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Sample records for under-recognized familial syndrome

  1. Wernicke-Korsakoff-syndrome: under-recognized and under-treated.

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    Isenberg-Grzeda, Elie; Kutner, Haley E; Nicolson, Stephen E

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a well described syndrome of neurological and cognitive problems that comprises both Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) and Korsakoff syndrome (KS). WE is an acute neuropsychiatric disorder caused by thiamine deficiency. KS is a chronic consequence of thiamine deficiency with prominent impairment in memory formation. The authors review the literature on the pathophysiology, presentation, and treatment of WKS, focusing on the acute identification and treatment of WE. Most cases of WE are missed by clinicians, likely because patients do not present with the classic signs associated with the condition. Attaining high serum levels of thiamine during treatment may be important to restore cognitive function as quickly as possible, though the exact dosing and route needed for effective treatment is unknown. Data indicates that the administration of intravenous (IV) thiamine has little risk. In order to prevent this potentially devastating disease, physicians should have a high index of suspicion for WKS and dose thiamine accordingly. Copyright © 2012 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection: An Under-recognized Cause of Acute Coronary Syndromes.

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    Al Naabi, Hanan; Al Lawati, Hatim

    2017-07-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare condition that is often underdiagnosed given limitations of conventional cineangiography. In addition to the diagnostic challenge, the condition poses a major therapeutic dilemma given paucity of literature to guide management. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman, who presented with acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography at the time of the index hospitalization revealed type 2 SCAD. She was managed conservatively. Repeat coronary angiography three months later showed complete resolution of the previously noted dissection. Because of the high association between SCAD and fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD), a cross-sectional imaging was performed in this case, which ruled out underlying FMD. The patient has been followed longitudinally since her index event and has had no reported recurrences.

  3. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection: An Under-recognized Cause of Acute Coronary Syndromes

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    Hanan Al Naabi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD is a rare condition that is often underdiagnosed given limitations of conventional cineangiography. In addition to the diagnostic challenge, the condition poses a major therapeutic dilemma given paucity of literature to guide management. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman, who presented with acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography at the time of the index hospitalization revealed type 2 SCAD. She was managed conservatively. Repeat coronary angiography three months later showed complete resolution of the previously noted dissection. Because of the high association between SCAD and fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD, a cross-sectional imaging was performed in this case, which ruled out underlying FMD. The patient has been followed longitudinally since her index event and has had no reported recurrences.

  4. Prader-Willi Syndrome: an under-recognized cause of hypotonia?

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    Marlene Rodrigues

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The “floppy infant” is a well-recognized entity characterized by general­ized hypotonia presenting at birth or in early life. Hypotonia represents a diagnostic challenge because it may be the presentation sign of numerous diseases, as central or peripheral nervous system abnormalities, myopathies, genetic disorders, endocrinopathies, metabolic diseases and acute/chronic illness. Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that results from an abnormality in chromosome 15. Diagnosis is often delayed because clinical findings are relatively nonspecific and the dysmorphism is often subtle. We describe three term male newborns admitted in the first day of life for hypotonia and feeding difficulties. Pregnancy and familiar history were unremarkable. Clinical examination revealed marked global hypotonia, few active movements, weak cry, poor suck reflex, micrognathia, cryptorchidism, facial dysmorphic features: almond-shaped eyes with short palpebral fissures, narrow bifrontal diameter and short neck. Laboratory evaluations were normal. Brain ultrasound and magnetic resonance had no alterations. Cardiac and metabolic evaluations were irrelevant. PWS was suspected and genetic evaluation was performed. The methylation analysis specific for PWS confirmed the diagnosis. In the three cases it was observed development milestones delay, with progressive improvement after multidisciplinary approach. At last follow-up visit, all of them walk alone, explore the surrounding environment, understand simple language and say some words.These reports reinforce the idea that PWS should be considered in the presence of newborn hypotonia, and feeding difficulties, even in absence of typical facial features. Detecting PWS at neonatal age is important because it allows early intervention and better management of such infants.

  5. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: An Under-recognized Cause of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Adolescents Admitted to a Children's Hospital.

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    Maslyanskaya, Sofya; Talib, Hina J; Northridge, Jennifer L; Jacobs, Amanda M; Coble, Chanelle; Coupey, Susan M

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate whether ovulatory dysfunction due to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common underlying etiology of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) in adolescents who require hospitalization and to explore etiology, treatment, and complications of AUB with severe anemia in adolescents. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We identified female patients aged 8-20 years admitted to a children's hospital for treatment of AUB from January 2000 to December 2014. Our hospital protocol advises hormonal testing for PCOS and other disorders before treatment for AUB. We reviewed medical records and recorded laboratory evaluations, treatments, and final underlying diagnoses as well as recurrences of AUB and readmissions in the subsequent year. Of the 125 subjects, the mean age was 16.5 ± 2.9 years; mean hemoglobin level was 7.0 ± 1.8 g/dL; 54% were overweight/obese; and 41% sexually active. PCOS accounted for 33% of admissions; hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis immaturity 31%; endometritis 13%; bleeding disorders 10%. Girls with PCOS were more likely to be overweight/obese (74% vs 46%; P < .01) and girls with hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis immaturity had lower hemoglobin levels (6.4 g/dL vs 7.4 g/dL; P < .05), than girls with all other etiologies of AUB. Treating physicians failed to diagnose endometritis as the etiology for AUB in 4 of 8 girls with positive tests for sexually transmitted infection and no other etiology. PCOS was the most common underlying etiology in adolescents hospitalized with AUB. Screening for hyperandrogenemia is important for early diagnosis of PCOS to allow ongoing management and prevention of comorbidities. Endometritis was frequently underestimated as an etiology for AUB. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Familial Wolfram syndrome].

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    Bessahraoui, M; Paquis, V; Rouzier, C; Bouziane-Nedjadi, K; Naceur, M; Niar, S; Zennaki, A; Boudraa, G; Touhami, M

    2014-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive progressive neurodegenerative disorder, and it is mainly characterized by the presence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Other symptoms such as diabetes insipidus, deafness, and psychiatric disorders are less frequent. The WFS1 gene, responsible for the disease and encoding for a transmembrane protein called wolframin, was localized in 1998 on chromosome 4p16. In this report, we present a familial observation of Wolfram syndrome (parents and three children). The propositus was a 6-year-old girl with diabetes mellitus and progressive visual loss. Her family history showed a brother with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness since childhood and a sister with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and bilateral hydronephrosis. Thus, association of these familial and personal symptoms is highly suggestive of Wolfram syndrome. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis (biology), which showed the presence of WFS1 homozygous mutations c.1113G>A (p.Trp371*) in the three siblings and a heterozygote mutation in the parents. Our observation has demonstrated that pediatricians should be aware of the possibility of Wolfram syndrome when diagnosing optic atrophy in diabetic children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Stress in Families of Young Children with Down Syndrome, Williams Syndrome, and Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

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    Fidler, Deborah J.; Hodapp, Robert M.; Dykens, Elizabeth M.

