WorldWideScience

Sample records for undergraduate technical communication

  1. Emphasizing Research (Further) in Undergraduate Technical Communication Curricula: Involving Undergraduate Students with an Academic Journal's Publication and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Julie Dyke; Newmark, Julianne

    2011-01-01

    This article presents follow-up information to a previous publication regarding ways to increase emphasis on research skills in undergraduate Technical Communication curricula. We detail the ways our undergraduate program highlights research by requiring majors to complete senior thesis projects that culminate in submission to an online…

  2. Technical communication: Perspectives for the eighties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, J. C.; Pinelli, T. E.

    The proceeding suggest that technical communication has become an important subfield and is becoming an intrinsic part of many undergraduate curricula. Technical communication as a separate discipline, however, is relatively new. For that reason, proceedings that can make current research available as quickly as possible are suggested for preparation. The following topics were addressed: (1) a history and definition of technical writing, (2) the case method is technical communication (3) teaching technical writing (4) oral communication and rhetorical theory, and (5) new approaches in and practical applications of technical writing.

  3. Enhancing undergraduate students’ communications skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Merete; Witt, Klaus; Fridorff-Jens, Peter Kindt

    2014-01-01

    19729 Abstract Title: Enhancing undergraduate students communications skills Abstract Authors: •Merete Jorgensen, Copenhagen University , Family Medicine , Copenhagen •Klaus Witt, Research Unit , Family Medicine , Copenhagen •Peter Kindt Fridorff-Jens, Copenhagen University , IT-unit , Copenhagen...... the Consultation Logic (CL) and Consultation Analysis (CA), based on the Patient-Centred Consultation. To investigate the effect of various teaching methods in communication skills we have developed a scientific tool (DanSCORE) based on CL and CA to measure the students analysing ability Summary of work It has...... and they alternate with five plus four hour’s sessions of assessing, analyzing and discussion the videos in small groups with a peer (university teacher) and fellow students.We focus in our project on communication skills. 600 medical students are enrolled in the project. Changes in analyzing ability...

  4. Enhancing undergraduate students’ communications skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Merete; Witt, Klaus; Fridorff-Jens, Peter Kindt

    2014-01-01

    ,Monika Bullinger,Matthias Rose, Sylke Andreas.Enhancing medical students' communication skills: development and evaluation of an undergraduate training program.Published online 2012 March 24. doi: 10.1186/1472-6920-12-16 2.William T. Branch, Jr, MD; David Kern, MD; Paul Haidet, MD, MPH; Peter Weissmann, MD...... Abstract Presenter(s): •Merete Jorgensen, Copenhagen University , Family Medicine , Øster Farigmagsgade 5 , 1014 , K , Denmark , mejor@sund.ku.dk Abstract: Background Being teachers in Clinical Course of Family Medicine since 1995, we have developed two schemes for communication analysing purposes called...... and they alternate with five plus four hour’s sessions of assessing, analyzing and discussion the videos in small groups with a peer (university teacher) and fellow students.We focus in our project on communication skills. 600 medical students are enrolled in the project. Changes in analyzing ability...

  5. International Technical Communication: Beyond Translation, Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Fred

    1993-01-01

    Offers a personal view of international technical communication. Discusses computer-assisted translation, machine translation, machine interpreting, and the future of international technical communication. (SR)

  6. Technical Communication: Perspectives for the Eighties, Part 1. Proceedings of the Technical Communications Sessions at the 32Nd Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, J. C. (Compiler); Pinelli, T. E. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    Proceeding of the technical communication sessions at the 32nd annual meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication held in Dallas, Texas, March 26-28, 1981 are summarized. The proceeding suggest that technical communication has become an important subfield and is becoming an intrinsic part of many undergraduate curricula. Technical communication as a separate discipline, however, is relatively new. For that reason, proceedings that can make current research available as quickly as possible are suggested for preparation. The following topics were addressed: (1) a history and definition of technical writing, (2) the case method is technical communication (3) teaching technical writing (4) oral communication and rhetorical theory, and (5) new approaches in and practical applications of technical writing.

  7. Communication styles of undergraduate health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Williams, Brett; Boyle, Malcolm; Molloy, Andrew; McKenna, Lisa; Palermo, Claire; Molloy, Liz; Lewis, Belinda

    2011-05-01

    Few empirical studies have been undertaken on the communication styles of specific health-related disciplines. The objective of this study is to identify the communication styles of undergraduate health students at an Australian university. A cross-sectional study using a paper-based version of the Communicator Style Measure (CSM) was administered to a cohort of students enrolled in eight different undergraduate health-related courses. There were 1459 health students eligible for inclusion in the study. 860 students (response rate of 59%) participated in the study. Participants overall preferred the Friendly and Attentive communicator styles and gave least preference to the Contentious and Dominant styles. There was considerable similarity between participants from each of the health-related courses. There was no statistical difference in relation to communicator styles between the age of the participant or the year level they were enrolled in. These results show a preference for communicator styles which are facilitative of a client-centred approach, empathetic, and positive with interpersonal relationships. The lack of significant difference in communicator styles by year level further suggests that people disposed to such communicator styles are drawn to these health-related courses, rather than the specific field of study affecting their style. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Has Technical Communication Arrived as a Profession

    OpenAIRE

    Pringle, Kathy; Williams, Sean

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the design and technology components of technical communication by investigating how practitioners imagine their work and the profession, specifically with respect to technology. In short, we wanted to interrogate the duality of “core design skills” and “technology skills” by asking practitioners to reflect both on the definition of technical communication and on the role technology plays in their work. We wanted to weigh claims that communication and rhetorical skills a...

  9. Dehumanizing Communication Reified among Undergraduates and Lecturers: Issues and Suggestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvie, Adanma Nnekwu; Modebelu, Melody Ndidi

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses dehumanizing communication reified among undergraduates and lecturers. Dehumanization is the act of degrading people with respect to their best qualities and denial of humanness to others. On the other hand, communication is human interaction and learning. Communication becomes rude when it is deliberately directed resulting…

  10. Expert Systems as Tools for Technical Communicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grider, Daryl A.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses expertise, what an expert system is, what an expert system shell is, what expert systems can and cannot do, knowledge engineering and technical communicators, and planning and managing expert system projects. (SR)

  11. Teaching Workplace Skills to Technical Communicators

    OpenAIRE

    Darina M. Slattery; Yvonne Cleary

    2013-01-01

    peer-reviewed In this article, we introduce two programmes in technical communication (one distance, and one on-campus) offered by the University of Limerick. Both programmes have been running for several years, but are regularly reviewed to ensure that they remain relevant. We describe how these programmes correspond to industry needs, and how they develop core competencies of technical communicators. We outline two key types of assignment (writing and development), and explain their rele...

  12. The Speech Community in Technical Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Isabelle

    1991-01-01

    Explores context in technical communication through the speech community. Asks what the relationship is among language, culture, and thought, and what knowledge is needed for effective communication. Argues that the Whorfian hypothesis answers the first question, whereas Chomsky's work on grammatical competence and Flower and Hayes' investigations…

  13. Development and Evaluation of an Undergraduate Science Communication Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoman, Kay H.; James, Helen A.; Bowater, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design and evaluation of an undergraduate final year science communication module for the Science Faculty at the University of East Anglia. The module focuses specifically on science communication and aims to bring an understanding of how science is disseminated to the public. Students on the module are made aware of the…

  14. Listening for effective communication: A study of undergraduates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In almost every human interaction, listening plays a vital role and so determines the effectiveness of such communication events. Sadly the comportment of many university undergraduates during lectures leaves much to be desired. This to a large extent impedes their communication effectiveness. The purpose of this study ...

  15. The Technical Communicator as Advocate: Integrating a Social Justice Approach in Technical Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Natasha N.

    2016-01-01

    This article argues for the need for a social justice approach to technical communication research and pedagogy. Given previous calls by scholars in technical and professional communication (TPC) for an attention to diversity, inclusion, and equality, the author examines the place and purpose of social justice in TPC and provides useful approaches…

  16. Technical Report on Tele-Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Mateo County PACE Center, Redwood City, CA.

    To provide background material for those interested in tele-communication in education and for those planning to implement such programs in their schools, a research study was conducted to gather information from a variety of sources including educational and technical experts, conference participation, visits to schools conducting projects, and…

  17. Negotiating cultural encounters narrating intercultural engineering and technical communication

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Han

    2013-01-01

    Discusses the challenges of intercultural communication in engineering, technical, and related professional fields Given today's globalized technical and engineering environment, intercultural communication is an essential topic for engineers, other technical professionals, and technical communicators to learn. Engineering programs, in particular, need to think about how to address the ABET requirement for students to develop global competence and communication skills. This book will help readers learn what intercultural communication is like in the workplace-which is an import

  18. Dehumanizing Communication Reified among Undergraduates and Lecturers: Issues and Suggestions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duvie Adanma Nnekwu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses dehumanizing communication reified among undergraduates and t lecturers. Dehumanization is the act of degrading people with respect to their best qualities and denial of humanness to others. On the other hand, communication is human interaction and learning. Communication becomes rude when it is deliberately directed resulting in dehumanizing communication. The paper, therefore, examines dehumanizing communication in terms of its being intentional and unintentional and dehumanizing communication between lecturers and students and among students. It also took a swipe on the effects of dehumanizing communication on students and lecturers as well as proffer solutions to mitigating effect of dehumanizing communication between lecturer and students and among students. The suggested solutions among others include inter-group dialogue programme among contending groups in the student community, establishment of multicultural centers on campus in order to bring contending groups together (i.e. lecturers and students of all races and ethnicity. A compulsory course on “pedagogy of positiveness” is also recommended in the university curriculum to instill in the students the value of respecting people who may be different. Keywords: Dehumanization, Intentional and Unintentional Communication, Reified, Lecturers, Undergraduates, Teaching and Learning, Classroom

  19. The Future of Project Management in Technical Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2006-01-01

    Project Management increasing shapes workplace communication, especially when technical commuicators participate in cross-disciplinary development teams. This paper looks at the future of project management in technical communication and argues for a communicative approach to project management...... for technical communication students. The Project Management course in the International Bachelor Program of Marketing and Management Communication at the Aarhus School of Business is described, and the implications fortechnical communication curricula are discussed....

  20. Communication of technical information to lay audiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowes, J.E.; Stamm, K.R.; Jackson, K.M.; Moore, J.

    1978-05-01

    One of the objectives of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program is to provide terminal storage facilities for commercial radioactive wastes in various geologic formations at multiple locations in the United States. The activities performed under the NWTS Program will affect regional, state, and local areas, and widespread public interest in this program is expected. Since a large part of the NWTS Program deals with technical information it was considered desirable to initiate a study dealing with possible methods of effectively transmitting this technical information to the general public. This study has the objective of preparing a state-of-the-art report on the communication of technical information to lay audiences. The particular task of communicating information about the NWTS Program to the public is discussed where appropriate. The results of this study will aid the NWTS Program in presenting to the public the quite diverse technical information generated within the program so that a widespread, thorough public understanding of the NWTS Program might be achieved. An annotated bibliography is included

  1. The Impact of Teaching Communication Strategies on English Speaking of Engineering Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsom, Tiwaporn

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of teaching communication strategies on Thai engineering undergraduate students' communication strategy use and strategic competence. Fifty-seven engineering undergraduate students were taught ten communication strategies for ten weeks and responded to a self-report communication strategy questionnaire before and…

  2. Training program developed for senior undergraduates majoring in optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Sheng; Zhang, Xinliang; Ke, Changjian

    2017-08-01

    Based on the well-known simulation software VPI TransmissionMaker, a comprehensive training program for senior undergraduates majoring in optical communication and optical network technology was developed by the author after detailed study of the teaching difficult and key points in the discipline. Aiming at solving practical scientific and engineering problems, the program helped our students to develop the ability of acquiring and applying knowledge by designing optical devices, optical signal processing algorithms and optical fiber communication systems. Furthermore, innovation is inspired by introducing competition mechanism among project teams. The program was validated through four years of use and achieved good results.

  3. Legitimizing Technical Communication in English Departments: Carolyn Miller's "Humanistic Rationale for Technical Writing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Carolyn Miller's oft-cited "Humanistic Rationale for Technical Writing," published in 1979, tries to give technical communication faculty more cultural capital in English departments controlled by literature professors. Miller replaces a positivistic emphasis in technical communication pedagogy with rhetoric. She shows how technical knowledge is…

  4. Multilateral collaboration between technical communicators and translators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandepitte, Sonia; Maylath, Bruce; Mousten, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a multilateral international project (Thompson and Carter 1973, Moreno-Lopez 2004) in technical communication and translator training programmes and discusses its use of technologies in what is seen as the largest and most complex international learning-by-doing collaboration...... the scripts for the two translation directions and the student-topic database. The project culminates in multilateral videoconferences that summarise the main aspects of learning by students. As the collaboration closely resembles the complexity of the international documentation workplaces of language...

  5. Undergraduates' perceptions of three augmentative and alternative communication modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achmadi, Donna; van der Meer, Larah; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio E; O'Reilly, Mark F; Lang, Russell; Schlosser, Ralf W; Hodis, Flaviu; Green, Vanessa A; Sutherland, Dean; McLay, Laurie; Marschik, Peter B

    2015-02-01

    To assess undergraduates' perceptions of three augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) modes. We showed 104 undergraduates a video clip of a person using each of the three AAC modes and asked them to rate each option in terms of perceived (a) intelligibility, (b) ease of acquisition, (c) effectiveness/acceptability, and (d) preference. The three AAC modes shown were (a) manual signing, (b) picture exchange, and (c) speech-generating device. Mean ratings for perceived intelligibility and effectiveness/acceptability were significantly higher for the speech-generating device. The speech-generating device and manual signing options were rated as being more preferred over picture exchange. Picture exchange was rated significantly higher on perceived ease of acquisition. Speech-generating devices were perceived to have greater social validity than manual signing and picture exchange.

  6. Multilateral collaboration between technical communicators and translators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandepitte, Sonia; Maylath, Bruce; Mousten, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a multilateral international project (Thompson and Carter 1973, Moreno-Lopez 2004) in technical communication and translator training programmes and discusses its use of technologies in what is seen as the largest and most complex international learning-by-doing collaboration...... to date. The project is a student collaboration involving two sets of cross-cultural virtual teams who either translate from Danish and Dutch into English and review (or edit) into American English or who are involved in international collaborative writing by Spaniards and Americans, usability testing...... by Finnish students, and translation from English into Dutch, French and Italian (Humbley et al. 2005; Maylath et al. 2008; Mousten et al. 2008; Mousten; Vandepitte et al. 2010; Mousten et al. 2010, Mousten et al. 2012, Maylath et al. 2013, Maylath et al. 2013b). While students use email, iChat and Skype...

  7. An appraisal of undergraduate curriculum of technical education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to appraise the curriculum of technical teacher education in terms of its compatibility to the goals of the programme. A sample of three Universities offering technical teacher programme was used for the study. Components of the technical teacher education curriculum in each institution were ...

  8. TecCOMFrame : A competence framework for technical communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleary, Yvonne; Karreman, Joyce; Closs, Sissi; Drazek, Zygmunt; Engberg, Jan; Ghenghea, Voichita; Meex, Birgitta; Minacori, Patricia; Muller, J.; Straub, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    The role of technical communicators is expanding due to technology. However, many individuals throughout Europe gain employment as technical communicators without undergoing specialized training. TecCOMFrame, a three-year project funded by the European Union, aims to develop: 1) a common academic

  9. Gender, Technology, and the History of Technical Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durack, Katherine T.

    1997-01-01

    Considers why women have been absent from the history of technical communication. Discusses research from the history of technology suggesting that notions of "technology,""work," and "workplace" may be gendered terms. Concludes with several suggestions for defining technical communication so that significant works of…

  10. Downsizing Technical Communication Staff: The Risk to Corporate Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smudde, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that companies responding to the struggling economy are downsizing staff, including technical communicators. Maintains that such cutbacks affect not only employee confidence and productivity but also product quality, customer satisfaction, and future sales. States that technical communicators' critical knowledge is an asset that companies…

  11. Technical Communicator: A New Model for the Electronic Resources Librarian?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulseberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This article explores whether technical communicator is a useful model for electronic resources (ER) librarians. The fields of ER librarianship and technical communication (TC) originated and continue to develop in relation to evolving technologies. A review of the literature reveals four common themes for ER librarianship and TC. While the…

  12. An exploratory study of the attitude of undergraduate students toward communication skills

    OpenAIRE

    渡部, 麻美

    2016-01-01

    Communication skills’ are required in job-hunting of young people. While people regard ‘communication skills’ as important, there are often some aspects of‘communication skills’ that people perceive negatively. This study investigated undergraduate students’attitudes toward ‘communication skills’. These attitudes were assessed using five factors: versatility, uncertainness, excessive demands, absoluteness, and possibility of measurement. Undergraduate students with job-hunting experience app...

  13. Communication with patients as a problem in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, J; Tvorogova, N D; Chrobák, L

    1992-01-01

    The work is based on the following concepts: communication with patients ceases being a matter of experience learning only (the trial and error method) and should become a part of systematic training; it should not be included only into continuous education of graduated physicians but must be gradually introduced into undergraduate education as well; it is not an optional activity which may but may not be performed by physicians, but it is a specific component of their clinical competence. Today attempts to instruct medical students in communication with patients and their relatives are being made at many medical schools all over the world. Reports on such instruction are, however, scattered in various journals or in internal publications published by universities, faculties and clinics. Thus they are not available very easily. If there exist some survey works, they are mostly conceived on the national level. The objective of the study presented here is to show a comparatively comprehensive survey dealing with the medical student instruction on the international level, analyze trends in development and identify problems that have not been solved so far. The work consists of five chapters. The first one gives a short survey of current concepts in communication with patients reaching beyond the traditional training in taking medical history. Among others, the following factors are included here: explanation of both diagnostical and therapeutical methods to the patient, informing the patient about results obtained from the examination, telling him or her general conclusions and recommendations, informing patients of social associations of the disease, developing in the patients those attitudes which support their cooperation with physicians and the patient's will to live, ability to treat serious and terminal patients properly, ability to treat patients' relatives and communicate with other members of a medical team. The second chapter shows current attempts to train

  14. Multimedia as a Means to Enhance Teaching Technical Vocabulary to Physics Undergraduates in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanganwa, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether the integration of ICT in education can facilitate teaching and learning. An example of such integration is computer assisted language learning (CALL) of English technical vocabulary by undergraduate physics students in Rwanda. The study draws on theories of cognitive load and multimedia learning to explore learning…

  15. DCS (Defense Communications System) Technical Control Engineering Criteria. Revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    ai EP 3-78RI uj DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING CENTER ENGINEERING PUBLICATION NO. 3-78 RI DCS TECHNICAL CONTROL ENGINEERING CRITERIA :V4 DTIC...EP3-78R1 Ř. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED DCS Technical Control Engineering Criteria Engineering Publication(Rev) Ś... CONTROL ENGINEERING CRITERIA MAY 1981 Prepared by: e Members Engineering & Technical Pnl, Tech Control Improvement Program Phasing Grp & Staff

  16. Developing Oral and Written Communication Skills in Undergraduate Computer Science and Information Systems Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortsarts, Yana; Fischbach, Adam; Rufinus, Jeff; Utell, Janine M.; Yoon, Suk-Chung

    2010-01-01

    Developing and applying oral and written communication skills in the undergraduate computer science and computer information systems curriculum--one of the ABET accreditation requirements - is a very challenging and, at the same time, a rewarding task that provides various opportunities to enrich the undergraduate computer science and computer…

  17. Podcasting to Provide Teaching and Learning Support for an Undergraduate Module on English Language and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edirisingha, Palitha; Rizzi, Chiara; Nie, Ming; Rothwell, Libby

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports findings from research into the benefits of integrating podcasts into a first year undergraduate module on English Language and Communication at Kingston University. As part of a Faculty teaching and learning support scheme for first year undergraduates, six podcasts were developed to improve students' learning and study skills…

  18. Technical errors in intraoral radiographs performed by undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Laureano da Rosa

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the technical errors in periapical examinations performed by dental students. Methods: Patient record charts at the dental clinic of the dentistry course were analyzed. Of these, the charts that presented at least ten periapical intraoral radiographs were used in the study, therefore a total of 219 patient record charts were selected, totaling 2 821 radiographs. The radiographs were analyzed one by one, using an uniform light negatoscope, in a darkened room, by a professional radiologist, taking into consideration the following evaluation criteria: technically good and unsatisfactory radiographs. The technical errorswere classified as errors in radiographic technique and radiographic processing errors. The data on quality critera stipulated and obtainedin the evaluation were tabulated, intervals of confidence were used to infer the percentage that were suitable and unsuitable in the studied period, and were statistically analyzed using the chi-square test, at the level of significance of 5%. Results: The results were: of the 2 821 radiographs analyzed, only 1 425 (50.51% were technically good. of the 1 396 (49.49% considered inadequat, 1 155 (82.74% presented errors in radiographic technique, while 241 (17.26% presented radiographic processing errors. The most frequently repeated error was image overlapping (32.88%, followed by the underexposure (25.43%, cut of the tooth (9.31%, chemicalcontamination problems (4.51%, cone cut (3.15%, other errors in radiographic technique (1.86% and other radiographic processing errors (1.43%. Conclusion: The conclusion was that steps must be taken to improve the quality of radiographs obtained because, although they did not make it impossible to interpret the radiographs, this was made extremely difficult, and the depreciated the value of the achives of past clinical situations and cases.

  19. Methods for communicating technical information as public information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zara, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Many challenges face the nuclear industry, especially in the waste management area. One of the biggest challenges is effective communication with the general public. Technical complexity, combined with the public's lack of knowledge and negative emotional response, complicate clear communication of radioactive waste management issues. The purpose of this session is to present and discuss methods for overcoming these obstacles and effectively transmitting technical information as public information. The methods presented encompass audio, visual, and print approaches to message transmission. To support these methods, the author also discusses techniques, based on current research, for improving the communication process

  20. Building Currency: Crafting New Channels for Undergraduate Communication Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Vickie Shamp; Barbe, Kaylene; Fullbright, Kalyn G.

    2016-01-01

    University professional development funds, generally present for faculty, and often available for graduate students through grants or stipends, are seldom available to undergraduates. In this study, we assessed Giddens and Pierson's (1998) structuration theory in terms of how a professional development fund for undergraduates can impact the lives…

  1. Research and Teaching: Encouraging Science Communication in an Undergraduate Curriculum Improves Students' Perceptions and Confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Train, Tonya Laakko; Miyamoto, Yuko J.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to effectively communicate science is a skill sought after by graduate and professional schools as well as by employers in science-related fields. Are content-heavy undergraduate science curricula able to incorporate opportunities to develop science communication skills, and is promoting these skills worth the time and effort? The…

  2. Core Skills for Effective Science Communication: A Teaching Resource for Undergraduate Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer-Mapstone, Lucy; Kuchel, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Science communication is a diverse and transdisciplinary field and is taught most effectively when the skills involved are tailored to specific educational contexts. Few academic resources exist to guide the teaching of communication with non-scientific audiences for an undergraduate science context. This mixed methods study aimed to explore what…

  3. The Development of Internet Use for Communication among Undergraduate Students: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    As few studies utilized longitudinal design to examine the development of Internet use for communication, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of gender and initial Internet use for communication on subsequent use. The study sample was 280 undergraduate students who were assessed at five time points. Hierarchical linear models were…

  4. Teaching Scientists to Communicate: Evidence-Based Assessment for Undergraduate Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer-Mapstone, Lucy; Kuchel, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Communication skills are one of five nationally recognised learning outcomes for an Australian Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree. Previous evidence indicates that communication skills taught in Australian undergraduate science degrees are not developed sufficiently to meet the requirements of the modern-day workplace--a problem faced in the UK and…

  5. Willingness to Communicate in English as a Second Language: A Case Study of Pakistani Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Syeda Farzana; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Khan, Salman Ali

    2015-01-01

    Willingness to communicate (WTC) construct plays an important role in second language (L2) teaching and learning. Almost any second language learner is likely to respond to a direct question, but many will not continue or initiate communication. The present study investigates Pakistani undergraduate students' perception of their willingness to…

  6. Student Perceptions of Communication Skills in Undergraduate Science at an Australian Research-Intensive University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer-Mapstone, Lucy D.; Matthews, Kelly E.

    2017-01-01

    Higher education institutions globally are acknowledging the need to teach communication skills. This study used the Science Student Skills Inventory to gain insight into how science students perceive the development of communication skills across the degree programme. Responses were obtained from 635 undergraduate students enrolled in a Bachelor…

  7. Using an Interdisciplinary Approach to Teach Undergraduates Communication and Information Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkelman, Andrea L.; Aune, Jeanine E.; Nonnecke, Gail R.

    2010-01-01

    For successful and productive careers, undergraduate students need effective communication and critical thinking skills; information literacy is a substantial component in the development of these skills. Students often perceive communication courses as distinct and separate from their chosen discipline. Faculty from the Departments of English and…

  8. Graduate Employability and Communication Competence: Are Undergraduates Taught Relevant Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clokie, Trish L.; Fourie, Elna

    2016-01-01

    This research establishes the role of communication education in employability by determining how employers of graduates view communication, identifying communication skills that employers view as relevant, and establishing whether these skills are included in communication courses. To achieve these aims, local businesses were surveyed, and the…

  9. Blended learning pedagogy designed for communication module among undergraduate nursing students: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Shefaly; Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Devi, M Kamala; Chen, Hui-Chen; Soong, Swee Kit Alan; Ang, Emily

    2018-02-01

    Effective communication is important for nurse and patient outcomes. Nursing students often feel unprepared to communicate effectively with patients and other healthcare workers within the clinical environment. Blended learning pedagogy-based communication skills training can provide an alternative to traditional methods of teaching to enhance students' satisfaction and self-efficacy levels in communicating with others. To examine the effectiveness of blended learning pedagogy in a redesigned communication module among nursing undergraduates in enhancing their satisfaction levels and attitudes towards learning communication module as well as self-efficacy in communication. A single group pre-test and post-test quasi-experimental design was adopted. Data were collected from August 2016 to November 2016 from 124 nursing undergraduates from a leading nursing school. Blended learning pedagogy was adopted to redesign a communication module that offered a wide array of learning opportunities via face-to-face classroom and online sessions. Validated and reliable instruments were used to measure satisfaction levels with blended learning pedagogy, attitudes towards learning communication, and communication self-efficacy. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Participants had enhanced satisfaction levels with blended learning pedagogy, better attitudes in learning communication skills, and improved communication self-efficacies at posttest (week 13 of the semester) when compared with their pre-test scores (week one of the semester). Participants scored higher in the Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale, the Communication Skills Attitude Scale, and the communication skills subscale of the Nursing Students Self-Efficacy Scale. Blended learning pedagogy can be effectively used in facilitating communication modules and enhancing student outcomes among nursing undergraduates. The long-term effectiveness of using blended learning pedagogy in

  10. Content Analysis as a Best Practice in Technical Communication Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Alexander; Evans, Mary; McBride, Alicia; Queen, Matt; Spyridakis, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Content analysis is a powerful empirical method for analyzing text, a method that technical communicators can use on the job and in their research. Content analysis can expose hidden connections among concepts, reveal relationships among ideas that initially seem unconnected, and inform the decision-making processes associated with many technical…

  11. Using communication norms in socio-technical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weigand, H.; Whitworth, B.; de Moor, A.

    2009-01-01

    Often socio-technical systems are designed simply on the basis of what the user asks, and without considering explicitly whether the required process structure is right and wrong. However, poor communication may cause many problems. Therefore, a design cycle should always include diagnosis, and in

  12. Facilitating Service Learning in the Online Technical Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from the author's experience teaching online technical communication courses with an embedded service-learning component, this essay opens the discussion to the potential problems involved in designing online service-learning courses and provides practical approaches to integrating service learning into online coursework. The essay…

  13. Integrate oral communication with technical writing: Towards a rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, T.

    1981-01-01

    Integrating oral communication and technical writing instruction, to give students the opportunity to learn and practice interpersonal skills, is proposed. By linking speech and writing the importance of small-group interaction in developing transferrable ideas is acknowledged. Three reasons for integration are examined: workday activities, application of role-taking to writing, and conflict resolution. Four advantages of integration are stated.

  14. Layered Literacies: A Theoretical Frame for Technical Communication Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kelli Cargile

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a theoretical frame for technical communication pedagogy based on six layered literacies: basic, rhetorical, social, technological, ethical, and critical. Suggests how the frame can be applied to a program of study or individual course in order to establish teaching objectives; develop course and lesson activities; and assess pedagogical…

  15. Using Isocrates to Teach Technical Communication and Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizee, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Building on work by Dubinsky, Haskins, and Simmons and Grabill, this article explains how a technical communication instructor used Isocrates and informal usability testing to help guide a service-learning project involving the One Laptop Per Child XO-1 notebook. For the project, engineering students received feedback from peers and elementary…

  16. Problems in Communication between Businesses and Technical Education System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szafrański Maciej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents how some communication problems between business and Technical Education System (TES can be reduced. This comes to a misunderstanding of the needs of entrepreneurs for the knowledge and skills, in this paper treated as a resource on the market. The authors explain why debated issue falls in the area of corporate management. It identifies one of the reasons hindering the solution of problems. In order to clarify the issues it references the achievements of analytic philosophy of language and the theory of communication code. It proposed a method of facilitating the solution of the problem, which is being implemented since 2016 by the research team, co-created by the authors of this publication. The aim of the development of this publication is to supplement the theoretical and practical knowledge of management in manufacturing companies and others with high technical potential, where there is a large, growing and rapidly changing demand for knowledge and technical skills.

  17. Using "Facebook" to Improve Communication in Undergraduate Software Development Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Terence; Devlin, Marie; Drummond, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    As part of the CETL ALiC initiative (Centre of Excellence in Teaching and Learning: Active Learning in Computing), undergraduate computing science students at Newcastle and Durham universities participated in a cross-site team software development project. To ensure we offer adequate resources to support this collaboration, we conducted an…

  18. Broadening the voice of science: Promoting scientific communication in the undergraduate classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Lauren A; Emberts, Zachary; Joseph, Paul N; Allen, Pablo E; Lopatto, David; Miller, Christine W

    2017-12-01

    Effective and accurate communication of scientific findings is essential. Unfortunately, scientists are not always well trained in how to best communicate their results with other scientists nor do all appreciate the importance of speaking with the public. Here, we provide an example of how the development of oral communication skills can be integrated with research experiences at the undergraduate level. We describe our experiences developing, running, and evaluating a course for undergraduates that complemented their existing undergraduate research experiences with instruction on the nature of science and intensive training on the development of science communication skills. Students delivered science talks, research monologues, and poster presentations about the ecological and evolutionary research in which they were involved. We evaluated the effectiveness of our approach using the CURE survey and a focus group. As expected, undergraduates reported strong benefits to communication skills and confidence. We provide guidance for college researchers, instructors, and administrators interested in motivating and equipping the next generation of scientists to be excellent science communicators.

  19. Children's Literature in the Undergraduate Course on Communication Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Students will develop positive attitudes toward communication research by linking new values and principles with the familiar values and principles contained in children's literature. Course: Communication Research Methods.

  20. Teaching and Assessing Communication Skills in Medical Undergraduate Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Jyoti Nath; Anshu, -; Chhatwal, Jugesh; Gupta, Piyush; Singh, Tejinder

    2016-06-08

    Good communication skills are essential for an optimal doctor-patient relationship, and also contribute to improved health outcomes. Although the need for training in communication skills is stated as a requirement in the 1997 Graduate Medical Education Regulations of the Medical Council of India, formal training in these skills has been fragmentary and non-uniform in most Indian curricula. The Vision 2015 document of the Medical Council of India reaffirms the need to include training in communication skills in the MBBS curriculum. Training in communication skills needs approaches which are different from that of teaching other clinical subjects. It is also a challenge to ensure that students not only imbibe the nuances of communication and interpersonal skills, but adhere to them throughout their careers. This article addresses the possible ways of standardizing teaching and assessment of communication skills and integrating them into the existing curriculum.

  1. Professional communications of Russian technical and engineering specialists: empirical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R N Abramov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sociology of professions focus on the role of interpersonal and intergroup communications in the professional communities as an element of professional culture. The article considers forms and features of professional communications of Russian engineers and technicians in the context of their professional culture defined as the constellation of ideology, values, beliefs, language, and forms of activity typical for the community, which rarely becomes an object of Russian sociologists’ studies. The author shows that interpersonal professional communications on the various aspects of professional activity is an important element of professional culture. The article is based on the results of online survey of Russian engineers and expert interviews with Russian technical specialists - they were questioned on the ways of updating their professional knowledge and on the role of various channels of communication in this process. At the beginning of the article, the author provides an overview of approaches to the study of professional culture in Russia and abroad, and underlines the significant role of the Internet and the declining role of literature as a source of new knowledge for the engineering and technical staff. The results of the study also revealed an important role of informal and direct communications in the transfer of professional knowledge within the engineering community, while organizational environment has a relatively low impact on the updating of professional knowledge, which can be explained by the lack of management attention to the professional development of specialists.

  2. Communication Platform Payload Definition (CPPD) study. Volume 2: Technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, E. M.; Driggers, T.; Jorasch, R.

    1986-01-01

    This is Volume 2 (Technical Report) of the Ford Aerospace & Communications Corporation Final Report for the Communication Platform Payload Definition (CPPD) Study program conducted for NASA Lewis Research Center under contract No. NAS3-24235. This report presents the results of the study effort leading to five potential platform payloads to service CONUS and WARC Region 2 traffic demand as projected to the year 2008. The report addresses establishing the data bases, developing service aggregation scenarios, selecting and developing 5 payload concepts, performing detailed definition of the 5 payloads, costing them, identifying critical technology, and finally comparing the payloads with each other and also with non-aggregated equivalent services.

  3. Globalizing Technical Communication Programs: Visions, Challenges, and Emerging Directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maylath, Bruce; Mousten, Birthe; Vandepitte, Sonia

    Speakers Maylath, Mousten and Vandepitte, co-authors of two chapters on what they call the Trans-Atlantic Project, will describe the programmatic framework for establishing the collaborative partnerships in which students studying technical writing in the U.S. work with students studying translat......Speakers Maylath, Mousten and Vandepitte, co-authors of two chapters on what they call the Trans-Atlantic Project, will describe the programmatic framework for establishing the collaborative partnerships in which students studying technical writing in the U.S. work with students studying...... translation in Europe to create procedural documents in Danish, Dutch, English, French, German and/or Italian. They will provide guidelines for  how international partnerships of this kind can be established between technical communication programs and translation programs anywhere, even in the abscence...... of any sort of written institutional agreements and with minimal technology. Drawing on pedagogical and communication theories, such as Freinet and Steehouder and van der Meij, to facilitate student learning, the presenters will illustrate how international collaborative projects on technical documents...

  4. How can mobile SMS communication support and enhance a first year undergraduate learning environment?

    OpenAIRE

    Geraldine Jones; Gabriele Edwards; Alan Reid

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a case study investigating how the academic and personal development of first year students on an undergraduate sports education degree can be supported and enhanced with mobile SMS (Short Message Service) communication. SMS-based technologies were introduced in response to students’ particular needs (in transition to Higher Education) and characteristics (adept mobile communicators). Despite being unaccustomed to using their mobile phones for academic study, students...

  5. An audit on technical quality of root fillings performed by undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, W; Heidarifar, O; Killough, S; Lappin, M J; El Karim, I A

    2017-06-23

    To evaluate radiographically the technical quality of root fillings performed by undergraduate dental students and to assess whether students were exposed to an appropriate endodontic case mix during their clinical training. A retrospective audit was undertaken evaluating the clinical records of patients who underwent endodontic procedures during the period from September 2015 to June 2016 in the Dental School at Queen's University Belfast, UK. Two final-year dental students were trained and calibrated to evaluate postoperative intra-oral periapical radiographs of completed root canal treatments using specific assessment criteria. Data were presented as frequencies, percentage and mean ± standard deviation (SD). Comparisons of treatment outcomes between groups (posterior and anterior teeth) were calculated using Fisher's exact test, and the level of significance was set at P  0.05). In the majority of the teeth treated by undergraduate students at Queen's University Belfast, the technical quality of the root filling was acceptable and students were exposed to an appropriate case mix for endodontic training. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Interpretive Structural Modeling of MLearning Curriculum Implementation Model of English Language Communication Skills for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Muhammad Ridhuan Tony Lim; Siraj, Saedah; Asra; Hussin, Zaharah

    2014-01-01

    In the field of distance education, learning mediated through mobile technology or mobile learning (mLearning) has rapidly building a repertoire of influence in distance education research. This paper aims to propose an mLearning curriculum implementation model for English Language and Communication skills course among undergraduates using…

  7. Grade/Study-Performance Contracts, Enhanced Communication, Cooperative Learning, and Student Performance in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Ralph C.

    1997-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a teaching strategy, designed to increase student retention while maintaining academic performance levels in undergraduate organic chemistry, that uses grade/study-performance contracts, enhanced communication using electronic mail, and cooperative learning. Concludes that a series of interventions can substantially…

  8. Tracing the History of Technical Communication from 1850-2000: Plus a Series of Survey Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Earl E.

    This research focuses on the history of technical communication since 1850, with a specific focus on the technological changes that occurred between 1900 and 1950. This paper also discusses the development of professional technical communication organizations and the development of technical communication programs at the bachelor, masters, and…

  9. Practices in communicating technical issues to the general public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Storey, P.

    2006-01-01

    The conclusions and recommendations of this session can be summarized this way. - Basic goal for the regulator is to protect the public and communication is a must to fully achieve this goal. - Regulator should become the prime source of information to the public and the media, regulator should base its actions upon values of competence, independence, transparency and stringency. - Set up of a Information and Communication Policy will help for consistency and efficiency. Policy will include setting goals, strategies, organisational aspects, procedures, and tools. Practices should be developed in accordance with local culture. - Challenges will consider transparency, public involvement and consultation with the stakeholders. - Practices will include in general: - Interactions with the media like press releases, news conferences, media workshops. Printed materials from plant periodical status reports, to periodical and annual reports and specific reports. Audio-visual materials. Use of radio and TV. Web site and electronic mail. - Method chosen depends on the targeted audience and the relevance of the topic. - Messages should be clearly understandable. Do not dehumanize the message by making it technically unintelligible. - Two excellent examples presented. How local culture and social characteristics were taken into account in designing and implementing plans is key for success. - Municipalities are to be considered as front line stakeholders. - Communicators role is relevant to meet regulatory needs. Good collaboration between communicators and technical staff produces benefits for the nuclear regulator and the public. (authors)

  10. Starting them Early: Incorporating Communication Training into Undergraduate Research Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, B. A.; Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D.

    2014-12-01

    In order to truly broaden the impact of our scientific community, effective communication should be taught alongside research skills to developing scientists. In the summer of 2014, we incorporated an informal communications course into the 10th year of UNAVCO's Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS), a year-long internship program centered around an 11-week intensive summer research experience. The goals of the newly designed course included giving students the tools they need to make a broader impact with their science, starting now; improving the students' confidence in public speaking and using social media for outreach; and giving students the tools they need to apply for jobs or graduate school. Specifically, the course included teaching of professional communication skills, such as e-mail and phone etiquette, resume and CV tailoring, and interview techniques, and public communications skills, such as crafting and simplifying messages, visual communication for the public, and public speaking. Student interns were encouraged to step back from the details of their research projects to put their work into a big-picture context relevant to the public and to policy makers. The course benefited from input and/or participation from UNAVCO Education and Community Engagement staff, engineering and managerial staff, and graduate student interns outside the RESESS program, and University of Colorado research and communications mentors already involved in RESESS. As the summer program is already packed with research and skill development, one major challenge was fitting in teaching these communications skills amongst many other obligations: a GRE course, a peer-focused scientific communications course, a computing course, and, of course, research. Can we do it all? This presentation will provide an overview of the course planning, articulation of course goals, and execution challenges and successes. We will present our lessons learned from

  11. An Integrated Communication Skills Package for Undergraduate Chemists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, W. J.; Murray, R. E. G.; Moore, B. D.; Nonhebel, D. C.

    2000-02-01

    Positive feedback and evaluations were provided by students, graduates, academic staff in the department, and industrial contacts and employers. The funding council (Scottish Higher Education Funding Council), in the report on the Teaching Quality Assessment visit, identified this communication skills package as one of the Department's strengths in teaching. These positive evaluations suggest that the package is an effective means of developing the communication skills of students in chemistry.

  12. Clinical communication for international students in the UK undergraduate curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Kelechi; Wedderburn, Catherine; Maurice, James

    2011-09-01

    The UK's General Medical Council (GMC) emphasises effective communication as fundamental to good medical practice. Conversations with colleagues without English as a first language suggested that their needs in learning clinical communication skills might have differed from those of native English speakers. This study investigated whether training in UK medical schools was adequately catering for these students. An electronic questionnaire was distributed to seven UK medical schools. Responses were analysed to find areas of concern, the most beneficial aspects of the current curriculum and proposals for improvements. In total, 151 international students responded. Students reported improvements in clinical communication throughout medical school, but concerns remain concerning 'social communication' and integration with peers. A majority felt that there was a need to improve clinical communication training specifically for international students. Medical schools are successful in helping international students to develop clinical communication skills, but could further encourage social integration. This could be achieved by introducing a programme linking international students with non-international students upon medical school entry. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  13. Communicating across the Curriculum in an Undergraduate Business Program: Management 100--Leadership and Communication in Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleja, Elizabeth A.; Greenhalgh, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    Educating undergraduate business students in the 21st century requires more than addressing the quantitative side of business; rather, it calls for including the more qualitative "soft skills," such as speaking and writing. This article examines the design, delivery, and effectiveness of an undergraduate program dedicated to leadership,…

  14. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 21: Technological innovation and technical communications: Their place in aerospace engineering curricula. A survey of European, Japanese, and US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Holland, Maurita Peterson; Keene, Michael L.; Kennedy, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Aerospace engineers and scientists from Western Europe, Japan, and the United States were surveyed as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Questionnaires were used to solicit their opinions regarding the following: (1) the importance of technical communications to their profession; (2) the use and production of technical communications; and (3) their views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications. The ability to communicate technical information effectively was very important to the aerospace engineers and scientists who participated in the study. A considerable portion of their working week is devoted to using and producing technical information. The types of technical communications used and produced varied within and among the three groups. The type of technical communication product used and produced appears to be related to respondents' professional duties. Respondents from the three groups made similar recommendations regarding the principles, mechanics, and on-the-job communications to be included in an undergraduate technical communications course for aerospace majors.

  15. Integrating Technical Communication in the Mechanical Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Seth; Ashcraft, Timothy; van Poppel, Bret

    2017-11-01

    Technical communication is essential to engineering practice, but these skills can be challenging to teach and assess in the classroom. Instructors in the Mechanical Engineering (ME) program at the United States Military Academy are developing new learning exercises to prepare students for success in their capstone design course and beyond. In this paper we highlight the recent successes and lessons learned from two courses: junior-level Thermal-Fluid Systems and the senior-level ME Seminar. Both courses support the newly implemented West Point Writing Program (WPWP), an institutional, writing-across-the-curriculum program. The junior course incorporates four hands-on experiments, which provide an abundance of data for students to analyze, assess, and present. In the senior course the majority of the content that students present is from their ongoing capstone design projects. Between the two courses, students craft essays, lab reports, short summaries, posters, quad charts, and technical presentations. Both courses include peer evaluation, revision exercises, and timed (on demand) writing assignments. The junior course includes assignments co-authored by a group as well as an individual report. An overview of both courses' assignments with course-end feedback from the students and the faculty is provided. Strengths and weaknesses are identified and recommendations for instructors seeking to implement similar technical communications assignments in their own courses are presented.

