba). The benefits accrued from the filtered extraction of granulocytes, monocytes (Adacolumn), and lymphocytes (Cellsorba) appear greater than the simple extraction of these cells. There appears to be an immunologic modulation of leukocytes and dendritic cells and a diminished response to proinflammatory cytokines. Unfortunately, blinded placebo-controlled trials are lacking. Nevertheless, the aggregate clinical experience detailed in this review suggests a relatively safe and attractive alternative to current inflammatory bowel disease therapies. Randomized, controlled sham trials are in progress. PMID:28331481

  17. The -2518 A/G MCP-1 polymorphism as a risk factor of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Anna; Przybyłowska, Karolina; Sygut, Andrzej; Dziki, Lukasz; Chojnacki, Cezary; Chojnacki, Jan; Dziki, Adam; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2012-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are disorders originated from immune disturbances. The AIM OF THE STUDY was to evaluate the association between the -2518 A/G MCP-1 polymorphism and the risk of IBD development. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Study group consisted of 197 subjects with IBD (120 with ulcerative colitis and 77 with Crohn's disease) as well as 210 healthy controls. The presence of the -2518 G/G MCP-1 genotype in the investigated groups seems to be connected with higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease as well as Crohn's disease only (OR 2.26; 95% CI 1.44-3.54 and OR 2.08; 95% CI 1.21-3.46, respectively). Our data showed that the -2518 A/G MCP-1 polymorphism might be associated with the IBD occurrence and might be used as predictive factor of these diseases in a Polish population.

  18. Neuro-immune interactions in inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome: Future therapeutic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraneveld, A.D.; Rijnierse, A.; Nijkamp, F.P.; Garssen, J.

    2008-01-01

    The gastro-intestinal tract is well known for its largest neural network outside the central nervous system and for the most extensive immune system in the body. Research in neurogastroenterology implicates the involvement of both enteric nervous system and immune system in symptoms of inflammatory

  19. A Novel Therapy for Inflammatory Bowel Disease-Dual Regulatory T-Cell Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    a gut-homing Treg cell. We will test this hypothesis using an IBD animal model, i.e. experimental colitis. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Inflammatory bowel...address this question, animals were induced for severe experimental colitis. At day 3, the animals received one of the following immunizations: 1) no...transfer. On day 14, the animals were induced for the experimental colitis for the second time and monitored for body weight on a daily basis. A

  20. Biomarkers of Therapeutic Response in the IL-23 Pathway in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cayatte, Corinne; Joyce-Shaikh, Barbara; Vega, Felix; Boniface, Katia; Grein, Jeffrey; Murphy, Erin; Blumenschein, Wendy M; Chen, Smiley; Malinao, Maria-Christina; Basham, Beth; Pierce, Robert H; Bowman, Edward P; McKenzie, Brent S; Elson, Charles O; Faubion, William A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Interleukin-23 (IL-23) has emerged as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As biomarkers of disease state and treatment efficacy are becoming increasingly important in drug development, we sought to identify efficacy biomarkers for anti-IL-23 therapy in Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS: Candidate IL-23 biomarkers, downstream of IL-23 signaling, were identified using shotgun proteomic analysis of feces and colon lavages obtained from a short-...

  1. Immunizations in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Treated with Immunosuppressive Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Ying; Bousvaros, Athos

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) will receive immunosuppressive therapy at some point for their disease, whether for the short term (such as a course of corticosteroids) or long term (such as maintenance therapy with immunomodulators or biologics). The systemic immunosuppression places patients at increased risk for infections. Therefore, it is important that patients are up-to-date with immunizations to minimize vaccine-preventable infections. However, the ...

  2. Customer Quality of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease In Tabriz, 1391

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Hasanzadeh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Customer Quality is one of the most important dimensions of quality in health care which refers to service receiver's knowledge, attitude and skills that play effective role in treatment process. This study is aimed at assessing customer quality score in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Tabriz city in 2012. Material and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study which was conducted with the participation of 94 Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients who referred to Tabriz Imam Reza Hospital and Golgasht clinic. Customer Quality was measured using a questionnaire with 19 items which its validity was confirmed by 10 experts and its reliability was reviewed using Cronbach's alpha index (α =0.78.  Obtained data were analyzed using SPSS17.   Results: The results illustrated that average score of customer quality among patients with inflammatory bowel disease is 70.63 (±9.67. All the participants achieved stage 1 scores of Customer Quality in self-management but only 11.7% reported highest customer quality score and were able to continue their self-care in high pressure circumstances such as stress and financial problems. Also, there was a significant relation between customer quality score and patient’s education (P-value=0.05, so that by having higher education level, the customer quality score was increased as well. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that customer quality status in assessed patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease is partially acceptable, but major problems in some areas are evident and require more attention of health care managers and policy makers. ​

  3. Meta-analysis of the role of oral contraceptive agents in inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Godet, P G; May, G R; Sutherland, L R

    1995-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have been performed to determine factors that might contribute to the development of inflammatory bowel disease. Although the role of oral contraceptive agents in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) have been assessed, most studies were of small sample size and characterised by low statistical precision. A meta-analysis was performed to increase the statistical power and to investigate the association between the use of oral contraceptives and the...

  4. The Incidence Rate of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in an Urban Area of Iran: A Developing Country

    OpenAIRE

    Zahedi, Mohammad Javad; Darvish Moghadam, Sodaif; Hayat Bakhsh Abbasi, Mehdi; Dehghani, Masood; Shafiei pour, Sara; Zydabady nejad, Hamideh; Broumand, Kiekam

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) varies among different societies. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence rate of IBD in Kerman, a city in Southeast Iran. METHODS All medical records that indicated a new diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD) were retrieved from the gastrointestinal endoscopy and pathology departments of 12 centers from October 2011 to September 2012. RESULTS The incidence rate of UC in Kerman was estimated at 4.9...

  5. Influence of environmental factors in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Legaki, Evangelia; Gazouli, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are multifactorial diseases that are manifested after disruption of a genetic predisposed individual and its intestinal microflora through an environmental stimulus. Urbanization and industrialization are associated with IBD. Epidemiological data, clinical observations and family/immigrants studies indicate the significance of environmental influence in the development of IBD. Some environmental fa...

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Eating Disorders: A systematized review of comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilzarbe, L; Fàbrega, M; Quintero, R; Bastidas, A; Pintor, L; García-Campayo, J; Gomollón, F; Ilzarbe, D

    2017-11-01

    Research has shown that there is an association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease, anxiety and mood disorders, however little is known about their association with Eating Disorders. In this paper we will present a case of a young female with a comorbid diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Eating Disorder, and then discuss the results from a systematic review of the literature, describing published cases of patients with the same condition. A systematized review of the literature was conducted according to MOOSE guidelines. A computerized literature search of MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE, and a manual search through reference lists of selected original articles were performed to identify all published case-reports, case series and studies of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Eating Disorders. Fourteen articles were included, encompassing 219 cases, including ours. The vast majority were females ranging from 10 to 44years old. Anorexia Nervosa (n=156) and Crohn's Disease (n=129) was the most frequent combination (n=90) reported in the literature. These cases present a poor prognosis because of corticoid refusal, medication abandon and/or deliberate exacerbation of IBD symptoms, in the context of trying to lose weight. Recent evidence suggests there is a possible association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Eating Disorders, although the mechanisms involved in its ethiopathogenesis are still unknown. To be aware of this association is important because a delayed diagnosis of this comorbidity may lead to worse prognosis. Further research and a multidisciplinary approach could facilitate earlier diagnosis and provide therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of Sex and Disease on Illness-Related Concerns in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Maunder

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Identifying the normal concerns of people with ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease (CD facilitates a comprehensive approach to their medical care. Clinically, it can be easily appreciated that the concerns of men and women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD may differ and that this may have a substantial impact on both coping and treatment decisions. However, sex differences have received little empirical study.

  8. Non-Invasive Mapping of the Gastrointestinal Microbiota Identifies Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Papa, Eliseo; Docktor, Michael; Smillie, Christopher; Weber, Sarah; Preheim, Sarah P.; Gevers, Dirk; Giannoukos, Georgia; Ciulla, Dawn; Tabbaa, Diana; Ingram, Jay; Schauer, David B.; Ward, Doyle V.; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Bousvaros, Athos

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is challenging to diagnose because of the non-specificity of symptoms; an unequivocal diagnosis can only be made using colonoscopy, which clinicians are reluctant to recommend for children. Diagnosis of pediatric IBD is therefore frequently delayed, leading to inappropriate treatment plans and poor outcomes. We investigated the use of 16S rRNA sequencing of fecal samples and new analytical methods to assess differences in the microbiota o...

  9. Review article: remission rates achievable by current therapies for inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Peyrin-Biroulet , Laurent; Lémann , Marc

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aim: To review remission rates with current medical treatments for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods We searched MEDLINE (source PUBMED, 1966 to January, 2011). Results Induction and maintenance of remission was observed in 20% (range, 9-29.5%) and 53% (range, 36.8-59.6%) of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients treated with oral 5-ASA derivatives. Induction of remission was noted in 52% (range, 48-58%) of Crohn?s disease (CD) patients and 54% of UC...

  10. Motivational interviewing in inflammatory bowel disease patients: a useful tool for outpatient counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocciaro, Filippo; Di Mitri, Roberto; Russo, Giuseppina; Leone, Salvo; Quercia, Valerio

    2014-10-01

    Most inflammatory bowel disease patients miss follow-up visits and are non-adherent to therapy due to the lack of an engaging patient-physician relationship. Motivational interviewing is a patient-centred counselling method used to elicit/strengthen motivation towards change. The aim of this study was to assess the role of motivational interviewing in patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease. The study included consecutive patients with inflammatory bowel disease presenting for the first consultation (June 2012-February 2013). All consultations were carried out applying the motivational interviewing approach. After each consultation, patients filled out a questionnaire asking demographic data, and their past and current experience. Overall, 23 males (51.1%) and 22 females (48.9%), mean age 36.1±15.2 years, were enrolled. Before and after experiencing the motivational interviewing approach (mean visit duration 41.5±8.7min) "overall satisfaction rate", "physician's communication skills", and "perceived empathy" were 60% vs 100%, 40% vs 95.6%, and 40% vs 100%, respectively. Satisfaction was lower in patients affected by indeterminate colitis (p=0.004), and of younger age (p=0.02). The motivational interview approach is appreciated by inflammatory bowel disease patients. Despite being time-consuming, the motivational interview appears considerably worthwhile at the first visit and in younger patients. Motivational interviewing can help physicians to deal with their patients, moving from "cure" to "care". Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Will novel oral formulations change the management of inflammatory bowel disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Ainsworth, Mark Andrew

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The traditional management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with sulphasalazine/5-aminosalicylic acid, glucocorticoids and immunomodulators (i.e., thiopurines and methotrexate) was nearly two decades ago extended with intravenously or subcutaneously administered biologics (i...... the current approaches with promising new oral drugs with distinct modes of action, including: the Janus kinase inhibitors (i.e., tofacitinib, filgotinib and peficitinib); the immunomodulatory drug (laquinimod); a small α4 antagonist (AJM300); agonists for sphingosine-phosphate receptors (i.e., ozanimod, APD...

  12. Fecal microbiome in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    OMORI, Marie; MAEDA, Shingo; IGARASHI, Hirotaka; OHNO, Koichi; SAKAI, Kosei; YONEZAWA, Tomohiro; HORIGOME, Ayako; ODAMAKI, Toshitaka; MATSUKI, Naoaki

    2017-01-01

    Although alteration of commensal microbiota is associated with chronic gastrointestinal (GI) diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in dogs, the microbiota composition in intestinal lymphoma, an important differential diagnosis of canine IBD, has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota in dogs with IBD, dogs with intestinal lymphoma, and healthy dogs. Eight dogs with IBD, eight dogs with intestinal lymphoma, and fifteen healthy dogs we...

  13. Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease following Bacille Calmette-Guérin and Smallpox Vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Anne Marie; Jess, Tine; Sørup, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Childhood immunology has been suggested to play a role in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) based on the studies of childhood vaccinations, infections, and treatment with antibiotics. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and smallpox vaccinations were gradually phased-out in Denmark...... for children born between 1965 and 1976, hence allowing the study of subsequent risk of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in a unique prospective design....

  14. Potential impact of diet on treatment effect from anti-TNF drugs in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the current knowledge on the impact of diet on anti-TNF response in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), to identify dietary factors that warrant further investigations in relation to anti-TNF treatment response, and, finally, to discuss potential strategies for such invest...... inflammation and potentially impact treatment response to anti-TNF drugs. Further studies using hypothesis-driven and data-driven strategies in prospective observational, animal and interventional studies are warranted....