    2000-01-01

    Compared stress levels in families of children with Down syndrome (DS), Williams syndrome (WS), or Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). Found that DS families experienced less Pessimism than others and less Parent and Family Problems than SMS families. Strongest predictors of Parent and Family Problems were maladaptive behavior in SMS, younger age in DS,…

  8. Pediatric rheumatology: An under-recognized subspecialty in India

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    Akhila Kavirayani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatrics in India at the levels of both undergraduate and postgraduate training is often viewed upon as an acute disease specialty with little emphasis on chronic medical musculoskeletal diseases. Pediatric rheumatology is an under-recognized subspecialty of pediatrics which deals specifically with childhood arthritis, noninflammatory joint pains, connective tissue diseases, autoimmune diseases, vasculitis, and other rare inflammatory disorders. This article aims to give a bird's eye view of the repertoire of commonly encountered problems seen by a pediatric rheumatologist, via a classical case vignette for each topic followed by discussion. There is also mention of some rare diseases managed within pediatric rheumatology to give a flavor of the spectrum of diseases encountered. This is to raise awareness of the importance of pediatric rheumatology as a subspecialty within India and to prompt readers to seek specialist advice when encountering challenging cases. Pediatric rheumatologists network and work collaboratively with many other specialties such as ophthalmology, dermatology, neurology, orthopedics, nephrology, infectious diseases, immunology, and gastroenterology for combined care of diverse conditions. There is an unmet need in India to develop a training program for pediatric rheumatology so that shared care pathways with sensitized pediatricians and other specialists can be developed nationwide, to serve these children better to achieve optimal outcomes.

  9. Waardenburg syndrome and myelomeningocele in a family.

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    Chatkupt, S; Chatkupt, S; Johnson, W G

    1993-01-01

    We report the first family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and myelomeningocele in which more than one subject was affected with both disorders. The possible association is discussed. Prenatal screening for myelomeningocele is suggested for a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

  10. Waardenburg syndrome and myelomeningocele in a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatkupt, S; Chatkupt, S; Johnson, W G

    1993-01-01

    We report the first family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and myelomeningocele in which more than one subject was affected with both disorders. The possible association is discussed. Prenatal screening for myelomeningocele is suggested for a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Images PMID:8423616

  11. Modeling Family Adaptation to Fragile X Syndrome

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    Raspa, Melissa; Bailey, Donald, Jr.; Bann, Carla; Bishop, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Using data from a survey of 1,099 families who have a child with Fragile X syndrome, we examined adaptation across 7 dimensions of family life: parenting knowledge, social support, social life, financial impact, well-being, quality of life, and overall impact. Results illustrate that although families report a high quality of life, they struggle…

  12. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

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    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2016-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

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    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have......-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2...... of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R) estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171), or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years...

  14. Family Demands, Social Support and Family Functioning in Taiwanese Families Rearing Children with Down Syndrome

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    Hsiao, C-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) affects not only children but also their families. Much remains to be learned about factors that influence how families of children with DS function, especially families in non-Western populations. The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to examine how family demographics, family demands and…

  15. Familial prune belly syndrome in a Nigerian family.

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    Ibadin, Michael Okoeguale; Ademola, Ade Adeyekun; Ofovwe, Gabriel Egberue

    2012-03-01

    A case of Prune Belly Syndrome in an infant, the second in a middle class family with both parents in their late thirties, is presented because of its rarity. Constraints in the management are discussed and relevant literature reviewed. This is intended to awaken interest and sharpen indices of suspicion that would facilitate early diagnosis, enhance management, and mitigate prejudices.

  16. Intra-abdominal hypertension in fulminant Clostridium difficile infection--an under-recognized treatable complication.

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    Oud, Lavi

    2010-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhea in adults, with recent reports of increased severity and case fatality. Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are increasingly recognized and treatable complications of severe illness in medical patients, and are independent predictors of mortality. Patients with severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are at increased risk for IAH and ACS. However, ACS has been only rarely described in this population. We report a case of a 61 year-old morbidly obese, chronically ill, ventilator dependent patient, who developed fulminant CDI, including progressive colonic distension, acute renal failure and intra-abdominal fluid sequestration. Her clinical course worsened abruptly, with new shock, worsening hypoxic respiratory failure, increased peak airway pressures and reduced tidal volumes. Intra-abdominal pressure was 30 mm Hg. The patient was not considered a surgical candidate, was refractory to escalating non-surgical support, and died following withdrawal of life support. Although patients with fulminant CDI share many risk factors for IAH and ACS, these conditions were rarely reported in this population and are likely under recognized, as was the case with the present patient. Increased vigilance for IAH is needed in this at-risk population.

  17. Fragile X Syndrome in a Colombian Family

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    Saldarriaga Gil, Wilmar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was performed on a family from Cali, Colombia in which nine patients were evaluated, three of which presented with intellectual disability with no previous etiological diagnosis. The proband was diagnosed with Fragile X syndrome by DNA molecular testing and, cascade testing, performed on all available family members, identifying two additional individuals with the full mutation and four carriers of a premutation allele. With this report we seek to contribute to Colombian epidemiology of the syndrome and emphasize the importance of diagnosis to provide a comprehensive and specific treatment to those affected. Further we seek to identify premutation carriers in their families or women with a full mutation without the classic phenotype for genetic counseling and education about potential associated pathologies.

  18. Familial prune belly syndrome in a Nigerian family

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    Michael Okoeguale Ibadin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Prune Belly Syndrome in an infant, the second in a middle class family with both parents in their late thirties, is presented because of its rarity. Constraints in the manage-ment are discussed and relevant literature reviewed. This is intended to awaken interest and sharpen indices of suspicion that would facilitate early diagnosis, enhance management, and mitigate prejudices.