  16. The effect of video-assisted oral feedback versus oral feedback on surgical communicative competences in undergraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesseler, M; Sterz, J; Bender, B; Hoefer, S; Walcher, F

    2017-08-01

    Feedback can significantly improve future performance. Reviewing one's performance by video is discussed as useful adjunct to debriefing, particularly for non-technical skills. Communicative competencies are an essential part of daily clinical practice; thus should be taught and assessed during undergraduate training. The aim of this study was to compare the educational value of video-assisted feedback versus oral feedback in communicative competencies in the surgical context. Fourth-year medical students completed a 210-min training unit of 'taking patient's history and obtaining informed consents prior to surgery' using role plays. Oral feedback was received directly thereafter using agenda-led, outcome-based guidelines (ALOBA). In the study group, the role plays were video-taped and reviewed thereafter. Afterwards, students completed two OSCE stations, where they were assessed regarding their communicative competencies and the content of the clinical scenario. One-hundred students (49 receiving video-assisted feedback, 51 oral) participated in the study. Those receiving video-assisted feedback performed significantly better in overall score in both OSCE stations (p communicative competencies at taking patient history (p = 0.029 or better), and in 2 of 5 items at obtaining informed consent (p = 0.008, <0.001). The educational effect size for both tasks was large. Using our methodology, video-assisted feedback offered a significant educational benefit over oral feedback alone during a simulated patient encounter in a surgical context.

  17. Engaging Undergraduates in Methods of Communicating Global Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C.; Colgan, M. W.; Humphreys, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    Global Climate Change has become a politically contentious issue in large part because of the failure of scientists to effectively communicate this complex subject to the general public. In a Global Change class, offered within a science department and therefore focused primarily on the underlying science, we have incorporated a citizen science module into the course to raise awareness among future scientists to the importance of communicating information to a broad and diverse audience. The citizen science component of this course focuses on how the predicted climate changes will alter the ecologic and economic landscape of the southeastern region. Helping potential scientists to learn to effectively communicate with the general public is particularly poignant for this predominate southern student body. A Pew Research Center for the People and the Press study found that less than 50% of Southerners surveyed felt that global warming is a very serious problem and over 30% of Southerners did not believe that there was any credible evidence that the Earth is warming. This interdisciplinary and topical nature of the course attracts student from a variety of disciplines, which provides the class with a cross section of students not typically found in most geology classes. This mixture provides a diversity of skills and interest that leads to success of the Citizen Science component. This learning approach was adapted from an education module developed through the Earth System Science Education Alliance and a newly developed component to that program on citizen science. Student teams developed several citizen science-related public service announcements concerning projected global change effects on Charleston and the South Carolina area. The scenario concerned the development of an information campaign for the City of Charleston, culminating with the student presentations on their findings to City officials. Through this real-life process, the students developed new

  18. Descriptive analysis of context evaluation instrument for technical oral presentation skills evaluation: A case study in English technical communication course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Abdullah-Adnan; Asmawi, Adelina; Hamid, Mohd Rashid Ab; Mustafa, Zainol bin

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports a pilot study of Context Evaluation using a self-developed questionnaire distributed among engineering undergraduates at a university under study. The study aims to validate the self-developed questionnaires used in the Context evaluation, a component in the CIPP Model. The Context evaluation assesses background information for needs, assets, problems and opportunities relevant to beneficiaries of the study in a defined environment. Through the questionnaire, background information for the assessment of needs, assets and problems related to the engineering undergraduates' perceptions on the teaching and learning of technical oral presentation skills was collected and analysed. The questionnaire was developed using 5-points Likert scale to measure the constructs under study. They were distributed to 100 respondents with 79 returned. The respondents consisted of engineering undergraduates studied at various faculties at one technical university in Malaysia. The descriptive analysis of data for each item which makes up the construct for Context evaluation is found to be high. This implied that engineering undergraduates showed high interest in teaching and learning of technical oral presentation skills, thus their needs are met. Also, they agreed that assets and facilities are conducive to their learning. In conclusion, the context evaluation involving needs and assets factors are both considerably important; their needs are met and the assets and facilities do support their technical oral presentation skills learning experience.

  19. Factor structure of the Communicator Styles Measure (CSM) when used with undergraduate health science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Boyle, Malcolm; Williams, Brett; Molloy, Andrew; McKenna, Lisa; Palermo, Claire; Molloy, Liz

    2013-06-01

    It is important for educators to consider the communication skills of students enrolled in health science programmes. To date, research into this area is limited, and having measures that are valid and reliable would assist educators and researchers to complete high-quality investigations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factor structure of Communicator Styles Measure. Data from the Communicator Styles Measure completed by 860 undergraduate health science students enrolled in eight different courses at an Australian university (response rate of 59%) were analysed using principal component analysis with varimax rotation and a cluster analysis using elementary linkage analysis. The Communicator Styles Measure is a self-report scale consisting of 40 items designed to assess ten communication styles and one's perception of his/her ability to communicate. Communicator Styles Measure items loaded onto five new viable factors labelled personable, energetic, confident, open and confronting. Six items of the original 40 from the Communicator Styles Measure did not load onto any factor and were therefore considered redundant. The original factor structure proposed by the Communicator Styles Measure's author was not supported, which calls into question its construct validity. However, the five new factors identified in this study may be useful for researchers and educators when assessing the communication skills of students and practitioners. Further investigation into the construct validity and reliability of the five new Communicator Styles Measure factors is recommended. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  20. Effective teaching of communication to health professional undergraduate and postgraduate students: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Levett-Jones, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    The objective is to identify and assess the effectiveness of tools and methods of teaching communication skills to health professional students in undergraduate and postgraduate programs, to facilitate communication in hospitals, nursing homes and mental health institutions.For this review, effective communication will be defined as that which enhances patient satisfaction, safety, symptom resolution, psychological status, or reduces the impact/burden of disease and/or improved communication skills within undergraduate or postgraduate studentsThe review question is: What is the best available evidence on strategies to effectively teach communication skills to undergraduate and postgraduate medical, nursing and allied health students (nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech pathology etc)? Communication is a two-way interaction where information, meanings and feelings are shared both verbally and non-verbally. Effective communication is when the message being conveyed is understood as intended. Effective communication between the health professional and patient is increasingly being recognised as a core clinical skill. Research has identified the far reaching benefits of effective communication skills including enhanced patient satisfaction, patient safety, symptom resolution and improvements in functional and psychological status. Poor communication can result in omitted or misinterpretation of information resulting in declining health of the patient. Despite the importance of effective communication in ensuring positive outcomes for both the patient and health professional, there is concern that contemporary teaching and learning approaches do not always facilitate the development of a requisite level of communication skills, both verbal and written and a difficulty for the current generation of communication skills teachers is that many have not had the experience of being taught communication skills themselves.Studies have shown that

  1. Experiences of nursing undergraduates on a redesigned blended communication module: A descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Shefaly; Siew, An Ling; Ang, Emily

    2018-02-01

    Education is going through accelerated changes to accommodate the needs of contemporary students. However, there are ongoing concerns regarding the quality of education in communication skills for nurses and other healthcare professionals. Many studies have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a blended learning pedagogical tool in enhancing the learning of nursing undergraduates. However, little is known about students' experiences of a blended learning model for teaching communication skills. To explore first year nursing students' experiences of the blended learning design adopted in a communication module. A descriptive qualitative design was adopted. Data were collected in the form of written reflections from 74 first year nursing undergraduates who were enrolled in a university-affiliated nursing school. Students were asked to complete an online reflective exercise regarding an undergraduate communication module on their last day of class, and the submitted reflections were analyzed. A thematic analysis was conducted and ethics approval was obtained for this study. Six overarching themes and fifteen subthemes were generated. The six overarching themes were: 1) Helpful and engaging classroom experience, 2) valuable online activities, 3) meaningful assessment, 4) appreciation for interprofessional education, 5) personal enrichment, and 6) overall feedback and recommendations. The students in this study felt that the blended pedagogy communication module enhanced their learning and boosted their confidence in facing similar situations. Interprofessional education was well-accepted among students as they attained a deeper understanding on the importance of interprofessional learning and an appreciation towards other professionals. Blended pedagogy can be used in teaching communication skills to nursing students to provide a holistic and up-to-date learning experience. Future studies should consider engaging students in face-to-face interviews to obtain

  2. Teaching communication skills and medical ethics to undergraduate medical student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SADIA AHSIN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to improve communication skills and knowledge of bioethics of last year medical students doing clerkship and to evaluate the effectiveness of using workshops for this purpose from students’ point of view, in order to continue such programs in future. Methods: After Ethical approval for the study a two-day workshop on teaching effective communication skills and principles of medical ethics was planned and conducted by the department of Medical Education through multidisciplinary faculty of Foundation University Medical College, Pakistan. A total of 102 last year medical students participated in this workshop. The students were divided into 8 groups each containing 12 students. A team of pre trained facilitators for each group conducted the group activities. Teaching strategies including interactive discussions on basic principles of doctor-patient relationship, power point presentations, day to day case scenarios, video clips and presentations involving students in role plays were used. Pre and post workshop self evaluation proformas about knowledge and skills of communication and medical ethics were rated (0=none, 1=below average, 2=average, 3=above average, 4=very good, 5=excellent by the students. Results: 89 out of 102 participants returned the proformas. A significant percentage of students (%82 showed improvement in their knowledge and skills of appreciating bioethical issues like valid informed consent, patient confidentiality, end of life issues and breaking bad news by rating as “very good” after participation in the workshop. More than %70 students recommended this activity for other students. Conclusion: Teaching through interactive workshops was found to be an effective method as reflected by students’ feedback. Therefore, the program will be continued in future.

  3. Oral Communication and Technical Writing: A Reconsideration of Writing in a Multicultural Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibangu, Sylvain K.

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the status of orality in the history of technical communication. The article calls for orality as an integral part and driving force of technical writing. The article brings to light the misconceptions that have led to a diminished role of oral communication in technical writing. The article shows the implications of oral…

  4. Science Café Course: An Innovative Means of Improving Communication Skills of Undergraduate Biology Majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Goldina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To help bridge the increasing gap between scientists and the public, we developed an innovative two-semester course, called Science Café. In this course undergraduate biology majors learn to develop communication skills to be better able to explain science concepts and current developments in science to non-scientists. Students develop and host outreach events on various topics relevant to the community, thereby increasing interactions between budding scientists and the public. Such a Science Cafe course emphasizes development of science communication skills early, at the undergraduate level and empowers students to use their science knowledge in every day interactions with the public to increase science literacy, get involved in the local community and engage the public in a dialogue on various pressing science issues. We believe that undergraduate science majors can be great ambassadors for science and are often overlooked since many aspire to go on to medical/veterinary/pharmacy schools. However, science communication skills are especially important for these types of students because when they become healthcare professionals, they will interact with the public as part of their everyday jobs and can thus be great representatives for the field.

  5. Optics and communication technology major of physics undergraduate degree at King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranasiri, Prathan

    2014-09-01

    A physics undergraduate degree major in optics and communication technology has been offered at King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang (KMITL), Bangkok, Thailand. There are nine required three credit hour courses including two laboratory courses plus a number of selections in optics and communication based technology courses. For independent thinking and industrial working skills, nine credit hours of research project, practical training or overseas studies are included for selection in the final semester. Students are encouraged to participate in international conferences and professional organizations. Recently the program, with support from SPIE and OSA, has organized its first international conference on photonic solutions 2013 (ICPS 2013).

  6. A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Holloway, Karen; Sato, Yuko; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1996-01-01

    To understand the diffusion of aerospace knowledge, it is necessary to understand the communications practices and the information-seeking behaviors of those involved in the production, transfer, and use of aerospace knowledge at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels. In this paper, we report selected results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on communications practices and information-seeking behaviors in the workplace. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communications, use of libraries, the use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. The responses of the survey respondents are placed within the context of the Japanese culture. We assume that differences in Japanese and U.S. cultures influence the communications practices and information-seeking behaviors of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

  7. Facilitating awareness of philosophy of science, ethics and communication through manual skills training in undergraduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordahl, Hilde Lund; Fougner, Marit

    2017-03-01

    Professional health science education includes a common theoretical basis concerning the theory of science, ethics and communication. Former evaluations by first-year students of the bachelor physiotherapy program at Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences (HiOA) show that they find it hard to understand the relation between these particular topics and future professional practice. This challenge is the starting point for a pedagogical development project that aims to develop learning contexts that highlight the relevance of these theoretical concepts. The aim of the study is to explore and present findings on the value of using Sykegrep manual skills classes as an arena in which students can be encouraged to think about, reflect on and appreciate the role and value of the philosophical perspectives that inform their practice and contributes to practise knowledge. A qualitative study with data collection through focus groups was performed and analyzed using thematic content analysis. Eighteen first-year undergraduate students, who had completed the manual skills course, participated in the study. Analysis of the data yielded three categories of findings that can be associated with aspects of philosophy of science, ethics and communication. These are as follows: 1) preconceived understanding of physiotherapy; 2) body knowledge perspectives; and 3) relational aspects of interactions. Undergraduate students' understanding and experience of philosophy of science, ethics and communication may be facilitated by peer collaboration, reflection on intimacy and touch and the ethical aspects of interaction during manual skills training. Practical classes in Sykegrep provide a basis for students' discussions about the body as well as their experiences with the body in the collaborative learning context. The students' reflections on their expectations of manual skills in physiotherapy and experiences of touch and being touched can facilitate an awareness of

  8. Technical quality of root canal treatment performed by undergraduate students using hand instrumentation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, D M; Réus, J C; Felippe, W T; Pacheco-Pereira, C; Dutra, K L; Santos, J N; Porporatti, A L; De Luca Canto, G

    2018-03-01

    The technical quality of root canal treatment (RCT) may impact on the outcome. The quality of education received during undergraduate school may be linked to the quality of treatment provided in general dental practice. In this context, the aim of this systematic review was to answer the following focused questions: (i) What is the frequency of acceptable technical quality of root fillings, assessed radiographically, performed by undergraduate students? (ii) What are the most common errors assessed radiographically and reported in these treatments? For this purpose, articles that evaluated the quality of root fillings performed by undergraduate students were selected. Data were collected based on predetermined criteria. The key features from the included studies were extracted. GRADE-tool assessed the quality of the evidence. MAStARI evaluated the methodological quality, and a meta-analysis on all studies was conducted. At the end of the screening, 24 articles were identified. Overall frequency of acceptable technical quality of root fillings was 48%. From this total, 52% related to anterior teeth, 49% to premolars and 26% to molars. The main procedural errors reported were ledge formation, furcation perforation, apical transportation and apical perforation. The heterogeneity amongst the studies was high (84-99%). Five studies had a high risk of bias, eight had a moderate risk, and 11 had low risk. The overall quality of evidence identified was very low. The conclusion was that technical quality of root fillings performed by undergraduate students is low, which may reveal that endodontic education has limited achievement at undergraduate level. A plan to improve the quality of root fillings, and by extrapolation the overall quality of root canal treatment, should be discussed by the staff responsible for endodontic education and training. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Technical Writing and Communication in a Senior-Level Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, A. S.; Latosi-Sawin, Elizabeth

    1999-10-01

    To prepare chemistry majors for entry into graduate school and professional life, a senior-level seminar has been designed at Missouri Western State College that introduces students to scientific journals and aspects of professional communication. Students select topics, conduct research, report progress, write summaries for technical and nontechnical audiences, prepare abstracts, organize outlines, and present a formal research paper. At semester's end, each student delivers a 45-minute seminar to peers and departmental faculty, using easily learned presentation software. Faculty who would adopt this approach need to guide student research, emphasize purpose and audience, illustrate a synthesis of sources, support writing as a process, and help students overcome their fear of public speaking.

  10. Briefing Products - Tools for Communicating Technical Issues to a Non-Technical Audience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Harvey; Foster, Kevin T.

    2011-01-01

    Briefing Products are a new NARAC/IMAAC product line designed to communicate the consequences of a radiological, nuclear, chemical or biological agent incident to non-technical decision makers and key leaders. Each Briefing Product addresses a single decision or issue focused on potential actions that should be considered when responding to a hazard, while avoiding the use of technical or regulatory jargon. Briefing Products do not make protective action recommendations, although they do concretely assist decision-makers with development of their own protective actions by quoting or paraphrasing the published guidance relevant to the decision at hand. Briefing Products are produced in sets tailored to specific types of incident which together depict the key decisions and characteristics of the incident. Each Briefing Product in the set consists of three elements: (1) Primary Effects, (2) Key Points and (3) Presenter Notes. Both the Primary Effects and Key Points are ready for direct presentation, while the Presenter Notes are designed to provide background information to the presenter and are not for direct presentation to the audience. The Briefing Products themselves are alternative presentations of results from the customary standard NARAC/IMAAC technical products. Currently, Briefing Products are available for detonation of both RDDs (Radiological Dispersal Devices) and INDs (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A new set of products tailored to nuclear power plant (NPP) accidents is currently under development. This paper describes the scope, structure and content of the Briefing Product sets. Examples from the two sets of Briefing Products now available are presented.

  11. Speech Disfluencies and Mispronunciations in English Oral Communication among Malaysian Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Yong Enxhi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The common perception of Malaysians is that they are unable to speak fluently and communicate effectively in the English language as most Malaysians do not speak English as their first language. In a country that is full of diversity in terms of race and culture, it is only natural for Malaysians to be influenced by their first language when using English as their second language. This, however, creates a problem for undergraduates who are looking for job opportunities in both local and international companies because a potential employee’s ability to communicate smoothly in English is an important criteria used by employers. This study intends to shed light on the occurrence of speech disfluencies and mispronunciations among undergraduates of a Malaysian university as well as to provide an explanation for those mispronunciations by comparing the phonetic system of the English language with the Malay and Mandarin language. With the results of this study, it is hoped that actions and measures can be taken by the academic authorities and other relevant parties to gradually improve the oral proficiency skills of undergraduates and help them to be more marketable in the future.

  12. Mixed Method Study Examines Undergraduate Student Researchers’ Knowledge and Perceptions About Scholarly Communication Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Goertzen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Riehle, C. F., & Hensley, M. K. (2017. What do undergraduate students know about scholarly communication?: A mixed methods study. Portal: Libraries and the Academy, 17(1, 145–178. http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/pla.2017.0009 Abstract Objective – To examine undergraduate student researchers’ perception and understanding of scholarly communication practices and issues. Design – Mixed method study involving a survey and semi-structured interviews. Setting – Two major undergraduate universities in the Midwest region of the United States. Subjects – Undergraduate students who participated in or had completed undergraduate research experiences with faculty mentors. Method – The method was first approved by Institutional Review Board offices at both campuses involved in the study. Then, students received invitations to participate in a survey via email (Campus 1 = 221 students; Campus 2 = 345 students. Identical online surveys ran separately on each campus; both remained open for a period of three weeks. All respondents received a reminder email one week before the survey closed. Participants answered twelve questions related to demographics and scholarly communication practices. The survey examined knowledge and experience across five areas: the peer review process, author and publisher rights, publication and access models, impact of research, and data management. All students who completed the survey were entered in a drawing for a $50 Amazon card. The response rates were 34.8% (Campus 1 and 18.6% (Campus 2. Surveys on both campuses were administered using different software: campus 1 utilized Qualtrics survey software while campus 2 used an institution-specific survey software. Data sets were normed and merged later in the study to enable comparison and identify broad themes. Survey respondents were also invited to participate in a 15 to 20 minute follow-up interview and were compensated with a $20 Amazon gift card. The

  13. Communicating complex technical information in virtual teams of a multicultural global organization

    OpenAIRE

    Moksén, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Variant communication is used in the case organization to refer to information and interaction related to variant creation, meaning the customization of the mobile phones according to network operator’s or country’s specific requirements. Variant communication is a process of communicating complex technical messages through electronic communication channels to a multicultural audience. In this thesis the aim is to get a comprehensive understanding how the intercultural, virtual and technic...

  14. An investigation of communication patterns and strategies between international teaching assistants and undergraduate students in university-level science labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, Barbara Elas

    This research project investigates communication between international teaching assistants and their undergraduate students in university-level chemistry labs. During the fall semester, introductory-level chemistry lab sections of three experienced non-native speaking teaching assistants and their undergraduate students were observed. Digital audio and video recordings documented fifteen hours of lab communication, focusing on the activities and interactions in the first hour of the chemistry laboratory sessions. In follow-up one-on-one semi-structured interviews, the participants (undergraduates, teaching assistants, and faculty member) reviewed interactions and responded to a 10-item, 7-point Likert-scaled interview. Interactions were classified into success categories based on participants' opinions. Quantitative and qualitative data from the observations and interviews guided the analysis of the laboratory interactions, which examined patterns of conversational listening. Analysis of laboratory communication reveals that undergraduates initiated nearly two-thirds of laboratory communication, with three-fourths of interactions less than 30 seconds in duration. Issues of gender and topics of interaction activity were also explored. Interview data identified that successful undergraduate-teaching assistant communication in interactive science labs depends on teaching assistant listening comprehension skills to interpret and respond successfully to undergraduate questions. Successful communication in the chemistry lab depended on the coordination of visual and verbal sources of information. Teaching assistant responses that included explanations and elaborations were also seen as positive features in the communicative exchanges. Interaction analysis focusing on the listening comprehension demands placed on international teaching assistants revealed that undergraduate-initiated questions often employ deixis (exophoric reference), requiring teaching assistants to

  15. A MODEL FOR INTEGRATED SOFTWARE TO IMPROVE COMMUNICATION POLICY IN DENTAL TECHNICAL LABS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minko M. Milev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integrated marketing communications (IMC are all kinds of communications between organisations and customers, partners, other organisations and society. Aim: To develop and present an integrated software model, which can improve the effectiveness of communications in dental technical services. Material and Methods: The model of integrated software is based on recommendations of a total of 700 respondents (students of dental technology, dental physicians, dental technicians and patients of dental technical laboratories in Northeastern Bulgaria. Results and Discussion: We present the benefits of future integrated software to improve the communication policy in the dental technical laboratory that meets the needs of fast cooperation and well-built communicative network between dental physicians, dental technicians, patients and students. Conclusion: The use of integrated communications could be a powerful unified approach to improving the communication policy between all players at the market of dental technical services.

  16. Technical communication. Perspectives for the Eighties, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, J. C. (Compiler); Pinelli, T. E. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The importance of technical writing as a separate discipline is suggested. Some specific areas addressed were: technical writing skills industry needs, definitions of technical writing, the hows and whys of inhouse writing, and the nature of the composing process in technical comunication.

  17. TecCOMFrame : Building bridges between technical communication and translation studies through a prototype specialisation curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleary, Yvonne; Engberg, Jan; Karreman, Joyce; Meex, Birgitta; Closs, Sissi; Drazek, Zygmunt; Ghenghea, Voichita; Minacori, Patricia; Muller, J.; Straub, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Technical communication is a new field of work compared to other professions, and therefore it does not have a standardised curriculum. In Europe, many technical communicators do not have qualifications in the area. TecCOMFrame, a project funded by the European Union, aims to develop an academic

  18. A Study on the Impact of Collective Feedback in the Online Technical and Professional Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation study seeks to determine whether feedback in the online Technical and Professional Communication classroom impacts student performance. This dissertation proposes that online Technical and Professional Communication instructors consider adopt such a feedback methodology in order to engage students with writing practices that…

  19. Introducing Heuristics of Cultural Dimensions into the Service-Level Technical Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A significant problem for practitioners of technical communication is to gain the skills to compete in a global, multicultural work environment. Instructors of technical communication can provide future practitioners with the tools to compete and excel in this global environment by introducing heuristics of cultural dimensions into the…

  20. Tech Writing, Meet "Tomb Raider": Video and Computer Games in the Technical Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vie, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the common genre of the usability study in technical communication courses and proposes the incorporation of computer and video games to ensure a rhetorical focus to this genre. As games are both entertaining and educational, their use in the technical communication classroom provides a new perspective on multimodal…

  1. How can mobile SMS communication support and enhance a first year undergraduate learning environment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Jones

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss a case study investigating how the academic and personal development of first year students on an undergraduate sports education degree can be supported and enhanced with mobile SMS (Short Message Service communication. SMS-based technologies were introduced in response to students' particular needs (in transition to Higher Education and characteristics (adept mobile communicators. Despite being unaccustomed to using their mobile phones for academic study, students willingly accepted SMS communication with their tutor via a texting management service. This communication was used in concert and integrated with a more traditional learning and teaching context (lectures and a virtual learning environment. Drawing on evidence from two student surveys, focus groups and a tutor's journal, we illustrate how mobile SMS communication has influenced the student learning experience. Taking a holistic view of the learning environment we use Laurillard's (2002 conversational framework (Laurillard, D. 2002. Rethinking university teaching: a framework for the effective use of learning technologies. 2nd edition. London: Routledge. to analyse and discuss the role of texting in supporting student transition to higher education.

  2. Skills in clinical communication: Are we correctly assessing them at undergraduate level?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Zamora Cervantes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Communicating with the patient in clinical practice refers to the way in which the doctor and the patient interact both verbally and nonverbally, in order to achieve a shared understanding of problems and solutions. Traditional learning and assessment systems are overwhelmed when it comes to addressing the complex and multi-dimensional problems of professional practice. Problem Based Learning (PBL has been put forward as an alternative to the mere reproduction of knowledge and pre-established patterns, enabling students to develop their own learning strategies to overcome problems in their future professional practice. The challenge is to determine how to assess the acquisition of clinical communication skills. The authors have recommended a summative assessment of clinical communication skills based on the combination of different methods. It highlights the importance of feedback-based formative assessment. This raises the need to develop and validate assessment scales in clinical communication at an undergraduate level. Based on this work, the authors put forward a "fanned out" assessment in terms of clinical communication skills in Medicine degrees, with the use of different instruments in a "spiraled" manner, where the greater the contact with clinical practice in the various degree and integral courses, the greater difficulty experienced, with the participation of all the stakeholders involved (self, hetero and peer assessment without precluding the involvement of patients (real or simulated in the design of assessment instruments.

  3. Public Science Education and Outreach as a Modality for Teaching Science Communication Skills to Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arion, Douglas; OConnell, Christine; Lowenthal, James; Hickox, Ryan C.; Lyons, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University is working with Carthage College, Dartmouth College, and Smith College, in partnership with the Appalachian Mountain Club, to develop and disseminate curriculum to incorporate science communication education into undergraduate science programs. The public science education and outreach program operating since 2012 as a partnership between Carthage and the Appalachian Mountain Club is being used as the testbed for evaluating the training methods. This talk will review the processes that have been developed and the results from the first cohort of students trained in these methods and tested during the summer 2017 education and outreach efforts, which reached some 12,000 members of the public. A variety of evaluation and assessment tools were utilized, including surveys of public participants and video recording of the interactions of the students with the public. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under grant number 1625316.

  4. A Comparison of the Act and Frequency of Plagiarism between Technical and Non-Technical Programme Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    BavaHarji, Madhubala; Chetty, Thiba Naraina; Ismail, Zalina Bt; Letchumanan, Krishnaveni

    2016-01-01

    Concerned with intellectual theft, we decided to examine intellectual theft among undergraduates at a private higher education institution. The aim of this study was to compare the act and frequency of plagiarism, particularly between programmes, gender, year of study and academic performance. This study adopted the quantitative approach, using a…

  5. Culture and Workplace Communications: A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E. (Editor); Sato, Yuko (Editor); Barclay, Rebecca O. (Editor); Kennedy, John M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The advent of global markets elevates the role and importance of culture as a mitigating factor in the diffusion of knowledge and technology and in product and process innovation. This is especially true in the large commercial aircraft (LCA) sector where the production and market aspects are becoming increasingly international. As firms expand beyond their national borders, using such methods as risk-sharing partnerships, joint ventures, outsourcing, and alliances, they have to contend with national and corporate cultures. Our focus is on Japan, a program participant in the production of the Boeing Company's 777. The aspects of Japanese culture and workplace communications will be examined: (1) the influence of Japanese culture on the diffusion of knowledge and technology in aerospace at the national and international levels; (2) those cultural determinants-the propensity to work together, a willingness to subsume individual interests to a greater good, and an emphasis on consensual decision making-that have a direct bearing on the ability of Japanese firms to form alliances and compete in international markets; (3) and those cultural determinants thought to influence the information-seeking behaviors and workplace communication practices of Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists. In this article, we report selective results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on workplace communications. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communication, use of libraries, use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports.

  6. Technical Communication, Literary Theory, and English Studies: Stasis, Change, and the Problem of Meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebeaux, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that technical communication curricula occupy valid theoretical positions within English studies. Advocates curricula which emphasize the connections between reading and writing, the historical-cultural contexts underlying communication, and a new rhetoric for technology-based communications and readers with global language skills. (SR)

  7. What Do We Learn about Technical Communication in Hungary through My Students and My Hungarian Colleagues: An Initial Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Daniel D.

    2018-01-01

    Very few articles exist that document technical communication in Hungary. My Fulbright research reveals two general points: First, technical communication pedagogy stresses correct use of professional terms and phrases in technical translations or technical articles for fictional audiences. Second, it does not emphasize the importance of…

  8. 78 FR 9311 - Hazard Communication; Corrections and Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... 1926 [Docket No. OSHA-H022K-2006-0062 (formerly Docket No. H022K)] RIN 1218-AC20 Hazard Communication... amended by the Hazard Communication Standard final rule, published in the Federal Register on March 26... inquiries: Frank Meilinger, Director, Office of Communications, OSHA, Room N-3647, U.S. Department of Labor...

  9. PODCASTING TO PROVIDE TEACHING AND LEARNING SUPPORT FOR AN UNDERGRADUATE MODULE ON ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palitha EDIRISINGHA,

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis paper reports findings from research into the benefits of integrating podcasts into a first year undergraduate module on English Language and Communication at Kingston University. As part of a Faculty teaching and learning support scheme for first year undergraduates, six podcasts were developed to improve students’ learning and study skills and to provide advice on portfolio development and presentation skills. Student learning experience through podcasts was evaluated through two focus groups, personal interviews (six students and an end of semester evaluation questionnaire (n=35. The paper describes the teaching and learning context and how the podcasts were integrated as part of the blended learning delivery. It discusses to what extent podcasts were able to achieve of the intended outcomes and the processes involved in achieving those outcomes. The findings led to development of a model for integrating podcasts in on-campus blended learning, and which can have potential applications in distance learning contexts. The model is based on three main features of podcasts identified as facilitating student learning: learner choice and flexibility offered by podcasts; tacit knowledge and experience of peers conveyed in discussions; and a sense of informality brought into formal learning.The research reported in the paper was carried out as part of a UK national research project entitled Informal Mobile Podcasting and Learning Adaptation (IMPALA with funding from the UK Higher Education Academy.

  10. Co-Curricular Connections: The Role of Undergraduate Research Experiences in Promoting Engineering Students' Communication, Teamwork, and Leadership Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Deborah Faye; Ro, Hyun Kyoung; Alcott, Benjamin; Lattuca, Lisa R.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of undergraduate research (UR) in engineering, focusing on three particular learning outcomes: communication, teamwork, and leadership. The study included 5126 students across 31 colleges of engineering. The authors employed propensity score matching method to address the selection bias for selection into (and…

  11. Peer Feedback Enhances a "Journal Club" for Undergraduate Science Students That Develops Oral Communication and Critical Evaluation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colthorpe, Kay; Chen, Xuebin; Zimbardi, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Effective science communication is one of the key skills undergraduates must achieve and is one of the threshold learning outcomes for Science (TLO 4.1). In addition, presenting published research to their peers allows students to critically evaluate scientific research (TLO 3.1) and develop a deeper appreciation for the link between experimental…

  12. Competencies Needed in Oral Communication in English among Thai Undergraduate Public Relations Students: A Substantial Gap between Expectations and Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanapichet, Fasawang; Chinokul, Sumalee

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the competencies needed for oral communication in English among Thai undergraduate public relations students for handling public relations job interviews and performing entry-level public relations work. To identify these competencies, the study identified and involved all of the stakeholders in the data reliability…

  13. "Physiology in the News": Using Press Releases to Enhance Lay Communication and Introduce Current Physiology Research to Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kevin L.; Poteracki, James M.; Steury, Michael D.; Wehrwein, Erica A.

    2015-01-01

    Michigan State University's senior-level undergraduate physiology capstone laboratory uses a simple exercise termed "Physiology in the News," to help students explore the current research within the field of physiology while also learning to communicate science in lay terms. "Physiology in the News" is an activity that charges…

  14. Frazzled by Facebook? An Exploratory Study of Gender Differences in Social Network Communication among Undergraduate Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sharon H.; Lougheed, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Although a majority of young adults are members of at least one social networking site, peer reviewed research examining gender differences in social networking communication is sparse. This study examined gender differences in social networking, particularly for Facebook use, among undergraduates. A survey was distributed to 268 college students…

  15. Doctoral-Level Graduates in Professional, Technical, and Scientific Communication 1995-2000: A Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kelli Cargile; Thralls, Charlotte; Zachry, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Reports results of a survey study of a recently graduated group of PhDs in professional, technical, and scientific communication. Explains that this survey was designed to provide some insight into this growing population of specialists. Highlights the importance of constructing a profile of new graduates in professional, technical, and scientific…

  16. Cosmopolitanism: Extending Our Theoretical Framework for Transcultural Technical Communication Research and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Zsuzsanna Bacsa

    2013-01-01

    The effects of globalization on communication products and processes have resulted in document features and interactional practices that are sometimes difficult to describe within current theoretical frameworks of inter/transcultural technical communication. Although it has been recognized in our field that the old theoretical frameworks and…

  17. Computer-Assisted Instruction in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry: Design, Application, and Evaluation. Technical Report 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, George

    The computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program in undergraduate organic chemistry at the University of Texas was evaluated by an experimental design in 1969 and found to be successful. This report discusses in detail the formation of the design, its application, and the method of evaluation. The program itself included 15 teaching modules that…

  18. Non-Technical Skills in Undergraduate Degrees in Business: Development and Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise; Hancock, Phil

    2010-01-01

    The development of discipline-specific skills and knowledge is no longer considered sufficient in graduates of Bachelor level degrees in Business. Higher education providers are becoming increasingly responsible for the development of a generic skill set deemed essential in undergraduates. This required skill set comprises a broad range of…

  19. The longitudinal curriculum "social and communicative competencies" within Bologna-reformed undergraduate medical education in Basel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Claudia; Langewitz, Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Within the Bologna reform, a longitudinal curriculum of "social and communicative competencies" (SOKO) was implemented into the new Bachelor-Master structure of undergraduate medical education in Basel (Switzerland). The aim of the SOKO curriculum is to enable students to use techniques of patient-centred communication to elicit and provide information to patients in order to involve them as informed partners in decision making processes. The SOKO curriculum consists of 57 lessons for the individual student from the first bachelor year to the first master year. Teaching encompasses lectures and small group learning. Didactic methods include role play, video feedback, and consultations with simulated and real patients. Summative assessment takes place in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE). In Basel, a longitudinal SOKO curriculum based on students' cumulative learning was successfully implemented. Goals and contents were coordinated with the remaining curriculum and are regularly assessed in OSCEs. At present, most of the workload rests on the shoulders of the department of psychosomatic medicine at the university hospital. For the curriculum to be successful in the long-term, sustainable structures need to be instituted at the medical faculty and the university hospital to guarantee high quality teaching and assessment.

  20. Palmetto Academy: Undergraduates Exploring and Communicating the Multidisciplinary Nature of STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C.; Ali, A.; Runyon, C. J.; Colgan, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    One of the pillars of the US economy is a well-trained Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) workforce (National Academy of Sciences, 2007). The number of students choosing to study science and engineering has taken a dramatic decline. The percentage of those degrees conferred in SC was substantially lower than the national average and the percentage of those occupations within the SC workforce also falls below the national average, supporting the need for engaging and educational STEM programs. The NASA South Carolina Space Grant Consortium's Palmetto Research Academy (PRA) program is an immersive and integrated multidisciplinary exposure and training for undergraduate students with various backgrounds and career aspirations of critical importance to the Nation. This program offers exciting and inspiring hands-on research experiences that are aligned with NASA missions. The PRA advances NASA's research interest in areas such as aeronautics, biomedical science, sun-earth connections, planetary and Earth science. The PRA helps to develop the STEM workforce in STEM disciplines, a necessity in South Carolina. In addition, the PRA incorporates an education/outreach component, where the students engage secondary educators and students in NASA scientific and technical expertise. In 2012, the PRA had 10 research projects across the state in disciplines of mechanical and chemical engineering, bioengineering, chemistry, biogeooptical sciences, physics and astronomy and biomedical sciences. 18 undergraduates and 2 technical college students participated in authentic hands-on research mentored by leading scientists and engineers throughout the state. Examples projects include: A) Development of a series of astronomical telescopes to be mounted on a commercial human-tended suborbital rockets. The students built the instrument, including the power system and the mechanical interface, and performed function and fit testing on the XCOR Aerospace Lynx vehicle mock-up. B

  1. Approaching socio-technical issues in Knowledge Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance; Islas Sedano, Carolina

    2008-01-01

    This paper looks at the connection between technology, knowledge management and knowledge communication theory from a process perspective. Knowledge management and knowledge communication processes are examined through the iterations in creating project goals and objectives which connect the social...... context with a mobile phone technology.  The data comes from a Project Management course in which the students were asked to design and plan projects to situate SciMyst, a mobile phone game, in the social context around a museum in Helsinki.  The paper traces the evolution of students' project goals...

  2. Technical metaphor of railroad switch and communicative action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Caballero Bono

    2016-02-01

    statements on the status of the human embryo. Taken seriously, the «railroad switch» metaphor allows us to talk about an emergent communicative action in terms of the call experienced by a rational agent as a base for his or her calling an unborn human being.

  3. A Writing-Intensive Course Improves Biology Undergraduates' Perception and Confidence of Their Abilities to Read Scientific Literature and Communicate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Sara E.; Price, Jordan V.; Steinman, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Most scientists agree that comprehension of primary scientific papers and communication of scientific concepts are two of the most important skills that we can teach, but few undergraduate biology courses make these explicit course goals. We designed an undergraduate neuroimmunology course that uses a writing-intensive format. Using a mixture of…

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 52: A comparison of the technical communications practices of Japanese and US aerospace engineers and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Holloway, Karen; Sato, Yuko; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    To understand the diffusion of aerospace knowledge, it is necessary to understand the communications practices and the information-seeking behaviors of those involved in the production, transfer, and use of aerospace knowledge at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels. In this paper, we report selected results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on communications practices and information-seeking behaviors in the workplace. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communications, use of libraries, the use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. The responses of the survey respondents are placed within the context of the Japanese culture. We assume that differences in Japanese and U.S. cultures influence the communications practices and information-seeking behaviors of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

  5. The future of mathematical communication. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christy, J.

    1994-12-31

    One of the first fruits of cooperation with LBL was the use of the MBone (Multi-Cast Backbone) to broadcast the Conference on the Future of Mathematical Communication, held at MSRI November 30--December 3, 1994. Late last fall, MSRI brought together more than 150 mathematicians, librarians, software developers, representatives of scholarly societies, and both commercial and not-for-profit publishers to discuss the revolution in scholarly communication brought about by digital technology. The conference was funded by the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Paul and Gabriella Rosenbaum Foundation. It focused on the impact of the technological revolution on mathematics, but necessarily included issues of a much wider scope. There were talks on electronic publishing, collaboration across the Internet, economic and intellectual property issues, and various new technologies which promise to carry the revolution forward. There were panel discussions of electronic documents in mathematics, the unique nature of electronic journals, technological tools, and the role of scholarly societies. There were focus groups on Developing Countries, K-12 Education, Libraries, and Te{sub X}. The meeting also embodied the promises of the revolution; it was multicast over the MBone channel of the Internet to hundreds of sites around the world and much information on the conference will be available on their World Wide Web server at the URL http://www.msri.org/fmc. The authors have received many comments about the meeting indicating that it has had a profound impact on how the community thinks about how scientists can communicate and make their work public.

  6. Teaching and assessment of communication skills in undergraduate dental education - a survey in German-speaking countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttermann, S; Sobotta, A; Hahn, P; Kiessling, C; Härtl, A

    2017-08-01

    Teaching communication is perceived to be of importance in dental education. Several reports have been published worldwide in the educational literature describing modifications of the dental curriculum by implementing the teaching of communication skills. Surveys which evaluate the current state of training and assessment of communication skills in dental education in different countries exist already in some countries, but little information is available about German-speaking countries. In a cross-sectional study with the aim of a census, all 36 dental schools in Germany (30), Austria (3), and Switzerland (3) were surveyed. The present survey revealed that at 26 of the 34 dental schools (76%), communication skills training has been implemented. Training of communication skills mainly takes place between the 6th and the 9th semester. Ten schools were able to implement a partly longitudinal curriculum, while the other sites only offer stand-alone courses. Of the 34 dental schools, six assess communication skills in a summative way. Three of those schools also use formative assessments for their students. Another seven sites only use formative assessment. From the various formats of assessment, OSCE is mentioned most frequently. The necessity to train and assess communication skills has reached German-speaking dental schools. The present survey allows an overview of the training and assessment of communication skills in undergraduate dental education in German-speaking Europe. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Challenge Study: A Project-Based Learning on a Wireless Communication System at Technical High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    The challenge study is a project based learning curriculum at Technical High School aimed at the construction of a wireless communication system. The first period was engineering issues in the construction of an artificial satellite and the second period was a positional locating system based on the general purpose wire-less device--ZigBee device.…

  8. Game Theory and Technical Communication: Interpreting the Texas Two-Step through Harsanyi Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Miriam F.

    2012-01-01

    The author uses game theoretical models to identify technical communication breakdowns encountered during the notoriously confusing Texas Two-Step voting and caucusing process. Specifically, the author uses narrative theory and game theory to highlight areas where caucus participants needed instructions to better understand the rules of the game…

  9. A Friend in Your Neighborhood: Local Risk Communication in a Technical Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Lynne

    2009-01-01

    When examined rhetorically, Savannah River Site Community Preparedness Information calendars from 1994, 2004, and 2008 represent living rhetorical practices aimed at changing the public mind. My technical communication classroom at USC Aiken is uniquely situated for us to examine documents constantly generated by the site's Public Affairs…

  10. The Overruled Dust Mite: Preparing Technical Communication Students To Interact with Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastman Breuch, Lee-Ann M.

    2001-01-01

    Notes that while many technical communication instructors declare the benefits of client projects, too often instructors do not prepare students to interact with clients. Reviews a qualitative case study that demonstrates the difficulty students can have interacting with clients. Relates how students may not always be prepared to listen or respond…

  11. The Scientist, Philosopher, and Rhetorician: The Three Dimensions of Technical Communication and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Technical communication's attempt to prioritize theories of scholarship and pedagogy has resulted in several authors contributing a three-dimensional framework to approach technology: the instrumental perspective, the critical humanist perspective, and the user-centered perspective [1-3]. This article traces connections between this framework for…

  12. Bridging the Gaps: Technical Communication in an International and Multicultural Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, Emily A.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that communication problems arise because of differences in world experience, in the amount of common knowledge shared within cultures, in the structure of societies and the workplace, in culturally specific rhetorical strategies, and even in differences in processing graphics. Suggests technical writing teachers find ways to incorporate…

  13. Theorycrafting the Classroom: Constructing the Introductory Technical Communication Course as a Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finseth, Carly

    2015-01-01

    When games are approached as a pedagogical methodology, the homologies between games and technical communication are highlighted: pedagogy that teaches people to play and succeed within certain confines; classroom assessment that provides meaningful feedback to encourage self-improvement; instructional design that incorporates gaming theory and…

  14. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 60: Culture and Workplace Communications: A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Sato, Yuko; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1997-01-01

    The advent of global markets elevates the role and importance of culture as a mitigating factor in the diffusion of knowledge and technology and in product and process innovation. This is especially true in the Large Commercial Aircraft (LCA) sector where the production and market aspects are becoming increasingly international. As firms expand beyond their national borders, using such methods as risk- sharing partnerships, joint ventures, outsourcing, and alliances, they have to contend with national and corporate cultures. Our focus is on Japan, a 'program participant' in the production of the Boeing Company's 777; the influence of Japanese culture on the diffusion of knowledge and technology in aerospace at the national and international levels; those cultural determinants-the propensity to work together, a willingness to subsume individual interests to a greater good, and an emphasis on consensual decisionmaking-that have a direct bearing on the ability of Japanese firms to form alliances and compete in international markets; and those cultural determinants thought to influence the information- seeking behaviors and workplace communication practices of Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists. In this paper, we report selective results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on workplace communications. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communication, use of libraries, use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports.