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease in central India: a single centre experience over five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ajay K; Sircar, Shohini; Jain, Mayank; Adkar, Sagar; Waghmare, Chandrashekhar

    2012-10-01

    In this retrospective study, the records of all patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease between 2005 and 2010 were analysed. Ulcerative colitis is far more common than Crohn's disease in our setting. The incidence is similar in both sexes and the age at diagnosis for both is similar. Limited left-sided ulcerative colitis is more common. Crohn's disease is difficult to diagnose and is commonly treated as tuberculosis in our setting.

  16. On the Problem of Differential Diagnosis of Inflammatory and Functional Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Ya. Budzak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the problems of differential diagnosis of inflammatory (ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and functional (irritable bowel syndrome disease of the intestine. The necessity of such differential diagnosis in certain categories of patients was noted. The possibilities of instrumental and laboratory methods of study are shown. Particular attention is paid to the definition of fecal tests — calprotectin and lactoferrin. An analysis of the studies of their information content has been carried out.

  17. Potential prospects of nanomedicine for targeted therapeutics in inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Pichai, Madharasi VA; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as Crohn’s disease are highly debilitating. There are inconsistencies in response to and side effects in the current conventional medications, failures in adequate drug delivery, and the lack of therapeutics to offer complete remission in the presently available treatments of IBD. This suggests the need to explore beyond the horizons of conventional approaches in IBD therapeutics. This review examines the arena of the evolving IBD nanomedicine, studied ...

  18. Cannabis and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: change blossoms a mile high

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffenberg, Edward J.; Newman, Heike; Collins, Colm; Leinwand, Kristina; Tarbell, Sally

    2017-01-01

    The trend towards decriminalization of cannabis (marijuana) continues sweeping across the United States. Colorado has been a leader of legalization of medical and recreational cannabis use. The growing public interest in the medicinal properties of cannabis and its use by patients with a variety of illnesses including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) makes it important for pediatric gastroenterologists to understand this movement and its potential impact on patients. This article describes th...

  19. MicroRNAs in inflammatory bowel disease--pathogenesis, diagnostics and therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is complex and largely unknown. Until recently, research has focused on the study of protein regulators in inflammation to reveal the cellular and molecular networks in the pathogenesis of IBD. However, in the last few years, new and promising...... diagnosis of IBD, and in the development of personalized therapies. Here, we provide a short review of the current state-of-the-art of miRNAs in IBD pathogenesis, diagnostics and therapeutics....

  20. IMPORTANCE OF MEASURING LEVELS OF INFLIXIMAB IN PATIENTS TREATING INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE IN A BRAZILIAN COHORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampa, Katia Cristina; Morsoletto, Daphne Benatti Gonçalves; Loures, Marcela Rocha; Pissaia, Alcindo; Nones, Rodrigo Bremer; Ivantes, Cláudia Alexandra Pontes

    2017-12-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. In such pathologies, there is an increased production of alpha tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α). Patients, in whom the conventional immunosuppressant treatment fails, require the use of immunobiological therapy, such as anti-TNF-α, a monoclonal antibody. Infliximab is an anti-TNF-α drug, a chimerical immunoglobulin, with a murine component, which is responsible for the generation of immunogenicity against the drug and formation of anti-TNF-α antibodies. The presence of anti-drug antibodies may be responsible for adverse events and reduction of the drug's effectiveness. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases undergoing therapy with biological medication, such as infliximab, can relapse overtime and this may not be translated into clinical symptoms. Thus, there is a need for a method to evaluate the efficacy of the drug, through the measurement of serum infliximab levels, as well as antibodies research. This study aimed to measure serum infliximab levels and anti-infliximab antibodies in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases post-induction phase and during maintenance therapy, and describe the therapeutic modifications that took place based on the serum levels results. It was a retrospective study, that included forty-five patients, with a total of 63 samples of infliximab measurement. Twenty-one patients had an adequate infliximab serum level, 31 had subtherapeutic levels and 11 had supratherapeutic levels. Seven patients had their medication suspended due to therapeutic failure or high levels of antibodies to infliximab. In conclusion, only a third of the patients had adequate infliximab levels and 36% presented with subtherapeutic levels at the end of the induction phase. Therapy optimization occurred based in about 46% of the samples results, demonstrating the importance of having this tool to help the clinical handling of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases ongoing

  1. Cannabinoids for treating inflammatory bowel diseases: where are we and where do we go?

    OpenAIRE

    Hasenoehrl, Carina; Storr, Martin; Schicho, Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Fifty years after the discovery of ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as the psychoactive component of Cannabis, we are assessing the possibility of translating this herb into clinical treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Here, a discussion on the problems associated with a potential treatment is given. From first surveys and small clinical studies in patients with IBD we have learned that Cannabis is frequently used to alleviate diarrhea, abdominal pain, and los...

  2. Patients’ Diets and Preferences in a Pediatric Population with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Timothy J; Issenman, Robert M; Jacobson, Kevan

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the dietary practices of the pediatric inflammatory bowel disease population at the Children's Hospital of the Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation and the reported effectiveness of those diets.PATIENTS AND METHODS: A questionnaire mailed to 153 pediatric patients was returned by 125 patients (76 Crohn's disease [CD] and 49 ulcerative colitis [UC] patients) - an 82% response rate.RESULTS: The median age of respondents was 13 years, and 62% were male. Ninety per cent and ...

  3. Circulating L-selectin levels and endothelial CD34 expression in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, J B; Vainer, B; Horn, T

    1998-01-01

    Soluble L-selectin (sL-selectin) concentrations are positively correlated with disease activity in ulcerative colitis (UC) but not in Crohn's disease (CD). This difference in sL-selectin regulation could be due to a disease specific regulation of L-selectin ligands. The aim of this study was to c...... was to compare levels of circulating sL-selectin, expression of the L-selectin ligand CD34 in the affected colon, and inflammatory bowel disease activity....

  4. Progression of Inflammatory Bowel Disease to Cancer: Is the Patient Better Off without Lymphatic Vessels or Nodes (or Angiopoietin 2)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a well-recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) [~15-20% lifetime risk in ulcerative colitis ( UC )] but the...for colo- rectal cancer (CRC) [~15-20% lifetime risk in ulcerative colitis ( UC )]. The lymphatic system has been implicated in both IBD pathophysiology...inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Multiple factors have been implicated in the progression of ulcerative/granulomatous (Crohn’s) colitis to colorectal

  5. Transcriptomic landscape of lncRNAs in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Aashiq Hussain; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Seemann, Ernst Stefan

    2015-01-01

    differentially expressed lncRNAs, respectively, while in cases of the non-inflamed CD and UC, we identified 12 and 19 differentially expressed lncRNAs, respectively. We also observed significant enrichment (P-value test) for 96 differentially expressed lncRNAs and 154 protein...... their involvement in the immune response, pro-inflammatory cytokine activity and MHC protein complex. CONCLUSIONS: The lncRNA expression profiling in both inflamed and non-inflamed CD and UC successfully stratified IBD patients from the healthy controls. Taken together, the identified lncRNA transcriptional...

  6. Review article: gut-directed hypnotherapy in the management of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S L; Muir, J G; Gibson, P R

    2015-06-01

    Gut-directed hypnotherapy is being increasingly applied to patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to a lesser extent, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To review the technique, mechanisms of action and evidence for efficacy, and to identify gaps in the understanding of gut-directed hypnotherapy as a treatment for IBS and IBD. A review of published literature and a systematic review of clinical trials in its application to patients with IBS and IBD were performed. Gut-directed hypnotherapy is a clearly described technique. Its potential mechanisms of action on the brain-gut axis are multiple with evidence spanning psychological effects through to physiological gastrointestinal modifications. Six of seven randomised IBS studies reported a significant reduction (all P hypnotherapy ranged between 24% and 73%. Efficacy was maintained long-term in four of five studies. A therapeutic effect was also observed in the maintenance of clinical remission in patients with ulcerative colitis. Uncontrolled trials supported the efficacy and durability of gut-directed hypnotherapy in IBS. Gaps in understanding included to whom and when it should be applied, the paucity of adequately trained hypnotherapists, and the difficulties in designing well controlled-trials. Gut-directed hypnotherapy has durable efficacy in patients with IBS and possibly ulcerative colitis. Whether it sits in the therapeutic arsenal as a primary and/or adjunctive therapy cannot be ascertained on the current evidence base. Further research into efficacy, mechanisms of action and predictors of response is required. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Hepatocyte growth factor treatment ameliorates diarrhea and bowel inflammation in a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, L Grier; Schwartz, Marshall Z; Kuenzler, Keith A; Birbe, Ruth

    2004-02-01

    Transfection of the HLA-B27 gene into normal Fischer rats induces phenotypic changes similar to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study investigated the benefits of 2 doses of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on the manifestations of IBD in this rat model. Fischer rats and HLA-B27 rats were divided into 4 groups: Fischer rats treated with saline, HLA-B27 rats treated with saline, HGF at 150 microg/kg/d, and HGF at 300 microg/kg/d. HGF or saline was infused for 14 days via an osmotic pump attached to a catheter in the internal jugular vein. After treatment, rats were evaluated for diarrhea and reduction in gross and microscopic bowel inflammation. Statistics were determined using analysis of variance (ANOVA). A P value diarrhea by 40%, gross inflammation by 41%, and microscopic inflammation by 72% (P diarrhea by 46%, gross inflammation by 45%, and microscopic inflammation by 54% (P < or =.05). HGF administration reduces the clinical manifestations of IBD in this rat model. Similar effects were seen at both doses of HGF administration, implying that there is a plateau above which further increases in HGF levels provides no added benefit. HGF administration may be clinically useful in the management of IBD.

  8. Gut Microbiota in Health, Diverticular Disease, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Time for Microbial Marker of Gastrointestinal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo; Petito, Valentina; Graziani, Cristina; Schiavoni, Elisa; Paroni Sterbini, Francesco; Poscia, Andrea; Gaetani, Eleonora; Franceschi, Francesco; Cammarota, Giovanni; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Masucci, Luca; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Few data exist on differences in gut microbiota composition among principal gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. We evaluated the differences in gut microbiota composition among uncomplicated diverticular disease (DD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) patients. DD, IBS, and IBD patients along with healthy controls (CT) were enrolled in our Italian GI outpatient clinic. Stool samples were collected. Microbiota composition was evaluated through a metagenomic gene-targeted approach. GI pathology represented a continuous spectrum of diseases where IBD displayed one extreme, while CT displayed the other. Among Phyla, Biplot PC2/PC3 and dendogram plot showed major differences in samples from IBS and IBD. DD resembled species CT composition, but not for Bacteroides fragilis. In IBS, Dialister spp. and then Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were the most representative species. Ulcerative colitis showed a reduced concentration of Clostridium difficile and an increase of Bacteroides fragilis. In Crohn's disease, Parabacteroides distasonis was the most represented, while Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bacteroides fragilis were significantly reduced. Each disorder has its definite overall microbial signature, which produces a clear differentiation from the others. On the other hand, shared alterations constitute the "core dysbiosis" of GI diseases. The assessment of these microbial markers represents a parameter that may complete the diagnostic assessment. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Technical Quality of Delivered Care for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Tabriz Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Somi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and objectives : Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a chronic disease and requires complex treatment. Due to the various treatment options and gradual understanding of specialists about the risks and benefits of different treatments of IBD, delivering care according to the treatment protocols and guidelines is essential. This study was conducted to assess delivered care from the perspective of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Material and Methods : This cross-sectional study was conducted with 94 participants with IBD selected randomly in Emam Reza hospital and Golgasht clinic in Tabriz. Data were collected by an approved researcher-made questionnaire via interviewing patients. Chi-Squared Test was used to evaluate the relationship between demographic variables and accordance of delivered care with standards. SPSS17 was used for data analysis. Results : The results indicated that "visit by specialist" and "providing dietary recommendation by nutritionist" aspects had highest and lowest degree of accordance with standards, respectively. Furthermore, the aspects of “delivered care in exacerbation status of disease” and “delivered care by other specialists” had only 20 percent compliance with standards. Also, there was a significant relationship between age, job, education status, smoking and compliance with related standards in some care aspects (p Conclusion : The study results indicated that there is a deep gap between delivered cares for patients with inflammatory bowel disease and related standards. These deficiencies showed the parts that need improvement and require healthcare managers and policy makers’ attention.