  19. Familial pseudotail, scoliosis and synpolydactyly syndrome.

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    Alfawareh, Mohammad; Orief, Tamer; Faqeih, Eissa

    2016-05-01

    This case series describes a novel condition characterized by familial pseudotail associated with scoliosis, and synpolydactyly that has not been previously reported in literature. The authors present three siblings and one cousin from the same family living in the northern region of the Arabian Peninsula. All cases presented with pseudotail, scoliosis, and complex synpolydactyly. The authors demonstrated complete clinical and radiological descriptions in addition the detailed performed surgeries. The histopathological result of the resected pseudotail specimens revealed bony lesion covered with thick fibrous tissue and evidence of mature adipocytes within trabecular spaces. The described cases represent a novel condition that has not been previously reported in the literature. Familial pseudotail scoliosis synpolydactyly syndrome is a newly recognized form of familial pseudotail.

  20. Familial dysautonomy (Riley-Day syndrome

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    Edward R. Tonholo Silva

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Familial dysautonomia, also known as Riley-Day syndrome, is a disorder of autonomic nervous system with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Reduction and/or loss of unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers is found, as reduction of dopamine beta-hydroxylase in blood. The diagnosis is based on clinical features: diminished lacrimation, insensitivity to pain, poor temperature control, abolished deep tendon reflexes, postural hypotension, vomiting attacks, poor motor coordenation, and mental retardation. The treatment is symptomatic and many children die during the first years of life, usually as a result of repeated aspiration pneumonia. We report the case of a 1 year-old child with familial dysautonomia.

  1. Senior-Loken syndrome in an Iranian family

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    Roozbeh Jamshid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Senior-Loken syndrome is a rare entity that combines familial juvenile nephro-nophthisis with retinal dystrophy. Herein, we report Senior-Loken syndrome in six members of an Iranian family with progressive blindness and renal failure since childhood. Although, this syn-drome was reported from other parts of the world, report of six members of one family with this syndrome is rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report from Iran.

  2. a family doctor look for metabolic syndrome?

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    Izabela Maria Banaś

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The asymptomatic course, early genesis, multifactorial onset, and the lack of a single definition of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents make it difficult to assess its prevalence. Metabolic syndrome developed in childhood increases cardiovascular risk in adulthood. Objectives. The evaluation of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome based on age, sex, weight and abdominal obesity in a population of children and adolescents in a family doctor’s practice. Material and methods. The study group comprised 325 children and adolescents (177♀, 148♂ aged 7, 13 and 16 years. Anthropometric measurements (height, weight, waist circumference were made, along with the determination of blood pressure, fasting glucose and lipid levels. Overweight states and obesity were assessed according to the IOTF criteria. Abdominal obesity and hypertension were evaluated using growth charts appropriate for the age, gender and height of the children of Lodz. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed based on the NCEP/AT P III criteria. Results . Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 6.5% of the subjects. In children aged 13 and 16 years – 7.6% (p > 0.05 vs. 7 years, aged 7 years – 3.9% (p > 0.05 vs. 13, 16 years, boys (8.8%; p > 0.05, girls (4.5%; p > 0.05. Among children with excessive body weight, metabolic syndrome was observed in every fourth child (25.4%, more often in those with obesity (44.1% than with abdominal obesity (32% and those who were overweight (19.2%, respectively (p < 0.001 vs. metabolic syndrome. The number of components of metabolic syndrome elevated with increasing body weight (p < 0.001. Abdominal obesity was observed in 17.5% of the subjects. Children with abdominal obesity had higher levels of triglycerides (p < 0.05 and lower HDL cholesterol (p 110 mg/dl in 85 (26.1% and excessive body weight in 71 subjects (21.8%. Conclusions . The presence of metabolic syndrome correlated with overweight state, obesity and abdominal obesity

  3. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families.

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    Jenny von Salomé

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, has been suggested in LS. Anticipation is a well-known phenomenon in e.g neurodegenerative diseases and several reports have studied anticipation in heritable cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anticipation can be shown in a nationwide cohort of Swedish LS families referred to the regional departments of clinical genetics in Lund, Stockholm, Linköping, Uppsala and Umeå between the years 1990-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2 families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171, or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years/generation for NREM and hazard ratio of 1.33 for COX-R and PMS2 (7.3 years/generation and hazard ratio of 1.86. The estimated anticipation effects for MLH1

  4. Familial Brugada syndrome uncovered by hyperkalaemic diabetic ketoacidosis

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    Postema, Pieter G.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; DeVries, J. Hans; Tan, Hanno L.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of diabetic ketoacidosis with concomitant hyperkalaemia that uncovered a typical Brugada syndrome electrocardiogram (ECG). Further provocation testing in the patient and his son confirmed familial Brugada syndrome. Diabetic ketoacidosis with hyperkalaemia may uncover an

  5. A Korean family with the Muenke syndrome.

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    Yu, Jae Eun; Park, Dong Ha; Yoon, Soo Han

    2010-07-01

    The Muenke syndrome (MS) is characterized by unicoronal or bicoronal craniosynostosis, midfacial hypoplasia, ocular hypertelorism, and a variety of minor abnormalities associated with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. The birth prevalence is approximately one in 10,000 live births, accounting for 8-10% of patients with coronal synostosis. Although MS is a relatively common diagnosis in patients with craniosynostosis syndromes, with autosomal dominant inheritance, there has been no report of MS, in an affected Korean family with typical cephalo-facial morphology that has been confirmed by molecular studies. Here, we report a familial case of MS in a female patient with a Pro250Arg mutation in exon 7 (IgII-IGIII linker domain) of the FGFR3 gene. This patient had mild midfacial hypoplasia, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, a beak shaped nose, plagio-brachycephaly, and mild neurodevelopmental delay. The same mutation was confirmed in the patient's mother, two of the mother's sisters and the maternal grandfather. The severity of the cephalo-facial anomalies was variable among these family members.

  6. Pisotriquetral joint disorders: an under-recognized cause of ulnar side wrist pain

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    Moraux, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Imagerie Medicale Jacquemars Gielee, Lille (France); Lefebvre, G.; Pansini, V.; Aucourt, J.; Vandenbussche, L.; Cotten, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Demondion, X. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Pole Recherche Faculte de Medecine de Lille, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Lille (France)

    2014-06-15

    Pisotriquetral joint disorders are often under-recognized in routine clinical practice. They nevertheless represent a significant cause of ulnar side wrist pain. The aim of this article is to present the main disorders of this joint and discuss the different imaging modalities that can be useful for its assessment. (orig.)