  15. Technical Communication Internship Requirements in the Academic Economy: How We Compare among Ourselves and across Other Applied Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Gerald J.; Seible, Marcea K.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a study of internship requirements in technical communication programs compared with three established professions and one emerging profession that have certification or licensing requirements for practitioners. The study addresses three questions about technical communication internship programs: 1) Are internships offered as…

  16. Moving towards Ethnorelativism: A Framework for Measuring and Meeting Students' Needs in Cross-Cultural Business and Technical Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhua

    2013-01-01

    Scholars in business and technical communication have continuously made efforts to look for effective teaching approaches for cross-cultural business and technical communication; however, little research has been conducted to study the process by which students develop intercultural competence; fewer studies have been conducted to assess learners'…

  17. It's not hype, it's communication: Using public relations techniques to improve your technical messages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martell, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Technical communicators are concerned that if they employ public relations (PR) techniques, they somehow compromise their work. They believe PR equates with type. However, to those of us in the field, PR means simply how people relate. Knowing PR techniques gives one a better understanding of human factors and interactions; using the techniques improves the chances for communication to occur. If technical communications are willing to learn PR techniques, they will gain strong tools to use to strengthen their messages.

  18. English Language Proficiency Tests and Academic Achievement: A Study on the Malaysian University English Test as a Predictor of Technical Programme Undergraduates Academic Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhazlini Rahmat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Malaysian education system, English has always played an important role. In acknowledging its importance, Malaysian University English Test (MUET has been introduced to enable continued emphasis on this role.  MUET has been made compulsory for those who wish to pursue a first degree programme in local universities. This study aims to examine the relationship between English language proficiency test (as measured by MUET bands to predict the undergraduates academic achievement (as measured by Cumulative Grade Point Average score. It also aims to determine the recommended MUET band as an entry requirement for prospective technical programme undergraduates in Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM. The study was carried out among 225 final year undergraduates of five different faculties in UPM, namely Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Forestry, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, and Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.  The data used were obtained by administering a brief questionnaire and were quantitatively analysed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS version 19.  The study revealed that there is a medium positive correlation between English language proficiency and academic achievement where students who have scored higher bands for MUET are the ones who obtained higher CGPA in their study. Based on the findings, it is recommended that UPM and other local universities make changes towards the minimum MUET entry requirement to help prospective undergraduates excel in their academic study. Keywords: English language proficiency, academic achievement, technical programme, MUET, CGPA

  19. A writing-intensive course improves biology undergraduates' perception and confidence of their abilities to read scientific literature and communicate science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Sara E; Price, Jordan V; Steinman, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    Most scientists agree that comprehension of primary scientific papers and communication of scientific concepts are two of the most important skills that we can teach, but few undergraduate biology courses make these explicit course goals. We designed an undergraduate neuroimmunology course that uses a writing-intensive format. Using a mixture of primary literature, writing assignments directed toward a layperson and scientist audience, and in-class discussions, we aimed to improve the ability of students to 1) comprehend primary scientific papers, 2) communicate science to a scientific audience, and 3) communicate science to a layperson audience. We offered the course for three consecutive years and evaluated its impact on student perception and confidence using a combination of pre- and postcourse survey questions and coded open-ended responses. Students showed gains in both the perception of their understanding of primary scientific papers and of their abilities to communicate science to scientific and layperson audiences. These results indicate that this unique format can teach both communication skills and basic science to undergraduate biology students. We urge others to adopt a similar format for undergraduate biology courses to teach process skills in addition to content, thus broadening and strengthening the impact of undergraduate courses.

  20. Final Scientific/Technical Report Solar America Initiative: Solar Outreach and Communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissman, Jane M

    2011-09-10

    The purpose of the Solar America Initiative: Solar Outreach and Communications grant was to promote better communications among stakeholders; address infrastructure barriers to solar energy; and coordinate with industry, the U.S. Department of Energy, national laboratories, states, cities and counties. The Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC), a non-profit organization formed in 1982, approached this grant project by establishing a wide range of communication and outreach activities including newsletters, workshops, webinars, model practices and publications; by advancing easy and fair hook-up rules to the utility grid; and by upgrading training based on industry competency standards. The Connecting to the Grid project and the Solar Codes and Standards Public Hearings project offered communication coupled with technical assistance to overcome interconnection, net metering and other regulatory and program barriers. The Workforce Development Project tackled building a strong workforce through quality training and competency assessment programs. IREC's web site, the semi-monthly state and stakeholder newsletter and the metrics report resulted in better communications among stakeholders. Workshops and phone seminars offered technical assistance and kept stakeholders up-to-date on key issues. All of these activities resulted in implementing sustainable solutions to institutional and market barriers to solar energy and getting the right information to the right people.

  1. Illustrator's view of more-effective technical communication through computer graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGasperi, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    The need for dynamic and well-designed presentations is critical for effective technical communication. Computer graphics as an art media tool for the illustrator often surpasses other available media. After the speed of the computer, its capability to produce an increible range of complex color schemes makes it such an invaluable aid. However, it is evident that this medium is frequently not used to its fullest capacity in the field of technical communication. This is because of the lack of well-designed visual presentations. In particular, this situation is often caused by the improper use of color, the lack of contrast, and visual continuity. Improving the state-of-the-art in the area of visual presentations is achievable by including graphic design techniques, a common-reference language, and by improving versatility in graphics programs and software packages

  2. Technical communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Bitter almond oil (benzaldehyde), a flavoring compound used in many foods, was isolated from apricot kernels; 2 synthetic benzaldehyde samples were obtained from commercial sources. All samples were analyzed for radiocarbon ( 14 C) content. The natural sample yielded a value consistent with its natural origin (approximately 116% of Modern Standard Activity), while the synthetic samples were devoid of 14 C activity as expected for a petrochemical material. Implications for quality control of bitter almond oil are discussed

  3. Technical Communication Practices of Russian and U. S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    3.00 (105) 3.00 (161) COLLABORATIVE WRITING PRACTICES OF RUSSIAN AND U.S. AEROSPACE ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS Number of Groups Mean 2.82 (90) 2.82...in descending writing practices (see Table 5) or their production of written order): technical communication as a function of the number of groups and...group size. However. this lack of a real difference between the two groups in their collaborative writing practices and Russian U.S. their production

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 25: The impact of language and culture on technical communication in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, John R.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Keene, Michael L.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most significant developments in the field of technical communication during the 1980's and 1990's has been a growing interest in international technical communication, including technical communication in Japan. This article provides insights into aspects of the Japanese language and culture that affect Japanese technical communication practices. These insights are then used to interpret and report the results of a survey of Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the kinds of communication products they produce, the kinds they use, and the specific recommendation they would offer to designers of academic programs in technical communication.

  5. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. XXV - The impact of language and culture on technical communication in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, John R.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Keene, Michael L.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most significant developments in the field of technical communication during the 1980s and 1990s has been a growing interest in international technical communication, including technical communication in Japan. This article provides insights into aspects of the Japanese language and culture that affect Japanese technical communication practices. The authors then use these insights to interpret and report the results of a survey of Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the kinds of communication products they produce, the kinds they use, and the specific recommendations they would offer to designers of academic programs in technical communication.

  6. Communication of technical information to lay audiences. [National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowes, J.E.; Stamm, K.R.; Jackson, K.M.; Moore, J.

    1978-05-01

    One of the objectives of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program is to provide terminal storage facilities for commercial radioactive wastes in various geologic formations at multiple locations in the United States. The activities performed under the NWTS Program will affect regional, state, and local areas, and widespread public interest in this program is expected. Since a large part of the NWTS Program deals with technical information it was considered desirable to initiate a study dealing with possible methods of effectively transmitting this technical information to the general public. This study has the objective of preparing a state-of-the-art report on the communication of technical information to lay audiences. The particular task of communicating information about the NWTS Program to the public is discussed where appropriate. The results of this study will aid the NWTS Program in presenting to the public the quite diverse technical information generated within the program so that a widespread, thorough public understanding of the NWTS Program might be achieved. An annotated bibliography is included.

  7. The use of interprofessional learning and simulation in undergraduate nursing programs to address interprofessional communication and collaboration: An integrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granheim, Benedikte M; Shaw, Julie M; Mansah, Martha

    2018-03-01

    To identify how simulation and interprofessional learning are used together in undergraduate nursing programs and undertaken in schools of nursing to address interprofessional communication and collaboration. An integrative literature review. The databases CINAHL, ProQuest, PubMed, Scopus, PsycInfo and Science Direct were searched to identify articles from 2006 to 2016 that reported on the use of IPL and simulation together in undergraduate nursing education. Whittemore and Knafl's five step process was used to guide the integrative review of quantitative and qualitative literature. Only peer reviewed articles written in English that addressed undergraduate nursing studies, were included in the review. Articles that did not aim to improve communication and collaboration were excluded. All articles selected were examined to determine their contribution to interprofessional learning and simulation in undergraduate nursing knowledge. The faculties of nursing used interprofessional learning and simulation in undergraduate nursing programs that in some cases were connected to a specific course. A total of nine articles, eight research papers and one narrative report, that focused on collaboration and communication were selected for this review. Studies predominantly used nursing and medical student participants. None of the included studies identified prior student experience with interprofessional learning and simulation. Four key themes were identified: communication, collaboration/teamwork, learning in practice and understanding of roles, and communication. This review highlights the identified research relating to the combined teaching strategy of interprofessional learning and simulation that addressed communication and collaboration in undergraduate nursing programs. Further research into the implementation of interprofessional learning and simulation may benefit the emergent challenges. Information drawn from this review can be used in informing education and

  8. A re-audit of the technical quality of undergraduate root canal treatment after the introduction of new technology and teaching practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, A; Coffey, D; Duncan, H F

    2017-10-01

    To revaluate through re-audit the technical quality of undergraduate nonsurgical root canal treatment (RCTx) in a dental teaching hospital as a result of recommended changes to teaching practices. The technical quality of undergraduate RCTx was evaluated radiographically after educational changes and the mandatory introduction of new technologies (nickel-titanium files, apex locators, greater taper gutta-percha points) in 182 root canals. Evaluation was based on four criteria: presence of voids, root canal filling termination (0-2 mm of radiographic apex), all roots filled and the prepared canal contained the original anatomy. Chi-squared analysis was used to determine statistically significant improvements in quality between the respective audits (P < 0.05). Twenty-three of the 40 canals in single-rooted teeth (57.5%) and 68 of the 129 (52.7%) canals in multirooted teeth analysed had an acceptable root filling. This compared with 48% of canals in single-rooted teeth and 38% of canals in multirooted teeth in the original audit. Specifically, the frequency of root canal voids and unsatisfactory apical root filling termination were reduced in multirooted teeth by 23% and 14% and in single-rooted teeth by 11% and 12%, respectively, compared with the original audit. When multirooted teeth were taken as one unit, 45.2% were considered to be acceptable, significantly better than the 18.8% multirooted teeth in the original audit (P = 0.042). Deviations from the canal anatomy on radiographic examination were rare findings in both audits. Changes to endodontic teaching practices significantly improved the technical standards of undergraduate root filling in multirooted teeth. The regular auditing of undergraduate teaching practice is necessary to inform current teaching, instigate change and improve standards. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Teaching Oral Communication in Undergraduate Science: Are We Doing Enough and Doing it Right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Communication skills and insights form an important basis for employability and participation in society. Universities aim to produce graduates with effective communication skills. Effective oral communication is critical for the advancement and sharing of scientific knowledge. There is increasing recognition within tertiary institutions of the…

  10. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 64: Culture and Workplace Communications: A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Sato, Yuko; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1997-01-01

    The advent of global markets elevates the role and importance of culture as a mitigating factor in the diffusion of knowledge and technology and in product and process innovation. This is especially true in the large commercial aircraft (LCA) sector where the production and market aspects are becoming increasingly international. As firms expand beyond their national borders, using such methods as risk-sharing partnerships, joint ventures, outsourcing, and alliances, they have to contend with national and corporate cultures. Our focus is on Japan, a program participant in the production of the Boeing Company's 777. The aspects of Japanese culture and workplace communications will be examined: 1.) the influence of Japanese culture on the diffusion of knowledge and technology in aerospace at the national and international levels; 2.) those cultural determinants-the propensity to work together, a willingness to subsume individual interests to a greater good, and an emphasis on consensual decision making-that have a direct bearing on the ability of Japanese firms to form alliances and compete in international markets; 3.) and those cultural determinants thought to influence the information-seeking behaviors and workplace communication practices of Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists. In this article, we report selective results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on workplace communications. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communication, use of libraries, use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports.

  11. Technical communications in aerospace - An analysis of the practices reported by U.S. and European aerospace engineers and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Myron

    1990-01-01

    The flow of scientific and technical information (STI) at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels is studied. The responses of U.S and European aerospace engineers and scientists to questionnaires concerning technical communications in aerospace are examined. Particular attention is given to the means used to communicate information and the social system of the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. Demographic data about the survey respondents are provided. The methods used to communicate technical data and the sources utilized to solve technical problems are described. The importance of technical writing skills and the use of computer technology in the aerospace field are discussed. The derived data are useful for R&D and information managers in order to improve access to and utilization of aerospace STI.

  12. Laboratory and project based learning in the compulsory course Biological Chemistry enhancing collaboration and technical communication between groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Bysted, Anette; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe how changes of laboratory training and project based learning were implemented in order to train the students in making a study design, basic laboratory skills, handling of data, technical communication, collaboration and presentation.......The aim of this paper was to describe how changes of laboratory training and project based learning were implemented in order to train the students in making a study design, basic laboratory skills, handling of data, technical communication, collaboration and presentation....

  13. Enhancing medical students' communication skills: development and evaluation of an undergraduate training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a relative lack of current research on the effects of specific communication training offered at the beginning of the medical degree program. The newly developed communication training "Basics and Practice in Communication Skills" was pilot tested in 2008 and expanded in the following year at the University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf in Germany. The goal was to promote and improve the communicative skills of participants and show the usefulness of an early offered intervention on patient-physician communication within the medical curriculum. Methods The students participating in the project and a comparison group of students from the standard degree program were surveyed at the beginning and end of the courses. The survey consisted of a self-assessment of their skills as well as a standardised expert rating and an evaluation of the modules by means of a questionnaire. Results Students who attended the communication skills course exhibited a considerable increase of communication skills in this newly developed training. It was also observed that students in the intervention group had a greater degree of self-assessed competence following training than the medical students in the comparison group. This finding is also reflected in the results from a standardised objective measure. Conclusions The empirical results of the study showed that the training enabled students to acquire specialised competence in communication through the course of a newly developed training program. These findings will be used to establish new communication training at the University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf. PMID:22443807

  14. The Geosciences Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research (GeoCUR): Supporting Faculty that Mentor Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, L. K.; Guertin, L. A.; Manley, P. L.; Fortner, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    Undergraduate research is a proven effective pedagogy that has a number of benefits including: enhancing student learning through mentoring relationships with faculty; increasing retention; increasing enrollment in graduate programs; developing critical thinking, creativity, problem solving and intellectual independence; and, developing an understanding of research methodology. Undergraduate research also has been demonstrated in preparing students for careers. In addition to developing disciplinary and technical expertise, participation in undergraduate research helps students improve communication skills (written, oral, and graphical) and time management. Early involvement in undergraduate research improves retention and, for those engaged at the 2YC level, helps students successfully transfers to 4YC. The Geosciences Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research (GeoCUR) supports faculty in their development of undergraduate research programs at all levels. GeoCUR leads workshops for new and future faculty covering all aspects of undergraduate research including incorporating research into coursework, project design, mentoring students, sustaining programs, and funding sources. GeoCUR members support new faculty by providing a range of services including: peer-review of grant proposals; advice on establishing an undergraduate research program; balancing teaching and research demands; and networking with other geoscientist. GeoCUR has also developed web resources that support faculty and departments in development of undergraduate research programs (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/undergraduate_research/index.html). This presentation will describe the services provided by GeoCUR and highlight examples of programs and resources available to geoscientists in all career stages for effective undergraduate research mentoring and development.

  15. How Technical Communicators Feel about Their Occupation: Facets, Attitudes, and Implications for the Future of the Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbin, Alice I.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Surveys three areas relating to job satisfaction--traditional aspects, gender differences, and job stress that might be unique to the technical writing profession. Indicates that technical communicators are satisfied with their compensation and opportunities for promotion but dissatisfied with the work itself, their supervision, and their…

  16. CPTSC 2001: Managing Change and Growth in Technical and Scientific Communication. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (28th, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 11-13, 2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maylath, Bruce, Ed.

    This proceedings presents 43 papers delivered at the 2001 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings include the following: "Act IV: On Being Less Invisible" (Bill Karis); "Building a Community of Professional Communicators by Mapping Needs and Assets"…

  17. Integrating 360° behavior-orientated feedback in communication skills training for medical undergraduates: concept, acceptance and students' self-ratings of communication competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engerer, Cosima; Berberat, Pascal O; Dinkel, Andreas; Rudolph, Baerbel; Sattel, Heribert; Wuensch, Alexander

    2016-10-18

    Feedback is considered a key didactic element in medical education, especially for teaching of communication skills. This study investigates the impact of a best evidence-based practice feedback concept within the context of communication skills training (CST). We evaluate this concept for acceptance and changes in students self-ratings of communication competence. Our CST integrating feedback process comprises a short theoretical introduction presenting standards for good communication and a constructive 360° feedback from three perspectives: feedback from peers, from standardized patients (SPs), and from a trainer. Feed-forward process was facilitated for documenting suggestions for improvements based on observable behaviors to maximize learning benefits. Our CST was applied to four groups of eight or nine students. We assessed the data on students' acceptance using a 6-point scale ranging from very good (1) to poor (6), applied a forced choice question to rank didactic items, and assessed changes in student' self-ratings of their communication competence on a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). Thirty-four medical undergraduates (82 % female, 18 % male) in their first clinical year, with an average age of 21.4 years (SD = 1.0), participated in the new training. The concept achieved high acceptance from good to very good: overall impression (M = 1.56), sufficient interaction for discussion (M = 1.15), and constructive learning atmosphere (M = 1.18). Specific elements, such as practical training with SPs (M = 1.18) and feedback by SPs (M = 1.12), showed highest acceptance. The forced choice ranking placed all feedback elements at the top of the list (feedback (FB) by SPs, rank 2; FB by trainer, rank 3; FB by colleagues, rank 4), whereas theoretical elements were at the bottom (theoretical introduction, rank 7; memory card, rank 9). Overall, student self-ratings of communication competence significantly improved in nine of the ten

  18. Including service learning in the undergraduate communication sciences and disorders curriculum: benefits, challenges, and strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kimberly A

    2011-12-01

    To describe some of the benefits of service learning (SL), considerations in course development and construction, and implementation and outcomes of an SL course in the undergraduate communication sciences and disorders (CSD) program at a small, public university in northwest Washington. A review of the literature on SL and a description of the author's experience in course development are provided on the basis of a computerized database search, library search, and discussions with the Western Washington University Center for Service Learning. Teaching an SL course can present challenges to both faculty and students; nonetheless, incorporating SL into the undergraduate CSD curriculum is an excellent way of enriching the academic experience and improving critical-thinking skills of young students. SL provides hands-on opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in their CSD classes to real-world contexts, gain a better understanding of course content through engagement in real situations, and integrate information from a variety of courses in and outside of their major.

  19. Perceptions and Problems of English Language and Communication Abilities: A Final Check on Thai Engineering Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajprasit, Krich; Pratoomrat, Panadda; Wang, Tuntiga

    2015-01-01

    English language and communication abilities are an essential part of the global engineering community. However, non-native English speaking engineers and students tend to be unable to master these skills. This study aims to gauge the perceived levels of their general English language proficiency, to explore their English communicative problems,…

  20. Facilitating Interdisciplinary Competence: Collaboration between Undergraduate Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Graduate Students Specializing in Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Libba Reed; Burrus, Embry; Willis, Laura; Grabowsky, Adelia

    2016-01-01

    The fast-paced nature of the healthcare setting, coupled with the number of allied professionals involved, demands accurate and concise written communication. It is imperative that written communication between nursing and allied professionals be clear to ensure that the highest quality of care is provided and that patient safety is maintained.…

  1. The Role of the Electronic Portfolio in Enhancing Information and Communication Technology and English Language Skills: The Voices of Six Malaysian Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Siew Ming; Lee, Yit Sim; Zulkifli, Nurul Farhana

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the construction and development of electronic portfolios (e-portfolios) on a small user population at a public university in Malaysia. The study was based on a three-month Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and language learning course offered to the undergraduates of the university. One of the…

  2. Lab notebooks as scientific communication: Investigating development from undergraduate courses to graduate research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob T. Stanley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In experimental physics, lab notebooks play an essential role in the research process. For all of the ubiquity of lab notebooks, little formal attention has been paid to addressing what is considered “best practice” for scientific documentation and how researchers come to learn these practices in experimental physics. Using interviews with practicing researchers, namely, physics graduate students, we explore the different experiences researchers had in learning how to effectively use a notebook for scientific documentation. We find that very few of those interviewed thought that their undergraduate lab classes successfully taught them the benefit of maintaining a lab notebook. Most described training in lab notebook use as either ineffective or outright missing from their undergraduate lab course experience. Furthermore, a large majority of those interviewed explained that they did not receive any formal training in maintaining a lab notebook during their graduate school experience and received little to no feedback from their advisors on these records. Many of the interviewees describe learning the purpose of, and how to maintain, these kinds of lab records only after having a period of trial and error, having already started doing research in their graduate program. Despite the central role of scientific documentation in the research enterprise, these physics graduate students did not gain skills in documentation through formal instruction, but rather through informal hands-on practice.

  3. Communications

    OpenAIRE

    anonymous

    1982-01-01

    Communications are read for interest in issues that have importance for all who practice and use management science. They are not refereed for technical correctness, as are articles and Notes that appear in Management Science. The reader is therefore cautioned that the publication of any Communication implies neither scientific standing nor acceptance per se on the part of either Management Science or TIMS. Centers Within Universities: Management and Evaluation by James G. Taaffe, On a Common...

  4. Three dimensional visualization breakthrough in analysis and communication of technical information for nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.H.; Cerny, B.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (USA); Hill, E.R.; Krupka, K.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Washington, DC (USA); Smoot, J.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Smith, D.R.; Waldo, K. [Dynamic Graphics, Inc., Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1990-11-01

    Computer graphics systems that provide interactive display and manipulation of three-dimensional data are powerful tools for the analysis and communication of technical information required for characterization and design of a geologic repository for nuclear waste. Greater understanding of site performance and repository design information is possible when performance-assessment modeling results can be visually analyzed in relation to site geologic and hydrologic information and engineering data for surface and subsurface facilities. In turn, this enhanced visualization capability provides better communication between technical staff and program management with respect to analysis of available information and prioritization of program planning. A commercially-available computer system was used to demonstrate some of the current technology for three-dimensional visualization within the architecture of systems for nuclear waste management. This computer system was used to interactively visualize and analyze the information for two examples: (1) site-characterization and engineering data for a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; and (2) three-dimensional simulations of a hypothetical release and transport of contaminants from a source of radionuclides to the vadose zone. Users may assess the three-dimensional distribution of data and modeling results by interactive zooming, rotating, slicing, and peeling operations. For those parts of the database where information is sparse or not available, the software incorporates models for the interpolation and extrapolation of data over the three-dimensional space of interest. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Three dimensional visualization breakthrough in analysis and communication of technical information for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.H.; Cerny, B.A.; Hill, E.R.; Krupka, K.M.; Smoot, J.L.; Smith, D.R.; Waldo, K.

    1990-11-01

    Computer graphics systems that provide interactive display and manipulation of three-dimensional data are powerful tools for the analysis and communication of technical information required for characterization and design of a geologic repository for nuclear waste. Greater understanding of site performance and repository design information is possible when performance-assessment modeling results can be visually analyzed in relation to site geologic and hydrologic information and engineering data for surface and subsurface facilities. In turn, this enhanced visualization capability provides better communication between technical staff and program management with respect to analysis of available information and prioritization of program planning. A commercially-available computer system was used to demonstrate some of the current technology for three-dimensional visualization within the architecture of systems for nuclear waste management. This computer system was used to interactively visualize and analyze the information for two examples: (1) site-characterization and engineering data for a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; and (2) three-dimensional simulations of a hypothetical release and transport of contaminants from a source of radionuclides to the vadose zone. Users may assess the three-dimensional distribution of data and modeling results by interactive zooming, rotating, slicing, and peeling operations. For those parts of the database where information is sparse or not available, the software incorporates models for the interpolation and extrapolation of data over the three-dimensional space of interest. 12 refs., 4 figs

  6. The impact of expert- and peer feedback on communication skills of undergraduate dental students - a single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Felix; Schmalz, Gerhard; Haak, Rainer; Rockenbauch, Katrin

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of peer- and expert feedback on communication skills of undergraduate dental students. All students of the first clinical treatment course (n=46) were randomly assigned into two groups. For three times a medical-dental interview/consultation of each student with a real patient was videotaped. After every consultation the videos were assessed either by a person experienced in communication (expert group) or by a fellow student (peer group), giving the students feedback regarding their chairside performed communication skills. Before and after the feedback-interventions all students conducted an interview with simulated patients, which was rated using a validated global rating and analyzed statistically. Global ratings mean scores after feedback-intervention were significantly improved (p0.05). During this study students improved their communication skills in dentist-patient interactions. The communication experience of the feedback provider seems not to have any impact on the communication skills in undergraduate dental students. The clinical courses in dentistry offer the opportunity to implement peer-feedback interventions in real treatment situation as part of communication training to longitudinally improve communication skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effect of Partner Reauditorization on Undergraduates' Attitudes Toward a Peer Who Communicates With Augmentative and Alternative Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyppa-Martin, Jolene; Reichle, Joe

    2018-03-28

    This study compared college students' attitudes toward a peer who used a nonelectronic augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system with and without a partner reauditorization strategy and also examined the effect of reauditorization on reported (a) ease of understanding the peer who used AAC, (b) willingness to engage in interactions with the peer who used AAC, and (c) preferences regarding AAC systems. Sixty-four participants completed surveys after viewing each of 2 counterbalanced conditions involving a video of a peer who communicated using AAC. Mean survey ratings were compared between conditions. Participants reported (a) more positive attitudes toward, (b) a greater ease in understanding, and (c) an increased willingness to interact with the peer who used nonelectronic AAC with partner reauditorization. Participants indicated that reauditorization contributed positively to the observed conversation. Reported preferences for nonelectronic AAC systems did not vary as a function of reauditorization, and most participants reported a preference for an electronic speech-generating device when compared with a nonelectronic system. Partner reauditorization may play a role in improving attitudes that individuals hold about peers who use nonelectronic AAC and may contribute to ease of understanding the aided message and increased likelihood of peer interactions.

  8. Bridging the Gap: Embedding Communication Courses in the Science Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandciu, Eric; Stewart, Jaclyn J.; Stoodley, Robin; Birol, Gülnur; Han, Andrea; Fox, Joanne A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a model for embedding science communication into the science curriculum without displacing science content. They describe the rationale, development, design, and implementation of two courses taught by science faculty addressing these criteria. They also outline the evaluation plan for these courses, which emphasize broad…

  9. Undergraduate Students' Perceptions of the Communication Behaviors of Their Advisors and Perceptions of Relational Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punyanunt-Carter, Narissra; Carter, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the specific interpersonal communication styles and behaviors of advisors and the expectations they have on their advisee's level of satisfaction, as well as what characteristics lead to higher relational satisfaction in the advisor-advisee relationship. A combination of convenience and snowball sampling were utilized to obtain…

  10. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 27: The technical communication practices of engineering and science students: Results of the phase 3 academic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Hecht, Laura M.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate engineering science students in the context of two general aspects of the educational experience. First, we explore the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that lead to the choice of becoming an engineer or a scientist, current satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives. Second, we look at the technical communication practices, habits, and training of engineers and science (Physics) students. The reported data were obtained from a survey of students enrolled in the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Bowling Green State University, and Texas A&M University. The survey was undertaken as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Data are reported for the following categories: student demographics; skill importance, skill training, and skill helpfulness; collaborative writing; computer and information technology use and importance, use of electronic networks; use and importance of libraries and library services; use and importance of information sources and products; use of foreign technical reports; and foreign language (reading and speaking) skills.

  11. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 26: The technical communication practices of aerospace engineering students: Results of the phase 3 AIAA National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Hecht, Laura M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate engineering students in the context of two general aspects of the educational experience. First, we explore the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that lead to the choice of becoming an engineer, current satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives. Second, we look at the technical communication practices, habits, and training of aerospace engineering students. The reported data were obtained from a survey of student members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The survey was undertaken as a phase 3 activity of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Data are reported for the following categories: student demographics; skill importance, skill training, and skill helpfulness; collaborative writing; computer and information technology use and importance; use of electronic networks; use and importance of libraries and library services; use and importance of information sources and products; use of foreign language technical reports; and foreign language (reading and speaking) skills.

  12. Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional simulation-based educational module: communication, teamwork, and confidence performing cardiac resuscitation skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Luctkar-Flude

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Marian Luctkar-Flude1, Cynthia Baker1, Cheryl Pulling1, Robert McGraw2, Damon Dagnone2, Jennifer Medves1, Carly Turner-Kelly11School of Nursing, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; 2School of Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, CanadaPurpose: Interprofessional (IP collaboration during cardiac resuscitation is essential and contributes to patient wellbeing. The purpose of this study is to evaluate an innovative simulation-based IP educational module for undergraduate nursing and medical students on cardiac resuscitation skills.Methods: Nursing and medical trainees participated in a new cardiac resuscitation curriculum involving a 2-hour IP foundational cardiac resuscitation skills lab, followed by three 2-hour IP simulation sessions. Control group participants attended the existing two 2-hour IP simulation sessions. Study respondents (N = 71 completed a survey regarding their confidence performing cardiac resuscitation skills and their perceptions of IP collaboration.Results: Despite a consistent positive trend, only one out of 17 quantitative survey items were significantly improved for learners in the new curriculum. They were more likely to report feeling confident managing the airway during cardiac resuscitation (P = 0.001. Overall, quantitative results suggest that senior nursing and medical students were comfortable with IP communication and teamwork and confident with cardiac resuscitation skills. There were no significant differences between nursing students’ and medical students’ results. Through qualitative feedback, participants reported feeling comfortable learning with students from other professions and found value in the IP simulation sessions.Conclusion: Results from this study will inform ongoing restructuring of the IP cardiac resuscitation skills simulation module as defined by the action research process. Specific improvements that are suggested by these findings include strengthening the team

  13. "Enjoy Your Sexuality, but Do it in Secret": Exploring Undergraduate Women's Reports of Friends' Sexual Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Sarah L

    2016-03-01

    In the current study I used mixed methods to explore the messages that undergraduate women ( n = 415) reported receiving from their male and female friends regarding sex and romantic relationships. Reports of friends' messages varied widely and entailed both support for and criticism of sexual gatekeeping and sex positivity (e.g., sexual agency) and advice regarding sex and romantic relationships. Four individuals, including the author, developed codes to examine this wide range of responses to sexual expectations and prohibitions and independently and reliably coded the data. Response patterns illustrate that reports of female friends' messages were typically longer and more nuanced than reports of male friends' messages. Sex-positive messages and sexual gatekeeping messages were frequently reported simultaneously, and this pattern of co-occurrence illustrates the tensions between diverse discourses regarding women's sexuality. The diversity in reports of friends' messages challenges popular notions that friends' influences are wholly problematic and highlights a need for more gender-focused sex education curricula.

  14. Teaching Undergraduate Students to Visualize and Communicate Public Health Data with Infographics

    OpenAIRE

    Shanks, Justin D.; Izumi, Betty; Sun, Christina; Martin, Allea; Byker Shanks, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which an infographic assignment facilitated student learning around health science issues, as well as the ways in which the assignment was an effective teaching tool. The objectives of the assignment were to (1) understand the purposes of and potential uses for infographics, (2) cultivate creative visual communication skills, and (3) disseminate a complex health topic to diverse audiences. The infographic assignment was developed at Monta...

  15. TYPES OF META-COMMUNICATIVE ADDRESSING IN THE RELATIONSHIP OF CREATIVE TRAINING PROFESSOR – STUDENTS IN TECHNICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda-Marina BADULESCU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Applying the method of observation, based on the reactions of samples of technical students, the authors emphasize meta-communicative addressing modes at the level of creative trainer in “Politehnica” University of Bucharest. The innovative aspect is represented by the transfer of the addressing modes from the linguistic field to the psycho-pedagogic field, with the function of monitoring and controlling the intercommunication system in the technical training environment.

  16. Public Communication of Technical Issues in Today's Changing Visual Language - 12436

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Laura [Potomac Communications Group (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Communication regarding the management of radioactive materials is a well-established challenge. Residents and consumers have suspected for years that companies and governments place short-term economic concerns ahead of health and safety. This skepticism is compounded with increased attention to safety issues at nuclear power plants everywhere after Fukushima. Nonetheless, today's environment presents unexpected opportunities to transform public fear into teachable moments that bring knowledge and facts to discussions on nuclear energy. In the weeks following Japan's crisis, the lack of reliable information on radiation levels saw citizens taking to the streets with dosimeters and Geiger counters in crowd-sourced radiation monitoring efforts. Efforts, based mainly online, represent a growing set of examples of how internet and cell-phone technology are being put to use in emergency situations. The maps, graphs and tables created to meet public interest also exemplify some of the psychological priorities of audiences and present learning tools that can improve future education efforts in non-emergency situations. Industry outreach efforts often consist of technical details and quantitative data that are difficult for lay audiences to interpret. The intense attention to nuclear energy issues since last March has produced a wide array of visual samples. Citizen monitors, news organizations, government agencies and others have displayed quantitative information in innovative ways. Their efforts offer new perspective on what charts, maps and info graphics do - or need to do - to illustrate requirements, record assessments and promote understanding of nuclear-waste issues. Surveying the best examples, nuclear communicators can improve their offerings of easy-to-use, evidence-based visuals to inform stakeholders. Familiar to most communications professionals in the nuclear industry, risk communication is a science-based approach with over three decades of

  17. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 2:] Technical communications in aeronautics: Results of an exploratory study. An analysis of managers' and nonmanagers' responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Glassman, Myron; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Oliu, Walter E.

    1989-01-01

    Data collected from an exploratory study concerned with the technical communications practices of aerospace engineers and scientists were analyzed to test the primary assumption that aerospace managers and nonmanagers have different technical communications practices. Five assumptions were established for the analysis. Aerospace managers and nonmanagers were found to have different technical communications practices for three of the five assumptions tested. Although aerospace managers and nonmanagers were found to have different technical communications practices, the evidence was neither conclusive nor compelling that the presumption of difference in practices could be attributed to the duties performed by aerospace managers and nonmanagers.

  18. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 3:] Technical communications in aeronautics: Results of an exploratory study. An analysis of profit managers' and nonprofit managers' responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Glassman, Myron; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Oliu, Walter E.

    1989-01-01

    Data collected from an exploratory study concerned with the technical communications practices of aerospace engineers and scientists were analyzed to test the primary assumption that profit and nonprofit managers in the aerospace community have different technical communications practices. Five assumptions were established for the analysis. Profit and nonprofit managers in the aerospace community were found to have different technical communications practices for one of the five assumptions tested. It was, therefore, concluded that profit and nonprofit managers in the aerospace community do not have different technical communications practices.

  19. Teaching Undergraduate Students to Visualize and Communicate Public Health Data with Infographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Justin D; Izumi, Betty; Sun, Christina; Martin, Allea; Byker Shanks, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which an infographic assignment facilitated student learning around health science issues, as well as the ways in which the assignment was an effective teaching tool. The objectives of the assignment were to (1) understand the purposes of and potential uses for infographics, (2) cultivate creative visual communication skills, and (3) disseminate a complex health topic to diverse audiences. The infographic assignment was developed at Montana State University and piloted at Portland State University. Students were assigned to small groups of three or four to create an infographic focused on a health science issue. The assignment was divided into four steps: brainstorming, developing, designing, and finalizing. Focus groups were conducted to assess how learning occurred throughout the assignment and identify any opportunities for modification of the assignment. This study was conducted with freshman students enrolled at Portland State University, a public university located in downtown Portland, OR, USA. Thirty four students completed the assignment and 31 students participated in one of three focus groups. Four themes emerged from focus groups: (1) Communicating Science-Related Topics to Non-experts, (2) Developing Professional Skills, (3) Understanding Health Issues, and (4) Overall Experience. This article outlines the assignment, discusses focus group results, and presents assignment modifications. It is clear that the infographic assignment facilitated learning about accessing and translating data. This assignment is ideally suited for use with diverse college-age audiences in health education and health promotion fields.

  20. Teaching Undergraduate Students to Visualize and Communicate Public Health Data with Infographics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D. Shanks

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which an infographic assignment facilitated student learning around health science issues, as well as the ways in which the assignment was an effective teaching tool. The objectives of the assignment were to (1 understand the purposes of and potential uses for infographics, (2 cultivate creative visual communication skills, and (3 disseminate a complex health topic to diverse audiences. The infographic assignment was developed at Montana State University and piloted at Portland State University. Students were assigned to small groups of three or four to create an infographic focused on a health science issue. The assignment was divided into four steps: brainstorming, developing, designing, and finalizing. Focus groups were conducted to assess how learning occurred throughout the assignment and identify any opportunities for modification of the assignment. This study was conducted with freshman students enrolled at Portland State University, a public university located in downtown Portland, OR, USA. Thirty four students completed the assignment and 31 students participated in one of three focus groups. Four themes emerged from focus groups: (1 Communicating Science-Related Topics to Non-experts, (2 Developing Professional Skills, (3 Understanding Health Issues, and (4 Overall Experience. This article outlines the assignment, discusses focus group results, and presents assignment modifications. It is clear that the infographic assignment facilitated learning about accessing and translating data. This assignment is ideally suited for use with diverse college-age audiences in health education and health promotion fields.

  1. Short communication: Characteristics of student success in an undergraduate physiology and anatomy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwazdauskas, F C; McGilliard, M L; Corl, B A

    2014-10-01

    Several factors affect the success of students in college classes. The objective of this research was to determine what factors affect success of undergraduate students in an anatomy and physiology class. Data were collected from 602 students enrolled in the Agriculture and Life Sciences (ALS) 2304 Animal Physiology and Anatomy course from 2005 through 2012. The data set included 476 females (79.1%) and 126 males (20.9%). Time to complete exams was recorded for each student. For statistical analyses, students' majors were animal and poultry sciences (APSC), agricultural sciences, biochemistry, biological sciences, dairy science, and "other," which combined all other majors. All analyses were completed using the GLIMMIX procedure of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). Gender, major, matriculation year, major by year interaction, gender by year interaction, and time to complete the exam affected final course grade. The significant gender effect was manifested in the final grade percentage of 75.9 ± 0.4 for female students compared with 72.3 ± 0.6 for male students. Junior males had final course grades comparable with those of females, but sophomore and senior males had lower final course grades than other combinations. Biology majors had a final grade of 82.4 ± 0.6 and this grade was greater than all other majors. Students classified as "other" had a final score of 74.4 ± 0.8, which was greater than agricultural science majors (69.5 ± 0.9). The APSC grade (72.6 ± 0.5) was higher than the agricultural science majors. Junior students had significantly greater final grades (76.1 ± 0.5) than sophomores (73.3 ± 0.6) and seniors (72.9 ± 0.9). All biology students had greater final grades than all other majors, but biochemistry juniors had greater final course grades than APSC, agricultural science, and dairy science juniors. "Other" seniors had greater final course grades than agricultural science seniors. The regression for time to complete the exam was

  2. Activity theory and genre ecology: Conceptual tools for understanding technical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winberg, Christine

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a year-long project in an architectural technology department, which studied students’ oral language development in plenary discussions in a first year History and Appreciation of Architecture course. Data was obtained by videotaping classroom activities, and by interviewing the lecturer and students who were participants in the course. The data was analysed, using categories suggested by Activity Theory. The category of ‘rules’ was selected from the activity system for further analysis, using a Genre Ecology approach. The findings of the study show how technical communication is managed within a classroom based activity system comprising lecturer and students, and graphic and verbal texts, in a context of learning. Learning, teaching, and expert discourses of the architectural review genre interact and are negotiated by participants. Through participation in plenary discussion, students from diverse backgrounds contribute to one another’s experience of architectural design, and by valuing and responding to students’ contributions, the lecturer facilitates students’ understanding of the ‘rules’ of architectural communication, and enables students to access an expanded repertoire of the genre of architectural review.

  3. Bonding with the Nuclear Industry: A Technical Communication Professor and His Students Partner With Y-12 National Security Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Russel

    2016-01-01

    This article describes how a special kind of academe-industry collaboration--based on a joint appointment agreement between a university and an industry site--was set up, promoted, and experienced by a professor of technical communication and his student interns. To illustrate the nature and value of this kind of collaboration, the article…

  4. Multilevel Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness in Indian Technical Education: The Mediating Role of Communication, Power and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochhayat, Jyotiranjan; Giri, Vijai N.; Suar, Damodar

    2017-01-01

    This study provides a new conceptualization of educational leadership with a multilevel and integrative approach. It examines the impact of multilevel leadership (MLL) on the effectiveness of technical educational institutes through the mediating effects of organizational communication, bases of power and organizational culture. Data were…

  5. Characteristic-Based, Task-Based, and Results-Based: Three Value Systems for Assessing Professionally Produced Technical Communication Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carliner, Saul

    2003-01-01

    Notes that technical communicators have developed different methodologies for evaluating the effectiveness of their work, such as editing, usability testing, and determining the value added. Explains that at least three broad value systems underlie the assessment practices: characteristic-based, task-based, and results-based. Concludes that the…

  6. An overview of training and technical communication of Chinese representative nuclear power engineering company of EPC mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Ting; Zhang Xiangyu

    2015-01-01

    After the Fukushima severe accident, nuclear power development has been in stagnation in all over the world. The Chinese nuclear industry has a slowdown on new NPP construction. As a result, high level technique on safety and effective communication are required. For nuclear power engineering company with EPC mode, high quality on training and technical communication is the principal investment in order to achieve better service on engineering design, environmental impact assessment, environmental engineering design, and equipment supervision and so on. EPC mode requires wide range knowledge on almost every field related to nuclear on nuclear power engineering. In this paper, the author investigated the case of the only nuclear power engineering EPC company (CNPE) in China and present an overview on its training and technical communication both domestic and abroad. Basically, there are 4 main branches of training. The internal training focuses on specifically task (both management and technique), such as HSE training, QC training and quality and safety training. Long term education in the university is organized by cooperated mechanism. Code and platform training is partly carried out by international organization or company, and the experienced engineers coach makes up the other part. The communication is a large part since the EPC mode needs the information and requirements from the NPP entity, authority, and the other institutes, international organizations (like IAEA, NINE, IRSN, OECD, NRC and CEA etc.) and sometimes the public. The overview of the training and communication of the EPC company prevails the outline of its advantage on domestic communication and disadvantage on international technical communication. The paper can be a tool on the soft strength construction of company under EPC mode to broaden its business like consultation and training. Some advice is given by the author on the consultation and global communication in the future. (author)

  7. Undergraduate technical skills training guided by student tutors – Analysis of tutors' attitudes, tutees' acceptance and learning progress in an innovative teaching model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyrich, Peter; Schrauth, Markus; Kraus, Bernd; Habermehl, Daniel; Netzhammer, Nicolai; Zipfel, Stephan; Jünger, Jana; Riessen, Reimer; Nikendei, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Background Skills labs provide a sheltered learning environment. As close supervision and individual feedback were proven to be important in ensuring effective skills training, we implemented a cross-year peer tutor system in our skills lab of internal medicine that allowed intense training sessions with small learning groups (3–4 students) taught by one student tutor. Methods The expectations, experiences and criticisms of peer tutors regarding the tutor system for undergraduate skills lab training were investigated in the context of a focus group. In addition, tutees' acceptance of this learning model and of their student tutors was evaluated by means of a pre/post web-based survey. Results 14 voluntary senior students were intensely prepared by consultants for their peer tutor activity. 127 students participated in the project, 66.9% of which responded to the web-based survey (23 topics with help of 6-point Likert scale + free comments). Acceptance was very high (5.69 ± 0.07, mean ± SEM), and self-confidence ratings increased significantly after the intervention for each of the trained skills (average 1.96 ± 0.08, all p skills training to be provided by faculty staff only. Focus group analyses with tutors revealed 18 different topics, including profit in personal knowledge and personal satisfaction through teaching activities. The ratio of 1:4 tutor/tutees was regarded to be very beneficial for effective feedback, and the personalized online evaluation by tutees to be a strong motivator and helpful for further improvements. The tutors ascribed great importance to the continuous availability of a contact doctor in case of uncertainties. Conclusion This study demonstrates that peer teaching in undergraduate technical clinical skills training is feasible and widely accepted among tutees, provided that the tutors receive sufficient training and supervision. PMID:18400106

  8. Developing Science Communication in Africa: Undergraduate and Graduate Students should be Trained and Actively Involved in Outreach Activity Development and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikari, Thomas K; Yawson, Nat Ato; Quansah, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in scientific research output from Africa, public understanding of science in many parts of the continent remains low. Science communication there is faced with challenges such as (i) lack of interest among some scientists, (ii) low availability of training programs for scientists, (iii) low literacy rates among the public, and (iv) multiplicity of languages. To address these challenges, new ways of training and motivating scientists to dialogue with non-scientists are essential. Developing communication skills early in researchers' scientific career would be a good way to enhance their public engagement abilities. Therefore, a potentially effective means to develop science communication in Africa would be to actively involve trainee scientists (i.e., undergraduate and graduate students) in outreach activity development and delivery. These students are often enthusiastic about science, eager to develop their teaching and communication skills, and can be good mentors to younger students. Involving them in all aspects of outreach activity is, therefore, likely to be a productive implementation strategy. However, science communication training specifically for students and the involvement of these students in outreach activity design and delivery are lacking in Africa. Here, we argue that improving the training and involvement of budding scientists in science communication activities would be a good way to bridge the wide gap between scientists and the African public.