  10. Biomarkers as Potential Treatment Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis B Murdoch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the concept of ‘treat-to-target’ in inflammatory bowel disease as a mechanism to standardize management and prevent complications. While clinical, radiographic and endoscopic treatment end points will figure prominently in this promising management paradigm, the role that noninvasive biomarkers will play is currently undefined. The goal of the present systematic review was to investigate the potential value of biomarkers as treatment targets in inflammatory bowel disease, with particular focus on those best studied: serum C-reactive protein (CRP and fecal calprotectin. In Crohn disease, elevated CRP levels at baseline predict response to anti-tumour necrosis factor agents, and normalization is usually associated with clinical and endoscopic remission. CRP and hemoglobin levels can be used to help predict clinical relapse in the context of withdrawal of therapy. Ultimately, the authors conclude that currently available biomarkers should not be used as treatment targets in inflammatory bowel disease because they have inadequate operational characteristics to make them safe surrogates for clinical, endoscopic and radiographic evaluation. However, CRP and fecal calprotectin are important adjunctive measures that help alert the clinician to pursue further investigation.

  11. Psychiatric morbidity after surgery for inflammatory bowel disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangenberg, Marie Strøm; El-Hussuna, Alaa

    2017-12-28

    To examine the evidence about psychiatric morbidity after inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related surgery. PRISMA guidelines were followed and a protocol was published at PROSPERO (CRD42016037600). Inclusion criteria were studies describing patients with inflammatory bowel disease undergoing surgery and their risk of developing psychiatric disorder. Twelve studies (including 4340 patients) were eligible. All studies were non-randomized and most had high risk of bias. Patients operated for inflammatory bowel disease had an increased risk of developing depression, compared with surgical patients with diverticulitis or inguinal hernia, but not cancer. In addition, patients with Crohn's disease had higher risk of depression after surgery compared with non-surgical patients. Patients with ulcerative colitis had higher risk of anxiety after surgery compared with surgical colorectal cancer patients. Charlson comorbidity score more than three and female gender were independent predictors for depression and anxiety following surgery. The review cannot give any clear answer to the risks of psychiatric morbidity after surgery for IBD studies with the lowest risk of bias indicated an increased risk of depression among surgical patients with Crohn's disease and increased risk of anxiety among patients with ulcerative colitis.

  12. Impact of ethnicity, geography, and disease on the microbiota in health and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prideaux, Lani; Kang, Seungha; Wagner, Josef; Buckley, Michael; Mahar, Jackie E; De Cruz, Peter; Wen, Zhonghui; Chen, Liping; Xia, Bing; van Langenberg, Daniel R; Lockett, Trevor; Ng, Siew C; Sung, Joseph J Y; Desmond, Paul; McSweeney, Chris; Morrison, Mark; Kirkwood, Carl D; Kamm, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    The gut microbiota is central to health and disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. Differences in microbiota related to geography and ethnicity may hold the key to recent changes in the incidence of microbiota-related disorders. Gut mucosal microbiota was analyzed in 190 samples from 87 Caucasian and Chinese subjects, from Australia and Hong Kong, comprising 22 patients with Crohn's disease, 30 patients with ulcerative colitis, 29 healthy controls, and 6 healthy relatives of patients with Crohn's disease. Bacterial 16S rRNA microarray and 454 pyrosequencing were performed. The microbiota was diverse in health, regardless of ethnicity or geography (operational taxonomic unit number and Shannon diversity index). Ethnicity and geography, however, did affect microbial composition. Crohn's disease resulted in reduced bacterial diversity, regardless of ethnicity or geography, and was the strongest determinant of composition. In ulcerative colitis, diversity was reduced in Chinese subjects only, suggesting that ethnicity is a determinant of bacterial diversity, whereas composition was determined by disease and ethnicity. Specific phylotypes were different between health and disease. Chinese patients with inflammatory bowel disease more often than healthy Chinese tended to have had a Western diet in childhood, in the East and West. The healthy microbiota is diverse but compositionally affected by geographical and ethnic factors. The microbiota is substantially altered in inflammatory bowel disease, but ethnicity may also play an important role. This may be key to the changing epidemiology in developing countries, and emigrants to the West.

  13. Maintaining Intestinal Health: The Genetics and Immunology of Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel DiseaseSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith R. Kelsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a multifactoral disease caused by dysregulated immune responses to commensal or pathogenic microbes in the intestine, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation. An emerging population of patients with IBD younger than 5 years of age represent a unique form of disease, termed very early onset IBD (VEO-IBD, which is phenotypically and genetically distinct from older-onset IBD. VEO-IBD is associated with increased disease severity, aggressive progression, and poor responsiveness to most conventional therapies. Further investigation into the causes and pathogenesis of VEO-IBD will help improve treatment strategies and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that are essential to maintain intestinal health or provoke the development of targeted therapeutic strategies to limit intestinal inflammation and promote tissue repair. Here, we discuss the phenotypic nature of VEO-IBD, the recent identification of novel gene variants associated with disease, and functional immunologic studies interrogating the contribution of specific genetic variants to the development of chronic intestinal inflammation. Keywords: Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Whole Exome Sequencing, Mucosal Immunology

  14. Novel catalase loaded nanocores for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Arun K S; Srivastava, Shikha; Patel, Satish; Singh, Manju R; Singh, Deependra

    2017-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammatory disorder of the digestive tract reported to be primarily caused by oxidative stress. In this study, alginate encapsulated nanoceramic carriers were designed to deliver acid labile antioxidant enzyme catalase orally. Complete system was characterized for size, loading efficiency, in vitro antioxidant assay and in vitro release. The prepared nanoceramic system was found to be spherical with diameter of 925 ± 6.81 nm. The in vitro release data followed the Higuchi model in acidic buffer whereas in alkaline pH sustained and almost first order release of enzyme was observed up to 6 h.

  15. Neural control disturbances of the gastrointestinal tract and visceral pain in inflammatory bowel diseases 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Ciesielczyk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition, the etiology of which is composed of factors such as the environment, genetic predisposition, gut dysbiosis and inadequate immune response. The pathologic findings in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are related to dysfunction of gastrointestinal secretion and motility and also disturbed visceral sensory function, with accompanying intestinal and parenteral complications. The systemic inflammatory response affects neurological control via the gut-brain axis, which modulates the cooperation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS, enteric nervous system (ENS and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT. In chronic inflammation the intestinal neuropathy disrupts peristalsis and intestinal secretion as well as causing unpleasant symptoms of the patients. Pain receptors are stimulated by inflammatory mediators, and due to the intensified activation of the nociceptive system visceral hypersensitivity through central and peripheral sensitization is generated. Chronic visceral pain negatively influences the course of disease and the quality of the patient’s life. The growing knowledge about the neurological control dysfunction of the intestine and immune system dysregulation could provide proper directives for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  16. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Associated with Virulence Factors in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, traditionally divided into Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). UC is a relapsing non-transmural chronic inflammatory disease that is restricted to the colon and during flares the disease...... is characterised by bloody diarrhoea. CD is a chronic, segmental localised granulomatous disease that can affect any part of the entire gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to the anus. The aetiology of IBD is still unknown, but studies indicate several possible aetiologies such as the host immune system...... and influence of the gastrointestinal microbiota. The gut microbiota of IBD patients contributes to initiation and/ or maintaining the inflammatory state by providing antigens or co-stimulatory factors that drive the immune response in a misdirection in these genetically susceptible hosts. Alterations...

  17. Mind the gaps: confocal endomicroscopy showed increased density of small bowel epithelial gaps in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Julia J; Madsen, Karen L; Boulanger, Pierre; Dieleman, Levinus A; Meddings, Jon; Fedorak, Richard N

    2011-03-01

    Confocal endomicroscopy can be used to image intestinal mucosa. Epithelial gaps resulting from shedding of epithelial cells have been reported in patients. We hypothesize that the rate of epithelial cell shedding increases in patients with Crohn's disease, leading to more epithelial gaps and barrier dysfunction. In this study, we used probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy to quantify epithelial cells and gaps in patients with Crohn's disease compared with controls. We also determined the density of epithelial gaps in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease-interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10) mice, versus the background strain using rigid probe confocal endomicroscopy. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy of the terminal ileum of both patients with Crohn's disease and controls was performed by a single endoscopist during colonoscopy. In mice, sections of the small intestine were imaged using a rigid confocal probe. Gap density was defined as the number of epithelial gaps per 1000 cells counted. In this study, we examined 6 controls (2 male and 4 female; median age 59 y) and 8 patients with Crohn's disease (5 male and 3 female; median age 42 y). The mean gap densities (±standard error) observed for the 2 groups were 17.7±5.6 and 117±33 gaps per 1000 cells, respectively (P<0.01). For control and IL-10 mice, the gap densities were 10.5±2.2 and 17.8±1.4 gaps per 1000 cells, respectively (P<0.01). The epithelial gap density was significantly higher in patients with Crohn's disease than controls. Gap density was also elevated in the mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. Prevalence and clinical importance of mesenteric venous thrombosis in the Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violi, N Vietti; Vietti Violi, Naïk; Schoepfer, Alain M; Fournier, Nicolas; Guiu, Boris; Bize, Pierre; Denys, Alban

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) in the Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort Study and to correlate MVT with clinical outcome. Abdominal portal phase CT was used to examine patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Two experienced abdominal radiologists retrospectively analyzed the images, focusing on the superior and inferior mesenteric vein branches and looking for signs of acute or chronic thrombosis. The location of abnormalities was registered. The presence of MVT was correlated with IBD-related radiologic signs and complications. The cases of 160 patients with IBD (89 women, 71 men; Crohn disease [CD], 121 patients; ulcerative colitis [UC], 39 patients; median age at diagnosis, 27 years for patients with CD, 32 years for patients with UC) were analyzed. MVT was detected in 43 patients with IBD (26.8%). One of these patients had acute MVT; 38, chronic MVT; and four, both. The prevalence of MVT did not differ between CD (35/121 [28.9%]) and UC (8/39 [20.5%]) (p = 0.303). The location of thrombosis was different between CD and UC (CD, jejunal or ileal veins only [p = 0.005]; UC, rectocolic veins only [p = 0.001]). Almost all (41/43) cases of thrombosis were peripheral. MVT in CD patients was more frequently associated with bowel wall thickening (p = 0.013), mesenteric fat hypertrophy (p = 0.005), ascites (p = 0.002), and mesenteric lymph node enlargement (p = 0.036) and was associated with higher rate of bowel stenosis (p < 0.001) and more intestinal IBD-related surgery (p = 0.016) in the outcome. Statistical analyses for patients with UC were not relevant because of the limited population (n = 8). MVT is frequently found in patients with IBD. Among patients with CD, MVT is associated with bowel stenosis and CD-related intestinal surgery.

  19. Cigarette smoking and quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. South Limburg IBD Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russel, M G; Nieman, F H; Bergers, J M; Stockbrügger, R W

    1996-11-01

    Smoking has been reported as influencing disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of our study was to elucidate the relationship between smoking and aspects of disease-specific quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease. Cross-sectional study. In 1105 prevalent patients with inflammatory bowel disease, diagnosed according to the criteria of Lennard-Jones and Truelove and Witts, disease-specific quality of life was investigated using the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ). In Crohn's disease, smoking females reported a lower quality of life than non-smoking females (all four dimensions of the IBDQ). Using an explanatory model of relationships between the four dimensions for the analysis, it became evident that smoking is associated with more bowel symptoms in young Crohn's disease females, with more emotional dysfunction in all Crohn's disease females, and with more systemic symptoms in all three diagnostic groups with marked bowel symptoms. Moderately smoking male ulcerative colitis patients reported fewer bowel complaints compared with non-smoking male ulcerative colitis patients. There is a relationship between smoking and disease-specific quality of life in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The hypothesis is presented that a part of the observed differences in the studied quality of life dimensions with respect to age, sex and disease group are related to concomitant oral contraceptive use.