  7. Superior Canal Dehiscence Syndrome Affecting 3 Families.

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    Heidenreich, Katherine D; Kileny, Paul R; Ahmed, Sameer; El-Kashlan, Hussam K; Melendez, Tori L; Basura, Gregory J; Lesperance, Marci M

    2017-07-01

    Superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) is an increasingly recognized cause of hearing loss and vestibular symptoms, but the etiology of this condition remains unknown. To describe 7 cases of SCDS across 3 families. This retrospective case series included 7 patients from 3 different families treated at a neurotology clinic at a tertiary academic medical center from 2010 to 2014. Patients were referred by other otolaryngologists or were self-referred. Each patient demonstrated unilateral or bilateral SCDS or near dehiscence. Clinical evaluation involved body mass index calculation, audiometry, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing, electrocochleography, and multiplanar computed tomographic (CT) scan of the temporal bones. Zygosity testing was performed on twin siblings. The diagnosis of SCDS was made if bone was absent over the superior semicircular canal on 2 consecutive CT images, in addition to 1 physiologic sign consistent with labyrinthine dehiscence. Near dehiscence was defined as absent bone on only 1 CT image but with symptoms and at least 1 physiologic sign of labyrinthine dehiscence. A total of 7 patients (5 female and 2 male; age range, 8-49 years) from 3 families underwent evaluation. Family A consisted of 3 adult first-degree relatives, of whom 2 were diagnosed with SCDS and 1 with near dehiscence. Family B included a mother and her child, both of whom were diagnosed with unilateral SCDS. Family C consisted of adult monozygotic twins, each of whom was diagnosed with unilateral SCDS. For all cases, dehiscence was located at the arcuate eminence. Obesity alone did not explain the occurrence of SCDS because 5 of the 7 cases had a body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) less than 30.0. Superior canal dehiscence syndrome is a rare, often unrecognized condition. This report of 3 multiplex families with SCDS provides evidence in support of a potential genetic contribution to the etiology

  8. Linkage analysis in familial Angelman syndrome

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    Wagstaff, J. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Shugart, Y.Y. (Columbia Univ., New York (United States)); Lalande, M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Familial Angelman syndrome (AS) can result from mutations in chromosome 15q11q13 that, when transmitted from father to child, result in no phenotypic abnormality but, when transmitted from mother to child, cause AS. These mutations therefore behave neither as dominant nor as recessive mutations but, rather, show an imprinted mode of inheritance. The authors have analyzed two sibling pairs with AS and a larger family with four AS offspring of three sisters with several recently described microsatellite polymorphisms in the AS region. AS siblings inherited the same maternal alleles at the GABRB3 and GABRA5 loci, and the unaffected siblings of AS individuals inherited the other maternal alleles at these loci. In one of the AS sibling pairs, analysis of a recombination event indicates that the mutation responsible for AS is distal to locus D15S63. This result is consistent with a previously described imprinted submicroscopic deletion causing AS, a deletion that includes loci D15S10, D15S113, and GABRB3, all distal to D15S63. The analysis of the larger AS family provides the first clear demonstration of a new mutation in nondeletion AS. Analysis of linkage of AS to GABRB3 in these three families, on the assumption of imprinted inheritance (i.e., penetrance of an AS mutation is 1 if transmitted maternally and is 0 if transmitted paternally), indicates a maximum lod score of 3.52 at 6 = 0. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Prader Willi Syndrome: A Family's Experience

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    Emma Walker

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic research has offered, and continues to offer, a medical explanation of chromosomal disorders such as Down Syndrome and Asberger Syndrome and more recently the rare chromosomal disorder Prader Willi Syndrome. This research gives a pathogenic explanation of disorders which includes historical background, genetic defects and clinical features. This study set out to offer an insight into the effects of PWS on the child and his/her family. It also aimed to highlight what support systems are in place in the Co. Louth area of Ireland for individuals with PWS. Unfortunately, PWS is not curable at this time. Between 1995-2003 there were 39 diagnosed cases of PWS in Ireland, an average of 4.3 per year. On average there are four infants or children diagnosed in Ireland with PWS per year (Turner, 2004, National Centre for Medical Genetics. This study is an exploratory and descriptive case study. This case study drew on multiple sources of evidence to construct a valid and unique illustration of PWS. The primary source of data was derived from in-depth interviews with the parents of a 3-year-old girl who has PWS. She was diagnosed during the third week of life. The evidence of this study suggests that non-specialist medical staff are not generally familiar with PWS. Training in relation to diagnostic criteria for chromosomal disorders would be extremely beneficial to them and to familes that are affected by the syndrome. This study highlights the need for parents to be their own child's advocate in obtaining desired support services for their area. Support services in the North East region have been greatly increased due to the setting up of the North Eastern Health Board (now known as Health Service Executive, North East Region Early Intervention Services (EIS in 2000.

  10. Childhood cancers in families with and without Lynch syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, John A.; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Casey, Graham; Durno, Carol A.; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Win, Aung Ko

    2015-01-01

    Background Inheritance of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes or the EPCAM gene is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and other adult malignancies (Lynch syndrome). The risk of childhood cancers in Lynch syndrome families, however, is not well studied. Materials and Methods Using data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we compared the proportion of childhood cancers (diagnosed before 18 years of age) in the first-, second-, and third-degree relatives of 781 probands with a pathogenic mutation in one of the MMR genes; MLH1 (n = 275), MSH2 (n = 342), MSH6 (n = 99), or PMS2 (n = 55) or in EPCAM (n = 10) (Lynch syndrome families), with that of 5073 probands with MMR-proficient colorectal cancer (non-Lynch syndrome families). Results There was no evidence of a difference in the proportion of relatives with a childhood cancer between Lynch syndrome families (41/17,230; 0.24 %) and non-Lynch syndrome families (179/94,302; 0.19 %; p = 0.19). Incidence rate of all childhood cancers was estimated to be 147 (95 % CI 107–206) per million population per year in Lynch syndrome families and 115 (95 % CI 99.1–134) per million population per year in non-Lynch syndrome families. There was no evidence for a substantial increase in the risk of all childhood cancers, hematologic cancers, brain and central nervous system cancers, Lynch syndrome-associated cancers, or other cancers in Lynch syndrome families compared with non-Lynch syndrome families. Larger studies, however, are required to more accurately define the risk of specific individual childhood cancers in Lynch syndrome families. Conclusion The risk of childhood cancers does not appear to be significantly increased in Lynch syndrome families compared with non-Lynch syndrome families. Larger studies, however, are required to more accurately define the risk of specific individual childhood cancers in Lynch syndrome families. PMID:25963852

  11. Family Therapy of the Moderate Type of Parental Alienation Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    Modification of traditional family therapy approaches are warranted if there is to be any chance of success in the treatment of Parental Alienation Syndrome families. Especially important is the full support of the court. Describes the special family therapeutic techniques warranted in the treatment of families in which the Parental Alienation…