  9. How do United Kingdom (UK) medical schools identify and support undergraduate medical students who ‘fail’ communication assessments? A national survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The doctor’s ability to communicate effectively (with patients, relatives, advocates and healthcare colleagues) relates directly to health outcomes, and so is core to clinical practice. The remediation of medical students’ clinical communication ability is rarely addressed in medical education literature. There is nothing in the current literature reporting a contemporary national picture of how communication difficulties are managed, and the level of consequence (progression implications) for students of performing poorly. This survey aimed to consolidate practices for identifying and processes for managing students who ‘fail’ communication assessments across all UK medical schools. Methods Data were collected via an email survey to all leads for clinical communication in all UK Medical Schools for the UK Council for Clinical Communication in Undergraduate Medical Education. Results All but two participating Schools reported some means of support and/or remediation in communication. There was diversity of approach, and variance in the level of systemisation adopted. Variables such as individuality of curricula, resourcing issues, student cohort size and methodological preferences were implicated as explaining diversity. Support is relatively ad hoc, and often in the hands of a particular dedicated individual or team with an interest in communication delivery with few Schools reporting robust, centralised, school level processes. Conclusions This survey has demonstrated that few Medical Schools have no identifiable system of managing their students’ clinical communication difficulties. However, some Schools reported ad hoc approaches and only a small number had a centralised programme. There is scope for discussion and benchmarking of best practice across all Schools with allocation of appropriate resources to support this. PMID:23834990

  10. Feasibility analysis of AP1000 wireless communication system and selection of technical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xin

    2012-01-01

    This article expatiates the rationality and feasibility of AP1000 nuclear power plant adopts wireless communication system as the first choice in routine and emergency operations, compares and analysed. 5 major wireless communication technology solutions, and introduces the Wi-Fi based wireless communication system architecture. (author)

  11. Communicating the relevance of the library in the age of Google: Improving undergraduate research skills and information literacy though new models of library instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Rempel

    2013-12-01

    ón-Aguirre & Fleming-May, 2012; tailoring library instruction to course curricula and assignments (Smith, et al., 2012; and incorporating active, student-centred learning into library instruction sessions (Abate, Gomes, & Linton, 2011. The successful implementation of these measures is ultimately dependent upon communication and collaboration among library staff, faculty, and students. Implementing major changes to library instruction can be challenging for all stakeholders; such challenges will be explored in a discussion of the implementation of a prototype library instruction model developed at Selkirk College, a small undergraduate-focused institution in British Columbia, Canada.

  12. Security communication systems for nuclear fixed site facilities. Technical report Jan 77-Apr 80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howington, L.C.; Taylor, L.L.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents a basic discussion of communication techniques and factors relevant to designing communication systems for nuclear fixed site facility security systems. The reader is provided communication fundamentals, design considerations, and specification techniques. Copious references and an annotated bibliography are provided for individuals who desire to delve deeper than the limits and areas of study of this report. Ease of reading and use of this report are enhanced by relegating detailed communication design treatise to the Appendices. Sample procurement specifications are provided throughout the report for various communication system components and are distinguished from the regular text by using a smaller type

  13. Undergraduate technical skills training guided by student tutors--analysis of tutors' attitudes, tutees' acceptance and learning progress in an innovative teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyrich, Peter; Schrauth, Markus; Kraus, Bernd; Habermehl, Daniel; Netzhammer, Nicolai; Zipfel, Stephan; Jünger, Jana; Riessen, Reimer; Nikendei, Christoph

    2008-04-09

    Skills labs provide a sheltered learning environment. As close supervision and individual feedback were proven to be important in ensuring effective skills training, we implemented a cross-year peer tutor system in our skills lab of internal medicine that allowed intense training sessions with small learning groups (3-4 students) taught by one student tutor. The expectations, experiences and criticisms of peer tutors regarding the tutor system for undergraduate skills lab training were investigated in the context of a focus group. In addition, tutees' acceptance of this learning model and of their student tutors was evaluated by means of a pre/post web-based survey. 14 voluntary senior students were intensely prepared by consultants for their peer tutor activity. 127 students participated in the project, 66.9% of which responded to the web-based survey (23 topics with help of 6-point Likert scale + free comments). Acceptance was very high (5.69 +/- 0.07, mean +/- SEM), and self-confidence ratings increased significantly after the intervention for each of the trained skills (average 1.96 +/- 0.08, all p technical clinical skills training is feasible and widely accepted among tutees, provided that the tutors receive sufficient training and supervision.

  14. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 38: Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) and the communication of technical information in aerospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Daniel J.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of computers as a medium for communication (CMC) used by aerospace engineers and scientists to obtain and/or provide technical information related to research and development activities. The data were obtained from a questionnaire survey that yielded 1006 mail responses. In addition to communication media, the research also investigates degrees of task uncertainty, environmental complexity, and other relevant variables that can affect aerospace workers' information-seeking strategies. While findings indicate that many individuals report CMC is an important function in their communication patterns, the research indicates that CMC is used less often and deemed less valuable than other more conventional media, such as paper documents, group meetings, telephone and face-to-face conversations. Fewer than one third of the individuals in the survey account for nearly eighty percent of the reported CMC use, and another twenty percent indicate they do not use the medium at all, its availability notwithstanding. These preliminary findings suggest that CMC is not as pervasive a communication medium among aerospace workers as the researcher expect a priori. The reasons underlying the reported media use are not yet fully known, and this suggests that continuing research in this area may be valuable.

  15. Development and reliability of the explicit professional oral communication observation tool to quantify the use of non-technical skills in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, P.F.; van Noord, I.; de Bruijne, M.C.; Knol, D.L.; Wagner, C.; van Dyck, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background A lack of non-technical skills is increasingly recognised as an important underlying cause of adverse events in healthcare. The nature and number of things professionals communicate to each other can be perceived as a product of their use of non-technical skills. This paper describes the

  16. Development and reliability of the explicit professional oral communication observation tool to quantify the use of non-technical skills in healthcare.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, P.F.; Noord, I. van; Bruijne, M. de; Knol, D.L.; Wagner, C.; Dyck, C. van

    2013-01-01

    Background: A lack of non-technical skills is increasingly recognised as an important underlying cause of adverse events in healthcare. The nature and number of things professionals communicate to each other can be perceived as a product of their use of non-technical skills. This paper describes the

  17. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (14th, Orlando, Florida, October 7-9, 1987).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geonetta, Sam C., Ed.

    Based on the notion of "reaching out," this proceedings presents papers from the annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication. Papers in the proceedings are: "Southern Tech's Technical Writing Certificate" (William S. Pfeiffer); "Reach Out and Quack Someone" (Daniel R. Jones);…

  18. To what extent does the Health Professions Admission Test-Ireland predict performance in early undergraduate tests of communication and clinical skills? An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Maureen E; Regan, Daniel; Dunne, Fidelma; Henn, Patrick; Newell, John; O'Flynn, Siun

    2013-05-10

    Internationally, tests of general mental ability are used in the selection of medical students. Examples include the Medical College Admission Test, Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test and the UK Clinical Aptitude Test. The most widely used measure of their efficacy is predictive validity.A new tool, the Health Professions Admission Test- Ireland (HPAT-Ireland), was introduced in 2009. Traditionally, selection to Irish undergraduate medical schools relied on academic achievement. Since 2009, Irish and EU applicants are selected on a combination of their secondary school academic record (measured predominately by the Leaving Certificate Examination) and HPAT-Ireland score. This is the first study to report on the predictive validity of the HPAT-Ireland for early undergraduate assessments of communication and clinical skills. Students enrolled at two Irish medical schools in 2009 were followed up for two years. Data collected were gender, HPAT-Ireland total and subsection scores; Leaving Certificate Examination plus HPAT-Ireland combined score, Year 1 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) scores (Total score, communication and clinical subtest scores), Year 1 Multiple Choice Questions and Year 2 OSCE and subset scores. We report descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients and Multiple linear regression models. Data were available for 312 students. In Year 1 none of the selection criteria were significantly related to student OSCE performance. The Leaving Certificate Examination and Leaving Certificate plus HPAT-Ireland combined scores correlated with MCQ marks.In Year 2 a series of significant correlations emerged between the HPAT-Ireland and subsections thereof with OSCE Communication Z-scores; OSCE Clinical Z-scores; and Total OSCE Z-scores. However on multiple regression only the relationship between Total OSCE Score and the Total HPAT-Ireland score remained significant; albeit the predictive power was modest. We found

  19. To what extent does the Health Professions Admission Test-Ireland predict performance in early undergraduate tests of communication and clinical skills? – An observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Internationally, tests of general mental ability are used in the selection of medical students. Examples include the Medical College Admission Test, Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test and the UK Clinical Aptitude Test. The most widely used measure of their efficacy is predictive validity. A new tool, the Health Professions Admission Test- Ireland (HPAT-Ireland), was introduced in 2009. Traditionally, selection to Irish undergraduate medical schools relied on academic achievement. Since 2009, Irish and EU applicants are selected on a combination of their secondary school academic record (measured predominately by the Leaving Certificate Examination) and HPAT-Ireland score. This is the first study to report on the predictive validity of the HPAT-Ireland for early undergraduate assessments of communication and clinical skills. Method Students enrolled at two Irish medical schools in 2009 were followed up for two years. Data collected were gender, HPAT-Ireland total and subsection scores; Leaving Certificate Examination plus HPAT-Ireland combined score, Year 1 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) scores (Total score, communication and clinical subtest scores), Year 1 Multiple Choice Questions and Year 2 OSCE and subset scores. We report descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients and Multiple linear regression models. Results Data were available for 312 students. In Year 1 none of the selection criteria were significantly related to student OSCE performance. The Leaving Certificate Examination and Leaving Certificate plus HPAT-Ireland combined scores correlated with MCQ marks. In Year 2 a series of significant correlations emerged between the HPAT-Ireland and subsections thereof with OSCE Communication Z-scores; OSCE Clinical Z-scores; and Total OSCE Z-scores. However on multiple regression only the relationship between Total OSCE Score and the Total HPAT-Ireland score remained significant; albeit the

  20. A Decision Model for Technical Journal Deselection with an Experiment in Biomedical Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triolo, Victor A; Bao, Dachun

    1993-01-01

    Proposes a model for technical journal deselection based on the Bradford law of distribution. The model's operational prescriptives, characteristics of the Bradford distribution in the field of pediatrics, and relevance to collection management are discussed. (42 references) (KRN)

  1. 76 FR 7870 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Cybersecurity and Communications Technical Assistance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... used by OEC to support quality improvement of its technical assistance services. Registration forms..., mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g...

  2. Perceived gender inequality, sexual communication self-efficacy, and sexual behaviour among female undergraduate students in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael W; Williams, Mark L; Beasley, R Palmer; Tran, Ly T H; Nguyen, Huong T H; Le, Thach Ngoc

    2012-09-01

    Worldwide, the literature on sexual behaviour has documented associations between gender-based relationship inequality and sexual communication ability and the actual use of condoms or other contraceptives among young women. This study aimed to examine these associations among undergraduate female students in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. A cross-sectional survey of 1181 female third-year students from two universities in the Mekong Delta was conducted. Latent variable modelling and logistic regression were employed to examine the hypothesised associations. Among the 72.4% of students who had ever had boyfriends, 44.8% indicated that their boyfriends had asked for sex, 13% had had penile-vaginal sex and 10.3% had had oral sex. For those who had had penile-vaginal sex, 33% did not use any contraceptive method, including condoms, during their first sexual intercourse. The greater a student's perception that women were subordinate to men, the lower her self-efficacy for sexual communication and the lower her actual frequency of discussing safer sex matters and asking her partner to use a condom. Sexual communication self-efficacy was associated with actual contraceptive use (P=0.039) but only marginally with condom use (P=0.092) at first sexual intercourse. Sexual health promotion strategies should address the influence of gender relations on young women's sexual communication self-efficacy and the subsequent impact on actual contraceptive and condom use.

  3. Perceived gender inequality, sexual communication self-efficacy, and sexual behaviour among female undergraduate students in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M.; Ross, Michael W.; Williams, Mark L.; Beasley, R. Palmer; Tran, Ly T. H.; Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Le, Thach Ngoc

    2012-01-01

    Background Worldwide, the literature on sexual behaviour has documented associations between gender-based relationship inequality and sexual communication ability and the actual use of condoms or other contraceptives among young women. This study aimed to examine these associations among undergraduate female students in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 1181 female third-year students from two universities in the Mekong Delta was conducted. Latent variable modelling and logistic regression were employed to examine the hypothesised associations. Results Among the 72.4% of students who had ever had boyfriends, 44.8% indicated that their boyfriends had asked for sex, 13% had had penile–vaginal sex and 10.3% had had oral sex. For those who had had penile–vaginal sex, 33% did not use any contraceptive method, including condoms, during their first sexual intercourse. The greater a student’s perception that women were subordinate to men, the lower her self-efficacy for sexual communication and the lower her actual frequency of discussing safer sex matters and asking her partner to use a condom. Sexual communication self-efficacy was associated with actual contraceptive use (P = 0.039) but only marginally with condom use (P = 0.092) at first sexual intercourse. Conclusion Sexual health promotion strategies should address the influence of gender relations on young women’s sexual communication self-efficacy and the subsequent impact on actual contraceptive and condom use. PMID:22877589

  4. Risk communication: Translating technically complex information to facilitate informed decision-making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprecher, W.M.; Turner, E.

    1991-01-01

    Based on a review of risk communication and related literature, including policy material, this paper describes the newly revamped risk management program of the DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and some of the risk-related issues being confronted as the high-level waste management program moves forward. It also describes preliminary activities underway in which the OCRWM is developing strategies for risk communication. The authors offer a definition of risk management as comprised by the components of risk assessment and risk communication. The paper explores the discrepant views that experts and nonexperts have with respect to what constitutes a valid risk assessment model. By illustrating differences in the assessment of risk by experts and lay people, the paper demonstrates how these differences can create challenges in communicating risk and making decisions about risk. Finally, the paper discusses ways in which risk communication could be enhance, and elaborates on the OCRWM's commitment to improve its overall risk management efforts

  5. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 69: Writing for the Aerospace Industry. Chapter 3; The Practice of Technical and Scientific Communication: Writing in Professional Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    The large and complex aerospace industry, which employed approximately 850,000 people in 1994 (Aerospace Facts, 1994-95, p. 11), plays a vital role in the nation's economy. Although only a small percentage of those employed in aerospace are technical communicators, they perform a wide variety of communication duties in government and the private sector.

  6. Psycho-education's impact on communication skills, self-esteem and anger expression status of emergency medical technical student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinc Mersin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Emergency medical students are first persons that encountered and make medical aids to patients or traumatized people. It is stated that having adequate facilities about the communication of each health workers to deal with emergency patient and wounded persons is as important as immediate treatment. This research was conducted as quasi-experimental in order to determine the education of emotion recognition and expression's impact on communication skills, self-esteem and anger expression status of emergency medical technical students. Methods: The research was made with 7 students in first year of education in emergency department at a university in Turkey in 2013-2014 academic years. Total 12-session education of emotion recognition and expression was given to student within research for 2 hours in a week during 12 weeks. Information Form including socio-demographic characteristics, Communication Skills Inventory (CSI, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES and Spielberger Trait Anger Scale (STAS were applied to students before and after psycho-education. Results: It was determined that CSI mean scores of students within research were high before and after psycho-education but there is no statistically difference between them. It was determined that also there is no significantly difference between students' RSES and STAS mean scores before and after psycho-education. Conclusion: It was determined in the research that education of emotion recognition and expression has no impact on communication skills, self-esteem and anger expression status of students and students' communication skills levels were high before and after psycho-education. It has been concluded that especially empathy from communication skills is the mode of existence and therefore cannot be taught. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(6.000: 489-495

  7. The Effective of Using 5 Simple Steps (QSCCS) Learning Activities on Facebook to Promote Self-Learning in the 21st Century in Technology Printing and Advertising Course for Undergraduate Students in Education Technology and Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittiwong, Tipparat; Wongnam, Thanet

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) study the result of implementing QSCCS with Facebook; 2) study students' opinions concerning the implementation of QSCCS with Facebook. The samples were 38 Technology and Communications undergraduates who attended Printing and Advertising Technology course in academic year of 2013. The information was…

  8. The Prelinguistic Cognitive Basis of Children's Communicative Intentions. Technical Report No. 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Glenn M.

    The proposal that young children's communicative intentions stem from prelinguistic cognitive abilities is examined in detail. The most developed available formulation of this proposal, that provided by Brown (1973), is evaluated, and the evidence in support of it is found to be insufficient. Three crucial problems, which must be solved before an…

  9. Fluid Centrality: A Social Network Analysis of Social-Technical Relations in Computer-Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Judith Guevarra

    2010-01-01

    In this article, centrality is explored as a measure of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in networked learning. Centrality measure is quite common in performing social network analysis (SNA) and in analysing social cohesion, strength of ties and influence in CMC, and computer-supported collaborative learning research. It argues that measuring…

  10. Digital Semaphore: Technical Feasibility of QR Code Optical Signaling for Fleet Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    communication to be used in conjunction with existing RF technologies. This work has fundamental implications for naval warfare. Literature review to date has...eliminates camera blur induced by the shutter, providing clear images at extremely high frame rates. Thusly, digital cinema cameras are more suitable

  11. The Development of Meta-Cognitive Awareness in Memory, Communication, and Attention. Technical Report No. 452.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yussen, Steven R.; Bird, J. Elizabeth

    Thirty-six children between four and seven years of age were asked a series of questions to determine their degree of insight (meta-cognitive awareness) regarding the way four common variables influence the ease with which a person can perform the three cognitive tasks of remembering, communicating, and attending. The four variables were the…

  12. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 28: The technical communication practices of aerospace engineering and science students: Results of the phase 4 cross-national surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Hecht, Laura M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate aerospace engineering and science students in the context of two general aspects of the educational experience. First, we explore the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that lead to the choice of becoming an aerospace engineer or a scientist, current satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives. Second, we look at the technical communication skills, practices, habits, and training of aerospace engineering and science students. The reported data were obtained from a survey of students enrolled in aerospace engineering and science programs at universities in India, Japan, Russia, and the United Kingdom. The surveys were undertaken as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Data are reported for the following categories: student demographics; skill importance, skill training, and skill helpfulness; collaborative writing; computer and information technology use and importance, use of electronic networks; use and importance of libraries and library services; use and importance of information sources and products; use of foreign language technical reports; and foreign language (reading and speaking) skills.

  13. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 33: Technical communications practices and the use of information technologies as reported by Dutch and US aerospace engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Tan, Axel S. T.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to aerospace engineers and scientists at the National Aerospace Laboratory (The Netherlands), and NASA ARC (U.S.), and NASA LaRC (U.S.). This paper presents responses of the Dutch and U.S. participants to selected questions concerning four of the seven project objectives: determining the importance of technical communications to aerospace engineering professionals, investigating the production of technical communications, examining the use and importance of computer and information technology, and exploring the use of electronic networks.

  14. Summative assessment of undergraduates' communication competence in challenging doctor-patient encounters. Evaluation of the Düsseldorf CoMeD-OSCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortsiefer, Achim; Immecke, Janine; Rotthoff, Thomas; Karger, André; Schmelzer, Regine; Raski, Bianca; Schmitten, Jürgen In der; Altiner, Attila; Pentzek, Michael

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the summative assessment (OSCE) of a communication training programme for dealing with challenging doctor-patient encounters in the 4th study year. Our OSCE consists of 4 stations (breaking bad news, guilt and shame, aggressive patients, shared decision making), using a 4-item global rating (GR) instrument. We calculated reliability coefficients for different levels, discriminability of single items and interrater reliability. Validity was estimated by gender differences and accordance between GR and a checklist. In a pooled sample of 456 students in 3 OSCEs over 3 terms, total reliability was α=0.64, reliability coefficients for single stations were >0.80, and discriminability in 3 of 4 stations was within the range of 0.4-0.7. Except for one station, interrater reliability was moderate to strong. Reliability on item level was poor and pointed to some problems with the use of the GR. The application of the GR on regular undergraduate medical education shows moderate reliability in need of improvement and some traits of validity. Ongoing development and evaluation is needed with particular regard to the training of the examiners. Our CoMeD-OSCE proved suitable for the summative assessment of communication skills in challenging doctor-patient encounters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The distress of voice-hearing: the use of simulation for awareness, understanding and communication skill development in undergraduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Fiona; Kellehear, Kevin; Armari, Elizabeth; Pearson, Arana; Holmes, Douglas

    2013-11-01

    Role-play scenarios are frequently used with undergraduate nursing students enrolled in mental health nursing subjects to simulate the experience of voice-hearing. However, role-play has limitations and typically does not involve those who hear voices. This collaborative project between mental health consumers who hear voices and nursing academics aimed to develop and assess simulated voice-hearing as an alternative learning tool that could provide a deeper understanding of the impact of voice-hearing, whilst enabling students to consider the communication skills required when interacting with voice-hearers. Simulated sounds and voices recorded by consumers on mp3 players were given to eighty final year nursing students undertaking a mental health elective. Students participated in various activities whilst listening to the simulations. Seventy-six (95%) students completed a written evaluation following the simulation, which assessed the benefits of the simulation and its implications for clinical practice. An analysis of the students' responses by an external evaluator indicated that there were three major learning outcomes: developing an understanding of voice-hearing, increasing students' awareness of its impact on functioning, and consideration of the communication skills necessary to engage with consumers who hear voices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of internet technologies for students' communicative competence development in the process of professional foreign language study in technical universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanova, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    Problems of mature thinking formation and development of foreign-language professional communicative competence of competitive graduates of technical universities are considered in the article. The most important factors influencing the achievement of high standard of knowledge, students' abilities and skills and increase of their abilities to establish deep meta-subject connections due to Internet technologies in the course of professional foreign language training are analyzed. The article is written on the basis of project material "Network School of National Research Nuclear University MEPhI" aimed at optimization of technological aspect of training. The given academic on-line program assigns to the teacher a part of an organizer who only coordinates creative, academic students' activity.

  17. Information and Communication Technology Skills of Students Using the Distant Education Management System to Complete Their Theology Undergraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalman, Murat; Basaran, Bulent; Gonen, Selehattin

    2016-01-01

    Considering several variables, the present study aimed at examining the information and communication technology skills of university students taking their courses with the distant education system. In the study, the singular and relational survey model, one of general survey models, was used. The research sample was made up of 381 students…

  18. Information overload an international challenge to professional engineers and technical communicators

    CERN Document Server

    Ulijn, J M; Fazal, Zohra

    2012-01-01

    "This book covers the ever-increasing problem of information overload from both the professional and academic perspectives. Focusing on the needs of practicing engineers and professional communicators, it addresses the causes and costs of information overload, along with strategies and techniques for reducing and minimizing its negative effects. The theoretical framework of information overload and ideas for future research are also presented. The book brings together an international group of authors, providing a truly global point of view on this important, rarely covered topic"--

  19. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 31: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 SME mail survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists affiliated with, not necessarily belonging to, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME).

  20. Technical Note: Novel method for water vapour monitoring using wireless communication networks measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. David

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new technique that overcomes the obstacles of the existing methods for monitoring near-surface water vapour, by estimating humidity from data collected through existing wireless communication networks.

    Weather conditions and atmospheric phenomena affect the electromagnetic channel, causing attenuations to the radio signals. Thus, wireless communication networks are in effect built-in environmental monitoring facilities. The wireless microwave links, used in these networks, are widely deployed by cellular providers for backhaul communication between base stations, a few tens of meters above ground level. As a result, if all available measurements are used, the proposed method can provide moisture observations with high spatial resolution and potentially high temporal resolution. Further, the implementation cost is minimal, since the data used are already collected and saved by the cellular operators. In addition – many of these links are installed in areas where access is difficult such as orographic terrain and complex topography. As such, our method enables measurements in places that have been hard to measure in the past, or have never been measured before. The technique is restricted to weather conditions which exclude rain, fog or clouds along the propagation path. Strong winds that may cause movement of the link transmitter or receiver (or both may also interfere with the ability to conduct accurate measurements.

    We present results from real-data measurements taken from two microwave links used in a backhaul cellular network that show convincing correlation to surface station humidity measurements. The measurements were taken daily in two sites, one in northern Israel (28 measurements, the other in central Israel (29 measurements. The correlation between the microwave link measurements and the humidity gauges were 0.9 and 0.82 for the north and central sites, respectively. The Root Mean Square Differences

  1. Will Professional Communication Be the Death of Business Communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locker, Kitty O.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the growth of business and technical communication courses as college courses in universities. Documents the move to "professional" communication in English departments. Explains why technical communication dominates "professional" communication. Argues that faculty who teach business communication in business schools…

  2. WINDING METHOD SELECTION FOR TECHNICAL IMPLEMENTATION OF FIBER OPTIC COMMUNICATION LINE FOR HIGH-SPEED OBJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav A. Loparev

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with fiber-optical cable winding methods for realization of fiber-optic communication line with high-speed object. We consider possible options of coils for optical cable winding providing mobility of one of the cable ends on an object. It is shown that the choice of a winding process is caused by the need of ensuring the minimum deformation of fiber-optical micro cable in case of separation from a winding body. It is revealed that the minimum tension value and its unevenness are observed when reeling from coils with a rocket form. Design ratios for determination of winding parameters are given. It is shown that reduction of tension unevenness reduces the jumps of internal tension and probability of break and emergence of optical signal local attenuation. Decrease in internal stresses occurs due to the absence of overlapping of the coils of the underlying layers with the overlying ones. To confirm the operability and the possibility of constructive implementation of the selected winding scheme, experiments were carried out to perform rocket and other types of winding with the use of a specially designed machine model. It is shown that the application of line rocket winding enables to achieve stability when reeling a cable during the movement and excludes breaks. Attenuation of optical signal decreases due to the increase in the bend minimum radius. This phenomenon is explained by reduction of the internal stresses causing optical signal attenuation in the place of cable separation from the coil.

  3. Professional communication competences of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włoszczak-Szubzda, Anna; Jarosz, Mirosław Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    Dissonance between the high 'technical' professionalism of nurses and the relatively low level of patient satisfaction with care received is a phenomenon observed in many countries. Many studies show that it occurs in the case of an inadequate interpersonal communication between nurses and patients. Three basic scopes of communication competences were involved in the research process: a) motivation, b) knowledge, c) skills, and the following three methods were used: 1) documentation analysis (standards, plans and educational programmes); 2) diagnostic survey concerning professional communication competences of nurses in nursing care--a questionnaire form designed by the authors; 3) self-reported communication skills in nursing care--adjective check list. The study group covered a total number of 108 respondents in the following subgroups: 1) professional nurses who, as a rule, were not trained in interpersonal communication (42 respondents); students of nursing covered by a standard educational programme (46 respondents); 3) students of nursing who, in addition to a standard educational programme, attended extra courses in professional interpersonal communications nursing (20 respondents). The data obtained were subjected to statistical analysis with the use of descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing. The results of studies indicate poor efficacy of shaping communication competences of nurses based on education in the area of general psychology and general interpersonal communication. Communication competences acquired during undergraduate nursing education, are subject to regression during occupational activity. Methods of evaluating communication competences are useful in constructing group and individual programmes focused on specific communication competences rather than on general communication skills.

  4. Pattern of Smartphones Utilisation among Engineering Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muliati Sedek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The smartphones ownership among the undergraduates in Malaysia was recorded as high. However, little was known about its utilization patterns, thus, the focus of this research was to determine the utilisation patterns of smartphones based on the National Education Technology Standard for Students (NETS.S among engineering undergraduates in Malaysia. This study was based on a quantitative research and the population comprised undergraduates from four Malaysian Technical Universities. A total of 400 questionnaires were analyzed. Based on the results, the undergraduates’ utilisation level of smartphones for communication and collaboration tool was at a high level. Meanwhile, utilisation for operations and concepts tool and research and information fluency tool were at moderate level. Finally, smartphones utilisation as digital citizenship tool and critical thinking, problem solving and creativity tool were both at a low level. Hence, more training and workshops should be given to the students in order to encourage them to fully utilise smartphones in enhancing the higher order thinking skills.

  5. Communicative skills and attitude towards telework of chilean undergraduates/Competencias comunicativas y actitud hacia el teletrabajo de

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lic. Óscar Muñoz Villegas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In this article are explained the outstanding results of a not random or ex-post factum research done in Valdivia, Chile, to assess the communicative skills and attitudes towards telework that students of two different academic groups or epistemes (Science and Humanities in the Austral University of Chile (AuCh affirm havingResumen: En el presente artículo se explican los resultados más relevantes de una investigación no aleatoria o ex -post factum llevada a cabo en Valdivia, Chile, con el objetivo de valorar las competencias comunicativas y actitudes hacia teletrabajo que afirman poseer los estudiantes de dos grupos académicos o epistemes diferentes (ciencias y humanidades en Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh.

  6. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 40: Technical communications in aerospace education: A study of AIAA student members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John M.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary analysis of a survey of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) student members. In the paper we examine (1) the demographic characteristics of the students, (2) factors that affected their career decisions, (3) their career goals and aspirations, and (4) their training in technical communication and techniques for finding and using aerospace scientific and technical information (STI). We determine that aerospace engineering students receive training in technical communication skills and the use of STI. While those in the aerospace industry think that more training is needed, we believe the students receive the appropriate amount of training. We think that the differences between the amount of training students receive and the perception of training needs is related partially to the characteristics of the students and partially to the structure of the aerospace STI dissemination system. Overall, we conclude that the students' technical communication training and knowledge of STI, while limited by external forces, makes it difficult for students to achieve their career goals.

  7. Communication, Communication, Communication! Growth through Laboratory Instructing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jamie J.; DeAngelo, Samantha; Mack, Nancy; Thompson, Claudia; Cooper, Jennifer; Sesma, Arturo, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined gains undergraduate students made in their communication and collaboration skills when they served as peer teachers, i.e., laboratory instructors (LIs), for a General Psychology laboratory. Self-ratings of communication and collaboration skills were completed before and after teaching the laboratory. When compared to before the…

  8. The level of emotional intelligence in undergraduate students of nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majerníková Ľudmila

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The theory of emotional intelligence provides a framework to think about all of the non-technical skills you need in order to be a good nurse. It’s often described as the potential to feel, use, communicate, recognize, remember, describe, identify, learn from, manage, understand, and explain emotions. The aim of the study was to determine the level of total global Emotional Intelligence among undergraduate students of nursing and also to check the influence of factors (the year of study, type of completed high school education on Emotional Intelligence.

  9. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 33: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 AIAA mail survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who are members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA).

  10. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 24: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 SAE mail survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists affiliated with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE).

  11. Summer Technical Students 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    About 100 technical and doctoral students arrive each year, undergraduates and post-graduates who are preparing diploma or doctoral theses in applied science and technology. They spend up to two years at the Laboratory, as technical students as part of their formal training for a recognised degree or its equivalent.

  12. Pattern of Smartphones Utilisation among Engineering Undergraduates

    OpenAIRE

    Muliati Sedek

    2014-01-01

    The smartphones ownership among the undergraduates in Malaysia was recorded as high. However, little was known about its utilization patterns, thus, the focus of this research was to determine the utilisation patterns of smartphones based on the National Education Technology Standard for Students (NETS.S) among engineering undergraduates in Malaysia. This study was based on a quantitative research and the population comprised undergraduates from four Malaysian Technical Universities. A total ...

  13. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 61: The Technical Communications Practices of ESL Aerospace Engineering Students in the United States: Results of a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, John R.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1997-01-01

    When engineering students graduate and enter the world of work, they make the transition from an academic to a professional community of knowledge. The importance of oral and written communication to the professional success and advancement of engineers is well documented. For example, studies such as those conducted by Mailloux (1989) indicate that communicating data, information, and knowledge takes up as much as 80% of an engineer's time. However, these same studies also indicate that many engineering graduates cannot (a) write technical reports that effectively inform and influence decisionmaking, (b) present their ideas persuasively, and (c) communicate with their peers. If these statements are true, how is learning to communicate effectively in their professional knowledge community different for engineering students educated in the United States but who come from other cultures-cultures in which English is not the primary language of communication? Answering this question requires adequate and generalizable data about these students' communications abilities, skills, and competencies. To contribute to the answer, we undertook a national (mail) survey of 1,727 student members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The focus of our analysis and this paper is a comparison of the responses of 297 student members for whom English is a second language with the responses of 1,430 native English speaking students to queries regarding career choice, bilingualism and language fluency, communication skills, collaborative writing, computer use, and the use of electronic (computer) networks.

  14. [An experience applying the teaching strategies of cooperative learning and creative thinking in a mental-health nursing practicum for undergraduates at a technical college].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hsien; Lin, Mei-Feng; Ho, Hsueh-Jen; Chang, Lu-Na; Chen, Shiue

    2015-04-01

    Lack of knowledge and experience is prevalent in undergraduate students who are taking their clinical practicum for mental-health nursing. This issue negatively affects the learning process. This article shares an experience of implementing a practicum-teaching program. This program was developed by the authors to facilitate the cooperative learning and clinical care competence of students. A series of multidimensional teaching activities was designed by integrating the strategies of peer cooperation and creative thinking to promote group and individual learning. Results indicate that the program successfully encouraged the students to participate more actively in the learning process. Additionally, the students demonstrated increased competence in empathetic caring toward patients, stronger friendship relationships with peers, and improved self-growth. The authors hope this teaching program provides a framework to increase the benefits for students of participating in clinical practicums and provides a teaching reference for clinical instructors.

  15. Development of research paper writing skills of poultry science undergraduate students studying food microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Z R; Donalson, L M; Kim, W K; Li, X; Zabala Díaz, I; Landers, K L; Maciorowski, K G; Ricke, S C

    2006-02-01

    Because food and poultry industries are demanding an improvement in written communication skills among graduates, research paper writing should be an integral part of a senior undergraduate class. However, scientific writing assignments are often treated as secondary to developing the technical skills of the students. Scientific research paper writing has been emphasized in an undergraduate course on advanced food microbiology taught in the Poultry Science Department at Texas A& M University (College Station, TX). Students' opinions suggest that research paper writing as part of a senior course in Poultry Science provides students with scientific communication skills and useful training for their career, but more emphasis on reading and understanding scientific literature may be required.

  16. Development and reliability of the explicit professional oral communication observation tool to quantify the use of non-technical skills in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Peter F; van Noord, Inge; de Bruijne, Martine; Knol, Dirk L; Wagner, Cordula; van Dyck, Cathy

    2013-07-01

    A lack of non-technical skills is increasingly recognised as an important underlying cause of adverse events in healthcare. The nature and number of things professionals communicate to each other can be perceived as a product of their use of non-technical skills. This paper describes the development and reliability of an instrument to measure and quantify the use of non-technical skills by direct observations of explicit professional oral communication (EPOC) in the clinical situation. In an iterative process we translated, tested and refined an existing checklist from the aviation industry, called self, human interaction, aircraft, procedures and environment, in the context of healthcare, notably emergency departments (ED) and intensive care units (ICU). The EPOC comprises six dimensions: assertiveness, working with others; task-oriented leadership; people-oriented leadership; situational awareness; planning and anticipation. Each dimension is specified into several concrete items reflecting verbal behaviours. The EPOC was evaluated in four ED and six ICU. In the ED and ICU, respectively, 378 and 1144 individual and 51 and 68 contemporaneous observations of individual staff members were conducted. All EPOC dimensions occur frequently, apart from assertiveness, which was hardly observed. Intraclass correlations for the overall EPOC score ranged between 0.85 and 0.91 and for underlying EPOC dimensions between 0.53 and 0.95. The EPOC is a new instrument for evaluating the use of non-technical skills in healthcare, which is reliable in two highly different settings. By quantifying professional behaviour the instrument facilitates measurement of behavioural change over time. The results suggest that EPOC can also be translated to other settings.

  17. Undergraduate Program: New Orleans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsock, Lori

    2008-03-01

    Undergraduate chemical science students—join us in New Orleans on April 6-7, 2008 for an educational program designed specifically for you. Attend symposia on chemistry in sports and health and learn how it impacts your life everyday; meet with graduate school recruiters. Focus on your professional future in chemistry by learning more about careers in public health and how to communicate and work effectively with cross-functional teams. Hear eminent scientist Richard B. Silverman (John Evans Professor of Chemistry, Northwestern University and author of The Organic Chemistry of Drug Design and Drug Action 2004) speak about "Drug Discovery: Ingenuity or Serendipity?" All events will take place at the Hilton Riverside Hotel in New Orleans, except the Undergraduate Research Poster Sessions and Sci-Mix, both of which will be held in Hall A of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center.

  18. Undergraduate Convexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Niels

    Based on undergraduate teaching to students in computer science, economics and mathematics at Aarhus University, this is an elementary introduction to convex sets and convex functions with emphasis on concrete computations and examples. Starting from linear inequalities and Fourier-Motzkin elimin...

  19. Communications Satellite Systems Conference, 9th, San Diego, CA, March 7-11, 1982, Collection of Technical Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Shuttle-to-Geostationary Orbital Transfer by mid-level thrust is considered along with multibeam antenna concepts for global communications, the antenna pointing systems for large communication satellites, the connection phase of multidestination protocols for broadcast satellites, and an experiment in high-speed international packet switching. Attention is given to a dynamic switch matrix for the TDMA satellite switching system, the characterization of 16 bit microprocessors for space use, in-orbit operation and test of Intelsat V satellites, the first operational communications system via satellite in Europe, the Arab satellite communications systems, second generation business satellite systems for Europe, and a high performance Ku-band satellite for the 1980's. Other topics investigated are related to Ku-band terminal design tradeoffs, progress in the definition of the Italian satellite for domestic telecommunications, future global satellite systems for Intelsat, and satellite refuelling in orbit.

  20. COMMUNICATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor and D. Barney

    2010-01-01

    CMS Centres, Outreach and the 7 TeV Media Event The new CMS Communications group is now established and is addressing three areas that are critical to CMS as it enters the physics operations phase: - Communications Infrastructure, including almost 50 CMS Centres Worldwide, videoconferencing systems, and CERN meeting rooms - Information systems, including the internal and external Web sites as well as the document preparation and management systems - Outreach and Education activities, including working with print, radio and TV media, visits to CMS, and exhibitions. The group has been active in many areas, with the highest priority being accorded to needs of CMS operations and preparations for the major media event planned for 7 TeV collisions. Unfortunately the CMS Centre@CERN suffered a major setback when, on 21st December, a cooling water pipe froze and burst on the floor above the CMS Centre main room. Water poured through the ceiling, flooding the floor and soaking some of the consoles, before e...

  1. COMMUNICATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Petrilli

    2013-01-01

    The organisation of the Open Days at the end of September was the single biggest effort of the CMS Communications Group this year. We would like to thank all volunteers for their hard work to show our Point 5 facilities and explain science and technology to the general public. During two days more than 5,000 people visited the CMS detector underground and profited from the surface activities, which included an exhibition on CMS, a workshop on superconductivity, and an activity for our younger visitors involving wooden Kapla blocks. The Communications Group took advantage of the preparations to produce new CMS posters that can be reused at other venues. Event display images have been produced not just for this occasion but also for other exhibits, education purposes, publications etc. During the Open Days, Gilles Jobin, 2012 winner of CERN Collide@CERN prize, performed his Quantum show in Point 5, with the light installation of German artist Julius von Bismarck. Image 3: CERN Open Days at CMS wel...

  2. Communication and Collaboration in Library Technical Services: A Case Study of New York University in Abu Dhabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Justin

    2016-01-01

    New York University Abu Dhabi Library has developed new strategies to increase efficiency in technical services processing between units based in New York and Abu Dhabi. This case study discusses the challenges specific to the international context and the methods used to overcome them, increase speed processing, and ultimately improve patron…

  3. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 4:] Technical communications in aerospace: An analysis of the practices reported by US and European aerospace engineers and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Myron

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from pilot surveys on the use of scientific and technical information (STI) by U.S. and NATO-nation aerospace scientists and engineers, undertaken as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. The survey procedures and the demographic characteristics of the 67 scientists and engineers who responded to the survey are summarized, and the results are presented in a series of tables and discussed in detail. Findings emphasized include: (1) both U.S. and NATO respondents spend around 60 percent of their work week producing or using STI products; (2) NATO respondents are more likely than their U.S. counterparts to use 'formal' STI products (like technical reports and papers) and the services of librarians and online data bases; (3) most of the respondents use computers and information technology in preparing STI products; and (4) respondents who had taken courses in technical communication agreed on the value and ideal subject matter of such courses.

  4. Undergraduate Convexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Niels

    Based on undergraduate teaching to students in computer science, economics and mathematics at Aarhus University, this is an elementary introduction to convex sets and convex functions with emphasis on concrete computations and examples. Starting from linear inequalities and Fourier-Motzkin elimin......Based on undergraduate teaching to students in computer science, economics and mathematics at Aarhus University, this is an elementary introduction to convex sets and convex functions with emphasis on concrete computations and examples. Starting from linear inequalities and Fourier......-Motzkin elimination, the theory is developed by introducing polyhedra, the double description method and the simplex algorithm, closed convex subsets, convex functions of one and several variables ending with a chapter on convex optimization with the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions, duality and an interior point...... algorithm....

  5. Style and Ethics of Communication in Science and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Humphrey, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    Scientists and engineers seek to discover and disseminate knowledge so that it can be used to improve the human condition. Style and Ethics of Communication in Science and Engineering serves as a valuable aid in this pursuit-it can be used as a textbook for undergraduate or graduate courses on technical communication and ethics, a reference book for senior design courses, or a handbook for young investigators and beginning faculty members. In addition to presenting methods for writing clearly and concisely and improving oral presentations, this compact book provides practical guidelines for pr

  6. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. XXXIII - Technical communications practices and the use of information technologies as reported by Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Tan, Axel S. T.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to aerospace engineers and scientists at the National Aerospace Laboratory (The Netherlands), and NASA Ames Research Center (U.S.), and the NASA Langley Research Center (U.S.). This paper presents responses of the Dutch and U.S. participants to selected questions about four of the seven project objectives: determining the importance of technical communications to aerospace engineering professionals, investigating the production of technical communications, examining the use and importance of computer and information technology, and exploring the use of electronic networks.