  20. Wegener’s granulomatosis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease and presenting with chronic enteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahedi K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kamyar Shahedi,1,2 Ramy Magdy Hanna,1,2 Oleg Melamed,1,2 James Wilson2,31Department of Medicine Olive-View UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, CA, 2David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 3UCLA Medical Center-UCLA Stone Center, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Wegener’s granulomatosis, also known as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitis, is a small vessel vasculitis with primarily pulmonary, renal, and sinus disease manifestations. The prevalence of Wegener’s granulomatosis is three cases per 100,000 patients. Cardiovascular, neurologic, cutaneous, and joint manifestations have been reported in many case reports and case series. Gastrointestinal manifestations are less noted in Wegener’s granulomatosis, although they have been previously reported in the form of intestinal perforation and intestinal ischemia. Additionally, there are characteristic findings of vasculitis that are noted with active Wegener’s granulomatosis of the small bowel. We report a case of an elderly patient who presented with weight loss, diarrhea, and hematochezia. His symptoms were chronic and had lasted for more than 1 year before diagnosis. Inflammatory bowel disease or chronic enteritis due to Salmonella arizonae because of reptile exposure originally were suspected as etiologies of his presentation. The findings of proteinuria, renal failure, and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis on renal biopsy, in conjunction with an elevated c-ANCA titer, confirmed the diagnosis of Wegener’s granulomatosis with associated intestinal vasculitis. This case demonstrates an atypical presentation of chronic duodenitis and jejunitis secondary to Wegener’s granulomatosis, which mimicked inflammatory bowel disease.Keywords: ANCA-associated vasculitis, Wegener’s syndrome, pauci-immune glomerulonephritis, Salmonella arizonae, inflammatory bowel disease

  1. Computed tomography in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease - methodics of MSCT and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitterling, H.; Rock, C.; Reiser, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the diagnostic yield of multislice computed tomography (MSCT) in inflammatory bowel disease. Contrast media are administered intraluminally (colon, small intestine) and intravenously (triple contrast CT).Filling of small bowel is achieved by means of jejunal tube (''Sellink CT'') or via the oral route. Pharmacological relaxation of the intestine decreases motion artifact. Intraluminal contrast media consist of either hyperdense, ''positive'' or hypodense, ''negative'' liquids. Thin-slice MSCT of the entire abdomen allows high-quality post processing (MPR, thin-slice MIP). Due to superior distension, Sellink CT improves estimation of stenosis or changes in thickness and contrast of bowel wall.Positive contrast is superior in the detection and preoperative localization of abscess, fistula or conglomerate tumour, because it accurately differentiates between intra- and extraluminal structures.However, negative contrast facilitates quantitative evaluation of bowel wall thickening or enhancement and demonstrates gastrointestinal bleeding. MSCT of the small intestine is superior to conventional enteroclysis, especially in the diagnosis of mesenterial or other extraintestinal disease. As a side effect, the colon is assessed in the same examination. Radiation dose is less in MSCT (7.8-13.3 mSv) than in conventional fluoroscopy (13.99±7.57 mSv). MSCT can be performed as an alternative or adjunct to colonoscopy, if endoscopic access is restricted. It is already the imaging modality of choice in acute diverticulitis. (orig.) [de

  2. Role of wireless capsule endoscopy in the follow-up of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitselos, Ioannis V; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K; Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Tsianos, Epameinondas V

    2015-06-10

    The introduction of wireless capsule endoscopy in 2000 has revolutionized our ability to visualize parts of the small bowel mucosa classically unreached by the conventional endoscope, and since the recent introduction of colon capsule endoscopy, a promising alternative method has been available for the evaluation of large bowel mucosa. The advantages of wireless capsule endoscopy include its non-invasive character and its ability to visualize proximal and distal parts of the intestine, while important disadvantages include the procedure's inability of tissue sampling and significant incompletion rate. Its greatest limitation is the prohibited use in cases of known or suspected stenosis of the intestinal lumen due to high risk of retention. Wireless capsule endoscopy plays an important role in the early recognition of recurrence, on Crohn's disease patients who have undergone ileocolonic resection for the treatment of Crohn's disease complications, and in patients' management and therapeutic strategy planning, before obvious clinical and laboratory relapse. Although capsule endoscopy cannot replace traditional endoscopy, it offers valuable information on the evaluation of intestinal disease and has a significant impact on disease reclassification of patients with a previous diagnosis of ulcerative colitis or inflammatory bowel disease unclassified/indeterminate colitis. Moreover, it may serve as an effective alternative where colonoscopy is contraindicated and in cases with incomplete colonoscopy studies. The use of patency capsule maximizes safety and is advocated in cases of suspected small or large bowel stenosis.

  3. Risk factors for gallstones and kidney stones in a cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagagnini, Stefania; Heinrich, Henriette; Rossel, Jean-Benoît; Biedermann, Luc; Frei, Pascal; Zeitz, Jonas; Spalinger, Marianne; Battegay, Edouard; Zimmerli, Lukas; Vavricka, Stephan R; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael; Misselwitz, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Gallstones and kidney stones are known complications of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Risk factors have been insufficiently studied and explanatory studies date back up to 30 years. It remains unclear, whether improved treatment options also influenced risk factors for these complications. Identifying risk factors for gallstones and kidney stones in IBD patients. Using data from the Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort Study we assessed associations of diseases characteristics with gallstones and kidney stones in univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Out of 2323 IBD patients, 104 (7.8%) Crohn's disease (CD) and 38 (3.8%) ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were diagnosed with gallstones. Significant risk factors for gallstones were diagnosis of CD, age at diagnosis, disease activity and duration, NSAID intake, extra-intestinal manifestations and intestinal surgery. Kidney stones were described in 61 (4.6%) CD and 30 (3.0%) UC patients. Male gender, disease activity, intestinal surgery, NSAID usage and reduced physical activity were significant risk factors. Hospitalization was associated with gallstones and kidney stones. The presence of gallstones increased the risk for kidney stones (OR 4.87, p<0.001). The diagnosis of CD, intestinal surgery, prolonged NSAID use, disease activity and duration and bowel stenosis were significantly associated with cholecystonephrolithiasis in IBD.

  4. Physiological basis for novel drug therapies used to treat the inflammatory bowel diseases I. Pathophysiological basis and prospects for probiotic therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    Mechanisms underlying the conditioning influence of the intestinal flora on mucosal homeostasis, including development and function of immune responses, are attracting increasing scientific scrutiny. The intestinal flora is a positive asset to host defense, but some of its components may, in genetically susceptible hosts, become a risk factor for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It follows that strategies to enhance assets or offset microbial liabilities represent a therapeutic option; therein lies the rationale for manipulation of the flora in IBD. In addition, the diversity of regulatory signalling among the flora and host epithelum, lymphoid tissue, and neuromuscular apparatus is an untapped reservoir from which novel therapeutics may be mined. Moreover, the capacity to engineer food-grade or commensal bacteria to deliver therapeutic molecules to the intestinal mucosa promises to extend the scope of microbial manipulation for the benefit of mankind.

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease: a model of chronic inflammation-induced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang-Yu; Taboada, Sofia; Liao, Jie

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a well-recognized risk factor for the development of human cancer. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is a typical longstanding inflammatory disease of the colon with increased risk for the development of colorectal carcinoma. Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process may contribute to multistage progression of human cancer development, including the overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, overproduction/activation of key arachidonic acid metabolites and cytokines/growth factors, and immunity system dysfunction. Multiple animal models of IBD have been established, and in general, these models can be mainly categorized into chemically induced, genetically engineered (transgenic or gene knock-out), spontaneous, and adoptive transferring animal models. This chapter mainly focuses on (1) epidemiologic and molecular evidence on IBD and risk of colorectal cancer, (2) molecular pathogenesis of IBD-induced carcinogenesis, and (3) modeling of IBD-induced carcinogenesis in rodents and its application.

  6. [Pathophysiological-based diagnosis and therapy of iron-deficient anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J M; Hartmann, F; Cordes, H-J; Dignass, A U

    2009-02-01

    Anaemia is the most frequent extraenteric complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). A disabling complication of IBD, anaemia worsens the patient's general condition and quality of life, and increases hospitalization rates. The main types of anemia in IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. The combination of the serum transferrin receptor with ferritin concentrations and inflammatory markers allows a reliable assessment of the iron status. Iron deficiency is usually treated with oral iron supplements. However, it is less effective in IBD and may lead to an increased inflammatory activity through the generation of reactive oxygen species. A systematic review of anemia in IBD, its pathogenetic features, epidemiology, diagnosis and therapy based on the evidence from recent studies will be the focus of this article.

  7. How Patients View Probiotics: Findings from a Multicenter Study of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, MaryBeth; Brinich, Margaret A.; Geller, Gail; Harrison, Krista; Highland, Janelle; James, Katherine; Marshall, Patricia; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Tilburt, Jon; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Farrell, Ruth M.; Sharp, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have access to a growing number of probiotic products marketed to improve digestive health. It is unclear how patients make decisions about probiotics and what role they expect their gastroenterologists to play as they consider using probiotics. Understanding patients’ knowledge, attitudes and expectations of probiotics may help gastroenterologists engage patients in collaborative discussions about probiotics. Study Focus groups were conducted with patients with IBD and IBS at the Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins University. Inductive analytic methods were utilized to identify common themes and draw interpretations from focus group narratives. Results One hundred thirty-six patients participated in 22 focus groups between March and August 2009. Patients viewed probiotics as an appealing alternative to pharmaceutical drugs and understood probiotics as a more “natural,” low-risk therapeutic option. Many patients were hesitant to use them without consulting their gastroenterologists. Patients would weigh the risks and benefits of probiotics, their disease severity and satisfaction with current treatments when considering probiotic use. Conclusions Patients are interested in probiotics but have many unanswered questions about their use. Our findings suggest that patients with IBD and IBS will look to gastroenterologists and other clinicians as trustworthy advisors regarding the utility of probiotics as an alternative or supplement to pharmaceutical drugs. Gastroenterologists and other clinicians who care for patients with these diseases should be prepared to discuss the potential benefits and risks of probiotics and assist patients in making informed decisions about their use. PMID:21716123

  8. The role of SP-D in human colonic inflammatory bowel disease and in murine DSS induced colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexøe, Anders Bathum; Pilecki, Bartosz; Leicht von Huth, Sebastian

    Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is expressed in the intestinal epithelium and is essential for innate host defence and regulation of inflammatory responses. Genetic variations of SP-D are associated with clinical...

  9. Clinicians’ Guide to the Use of Fecal Calprotectin to Identify and Monitor Disease Activity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Bressler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Objective monitoring of the severity of inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an essential part of disease management. However, repeat endoscopy to define extent and severity of inflammation is not practical. Fecal calprotectin (FC is a biomarker that can be used as a surrogate test to distinguish inflammatory from noninflammatory gastrointestinal disease.

  10. Comparison of three commercial fecal calprotectin ELISA test kits used in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Bachmann Holmetoft, Ulla; Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fecal calprotectin is a noninvasive marker of intestinal inflammation used to distinguish between functional and organic bowel diseases and to evaluate disease activity among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The goal of this study was to compare three different ELISA tests...... and 18 to 67 years, respectively. Disease activity in the patients was established using the following clinical activity indices: the Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index (SCCAI), the Harvey Bradshaw Index (HBI) and the Modified Pouchitis Disease Activity Index (MPDAI). Three ELISA calprotectin tests...... (EK-CAL, CALPRO and HK325) were performed on fecal specimens and results compared. RESULTS: The CALPRO calprotectin ELISA test was shown to have the best specificity of 96% compared to the HK325 and the EK-CAL calprotectin ELISA tests with 28% specificity and 74% specificity, respectively...

  11. Survival in Danish patients with breast cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: A nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Pedersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Background: Incidences of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and of breast cancer have increased over the last decades. The influence of IBD on breast cancer prognosis, however, is unknown. We therefore examined the impact of IBD on treatment receipt and survival in breast cancer patients...... without IBD. In contrast, breast cancer patients with CD are treated with radiotherapy less often. Survival of breast cancer in patients with CD treated with chemotherapy is poorer compared to survival in patients without IBD.(Inflamm Bowel Dis 2007). Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec-10.......Methods: Information on breast cancer patients (stage and treatment) diagnosed between 1980 and 2004 was sourced from the Danish Cancer Registry. Data on IBD and potential confounders were extracted from the Danish National Registry of Patients covering all Danish hospitals. Cox regression was used to compute...

  12. Crosstalk between the intestinal microbiota and the innate immune system in intestinal homeostasis and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupaul-Chicoine, Jeremy; Dagenais, Maryse; Saleh, Maya

    2013-09-01

    : Inflammatory bowel diseases are a set of complex and chronic disorders that arise in genetically predisposed individuals due to a lack of tolerance to the gut microflora. Although the intestinal microbiota is required for the proper development of the host and the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, its dysbiosis is associated with inflammatory bowel diseases pathogenesis. In this review, we focus the discussion on the crosstalk between the innate immune system and the microbiota. We examine new findings from genetic and functional studies investigating the critical role of the intestinal epithelial cell layer and the processes that maintain its integrity in health and disease. We further explore the mechanisms of the mucosal innate immune system including dendritic cells, macrophages, and innate-like lymphocytes in mediating immunological tolerance at the steady state or pathogenic inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. Application of 5-Aminosalicylic Acid Preparations in the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Stepanov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the comparative characterization of different derivatives of 5-aminosalicylic acid. Researches of the past decades have changed the presentation of the potential use of aminosalicylates in the therapy of various inflammatory bowel diseases. In connection with unknown etiology of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, there is no causal treatment of these diseases. The essence of treatment is reduced to inhibition of inflammatory activity during exacerbations and a course of preventive treatment. Numerous studies over the past 20 years have shown that the basis of basic treatment for nonspecific chronic inflammatory bowel diseases is 5-aminosalicylic acid drugs, or salicylates. When choosing the dosage form, you should take into account the differences between mesalazine preparations depending on the type of the coat. It is shown that in terms of pharmacokinetics, the most effective mesalazine dosage forms for the treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease with lesions of the colon are enteric coated tablets that provides a pH-dependent gradual release of 5-aminosalicylic acid throughout the entire colon. 5-aminosalicylic acid drugs available today on the pharmaceutical market are able to control the course of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease with lesions of the colon in the majority of patients. The use of 5-aminosalicylic acid preparations is not limited to the treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. The drug is widely used in other diseases of the bowel, such as diverticular disease of the colon, colitis banal, radiation damages of the colon, as well as to treat common diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome. The study, which was conducted in the department bowel disease of the State Institution «Institute of Gastroenterology» for 2 years, showed a positive effect of 20-day treatment with Mesacol in uncomplicated diverticular disease. The use of Mesacol at a dose of 1,600 mg

  14. Microbial Sensing by the Intestinal Epithelium in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Scharl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have raised evidence that the intestinal microbiota plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowels diseases. This evidence comes from several observations. First, animals raised under germ-free conditions do not develop intestinal inflammation in several different model systems. Second, antibiotics are able to modulate the course of experimental colitis. Third, genetic polymorphisms in a variety of genes of the innate immune system have been associated with chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases. Dysfunction of these molecules results in an inappropriate response to bacterial and antigenic stimulation of the innate immune system in the gastrointestinal tract. Variants of pattern recognition receptors such as NOD2 or TLRs by which commensal and pathogenic bacteria can be detected have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. But not only pathways of microbial detection but also intracellular ways of bacterial processing such as autophagosome function are associated with the risk to develop Crohn's disease. Thus, the “environment concept” and the “genetic concept” of inflammatory bowel disease pathophysiology are converging via the intestinal microbiota and the recognition mechanisms for an invasion of members of the microbiota into the mucosa.