  12. Coping with a child with Dravet syndrome: insights from families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Kathleen; Camfield, Carol S; Camfield, Peter R

    2008-06-01

    Dravet syndrome is a truly catastrophic childhood-onset epilepsy. Families are faced with repeated episodes of status epilepticus, intractable seizures, mental handicap, behavior disorders, and a life of dependency; understandably, coping with Dravet syndrome is very difficult. Twenty-four families with a child with Dravet syndrome were interviewed and identified some practical suggestions to improve their daily life. These included inserting an indwelling venous access device, creating a portable microenvironment, writing an emergency department protocol, establishing emergency routines for the family, assigning a parent on call to lessen the effect on siblings, creating personal time to decrease parental stress, finding respite care, and contacting an Internet support group. Unresolved and common issues included transition to adult care, the utility of early diagnosis, and social isolation. These solutions and issues may be helpful to many families with a child with Dravet syndrome and possibly other severe childhood-onset epilepsies.

  13. Alport syndrome in a Kazakh family: a case study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alport syndrome is a type-IV collagen inherited disorder caused by mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 (autosomal recessive) or COL4A5 (X-linked). In our study, we describe the case of Alport syndrome in a Kazakh family. The 20- year-old male, born in 1993, was diagnosed with chronic nephritic syndrome when he was ...

  14. Investigation of two families with nail-patella syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Alzen, G.; Ittel, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    The radiological and clinical features of two families with a nail-patella syndrome are described. Our findings emphasize the varying expressivity of the syndrome, which has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and a penetrance of 100%. It is important for the radiologist to be aware of the syndrome's stigmata so that renal failure can be detected as early as possible after the diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia. (orig.) [de

  15. Alport syndrome in a Kazakh family: a case study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2National Research Center for Maternal and Child Health, 32 Turan Prospect, Astana 010000, Kazakhstan ... In our study, we describe the case of Alport syndrome in a Kazakh family. The 20-year-old male, born in 1993, was diagnosed with chronic nephritic syndrome, when he was 16 years old. ... Journal of Genetics, Vol.

  16. Divorce in families of children with Down Syndrome or Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Renne Gerber Lederman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the impact in the stability and management of the marriage of parents of a child with Down or Rett Syndrome. Morbidity of the syndromes and the marital status of the couples before and after the birth of the affected children were considered variables. The divorce rate in families with Down syndrome was 10%, similar to the Brazilian rate population. In Rett Syndrome, the divorce rate was significantly higher, 23.5%. The higher morbidity of Rett Syndrome, and the moment of diagnosis could be relevant factors for the increased divorce rate related to this syndrome.

  17. Divorce in families of children with Down Syndrome or Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Vivian Renne Gerber; Alves, Bianca dos Santos; Negrão, Juliana; Maria, Juliana Negrão; Schwartzman, José Salomão; D'Antino, Maria Eloisa Famá; Brunoni, Decio

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the impact in the stability and management of the marriage of parents of a child with Down or Rett Syndrome. Morbidity of the syndromes and the marital status of the couples before and after the birth of the affected children were considered variables. The divorce rate in families with Down syndrome was 10%, similar to the Brazilian rate population. In Rett Syndrome, the divorce rate was significantly higher, 23.5%. The higher morbidity of Rett Syndrome, and the moment of diagnosis could be relevant factors for the increased divorce rate related to this syndrome.

  18. Family Burden and Problems in Patients with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahel Hemmati

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Down syndrome (Trisomy of 21 is the most common chromosomal abnormality which associated with different somatic, psychotic, familial and social problems. This research was done under supervision of the child developmental disturbances group and with support of deputy of research in the University of Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences with the goal of surveying problems and familial burden of patient with down syndrome. Materials & Methods: 61 families of the patients registered by the Iranian Society of Down Syndrome were participated (31 families with boys and 30 families with girls patients, patient with the range age of 3-17 years. Expert panel structured questionnaire in 7 domain (each 3 to 6 question were used. The dates banked and analysis with student spss-pc. Results: This survey found the most problems in 7 Domains including somatic, psychotic, behavioral, social, learning, supportive and communication problems. Mean priority scores in these domains based on family opinion was near and was 19.72 (SD=2.41. The datas showed most of families need education and knowing about supporting centers. %97 of patients were well accepted by their families, 96% of Families worried about their children after their death. In spite of the disabilities in these patients the families accounted their children as an able person. Conclusion: The patients with Down Syndrome are accepted in their families and also adjusted with other family members, so the families Support them and expend all the expenditures. The families attitude about these patients are good and not shameful of their. Then need of education, information, social planning about their vocation, and future is a necessitate based on families opinion.

  19. Family satisfaction following spinal fusion in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Jenny; Torode, Ian; Ellaway, Carolyn; Jacoby, Peter; Bunting, Catherine; Wong, Kingsley; Christodoulou, John; Leonard, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated family satisfaction following spinal fusion in girls with Rett syndrome. Families participating in the population-based and longitudinal Australian Rett Syndrome Database whose daughter had undergone spinal fusion provided data on satisfaction overall, care processes and expected changes in health and function. Content analysis of responses to open-ended questions was conducted. Families reported high levels of overall satisfaction and consistently high ratings in relation to surgical and ICU care. Outstanding clinical care and the development of strong partnerships with clinical staff were much appreciated by families, whereas poor information exchange and inconsistent care caused concerns. Family satisfaction is an important outcome within a patient-centred quality of care framework. Our findings suggest strategies to inform the delivery of care in relation to spinal fusion for Rett syndrome and could also inform the hospital care of other children with disability and a high risk of hospitalization.

  20. EEC syndrome sans clefting: Variable clinical presentations in a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakkar Sejal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft palate/lip syndrome (EEC is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome with varied presentation and is actually a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome leading to intra- and interfamilial differences in severity because of its variable expression and reduced penetrance. The cardinal features include ectrodactyly, sparse, wiry, hypopigmented hair, peg-shaped teeth with defective enamel and cleft palate/lip. A family comprising father, daughter and son presented to us with split hand-split foot deformity (ectrodactyly, epiphora, hair changes and deafness with variable involvement in each family member.

  1. PRIMARY SJOGREN'S SYNDROME ANDOFDISEASE BASEDOV (FAMILY CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Panchovska

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bstract. Case report of two sislers with primary Sjttgren’s syndrome combined with Basedow’s disease is described. Immunological studies revealed HLA-DR3 antigen which reliably more often is found in pts with above autoimmunic diseases. Some clinical peculiarities of the process of SjOgrcn’s syndrome stipulated by genetic and exogenous factors.