  7. Using Communicative Action Theory to Analyse Relationships Between Supervisors and Phd Students in a Technical University in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Christie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors use the theory of communicative action (Habermas, 1984-6 to analyse problematic relationships that can occur between supervisors and PhD students, between co-supervisors and between the students themselves. In a situation where power is distributed unequally, instrumental and strategic action on the part of either party can complicate and disturb efficacious relationships. We use Flanagan’s critical incident technique (Flanagan, 1954 to analyse twenty-five incidents that are told from a supervisor perspective and twentyfive from a PhD student perspective. The analysis reveals that a large proportion of incidents involved power struggles. Other categories include lack of professional or emotional support and poor communication. Rational dialogue based on Habermasian principles might have avoided many of these problems. The analysis concludes with some practical suggestions as to how the use of communicative action theory and critical incident technique can improve supervision, supervision training and the PhD process.

  8. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 37: The impact of political control on technical communications: A comparative study of Russian and US aerospace engineers and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Flammia, Madelyn; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Until the recent dissolution of the Soviet Union, the Communist Party exerted a strict control of access to and dissemination of scientific and technical information (STI). This article presents models of the Soviet-style information society and the Western-style information society and discusses the effects of centralized governmental control of information on Russian technical communication practices. The effects of political control on technical communication are then used to interpret the results of a survey of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the time devoted to technical communication, their collaborative writing practices and their attitudes toward collaboration, the kinds of technical documents they produce and use, and their use of computer technology, and their use of and the importance to them of libraries and technical information centers. The data are discussed in terms of tentative conclusions drawn from the literature. Finally, we conclude with four questions concerning government policy, collaboration, and the flow of STI between Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

  9. Superfund TIO videos: Set B. Community relations, communicating with the media and presenting technical information. Part 9. Audio-Visual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The videotape is divided into three sections. Section 1 discusses the Superfund Community Relations (CR) Program and its history and objectives. Community Relations requirements as defined by CERCLA for Superfund actions are outlined. Community Relations requirements, the nature of community involvement in CR plans, effective CR techniques, and the roles of the OSC, RPM, and EPA Community Relations Coordinator (CRC) are discussed. Section 2 (1) describes the media's perspective on seeking information; (2) identifies five settings and mechanisms for interacting with the media; (3) offers good media-relations techniques; and (4) lists tips for conducting media interviews. Section 3 outlines techniques for presenting technical information, describes how to be prepared to address typical issues of community concern, and identifies the four key elements in handling tough questions

  10. Technical Report Writing Today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riordan, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Section 1: Technical Communication Basics (8 chapters on tech com, audiences, tech com process, tech com style, researching, designing pages, using visual aids, describing). Section 2: Technical Communication Applications (7 chapters on sets of instructions, informal reports and email, developing...... websites/using social media, formal reports, recommendation and feasibility reports, proposals, user manuals). Section 3: Professional Communication (2 chapters and 2 appendices on presentations, job application materials, brief handbook for tech writers, documenting sources).......Section 1: Technical Communication Basics (8 chapters on tech com, audiences, tech com process, tech com style, researching, designing pages, using visual aids, describing). Section 2: Technical Communication Applications (7 chapters on sets of instructions, informal reports and email, developing...

  11. Attitudes of Undergraduates towards Grammar Translation Method and Communicative Language Teaching in EFL Context: A Case Study of SBK Women’s University Quetta, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hina Durrani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available CLT and GTM have been popular and much practiced methodologies in classrooms worldwide in teaching English language. The purpose of the current research is to examine students’ attitude towards Grammar Translation Method and CLT in Pakistan at graduate level. The data for the current study was collected through questionnaire from undergraduate students of Baluchistan, Pakistan. The questionnaire was adapted from the studies of Palacios (2006 and McClintock (2011. Theoretical framework of Richard and Rodger (2001 was used as a guide for the study. However the data was analyzed quantitatively in SPSS. The overall results show that the students had a positive attitude towards GTM and their attitude was less favorable towards CLT. Keywords: CLT, GTM, Attitudes

  12. 20th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE)

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle Slone

    2013-01-01

    Delaware Technical Community College (DTCC) is one of the pilot schools involved in the Community College Undergraduate Research Initiative (CCURI) which is responding to the call for reform of undergraduate science education. The major tenet of this initiative is to engage students early in their course of study by embedding undergraduate research into the curriculum. At DTCC this is accomplished by incorporating research-based laboratories, case studies, and problem-based learning activitie...

  13. Desire and reality – teaching and assessing communicative competencies in undergraduate medical education in German-speaking Europe – a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtl, Anja; Bachmann, Cadja; Blum, Katharina; Höfer, Stefan; Peters, Tim; Preusche, Ingrid; Raski, Bianca; Rüttermann, Stefan; Wagner-Menghin, Michaela; Wünsch, Alexander; Kiessling, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Increasingly, communicative competencies are becoming a permanent feature of training and assessment in German-speaking medical schools (n=43; Germany, Austria, Switzerland – ”D-A-CH”). In support of further curricular development of communicative competencies, the survey by the “Communicative and Social Competencies” (KusK) committee of the German Society for Medical Education (GMA) systematically appraises the scope of and form in which teaching and assessment take place. Methods: The iterative online questionnaire, developed in cooperation with KusK, comprises 70 questions regarding instruction (n=14), assessment (n=48), local conditions (n=5), with three fields for further remarks. Per location, two to three individuals who were familiar with the respective institute’s curriculum were invited to take part in the survey. Results: Thirty-nine medical schools (40 degree programmes) took part in the survey. Communicative competencies are taught in all of the programmes. Ten degree programmes have a longitudinal curriculum for communicative competencies; 25 programmes offer this in part. Sixteen of the 40 programmes use the Basler Consensus Statement for orientation. In over 80% of the degree programmes, communicative competencies are taught in the second and third year of studies. Almost all of the programmes work with simulated patients (n=38) and feedback (n=37). Exams are exclusively summative (n=11), exclusively formative (n=3), or both summative and formative (n=16) and usually take place in the fifth or sixth year of studies (n=22 and n=20). Apart from written examinations (n=15) and presentations (n=9), practical examinations are primarily administered (OSCE, n=31); WPA (n=8), usually with self-developed scales (OSCE, n=19). With regards to the examiners’ training and the manner of results-reporting to the students, there is a high variance. Conclusions: Instruction in communicative competencies has been implemented at all 39 of the

  14. Desire and reality--teaching and assessing communicative competencies in undergraduate medical education in German-speaking Europe--a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtl, Anja; Bachmann, Cadja; Blum, Katharina; Höfer, Stefan; Peters, Tim; Preusche, Ingrid; Raski, Bianca; Rüttermann, Stefan; Wagner-Menghin, Michaela; Wünsch, Alexander; Kiessling, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, communicative competencies are becoming a permanent feature of training and assessment in German-speaking medical schools (n=43; Germany, Austria, Switzerland - "D-A-CH"). In support of further curricular development of communicative competencies, the survey by the "Communicative and Social Competencies" (KusK) committee of the German Society for Medical Education (GMA) systematically appraises the scope of and form in which teaching and assessment take place. The iterative online questionnaire, developed in cooperation with KusK, comprises 70 questions regarding instruction (n=14), assessment (n=48), local conditions (n=5), with three fields for further remarks. Per location, two to three individuals who were familiar with the respective institute's curriculum were invited to take part in the survey. Thirty-nine medical schools (40 degree programmes) took part in the survey. Communicative competencies are taught in all of the programmes. Ten degree programmes have a longitudinal curriculum for communicative competencies; 25 programmes offer this in part. Sixteen of the 40 programmes use the Basler Consensus Statement for orientation. In over 80% of the degree programmes, communicative competencies are taught in the second and third year of studies. Almost all of the programmes work with simulated patients (n=38) and feedback (n=37). Exams are exclusively summative (n=11), exclusively formative (n=3), or both summative and formative (n=16) and usually take place in the fifth or sixth year of studies (n=22 and n=20). Apart from written examinations (n=15) and presentations (n=9), practical examinations are primarily administered (OSCE, n=31); WPA (n=8), usually with self-developed scales (OSCE, n=19). With regards to the examiners' training and the manner of results-reporting to the students, there is a high variance. Instruction in communicative competencies has been implemented at all 39 of the participating medical schools. For the most part

  15. Desire and reality – teaching and assessing communicative competencies in undergraduate medical education in German-speaking Europe – a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Härtl

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Increasingly, communicative competencies are becoming a permanent feature of training and assessment in German-speaking medical schools (n=43; Germany, Austria, Switzerland – ”D-A-CH”. In support of further curricular development of communicative competencies, the survey by the “Communicative and Social Competencies” (KusK committee of the German Society for Medical Education (GMA systematically appraises the scope of and form in which teaching and assessment take place. Methods: The iterative online questionnaire, developed in cooperation with KusK, comprises 70 questions regarding instruction (n=14, assessment (n=48, local conditions (n=5, with three fields for further remarks. Per location, two to three individuals who were familiar with the respective institute’s curriculum were invited to take part in the survey. Results: Thirty-nine medical schools (40 degree programmes took part in the survey. Communicative competencies are taught in all of the programmes. Ten degree programmes have a longitudinal curriculum for communicative competencies; 25 programmes offer this in part. Sixteen of the 40 programmes use the Basler Consensus Statement for orientation. In over 80% of the degree programmes, communicative competencies are taught in the second and third year of studies. Almost all of the programmes work with simulated patients (n=38 and feedback (n=37. Exams are exclusively summative (n=11, exclusively formative (n=3, or both summative and formative (n=16 and usually take place in the fifth or sixth year of studies (n=22 and n=20. Apart from written examinations (n=15 and presentations (n=9, practical examinations are primarily administered (OSCE, n=31; WPA (n=8, usually with self-developed scales (OSCE, n=19. With regards to the examiners’ training and the manner of results-reporting to the students, there is a high variance. Conclusions: Instruction in communicative competencies has been implemented at all 39 of

  16. Diagnostic imaging in undergraduate medical education: an expanding role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    Radiologists have been involved in anatomy instruction for medical students for decades. However, recent technical advances in radiology, such as multiplanar imaging, 'virtual endoscopy', functional and molecular imaging, and spectroscopy, offer new ways in which to use imaging for teaching basic sciences to medical students. The broad dissemination of picture archiving and communications systems is making such images readily available to medical schools, providing new opportunities for the incorporation of diagnostic imaging into the undergraduate medical curriculum. Current reforms in the medical curriculum and the establishment of new medical schools in the UK further underline the prospects for an expanding role for imaging in medical education. This article reviews the methods by which diagnostic imaging can be used to support the learning of anatomy and other basic sciences

  17. Handing Over and Letting Go: Using Online Continuing Medical Education in Teaching and Assessing Medical English Language and Communication Skills to Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekemans, Herlinda

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades the medical community has increasingly underlined the necessity for medical students and healthcare professionals to acquire adequate and patient-friendly medical language and communication skills. Although teachers of foreign languages for medical purposes are usually not medically trained, their learners present them with…

  18. Prototype development and demonstration for response, emergency staging, communications, uniform management, and evacuation (R.E.S.C.U.M.E.) : technical report on prototype development and field testing of R.E.S.C.U.M.E. applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This document is the final project technical report for the development and field testing of the Response, Emergency Staging, Communications, Uniform Management, and Evacuation (R.E.S.C.U.M.E.) application bundle, with a focus on the Incident Zone (I...

  19. Field convergence between technical writers and technical translators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnecchi, M.; Maylath, B.; Mousten, Birthe

    2011-01-01

    As translation of technical documents continues to grow rapidly and translation becomes more automated, the roles of professional communicators and translators appear to be converging. This paper updates preliminary findings first presented at the 2008 International Professional Communication...

  20. 當代傳播思潮中的數位素養: 評介Digital Literacy for Technical Com Digital Literacy in Contemporary Communication: A Review of Digital Literacy for Technical Communication: 21st Century Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Sheng, Deng

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The ever-advancing technology has reformed our work environment and also redefined our life styles. The advancement of computer and cyber technology has allowed “digital” jobs and products to infiltrate different aspects of our society, influencing the ways of modern communication as well as the future course of education practices. Comparing with conventional literacy concepts about “reading, writing, listening, and speaking”, “digital literacy” lays more emphasis on the effects and changes caused by a digital context. Based on the standpoints of social constructivism and with experts in communication studies and educators as subjects, this paper reviews the book Digital Literacy for Technical communication: 21st Century Theory and Practice to analyze and discuss key knowledge and abilities required for the future and possible development of related research. Based on the compilation of the book, this review is divided into four parts. The first raises questions about the ontology of “digital literacy”, identifies the scope and meaning of “digital literacy” as defined by Spilkaet al., and confirms the discourse of this review. The second introduces the evolvement of a digital context and describes its three characteristics –authoring, publishing, and management technology – as the preconditions for developing digital literacy. The third discusses the “ fundamental knowledge” for the practice of “digital literacy” and introduces “shaping tools, information design, and content management” as references for communication and education works. The last part concludes the cultural, crosscultural, audience, and ethical perspectives introduced in this book and discusses how to connect “human and technology” for the future development of communication studies and education.

  1. Evaluation of interprofessional education: lessons learned through the development and implementation of an interprofessional seminar on team communication for undergraduate health care students in Heidelberg - a project report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sarah; Mahler, Cornelia; Krug, Katja; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    This project report describes the development, "piloting" and evaluation of an interprofessional seminar on team communication bringing together medical students and Interprofessional Health Care B.Sc. students at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg University, Germany. A five-member interprofessional team collaborated together on this project. Kolb's experiential learning concept formed the theoretical foundation for the seminar, which explored three interprofessional competency areas: team work, communication and values/ethics. Evaluation for the purposes of quality assurance and future curricula development was conducted using two quantitative measures: descriptive analysis of a standardized course evaluation tool (EvaSys) ANOVA analysis of the German translation of the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (UWE-IP-D). The key finding from the standardized course evaluation was that the interprofessional seminars were rated more positively [M=2.11 (1 most positive and 5 most negative), SD=1, n=27] than the monoprofessional seminars [M=2.55, SD=0.98, n=90]. The key finding from the UWE-IP-D survey, comparing pre and post scores of the interprofessional (IP) (n=40) and monoprofessional (MP) groups (n=34), was that significant positive changes in mean scores for both groups towards communication, teamwork and interprofessional learning occurred. Lessons learnt included: a) recognising the benefit of being pragmatic when introducing interprofessional education initiatives, which enabled various logistical and attitudinal barriers to be overcome; b) quantitative evaluation of learning outcomes alone could not explain positive responses or potential influences of interprofessional aspects, which highlighted the need for a mixed methods approach, including qualitative methods, to enrich judgment formation on interprofessional educational outcomes.

  2. A conference experience for undergraduates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.A.; Magee, N.H.; Bryant, H.C.; Zeilik, M.

    1999-01-01

    Programs launched by many universities and the federal government expose many undergraduate students in the physical sciences to research early in their careers. However, in their research experiences, undergraduates are not usually introduced to the modes by which scientific knowledge, which they may have helped gather, is communicated and evaluated by working scientists. Nor is it always made clear where the research frontiers really lie. To this end, we guided a selected group of undergraduates through a national scientific conference, followed by a week of tutorials and discussions to help them better understand what had transpired. The program complemented the basic undergraduate research endeavors by emphasizing the importance of disseminating results both to other scientists and to society in general. Tutors and discussion leaders in the second week were experts in their fields and included some of the invited speakers from the main meeting. A considerable improvement in the understanding of the issues and prospects for a career in physics was discernible among the students after their two-week experience. copyright 1999 American Association of Physics Teachers

  3. Towards the Development of Phospholipid-Encapsulated Gold Nanorod Chains for Enhanced Raman-Scattering and the Improvement of Student Scientific Communication Skills in Undergraduate Classroom and Laboratory Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alexander F.

    Depending on functionalization, nanospecies can serve effectively as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes. Their efficacy can be improved by tuning their shape and concentrating their electric field profile into smaller regions. This tuning is seen particularly well in nanorods, which concentrate such fields near the rod tips or ends, in 'hotspots'. These hotspots can be constructively enhanced through the self-assembly of the nanospecies in question, further increasing the enhancement of Raman-active species within. When considering their potential application as SERS probes, both the separation of end-to-end assembled nanorods (gap size), as well as the degree of assembly (chain length), are factors that must be optimized to obtain maximal signal. This thesis reports on the development of robust and variable methods for assembling gold nanorod species in an end-to-end configuration, and for investigating their effectiveness as SERS probes. Using both polymers and short charged ligands with control over their locations of attachment to gold nanorods, nanorod assembly could be initiated in a longitudinal direction either through changing the solvent system or through the introduction of bridging ligands. Exploitation of the inter-rod gap 'hotspot' region allowed for significant Raman enhancement of species located in said gap. Using phospholipids to encapsulate the assembling nanorod allowed for significant control over the proportions of species, in terms of length of the nanorod chain. This control allowed for further optimization of the Raman signals from species of interest. This thesis also details the investigation, over a period of several academic years, of the success of the Writing Instruction and Training (WIT) program, an initiative to iteratively improve student written communication skills as they related to scientific chemical communication. In courses ranging from first to third year, undergraduates were provided with opportunities to

  4. Team-based learning increases active engagement and enhances development of teamwork and communication skills in a first-year course for veterinary and animal science undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Susan J; Heberle, Nicole; McEwen, Margaret-Mary; Adams, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) was implemented into a first-year course (Principles in Animal Behaviour, Welfare and Ethics) for BSc Veterinary Bioscience (VB) and Animal Science (AS) students. TBL is now used widely in teaching medical students, but has had more limited uptake in veterinary education. This study reports its use over 2 years with cohorts of 126 and 138 students in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Average individual marks for multiple-choice question (MCQ) tests in the Readiness Assurance component of TBL were higher for the teams than for individuals for each session, explicitly demonstrating the advantages of teamwork. Students reported that they felt actively involved and that TBL helped them both with their learning and in developing other important skills, such as teamwork and communication. Qualitative analysis of written feedback from the students revealed positive themes of discussion, application, revelation, socializing, engagement, clarification, and retention/revision. In 2011 negative comments included the need to shorten the TBL sessions, but in 2012 tightening of the timelines meant that this was no longer a major concern. Requests to provide better introductory and background materials and ambiguity in questions in the TBL activities were what students least liked about the TBL. However, most comments were positive rather than negative in nature, and many students preferred the TBL to lectures. With requirements for curricula to teach professional skills, such as communication and teamwork, and the positive results from TBL's implementation, it is hoped that this study will encourage others to trial the use of TBL in veterinary education.

  5. An approach to communications security for a communications data delivery system for V2V/V2I safety : technical description and identification of policy and institutional issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report identifies the security approach associated with a communications data delivery system that supports vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communications. The report describes the risks associated with communication...

  6. Emotional intelligence score and performance of dental undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yuh; Ninomiya, Kazunori; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and undergraduate dental students' ability to deal with different situations of communication in a clinical dentistry practical training course of communication skills. Fourth-year students in 2012 and in 2013 at the Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Niigata participated in the survey. The total number of participating students was 129 (88 males and 41 females). The students were asked to complete the Japanese version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test in communication skills. Female students tended to have significantly higher EI score than males. The EI score in the group with high-grade academic performers was higher than in the low-grade group. The influence of EI on academic performance appeared to be mainly due to the students' ability to accurately perceiving emotions and to their ability to understand emotional issues. The importance of EI may also lie in its ability to parse out personality factors from more changeable aspects of a person's behavior. Although further studies are required, we believe that dental educators need to assume the responsibility to help students develop their emotional competencies that they will need to prosper in their chosen careers. In our conclusion, dental educators should support low achievers to increase their levels of self-confidence instead of concentrating mainly on improving their technical skill and academic performance. This may lead to upgrading their skills for managing emotions and to changing their learning approach.

  7. Elucidating Bioethics with Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Betty B.; Shannon, Thomas A.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the importance of developing bioethics programs for undergraduate students. Two aspects are considered: (1) current areas of concern and sources of bibliographic information; and (2) problems encountered in undergraduate projects. A list of references is provided. (HM)

  8. The SUPER Program: A Research-based Undergraduate Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernakovich, J. G.; Boone, R. B.; Boot, C. M.; Denef, K.; Lavallee, J. M.; Moore, J. C.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Producing undergraduates capable of broad, independent thinking is one of the grand challenges in science education. Experience-based learning, specifically hands-on research, is one mechanism for increasing students' ability to think critically. With this in mind, we created a two-semester long research program called SUPER (Skills for Undergraduate Participation in Ecological Research) aimed at teaching students to think like scientists and enhancing the student research experience through instruction and active-learning about the scientific method. Our aim was for students to gain knowledge, skills, and experience, and to conduct their own research. In the first semester, we hosted active-learning workshops on "Forming Hypotheses", "Experimental Design", "Collecting and Managing Data", "Analysis of Data", "Communicating to a Scientific Audience", "Reading Literature Effectively", and "Ethical Approaches". Each lesson was taught by different scientists from one of many ecological disciplines so that students were exposed to the variation in approach that scientists have. In the second semester, students paired with a scientific mentor and began doing research. To ensure the continued growth of the undergraduate researcher, we continued the active-learning workshops and the students attended meetings with their mentors. Thus, the students gained technical and cognitive skills in parallel, enabling them to understand both "the how" and "the why" of what they were doing in their research. The program culminated with a research poster session presented by the students. The interest in the program has grown beyond our expectations, and we have now run the program successfully for two years. Many of the students have gone on to campus research jobs, internships and graduate school, and have attributed part of their success in obtaining their positions to their experience with the SUPER program. Although common in other sciences, undergraduate research experiences are

  9. Engaging Undergraduates in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajwani, Kiran; Miron, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Siegfried and Stock (2007) explore the undergraduate training of PhD economists. Their findings show that among U.S. undergraduate economics programs, the Harvard University Economics Department produces many eventual economics PhD recipients. In this article, the authors discuss Harvard's undergraduate economics program and highlight some key…

  10. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project: Report 43: The Technical Communication Practices of U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 1 Mail Survey -- Manufacturing and Production Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communication practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were members of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers.

  11. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report No. 36: The Technical Communications Practices of US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 1 NASA Langley Research Center Mail Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were assigned to the Research and Technology Group (RTG) at the NASA Langley Research Center in September 1995.

  12. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 25: The technical communications practices of British aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 4 RAeS mail survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of British aerospace engineers and scientists.

  13. Progress update on a 2015 USIP interdisciplinary undergraduate student microgravity experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, A.; Colwell, J. E.; Brisset, J.; Kirstein, J.; Brightwell, K.; Hayden, R.; Jorges, J.; Schwartzberg, D.; Strange, J.; Yates, A.

    2016-12-01

    Our team was selected by the 2016 USIP program to build, fly, and analyze the results from a granular dynamics experiment that will fly in 2017 on a suborbital flight. The experiment will be designed to test technology and enable science relevant to low-gravity planetary objects, such as asteroids, comets, and small moons. Following on the success of previous NASA Flight Opportunities Program (FOP) and Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (USIP) projects, however, the primary driver of the project is to enable undergraduate student participation in the entire lifetime of a science and technology development project. Our mentoring team consists of faculty, postdoctoral researchers, and graduate students, who have experience with the past USIP program and similar projects, as well as with mentoring undergraduate students. The undergraduate team includes a diversity of major disciplines, including physics, mechanical/aerospace engineering, electrical engineering, business (accounting), and marketing. Each team member has specific project tasks, as outlined in the proposal, and all members will also help develop and participate in outreach events. In additional to their project roles, students will also be responsible for presentations and milestones, such as design reviews. Through these reviews and the outreach events, all team members have the chance to develop their technical and non-technical communication skills. Previous experience with the NASA USIP program demonstrated that students achieve significant growth through these projects -gaining a better understanding of the entire lifecycle of a project, and, likely more importantly, how to work with a diverse team. In this talk, we will discuss the status of the project, and present student impressions and thoughts on the project thus far.

  14. Undergraduate students' development of social, cultural, and human capital in a networked research experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jennifer Jo; Conaway, Evan; Dolan, Erin L.

    2016-12-01

    think and work like a scientist—a scientific habitus. They reported developing human capital in the forms of technical, analytical, and communication skills in scientific research. Most of the students had little, direct interaction with network members in other research groups and thus developed little cross-institutional capital. The exception to this trend was at one institution that housed three research groups. Because proximity facilitated shared activities, students across research groups at this institution developed cross-lab ties with faculty and peers through which they developed social, cultural, and human capital. An important long-term concern is whether the capital students have developed will help them access opportunities in science beyond the network. At this point, many undergraduates have had limited opportunities to actually draw on capital beyond the network. Nevertheless, a number of students demonstrated awareness that they had developed resources that they could use in other scientific contexts.

  15. The masked educator-innovative simulation in an Australian undergraduate Medical Sonography and Medical Imaging program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Searl, Kerry; Bowman, Anita; McAllister, Margaret; Cowling, Cynthia; Spuur, Kelly

    2014-12-01

    Clinical learning experiences for sonography and medical imaging students can sometimes involve the practice of technical procedures with less of a focus on developing communication skills with patients. Whilst patient-based simulation scenarios have been widely reported in other health education programmes, there is a paucity of research in sonography and medical imaging. The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) in the learning and teaching of clinical communication skills to undergraduate medical sonography and medical imaging students. Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) is a simulation technique where the educator is hidden behind wearable realistic silicone body props including masks. Focus group interviews were conducted with 11 undergraduate medical sonography and medical imaging students at CQUniversity, Australia. The number of participants was limited to the size of the cohort of students enrolled in the course. Prior to these interviews participants were engaged in learning activities that featured the use of the Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) method. Thematic analysis was employed to explore how the introduction of Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) contributed to students' learning in relation to clinical communication skills. Key themes included: benefits of interacting with someone real rather than another student, learning made fun, awareness of empathy, therapeutic communication skills, engaged problem solving and purposeful reflection. Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) combined with interactive sessions with an expert facilitator, contributed positively to students' learning in relation to clinical communication skills. Participants believed that interacting with someone real, as in the Mask-Ed characters was beneficial. In addition to the learning being described as fun, participants gained an awareness of empathy, therapeutic communication skills, engaged problem solving and purposeful reflection.

  16. Communication theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Irene F.; Stelter, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Communication theory covers a wide variety of theories related to the communication process (Littlejohn, 1999). Communication is not simply an exchange of information, in which we have a sender and a receiver. This very technical concept of communication is clearly outdated; a human being...... is not a data processing device. In this chapter, communication is understood as a process of shared meaning-making (Bruner, 1990). Human beings interpret their environment, other people, and themselves on the basis of their dynamic interaction with the surrounding world. Meaning is essential because people...... ascribe specific meanings to their experiences, their actions in life or work, and their interactions. Meaning is reshaped, adapted, and transformed in every communication encounter. Furthermore, meaning is cocreated in dialogues or in communities of practice, such as in teams at a workplace or in school...

  17. Das Longitudinale Curriculum "Soziale und kommunikative Komptenzen" im Bologna-reformierten Medizinstudium in Basel [The longitudinal curriculum "social and communicative competencies" within Bologna-reformed undergraduate medical education in Basel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langewitz, Wolf

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: Within the Bologna reform, a longitudinal curriculum of “social and communicative competencies” (SOKO was implemented into the new Bachelor-Master structure of undergraduate medical education in Basel (Switzerland. Project description: The aim of the SOKO curriculum is to enable students to use techniques of patient-centred communication to elicit and provide information to patients in order to involve them as informed partners in decision making processes. The SOKO curriculum consists of 57 lessons for the individual student from the first bachelor year to the first master year. Teaching encompasses lectures and small group learning. Didactic methods include role play, video feedback, and consultations with simulated and real patients. Summative assessment takes place in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE. Conclusion: In Basel, a longitudinal SOKO curriculum based on students’ cumulative learning was successfully implemented. Goals and contents were coordinated with the remaining curriculum and are regularly assessed in OSCEs. At present, most of the workload rests on the shoulders of the department of psychosomatic medicine at the university hospital. For the curriculum to be successful in the long-term, sustainable structures need to be instituted at the medical faculty and the university hospital to guarantee high quality teaching and assessment.[german] Hintergrund: Mit der Umstellung auf die Bachelor-/Masterstruktur wurde in Basel (Schweiz ein longitudinales Curriculum „soziale und Kommunikative Kompetenzen“ (SOKO in das Medizinstudium implementiert. Projektbeschreibung: Ziel ist es, den Studierenden grundlegende Techniken einer patientenzentrierten Kommunikation in dem Sinne zu vermitteln, dass die Studierenden in der Lage sind, Informationen zu erheben und Informationen an Patientinnen und Patienten weiterzugeben, um sie als gut informierte Partner am Entscheidungsprozess zu beteiligen. Das

  18. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 45; The Technical Communications Practices of US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 3 US Aerospace Engineering Educators Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. Little is also known about the intermediary-based system that is used to transfer the results of federally funded R&D to the U.S. aerospace industry. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports, present a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communication practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and identified themselves as educators.

  19. Views and experiences of mental health nurses working with undergraduate assistants in nursing in an acute mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Mannix, Judy; Jackson, Debra; Hunt, Glenn E

    2012-04-01

    Undergraduate nurses are employed as assistants in nursing (AIN) in inpatient mental health settings; however, there is a paucity of published research exploring registered nurses' (RN) views about the AIN role in these settings. This qualitative study documents the views and experiences of RN working with undergraduate AIN. Fifty structured face-to-face interviews were analysed, and the results are discussed in three sections. The first section outlines RN perceptions of qualities and skills required of AIN in mental health, and the responses primarily focus on communication skills, initiative, and willingness to learn. The second section targets factors in the workplace that might enhance the interest of AIN in a mental health nursing career; the responses emphasize their need to work with experienced staff. The last section outlines RN expectations of AIN, most of which are met and involve physical observations and technical tasks; less fulfilled activities primarily cluster around interactions with patients. Findings highlight the advantages and disadvantages of drawing on undergraduate nursing students as AIN in mental health settings. Communication skills, personal initiative, safety training to prevent violence, and education to increase knowledge and awareness about mental illness, diagnosis, and mental status-related skills were all important concerns articulated by RN. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  20. Competencies for first year residents - physicians' views from medical schools with different undergraduate curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstenberg, Sophie; Schick, Kristina; Deppermann, Jana; Prediger, Sarah; Berberat, Pascal O; Kadmon, Martina; Harendza, Sigrid

    2017-09-07

    Frameworks like the CanMEDS model depicting professional roles and specific professional activities provide guidelines for postgraduate education. When medical graduates start their residency, they should possess certain competencies related to communication, management and professionalism while other competencies will be refined during postgraduate training. Our study aimed to evaluate the relevance of different competencies for a first year resident required for entrustment decision from the perspective of physicians from medical faculties with different undergraduate medical curricula. Nine hundred fifty-two surgeons and internists from three medical schools with different undergraduate medical curricula were invited to rank 25 competencies according to their relevance for first year residents. The rankings were compared between universities, specialties, physicians' positions, and gender. Two hundred two physicians participated, 76 from Hamburg University, 44 from Oldenburg University, and 82 from Technical University Munich. No significant differences were found regarding the top 10 competencies relevant for first year residents between the universities. 'Responsibility' was the competency with the highest rank overall. Internists ranked 'Structure, work planning and priorities' higher while surgeons ranked 'Verbal communication with colleagues and supervisors' higher. Consultants evaluated 'Active listening to patients' more important than department directors and residents. Female physicians ranked 'Verbal communication with colleagues and supervisors' and 'Structure, work planning and priorities' significantly higher while male physicians ranked 'Scientifically and empirically grounded method of working' significantly higher. Physicians from universities with different undergraduate curricula principally agreed on the competencies relevant for first year residents. Some differences between physicians from different positions, specialties, and gender were

  1. Interactive and Hands-on Methods for Professional Development of Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, S. N.; LeBeau, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Professional development workshops for undergraduate research programs can range from communicating science (i.e. oral, technical writing, poster presentations), applying for fellowships and scholarships, applying to graduate school, and learning about careers, among others. Novel methods of presenting the information on the above topics can result in positive outcomes beyond the obvious of transferring knowledge. Examples of innovative methods to present professional development information include 1) An interactive session on how to write an abstract where students are given an opportunity to draft an abstract from a short technical article, followed by discussion amongst a group of peers, and comparison with the "published" abstract. 2) Using the Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) method to evaluate and critique a research poster. 3) Inviting "experts" such as a Fulbright scholar graduate student to present on applying for fellowships and scholarships. These innovative methods of delivery provide more hands-on activities that engage the students, and in some cases (abstract writing) provide practice for the student. The methods also require that students develop team work skills, communicate amongst their peers, and develop networks with their cohort. All of these are essential non-technical skills needed for success in any career. Feedback from students on these sessions are positive and most importantly, the students walk out of the session with a smile on their face saying how much fun it was. Evaluating the impact of these sessions is more challenging and under investigation currently.

  2. Professional communication competences of paramedics--practical and educational perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włoszczak-Szubzda, Anna; Jarosz, Mirosław J; Goniewicz, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    Dissonance between the high 'technical' competences of medical professionals, including paramedics or emergency medical technicians (EMT), and the relatively low level of patient satisfaction with care received, is a phenomenon observed in many countries. Many studies show that it occurs in the case of an inadequate interpersonal communication between medical professionals and patients. The primary goal of the presented research was evaluation of the level (study of the state) of communication competences of paramedics, and determination of the factors on which this level depends. An additional goal was analysis of the needs and educational possibilities within the existing models of education in the area of interpersonal communication provided by higher medical education institutions. The following three methods were used: 1) documentation analysis (standards, plans and educational programmes); 2) diagnostic survey concerning professional communication competences of paramedics; 3) self-reported communication skills in emergency medical services--adjective check list. The last two instruments were subject to standardization from the aspect of reliability and validity. The study group covered a total of 105 respondents in the following subgroups: 1) professional paramedics who, as a rule, were not trained in interpersonal communication (31 respondents); paramedic students covered by a standard educational programme (54 respondents); 3) paramedic students who, in addition to a standard educational programme, attended extra courses in professional interpersonal communications (20 respondents). The results of studies indicate poor efficacy of shaping communication competences of paramedics based on education in the area of general psychology and general interpersonal communication. Communication competences acquired by paramedics during undergraduate education are subject to regression during occupational activity. Methods of evaluating communication competences are

  3. Improving Undergraduates' Critique via Computer Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Maslawati; Musa, Faridah; Amin, Maryam Mohamed; Mufti, Norlaila; Latiff, Rozmel Abdul; Sallihuddin, Nani Rahayu

    2014-01-01

    Our current university students, labeled as "Generation Y" or Millennials, are different from previous generations due to wide exposure to media. Being technologically savvy, they are accustomed to Internet for information and social media for socializing. In line with this current trend, teaching through computer mediated communication…

  4. Undergraduate Biotechnology Students' Views of Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondston, Joanne Elisabeth; Dawson, Vaille; Schibeci, Renato

    2010-01-01

    Despite rapid growth of the biotechnology industry worldwide, a number of public concerns about the application of biotechnology and its regulation remain. In response to these concerns, greater emphasis has been placed on promoting biotechnologists' public engagement. As tertiary science degree programmes form the foundation of the biotechnology…

  5. Undergraduate module on nutrition education and communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On average, respondents answered 96% of the questions in the questionnaire. Information was obtained on areas such as students' social/cultural interests; food and nutrition experience and expertise; food and eating habits; ideas of nutrition education and training in nutrition education; and study preferences. In addition ...

  6. Effectiveness of a second life(®) simulation as a teaching strategy for undergraduate mental health nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Lori I; Knisley, Samantha J; Morgan, Karyn I

    2012-07-01

    Learning may be enhanced in mental health nursing education by applying virtual reality technologies in which students may safely practice communication and assessment skills with simulated patients. The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess the effectiveness of a Second Life(®) (SL) virtual simulation as a teaching strategy for undergraduate mental health nursing students. Data were collected via a researcher-developed survey questionnaire. Students perceived the simulation to be moderately effective as an educational strategy and slightly difficult as a technical program. Positive aspects included client assessment in an environment where mistakes were without consequence, working from home, and novelty. Drawbacks were dressing and maneuvering the avatar and lack of realism. Correlations were found between educational effectiveness and technical difficulty and between educational effectiveness and age of the computer. SL virtual simulation has potential to provide unique, easily accessible, safe, and fun learning for mental health nursing students. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Technical Agency in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina

    2015-01-01

    ) description of hybrid networks in which human and non-human actants are granted agency without differentiating different kinds of agency, EMCA focuses on the member's perspectives and the situated construction of technical agency that is made relevant within an ongoing interaction. Based on an EMCA analysis......The paper combines the discussion of technical agency and hybrid networks of Actor-Network Theory (ANT) with an ethnomethodological/conversation analytical (EMCA) perspective on situated practices in which participants ascribe agency to technical artefacts. While ANT works with (ethnographic...... of three video recordings of situations in which technical agency is made relevant by the human participants, the paper demonstrates different ways in which agency is granted to technical artefacts. Human participants can treat a technology as communication partner, as an active part (and actant...

  8. Oral Communication Apprehension among International Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Fatemeh; Puteh, Marlia

    2018-01-01

    Communication apprehension has been identified as a major factor which inhibits an individual's willingness to communicate and his/her ability to develop effective communication skills. While many prior studies have investigated oral communication apprehension among undergraduate students, there has been little research exploring this phenomenon…

  9. perception of undergraduates of undergraduates' about computer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Computer and internet has omputer and internet has omputer and internet has brought innovative chang brought innovative chang computer and IT related courses have recently been i level. Therefore, level. Therefore, it was important to know the perc it was important to know the perc undergraduate students about the.

  10. Undergraduate courses for enhancing design ability in naval architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Yeul Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary lectures in undergraduate engineering courses typically focus on teaching major technical knowledge-based theories in a limited time. Therefore, most lectures do not allow the students to gain understanding of how the theories are applied, especially in Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering departments. Shipyards require students to acquire practical ship design skills in undergraduate courses. To meet this requirement, two lectures are organized by the authors; namely, “Planning Procedure of Naval Architecture & Ocean Engineering” (PNAOE and “Innovative Ship Design” (ISD. The concept of project-based and collaborative learning is applied in these two lectures. In the PNAOE lecture, sophomores receive instruction in the designing and building of model ships, and the students' work is evaluated in a model ship contest. This curriculum enables students to understand the concepts of ship design and production. In the ISD lecture, seniors learn how to develop their creative ideas about ship design and communicate with members of group. They are encouraged to cooperate with others and understand the ship design process. In the capstone design course, students receive guidance to facilitate understanding of how the knowledge from their sophomore or junior classes, such as fluid mechanics, statics, and dynamics, can be applied to practical ship design. Students are also encouraged to compete in the ship design contest organized by the Society of Naval Architects of Korea. Moreover, the effectiveness of project-based and collaborative learning for enhancing interest in the shipbuilding Industry and understanding the ship design process is demonstrated by citing the PNAOE and ISD lectures as examples.

  11. Undergraduate courses for enhancing design ability in naval architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Yeul; Ku, Namkug; Cha, Ju-Hwan

    2013-09-01

    Contemporary lectures in undergraduate engineering courses typically focus on teaching major technical knowledge-based theories in a limited time. Therefore, most lectures do not allow the students to gain understanding of how the theories are applied, especially in Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering departments. Shipyards require students to acquire practical ship design skills in undergraduate courses. To meet this requirement, two lectures are organized by the authors; namely, "Planning Procedure of Naval Architecture & Ocean Engineering" (PNAOE) and "Innovative Ship Design" (ISD). The concept of project-based and collaborative learning is applied in these two lectures. In the PNAOE lecture, sophomores receive instruction in the designing and building of model ships, and the students' work is evaluated in a model ship contest. This curriculum enables students to understand the concepts of ship design and production. In the ISD lecture, seniors learn how to develop their creative ideas about ship design and communicate with members of group. They are encouraged to cooperate with others and understand the ship design process. In the capstone design course, students receive guidance to facilitate understanding of how the knowledge from their sophomore or junior classes, such as fluid mechanics, statics, and dynamics, can be applied to practical ship design. Students are also encouraged to compete in the ship design contest organized by the Society of Naval Architects of Korea. Moreover, the effectiveness of project-based and collaborative learning for enhancing interest in the shipbuilding Industry and understanding the ship design process is demonstrated by citing the PNAOE and ISD lectures as examples.

  12. The Mathematics Self-Efficacy of Rural Central Appalachian Undergraduate Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music, Lisa J.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation study was a two-part investigation with a sample of undergraduate students from three community and technical colleges and one university in the state of Kentucky. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors that contribute to the mathematics self-efficacy of rural Central Appalachian undergraduate females. Two…

  13. Professional communication competences of physiotherapists -- practice and educational perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włoszczak-Szubzda, Anna; Jarosz, Mirosław J

    2013-01-01

    Dissonance between the high 'technical' competences of medical professionals, including physiotherapists, and the relatively low level of patient satisfaction with care received is a phenomenon observed in many countries. Many studies show that it occurs in the case of an inadequate interpersonal communication between medical professionals and patients. The primary goal of the presented research was evaluation of the level (study of the state) of communication competences of physiotherapists, and determination of the factors on which this level depends. An additional goal was analysis of the needs and educational possibilities within the existing models of education in the area of interpersonal communication provided by higher medical education institutions. The self-designed questionnaire and adjective check list were subject to standardization from the aspect of reliability and validity. Information available on the websites of 20 educational facilities in Poland were compared. The study group covered a total number of 115 respondents in the following subgroups: 1) occupationally-active physiotherapists who, as a rule, were not trained in interpersonal communication (35 respondents); students of physiotherapy covered by a standard educational programme (60 respondents); 3) students of physiotherapy who, in addition to a standard educational programme, attended extra courses in professional interpersonal communications (20 respondents). The results of studies indicate poor efficacy of shaping communication competences of physiotherapists based on education in the area of general psychology and general interpersonal communication. Communication competences acquired during undergraduate physiotherapy education are subject to regression during occupational activity. Methods of evaluating communication competences are useful in constructing group and individual programmes focused on specific communication competences, rather than on general communication skills.

  14. Technical innovation and policy of scientific technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Wi Jin

    2006-04-01

    This book deals with system of innovation and policy of scientific technology : main view point and Topic, technical politics and technical learning, spread of internet and change of structure in information and communications industry, characteristic of technical innovation of software as open source, transfer into national innovation system, change of activity of public scientific technology, theory on technical innovation, evolution of technical innovation policy and participation of civil.

  15. Effect of a video on developing skills in undergraduate nursing students for the management of totally implantable central venous access ports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Ariane F; Moreli, Lucimara; Braga, Fernanda T M M; Vasques, Christiane I; Santos, Claudia B; Carvalho, Emilia C

    2012-08-01

    Handling Totally Implantable Access Ports (TIAP) is a nursing procedure that requires skill and knowledge to avoid adverse events. No studies addressing this procedure with undergraduate students were identified prior to this study. Communication technologies, such as videos, have been increasingly adopted in the teaching of nursing and have contributed to the acquisition of competencies for clinical performance. To evaluate the effect of a video on the puncture and heparinization of TIAP in the development of cognitive and technical competencies of undergraduate nursing students. Quasi-experimental study with a pretest-posttest design. 24 individuals participated in the study. Anxiety scores were kept at levels 1 and 2 in the pretest and posttest. In relation to cognitive knowledge concerning the procedure, the proportion of correct answers in the pretest was 0.14 (SD=0.12) and 0.90 in the posttest (SD=0.05). After watching the video, the average score obtained by the participants in the mock session was 27.20. The use of an educational video with a simulation of puncture and heparinization of TIAP proved to be a strategy that increased both cognitive and technical knowledge. This strategy is viable in the teaching-learning process and is useful as a support tool for professors and for the development of undergraduate nursing students. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. SPIC Undergraduate Programme

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 12. SPIC Undergraduate Programme. P K Subrahmanyam. Information and Announcements Volume 3 Issue 12 December 1998 pp 108-110. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Technical report writing today

    CERN Document Server

    Riordan, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    "Technical Report Writing Today" provides thorough coverage of technical writing basics, techniques, and applications. Through a practical focus with varied examples and exercises, students internalize the skills necessary to produce clear and effective documents and reports. Project worksheets help students organize their thoughts and prepare for assignments, and focus boxes highlight key information and recent developments in technical communication. Extensive individual and collaborative exercises expose students to different kinds of technical writing problems and solutions. Annotated student examples - more than 100 in all - illustrate different writing styles and approaches to problems. Numerous short and long examples throughout the text demonstrate solutions for handling writing assignments in current career situations. The four-color artwork in the chapter on creating visuals keeps pace with contemporary workplace capabilities. The Tenth Edition offers the latest information on using electronic resum...