  15. A clinical review of recent findings in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponder A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alexis Ponder, Millie D LongDepartment of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, including both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are disorders of chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract marked by episodes of relapse and remission. Over the past several decades, advances have been made in understanding the epidemiology of IBD. The incidence and prevalence of both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis have been increasing worldwide across pediatric and adult populations. As IBD is thought to be related to a combination of individual genetic susceptibility, environmental triggers, and alterations in the gut microbiome that stimulate an inflammatory response, understanding the potentially modifiable environmental risk factors associated with the development or the course of IBD could impact disease rates or management in the future. Current hypotheses as to the development of IBD are reviewed, as are a host of environmental cofactors that have been investigated as both protective and inciting factors for IBD onset. Such environmental factors include breast feeding, gastrointestinal infections, urban versus rural lifestyle, medication exposures, stress, smoking, and diet. The role of these factors in disease course is also reviewed. Looking forward, there is still much to be learned about the etiology of IBD and how specific environmental exposures intimately impact the development of disease and also the potential for relapse.Keywords: clinical epidemiology, inflammatory bowel disease, environmental risk factors

  16. Review article: the role of oxidative stress in pathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechota-Polanczyk, Aleksandra; Fichna, Jakub

    2014-07-01

    In this review, we focus on the role of oxidative stress in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and colitis-associated colorectal cancer and discuss free radicals and free radical-stimulated pathways as pharmacological targets for anti-IBD drugs. We also suggest novel anti-oxidative agents, which may become effective and less-toxic alternatives in IBD and colitis-associated colorectal cancer treatment. A Medline search was performed to identify relevant bibliography using search terms including: 'free radicals,' 'antioxidants,' 'oxidative stress,' 'colon cancer,' 'ulcerative colitis,' 'Crohn's disease,' 'inflammatory bowel disease.' Several therapeutics commonly used in IBD treatment, among which are immunosuppressants, corticosteroids and anti-TNF-α antibodies, could also affect the IBD progression by interfering with cellular oxidative stress and cytokine production. Experimental data shows that these drugs may effectively scavenge free radicals, increase anti-oxidative capacity of cells, influence multiple signalling pathways, e.g. MAPK and NF-kB, and inhibit pro-oxidative enzyme and cytokine concentration. However, their anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effectiveness still needs further investigation. A highly specific antioxidative activity may be important for the clinical treatment and relapse of IBD. In the future, a combination of currently used pharmaceutics, together with natural and synthetic anti-oxidative compounds, like lipoic acid or curcumine, could be taken into account in the design of novel anti-IBD therapies.

  17. ORAL MUCOSA LESIONS AND ORAL SYMPTOMS IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno LARANJEIRA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease is known for its extra intestinal manifestations, the oral cavity is no exception. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and oral mucosa lesions and symptoms, and complementary to evaluate their possible relation with oral hygiene, smoking habits, drug therapy, duration and activity of the disease. Methods Patients were selected from the Gastroenterology Clinic of a Portuguese tertiary referral hospital. This sample consisted of 113 patients previously diagnosed with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease along with a control group of 58 healthy individuals that were accompanying the study group patients to their appointments. Clinical interviews and clinical examinations were performed for data collection. Results The patients in the study group were more affected by oral symptoms (P=0.011, and showed a trend towards a higher incidence of oral mucosal lesions, even though statistical significance was not reached (8.8% versus 3.4% in the control group; P=0.159. Patients in active phase were the most affected. No differences were detected between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, or concerning smoking habits. The corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy seemed to increase the incidence of oral symptoms (P=0.052. The oral mucosa lesions increased and the oral symptoms decreased over the course of the disease, however without statistical significance. Conclusion Oral mucosa’s lesions and oral symptoms were positively associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, mainly during disease activity periods and conceivably, associated with corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy.

  18. Impotence after mesorectal and close rectal dissection for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, I; George, B D; Kettlewell, M G; Mortensen, N J

    2001-06-01

    Close rectal dissection is a surgical technique used by some surgeons in inflammatory bowel disease. It is performed within the mesorectum, close to the rectal muscle wall, with the aim of minimizing damage to the pelvic sexual nerves. Other surgeons dissect in the more anatomical mesorectal plane. Our aim was to determine whether close rectal dissection is more protective of the pelvic sexual nerves than mesorectal dissection. Patients undergoing surgery for inflammatory bowel disease were entered prospectively into a database. Male patients were mailed a standardized, validated, urologic impotence questionnaire: the International Index of Erectile Function. There was an 81 percent response rate. Six of 156 assessable patients were totally impotent (3.8 percent). They were all in the 50-year-old to 70-year-old age group, with no impotence in patients younger than 50 years old. Twenty-one patients complained of minor diminution of erectile function (13.5 percent), where sexual activity was still possible. There was no statistical difference in the rate of complete (2.2 percent vs. 4.5 percent, P = 0.67) or partial (13.5 percent vs. 13.3 percent, P = 0.99) impotence between close rectal and mesorectal dissection (Fisher's exact test). There were no ejaculatory difficulties. The time elapsed since surgery ranged from 2.7 months to 192.7 months, with a median of 74.5 months. Rectal excision for inflammatory bowel disease can be conducted with low rates of impotence. Minor degrees of erectile dysfunction may be more common than currently recognized. We could not demonstrate that close rectal dissection significantly protects the patient from impotence compared with operating in the anatomical mesorectal plane. Age appears to be the most important risk factor for postoperative impotence.

  19. Oral Cancer and Oral Precancerous Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Roda, Giulia; Brygo, Alexandre; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Other risk factors include age over 40, male sex, several dietary factors, nutritional deficiencies, viruses, sexually transmitted infections, human papillomavirus, chronic irritation, and possibly genetic predisposition. Precancerous lesions in the oral cavity include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and lichen planus. Histology of oral cancer varies widely but the great majority are squamous cell carcinomas.Epidemiological studies and cancer registries have shown a consistently increased risk of oral malignancies in kidney, bone marrow, heart, or liver transplantation, in graft vs host disease, and in patients with HIV infection. Because of the increasing use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, it is useful to more accurately delineate the consequences of chronic immunosuppression to the oral cavity. Oral cancer and precancerous oral lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] have been scarcely reported and reviews on the topic are lacking.We conducted a literature search using the terms and variants of all cancerous and precancerous oral manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases. By retrieving the existing literature, it is evident that patients with IBD belong to the high-risk group of developing these lesions, a phenomenon amplified by the increasing HPV prevalence. Education on modifiable risk behaviours in patients with oral cancer is the cornerstone of prevention.Oral screening should be performed for all IBD patients, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or biological drug. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Use of azathioprine and the risk of cancer in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Björn; Svanström, Henrik; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Jess, Tine; Hviid, Anders

    2013-06-01

    Increased risks of lymphoma and skin cancer associated with thiopurine use among patients with inflammatory bowel disease have been shown, but data on the overall cancer risk are limited. We conducted a historical cohort study of 45,986 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (of whom, 5,197 (11%) used azathioprine) in Denmark from 1997 to 2008. We linked registry data on filled drug prescriptions, cancer diagnoses, and covariates and compared rates of overall incident cancer and cancer subgroups between users and nonusers of azathioprine, adjusting for propensity scores. During a median 7.9 (interquartile range: 3.5-12.0) person-years of follow-up, 2,596 incident cases of cancer were detected. Azathioprine use was associated with an increased risk of overall cancer (rate ratio = 1.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.15, 1.74), whereas former use of azathioprine (rate ratio = 1.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.83, 1.25) or increasing cumulative received doses (increase in rate ratio per 365 additional defined daily doses = 1.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.89, 1.27) were not. In subgroup analyses, azathioprine use was associated with increased risk of lymphoid tissue cancer (rate ratio = 2.40, 95% confidence interval: 1.13, 5.11) and urinary tract cancer (rate ratio = 2.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.24, 6.51). In conclusion, azathioprine use was associated with an increased risk of overall cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, although these data cannot establish causality.

  1. Radio localization of inflammatory bowel diseases using 99mtc-colloidal bismuth subcitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, G.; Miranda, M.; Sanchez, I.; Oliva, J.; Velasco, M.; Paniagua, M.; Pinol, F.; Riano, A.; Paneque, A.; Castillo, J.; Leyvad, R.

    2006-01-01

    A correct diagnosis and adequate assessment of disease activity is crucial in the management and surveillance of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). However, in certain occasions the obtained results by means of traditional techniques are not correlated specifically with the inflammatory state of the mucosal wall, mainly in case of the small bowel, due to its no accessibility. This investigation constituted a multi centric clinical trial phase I-II. Forty-four patients were prospectively evaluated with the objective of determining the validity of the scintigraphy with 99mTc-Sn-CBS for the diagnosis of illnesses with ulcerations of the intestinal tube. Of the evaluated patients, 20 presented Cohns Disease (in 1 of them the scintigraphy was not useful), Idiopathic Ulcerative Colitis, 3 gastric ulcer and 20 patients were seemingly healthy, conforming these last ones the group control. Five hundred mgs of CBS were labelled with 370 MBq (10 mCi) of 99mTc and administered by oral via as unique dose. The diagnostic test had duration of three days for each patient: first day for the patient's preparation with soft diet and 20% mannitol and two days for the image registrations. The images were carried out at 2, 4, 6 and 24 hours post administered the product. All procedures were performed by experienced examiners, who were blinded to the clinical data and other results. It was determined the sensibility and specificity of this technique taking like reference test, the colonoscopy, gastroduodenoscopy, intestinal transit and/or biopsy, achieving a sensibility of 91,3% and a specificity of 90%. During the whole study an adverse event appeared, which had not very probable causation according to the scale of Karch and Lasagna. It can be concluded that the diagnostic criteria established in this study can be useful for the evaluation of inflammatory bowel diseases by scintigraphy with 99mTc-Sn-CBS. (Author)

  2. Rapid Infliximab Infusion in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Multicenter North American Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Matary, Wael; Dykes, Dana M H; Bauman, Laura; Elkadri, Abdul; Carroll, Matthew W; Izaguirre, Marisa R; deBruyn, Jennifer; Samson, Charles M; Crim, Alisa Muniz; Ali, Sabina; Grossman, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    Infliximab (IFX) infusion may lead to development of anti-IFX antibodies, and subsequent infusion reactions (IRs). The safety of rapid IFX infusion administered over 60 minutes has been under-investigated in children with inflammatory bowel disease. In a multicenter study, the frequency and nature of rapid infusion-associated IRs were examined. The medical records of all consecutive children with inflammatory bowel disease receiving rapid IFX infusions between January 2014 and December 2016 were reviewed. Poisson regression analysis was used to identify possible associated factors with IRs. A total of 4120 rapid infusions for 453 children (median age 16 yrs [interquartile range 13.8-17.8], 289 males, 374 with Crohn's disease) were included. One hundred thirty-five participants (29.8%) received rapid IFX infusion for induction and maintenance while the rest received rapid IFX infusion after a median of 5 (interquartile range 4-9) standard infusions. The median dose of IFX using rapid protocol was 8 mg/kg/infusion (interquartile range 6-10). Two hundred sixty-seven (59%) patients received 1 or more premedications and 161 (35.5%) participants received concomitant immunosuppression. Twenty-one participants (4.6%) had IRs with rapid infusions and 2 participants discontinued IFX because of IRs (0.4%). Antihistamine premedications were associated with less frequent IR (adjusted relative risk = 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.64; P = 0.002). In children with inflammatory bowel disease, rapid IFX infusion administered over 60 minutes is safe and well-tolerated. Antihistamine premedications may reduce frequency of IRs (see Video Abstract, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/IBD/B632).