  2. Familial clustering of a rare syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Jayashree; Ganesh, Hari; Dwivedi, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft palate syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with variable expressivity and reduced penetration. The cardinal features are cleft palate/lip, lobster hand deformity, sparse hypopigmented hair, dry scaly skin, and lacrimal and urogenital anomalies. A neonate presented to us with typical features, his mother and other two siblings were also affected. PMID:21814340

  3. Families of 30-35-Year Olds with Down's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Background: The families of a population sample of people with Down's syndrome (DS), and of their non-disabled controls, have been followed since early childhood, and the families have now been seen again as their sons and daughters reached age 30 and 35 years. Methods: A semi-structured interview schedule was used, including items from the…

  4. Nonorganic Failure-to-Thrive Syndrome and the Family System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderette, Paula; deGraffenried, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that nonorganic failure-to-thrive syndrome (NFTT) in infants is the result of family disengagement--the family system's maladaptive style of interaction. Proposes a systems-based approach to diagnosis and to treatment, focusing on the process of disengagement and other interaction factors. (Author/ABB)

  5. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: A Significant Family Genetic Phenotypic Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janák, David; Novotný, Karel; Roček, Miloslav; Rohn, Vilém

    We report on a very rare case of diagnosis and successful surgical treatment of three young family members with a four-fold presentation of thoracic outlet syndrome. In the relevant family case, we are considering and discussing the population incidence, a possible HOX genes disorder, and a significant phenotypic presentation.

  6. Genetic testing for Lynch syndrome: family communication and motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.M. Leenen (Celine); M.D. Heijer (Mariska den); C.A. van der Meer (Conny); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M.E. van Leerdam (Monique); A. Wagner (Anja)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCurrent genetic counselling practice for Lynch syndrome (LS) relies on diagnosed index patients to inform their biological family about LS, referred to as the family-mediated approach. The objective of this study was to evaluate this approach and to identify factors influencing the

  7. Familial Occurrence of Kawasaki Syndrome in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergun, Marina; Kao, Annie; Hauger, Sarmistha B.; Newburger, Jane W.; Burns, Jane C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe families with multiple members affected with Kawasaki syndrome (KS) to increase awareness of the familial occurrence of KS among practitioners who care for these patients. Design Retrospective review of medical records at 2 medical centers and data collection from remote KS families who contacted the KS Research Program at the University of California, San Diego. Results Eighteen families with multiple affected members were identified. There were 9 families with 2 affected siblings. In San Diego, 3 (0.7%) of 424 KS families had sibling cases. Nine families were identified with KS in 2 generations or in multiple affected members, yielding a total of 24 KS-affected children. No clear pattern of inheritance could be deduced from these pedigrees, and it is likely that multiple polymorphic alleles influence KS susceptibility. Conclusion Physicians should counsel affected families and make them aware of the potential increased risk of KS among family members. PMID:16143748

  8. Potential Allergens in Disposable Diaper Wipes, Topical Diaper Preparations, and Disposable Diapers: Under-recognized Etiology of Pediatric Perineal Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, JiaDe; Treat, James; Chaney, Keri; Brod, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis in young children may be an under-recognized cause of perineal dermatitis. The diapered infant skin is uniquely susceptible to allergic contact dermatitis because of more permeable neonatal skin, a moist environment, frequent contact with irritants and resultant skin barrier breakdown, and exposure to topical products such as diaper wipes, diaper preparations, and disposable diapers. To our knowledge, potential allergens in these products have not been thoroughly catalogued or studied. We explore and review potential allergenic ingredients in diaper wipes, topical diaper preparations, and disposable diapers. We analyzed 63 diaper wipes, 41 topical diaper preparations, and the 3 top selling diaper brands available from two of the largest retailers in the United States. Each potential allergen is discussed, and epidemiologic studies of rates of sensitization to potential allergens in children are also reported. Botanical extracts, including members of the Compositae family, were the most commonly represented potential allergen in both diaper wipes and topical preparations. Other potential allergens identified with high frequency include α-tocopherol, fragrances, propylene glycol, parabens, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, and lanolin. Frequent culprits such as formaldehyde releasers and methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone were not prevalent in our analyzed products.

  9. [Gardner syndrome--parent alienation syndrome (PAS). Diagnosis or family reality?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namysłowska, Irena; Heitzman, Janusz; Siewierska, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The authors present characteristics of Parental Alienation Syndrome (PAS) proposed by Gardner as well as data, which may help to differentiate that syndrome with real psychological, physical and sexual abuse. The consequences of Gardner Syndrome for legal decisions in the court cases of child custody and the critique of this syndrome in forensic and psychiatric literature are also discussed, and several questions posed. Authors propose to treat Gardner Syndrome not as as a child disorder but as a specific, dynamic family situation, which occurs sometimes, during divorce and fight about child custody.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AUTOINFLAMMATORY SYNDROME 2 Sources for This Page Aksentijevich I, D Putnam C, Remmers EF, Mueller JL, Le J, Kolodner RD, Moak Z, Chuang M, Austin F, Goldbach-Mansky R, Hoffman HM, Kastner DL. The ...

  11. Rhombencephalosynapsis as a cause of aqueductal stenosis: an under-recognized association in hydrocephalic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Grimm, John; Nelson, Marvin D.

    2014-01-01

    Rhombencephalosynapsis is a rare genetic aberration characterized by variable vermian hypoplasia/aplasia in conjunction with united cerebellar hemispheres. Genetic defects in the isthmic organizer at the mesencephalic-metencephalic junction are presumably responsible for the associated aqueductal stenosis. We performed a retrospective review of 20 children with rhombencephalosynapsis to evaluate for and emphasize the association of aqueductal stenosis and hydrocephalus. We retrospectively reviewed the MR and CT images of 20 children (0-11 years old) with rhombencephalosynapsis encountered at two academic children's hospitals. Rhombencephalosynapsis spectrum severity was graded based on pre-existing literature. We analyzed examinations for ventriculomegaly and degree of aqueductal stenosis. The collicular distances were measured from the collicular apices. Imaging studies were also analyzed for malformations of cortical and cerebellar development. Thirteen of the 20 children (65%) with rhombencephalosynapsis presented with clinical or imaging evidence of hydrocephalus and aqueductal stenosis, principally involving the caudal cerebral aqueduct. All children with aqueductal stenosis had collicular fusion. All six children with complete rhombencephalosynapsis had aqueductal stenosis. The cerebral aqueduct varied from normal to stenotic in children with incomplete rhombencephalosynapsis. Corpus callosum dysgenesis was present in four children. Aqueductal stenosis in the setting of rhombencephalosynapsis is an under-recognized cause of noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Our findings support the hypothesis that a defect involving the common gene(s) responsible for the differentiation and development of both the roof plate and midline cerebellar primordium at the mesencephalon/first rhombomere junction may be responsible for the association of aqueductal stenosis and rhombencephalosynapsis. (orig.)