  18. Razvoj komunikacijskih in vodstvenih kompetenc pri vodjih tehnične stroke = The Development of Communication and Leading Competences among the Leaders of Technical Expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Jermanis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A leader holds an important role in the communication process.His/her way of passing information and of communication continuouslyinfluences the employees as it streams their behaviour and buildsmutual trust. The purpose of this article is to show the development ofcommunication and leading competences for mid-level leaders. Furthermore,the article defines specific competences and their importancefor the efficient management of staff. 152 mid-level leaders workingfor an automotive company – a worldwide automotive supplier –were involved in the research. They completed the education programmefor mid-level leaders. Descriptive statistical techniques and factoranalysis were used for data processing.

  19. Communicating health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, A

    1995-01-01

    Routine production of communication materials without paying attention to utilization, field test, and impact analysis is ineffective. The concept of information, education, and communication (IEC) should encompass voluntary activity of health education in a tradition of innovation. One seminal factor may be the communication technologies developed by the National Technology Missions. The missions were participatory by seeking solutions among communities and analyzing health issues from the perspective of those directly involved, rather than from the top down. The prime focus of the national drinking water mission was convenience, hence messages concentrating on health advantages were ignored. At this juncture, influencing health behavior required decentralization reflecting local cultures. Thus community-based partners became the foundation of a strategy of communicating safe water. As national strategies emerged in each of the technology missions, communication addressed advocacy of the need for political will, dissemination of technical information, and influencing patterns of behavior. Despite learning a new understanding, the danger exists that IEC remains just another label of mass communication with posters, advertisements, brochures, radio, and television. Decisions on contraceptive choice and use requires more than just accurate information; it requires the power to make such a decision. A new approach demands a priority for communication skills taking into account people's aspirations. The HIV-AIDS crisis underlines the urgency with which communication has to respond to health challenges. A series of experiments facilitated by the World Conservation Union helped build communication capabilities among environmental groups working in Latin America, Africa, and India. The International Reference Center on Water and Sanitation initiated pilot communication projects in West Africa for community health.

  20. Computer-based communication in support of scientific and technical work. [conferences on management information systems used by scientists of NASA programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallee, J.; Wilson, T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported of the first experiments for a computer conference management information system at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Between August 1975 and March 1976, two NASA projects with geographically separated participants (NASA scientists) used the PLANET computer conferencing system for portions of their work. The first project was a technology assessment of future transportation systems. The second project involved experiments with the Communication Technology Satellite. As part of this project, pre- and postlaunch operations were discussed in a computer conference. These conferences also provided the context for an analysis of the cost of computer conferencing. In particular, six cost components were identified: (1) terminal equipment, (2) communication with a network port, (3) network connection, (4) computer utilization, (5) data storage and (6) administrative overhead.

  1. Retrograde snare-assisted rescue via the anterior communicating artery for lost access during multiple overlapping pipeline embolization device placement: A technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Wonsoo; Kang, Dong-Hun; Kim, Byung Moon; Park, Jaechan; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2018-03-07

    The pipeline embolization device (PED; ev3, Irvine, California, USA) has been used to divert flow away from an aneurysm sac. The risk of complications may increase for flow diversion with giant aneurysms, since these cases may require multiple overlapping PEDs, which makes the technique highly complex. We report a rescue technical strategy for lost access during multiple overlapping PED placement for a giant, fusiform cavernous aneurysm. By using the collateral circulation as an alternative rescue route, intraprocedural loss of distal access may be salvaged. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Why and How to Advance Technical Copywriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Leigh

    1996-01-01

    States that promotional writing for industrial/high-tech products, or technical copywriting, is gaining more attention in technical communication, although it is neglected in higher education. Testifies to the significance of technical copywriting. Suggests that dialogical audience analysis and an emphasis on rational appeal will contribute to…

  3. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Skills for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Skills for Bachelor of Education Degree Students at the University of Zimbabwe: Implications for University Policy on a Computer Course for Undergraduate Student Teachers.

  4. Strategies for using peer-assisted learning effectively in an undergraduate bioinformatics course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Casey; Ayon, Carlos; Moberg-Parker, Jordan; Levis-Fitzgerald, Marc; Sanders, Erin R

    2013-01-01

    This study used a mixed methods approach to evaluate hybrid peer-assisted learning approaches incorporated into a bioinformatics tutorial for a genome annotation research project. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from undergraduates who enrolled in a research-based laboratory course during two different academic terms at UCLA. Findings indicate that a critical feature of the peer-assisted learning approach is to have near-peer leaders with genome annotation experience, allowing them to communicate technical and conceptual aspects of the process in the context of a research project (a.k.a., the "big picture"). These characteristics are important for creating connections between the wet lab experiments and the computer lab activities, engendering excitement about the research project and fostering engagement in bioinformatics as a discipline. Likewise, it is essential to couple tutorial training in genome annotation with appropriate instructional materials, providing detailed, step-by-step instructions for database navigation. Finally, the assessment results support this hybrid peer-assisted learning approach as a model for undergraduates to successfully learn bioinformatics in a course setting. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. What Is Undergraduate Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Judith A.

    1997-12-01

    The Council on Undergraduate Research promotes and assists development of collaborative student/faculty research at primarily undergraduate colleges and universities. Most science educators today accept such research as a critical component of an undergraduate science education. Research provides the primary opportunity for students to engage in the practice of science. We can draw an analogy between sports training and the education of young scientists. We cannot train future tennis players exclusively by providing them with lectures on tennis and supervising them performing skill-development drills. To become skilled at their game, tennis players must engage in active competition. Similarly, young scientists must engage in the enterprise that affords our understanding of the physical universe. Only by participating in scientific investigation can students understand the nature of science and become scientists.

  6. Imagining Technicities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liboriussen, Bjarke; Plesner, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    to the elements of taste and skill. In the final analysis those references were synthesized as five imagined technicities: the architect, the engineer, the client, the Chinese, and the Virtual World native. Because technicities are often assumed and rarely discussed as actants who influence practice, their role......, this article focuses on innovative uses of virtual worlds in architecture. We interviewed architects, industrial designers and other practitioners. Conceptually supported by an understanding of technicity found in Cultural Studies, the interviews were then coded with a focus on interviewees’ references...... in cooperation and development of ICTs seems to pass unnoticed. However, since they are aligned into ICTs, technicities impact innovation....

  7. Undergraduate Program: Philadelphia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsock, Lori

    2008-08-01

    Undergraduate chemical science students—join us in Philadelphia on August 17 and 18, 2008, for an educational and career-oriented program designed specifically for you. Attend symposia about global climate change and clean energy; hear Nobel Laureate F. Sherwood Rowland speak about his fascinating career, "A Life in Tracer Chemistry". Weigh options for your future by attending the Graduate School Reality Check and graduate school recruiting events. All events will take place in the Sheraton Philadelphia City Center at 17th and Race Streets, except the Undergraduate Poster Sessions and Sci-Mix, which will be held in the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

  8. Undergraduate Research: Importance, Benefits, and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, John K; Jung, Alan P

    Developing and maintaining undergraduate research programs benefits students, faculty mentors, and the university. Incorporating a research component along with a sound academic foundation enables students to develop independent critical thinking skills along with oral and written communication skills. The research process impacts valuable learning objectives that have lasting influence as undergraduates prepare for professional service. Faculty members at teaching intensive institutions can enhance learning experiences for students while benefiting from a productive research agenda. The university in turn benefits from presentations and publications that serve to increase visibility in the scientific community. Whether projects are derived through student-generated or mentor-generated means, students benefit from completion of exposure to the hypothesis-driven scientific method.

  9. Conducting Mathematical Research with Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth E.

    2013-01-01

    The notion that undergraduates are capable of making profound and original contributions to mathematical research is rapidly gaining acceptance. Undergraduates bring their enthusiasm, creativity, curiosity, and perseverance to bona fide research problems. This article discusses some of the key issues concerning undergraduate mathematical research:…

  10. "On the job" learning: A bioinformatics course incorporating undergraduates in actual research projects and manuscript submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason T; Harris, Justine C; Lopez, Oscar J; Valverde, Laura; Borchert, Glen M

    2015-01-01

    The sequencing of whole genomes and the analysis of genetic information continues to fundamentally change biological and medical research. Unfortunately, the people best suited to interpret this data (biologically trained researchers) are commonly discouraged by their own perceived computational limitations. To address this, we developed a course to help alleviate this constraint. Remarkably, in addition to equipping our undergraduates with an informatic toolset, we found our course design helped prepare our students for collaborative research careers in unexpected ways. Instead of simply offering a traditional lecture- or laboratory-based course, we chose a guided inquiry method, where an instructor-selected research question is examined by students in a collaborative analysis with students contributing to experimental design, data collection, and manuscript reporting. While students learn the skills needed to conduct bioinformatic research throughout all sections of the course, importantly, students also gain experience in working as a team and develop important communication skills through working with their partner and the class as a whole, and by contributing to an original research article. Remarkably, in its first three semesters, this novel computational genetics course has generated 45 undergraduate authorships across three peer-reviewed articles. More importantly, the students that took this course acquired a positive research experience, newfound informatics technical proficiency, unprecedented familiarity with manuscript preparation, and an earned sense of achievement. Although this course deals with analyses of genetic systems, we suggest the basic concept of integrating actual research projects into a 16-week undergraduate course could be applied to numerous other research-active academic fields. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Proceedings of the LLNL Technical Women`s Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Holtz, E. [ed.

    1993-12-31

    This report documents events of the LLNL Technical Women`s Symposium. Topics include; future of computer systems, environmental technology, defense and space, Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Physics, technical communication, tools and techniques for biology in the 1990s, automation and robotics, software applications, materials science, atomic vapor laser isotope separation, technical communication, technology transfer, and professional development workshops.

  12. Theory, Technology, and Creative Practice: Using Pixton Comics to Teach Communication Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Erin A.

    2014-01-01

    As a central area of study within the discipline, theories of interpersonal communication are the bedrock of many introductory textbooks designed for use in undergraduate courses on communication and communication theory (Griffin, 2012; Littlejohn & Foss, 2010; Miller, 2004; West & Turner, 2010). Though undergraduate students are, of…

  13. Avaliação do desempenho ambiental de uma instituição pública de ensino técnico e superior Environmental performance assessment of a public institution of technical and undergraduate education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomaz Sessegolo Marques de Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo foi relatar um estudo de caso baseado em indicadores ambientais categóricos no qual foi avaliado o desempenho ambiental de uma instituição pública de ensino técnico e superior. A revisão incluiu a série de normas ISO 14000, o Prêmio Nacional de Qualidade em Saneamento (PNQS e o Ecoblock. O método usado foi adaptado do SBP, um conjunto de procedimentos para a mensuração do desempenho ambiental de uma atividade antrópica, que se vale de construtos latentes e indicadores categóricos que expliquem o desempenho. Os indicadores foram organizados em sete construtos. Segundo os avaliadores e o modelo, a instituição faz 56,7% do máximo possível em gestão ambiental. Os construtos mais carentes foram gestão de resíduos sólidos e poluição sonora. O resultado da avaliação pode ser usado para reformulação da política ambiental da instituição.This article reports a case study in which the environmental performance of a public institution of higher and technical education was evaluated, based on environmental indicators in spades. The following standards series were reviewed: ISO 14000, National Quality Award in Sanitation (PNQS and Ecoblock. The method was adapted from SBP, a set of procedures for measuring the environmental performance of an anthropic activity, composed by latent constructs and categorical indicators that explain the performance. The indicators were organized in seven constructs. According to the assessed respondents and the model, the institution reached 56.7% of the maximum possible in environmental management. Lower constructs were management of solid waste and noise pollution. The evaluation can be used for reshaping the environmental policy of the institution.

  14. What They Learned: Using Multimedia to Engage Undergraduates in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artello, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Today's employers seek high levels of creativity, communication, and critical thinking, which are considered essential skills in the workplace. Engaging undergraduate students in critical thinking is especially challenging in introductory courses. The advent of YouTube, inexpensive video cameras, and easy-to-use video editors provides…

  15. Scenario-based teaching in undergraduate medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel K

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kunj Patel, Omar El Tokhy Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the study by Frost et al1 which highlights the importance of scenario-based teaching (SBT of clinical communication in medical undergraduate pediatrics teaching. SBT involves students navigating a storyline based around a complex problem, running in parallel with case-based learning. We were impressed by the results of the SBT program at Cardiff University School of Medicine. As medical students currently on our pediatric rotation at Imperial College London, we have experienced at first hand the benefits of SBT. Throughout the placement, it continues to help us tackle the complexities which arise when communicating with children and their families. We have noted its particular benefit in breaking bad news to families. Without effective teaching on this particular scenario, a failure to grasp this skill could exacerbate patient and parent concerns. Much like the authors of this study highlight,1 we believe specific teaching on communication skills should be a mandatory part of medical undergraduate education at every institution. Imperial College School of Medicine has developed a similar teaching style which has been unparalleled in its benefit to us during our pediatric rotation. Although there is scant literature available specifically addressing communicating with children and parents at undergraduate level, the use of SBT throughout undergraduate medical teaching should not be underestimated. Read the original paper by Frost et al

  16. The Accounting Undergraduate Capstone: Promoting Synthesis, Reflection, Transition, and Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grace F.; Halabi, Abdel K.

    2011-01-01

    The authors review 24 midwestern institutions that have an undergraduate capstone course. Specifically they focus on accounting capstone courses, discovering that these are used to promote personal and functional skill development in 8 areas: research, problem solving, critical thinking, reflection, synthesis, teamwork, communication, and…

  17. Auditing the ICT Experiences of Teacher Education Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Glenice; Proctor, Romina M. J.; Finger, Glenn; Lang, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The importance of teacher education graduates having appropriate information and communication technology (ICT) for learning competencies and experiences is well documented. However, without well developed processes for auditing the ICT experiences of undergraduates it should not be assumed that teachers will enter their profession with the…

  18. Sexty Southerners: Sexting Content and Behaviors among Selected Southern Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Heather K.; Marshall, S. Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Sexting is defined as sending/posting/sharing sexually explicit messages or nude/semi-nude images via electronic communication. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess and determine relationships of sexting behavioral intentions, sexting behaviors, and sexting content among selected Southern undergraduate students. Methods: Survey…

  19. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 30: Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) and the communication of technical information in aerospace. Ph.D Thesis - Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Daniel J.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    This research used survey research to examine the use of communication media in general and electronic media specifically in the U.S. aerospace industry. The survey population included 1,006 randomly selected U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who belong to the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Survey data were compared with qualitative information obtained from 32 AIAA members in telephone and face-to-face conversations. The Information Processing (IP) model developed by Tushman and Nadler and Daft and Lengel constituted the study's theoretical basis. This research analyzed responses regarding communication methods of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who create use and disseminate aerospace knowledge and explored selected contextual environmental variables related to media use and effective performance. The results indicate that uncertainty is significantly reduced in environments when levels of analyzability are high. When uncertainty is high there is significantly more use of electronic media. However no relation was found between overall effectiveness and media use in environments stratified by levels by analyzability or equivocality. The results indicate modest support for the influences of uncertainty and analyzability on electronic media use. Although most respondents reported that electronic networks are important for their work the data suggest that there are sharply disparate levels of use.

  20. EVALUATING THE ASSESSMENT OF UNDERGRADUATE THESIS EXAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adip Arifin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thesis examination is one of the crucial phases for students in undergraduate level. During the examination, they are required to perform best to get the maximum score which commonly is equal to six credits. Looking at the big portion of credit, the examination highly determines the student‘s GPA at last. In order to get the accurate and fair score, the appropriate assessment must be implemented by the board of examiners. The form of assessment may vary from one institution to another. This paper is aimed at discussing as well as evaluating the assessment of undergraduate thesis examination at STKIP PGRI Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia. The evaluation was based on the principles of good assessment adapted from Brown (2003 comprised of practicality, reliability, validity, and authenticity. Based on the result of evaluation, the form of assessment on undergraduate thesis examination administered at STKIP PGRI Ponorogo hasn‘t fully fulfilled the principles of good assessment. The findings also revealed that some assessment indicators need to be improved, such as the formulation of statement, the number of assessment item, and the technical procedure on how to administer the assessment.

  1. Perspectives of Science Communication Training Held by Lecturers of Biotechnology and Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondston, Joanne; Dawson, Vaille

    2014-01-01

    Science communication training for undergraduate science students has been recommended to improve future scientists' ability to constructively engage with the public. This study examined biotechnology lecturers' and science communication lecturers' views of science communication training and its possible inclusion in a biotechnology degree course…

  2. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimize the management of the Technical Network (TN), to ease the understanding and purpose of devices connected to the TN, and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive email notifications from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database. Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  3. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimise the management of the Technical Network (TN), to facilitate understanding of the purpose of devices connected to the TN and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive e-mails from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database at "network-cern-ch". Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  4. Dynamic Undergraduate Climate Change Affinity Program: University of Delaware Climate Program for Undergraduates (CPUG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, J.

    2017-12-01

    Multidisciplinary undergraduate climate change education is critical for students entering any sector of the workforce. The University of Delaware has developed a new interdisciplinary affinity program—UD Climate Program for Undergraduates (CPUG)—open to undergraduate students of all majors to provide a comprehensive educational experience designed to educate skilled climate change problem-solvers for a wide range of professional careers. The program is designed to fulfill all General Education requirements, and includes a residential community commitment and experiential learning in community outreach and problem solving. Seminars will introduce current popular press and research materials and provide practice in confirming source credibility, communications training, and psychological support, as well as team building. As undergraduates, members of the UD CPUG team will define, describe, and develop a solution or solutions for a pressing local climate challenge that has the potential for global impact. The choice of a challenge and approach to addressing it will be guided by the student's advisor. Students are expected to develop a practical, multidisciplinary solution to address the challenge as defined, using their educational and experiential training. Solutions will be presented to the UD community during the spring semester of their senior year, as a collaborative team solution, with enhancement through individual portfolios from each team member. The logic model, structure, curricular and co-curricular supports for the CPUG will be provided. Mechanisms of support available through University administration will also be discussed.

  5. Information and meaning revisiting Shannon's theory of communication and extending it to address todays technical problems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Travis LaDell

    2009-12-01

    This paper has three goals. The first is to review Shannon's theory of information and the subsequent advances leading to today's statistics-based text analysis algorithms, showing that the semantics of the text is neglected. The second goal is to propose an extension of Shannon's original model that can take into account semantics, where the 'semantics' of a message is understood in terms of the intended or actual changes on the recipient of a message. The third goal is to propose several lines of research that naturally fall out of the proposed model. Each computational approach to solving some problem rests on an underlying model or set of models that describe how key phenomena in the real world are represented and how they are manipulated. These models are both liberating and constraining. They are liberating in that they suggest a path of development for new tools and algorithms. They are constraining in that they intentionally ignore other potential paths of development. Modern statistical-based text analysis algorithms have a specific intellectual history and set of underlying models rooted in Shannon's theory of communication. For Shannon, language is treated as a stochastic generator of symbol sequences. Shannon himself, subsequently Weaver, and at least one of his predecessors are all explicit in their decision to exclude semantics from their models. This rejection of semantics as 'irrelevant to the engineering problem' is elegant and combined with developments particularly by Salton and subsequently by Latent Semantic Analysis, has led to a whole collection of powerful algorithms and an industry for data mining technologies. However, the kinds of problems currently facing us go beyond what can be accounted for by this stochastic model. Today's problems increasingly focus on the semantics of specific pieces of information. And although progress is being made with the old models, it seems natural to develop or

  6. Researching with undergraduate students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulf-Andersen, Trine Østergaard; Mogensen, Kevin; Hjort-Madsen, Peder

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a particular case of undergraduate students working on subprojects within the framework of their supervisors' (the authors') research project during Autumn Semester 2012 and Spring Semester 2013. The article's purpose is to show that an institutionalized focus on students...... as "research learners" rather than merely curriculum learners proves productive for both research and teaching. We describe the specific university learning context and the particular organization of undergraduate students' supervision and assistantships. The case builds on and further enhances a well......-established and proven university model of participant-directed, problem-oriented project work. We explore students' and researchers' experiences of being part of the collaboration, focusing on learning potentials and dilemmas associated with the multiple roles of researcher and student that characterized...

  7. Communicating Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, G. J.; McCaffrey, M. S.; Kiehl, J. T.; Schmidt, C.

    2010-12-01

    We are in an era of rapidly changing communication media, which is driving a major evolution in the modes of communicating science. In the past, a mainstay of scientific communication in popular media was through science “translators”; science journalists and presenters. These have now nearly disappeared and are being replaced by widespread dissemination through, e.g., the internet, blogs, YouTube and journalists who often have little scientific background and sharp deadlines. Thus, scientists are required to assume increasing responsibility for translating their scientific findings and calibrating their communications to non-technical audiences, a task for which they are often ill prepared, especially when it comes to controversial societal issues such as tobacco, evolution, and most recently climate change (Oreskes and Conway 2010). Such issues have been politicized and hi-jacked by ideological belief systems to such an extent that constructive dialogue is often impossible. Many scientists are excellent communicators, to their peers. But this requires careful attention to detail and logical explanation, open acknowledgement of uncertainties, and dispassionate delivery. These qualities become liabilities when communicating to a non-scientific audience where entertainment, attention grabbing, 15 second sound bites, and self assuredness reign (e.g. Olson 2009). Here we report on a program initiated by NCAR and UCAR to develop new approaches to science communication and to equip present and future scientists with the requisite skills. If we start from a sound scientific finding with general scientific consensus, such as the warming of the planet by greenhouse gases, then the primary emphasis moves from the “science” to the “art” of communication. The art cannot have free reign, however, as there remains a strong requirement for objectivity, honesty, consistency, and above all a resistance to advocating particular policy positions. Targeting audience

  8. LISTENING FOR EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION: A STUDY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    2016-07-01

    Jul 1, 2016 ... Abstract. In almost every human interaction, listening plays a vital role and so determines the effectiveness of such communication events. Sadly the comportment of many university undergraduates during lectures leaves much to be desired. This to a large extent impedes their communication effectiveness.

  9. Global health for undergraduates: "we are not alone".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiero, Victor K

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents a review of an undergraduate global health curriculum implemented at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. It is in concert with the framework and principles of the Association of American Colleges and Universities and their vision of Shared Futures of Global Learning and Social Responsibility. The rationale for a deep and broad undergraduate public health curriculum, which includes a global health component, is clear. Global health is a necessary and timely pathway for undergraduate liberal arts education. The world has dramatically changed in the past 50 years, and undergraduate education must continue to keep pace with these changes. Pathogens will adapt to changing ecologies, demographics, disease burdens, and population distributions. They are able to cross the world in hours or days. No country is invulnerable to disease importation and consequent indigenous transmission. Broad epidemic preparedness is required across all academic disciplines from epidemiology to sociology, from medicine to economics. Global health is anchored in the complementary application of various disciplines effectively joined to address a particular problem and mitigate potential adverse consequences. Our students recognize the reality of this interconnected world and are eager to take their place as global citizens. Knowledge, understanding, technical acumen, and humility represent the foundation of the global citizenry required to address the changing global pattern of disease worldwide. Undergraduate public health, and particularly undergraduate global health, will enable our undergraduates to embark on a myriad of professional trajectories that include public health, medicine, biomedical research, law, policy, environmental studies, anthropology, economics, sociology and other disciplines. The "Y" Generation in the U.S. (individuals born between 1980 and 2000) is poised for action; we must give them the tools to succeed.

  10. COMMUNICATIONAL APPROACH IN THE ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Dragos Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The need for information and communication increases when organizations experience organizational changes. The paper examines the need of communication in terms of the professor Tichy`s theory of the technical, political and cultural systems of organizati

  11. Integrating Clinical Neuropsychology into the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Antonio E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Claims little information exists in undergraduate education about clinical neuropsychology. Outlines an undergraduate neuropsychology course and proposes ways to integrate the subject into existing undergraduate psychology courses. Suggests developing specialized audio-visual materials for telecourses or existing courses. (NL)

  12. A Taxonomy of Technical Animation

    OpenAIRE

    D. Vaněček; J. Jirsa

    2011-01-01

    The age in which we are living nowadays is characterized by rapid innovation in the development of information and communication technologies (ICT). This innovation has a significant influence on the education process. This article deals with computer animation in technical education. Our aim is to show the taxonomy of education animation. The paper includes practical examples of animation.

  13. A Taxonomy of Technical Animation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vaněček

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The age in which we are living nowadays is characterized by rapid innovation in the development of information and communication technologies (ICT. This innovation has a significant influence on the education process. This article deals with computer animation in technical education. Our aim is to show the taxonomy of education animation. The paper includes practical examples of animation.

  14. Assessing Undergraduate Curriculum Through Student Exit Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, C. M.; Gonzales, L.; Martinez, C.

    2008-12-01

    One aspect of assessing the undergraduate curriculum is recognizing that the exit vector of the student is a metric in the absence of a structured assessment program. Detailed knowledge across all geosciences departments regarding the disposition of their recent baccalaureate recipients has been at best inconsistent, and in the case of about half of geoscience programs, non-existent. However, through examining of multiple datasets, a pattern of disposition of geosciences BS recipients emerges, providing a snapshot of the system- wide response to the system-wide "average" program. This pattern can also be juxtaposed against several frameworks of desired skill sets for recent graduates and the employment sectors likely to hire them. The question remains is can one deduce the effectiveness of the undergraduate program in placing graduates in their next step, whether in graduate school or the workplace. Likewise, with an increasing scrutiny on the "value" of an education, is the resulting economic gain sufficient for the student, such that programs will be viewed as sustainable. A factor in answering this question is the importance of the undergraduate program in the ultimate destination of the professional. Clear pathways exist for "optimal" schools for the production of new faculty and new industry professionals, but is it possible to identify those trends further up the educational pipeline? One major mechanism to examine the undergraduate program effectiveness related to exit vectors is to look at hiring trends witnessed related to markedly different program structures, such as those at universities outside of the United States. Rectifying academic programs between the United States and other national systems is often a challenge, but even given the substantial differences between depth of technical knowledge and breadth of education across these programs, in the end, the sum product is often viewed as roughly comparable. This paper will look at end

  15. Sage for undergraduates

    CERN Document Server

    Bard, Gregory V

    2015-01-01

    Professor Bard has provided a valuable service by carefully explaining everything an undergraduate student of mathematics, or a teacher of these topics, needs to get started with Sage quickly and easily. It will also be useful for any student or teacher of another STEM discipline. There is an excellent mix of the most frequently used commands, along with warnings about common pitfalls or caveats. I highly recommend it for anyone new to Sage, or who desires an overview of the system's impressive capabilities. -Robert A. Beezer, University of Puget Sound This book is a sort of "Missing Manual"

  16. Marketing information: The technical report as product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoher, F. F.; Pinelli, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    Technical reports constitute a product, the primary means for communicating the results of research to the user. The Langley scientific and technical information (STI) review and evaluation project undertook a review of the technical report as an effective product for information communication. Style manuals describing theory and practice in technical report preparation; publication manuals covering such factors as design, layout, and type style; and copies of technical reports were obtained from industrial, academic, governmental, and research organizations. Based on an analysis of this material, criteria will be established for the report components, for the relationship of the components within the report context, and for the overall report organization. The criteria will be used as bench marks and compared with the publication standards currently used to prepare NASA technical reports.

  17. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  18. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience Since the closure of the detector in February, the technical operation of CMS has been quite smooth and reliable. Some minor interventions in UXC were required to cure failures of power supplies, fans, readout boards and rack cooling connections, but all these failures were repaired in scheduled technical stops or parasitically during access dedicated to fixing LHC technical problems. The only occasion when CMS had to request an access between fills was to search for the source of an alarm from the leak-detection cables mounted in the DT racks. After a few minutes of diagnostic search, a leaking air-purge was found. Replacement was complete within 2 hours. This incident demonstrated once more the value of these leak detection cables; the system will be further extended (during the end of year technical stop) to cover more racks in UXC and the floor beneath the detector. The magnet has also been operating reliably and reacted correctly to the 14s power cut on 29 May (see below). In or...

  19. Technical endoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalar, K.O.

    1988-01-01

    A survey is provided on different versions of endoscopes, taking into account the new developments of video endoscopy. With a variety of practical examples it is shown that technical tests using endoscopy are a demanding task for nondestructive testing, whose requirements can only be met on a customized basis. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Evaluation of interprofessional education: lessons learned through the development and implementation of an interprofessional seminar on team communication for undergraduate health care students in Heidelberg – a project report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This project report describes the development, “piloting” and evaluation of an interprofessional seminar on team communication bringing together medical students and Interprofessional Health Care B.Sc. students at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg University, Germany.Project Description: A five-member interprofessional team collaborated together on this project. Kolb’s concept formed the theoretical foundation for the seminar, which explored three interprofessional competency areas: team work, communication and values/ethics. Evaluation for the purposes of quality assurance and future curricula development was conducted using two quantitative measures: Results: The key finding from the standardized course evaluation was that the interprofessional seminars were rated more positively [M=2.11 (1 most positive and 5 most negative, SD=1, n=27] than the monoprofessional seminars [M=2.55, SD=0.98, n=90]. The key finding from the UWE-IP-D survey, comparing pre and post scores of the interprofessional (IP (n=40 and monoprofessional (MP groups (n=34, was that significant positive changes in mean scores for both groups towards communication, teamwork and interprofessional learning occurred. Conclusions: Lessons learnt included: a recognising the benefit of being pragmatic when introducing interprofessional education initiatives, which enabled various logistical and attitudinal barriers to be overcome; b quantitative evaluation of learning outcomes alone could not explain positive responses or potential influences of interprofessional aspects, which highlighted the need for a mixed methods approach, including qualitative methods, to enrich judgment formation on interprofessional educational outcomes.

  1. Social Media and Electronic Networking Use and Preferences among Undergraduate Turf Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Cale A.; Kaminski, John E., III

    2016-01-01

    Most undergraduate students arrive on campus fluent in electronic communication methods and social media (SM). This cultural or communication shift presents both opportunities and challenges in pedagogy. Social media allows users to share and network with geographically diverse individuals and has the potential for engaging students both inside…

  2. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Monday 9 February 2004 From 10:00 to 12:00 - IT Auditorium - bldg. 31, 3rd floor ANSOFT High-Frequency Seminar David Prestaux, Application Engineer, ANSOFT F-78535 BUC, France This Technical Training seminar will present two Ansoft application products: Ansoft HFSS and Ansoft Designer. Ansoft HFSS makes use of the Finite Element Method (FEM) to calculate field solutions from first principles. It can accurately predict all high-frequency behaviours such as dispersion, mode conversion, and losses due to materials and radiation. Ansoft Designer is a suite of design tools to fully integrate high-frequency, physics-based electromagnetic simulations into a seamless system-level simulation environment. Ansoft Designer uses a simple interface to give complete control over every design task, by a method allowing multiple solvers, Solver on Demand. • Introduction • Overview of the Ansoft Total solution • Ansoft HFSS 9...

  3. A Preliminary Rhetoric of Technical Copywriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Leigh

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the rhetorical elements of technical copywriting, including its shared communicative aims with technical writing; authorship considerations such as ethics, education, and professionalism; and the concerns of promotional strategy, audience analysis, choice of media and materials, writing strategy, and style. (SR)

  4. Undergraduate Students' Information Search Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Kleopatra; Gialamas, Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates undergraduate students' information search practices. The subjects were 250 undergraduate students from two university departments in Greece, and a questionnaire was used to document their search practices. The results showed that the Web was the primary information system searched in order to find information for…

  5. Researching Undergraduate Social Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The experience(s) of undergraduate research students in the social sciences is under-represented in the literature in comparison to the natural sciences or science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). The strength of STEM undergraduate research learning environments is understood to be related to an apprenticeship-mode of learning supported…

  6. Undergraduate students' perceived academic environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the relationship between undergraduates' perception of the academic environment, their attitude to academic work and achievement. A total of 348 undergraduates who formed the sample were drawn from five departments in three universities in Nigeria. The study revealed that four dimensions of the ...

  7. Matrix groups for undergraduates

    CERN Document Server

    Tapp, Kristopher

    2016-01-01

    Matrix groups touch an enormous spectrum of the mathematical arena. This textbook brings them into the undergraduate curriculum. It makes an excellent one-semester course for students familiar with linear and abstract algebra and prepares them for a graduate course on Lie groups. Matrix Groups for Undergraduates is concrete and example-driven, with geometric motivation and rigorous proofs. The story begins and ends with the rotations of a globe. In between, the author combines rigor and intuition to describe the basic objects of Lie theory: Lie algebras, matrix exponentiation, Lie brackets, maximal tori, homogeneous spaces, and roots. This second edition includes two new chapters that allow for an easier transition to the general theory of Lie groups. From reviews of the First Edition: This book could be used as an excellent textbook for a one semester course at university and it will prepare students for a graduate course on Lie groups, Lie algebras, etc. … The book combines an intuitive style of writing w...

  8. Evaluation of interprofessional education: lessons learned through the development and implementation of an interprofessional seminar on team communication for undergraduate health care students in Heidelberg – a project report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sarah; Mahler, Cornelia; Krug, Katja; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This project report describes the development, “piloting” and evaluation of an interprofessional seminar on team communication bringing together medical students and Interprofessional Health Care B.Sc. students at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg University, Germany. Project Description: A five-member interprofessional team collaborated together on this project. Kolb’s experiential learning concept formed the theoretical foundation for the seminar, which explored three interprofessional competency areas: team work, communication and values/ethics. Evaluation for the purposes of quality assurance and future curricula development was conducted using two quantitative measures: descriptive analysis of a standardized course evaluation tool (EvaSys) ANOVA analysis of the German translation of the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (UWE-IP-D). Results: The key finding from the standardized course evaluation was that the interprofessional seminars were rated more positively [M=2.11 (1 most positive and 5 most negative), SD=1, n=27] than the monoprofessional seminars [M=2.55, SD=0.98, n=90]. The key finding from the UWE-IP-D survey, comparing pre and post scores of the interprofessional (IP) (n=40) and monoprofessional (MP) groups (n=34), was that significant positive changes in mean scores for both groups towards communication, teamwork and interprofessional learning occurred. Conclusions: Lessons learnt included: a) recognising the benefit of being pragmatic when introducing interprofessional education initiatives, which enabled various logistical and attitudinal barriers to be overcome; b) quantitative evaluation of learning outcomes alone could not explain positive responses or potential influences of interprofessional aspects, which highlighted the need for a mixed methods approach, including qualitative methods, to enrich judgment formation on interprofessional educational outcomes. PMID:27280133

  9. Extent of Information and Communication Technology Usage among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focused on determining the extent of information and Communication Technology usage among agriculture undergraduates and the implications for agricultural and rural transformation. Data were collected with the aid of structured questionnaire from 112 randomly selected undergraduates of the School of ...

  10. Journal of Development and Communication Studies Vol. 5. No. 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Levi Manda

    2017-06-15

    Jun 15, 2017 ... Abstract. The study evaluated factors that affect use of social media for HIV and AIDS communication among federal university undergraduates in south western Nigeria. The cross-sectional research method was employed. Structured questionnaire copies were administered to 355 undergraduate students.

  11. Simulation in Undergraduate Psychiatry: Exploring the Depth of Learner Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdool, Petal S; Nirula, Latika; Bonato, Sarah; Rajji, Tarek K; Silver, Ivan L

    2017-04-01

    Simulation-based methodologies are increasingly used in undergraduate medical education to expand students' exposure to complex clinical scenarios. Engagement of students in these simulation-based methodologies is a key determinant of their success in learning. Thus, the authors conducted a systematic review to (1) identify simulation methods in use within the undergraduate psychiatry curriculum and (2) assess learner engagement using these methods. Following a PRISMA methodology, the authors searched MEDLINE, ERIC, and PsychINFO databases from 1977 to 2015. Studies applying simulation in undergraduate psychiatric education were reviewed. The depth of learner engagement was assessed using Kolb's four-stage learning cycle. Of 371 publications identified, 63 met all the inclusion criteria: 48 used standardized patients and 16 used online or virtual learning case modules. Only one study used high fidelity mannequins. Three studies satisfied multiple stages in Kolb's Learning Cycle, including a single study that addressed all four domains. Despite the varied uses of simulation across other health disciplines, there were few novel or innovative uses of simulation in undergraduate psychiatric education since the last review in 2008. Expanding on the use of simulation to improve communication, build empathy, and decrease stigma in psychiatry is essential given the relevance to all facets of medical practice. Given the complexity of psychiatry, simulation interventions should extend beyond communication scenarios. Medical students need more opportunities to reflect and debrief on simulation experiences and integrate learning into new contexts. Faculty development should focus on these novel approaches to simulation to deeply engage learners and enhance outcomes.

  12. The National Climate Assessment as a Resource for Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, R. C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 Third National Climate Assessment (NCA3) is scientifically authoritative and features major advances, relative to other assessments produced by several organizations. NCA3 is a valuable resource for communicating climate science to a wide variety of audiences. Other assessments were often overly detailed and laden with scientific jargon that made them appear too complex and technical to many in their intended audiences, especially policymakers, the media, and the broad public. Some other assessments emphasized extensive scientific caveats, quantitative uncertainty estimates and broad consensus support. All these attributes, while valuable in research, carry the risk of impeding science communication to non-specialists. Without compromising scientific accuracy and integrity, NCA3 is written in exceptionally clear and vivid English. It includes outstanding graphics and employs powerful techniques aimed at conveying key results unambiguously to a wide range of audiences. I have used NCA3 as a resource in speaking about climate change in three very different settings: classroom teaching for undergraduate university students, presenting in academia to historians and other non-scientists, and briefing corporate executives working on renewable energy. NCA3 proved the value of developing a climate assessment with communication goals and strategies given a high priority throughout the process, not added on as an afterthought. I draw several lessons. First, producing an outstanding scientific assessment is too complex and demanding a task to be carried out by scientists alone. Many types of specialized expertise are also needed. Second, speaking about science to a variety of audiences requires an assortment of communication skills and tools, all tailored to specific groups of listeners. Third, NCA3 is scientifically impeccable and is also an outstanding example of effective communication as well as a valuable resource for communicators.

  13. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  14. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2011-01-01

    In this report we will review the main achievements of the Technical Stop and the progress of several centrally-managed projects to support CMS operation and maintenance and prepare the way for upgrades. Overview of the extended Technical Stop  The principal objectives of the extended Technical Stop affecting the detector itself were the installation of the TOTEM T1 telescopes on both ends, the readjustment of the alignment link-disk in YE-2, the replacement of the light-guide sleeves for all PMs of both HFs, and some repairs on TOTEM T2 and CASTOR. The most significant tasks were, however, concentrated on the supporting infrastructure. A detailed line-by-line leak search was performed in the C6F14 cooling system of the Tracker, followed by the installation of variable-frequency drives on the pump motors of the SS1 and SS2 tracker cooling plants to reduce pressure transients during start-up. In the electrical system, larger harmonic filters were installed in ...

  15. Risk communication basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrado, P.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In low-trust, high-concern situations, 50% of your credibility comes from perceived empathy and caring, demonstrated in the first 30 s you come in contact with someone. There is no second chance for a first impression. These and other principles contained in this paper provide you with a basic level of understanding of risk communication. The principles identified are time-tested caveats and will assist you in effectively communicating technical information.

  16. Risk communication basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrado, P.G.

    1995-01-01

    In low-trust, high-concern situations, 50% of your credibility comes from perceived empathy and caring, demonstrated in the first 30 s you come in contact with someone. There is no second chance for a first impression. These and other principles contained in this paper provide you with a basic level of understanding of risk communication. The principles identified are time-tested caveats and will assist you in effectively communicating technical information

  17. Attitudes towards transferable skills in medical undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, S R; Eaton, D G

    2001-02-01

    Changes to the style of medical teaching will place a greater responsibility on individual medical students to manage their own learning, highlighting the need for students to develop good so-called 'transferable' skills at an early stage in their undergraduate career. To assess the attitudes of first year undergraduates towards transferable skills, and investigate the gender difference in these attitudes. To assess the contribution of their first year course to skills development. First year students, enrolled on a traditional-style course. A questionnaire asking the students to consider: (a) the importance of named transferable skills for medicine; (b) their own ability in these areas; and (c) the influence of their first year course. All students, irrespective of gender, regarded transferable skills as very important to medicine, rating organizational skills and self-learning skills as most important. Overall, students have a high level of confidence in their own skills. Male students rated their overall level of skills more highly than women. In particular they rated their information handling, managing self-learning and technical skills more highly. Students feel that their first year course has enhanced their skills in most areas. Our results suggest that students will feel equipped to succeed in a learning system which places the onus on them to take responsibility for their own learning. They clearly believe that they have the necessary skills for independent learning. The study highlights the need to enhance students' self-evaluation skills.

  18. Advanced undergraduate quantum mechanics methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Deych, Lev I

    2018-01-01

    This introduction to quantum mechanics is intended for undergraduate students of physics, chemistry, and engineering with some previous exposure to quantum ideas. Following in Heisenberg’s and Dirac’s footsteps, this book is centered on the concept of the quantum state as an embodiment of all experimentally available information about a system, and its representation as a vector in an abstract Hilbert space. This conceptual framework and formalism are introduced immediately, and developed throughout the first four chapters, while the standard Schrödinger equation does not appear until Chapter 5. The book grew out of lecture notes developed by the author over fifteen years of teaching at the undergraduate level. In response to numerous requests by students, material is presented with an unprecedented level of detail in both derivation of technical results and discussion of their physical significance.  The book is written for students to enjoy reading it, rather than to use only as a source of formulas a...

  19. Communication Skills in Medical Education: An Integrated Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kellie; Lyons, Zaza

    2011-01-01

    The importance of teaching communication skills in any undergraduate medical curriculum cannot be overstated. Effective doctor-patient communication is widely recognised as an essential aspect of quality patient care. A communication skills module developed for first year medical students at the University of Western Australia (UWA) is described…

  20. Gender Differences in Workplace Communication: A Seminar Outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenton, Sherron B.

    1990-01-01

    Presents an outline for a half-day seminar on gender differences in workplace communication, which can be modified for a class lecture/workshop in a graduate management communication or an undergraduate business communication course. Appends a role-play activity for use in the seminar. (SR)

  1. Assessment of creativity in Psychology undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Luísa da Cruz Alves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is an important human faculty in several performance areas, including the work of a psychologist. This article aimed to describe creativity in a group of Psychology undergraduate students in order to verify whether their professional development fosters creative potential. The study comprised 75 students, equally distributed in three groups from the first, fifth and tenth terms, aged 18 to 59, who were submitted to the Verbal TTCT (Torrance Test of Creative Thinking: Thinking Creatively with Words, following technical specifications of this tool. Further to test evaluation, results of the three groups were statistically compared and the main results showed higher creativity index in senior students, mainly regarding Fluency – ability to produce a large number of ideas, and Originality – ability to produce new and infrequent ideas.

  2. Responsible use of social media by undergraduate student nurses / Ingrid van der Walt

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Walt, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The background and problem statement centre on the evolution of technology within teaching and learning, which involves undergraduate student nurses, as well as the use of social media as interactive teaching and communication tool. While examining the background to this topic, the researcher recognised a need to gain a deeper understanding of responsible social media use by undergraduate student nurses to the benefit of all the stakeholders, namely the Nursing Education Institution (NEI), ap...

  3. Developing Effective Undergraduate Research Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael; Ilie, Carolina C.