  3. Review article: the gut microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease-avenues for microbial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, J; Ianiro, G; Mukhopadhya, I; Hansen, R; Hold, G L

    2018-01-01

    The concept of an altered collective gut microbiota rather than identification of a single culprit is possibly the most significant development in inflammatory bowel disease research. We have entered the "omics" era, which now allows us to undertake large-scale/high-throughput microbiota analysis which may well define how we approach diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the future, with a strong steer towards personalised therapeutics. To assess current epidemiological, experimental and clinical evidence of the current status of knowledge relating to the gut microbiome, and its role in IBD, with emphasis on reviewing the evidence relating to microbial therapeutics and future microbiome modulating therapeutics. A Medline search including items 'intestinal microbiota/microbiome', 'inflammatory bowel disease', 'ulcerative colitis', 'Crohn's disease', 'faecal microbial transplantation', 'dietary manipulation' was performed. Disease remission and relapse are associated with microbial changes in both mucosal and luminal samples. In particular, a loss of species richness in Crohn's disease has been widely observed. Existing therapeutic approaches broadly fall into 3 categories, namely: accession, reduction or indirect modulation of the microbiome. In terms of microbial therapeutics, faecal microbial transplantation appears to hold the most promise; however, differences in study design/methodology mean it is currently challenging to elegantly translate results into clinical practice. Existing approaches to modulate the gut microbiome are relatively unrefined. Looking forward, the future of microbiome-modulating therapeutics looks bright with several novel strategies/technologies on the horizon. Taken collectively, it is clear that ignoring the microbiome in IBD is not an option. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Intestinal permeability to 99mTc-diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casellas, F.; Aguade, S.; Soriano, B.; Accarino, A.; Molero, J.; Guarner, L.

    1986-01-01

    Intestinal permeability in inflammatory bowel disease and its relation to periods of disease activity has been investigated by measuring the urinary excretion of DTPA labeled with 99mTc. Urine excretion in 10 control subjects was 2.7 +/- 1% of the test dose. Twelve patients with ulcerative colitis excreted 5.08 +/- 1.6% in remission, 10.61 +/- 2% during periods of mild activity, 19.41 +/- 0.9% during moderate activity, and 15.41 +/- 6.3% with severe activity. Sixteen patients with Crohn's disease excreted 5.7 +/- 1.9% in remission, 8.47 +/- 2.8% during mild activity of the disease, and 14.29 +/- 5.8% during moderate activity. No differences were observed between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, or between ileal and colonic forms of Crohn's disease. Excretion in remission was significantly greater than in control subjects and there was a correlation between excretion and disease activity. In serial determinations done in seven patients we found that urine excretion of the test substance correlated with disease activity. We also studied DTPA excretion in 10 cases with gastric or duodenal ulcer (2.28 +/- 1.4%), six cases of acute gastroenteritis (4.87 +/- 3.1%) and nine cases with other intestinal diseases (3.6 +/- 1.1%). In all these cases, DTPA excretion was lower than in inflammatory bowel disease. Our results show that the urinary excretion of DTPA is a simple test that measures accurately the degree of activity of inflammatory bowel disease. The test is useful in Crohn's disease as well as in ulcerative colitis, and detects intestinal permeability abnormalities even in clinical remission. Significantly lower excretions are found in other intestinal diseases. The test may be recommended as a screening test for use in clinical practice

  5. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke during active stages of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, S. L.; Lindhardsen, J.; Ahlehoff, O.

    2014-01-01

    patients with new-onset IBD and 236 275 age- and sex-matched controls. Poisson regression analyses with continuously updated covariates were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of AF and stroke. Disease activity stages of flare (new disease activity), persistent activity, and remission were...... defined by corticosteroid prescriptions, IBD hospital admissions, and biological treatment. Inflammatory bowel disease patients had a mean age of 43.9 years, 53.9 were women, and mean follow-up was 6.8 years. Among IBD patients, 685 had AF and 549 had a stroke, corresponding to incidence rates per 1000...

  6. Low Risk of Unemployment, Sick Leave, and Work Disability Among Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Marianne K; Prosberg, Michelle V; Vind, Ida

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the occurrence and risk of unemployment (UE), sick leave (SL), and work disability (WD) in incident patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after 7 years of follow-up compared with the background population and to determine outcome predictors. METHODS: The study...... than 55 years. The rate of WD in CD (5.8%) was markedly lowered compared with previous studies. Within the IBD population, sex, educational level, disease behavior, smoking status, and surgery were predictors of UE, SL, and WD. CONCLUSIONS: The observed increased risk of SL and WD in patients with IBD...

  7. Efficacy of risedronate in a post-menopausal woman affected by osteoporosis and inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Palomba

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Post-menopausal osteoporosis is a skeletal disease that can be asymptomatic and is sometimes underdiagnosed and undertreated. Post-menopausal osteoporosis can be associated with fractures and consequent impaired quality of life and increase of health care costs. Bisphosphonates are a therapeutic choice, because they proved to be effective in preventing bone loss. The current case report shows the efficacy of six-month risedronate administration in a post-menopausal woman affected by osteoporosis and inflammatory bowel disease in reducing biochemical bone turnover markers and increasing bone mineral density.

  8. Ferrokinetic Parameters and Regulation of Iron Metabolism in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Y. Boiko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Article presents parameters of iron metabolism and cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (CIBD. The material for the study was the blood of 69 patients with CIBD and anemia and 26 — without anemia. We have studied the features of main ferrokinetic parameters — iron, total iron-binding capacity of serum, transferrin saturation, ferritin, transferrin receptor, erythropoietin, hepcidin depending on hemoglobin level and the type of anemia. The relationship of iron metabolism disorders with the level of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α is shown.

  9. Guillain-Barré syndrome, tuberculosis and inflammatory bowel disease: a multiple association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Torre Ricardo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS has been associated with both infective or non-infective aetiologies. GBS is usually preceded by acute respiratory or gastrointestinal infection but its association with tuberculosis has been exceptionally reported. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is associated with clinical manifestations involving the neurological system, peripheral neuropathy is known to be related to IBD and, either demyelinating or axonal involvement of peripheral nerves have been described. We report an unusual case of GBS associated with lymph node tuberculosis and ulcerative colitis.

  10. Laparoscopic colonic resection in inflammatory bowel disease: minimal surgery, minimal access and minimal hospital stay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2008-11-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is technically demanding but can offer improved short-term outcomes. The introduction of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) as the default operative approach for IBD, however, may have inherent learning curve-associated disadvantages. We hypothesise that the establishment of MIS as the standard operative approach does not increase patient morbidity as assessed in the initial period of its introduction into a specialised unit, and that it confers earlier postoperative gastrointestinal recovery and reduced hospitalisation compared with conventional open resection.

  11. Optimizing the Care and Health of Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Nee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD including both ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is increasing worldwide. Although diagnosis is equally found in men and women, the chronicity of IBD poses a unique impact on the milestones of a woman’s life. As the gastroenterologist becomes increasingly important in the health maintenance of patients with IBD, this review stresses the unique gender issues in women with IBD related to menstruation, cervical cancer, sexual health, contraception, and menopause that may affect the course of disease, treatment decisions, and quality of life.

  12. The role of antibiotic and probiotic therapies in current and future management of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewaschuk, Julia B; Tejpar, Qassim Z; Soo, Isaac; Madsen, Karen; Fedorak, Richard N

    2006-12-01

    Abundant evidence indicates that the intestinal microflora have a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The composition of the gut microflora is altered in IBD patients with increased "pathogenic" bacteria and decreased bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. In light of this dysbiosis, various methods have been examined to alter the composition of the intestinal microflora, including the administration of antibiotics and introduction of probiotic species. This article summarizes studies evaluating the efficacy of antibiotics and probiotics in the induction and maintenance of remission of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, and pouchitis.

  13. Chronic Colitis in Biopsy Samples: Is It Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Something Else?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young Karen; Appelman, Henry D

    2017-12-01

    Chronic colitis, regardless of type, is defined histologically by chronic inflammation, mainly plasmacytosis, in the lamina propria. Specific diagnosis of chronic colitides in biopsies can be challenging for practicing pathologists. This article focuses on discussing specific histologic features in biopsies of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including ulcerative colitis, Crohn colitis, and colitis of indeterminate type. It also offers suggestions as to how to separate the IBDs from other chronic colitides, such as lymphocytic colitis, collagenous colitis, diverticular disease-associated colitis, diversion colitis, and chronic colitides that are due to drugs. Normal histology in colon biopsies is also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of Imaging Techniques in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases That Minimize Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitelli, Fortunata; Casciani, Emanuele; Maccioni, Francesca; Oliva, Salvatore; Al Ansari, Naiwa; Bonocore, Valeria; Cucchiara, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    The use of imaging in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has grown exponentially in the last few years. This has raised concerns about the risk of high cumulative level of radiation exposure from medical imaging in IBD patients during their lifetime, especially when the disease begins in pediatric age. Physicians caring for IBD children should be aware of the malignant potential of ionizing radiation and of the availability of alternative radiation-free techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US), in order to use them whenever possible. This review will focus on the value of US and MRI in pediatric IBD.

  15. Nutritional status of children with inflammatory bowel disease in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mouzan, Mohammad Issa; Al Edreesi, Mohammed Hadi; Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman Abdullah; Saadah, Omar Ibrahim; Al Qourain, Abdulaziz Abdullatif; Al Mofarreh, Mohammad Abdullah; Al Saleem, Khalid Abdulrahman

    2016-02-07

    To assess the prevalence of nutritional disorders in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Saudi Arabia. The data from a national cohort of children newly diagnosed with IBD between 2003 and 2012 were analyzed. The diagnosis of IBD and the differentiation between Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) were confirmed by gastroenterologists according to the standard criteria. The body mass index (BMI) of each child [weight (kg)/height(2) (m)] was calculated at the time of diagnosis. The World Health Organization standards and references were used and the BMI for age > +1 and nutritional status between children underweight. Awareness of this finding is important for patient care.

  16. Secretion imbalance between tumour necrosis factor and its inhibitor in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, M; Hiwatashi, N; Liu, Z; Toyota, T

    1998-01-01

    Background—Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α and TNF-β are soluble ligands binding to TNF receptors with similar activities; soluble TNF receptors neutralise TNF activity by acting as inhibitors. Little is known about the cytokine/soluble receptor role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). 
Aims—To test the hypothesis that an imbalance in secretion between TNF and TNF inhibitors plays a role in gut inflammation in patients with IBD. 
Methods—The secretion of TNF-α, TNF-β, and...

  17. Epidemiological studies of migration and environmental risk factors in the inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yanna; Butcher, Rhys; Leong, Rupert W

    2014-02-07

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are idiopathic chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract well known to be associated with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Permissive genotypes may manifest into clinical phenotypes under certain environmental influences and these may be best studied from migratory studies. Exploring differences between first and second generation migrants may further highlight the contribution of environmental factors towards the development of IBD. There are few opportunities that have been offered so far. We aim to review the available migration studies on IBD, evaluate the known environmental factors associated with IBD, and explore modern migration patterns to identify new opportunities and candidate migrant groups in IBD migration research.

  18. USE OF INFLIXIMAB IN THE CASE OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.E. Shchigoleva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Article is focused on the pressing issue, i.e. the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases. It reviews in detail the aspects of using monoclonal antibodies to the tumor necrosis factor in the case of Crohn’s disease and unspecific ulcerative colitis. The article describes the results of the authors’ observations and provides data obtained by foreign researchers.Key words: ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, treatment, Infliximab, antibodies to the tumor necrosis factor, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(1:55-61

  19. Food Bioactives and Their Effects on Obesity-Accelerated Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Yi-Siou; Lee, Pei-Sheng; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2018-01-31

    Current views support the concept that obesity is linked to a worsening of the course of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Gut microbiota and adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) are considered key mediators or contributors in obesity-associated intestinal inflammation. Dietary components can have direct or indirect effects on "normal" or "healthy" microbial composition and participate in adiposity and metabolic status with gut inflammation. In this perspective, we highlight food-derived bioactives that have a potential application in the prevention of obesity-exacerbated IBD, targeting energy metabolism, M1 (classical activated)-M2 (alternatively activated) macrophage polarization, and gut microbiota.