  12. Isolated familial pneumothorax in a Taiwanese family with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Y Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary spontaneous pneumothorax usually occurs as a sporadic event, but may be clustered in certain families with an underlying inherited disorder. Birt-Hogg-Dubι (BHD syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease accounting for familial pneumothorax. BHD syndrome, caused by mutation of the folliculin gene, is characterized by skin fibrofolliculoma, pulmonary cysts, pneumothorax, and renal cancer. We describe a BHD-affected Taiwanese family with clinical and genetic study. A rare mutation of the folliculin gene was detected in the patient and members with pulmonary cysts or pneumothorax, but no skin or renal lesions were found. This mutation was reported in a Taiwanese family and might indicate a pneumothorax-predominant phenotype. Isolated pneumothorax is an uncommon initial presentation of BHD syndrome. Family history should be carefully reviewed when managing a patient with pneumothorax.

  13. Familial cryptic translocation in Angelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyerts, L.K.; Wiley, J.E.; Loud, K.M. [ECU School of Medicine, Greenville, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The majority of patients with Angelman syndrome have been shown to have a cytogenetic or molecular deletion on the maternally derived chromosome 15. We report on a case of Angelman syndrome in which this deletion occurs as an unbalanced cryptic translocation involving chromosomes 14 and 15. The proband was diagnosed clinically as having Angelman syndrome. Multiple cytogenetic studies were done without detecting any deletion. When DNA probes (Oncor) specific for the Prader Willi/Angelman locus became available, the patient was restudied and found to be deleted for {open_quotes}region A{close_quotes} (D15S11) but not for {open_quotes}region B{close_quotes} (GABRB3). No other abnormality was detected. The proband`s mother was then studied. The chromosome 15 marker probe and D15S11 were detected on different chromosomes. Using alpha-satellite probes, a cryptic 14;15 translocation was uncovered. This balanced translocation was also found to be carried by the sister of the proband. This case, along with a case presented at the 1993 ASHG meeting, illustrates the need for using acrocentric probes when studying Angelman syndrome patients. The proband was studied using additional probes specific for this region and found to be deleted for SNRPN but not for D15S10. The breakpoint of the translocation in this patient delineates the smallest deletion of the Angelman syndrome region reported to date and therefore may represent the specific gene involved.

  14. Familial neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with an overgrowth syndrome resembling Weaver syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asperen, C. J.; Overweg-Plandsoen, W. C.; Cnossen, M. H.; van Tijn, D. A.; Hennekam, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of familial neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and an overgrowth syndrome resembling Weaver syndrome was observed in two related cases (a mother and her son). NF1 was confirmed by molecular genetic analysis showing a large deletion at 17q11.2, encompassing the entire NF1

  15. Autosomal dominant congenital Horner's syndrome in a Dutch family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, G; Ippel, P F; te Nijenhuis, F C

    1992-01-01

    A Dutch family is reported with congenital Horner's syndrome in five cases spanning five generations, with symptoms of varying degree but mainly ptosis and meiosis. Heterochromia iridium, anhidrosis, and enophthalmos were not present. The site of the lesion may be in the region between Gasser's ganglion and the short vertical segment of the internal carotid artery near the siphon. There are only four previous reports showing autosomal dominant inheritance of congenital Horner's syndrome. Images PMID:1548493

  16. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have...... of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R) estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171), or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years...

  17. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Connie M.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Soldin, Offie P.; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J.; Brunelli, Steven M.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. PMID:24574542

  18. Rhombencephalosynapsis as a cause of aqueductal stenosis: an under-recognized association in hydrocephalic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Matthew T. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Choudhri, Asim F. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); Grimm, John; Nelson, Marvin D. [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Rhombencephalosynapsis is a rare genetic aberration characterized by variable vermian hypoplasia/aplasia in conjunction with united cerebellar hemispheres. Genetic defects in the isthmic organizer at the mesencephalic-metencephalic junction are presumably responsible for the associated aqueductal stenosis. We performed a retrospective review of 20 children with rhombencephalosynapsis to evaluate for and emphasize the association of aqueductal stenosis and hydrocephalus. We retrospectively reviewed the MR and CT images of 20 children (0-11 years old) with rhombencephalosynapsis encountered at two academic children's hospitals. Rhombencephalosynapsis spectrum severity was graded based on pre-existing literature. We analyzed examinations for ventriculomegaly and degree of aqueductal stenosis. The collicular distances were measured from the collicular apices. Imaging studies were also analyzed for malformations of cortical and cerebellar development. Thirteen of the 20 children (65%) with rhombencephalosynapsis presented with clinical or imaging evidence of hydrocephalus and aqueductal stenosis, principally involving the caudal cerebral aqueduct. All children with aqueductal stenosis had collicular fusion. All six children with complete rhombencephalosynapsis had aqueductal stenosis. The cerebral aqueduct varied from normal to stenotic in children with incomplete rhombencephalosynapsis. Corpus callosum dysgenesis was present in four children. Aqueductal stenosis in the setting of rhombencephalosynapsis is an under-recognized cause of noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Our findings support the hypothesis that a defect involving the common gene(s) responsible for the differentiation and development of both the roof plate and midline cerebellar primordium at the mesencephalon/first rhombomere junction may be responsible for the association of aqueductal stenosis and rhombencephalosynapsis. (orig.)

  19. Angelman syndrome in an inbred family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuten, J.; Hennekam, R. C.; van Roy, B.; Mangelschots, K.; Sutcliffe, J. S.; Halley, D. J.; Hennekam, F. A.; Beaudet, A. L.; Willems, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe mental retardation, absent speech, puppet-like movements, inappropriate laughter, epilepsy, and abnormal electroencephalogram. The majority of AS patients (approximately 65%) have a maternal deficiency within chromosomal region 15q11-q13, caused by

  20. Johnson-McMillin microtia syndrome: New additional family

    OpenAIRE

    Nagwa Abdel-Meguid; Ola Hosny Gebril; Ehab Ragaa Abdelraouf; Mohammed Akmal Shafie; Mohammed Bahgat

    2014-01-01

    Microtia is a congenital anomaly that is found with different prevalence among various populations. The exact etiology of ear anomalies is still unknown. We describe a new additional family with this rare disorder; Johnson-McMillin syndrome (JMS) where mother, son, and distant grandmother have multiple features of JMS in the form of microtia, facial asymmetry, ear malformation, hearing defect, and hypotrichosis. Variable presentations in this family could be referred to phenotype variation su...