    2011-03-01

    Undergraduate research is a valuable educational tool for students pursuing a degree in physics, but these experiences can become problematic and ineffective if not handled properly. Undergraduate research should be planned as an immersive learning experience in which the student has the opportunity to develop his/her skills in accordance with their interests. Effective undergraduate research experiences are marked by clear, measurable objectives and frequent student-professor collaboration. These objectives should reflect the long and short-term goals of the individual undergraduates, with a heightened focus on developing research skills for future use. 1. Seymour, E., Hunter, A.-B., Laursen, S. L. and DeAntoni, T. (2004), ``Establishing the benefits of research experiences for undergraduates in the sciences: First findings from a three-year study''. Science Education, 88: 493--534. 2. Behar-Horenstein, Linda S., Johnson, Melissa L. ``Enticing Students to Enter Into Undergraduate Research: The Instrumentality of an Undergraduate Course.'' Journal of College Science Teaching 39.3 (2010): 62-70.

  4. Encouraging creativity and employability skills in undergraduate microbiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verran, Joanna

    2010-02-01

    Key skills such as communication and critical thinking are essential for today's microbiology graduate. There are many opportunities within the undergraduate curriculum to help students to use, develop and appreciate their own unique set of skills. This article describes personal experiences of research-led teaching at Manchester Metropolitan University (UK) which have been used successfully to encourage creativity and other employability skills in both large and smaller classroom settings, and through individual student project work. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of the Experiences of Female African American Undergraduate Engineering Students at a Predominantly White and an Historically Black Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frillman, Sharron Ann

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the experiences of twelve female African Americans enrolled as fulltime undergraduate engineering students at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, an historically Black university, and seven female African Americans enrolled as undergraduate engineering students at Purdue University in…

  6. Knowledge Communication as Situated Strategic Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    Knowledge communication is an emerging means of understanding the processes involved in constructing and passing knowledge from person to person which works together with technical communication in the knowledge society.  The concept of knowledge communication compliments technical communication...... as situated strategic action through which genres are (re)formed.  The medium of the Internet offers a space where the reification of this action can be observed, and its interactive potential offers academics insight into knowledge communication processes.  Thus, we propose that Bazerman's definition...... the concept of knowledge communication offers a fruitful place to bring together rhetoric and linguistics to understand writing in a changing society....

  7. Undergraduate Biocuration: Developing Tomorrow's Researchers While Mining Today's Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cassie S; Cates, Ashlyn; Kim, Renaid B; Hollinger, Sabrina K

    2015-01-01

    Biocuration is a time-intensive process that involves extraction, transcription, and organization of biological or clinical data from disjointed data sets into a user-friendly database. Curated data is subsequently used primarily for text mining or informatics analysis (bioinformatics, neuroinformatics, health informatics, etc.) and secondarily as a researcher resource. Biocuration is traditionally considered a Ph.D. level task, but a massive shortage of curators to consolidate the ever-mounting biomedical "big data" opens the possibility of utilizing biocuration as a means to mine today's data while teaching students skill sets they can utilize in any career. By developing a biocuration assembly line of simplified and compartmentalized tasks, we have enabled biocuration to be effectively performed by a hierarchy of undergraduate students. We summarize the necessary physical resources, process for establishing a data path, biocuration workflow, and undergraduate hierarchy of curation, technical, information technology (IT), quality control and managerial positions. We detail the undergraduate application and training processes and give detailed job descriptions for each position on the assembly line. We present case studies of neuropathology curation performed entirely by undergraduates, namely the construction of experimental databases of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) transgenic mouse models and clinical data from ALS patient records. Our results reveal undergraduate biocuration is scalable for a group of 8-50+ with relatively minimal required resources. Moreover, with average accuracy rates greater than 98.8%, undergraduate biocurators are equivalently accurate to their professional counterparts. Initial training to be completely proficient at the entry-level takes about five weeks with a minimal student time commitment of four hours/week.

  8. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Switzerland (please sp...

  9. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Swi...

  10. INDOT Technical Training Plan : [Technical Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of job classifications, increasing technical : performance expectations, licensing and certification requirements, : budget restrictions and frequent department : reorganization has made technical training of employees : more difficult, ...

  11. A Prototype Two-tier Mentoring Program for Undergraduate Summer Interns from Minority-Serving Institutions at the University of Alaska Fairbanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gens, R.; Prakash, A.; Ozbay, G.; Sriharan, S.; Balazs, M. S.; Chittambakkam, A.; Starkenburg, D. P.; Waigl, C.; Cook, S.; Ferguson, A.; Foster, K.; Jones, E.; Kluge, A.; Stilson, K.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) is partnering with Delaware State University, Virginia State University, Elizabeth City State University, Bethune-Cookman University, and Morgan State University on a U.S. Department of Agriculture - National Institute for Food and Agriculture funded grant for ';Enhancing Geographic Information System Education and Delivery through Collaboration: Curricula Design, Faculty, Staff, and Student Training and Development, and Extension Services'. As a part of this grant, in summer 2013, UAF hosted a week long workshop followed by an intense two week undergraduate internship program. Six undergraduate students from partnering Universities worked with UAF graduate students as their direct mentors. This cohort of undergraduate mentees and graduate student mentors were in-turn counseled by the two UAF principal investigators who served as ';super-mentors'. The role of each person in the two-tier mentoring system was well defined. The super-mentors ensured that there was consistency in the way the internship was setup and resources were allocated. They also ensured that there were no technical glitches in the research projects and that there was healthy communication and interaction among participants. Mentors worked with the mentees ahead of time in outlining a project that aligned with the mentees research interest, provided basic reading material to the interns to get oriented, prepared the datasets required to start the project, and guided the undergraduates throughout the internship. Undergraduates gained hands-on experience in geospatial data collection and application of tools in their projects related to mapping geomorphology, landcover, geothermal sites, fires, and meteorological conditions. Further, they shared their research results and experiences with a broad university-wide audience at the end of the internship period. All participants met at lunch-time for a daily science talk from external speakers. The program offered

  12. Florida specific NTCIP MIB development for actuated signal controller (ASC), closed-circuit television (CCTV), and center-to-center (C2C) communications with SunGuideSM software and ITS device test procedure development : technical report documentation pa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-30

    The project has been focused on National Transportation Communications for ITS Protocol : (NTCIP) research and testing across the entire life cycle of traffic operations, ITS, and statewide : communications deployments. This life cycle includes desig...

  13. System for technical innovation support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-08-01

    This book lists field of support system, which includes tax, development work, basic research project, industrial technology, information and communications field, energy field, part and materials field, local industry, the small and medium business such as technical development field, and industry-university collaboration like summary of investment and financing support and guarantee, support of manpower such as brain pool and contact Korea, support of technique like development technology and strategy for patent, support on certification such as company and technical goods, purchase support.

  14. Technical progress and climatic change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausubel, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    The global warming debate has neglected and thus underestimated the importance of technical change in considering reduction in greenhouse gases and adaptation to climate change. Relevant quantitative cases of long-run technical change during the past 100 years are presented in computing, communications, transport, energy, and agriculture. A noteworthy technological trajectory is that of decarbonization, or decreasing carbon intensity of primary energy. If human societies have not yet reached the end of the history of technology, the cost structure for mitigation and adaptation changes could be cheap. (Author)

  15. The NSF Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Partnering with Arecibo Observatory to Offer Undergraduate and Faculty Extragalactic Radio Astronomy Research Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaudo, Joseph; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Balonek, Thomas J.; Cannon, John M.; Coble, Kimberly A.; Craig, David W.; Denn, Grant R.; Durbala, Adriana; Finn, Rose; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Hoffman, G. Lyle; Lebron, Mayra E.; Miller, Brendan P.; Crone-Odekon, Mary; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Olowin, Ronald Paul; Pantoja, Carmen; Pisano, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Troischt, Parker; Venkatesan, Aparna; Wilcots, Eric M.; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    The NSF-sponsored Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team (UAT) is a consortium of 20 institutions across the US and Puerto Rico, founded to promote undergraduate research and faculty development within the extragalactic ALFALFA HI blind survey project and follow-up programs. The objective of the UAT is to provide opportunities for its members to develop expertise in the technical aspects of observational radio spectroscopy, its associated data analysis, and the motivating science. Partnering with Arecibo Observatory, the UAT has worked with more than 280 undergraduates and 26 faculty to date, offering 8 workshops onsite at Arecibo (148 undergraduates), observing runs at Arecibo (69 undergraduates), remote observing runs on campus, undergraduate research projects based on Arecibo science (120 academic year and 185 summer projects), and presentation of results at national meetings such as the AAS (at AAS229: Ball et al., Collova et al., Davis et al., Miazzo et al., Ruvolo et al, Singer et al., Cannon et al., Craig et al., Koopmann et al., O'Donoghue et al.). 40% of the students and 45% of the faculty participants have been women and members of underrepresented groups. More than 90% of student alumni are attending graduate school and/or pursuing a career in STEM. 42% of those pursuing graduate degrees in Physics or Astronomy are women.In this presentation, we summarize the UAT program and the current research efforts of UAT members based on Arecibo science, including multiwavelength followup observations of ALFALFA sources, the UAT Collaborative Groups Project, the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD), and the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS). This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, AST-121105, and AST-1637339.

  16. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2013-01-01

    For the reporting period, the CMS common systems and infrastructure worked well, without failures that caused significant data losses. One more disconnection of the magnet cold box occurred in the shadow of interruptions in data taking, caused by a series of technical faults. The recognition during 2012 that re-connection can only safely be done at around 2 T implies a minimum magnet recovery time of 12 hours and raises serious concerns about the number of ramping cycles of the magnet these incidents cause. This has triggered studies of how to make the cryo-system of the magnet more robust against failures. The proton-proton run ended just before the end-of-year CERN closure, during which CASTOR was installed on the negative end of CMS and both ZDC calorimeters were installed in TAN absorbers the LHC tunnel, in preparation for the heavy-ion run. The installation of CASTOR was an excellent “engineering test” of procedures for working in an activated environment. Despite some technical pr...

  17. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2011-01-01

      Operational experience 2011 CMS is approaching the end of a very successful year of operation. Proton- proton running ended in the late afternoon of 30th October with a stunning 5.73 fb–1 delivered by LHC, of which CMS recorded 5.22 fb–1. During heavy-ion operation, which continues until 7th December, both the accelerator and the CMS detector have also performed very well. Despite the encouraging overall reliability of technical operation, several infrastructure failures which occurred since the last Bulletin are worthy of mention, with one leading for the first time to significant data-loss. On 10th July, a CERN-wide power failure brought down essentially all services including the magnet, due to an MCS setting being left in “manual” after the recent technical stop, but there was no significant damage and the detector was operational before the LHC, despite a slow and tortuous recovery (one of several indications this year that there is room for improve...

  18. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    Summary of progress since last CMS week. Ten years of construction work have been completed. CMS is closed, in very close to the ideal low luminosity configuration, and performed well in the first tests with LHC beam. Behind this encouraging news is the story of a summer of intense commitment by many teams (from the collaboration and 3 CERN departments) working together, against the clock and despite many minor setbacks, to ensure that the experiment was ready to play a leading role in the excitement of September 10. Following beampipe bakeout and refill with pure neon, a magnificent effort by the ECAL group and the pt 5 technical crew made it possible to install and commission all 4 ECAL endcap Dees before the end of August. In the shadow of this activity, the barrel and forward pixel trackers and part of the beam monitoring were installed within the vac tank. The pt 5 technical teams then succeeded in safely removing the 20t installation tables and their support blocks from beneath the already installed ...

  19. Undergraduate Training in Nutritional Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, George M.

    1972-01-01

    Discusses need to establish minimum standards of training for nutrition educators,'' and standardized curricula at the undergraduate level. Gives attention to definitions, adequate training, and suggested guidelines as a starting point for further discussion. (LK)

  20. Light Gas Gun Testing of PVDF by Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Truell; Matthews, Lorin; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge

    Orbital debris has been a problem for spacecraft in orbit about the earth since the dawn of the space age. As such, a vital part of the launch preparation process for any space mission includes development of computer models, space debris tracking devices, in-situ dust detectors, and research into advanced shielding processes. It is necessary to reproduce the space environment in the lab in order to fully understand the physics behind the damage that space debris can cause. To this end, the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) employs a one-stage Light Gas Gun (LGG) for low velocity impact studies. This instrument has proven to be an ideal environment for introducing undergraduates to an experimental lab setting as well as to the field of orbital debris. This paper will discuss the advantages of including undergraduates in the lab early in their career. Recent data collected by undergraduates and technical interns using the CASPER LGG to determine the basic capabilities of Polyvinylidene Difluoride (PVDF) as an in-situ dust detector device will be examined. This type of device was chosen in part because it can easily be assembled and monitored by undergraduate students. Long-term educational goals of the project will also be discussed.

  1. Undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, L; Wass, J

    1993-01-23

    Pressures from students and teachers, from professional bodies, and from changes in the way health care is delivered are all forcing a rethink of how medical students should be taught. These pressures may be more intense in London but are not confined to it. The recommendation the Tomlinson report advocates that has been generally welcomed is for more investment in primary care in London. General practitioners have much to teach medical schools about effective ways of learning, but incentives for teaching students in general practice are currently low, organising such teaching is difficult and needs resources, and resistance within traditional medical school hierarchies needs to be overcome. Likewise, students value learning within local communities, but the effort demanded of public health departments and community organisations is great at a time when they are under greater pressure than ever before. The arguments over research that favour concentration in four multifaculty schools are less clear cut for undergraduate education, where personal support for students is important. An immediate concern is that the effort demanded for reorganising along the lines suggested by Tomlinson will not leave medical schools much energy for innovating.

  2. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    07 April 2009 Technical presentation by Leuze Electronics: 14.00 – 15.00, Main Building, Room 61-1-017 (Room A) Photoelectric sensors, data identification and transmission systems, image processing systems. We at Leuze Electronics are "the sensor people": we have been specialising in optoelectronic sensors and safety technology for accident prevention for over 40 years. Our dedicated staff are all highly customer oriented. Customers of Leuze Electronics can always rely on one thing – on us! •\tFounded in 1963 •\t740 employees •\t115 MEUR turnover •\t20 subsidiaries •\t3 production facilities in southern Germany Product groups: •\tPhotoelectric sensors •\tIdentification and measurements •\tSafety devices

  3. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    RADIOSPARES, the leading catalogue distributor of components (electronic, electrical, automation, etc.) and industrial supplies will be at CERN on Friday 3 October 2008 (Main Building, Room B, from 9.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m.) to introduce its new 2008/2009 catalogue. This will be the opportunity for us to present our complete range of products in more detail: 400 000 part numbers available on our web site (Radiospares France, RS International, extended range of components from other manufacturers); our new services: quotations, search for products not included in the catalogue, SBP products (Small Batch Production: packaging in quantities adapted to customers’ requirements); partnership with our focus manufacturers; demonstration of the on-line purchasing tool implemented on our web site in conjunction with CERN. RADIOSPARES will be accompanied by representatives of FLUKE and TYCO ELECTRONICS, who will make presentations, demonstrate materials and answer any technical questio...

  4. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    10 March 2010 DYNEOS 10:00 – 12:00 - Main Building, Room B, 61-1-009 Dyneos AG is active in the fields of photonics, laser and high-precision positioning. Our highly qualified engineer team has more than 30 years of experience in electro-optical solutions sales. The engineers are supported by a technical and administrative team. We are focused on the Swiss market and represent six suppliers (Coherent, PI Physik Instrumente, SIOS, Nanonics Imaging, APE, Ekspla) in order to give a qualified sales and service support to our customers. Our products are dedicated to the research field as well as to industry. In addition to standard catalog products, we offer custom designs to fulfill the specific needs of OEM customers or specific applications.

  5. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2010-01-01

    Overview Once again, the bulk of this article reviews the intense activity of a recently completed shutdown, which, although quite unforeseeable until a few weeks before it started, proved by its success that our often advertised capability to conduct major maintenance within a two month period is real. Although safely completed, on-time to remarkable precision, the activity was not without incident, and highlighted our dependence on many experienced, specialist teams and their precise choreography. Even after the yoke was safely closed, magnet re-commissioning and beampipe pumpdown showed new and thought-provoking behaviour. The struggle to maintain adequate technical resources will be a pre-occupation over the coming months, in parallel with the start of truly sustained operation, for which various procedures are still being put in place. Planning for future shutdowns must now become a high priority, with many working groups and task forces already in existence to prepare infrastructure improvements and to...

  6. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Tuesday 3 February 2004 From 09:00 to 13:30 - Training Centre Auditorium - bldg. 593, room 11 USB (Universal Serial Bus) CYPRESS Seminar Claudia Colombini, Field Application Engineer CYPRESS ActiveComp Electronic GmbH D-85077 MANCHING, Germany As a pioneer in USB, CYPRESS sets the standard for cost-effective solutions without sacrificing functionality, performance or reliability. Having shipped over 200 million USB devices, Cypress is the undisputed market leader and demonstrates unmatched USB expertise. With the industry's broadest selection of USB solutions, Cypress has the right silicon, software and support for every USB application, from Low-speed to High-Speed and USB On-The-Go (OTG). 9:00 - 10:30 Overview of USB systems. USB CYPRESS product overview. Peripherals: Low Speed, Full Speed, High Speed (1.1 and 2.0). Hub Solutions, Embedded Host Solutions, On-The-Go (OTG) and wireless USB. USB Development Tools (first part) 10:30 -...

  7. Reader-Centered Technical Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Technical writing is an essential part of professional communication and in recent years it has shifted from a genre-based approach. Formerly, technical writing primarily focused on generating templates of documents and sometimes it was creating or reproducing traditional forms with minor modifications and updates. Now, technical writing looks at the situations surrounding the need to write. This involves deep thinking about the goals and objectives of the project on hand. Furthermore, one observes that it is very important for any participatory process to have the full support of management. This support needs to be well understood and believed by employees. Professional writing may be very persuasive in some cases. When presented in the appropriate context, technical writing can persuade a company to improve work conditions ensuring employee safety and timely production. However, one must recognize that lot of professional writing still continues to make use of reports and instruction manuals. Normally, technical and professional writing addresses four aspects. Objective: The need for generating a given professionally written technical document and the goals the document is expected to achieve and accomplish. Clientele: The clientele who will utilize the technical document. This may include the people in the organization. This may also include "unintended readers." Customers: The population that may be affected by the content of the technical document generated. This includes the stakeholders who will be influenced. Environment: The background in which the document is created. Also, the nature of the situation that warranted the generation of the document. Swiss Psychologist Jean Piaget's view of Learning focuses on three aspects. The author likes to extend Jean Piaget's ideas to students, who are asked to prepare and submit Reader-Centered Technical Writing reports and exercises. Assimilation: Writers may benefit specifically, by assimilating a new object into

  8. Exploring Embedded Remediation for Community College Career Technical Education Pathways: Promising Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Donna Walters

    2014-01-01

    Public community colleges enroll nearly half of all undergraduate students in the United States and many of these students are enrolled in 1- and 2-year Career and Technical Education programs. Employers have indicated that colleges should place more emphasis on reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. Career Technical Education can address…

  9. Enhancing Teaching and Learning Wi-Fi Networking Using Limited Resources to Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Nurul I.

    2013-01-01

    Motivating students to learn Wi-Fi (wireless fidelity) wireless networking to undergraduate students is often difficult because many students find the subject rather technical and abstract when presented in traditional lecture format. This paper focuses on the teaching and learning aspects of Wi-Fi networking using limited hardware resources. It…

  10. Little people, big lessons: an innovative strategy to develop interpersonal skills in undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid Searl, Kerry; McAllister, Margaret; Dwyer, Trudy; Krebs, Katrina Lane; Anderson, Carina; Quinney, Loretto; McLellan, Sandy

    2014-09-01

    Learning the skills of child health nursing requires more than technical skill development. Humanistic attributes such as being genuine, accepting and empathic are imperative in gaining the trust of a child and in helping them feel comforted and safe in a health care setting. Interpersonal theory has a long history in nursing and numerous contemporary theories have drawn on the seminal work of Peplau to advance nursing practice. However, rarely has this theory been applied to simulation learning. This paper reports on an innovative simulation technique that blends interpersonal theory with puppets. Qualitative evaluation using focus group method with fifteen undergraduate nursing students revealed that the pedagogy had a positive impact on characteristics of the learner, the learning process and on interpersonal communication skills development. The study deepened insights about the educative process and led to learning impacts that suggest that puppet-based learning is a powerful medium to bridge theory and practice, bringing the importance of interpersonal theory to life for students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cross-Cultural Influences on Business Communication: Applications for Teaching and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two approaches for teaching international business communication: (1) an upper-level undergraduate international business communication course which stresses global management in the cultural context, breaking down international communication barriers, etc.; and (2) integrating elements of international business communication throughout…

  12. System for Users Technical Support

    OpenAIRE

    Andriušaitienė, Ramunė

    2007-01-01

    This Master thesis presents a study of computer equipment support services providing company’s business processes, specifics of the ongoing communication between end-users and supporting engineers-consultants and presents review of some information systems designed to automate certain technical support activities. Core aim of this study is to alleviate the daily work of above mentioned consultants when supporting end-users to locate and resolve issues in owned computer equipment. This paper o...

  13. Picture of Norwegian clinical learning laboratories for undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellard, Sally J; Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M

    2009-07-01

    Clinical preparation for practice is a vital part of undergraduate education in nursing. This study explored contemporary constructions of clinical skills laboratories in two nursing undergraduate programs in Norway using qualitative collective case study methods. Data were gathered using individual and group interviews and observation during site visits. The data revealed slightly different ways of organizing teaching and experimenting with use of pedagogical methods to facilitate learning of technical skills as well as encouraging students to activate relevant theoretical knowledge. While there was a lively and striking enthusiasm among staff about the way learning was managed within the laboratories, the pedagogical underpinnings for their particular approaches were less certain amongst participants. The paper concludes with the necessity to provide evidence for the outcome of laboratories learning and investigate suitable pedagogical methods for effective teaching and learning of practice skills. Hence, a need for research on transfer of knowledge and skills between the different sites (academy, clinical settings, and laboratories) is identified.

  14. Writing Globally: Teaching the Technical Writing Student To Prepare Documents for Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maylath, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    Argues that technical communication courses, particularly introductory courses in technical writing, must include a translation component if they are to prepare students for the kind of work they are now likely to encounter as technical communicators. Suggests the time is ripe for changing the curriculum so that students receive instruction in how…

  15. Communication skills in diagnostic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Bosman, Fred T

    2016-01-01

    Communication is an essential element of good medical practice also in pathology. In contrast to technical or diagnostic skills, communication skills are not easy to define, teach, or assess. Rules almost do not exist. In this paper, which has a rather personal character and cannot be taken as a set of guidelines, important aspects of communication in pathology are explored. This includes what should be communicated to the pathologist on the pathology request form, communication between pathologists during internal (interpathologist) consultation, communication around frozen section diagnoses, modalities of communication of a final diagnosis, with whom and how critical and unexpected findings should be communicated, (in-)adequate routes of communication for pathology diagnoses, who will (or might) receive pathology reports, and what should be communicated and how in case of an error or a technical problem. An earlier more formal description of what the responsibilities are of a pathologist as communicator and as collaborator in a medical team is added in separate tables. The intention of the paper is to stimulate reflection and discussion rather than to formulate strict rules.

  16. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2012-01-01

      UXC + detectors As explained in detail in the November 2011 bulletin, the bellows unit at −18.5 m from the CMS interaction point was identified as a prime candidate for the regularly occurring pressure spikes which occasionally led to sustained severe background conditions in 2011, affecting dead time and data quality. Similar regions in LHC with vacuum instabilities were observed to be close to bellows, which radiography showed to have distorted RF-fingers — on removal, they proved to have been severely overheated. The plans for the Year-End Technical Stop were adapted to prioritise radiography of the bellows at 16 m to 18 m either end of CMS. Excellent work by the beam pipe, survey and heavy mechanical teams allowed the X-rays to be taken as planned on 20th December, showing that the bellow at −18.5m had an obvious non-conformity. The RF-fingers were found inside the end of the opposing flared pipe instead of outside. In addition, the overlap between fingers and...

  17. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    2013-01-01

      Since the last report, much visible progress has been made, as the LS1 programme approaches the halfway point. From early October, technical and safety shift-crew have been present around the clock, allowing detectors to stay switched on overnight, ensuring that safety systems are operational and instructions for non-expert shift-crew are clear. LS1 progress Throughout the summer, whilst the solenoid vacuum tank and YB0 surfaces were accessible, an extensive installation programme took place to prepare for Tracker colder operation and the PLT installation, in 2014, the Phase 1 Pixel Tracker installation, in 2016–’17, and the HCAL Phase 1 upgrade completion, ending in LS2. This included pipework for N2 or dry air to flush the Tracker bulkhead region, many sensors to monitor temperature and dew point in the Tracker and its service channels, heating wires outside the Tracker cooling bundles, supports for the new vacuum-jacketed, concentric, CO2 Pixel cooling lines, the PLT cool...

  18. 2015 Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments: Challenges and Opportunities for a Changing and Diversifying Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlieb, Melissa R.; McLaughlin, Bryan; Cummins, R. Glenn

    2017-01-01

    As with previous years, enrollments in journalism and mass communication programs in the United States have continued to decline. In 2015, such decline among undergraduate student enrollments was particularly prevalent in journalism sequences; in contrast, undergraduate enrollments in strategic communication sequences have seen some growth since…

  19. A Construction of Global Literacy Indicators for Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Sheng Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the era of glocalization and logloblization, only university graduates who are globally literate can effectively deal with international affairs or work overseas. Therefore, this study aimed to construct a set of global literacy indicators for undergraduates in Taiwan. The global literacy indicators can be used as a guide to assess undergraduates’ global literacy level and serve as the foundation for developing global education curriculums. Employing a theoretical framework, this study drafted global literacy dimensions and indicators from reviewing related literature, and invited 18 practitioners with international experience to participate in this study. During the item development process, fuzzy Delphi method (FDM and analytic hierarchy process (AHP were applied to select and weight global literacy indicators respectively. Consequently, a set of global literacy indicators for undergraduates were constructed, which include the following four dimensions: communication, context, career development, and culture. “Communication” is the most important dimension among them, while “communicate with foreign languages” and “use information and communication technology (ICT to communicate with others” are the most important indicators and items at the second and third hierarchical levels, respectively.

  20. Students’ Motivation toward English Language Learning at Undergraduate Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this descriptive research is to explore the fact that why students are less motivated towards English language learning at undergraduate level. It also throws light upon the very facts of motivation with regard to the factors like student-teacher relationship, class room environment, self esteem or self respect, and willingness to communicate. Motivation plays a major part in learning a second language. It creates very powerful communicative factors by planting in them the seeds of self confidence. It is the responsibility of a teacher to create a comfortable environment in the class. The teacher should make the environment student-centered because if a student feels valued in the class, he or she would be more interested in learning a second language. The population of this research consisted of 199 students at undergraduate level from University of Sargodha (UOS Women Campus Faisalabad, Pakistan. For this purpose the researchers formed a questionnaire on the four point Likert’s scale on the different levels of motivation and gave the students maximum time to solve the questionnaire. The results and findings of the research show that motivation has a great role in learning with regard to the above mentioned factors. Keywords: Motivation, ELT, ESL, Pakistan, learner, undergraduate

  1. Assessors for communication skills: SPs or healthcare professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Siaw-Cheok; Dutta, Susmita; Sidhu, Jagmohni Kaur; De-Alwis, Ranjit; Chen, Nicole; Sow, Chew-Fei; Barua, Ankur

    2014-07-01

    The complexity of modern medicine creates more challenges for teaching and assessment of communication skills in undergraduate medical programme. This research was conducted to study the level of communication skills among undergraduate medical students and to determine the difference between simulated patients and clinical instructors' assessment of communication skills. This comparative study was conducted for three months at the Clinical Skills and Simulation Centre of the International Medical University in Malaysia. The modified Calgary-Cambridge checklist was used to assess the communication skills of 50 first year and 50 second year medical students (five-minutes pre-recorded interview videos on the scenario of sore throat). These videos were reviewed and scored by simulated patients (SPs), communication skills instructors (CSIs) and non-communication skills instructors (non-CSIs). Better performance was observed among the undergraduate medical students, who had formal training in communication skills with a significant difference in overall scores detected among the first and second year medical students (p = 0.0008). A non-significant difference existed between the scores of SPs and CSIs for Year 1 (p = 0.151). The SPs could be trained and involved in assessment of communication skills. Formal training in communication skills is necessary in the undergraduate medical programme.

  2. Technical innovation and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Yang Cheol

    1982-08-01

    This book gives explanations of the conception of technical innovation, development plan in Korea, connection between technology and a growth factor in national income, problem of technical innovation in developing country, analysis on cooperation between a developed country and a developing country, evaluation and strategy of technical development in Korea, technical innovation of industry, management of technical industry, analysis of special condition in Korea.

  3. SPIN-UP and Preparing Undergraduate Physics Majors for Careers in Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    Seven years ago, the Strategic Programs for Innovations in Undergraduate Physics (SPIN-UP) Report produced by the National Task Force on Undergraduate Physics identified several key characteristics of thriving undergraduate physics departments including steps these departments had taken to prepare students better for careers in industry. Today statistical data from AIP shows that almost 40% of students graduating with a degree in physics seek employment as soon as they graduate. Successful undergraduate physics programs have taken steps to adapt their rigorous physics programs to ensure that graduating seniors have the skills they need to enter the industrial workplace as well as to go on to graduate school in physics. Typical strategies noted during a series of SPIN-UP workshops funded by a grant from NSF to APS, AAPT, and AIP include flexible curricula, early introduction of undergraduates to research techniques, revised laboratory experiences that provide students with skills they need to move directly into jobs, and increased emphasis on ``soft'' skills such as communication and team work. Despite significant success, undergraduate programs face continuing challenges in preparing students to work in industry, most significantly the fact that there is no job called ``physicist'' at the undergraduate level. supported by grant NSF DUE-0741560.

  4. Clinical audit training improves undergraduates' performance in root canal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, J Y M; Tan, V J H; Lee, J R; Tong, Z G M; Foong, Y K; Tan, J M E; Parolia, A; Pau, A

    2017-12-20

    To evaluate the effectiveness of clinical audit-feedback cycle as an educational tool in improving the technical quality of root canal therapy (RCT) and compliance with record keeping performed by dental undergraduates. Clinical audit learning was introduced in Year 3 of a 5-year curriculum for dental undergraduates. During classroom activities, students were briefed on clinical audit, selected their audit topics in groups of 5 or 6 students, and prepared and presented their audit protocols. One chosen topic was RCT, in which 3 different cohorts of Year 3 students conducted retrospective audits of patients' records in 2012, 2014 and 2015 for their compliance with recommended record keeping criteria and their performance in RCT. Students were trained by and calibrated against an endodontist (κ ≥ 0.8). After each audit, the findings were reported in class, and recommendations were made for improvement in performance of RCT and record keeping. Students' compliance with published guidelines was presented and their RCT performances in each year were compared using the chi-square test. Overall compliance with of record keeping guidelines was 44.1% in 2012, 79.6% in 2014 and 94.6% in 2015 (P = .001). In the 2012 audit, acceptable extension, condensation and the absence of mishap were observed in 72.4, 75.7% and 91.5%; in the 2014 audit, 95.1%, 64.8% and 51.4%; and in 2015 audit, 96.4%, 82.1% and 92.8% of cases, respectively. In 2015, 76.8% of root canal fillings met all 3 technical quality criteria when compared to 48.6% in 2014 and 44.7% in 2012 (P = .001). Clinical audit-feedback cycle is an effective educational tool for improving dental undergraduates' compliance with record keeping and performance in the technical quality of RCT. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Current Use of Social Media in Undergraduate Nursing Education: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jennifer Gunberg; Myers, Shannon Marie

    2017-07-01

    Social media, including blogs, Twitter, wikis, Facebook, YouTube, and Ning, provides an opportunity for nurse educators to engage undergraduate nursing students who are members of the millennial generation in active learning while enhancing knowledge and fostering communication. Despite the rise of social media usage in undergraduate nursing education, there is a significant deficiency of empirical evidence supporting the efficacy and outcomes of these teaching strategies. This article provides an overview of social media use in undergraduate nursing education and a review of the existing research related to social media use in prelicensure nursing education. Overall, undergraduate nursing students respond positively to social media use in nursing education; however, no outcome measures are available to determine the effect of these teaching strategies on student learning.

  6. Developing virtual REU cohorts: Reflections from the IRIS Undergraduate Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenthal, M.; Taber, J.; Aster, R.; Frassetto, A.

    2007-12-01

    Beginning in 2006, the IRIS Education and Outreach program received funding from the National Science Foundation (EAR-0453427) to explore a novel approach to the traditional Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) model. This model blends the spirit of an REU program, which traditionally hosts participants in one location with successful prior IRIS experience hosting students at widely separated institutions to participate in summer research. A unique feature the IRIS Undergraduate Internship Program is that throughout the summer, interns form and sustain a virtual community, offering assistance, sharing ideas, asking questions, and relaying life experiences while conducting their research at diverse institutions. Key to IRIS's REU model is a combination of: one-on-one mentoring by researchers at IRIS institutions across the US, developing a strong unity among interns through both face-to-face and on-line interactions, participation of an IRIS REU alumni mentor to provide both group and intern-specific guidance developing interns' abilities to self-evaluate and work independently, through carefully designed web-based tools, and increasing interns' awareness of the IRIS and broader Earth Science community; demonstrating the role they will play in this larger community. Virtual interaction is facilitated by 1) bringing students together for face-to-face contact, through a week long orientation held annually at the IRIS PASSCAL Instrument Center on the campus of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and 2) the community enabling web infrastructure at http://www.iris.edu/internship/. During the orientation students engage in classes in geophysics basics, career preparation, as well as training to communicate virtually. Our experiences and evaluations from the 2006 and 2007 field seasons have:shown the increasing demand for electronic advertising of REU programs, provided support for several assumptions of the model including the key role of both the

  7. BURECS: An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Climate Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, D. P.; Marchant, D. R.; Christ, A. J.; Ehrenfeucht, S.

    2017-12-01

    The current structure of many undergraduate programs, particularly those at large research universities, requires students to engage with a major or academic emphasis early in their university careers. This oftentimes curbs exploration outside the major and can inhibit interdisciplinary collaboration. The Boston University Research Education and Communication of Science (BURECS) program seeks to bridge this institutional divide by fostering interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary collaboration on climate change-related issues by students from across Boston University (B.U.). Every year, approximately fifteen first-year students from B.U.'s College of Arts and Sciences, College of Communication, and School of Education are selected to join BURECS, which includes a climate science seminar, a hands-on lab course, a supported summer internship with Boston-area researchers, and the opportunity to participate in Antarctic field work during subsequent B.U. Antarctic Research Group expeditions. Currently in its third year, BURECS is funded through the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Professors Program.

  8. The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Outcomes for Over 250 Undergraduate Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troischt, Parker; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NSF-sponsored Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team (UAT) is a consortium of 19 institutions founded to promote undergraduate research and faculty development within the extragalactic ALFALFA HI blind survey project and follow-up programs. In this talk we present outcomes for the more than 250 undergraduate students who have who have participated in the program during the 8 years of funding. 40% of these students have been women and members of underrepresented groups. To date 148 undergraduate students have attended annual workshops at Arecibo Observatory, interacting with faculty, graduate students, their peers, and Arecibo staff in lectures, group activities, tours, and observing runs. Team faculty have supervised 159 summer research projects and 120 academic year (e.g., senior thesis) projects. 68 students have traveled to Arecibo Observatory for observing runs and 55 have presented their results at national meetings such as the AAS. Through participation in the UAT, students are made aware of career paths they may not have previously considered. More than 90% of alumni are attending graduate school and/or pursuing a career in STEM. 42% of those pursuing graduate degrees in Physics or Astronomy are women. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, and AST-1211005

  9. Do You Kiss Your Mother with That Mouth? An Authentic Large-Scale Undergraduate Research Experience in Mapping the Human Oral Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack T.H. Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Clinical microbiology testing is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of community and hospital-acquired infections. Laboratory scientists need to utilize technical and problem-solving skills to select from a wide array of microbial identification techniques. The inquiry-driven laboratory training required to prepare microbiology graduates for this professional environment can be difficult to replicate within undergraduate curricula, especially in courses that accommodate large student cohorts. We aimed to improve undergraduate scientific training by engaging hundreds of introductory microbiology students in an Authentic Large-Scale Undergraduate Research Experience (ALURE. The ALURE aimed to characterize the microorganisms that reside in the healthy human oral cavity—the oral microbiome—by analyzing hundreds of samples obtained from student volunteers within the course. Students were able to choose from selective and differential culture media, Gram-staining, microscopy, as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques, in order to collect, analyze, and interpret novel data to determine the collective oral microbiome of the student cohort. Pre- and postsurvey analysis of student learning gains across two iterations of the course (2012–2013 revealed significantly higher student confidence in laboratory skills following the completion of the ALURE (p < 0.05 using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Learning objectives on effective scientific communication were also met through effective student performance in laboratory reports describing the research outcomes of the project. The integration of undergraduate research in clinical microbiology has the capacity to deliver authentic research experiences and improve scientific training for large cohorts of undergraduate students. Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory techniques

  10. Professional practice and construction undergraduates' employability skills

    OpenAIRE

    Vohmann, B.; Frame, I.

    2016-01-01

    Employability skills are known to be valuable to undergraduates when entering the workplace and expected by employers, yet, in construction as in many disciplines, these skills often are not well developed. However, construction professionals frequently work in complex dynamic environments and employability skills may enhance undergraduates' practitioner effectiveness. Therefore it is important tutors exploit opportunities to help undergraduates develop their employability skills. This paper ...

  11. Embracing Tensions in Feminist Organizational Communication Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linabary, Jasmine R.; Long, Ziyu; Mouton, Ashton; Rao, Ranjani L.; Buzzanell, Patrice M.

    2017-01-01

    Feminist pedagogies hold potential to create more inclusive and transformative classrooms. Adopting a tension-centered approach, we draw on our individual and collective reflections on the design and instruction of a multi-section undergraduate organizational communication course to build an autoethnographic account of the tensions associated with…

  12. Communication Scaffolds for Project Management in PBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shigeru; Arai, Masayuki; Takai, Kumiko; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Hiroyoshi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the role-playing situation and the system requirement list are adopted into project-based learning classes to develop web applications. In the classes, the third-year undergraduate project managers communicate with the client of the project rolled by teachers on the Web bulletin board. These are expected to act as scaffolds to…

  13. Blogging in the Communication Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Carrie Anne

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an assignment that was developed for an undergraduate course on communication technologies taught at a public university in the Upper Midwest. The course focuses on the impact of new media technologies on traditional media industries and contemporary culture, and is taken by students majoring in journalism, public relations,…

  14. Current technologies in vehicular communication

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrakopoulos, George

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a concise and comprehensive overview of vehicular communication technologies. It classifies all relevant standards, protocols and applications, so as to enable the reader to gain a holistic approach towards the subject of vehicular communications. The primary methods are algorithmic processes and simulation results. First, an overview and classification of vehicular technologies is presented. Then, the book focuses on specific applications of V2V and V2I communications. Special attention is given to recent research and development results regarding R&D projects in the field, in cooperation with car manufacturing companies and universities at a global level. Designed to facilitate understanding of vehicle to vehicle and vehicle to infrastructure technologies, this textbook is appropriate for undergraduate and graduate students of vehicular communications or mobile networks.

  15. The Polaris Project: Undergraduate Research Catalyzing Advances in Arctic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, J. D.; Holmes, R. M.; Natali, S.; Mann, P. J.; Bunn, A. G.; Frey, K. E.

    2017-12-01

    With guidance and sufficient resources, undergraduates can drive the exploration of new research directions, lead high impact scientific products, and effectively communicate the value of science to the public. As mentors, we must recognize the strong contribution undergraduates make to the advancement of scientific understanding and their unique ability and desire to be transdisciplinary and to translate ideas into action. Our job is to be sure students have the resources and tools to successfully explore questions that they care about, not to provide or lead them towards answers we already have. The central goal of the Polaris Project is to advance understanding of climate change in the Arctic through an integrated research, training, and outreach program that has at its heart a research expedition for undergraduates to a remote field station in the Arctic. Our integrative approach to training provides undergraduates with strong intellectual development and they bring fresh perspectives, creativity, and a unique willingness to take risks on new ideas that have an energizing effect on research and outreach. Since the projects inception in summer 2008, we have had >90 undergraduates participate in high-impact field expeditions and outreach activities. Over the years, we have also been fortunate enough to attract an ethnically, racially, and culturally diverse group of students, including students from Puerto Rico, Hispanic-, African- and Native-Americans, members of the LGBT community, and first-generation college students. Most of these students have since pursued graduate degrees in ecology, and many have received NSF fellowships and Fulbright scholarships. One of our major goals is to increase the diversity of the scientific community, and we have been successful in our short-term goal of recruiting and retaining a diverse group of students. The goal of this presentation is to provide a description of the mentoring model at the heart of the Polaris Project

  16. Persuading Investors: Emphasizing Communication in a Finance Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yest, Michael T.; Grant, Kelly A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a unique project to faculty seeking an interdisciplinary activity that exposes students to the necessary art of persuasive communication in the field of finance. Specifically, we have designed a multi-stage simulation in which undergraduate business students apply both finance and communication skills, specifically…

  17. An Investigation of Parent/Child Communication about Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angera, Jeffrey J.; Brookins-Fisher, Jodi; Inungu, Joseph N.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the communication and initial sexuality education between parents and children as it relates to later sexual activity. The study asked 192 undergraduate college students from a Midwestern state university their perceptions about past communication with their parents regarding sexuality. The students completed a 180-item…

  18. Teaching Small Group Communication: The Do Good Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minei, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the parameters of a semester-long project called the "Do Good" project, geared towards developing small group communication skills in undergraduate students. This project highlights participation in a social engagement project that allows students to bridge concepts learned in small group communication lectures…

  19. Connecting Autoethnography with Service Learning: A Critical Communication Pedagogical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, David H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a project that encourages the development of a critical-pedagogical perspective in an undergraduate small group communication class. The project provides a transition from ideology to practice by combining activities that have been connected to critical communication pedagogy--service learning and autoethnography. The…

  20. Near field communications handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Ahson, Syed A; Furht, Borko

    2011-01-01

    Near Field Communication, or NFC, is a short-range high frequency wireless communication technology that enables the exchange of data between devices over about a decimeter. The technology is a simple extension of the ISO 14443 proximity-card standard (contact less card, RFID) that combines the interface of a smart card and a reader into a single device with practical implications. A complete reference for NFC, this handbook provides technical information about all aspects of NFC, as well as applications. It covers basic concepts as well as research grade material and includes a discussion of

  1. Communication network exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Seung Sul

    1988-05-01

    This book has two parts. The first parts is comprised of five chapters, which deals with communication network constitution with design of network and types, telephone network about outline and management of network, telephone network · data network · private network, international data telephone network about service and international data network and technical standards of quality of service, communication and data. The second parts handles exchange, which is about institution of switching, a manual exchange and step-by step exchange, a crossbar exchange, electronic exchange, international switching system, design of equipment of test and measurement.

  2. Teaching Economic Forecasting to Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donihue, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    Contends that academic departments have come under increasing scrutiny in terms of the scope of curriculum and teaching methods. Describes a senior undergraduate economics course in which the primary objective was to give students opportunities to combine theoretical training with quantitative skills and apply them to real-world problems. (CFR)

  3. Rethinking Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    A summary of fundamental changes made to the undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in the Chemistry Department at Gustavus Adolphus College (beginning in the 2013-2014 academic year) is presented. The yearlong sequence now consists of an introductory semester covering both quantum mechanics and thermodynamics/kinetics, followed by a second…

  4. Undergraduate Students' Attitudes toward Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Ju; Lin, Yu-Teh Kirk

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated American and Taiwan undergraduate students' attitudes toward biodiversity. The survey questionnaire consisted of statements prompted by the question "To what extent do you agree with the following statements about problems with the biodiversity issues." Students indicated strongly disagree, disagree, agree,…

  5. Undergraduate research: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, Hermannus; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; van der Hoeven, Gerrit

    This paper describes a one semester research course for undergraduates of computing programs. Students formulate a research proposal, conduct research and write a full paper. They present the results at a one-day student conference. On the one hand we offer the students a lot of structure and

  6. Undergraduates, Technology, and Social Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Betsy; Boniek, Susan; Turner, Elena; Lovell, Elyse D'nn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the spectrum of undergraduate students' social interactions and related technological tools. Qualitative methods were used for this phenomenological study exploring 35 in-person interviews, with horizonalization in an open coding system secured by in-depth analysis which revealed nuanced themes and…

  7. EERE Resources for Undergraduate Students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-10-01

    Looking to expand your experience outside of the classroom? The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a number of resources available for undergraduate students, including competitions, internships, and career planning information to help you navigate the education to employment pathway in energy.