  20. Comparison of geographic distributions of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Inflammatory Bowel Disease fail to support common evolutionary roots: Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases are not related by evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Andrew; Xue, Xiaoqing

    2018-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) shares overlapping symptoms and some features of pathogenesis with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD: Crohn's disease [CD], and Ulcerative Colitis [UC]). Geographic markers such as latitude/sunshine and more recently lactase population distributions are found to be correlated with IBD. As a result of clinical and pathogenic similarities between the 2 conditions, some authorities questioned whether a connection exists between them. We compare IBS directly with IBD, and indirectly with geographic markers associated with IBD, in order to evaluate possible evolutionary links between IBS and IBD. Similar correlations may link IBS as a precursor to IBD and possibly other conditions which are geographically connected with IBD. Data from four systematic reviews on IBD incidence and prevalence, IBS prevalence, and lactase distributions were included. Pearson's correlations were used for comparisons, with IBD values log-transformed because of skewed distribution. The articles provided 18-28 complete set of national data. Direct comparison between IBS and IBD showed no significant correlations (r = -0.14, r = -0.06 for CD and UC prevalence, r = -0.10 for CD incidence). Indirect comparisons also failed to show correlations of IBS with lactase distributions (r = -0.17), sunshine (r = -0.2) or latitude (r = 0.097); however, there was significant correlation between lactase distributions and CD incidence (r = -0.84), prevalence (r = -0.55) and UC prevalence (r = -0.59). Both sunshine (r= -0.53) and latitude (r = 0.58) are also significantly related to CD incidence. It is concluded that IBS and IBD do not follow similar global geographic patterns. This suggests a lack of an evolutionary genetic background coincident with emergence of lactase persistence. As well, vitamin D has no obvious impact on development of IBS. Similarities with IBD may result from sub groups (not yet identified) within the current Rome

  1. Role of wireless capsule endoscopy in reclassifying inflammatory bowel disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouahed, Jodie; Shagrani, Mohammad; Sant'Anna, Ana

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the role of wireless capsule endoscopy in identifying small bowel lesions in pediatric patients with newly diagnosed colonic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) type unclassified (IBDU), and to assess whether capsule endoscopy findings result in altered patient management. Ten pediatric patients recently diagnosed with IBDU through standard investigations were recruited from the pediatric gastroenterology clinic at McMaster Children's Hospital to undergo capsule endoscopy using the Pillcam SB(TM) (Given Imaging) capsule. Findings consistent with a diagnosis of Crohn's disease required the identification of at least three ulcerations. Three out of ten patients had newly identified findings on capsule endoscopy that met criteria for Crohn's disease. Three more patients had findings suspicious for Crohn's disease, but failed to meet the diagnostic criteria. Three additional patients had findings most consistent with ulcerative colitis, and one had possible gastritis with a normal intestine. Findings from capsule endoscopy allowed for changes in the medical management of three patients. In all ten cases, capsule endoscopy allowed for a better characterization of the type and extent of disease. No adverse outcomes occurred in the present cohort. This prospective study reveals that wireless capsule endoscopy is feasible, valuable, and non-invasive, offering the ability to potentially better characterize newly diagnosed pediatric IBDU cases by identifying lesions in the small bowel and reclassifying these as Crohn's disease. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Diverting Ileostomy for the Treatment of Severe, Refractory, Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Elizabeth C; Dawany, Noor; Baldassano, Robert N; Mamula, Petar; Mattei, Peter; Albenberg, Lindsey; Kelsen, Judith R

    2017-09-01

    Diverting ileostomy is used as a temporizing therapy in patients with perianal Crohn disease; however, little data exist regarding its use for colonic disease. The primary aim of the present study was to determine the role of diversion in severe refractory colonic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a pediatric population. Retrospective study of patients who underwent diverting ileostomy at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from 2000 to 2014 for the management of severe, refractory colonic IBD. Clinical variables were compared in the 1 year before ileostomy and 1 year after diversion. Surgical and disease outcomes including changes in diagnosis were reviewed through 2015. Twenty-four patients underwent diverting ileostomy for refractory colonic disease. Initial diagnoses were Crohn disease in 10 (42%), ulcerative colitis in 1 (4%), and IBD-unclassified in 13 patients (54%). Comparing data before and after surgery, there were statistically significant improvements in height and weight velocities, height velocity z score, blood transfusion requirement, hemoglobin, and hospitalization rates. Chronic steroid use decreased from 71% to 22%. At the conclusion of the study, 10 patients had undergone subsequent colectomy, 7 had successful bowel reanastomosis, and 7 remain diverted. Seven patients (29%) had a change in diagnosis. There were 13 surgical complications in 7 subjects, including prolapse reduction, stoma revision, and resection of ischemic bowel. In pediatric patients with refractory colonic IBD, diverting ileostomy can be a successful intervention to induce clinical stability. Importantly, diversion is a steroid-sparing therapy and allows additional time to clarify the diagnosis.

  3. Curcumin and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Potential and Limits of Innovative Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Vecchi Brumatti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin belongs to the family of natural compounds collectively called curcuminoids and it possesses remarkable beneficial anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and neuroprotective properties. Moreover it is commonly assumed that curcumin has also been suggested as a remedy for digestive diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, a chronic immune disorder affecting the gastrointestinal tract and that can be divided in two major subgroups: Crohn’s disease (CD and Ulcerative Colitis (UC, depending mainly on the intestine tract affected by the inflammatory events. The chronic and intermittent nature of IBD imposes, where applicable, long-term treatments conducted in most of the cases combining different types of drugs. In more severe cases and where there has been no good response to the drugs, a surgery therapy is carried out. Currently, IBD-pharmacological treatments are generally not curative and often present serious side effects; for this reason, being known the relationship between nutrition and IBD, it is worthy of interesting the study and the development of new dietary strategy. The curcumin principal mechanism is the suppression of IBD inflammatory compounds (NF-κB modulating immune response. This review summarizes literature data of curcumin as anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant in IBD, trying to understand the different effects in CD e UC.

  4. Periodontal and inflammatory bowel diseases: Is there evidence of complex pathogenic interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira-Junior, Ronaldo; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo

    2016-09-21

    Periodontal disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are both chronic inflammatory diseases. Their pathogenesis is mediated by a complex interplay between a dysbiotic microbiota and the host immune-inflammatory response, and both are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. This review aimed to provide an overview of the evidence dealing with a possible pathogenic interaction between periodontal disease and IBD. There seems to be an increased prevalence of periodontal disease in patients with IBD when compared to healthy controls, probably due to changes in the oral microbiota and a higher inflammatory response. Moreover, the induction of periodontitis seems to result in gut dysbiosis and altered gut epithelial cell barrier function, which might contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD. Considering the complexity of both periodontal disease and IBD, it is very challenging to understand the possible pathways involved in their coexistence. In conclusion, this review points to a complex pathogenic interaction between periodontal disease and IBD, in which one disease might alter the composition of the microbiota and increase the inflammatory response related to the other. However, we still need more data derived from human studies to confirm results from murine models. Thus, mechanistic studies are definitely warranted to clarify this possible bidirectional association.

  5. Sleep and inflammatory bowel disease: exploring the relationship between sleep disturbances and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnucan, Jami A; Rubin, David T; Ali, Tauseef

    2013-11-01

    Sleep disturbances are associated with a greater risk of serious adverse health events, economic consequences, and, most importantly, increased all-cause mortality. Several studies support the associations among sleep, immune function, and inflammation. The relationship between sleep disturbances and inflammatory conditions is complex and not completely understood. Sleep deprivation can lead to increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and C-reactive protein, which can lead to further activation of the inflammatory cascade. The relevance of sleep in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, has recently received more attention. Several studies have shown that patients with both inactive and active IBD have self-reported sleep disturbances. Here, we present a concise review of sleep and its association with the immune system and the process of inflammation. We discuss the studies that have evaluated sleep in patients with IBD as well as possible treatment options for those patients with sleep disturbances. An algorithm for evaluating sleep disturbances in the IBD population is also proposed. Further research is still needed to better characterize sleep disturbances in the IBD population as well as to assess the effects of various therapeutic interventions to improve sleep quality. It is possible that the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disturbances in this population may provide an opportunity to alter disease outcomes.

  6. The Involvement of Immune Semaphorins in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBDs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahava Vadasz

    Full Text Available Immune semaphorins are a large family of proteins involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases through the regulation of immune homeostasis and tissue inflammation. We aim to assess the possible involvement of semaphorin3A (sema3A and 4A (sema4A in peripheral immune responses and bowel tissue inflammation of patients suffering from Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC.Twenty-seven CD patients and 10 UC patients were studied and compared to 10 patients followed for acute diverticulitis (disease control and 12 healthy individuals. All were evaluated for sema3A expression on T regulatory cells (Tregs, serum levels of sema3A and sema4A, and tissue expression of sema3A and sema4A in bowel biopsies.The percentage (% of T regulatory cells (Tregs expressing sema3A in patients with active CD (64.5% ± 14.49% and active UC (49.8% ± 16.45% was significantly lower when compared to that of healthy controls (88.7% ± 3.6%, p< 0.001 and p< 0.0001, respectively. This expression was seen to be in negative correlation with CD activity. Serum levels of Sema4A were significantly lower in patients with CD and UC when compared to that of controls (5.69 ± 1 .48 ng\\ml for CD, 5.26 ± 1.23 ng/ml for UC patients vs 9.74 ± 2.73 ng/ml for normal controls, P<0.001. Sema4A was highly expressed in lymphocytes of the lamina propria of CD and UC patients but absent in patients with diverticulitis or in normal individuals.Altered % of Tregs expressing sema3A in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD is partially responsible for their failure in preventing CD4+ effector T cell induced inflammation in IBD in peripheral blood. The increased expression of sema4A in bowel biopsies from CD and UC patients is suggestive of its central role in regulating local tissue inflammation in the bowel.

  7. Histamine release from gut mast cells from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolte, Hendrik; Spjeldnæs, Nikolaj; Kruse, Aksel

    1990-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators from intestinal mast cells may serve as initiators of acute and delayed inflammation. Mast cell histamine release was measured in 19 patients with inflammatory bowel diseases using gut mast cells from enzymatically dispersed endoscopic forceps biopsy specimens...... of macroscopically inflamed and normal tissue. Mast cells and corresponding basophils were challenged with anti-IgE, anti-IgG, subclass anti-IgG4, and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and results were compared with those from nine patient control subjects. The mast cell count in patients with ulcerative...... colitis was increased compared with that in control subjects and patients with Crohn's disease, and the mast cell count obtained from inflamed tissue was greater than that of normal tissue. The study also shows the heterogeneity of the responsiveness of the histamine releasing cells to various...

  8. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Metabolism and Its Role in the Development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Wollny

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Beyond their role as structural molecules, sphingolipids are involved in many important cellular processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation, and migration. Altered sphingolipid metabolism is observed in many pathological conditions including gastrointestinal diseases. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD represents a state of complex, unpredictable, and destructive inflammation of unknown origin within the gastrointestinal tract. The mechanisms explaining the pathophysiology of IBD involve signal transduction pathways regulating gastro-intestinal system’s immunity. Progressive intestinal tissue destruction observed in chronic inflammation may be associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a sphingolipid metabolite, functions as a cofactor in inflammatory signaling and becomes a target in the treatment of IBD, which might prevent its conversion to cancer. This paper summarizes new findings indicating the impact of (S1P on IBD development and IBD-associated carcinogenesis.

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease and cancer response due to anti-CTLA-4: is it in the flora?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonnel, Franck; Soularue, Emilie; Coutzac, Clélia; Chaput, Nathalie; Mateus, Christine; Lepage, Patricia; Robert, Caroline

    2017-04-01

    Checkpoint inhibitors blocking CTLA-4 (ipilimumab) and PD-1 (nivolumab, pembrolizumab) have transfigured our cancer treatment paradigm. However, these drugs can induce immune-related adverse events that share clinical and pathological characteristics with immune-mediated diseases. One of the most severe immune-related adverse event observed with anti-CTLA-4 is an enterocolitis that mirrors naturally occurring inflammatory bowel disease. This paper reviews the clinical, immunological, and microbiota data associated with the immune-related enterocolitis induced by the cancer immunotherapy blocking CTLA-4, ipilimumab. A parallel analysis of the mechanisms underlying inflammatory bowel diseases on the one hand, and anti-CTLA-4-induced colitis on the other hand, stresses the crucial role of the gut microbiota and of resident T reg in the genesis of both iatrogenic and spontaneous inflammatory bowel diseases.