  8. Astrology Beliefs among Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Hannah; Impey, Chris; Buxner, Sanlyn; Antonellis, Jessie

    2011-01-01

    A survey of the science knowledge and attitudes toward science of nearly 10000 undergraduates at a large public university over a 20-year period included several questions addressing student beliefs in astrology and other forms of pseudoscience. The results from our data reveal that a large majority of students (78%) considered astrology "very" or…

  9. EERE Resources for Undergraduate Students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-04-01

    Looking to expand your experience outside of the classroom? The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a number of resources available for undergraduate students, including competitions, internships, and career planning information to help you navigate the education to employment pathway in energy.

  10. A Review of Undergraduate Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayman, Benjamin F.; Hamermesh, Morton

    1986-02-01

    A study aid for senior and graduate level students needing a review of undergraduate physics. Covers a broad range of topics, with carefully worked examples illustrating important problem-solving methods. A collection of self-test problems helps students prepare for the College Entrance Advanced Physics Examination and the Qualifying Written Examination for the PhD.

  11. Bioinformatics and the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Mark; Parker, Jeffrey; LeBlanc, Mark; Woodard, Craig T.; Glackin, Mary; Hanrahan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances involving high-throughput techniques for data generation and analysis have made familiarity with basic bioinformatics concepts and programs a necessity in the biological sciences. Undergraduate students increasingly need training in methods related to finding and retrieving information stored in vast databases. The rapid rise of…

  12. Project Management Communication 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, Line; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    that is developed through social or interpersonal communication practices. Looking at the broader picture of project management which besides the implementation phase also includes conception, planning and closure, we see a project management framework that brings together both technical and social aspects......How can we understand project management communication practices for developing effective practices in professional and technical communication? In this article we explore an approach to project management that focuses on projects as having a technical documentation structure with content...... of project communication. To understand how this works, we interviewed project managers about their understanding and strategy in communicating about the projects they lead. Findings demonstrate that more experienced project managers have a more nuanced understanding of project communication as both...

  13. Smart Video Communication for Social Groups - The Vconect Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ursu; P. Stollenmayer; D. Williams; P. Torres; P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); N. Farber; E. Geelhoed

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThis article introduces the Vconect project. Vconect (Video Communications for Networked Communities) is a collaborative European research and development project dealing with high-quality enriched video as a medium for mass communication within social communities. The technical

  14. Science communication a practical guide for scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Bowater, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Science communication is a rapidly expanding area and meaningful engagement between scientists and the public requires effective communication. Designed to help the novice scientist get started with science communication, this unique guide begins with a short history of science communication before discussing the design and delivery of an effective engagement event. Along with numerous case studies written by highly regarded international contributors, the book discusses how to approach face-to-face science communication and engagement activities with the public while providing tips to avoid potential pitfalls. This book has been written for scientists at all stages of their career, including undergraduates and postgraduates wishing to engage with effective science communication for the first time, or looking to develop their science communication portfolio.

  15. Tactile Communications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Communication with the crew is vital and must be maintained regardless of environmental conditions and crew activity. Current spacecraft communication systems depend...

  16. Fit for Purpose: Traditional Assessment Is Failing Undergraduates with Learning Difficulties. Might eAssessment Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter; Wray, Jane; Farrall, Helen; Aspland, Jo

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen unprecedented growth in the size, diversity and academic orientation of undergraduate student populations. There is evidence that the use of innovative pedagogies using information and communications technology has the potential to address such student diversity by offering opportunities for a more personalised student…

  17. Who Really Answers the Questions? Using Glasser's Quality School Model in an Undergraduate Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jennifer; Plumlee, Gerald L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors discuss the effectiveness of the Quality School model and active learning in an undergraduate classroom setting. They compare performance levels of students in two course sections of Principles of Macroeconomics and two sections of Managerial Communications. Students are given an opportunity to help shape the structure of the…

  18. Investigating Undergraduate Students' Ideas about the Fate of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Mallory; Coble, Kim; Bailey, Janelle M.; Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2017-01-01

    As astronomers further develop an understanding of the fate of the Universe, it is essential to study students' ideas on the fate of the Universe so that instructors can communicate the field's current status more effectively. In this study, we examine undergraduate students' preinstruction ideas of the fate of the Universe in ten semester-long…

  19. Social Issues and Problem-Based Learning in Sociology: Opportunities and Challenges in the Undergraduate Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglitis, Daina S.; Buntman, Fran L.; Alexander, Dameon V.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the use of problem-based learning (PBL) in the undergraduate sociology classroom. PBL shifts students from the role of passive listeners and learners to active knowledge builders and communicators through the use of concise and engaging social problem cases. PBL creates opportunities for building substantive area knowledge,…

  20. Factors Influencing Undergraduates Attitudes towards ICT: An Empirical Study in Kheis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerza, Alyya; Beauchamp, Gary

    2017-01-01

    The increasing use of information and communication technology (ICT) in higher education has been explored largely in relation to undergraduate's attitude towards the usage of ICT in the universities. However, the success of ICT in any learning institution including Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) depends on the attitudes of undergraduates…

  1. Development of a Teaching Methodology for Undergraduate Human Development in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria A.; Espinoza, José M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of a teaching methodology for the undergraduate Psychology course Human Development II in a private university in Lima, Peru is described. The theoretical framework consisted of an integration of Citizen Science and Service Learning, with the application of Information and Communications Technology (ICT), specifically Wikipedia and…

  2. Developing Academic Writing Skills as Part of Graduate Attributes in Undergraduate Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Preez, I.; Fossey, A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of graduate attributes in higher education is enjoying much attention worldwide. Employers consistently rank communication skills, in particular writing ability, among the most important skills for graduates to possess. The inclusion and development of graduate attributes in undergraduate curricula have received little attention.…

  3. How (and Whether) to Teach Undergraduates about the Replication Crisis in Psychological Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopik, William J.; Bremner, Ryan H.; Defever, Andrew M.; Keller, Victor N.

    2018-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, crises surrounding replication, fraud, and best practices in research methods have dominated discussions in the field of psychology. However, no research exists examining how to communicate these issues to undergraduates and what effect this has on their attitudes toward the field. We developed and validated a 1-hr lecture…

  4. Crossing the Atlantic: Integrating Cross-Cultural Experiences into Undergraduate Business Courses Using Virtual Communities Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luethge, Denise J.; Raska, David; Greer, Bertie M.; O'Connor, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Today's business school academics are tasked with pedagogy that offers students an understanding of the globalization of markets and the cross-cultural communication skills needed in today's business environment. The authors describe how a virtual cross-cultural experience was integrated into an undergraduate business course and used as an…

  5. Organization of an undergraduate research group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.; Noteboom, E.

    1995-01-01

    Traditionally, research groups consist of senior physicists, staff members, and graduate students. The physics department at Creighton University has formed a Relativistic Heavy Ion physics research group consisting primarily of undergraduate students. Although senior staff and graduate students are actively involved, undergraduate research and the education of undergraduates is the focus of the group. The presentation, given by two undergraduate members of the group, will outline progress made in the group's organization, discuss the benefits to the undergraduate group members, and speak to the balance which must be struck between education concerns and research goals

  6. Interdisciplinary Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib Callaos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication is fundamental in scientific practice and an integral part of academic work. The practice of communication cannot be neglected by those who are trying to advance scientific research. Effective means should continuously be identified in order to open channels of communication within and among disciplines, among scientists and between scientists and the general public.[1]The increasing importance of interdisciplinary communication has been pointed out by an increasing number of researchers and scholars, as well as in conferences and roundtables on the subject. Some authors even estimate that "interdisciplinary study represents the future of the university."[2] Since interdisciplinary study is "the most underthought critical, pedagogical and institutional concept in modern academy"[3] it is important to think and reflect, and even do some research, on this concept or notion. Research and practice based reflections with regards to this issue are important especially because the increasing complexity and proliferation of scientific research is generating countless specialties, sub-specialties and sub-sub-specialties, with their respective special languages; which were "created for discrete local areas of research based upon the disconnected branches of science."[4] On the other hand, scientific, technical and societal problems are requiring multi- or inter-disciplinary consideration. Consequently, interdisciplinary communication channels are being needed with urgency, and scientific research should be integrated, not just in the context of its discipline, but also in the context of related disciplines. Much more reflection and research should be done on this issue. Research on adequate research integration and communication is urgently required, i.e. meta-research efforts should be done in order to relate research results in an adequate and more useful way. This meta-research effort might be done in the context of each particular

  7. Communications article

    KAUST Repository

    Fariborzi, Hossein

    2017-07-20

    Seamless, covert communications using a communications system integrated or incorporated within an article of clothing is described. In one embodiment, the communications system is integrated or incorporated into a shoe insole and includes a haptic feedback mechanism, a communications module, a flexible pressure sensor, and a battery. The communications module includes a wireless communications module for wireless communications, a wired interface for wired communications, a microcontroller, and a battery charge controller. The flexible pressure sensor can be actuated by an individual\\'s toe, for example, and communication between two communications nodes can be achieved using coded signals sent by individuals using a combination of long and short presses on the pressure sensor. In response to the presses, wireless communications modules can transmit and receive coded signals based on the presses.

  8. Astrobites: The Online Astronomy Research Digest for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faesi, Christopher; Astrobites Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    Astrobites (http://astrobites.org) is an innovative science education initiative developed by graduate students in astrophysics for an undergraduate audience. Our goal is to help undergraduates make the transition from the classroom to careers in research by introducing them to the astronomical literature in a pedagogical, approachable, and comprehensible way. Every day we select one new journal article posted to the astrophysics preprint server (http://arXiv.org/astro-ph) and prepare a brief summary describing methods and results, explaining jargon, and providing context. We also write regular blog posts containing career advice, such as tips for applying for graduate school, how to install astronomical software, or demystifying the publishing process. The articles are written by a team of about 30 graduate students in astrophysics from throughout the US and Europe. Since its founding in 2010, Astrobites has grown dramatically, now reaching more than 1000 daily readers in over 100 countries worldwide. Our audience includes not only undergraduates, but also interested non-scientists, educators, and professional researchers. More broadly, Astrobites is interested in fostering the development of vital communication skills that are crucial to a successful science career, yet not formally taught in most astronomy PhD programs. In addition to providing our graduate student authors with valuable opportunities to practice these skills through writing and editing articles, we organize events such as the upcoming workshop Communicating Science 2013, at which graduate students in all science fields from around the country will learn from and interact with panelists who are experts in science communication.

  9. Advanced interdisciplinary undergraduate program: light engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakholdin, Alexey; Bougrov, Vladislav; Voznesenskaya, Anna; Ezhova, Kseniia

    2016-09-01

    The undergraduate educational program "Light Engineering" of an advanced level of studies is focused on development of scientific learning outcomes and training of professionals, whose activities are in the interdisciplinary fields of Optical engineering and Technical physics. The program gives practical experience in transmission, reception, storage, processing and displaying information using opto-electronic devices, automation of optical systems design, computer image modeling, automated quality control and characterization of optical devices. The program is implemented in accordance with Educational standards of the ITMO University. The specific features of the Program is practice- and problem-based learning implemented by engaging students to perform research and projects, internships at the enterprises and in leading Russian and international research educational centers. The modular structure of the Program and a significant proportion of variable disciplines provide the concept of individual learning for each student. Learning outcomes of the program's graduates include theoretical knowledge and skills in natural science and core professional disciplines, deep knowledge of modern computer technologies, research expertise, design skills, optical and optoelectronic systems and devices.

  10. National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Center Requirements Definition, Technical Assistance, and Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frantz, Frederick

    2003-01-01

    .... The current technology thrust areas for the Northeast Region are Concealed Weapons Detection, Secure Communications, Computer Forensics, Information Management, AGILE, and various technical assistance projects...

  11. Terabit Wireless Communication Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Shian U.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation briefly discusses a research effort on Terabit Wireless communication systems for possible space applications. Recently, terahertz (THz) technology (300-3000 GHz frequency) has attracted a great deal of interest from academia and industry. This is due to a number of interesting features of THz waves, including the nearly unlimited bandwidths available, and the non-ionizing radiation nature which does not damage human tissues and DNA with minimum health threat. Also, as millimeter-wave communication systems mature, the focus of research is, naturally, moving to the THz range. Many scientists regard THz as the last great frontier of the electromagnetic spectrum, but finding new applications outside the traditional niches of radio astronomy, Earth and planetary remote sensing, and molecular spectroscopy particularly in biomedical imaging and wireless communications has been relatively slow. Radiologists find this area of study so attractive because t-rays are non-ionizing, which suggests no harm is done to tissue or DNA. They also offer the possibility of performing spectroscopic measurements over a very wide frequency range, and can even capture signatures from liquids and solids. According to Shannon theory, the broad bandwidth of the THz frequency bands can be used for terabit-per-second (Tb/s) wireless communication systems. This enables several new applications, such as cell phones with 360 degrees autostereoscopic displays, optic-fiber replacement, and wireless Tb/s file transferring. Although THz technology could satisfy the demand for an extremely high data rate, a number of technical challenges need to be overcome before its development. This presentation provides an overview the state-of-the- art in THz wireless communication and the technical challenges for an emerging application in Terabit wireless systems. The main issue for THz wave propagation is the high atmospheric attenuation, which is dominated by water vapor absorption in the THz

  12. Technical assistance contractor Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project comprises Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (JEG) and its major teaming partners [Roy F. Weston, Inc. (RFW), Sergent, Hauskins ampersand Beckwith Agra, Inc. (SHB Agra), and Geraghty ampersand Miller, Inc. (G ampersand M)]. The first three companies have worked together effectively on the UMTRA Project for more than 10 years. With the initiation of the UMTRA Groundwater Project in April 1991, a need arose to increase the TAC's groundwater technical breadth and depth, so G ampersand M was brought in to augment the team's capabilities. The TAC contract's scope is to provide technical, analytical, environmental, engineering, design, inspection, and management support services to the US Department of Energy (DOE) for both surface and groundwater projects. The TAC team continues to support the DOE in completing surface remedial actions and initiating groundwater remediation work for start-up, characterization, design, construction oversight, and remedial operations. A key feature of the TAC's management approach is the extensive set of communication systems implemented for the UMTRA Project. These systems assist all functional disciplines in performing UMTRA Project tasks associated with management, technical support, administrative support, and financial/project controls

  13. Participatory Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    This user guide on participatory communication aims to answer the following questions: What do we mean when we say participatory communication? What are the practical implications of working with participatory communication strategies in development and social change processes? What practical...... experiences document that participatory communication adds value to a development project or program? Many communication practitioners and development workers face obstacles and challenges in their practical work. A participatory communication strategy offers a very specific perspective on how to articulate......, tools, and experiences on how to implement participatory communications strategies. It is targeted toward government officials, World Bank staff, develompent workers in the field, and civil society....

  14. Strategy of technical innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ga Jong

    1990-12-01

    This book deals with policy of scientific technique and technical innovation such as research for development and types of technical innovation, historical development and process of technical innovation, economic growth, technology change and investment for research and development, structure and form of technical transfer with the meaning process, from, structure and theory, economic growth and investment of research and development with experiential analysis and case study on strategy of technical innovation in electron and fine chemical industry.

  15. Students' Strengths and Weaknesses in Evaluating Technical Arguments as Revealed through Implementing Calibrated Peer Review™ in a Bioengineering Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Tracy; Saterbak, Ann

    2009-01-01

    In engineering fields, students are expected to construct technical arguments that demonstrate a discipline's expected use of logic, evidence, and conventions. Many undergraduate bioengineering students struggle to enact the appropriate argument structures when they produce technical posters. To address this problem we implemented Calibrated Peer…

  16. Book Review: New Perspectives on Technical Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, A. J. (Ed.); Sterken, Christiaan

    2012-08-01

    New Perspectives on Technical Editing by Avon J. Murphy (ed.) ISBN : 978-0895033949 (2010) Baywood Publishing Company Inc, Hardcover, 210 pages, 35.5 GBP This book presents a collection of 10 chapters dealing with diverse aspects of technical editing (ie, editorial planning, and analysis and structural changes made to other people's technological documents): research in technical editing, trends and teaching of technical editing, copyediting, and technical journal editing. The role and function of the modern journal and book editor is also dealt with in detail. Each chapter is written by an expert in the field: senior editors, university professors in technical communication, technical writers and linguists. The ever-evolving role of the editor is clearly elucidated in several historical reviews, and in the descriptions of the expectations for the future. A very striking aspect of this book is its extensive collection of bibliographic resources: every chapter lists dozens of very useful references, and the closing chapter, and annotated bibliography, contain many not so well known references, and are most useful. All in all, the book is a treasure trove listing more than 400 references, in addition to numerous webpage URLs embedded in the texts. The book is designed to help the reader to understand current practices and norms in technical editing, and to help to take action in editing as well as in teaching and educating would-be editors. The audience for this book thus includes editors and teachers, but also writers, researchers and students. A deep reading of this book will result in a better understanding of the difference between full technical editing and its much narrower component so well known as copyediting, and will convince any prospective editor that editing should not be undertaken if the people involved do not master the art of precision and accuracy in technical (as well as in human) communication, do not possess the technical know how and computer

  17. 47 CFR 80.659 - Technical requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Maritime Support Stations § 80.659 Technical requirements. The authorized frequency tolerance, class of emission, bandwidth, and transmitter power for maritime support stations are contained...

  18. [Art in undergraduate medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjellstad, Kenneth; Isaksen, Tor Olav; Frich, Jan C

    2003-08-28

    During the last decades attempts have been made at integrating art in medical education. What should be the form, content and objectives of such teaching? We address this question on the basis of a review of articles in medical journals from 1990 until May 2001 about art and undergraduate medical education. A common reason for integrating art in undergraduate medical education is that art may act as a balance to the dominance of natural science. One pedagogical approach is to use art as a tool for training skills. Many articles emphasise that teaching art should also contribute to the personal and professional development of medical students. The majority of articles report on courses in literature and medicine. Art is often taught in small or medium-sized groups; courses may last from single lessons to programmes over years. The aim of art courses may be the development of skills, but also one of facilitating personal growth and professional development.

  19. Thermodynamics a complete undergraduate course

    CERN Document Server

    Steane, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    This is an undergraduate textbook in thermodynamics—the science of heat, work, temperature, and entropy. The text presents thermodynamics in and of itself, as an elegant and powerful set of ideas and methods. These methods open the way to understanding a very wide range of phenomena in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology. Starting out from an introduction of concepts at first year undergraduate level, the roles of temperature, internal energy, and entropy are explained via the laws of thermodynamics. The text employs a combination of examples, exercises, and careful discussion, with a view to conveying the feel of the subject as well as avoiding common misunderstandings. The Feynman–Smuluchowski ratchet, Szilard’s engine, and Maxwell’s daemon are used to elucidate entropy and the second law. Free energy and thermodynamic potentials are discussed at length, with applications to solids as well as fluids and flow processes. Thermal radiation is discussed, and the main ideas significant to global...

  20. Relationship between non-technical skills and technical performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: does stress have an influence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krage, R.; Zwaan, L.; Tjon Soei Len, L.; Kolenbrander, M.; Groeningen, D. van; Loer, S.A.; Wagner, C.; Schober, P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-technical skills, such as task management, leadership, situational awareness, communication and decision-making refer to cognitive, behavioural and social skills that contribute to safe and efficient team performance. The importance of these skills during cardiopulmonary

  1. Advertising as a communications tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aduss, E.L.; Bisconti, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    Advertising is one component of the US nuclear industry's co-ordinated communications programme aimed at assuring an understanding of nuclear energy's role and benefits. This communication programme, conducted by the US Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA), includes many media and public relations activities, a variety of publications aimed at key audiences, reports, technical analyses, as well as advertising. Advertising enables USCEA to disseminate key information to very broad audiences continuously and consistently

  2. Innovation of Undergraduate Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    植村, 研一; Uemura, Kenichi

    1995-01-01

    Classical undergraduate medical education in Japan has largely based on didactic lectures, followed by protocol-guided laboratory experiments and clinical training of history taking and physical examination. Such education strategies are efficient for cramming facts and theories, which will soon become obsolete by the time when the students go into clinical practice and are not effective for education of effective clinical skills. In the cognitive domain, what students must learn are not fact...

  3. Assessment of Palliative Care Awareness among Undergraduate Healthcare Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, Rajaragupathy; Jayagowri, Karthikeyan

    2017-09-01

    Palliative care knowledge is being given meager importance in the curriculum of medical and other allied medical sciences. It is vital that all health care practitioners including medical, pharmacy, physiotherapy and nursing are aware and apply the best principles of palliative care. To assess the awareness of palliative care among undergraduate students of medical, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy. The study population included total of 200 students. Among 200 students, 50 were from each of the colleges of medicine, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy. After obtaining informed consent, questionnaire was given. The questionnaire contained the sociodemographic profile and 35 statements under nine groups, for which the respondents were expected to answer one out of the three options (Yes, No, Don't know). The groups of statements deal with palliative care definition, its philosophy, communication issues, non-pain symptoms, medications use and context of application of palliative care. It was found that less than 20% of nursing students were unaware of palliative care. Among the undergraduates of college of pharmacy, more than 50% had no knowledge of palliative care. More than 80% of physiotherapy, nursing and medical students agree that death should occur without any pain or symptoms. The need of palliative care was well understood by more than 70% of students of physiotherapy, pharmacy, nursing and medical colleges. Basic knowledge about palliative care was inadequate among the undergraduate students related to healthcare.

  4. An IYPT-based undergraduate physics tournament in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanyong; Song, Feng; Liu, Yubin; Sun, Qian

    2013-03-01

    International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a team-oriented scientific competition of secondary school students. The participants present their solutions to scientific problems they have prepared over several months and discuss their solutions with other teams. It can also be implemented in university level as its physics problems are all open questions and have no standard answers, especially suitable for undergraduates' ability training in China. The annual tournament of physics learning of undergraduates in our school of physics was started in 2008. Each year, there are 15-18 teams, 20 more student volunteers and 30 more faculty jurors involved. The students benefited in different ways. It is project-based, requiring students to solve the problems in a research way. Team work is developed in both experimenting and discussing stages. The knowledge learned in classrooms can be used to solve these practical and life-related problems, raising their interest and initiative in physics learning. Finally, they are building up their skills in scientific presentation and communication. An IYPT-based program called CUPT (China undergraduate physics tournament) was launched in 2010 and annually attracts about 40 universities to attend. It gains its important role in physics education. National Fund for Talent Training in Basic Sciences (J1103208)

  5. Undergraduates Learn Evolution Through Teaching Kindergartners About Blind Mexican Cavefish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Joshua B.; Gangidine, Andrew; Schafer, Rachel E.

    2017-01-01

    The development and implementation of a scientific outreach activity comes with a number of challenges. A successful outreach event must match the sophistication of content to the audience, be engaging, expand the knowledge base for participants, and be inclusive for a diverse audience. Ideally, a successful event will also convey the importance of scientific outreach for future scientists and citizens. In this paper, we present a simple, hands-on guide to a scientific outreach event targeted to kindergarten learners. This activity also pursued a second goal: the inclusion of undergraduate students in the development and delivery of the event. We provided a detailed set of four activities, focusing on the blind Mexican cavefish, which were enthusiastically received by kindergarten audiences. The engagement of undergraduate students in the development of this activity encouraged public outreach involvement and fostered new scientific and communication skills. The format of the outreach event we describe is flexible. We provide a set of guidelines and suggestions for adapting this approach to other biological topics. The activity and approach we describe enables the implementation of effective scientific outreach, using active learning approaches, which benefits both elementary school learners and undergraduate students. PMID:28936469

  6. Communication on the Safety Case for a Deep Geological Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Lucy; Bernier, Frederik; Bollingerfehr, Wilhelm; Cunado, Miguel; Ilett, Doug; Kwong, Gloria; ); Noseck, Ulrich; Roehlig, Klaus; Van Luik, Abe; Weber, Jan; Weetjens, Eef

    2017-01-01

    Communication has a specific role to play in the development of deep geological repositories. Building trust with the stakeholders involved in this process, particularly within the local community, is key for effective communication between the authorities and the public. There are also clear benefits to having technical experts hone their communication skills and having communication experts integrated into the development process. This report has compiled lessons from both failures and successes in communicating technical information to non-technical audiences. It addresses two key questions in particular: what is the experience base concerning the effectiveness or non-effectiveness of different tools for communicating safety case results to a non-technical audience and how can communication based on this experience be improved and included into a safety case development effort from the beginning? (authors)

  7. [Communication with intubated patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ami-Lozover, S; Benbassat, J

    1996-06-16

    For critically ill patients on assisted respiration caring behavior is particularly important. In this paper we review the literature on patient satisfaction with medical care and with their communication with the nursing staff. Communication skills of staff of intensive respiratory care units were studied by direct observation, debriefing of hospitalized patients and by interview of discharged patients. Direct observation showed that nurses spent only a small proportion of their time talking to patients. The interactions dealt with technical rather than emotional matters and consisted mostly of negative and discouraging comments rather than positive and supporting messages. Debriefing of hospitalized intubated patients revealed a high degree of overall satisfaction with care on the one hand, and complaints of communication problems, anxiety and anger on the other. Lastly, interviews with discharged patients revealed that as many as a quarter of those who could remember their hospitalization reported feelings of anxiety, anger, distrust in the staff and difficulty in communication. These findings suggest that the nursing staff needs improved communication skills. There is evidence that the judicious use of communication techniques may improve patient satisfaction, reduce anxiety and reduce duration of treatment.

  8. Technical writing in America: A historical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The standard distinction between poetic and referential language, the gulf between science and the humanities, and the distress many teachers of English feel when faced for the first time with the prospect of teaching technical writing are discussed. In the introduction of many technical writing textbooks. Technical communication is divorced from other forms of linguistic experience by making language limiting and reductive rather than creative and expansive. The emphasis on technical/scientific writing as radically different had blinded people to those traits it has in common with all species of composition and has led to a neglect of research, on fundamental rhetorical issues. A complete rhetorical theory of technical discourse should include information about the attitudes and motives of writers, the situations which motivate (or coerce) them to write, definitive features of technical style and form, interrelationship of expression and creativity, and functions of communication in shaping and preserving scientific networds and institutions. The previous areas should be explored with respect to contemporary practice and within an historical perspective.

  9. Collaborating for Success: Team Teaching the Engineering Technical Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Terrence; Long, Mike

    2012-01-01

    This paper will examine the collaborative teaching process undertaken at College of the North Atlantic-Qatar (CNA-Q) by Engineering and the Communication faculties to improve the overall quality of engineering students' capstone projects known as the Technical Thesis. The Technical Thesis is divided into two separate components: a proposal stage…

  10. Prenatal showers: educational opportunities for undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentz, Suzanne E; Brown, Janet M; Schmidt, Nola A; Alverson, Elise M

    2009-01-01

    J. Cranmer and C. Lajkowicz (1989) faced the challenge of securing student clinical experiences with healthy prenatal clients. They identified that lack of access to pregnant women, limited number of faculty, and large numbers of students contributed to problems in meeting select course objectives. Little has changed since then. This article describes a clinical experience, known as "Prenatal Showers," where undergraduate nursing students, implementing the teacher role, provide community-based prenatal education in the context of a baby shower. Student groups address educational topics identified by community partners. After student presentations, feedback from prenatal clients is analyzed. Lessons learned include selecting appropriate community partners, clearly articulating academic and community needs, and obtaining seed money to initiate the program. Prenatal Showers are most successful when community partners possess open lines of communication, an accessible population, an appreciation for the contributions made by students, and a willingness to share responsibility for their supervision. Prenatal Showers offer different advantages from traditional maternal-child clinical experiences because students gain experiences with prenatal clients from diverse backgrounds and engage in community-based nursing. The community benefits because educational needs of prenatal clients are met. Strong community partnerships benefit faculty by making clinical placements more accessible and reducing faculty workload.

  11. Technical efficiency, efficiency change, technical progress and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Technical efficiency, efficiency change, technical progress and productivity growth in the national health systems of continental African countries. ... a view to analysing changes in efficiency and changes in technology. The analysis was based on a five-year panel data (1999-2003) from all the 53 countries of continental ...

  12. Professional Communication and Translation in Convergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnecci, Marusca; Maylath, Bruce; Mousten, Birthe

    2008-01-01

    As translation of technical documents becomes commonplace, and as translation becomes more automated, the roles of translator and technical communicator appear to be converging. This paper examines the trend revealed from recent surveys, and it suggests further research to determine if the trend...... is likely to continue. The  paper also provides recommendations for academic programs interested in adjusting to the trend....

  13. Scientific communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Kobylarek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the problem of models of communication in science. The formal division of communication processes into oral and written does not resolve the problem of attitude. The author defines successful communication as a win-win game, based on the respect and equality of the partners, regardless of their position in the world of science. The core characteristics of the process of scientific communication are indicated , such as openness, fairness, support, and creation. The task of creating the right atmosphere for science communication belongs to moderators, who should not allow privilege and differentiation of position to affect scientific communication processes.

  14. Valuing Professional Development Components for Emerging Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, I.

    2015-12-01

    In 2004 the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) at Oregon State University (OSU) established a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program to engage undergraduate students in hands-on research training in the marine sciences. The program offers students the opportunity to conduct research focused on biological and ecological topics, chemical and physical oceanography, marine geology, and atmospheric science. In partnership with state and federal government agencies, this ten-week summer program has grown to include 20+ students annually. Participants obtain a background in the academic discipline, professional development training, and research experience to make informed decisions about careers and advanced degrees in marine and earth system sciences. Professional development components of the program are designed to support students in their research experience, explore career goals and develop skills necessary to becoming a successful young marine scientist. These components generally include seminars, discussions, workshops, lab tours, and standards of conduct. These componentscontribute to achieving the following professional development objectives for the overall success of new emerging undergraduate researchers: Forming a fellowship of undergraduate students pursuing marine research Stimulating student interest and understanding of marine research science Learning about research opportunities at Oregon State University "Cross-Training" - broadening the hands-on research experience Exploring and learning about marine science careers and pathways Developing science communication and presentation skills Cultivating a sense of belonging in the sciences Exposure to federal and state agencies in marine and estuarine science Academic and career planning Retention of talented students in the marine science Standards of conduct in science Details of this program's components, objectives and best practices will be discussed.

  15. Undergraduate Breakfast, Career Workshop, and Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students can enjoy a hearty breakfast and learn about how to prepare for a wide variety of careers in physics outside of academia. Topics of this interactive workshop will include planning and self-assessment, inventorying transferable skills, finding out more about career opportunities, and successfully applying for jobs. Immediately following the workshop, top presenters from the Undergraduate Research/SPS sessions will be recognized. All presenters in the undergraduate sessions will receive certificates acknowledging their scientific accomplishments.

  16. Promoting Undergraduate Research at Grand Valley State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemersma, P.; Mekik, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    of undergraduate research. Students are more likely to tackle larger research projects if they have gained confidence and experience by successfully completing smaller research projects. Many upper level geology courses require that students complete a research project. Research projects can range from investigating the grain size variability of river sediment in sedimentology to analyzing a Superfund site in hydrogeology. The geology department is also committed to instructing all our majors in how to organize and communicate the results of their research. Students are required to complete a course in geology Information Literacy and a geology seminar course. The information literacy course instructs the students in how to search for articles, introduces common graphing and computing software and demonstrates how to design and produce a research poster. In seminar, the entire geology faculty participate and instruct and mentor the students as they prepare a research paper and professional talk. In conclusion, we have created a supportive undergraduate research atmosphere at GVSU by acquiring funding for their research, by training our students in how to conduct and present their research, and, perhaps most importantly, by celebrating their accomplishments.

  17. Communicating geological hazards: assisting geoscientists in communication skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverman, D. G. E.

    2009-04-01

    Communication is important in all aspects of the geosciences but is more prominent in the area of geological hazards, as the main audience for scientific information often lacks a geoscience background; and because the implications of not communicating results effectively can be very serious. Geoscientists working in the hazards area face particular challenges in communicating the concepts of risk, probability and uncertainty. Barriers to effective communication of geoscience include the complex language used by geoscientists, restriction of dissemination of results to traditional scientific media, identification of the target audience, inability to tailor products to a variety of audiences, and lack of institutional support for communication efforts. Geoscientists who work in the area of natural hazards need training in risk communication, media relations, and communicating to non-technical audiences. Institutions need to support the efforts of geoscientists in communicating their results through providing communications training; ensuring access to communications professionals; rewarding efforts to engage the public; and devoting sufficient staff and budget to the effort of disseminating results. Geoscientists themselves have to make efforts to change attitudes towards social science, and to become involved in decision making at a community level. The International Union of Geological Sciences Commission for "Geoscience for Environmental Management" established a working group to deal with these issues. This group is holding workshops, publishing collections of papers, and is looking at other means to aid geoscientists in addressing these problems.

  18. Improving Scientific Writing in Undergraduate Geosciences Degrees Through Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, E. A.; Collins, G. S.; Craig, L.

    2016-12-01

    In the British educational system, students specialise early. Often geoscience undergraduates have not taken a class that requires extended writing since they were sixteen years old. This can make it difficult for students to develop the written skills necessary for a geoscience degree, which often has assessments in the form of essays and reports. To improve both the writing and editing skills of our undergraduates we have introduced a peer review system, in which seniors review the work of first year students. At Imperial College London we set written coursework in every year of the degree. Communication is taught and assessed in many courses. There are two major modules with substantial written components that bookend the undergraduate degree at Imperial; the freshmen all write an assessed essay, while all seniors take 'Science Communication', a course that aims to prepare them for a range of possible careers. In the 2015-16 academic year we linked these courses by introducing a modified form of peer marking and instruction. Seniors had to complete reviews of draft first year essays for credit in Science Communication. These reviews are completed for the department 'journal' and introduce the first and fourth years to the nature of peer review. Seniors learn how to critically, but kindly, evaluate the work of other students, and are also prepared for potentially submitting their senior theses to journals. Reviews were managed by volunteer seniors, who acted as associate editors. They allocated anonymous reviewers and wrote decision letters, which were sent to the freshmen before their final assessed essay submission. Ultimately the fourth year reviews were formally assessed and graded by members of staff, as were the revised and resubmitted first year essays. Feedback for both courses has improved since the introduction of student reviews of essays. The markers of the freshman essay have also commented on the improvement in the standard of the writing and a

  19. Communication Boot Camp: Discover the Speaker in You!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuraidah Binti Ali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning can take place almost anywhere, and this is especially true for our undergraduates who wish to become public speakers. Besides university course and public speaking workshops on campus grounds, undergraduates are now looking for a different learning environment – communication boot camps!! This study presents a compilation of learners’ experience, fun-filled activities, insightful feedback and memorable boot camp moments as captured in camp photos and feedback surveys. It involves a total of thirty seven undergraduates who enrolled in a Communication Boot Camp at Janda Baik, Pahang. Results show that Communication Boot Camp is a successful strategy to groom public speakers with a positive correlation between camp success and camp objectives, particularly in reducing shyness, motivating participants to become public speakers and discovering their talent and skills. In short, the study adds to the promise of zest and delight in public speaking.

  20. Do communication training programs improve students’ communication skills? - a follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Simmenroth-Nayda, Anne; Weiss, Cora; Fischer, Thomas; Himmel, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Background Although it is taken for granted that history-taking and communication skills are learnable, this learning process should be confirmed by rigorous studies, such as randomized pre- and post-comparisons. The purpose of this paper is to analyse whether a communication course measurably improves the communicative competence of third-year medical students at a German medical school and whether technical or emotional aspects of communication changed differently. Method A sample of 32 ran...

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 54: The technical communications practices of engineering technology students: Results of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project phase 3 student surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; England, Mark; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    Engineering technology programs are characterized by their focus on application and practice, and by their approximately 50/50 mix of theory and laboratory experience. Engineering technology graduates are employed across the technological spectrum and are often found in areas that deal with application, implementation, and production. Yet we know very little about the communications practices and information-use skills of engineering technology students. In this paper, we report selected results of an exploratory study of engineering technology students enrolled in three U.S. institutions of higher education. Data are presented for the following topics: career goals and aspirations; the importance of, receipt of, and helpfulness of communications and information-use skills instruction; collaborative writing; use of libraries; and the use of electronic (computer) networks.

  2. Motivation of first semester undergraduate students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne; Sigvardsen, Kari; Jonsson, Sofia

    Purpose - The importance and development of information systems are increasing, so are the need of business students' general understanding of information systems and the function of these in businesses as well as influence on firms’ competitiveness. The aim of this study was to identify first year...... of first semester undergraduate students. Keywords -Motivation; first year undergraduate students; Management Information Systems; teaching assistants. Paper type - Research paper....... undergraduate students’ motivation and commitment towards education regarding management information system, and how student teaching assistants' attitude and qualities influence these factors. The paper is based on a case study of first year undergraduate students taking the course IT in Business as part...

  3. Strategizing Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulbrandsen, Ib Tunby; Just, Sine Nørholm

    and less on the plan to communicate. Against the backdrop of the comprehensive changes to communication in and about organizations brought about by the rise of digital communication technologies and related contextual developments, Strategizing Communication provides better and more up to date tools......Strategizing Communication offers a unique perspective on the theory and practice of strategic communication. Written for students and practitioners interested in learning about and acquiring tools for dealing with the technological, environmental and managerial challenges, which organizations face...... when communicating in today’s mediascape, this book presents an array of theories, concepts and models through which we can understand and practice communication strategically. The core of the argument is in the title: strategizing – meaning the act of making something strategic. This entails looking...

  4. CSR communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golob, Ursa; Podnar, Klement; Elving, Wim

    2013-01-01

    communications. The most important outlets for CSR communication-related topics are Journal of Business Ethics and Corporate Communications: An International Journal. Originality/value – This paper represents the first attempt to perform a systematic and comprehensive overview of CSR communication papers......Purpose – This paper aims to introduce the special issue on CSR communication attached to the First International CSR Communication Conference held in Amsterdam in October 2011. The aim of the introduction is also to review CSR communication papers published in scholarly journals in order to make...... in scholarly journals. Its value is in making this rather vast and heterogeneous literature more visible and accessible to all CSR communication scholars....

  5. Data communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preckshot, G.G.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining computer communication systems used in nuclear power plants. The recommendations cover three areas important to these communications systems: system design, communication protocols, and communication media. The first area, system design, considers three aspects of system design--questions about architecture, specific risky design elements or omissions to look for in designs being reviewed, and recommendations for multiplexed data communication systems used in safety systems. The second area reviews pertinent aspects of communication protocol design and makes recommendations for newly designed protocols or the selection of existing protocols for safety system, information display, and non-safety control system use. The third area covers communication media selection, which differs significantly from traditional wire and cable. The recommendations for communication media extend or enhance the concerns of published IEEE standards about three subjects: data rate, imported hazards and maintainability

  6. Technology communication, from design to use: analysis of conflicts and possible mediation between technical approaches of design and situated practices of use within a well-defined institutional context

    OpenAIRE

    Salvioni, Carola; Colombetti, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a trigger event - the poor use of a specific technology -, aim of the research is to analyze root cause/s of such a problem, considering not only evident difficulties as regarding usability issues, but also investigating deeper reasons including organizational, cultural and social factors. In particular, the analysis dwells on working practices and communicative interactions that have affected and shaped the life-cycle of the technology (from design to use) within a well-defi...

  7. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  8. Technical training - places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  9. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Marie Lahchimi, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  10. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  11. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tél : 74924)  

  12. Technical Assistance Plan (TAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Technical Assistance Plan (TAP) enables community groups to retain the services of an independent technical advisor and to provide resources for a community group to help inform other community members about site decisions.

  13. Communication (action with communicative content).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, M T

    2010-01-01

    The term Communication generally designate the transmission of a message of concepts, feelings or needs from a speaker to a receiver by means of verbal or no verbal language. The pragmatic approach to human communication has put in evidence a further implication of this concept: every behaviour therefore has a value even when it is not intentional. Recently, a more dynamic concept of communication has been elaborated where communication means communicative action. This interpretation is the starting point for the theory of the "communicative acting" and subsequently of the so called discourse ethic elaborated by J. Habermas.

  14. Undergraduate Students’ Difficulties in Reading and Constructing Phylogenetic Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa'adah, S.; Tapilouw, F. S.; Hidayat, T.

    2017-02-01

    Representation is a very important communication tool to communicate scientific concepts. Biologists produce phylogenetic representation to express their understanding of evolutionary relationships. The phylogenetic tree is visual representation depict a hypothesis about the evolutionary relationship and widely used in the biological sciences. Phylogenetic tree currently growing for many disciplines in biology. Consequently, learning about phylogenetic tree become an important part of biological education and an interesting area for biology education research. However, research showed many students often struggle with interpreting the information that phylogenetic trees depict. The purpose of this study was to investigate undergraduate students’ difficulties in reading and constructing a phylogenetic tree. The method of this study is a descriptive method. In this study, we used questionnaires, interviews, multiple choice and open-ended questions, reflective journals and observations. The findings showed students experiencing difficulties, especially in constructing a phylogenetic tree. The students’ responds indicated that main reasons for difficulties in constructing a phylogenetic tree are difficult to placing taxa in a phylogenetic tree based on the data provided so that the phylogenetic tree constructed does not describe the actual evolutionary relationship (incorrect relatedness). Students also have difficulties in determining the sister group, character synapomorphy, autapomorphy from data provided (character table) and comparing among phylogenetic tree. According to them building the phylogenetic tree is more difficult than reading the phylogenetic tree. Finding this studies provide information to undergraduate instructor and students to overcome learning difficulties of reading and constructing phylogenetic tree.

  15. Virtual Reality, Combat, and Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, Emily Austin; Bodary, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Presents a brief examination of the evolution of virtual reality devices that illustrates how the development of this new medium is influenced by emerging technologies and by marketing pressures. Notes that understanding these influences may help prepare for the role of technical communicators in building virtual reality applications for education…

  16. NASA's Commercial Communication Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with "NASA's Commercial Communication Technology Program" are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Coordination/Integration of government program; 2) Achievement of seamless interoperable satellite and terrestrial networks; 3) Establishment of program to enhance Satcom professional and technical workforce; 4) Precompetitive technology development; and 5) Effective utilization of spectrum and orbit assets.

  17. Cultural Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  18. Internal Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Rathouský, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    The diploma thesis focuses on characteristics of internal communication, its implementation in various forms in different companies and analysis of the internal communication in one selected company. After the analysis of its current state in the multinational company, the thesis will recommend improvements to the areas of internal communication and human resources, with the main focus of global implementation of these recommendations.

  19. 78 FR 1823 - Cable Television Technical and Operational Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 79 [MB Docket No. 12-217; DA 12-2081] Cable Television Technical and Operational Requirements AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule; extension of reply comment period. SUMMARY: In this document, the Commission extends the deadline...

  20. Generic communications index. Listings of communications 1971-1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemeyer, D.; Towle, H.

    1991-05-01

    As part of its program to feed back information on operating experience to industry, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issues generic communications called bulletins (about 5/yr), circulars (now discontinued), generic letters (about 20/yr), and information notices (about 100/yr). The report presents an updated Generic Communications Index (GCI; previously published in NUREG/CR-4690, Vol. 1, December 1987) of all such communications from 1971, when such documentation started, to 1989. The GCI consists of records, one for each communication, containing fields for identification number, title, NRC technical contact, general system or topic, specific component or topic, cause or defect, potential effect, remarks, and vendors involved. To facilitate information retrieval, the report also contains topical listings of generic communications numbers. (author)