  10. A breakthrough in probiotics: Clostridium butyricum regulates gut homeostasis and anti-inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Takanori; Mikami, Yohei; Hayashi, Atsushi

    2015-09-01

    Intestinal immune homeostasis is regulated by gut microbiota, including beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms. Imbalance in gut bacterial constituents provokes host proinflammatory responses causing diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The development of next-generation sequencing technology allows the identification of microbiota alterations in IBD. Several studies have shown reduced diversity in the gut microbiota of patients with IBD. Advances in gnotobiotic technology have made possible analysis of the role of specific bacterial strains in immune cells in the intestine. Using these techniques, we have shown that Clostridium butyricum as a probiotic induces interleukin-10-producing macrophages in inflamed mucosa via the Toll-like receptor 2/myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 pathway to prevent acute experimental colitis. In this review, we focus on the new approaches for the role of specific bacterial strains in immunological responses, as well as the potential of bacterial therapy for IBD treatments.

  11. Faecal calprotectin, an useful marker in discriminating between inflammatory bowel disease and functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya Angulo, Maria Elena; de Las Heras Gómez, Ignacio; Martinez Villanueva, Miriam; Noguera Velasco, Jose Antonio; Avilés Plaza, Francisco

    2017-03-01

    Diagnostic discrimination between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and functional gastrointestinal disorders is complex, as they cause similar signs and symptoms. Faecal calprotectin (FC) is a useful marker in this context, and can be used to select patients who will most benefit from colonoscopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of FC in discriminating between organic disease and functional disorders. The study included 264 patients presenting with gastrointestinal complaints consistent with an organic pathology. FC levels were determined and diagnostic accuracy was assessed using the area under the curve obtained from the final diagnosis. Calprotectin levels in organic bowel disease patients were significantly higher (median 254μg/g; 95% confidence interval [CI], interquartile range 105-588.5) than in functional disease patients (95μg/g; 95% CI, 47.25-243.92) (P<.0001). Similarly, in patients with IBD, the values obtained were higher (270.85μg/g; 95% CI, 96.85-674.00) than in those with irritable bowel syndrome (79.70μg/g; 95% CI, 36.50-117.25) (P<.0001). For a cut-off of 150μg/g, FC had an area under the ROC curve to discriminate between organic and functional disease of 0.718, and 0.872 to discriminate between irritable bowel syndrome and IBD. Our study supports the importance of FC as a marker in the evaluation of patients with IBD. The best diagnostic accuracy is obtained at a cut-off value of 150μg/g. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  12. Disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and cardiovascular death - a danish nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases have been linked to increased risk of atherothrombotic events, but the risk associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unclear. We therefore examined the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and cardiovascular death in patients with IBD....

  13. Antibiotics and probiotics in inflammatory bowel disease: why, when, and how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantera, Cosimo; Scribano, Maria Lia

    2009-07-01

    To summarize recent evidence on the role of intestinal bacteria in inflammatory bowel diseases, and of antibiotics and probiotics in their treatment. The implications connected with the use of antibiotics are also examined. The hypothesis that Mycobacterium paratuberculosis could be a causative agent of Crohn's disease has not been confirmed by a large trial on symptomatic patients treated by a combination of antibiotics active against this bacterium. An increased number of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli have been found in the intestinal tissue of patients with Crohn's disease, but their role in the pathogenesis of this condition remains to be defined. The combination of metronidazole and azathioprine, associating the effects of a reduced bacterial load with immunosuppression, appears to be a therapeutic option to decrease the recurrence of postoperative Crohn's disease in high-risk patients. However, concerns are raised by the possibility that antibiotics may induce disease relapse due to Clostridium difficile infection. Recent literature provides increasing support for the use of antibiotics in Crohn's disease, although the side effects limit their long-term use. The efficacy of antibiotics in ulcerative colitis is not confirmed by the available literature, except in severe colitis. More trials are needed to support the use of probiotics as therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.

  14. Genome-wide association study implicates immune activation of multiple integrin genes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Christopher A.; Luo, Yang; Kennedy, Nicholas A.; Jostins, Luke; Rice, Daniel L.; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Ji, Sun-Gou; Heap, Graham; Nimmo, Elaine R.; Edwards, Cathryn; Henderson, Paul; Mowat, Craig; Sanderson, Jeremy; Satsangi, Jack; Simmons, Alison; Wilson, David C.; Tremelling, Mark; Hart, Ailsa; Mathew, Christopher G.; Newman, William G.; Parkes, Miles; Lees, Charlie W.; Uhlig, Holm; Hawkey, Chris; Prescott, Natalie J.; Ahmad, Tariq; Mansfield, John C.; Anderson, Carl A.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 215 risk loci for inflammatory bowel disease 1–8, which have revealed fundamental aspects of its molecular biology. We performed a genome-wide association study of 25,305 individuals, and meta-analyzed with published summary statistics, yielding a total sample size of 59,957 subjects. We identified 25 new loci, three of which contain integrin genes that encode proteins in pathways identified as important therapeutic targets in inflammatory bowel disease. The associated variants are correlated with expression changes in response to immune stimulus at two of these genes (ITGA4, ITGB8) and at previously implicated loci (ITGAL, ICAM1). In all four cases, the expression increasing allele also increases disease risk. We also identified likely causal missense variants in the primary immune deficiency gene PLCG2 and a negative regulator of inflammation, SLAMF8. Our results demonstrate that new common variant associations continue to identify genes relevant to therapeutic target identification and prioritization. PMID:28067908

  15. Treatment adherence is always worse than we think: an unresolved problem in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomollón, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    New diagnostic and treatment tools are the "stars" of scientific meetings but other aspects may have an even greater impact on patients' lives. Several new studies presented at DDW (Digestive Disease Week) 2016 demonstrated that: a) treatment adherence continues to be suboptimal even in the most advanced health systems; b) lack of adherence correlates with low treatment effectiveness, with higher levels of intestinal damage and higher costs; and c) the factor most consistently associated with poor adherence is age (the younger the patient, the poorer the adherence). In any new programme aiming to enhance the quality of inflammatory bowel disease management, a key element should be the inclusion of new patient information and communication systems to increase treatment adherence. The new tools available in the telemedicine era provide an opportunity to improve the care of inflammatory bowel disease, but their success is limited by multiple problems. Overcoming these barriers should be our key goal in the next few years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The real-world effectiveness of vedolizumab on intestinal and articular outcomes in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Orlando, Rosalba; Fries, Walter; Scolaro, Mariangela; Magnano, Antonio; Pluchino, Dario; Cappello, Maria; Morreale, Gaetano Cristian; Siringo, Sebastiano; Privitera, Antonino Carlo; Ferracane, Concetta; Belluardo, Nunzio; Alberghina, Nadia; Ventimiglia, Marco; Rizzuto, Giulia; Renna, Sara; Cottone, Mario; Orlando, Ambrogio

    2018-03-01

    The effectiveness of vedolizumab in real-world practice is under evaluation, while its role in inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthritis is still unclear. To report real-world data about the effectiveness of vedolizumab on intestinal and articular symptoms after 10 and 22 weeks of treatment. Web-based data from the cohort of the Sicilian Network for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (SN-IBD) were extracted to perform a prospective multicentre observational study. 163 patients (84 with Crohn's disease and 79 with ulcerative colitis) were included. At week 10, a steroid-free remission was achieved in 71 patients (43.6%), while at week 22 a steroid-free remission was obtained in 40.8% of patients. A response on articular symptoms was reported after 10 weeks of treatment in 17 out of 43 (39.5%) patients with active spondyloarthritis at baseline, and in 10 out of 22 (45.4%) patients at week 22. The only factor associated with articular response was the coexistence of clinical benefit on intestinal symptoms (at week 10: OR 8.471, p = 0.05; at week 22: OR 5.600, p = 0.08). Vedolizumab showed good effectiveness after 10 and 22 weeks of treatment. A subset of patients reported improvement also on articular symptoms, probably as a consequence of the concomitant control of gut inflammation. Copyright © 2018 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. SORPTION РATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF ENDOGENOUS INTOXICATION OF PEDIATRIC CHRONIC INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Fedorova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gut endotoxicosis caused by penetration of bacterial and metabolic toxins from chime on the background of increasing permeability of gut wall is of great importance in pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (nonspecific ulcerative colitis — NUC and Crohn’s disease. It is accompanied by disturbance of regulating homeostasis system with the following disturbances of organs and systems of toxication. Developed endotoxicosis accordingly contributes to maintain and to progress of metabolic and immunological changes. To obtain the precise degree and phase of development of endotoxicosis we estimated quantitative and qualitative changes of metabolic status in accordance with content in erythrocytes, plasma and urine LMMWP (low and medium molecular weight peptides. Taking into concideration the peculiarities of children endotoxicosis with, we suggested patogenetical absorption therapy. Therefore, the therapeutic complex was added enterosorbent ensoral, which absorb eczo and endogenic toxins and, moreover, positive influence for composition of intestinal microflora. Prominent clinical effect was accompanied by positive dynamics of laboratory-instrumental parameters.Key words: endogenous intoxication, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonspecific ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, low and medium molecular weight peptides, enterosorbents, children.

  18. Enteric Glial Cells: A New Frontier in Neurogastroenterology and Clinical Target for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Cortes, Fernando; Turco, Fabio; Linan-Rico, Andromeda; Soghomonyan, Suren; Whitaker, Emmett; Wehner, Sven; Cuomo, Rosario; Christofi, Fievos L

    2016-02-01

    The word "glia" is derived from the Greek word "γλoια," glue of the enteric nervous system, and for many years, enteric glial cells (EGCs) were believed to provide mainly structural support. However, EGCs as astrocytes in the central nervous system may serve a much more vital and active role in the enteric nervous system, and in homeostatic regulation of gastrointestinal functions. The emphasis of this review will be on emerging concepts supported by basic, translational, and/or clinical studies, implicating EGCs in neuron-to-glial (neuroglial) communication, motility, interactions with other cells in the gut microenvironment, infection, and inflammatory bowel diseases. The concept of the "reactive glial phenotype" is explored as it relates to inflammatory bowel diseases, bacterial and viral infections, postoperative ileus, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and motility disorders. The main theme of this review is that EGCs are emerging as a new frontier in neurogastroenterology and a potential therapeutic target. New technological innovations in neuroimaging techniques are facilitating progress in the field, and an update is provided on exciting new translational studies. Gaps in our knowledge are discussed for further research. Restoring normal EGC function may prove to be an efficient strategy to dampen inflammation. Probiotics, palmitoylethanolamide (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α), interleukin-1 antagonists (anakinra), and interventions acting on nitric oxide, receptor for advanced glycation end products, S100B, or purinergic signaling pathways are relevant clinical targets on EGCs with therapeutic potential.

  19. Enteric Glial Cells: A New Frontier in Neurogastroenterology and Clinical Target for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Cortes, Fernando; Turco, Fabio; Linan-Rico, Andromeda; Soghomonyan, Suren; Whitaker, Emmett; Wehner, Sven; Cuomo, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The word “glia” is derived from the Greek word “γλοια,” glue of the enteric nervous system, and for many years, enteric glial cells (EGCs) were believed to provide mainly structural support. However, EGCs as astrocytes in the central nervous system may serve a much more vital and active role in the enteric nervous system, and in homeostatic regulation of gastrointestinal functions. The emphasis of this review will be on emerging concepts supported by basic, translational, and/or clinical studies, implicating EGCs in neuron-to-glial (neuroglial) communication, motility, interactions with other cells in the gut microenvironment, infection, and inflammatory bowel diseases. The concept of the “reactive glial phenotype” is explored as it relates to inflammatory bowel diseases, bacterial and viral infections, postoperative ileus, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and motility disorders. The main theme of this review is that EGCs are emerging as a new frontier in neurogastroenterology and a potential therapeutic target. New technological innovations in neuroimaging techniques are facilitating progress in the field, and an update is provided on exciting new translational studies. Gaps in our knowledge are discussed for further research. Restoring normal EGC function may prove to be an efficient strategy to dampen inflammation. Probiotics, palmitoylethanolamide (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor–α), interleukin-1 antagonists (anakinra), and interventions acting on nitric oxide, receptor for advanced glycation end products, S100B, or purinergic signaling pathways are relevant clinical targets on EGCs with therapeutic potential. PMID:26689598

  20. Use of azathioprine and the risk of cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternak, Björn; Svanström, Henrik; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    interval: 0.83, 1.25) or increasing cumulative received doses (increase in rate ratio per 365 additional defined daily doses = 1.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.89, 1.27) were not. In subgroup analyses, azathioprine use was associated with increased risk of lymphoid tissue cancer (rate ratio = 2.40, 95......Increased risks of lymphoma and skin cancer associated with thiopurine use among patients with inflammatory bowel disease have been shown, but data on the overall cancer risk are limited. We conducted a historical cohort study of 45,986 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (of whom, 5,197 (11.......9 (interquartile range: 3.5-12.0) person-years of follow-up, 2,596 incident cases of cancer were detected. Azathioprine use was associated with an increased risk of overall cancer (rate ratio = 1.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.15, 1.74), whereas former use of azathioprine (rate ratio = 1.02, 95% confidence...