  1. Familial clustering of Leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata: an unknown genetic syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daboul Isam

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata (LPD is defined as the occurrence of multiple tumorous intraabdominal lesions, which are myomatous nodules. LPD is a rare disease with only about 100 cases reported. The usual course of LPD is benign with the majority of the patients being premenopausal females. Only two cases involving men have been reported, no syndrome or familial occurrence of LPD has been described. Case presentation We describe a Caucasian-American family in which six members (three men are diagnosed with Leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata (LPD and three deceased family members most likely had LPD (based on the autopsy reports. Furthermore we describe the association of LPD with Raynaud's syndrome and Prurigo nodularis. Conclusion Familial clustering of Leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata (LPD has not been reported so far. The etiology of LPD is unknown and no mode of inheritance is known. We discuss possible modes of inheritance in the presented case, taking into account the possibility of a genetic syndrome. Given the similarity to other genetic syndromes with leiomyomatosis and skin alterations, we describe possible similar genetic pathomechanisms.

  2. Small bowel endoscopy in familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan Jacob

    Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and patients with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of developing small intestinal neoplasia. In both conditions, the lifetime risk to develop small bowel cancer is estimated to be around 5%. In FAP, this risk is associated with the degree of

  3. Familial gastric cancer and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, G; Pedrazzani, C; Marrelli, D; Pinto, E; Roviello, F

    2010-05-01

    Gastric cancer occurs in some familial diseases with inherited cancer predisposition. Genetic factors have been correlated with the hereditary diffuse gastric cancer and other familial gastric cancer conditions as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The present study was aimed at searching for germ line mutations of TP53 gene in familial gastric cancer with cluster for Li-Fraumeni syndrome or Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. Twenty-three pedigrees with characteristics for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome were identified. DNA of the proband was sequenced using polymerase chain reaction/single-strand conformation polymorphism. Among these 23 cases, no germ line mutation of TP53 was identified, while two single-nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in four patients. In our area, in which a high rate of familial aggregation was demonstrated, the lack of germ line mutation of TP53 together with the infrequency of mutation of E-cadherin gene seem to limit the role of genetic predisposition in the development of gastric cancer.

  4. Familial skin cancer syndromes: Increased melanoma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransohoff, Katherine J; Jaju, Prajakta D; Jaju, Prajaka D; Tang, Jean Y; Carbone, Michele; Leachman, Sancy; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-03-01

    Phenotypic traits, such as red hair and freckling, increase melanoma risk by 2- to 3-fold. In addition, approximately 10% of melanomas are caused by inherited germline mutations that increase melanoma risk from 4- to >1000-fold. This review highlights the key genes responsible for inherited melanoma, with an emphasis on when a patient should undergo genetic testing. Many genetic syndromes associated with increased melanoma risk are also associated with an increased risk of other cancers. Identification of these high-risk patients is essential for preventive behavior reinforcement, genetic counseling, and ensuring other required cancer screenings. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Writing Problems in Developmental Dyslexia: Under-Recognized and Under-Treated2,3

    OpenAIRE

    Berninger, Virginia W.; Nielsen, Kathleen H.; Abbott, Robert D.; Wijsman, Ellen; Raskind, Wendy

    2008-01-01

    The International Dyslexia Association defines dyslexia as unexpected problems of neurobiological origin in accuracy and rate of oral reading of single real words, single pseudowords, or text or of written spelling. However, prior research has focused more on the reading than the spelling problems of students with dyslexia. A test battery was administered to 122 children who met inclusion criteria for dyslexia and qualified their families for participation in a family genetics study that has ...

  6. Aortic aneurysm and craniosynostosis in a family with Cantu syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Yoko; Miyatake, Satoko; Hayashidani, Michiko; Nishimura, Yutaka; Matsuura, Hiroo; Kamada, Masahiro; Kawagoe, Takuji; Yunoki, Keiji; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Yofune, Hiroko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Satisu, Hirotomo; Murakami, Akira; Miyake, Noriko; Nishimura, Gen; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is an autosomal dominant overgrowth syndrome associated with facial dysmorphism, congenital hypertrichosis, and cardiomegaly. Some affected individuals show bone undermodeling of variable severity. Recent investigations revealed that the disorder is caused by a mutation in ABCC9, encoding a regulatory SUR2 subunit of an ATP-sensitive potassium channel mainly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscle as well as vascular smooth muscle. We report here on a Japanese family with this syndrome. An affected boy and his father had a novel missense mutation in ABCC9. Each patient had a coarse face and hypertrichosis. However, cardiomegaly was seen only in the boy, and macrosomia only in the father. Skeletal changes were not evident in either patient. Craniosynostosis in the boy and the development of aortic aneurysm in the father are previously undescribed associations with Cantu syndrome. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome: Mutations Uncovered in Lebanese Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valencia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, short limbs, growth retardation, polydactyly, and ectodermal defects with cardiac anomalies occurring in around 60% of cases. EVC syndrome has been linked to mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes. Case Presentation. We report EvC syndrome in two unrelated Lebanese families both having homozygous mutations in the EVC2 gene, c.2653C>T (p.(Arg885* and c.2012_2015del (p.(Leu671* in exons 15 and 13, respectively, with the latter being reported for the first time. Conclusion. Although EvC has been largely described in the medical literature, clinical features of this syndrome vary. While more research is required to explore other genes involved in EvC, early diagnosis and therapeutic care are important to achieve a better quality of life.

  8. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome: Mutations Uncovered in Lebanese Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Maria; Tabet, Lara; Yazbeck, Nadine; Araj, Alia; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Charaffedine, Khalil; Fares, Farah; Badra, Rebecca; Farra, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, short limbs, growth retardation, polydactyly, and ectodermal defects with cardiac anomalies occurring in around 60% of cases. EVC syndrome has been linked to mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes. Case Presentation. We report EvC syndrome in two unrelated Lebanese families both having homozygous mutations in the EVC2 gene, c.2653C>T (p.(Arg885(*))) and c.2012_2015del (p.(Leu671(*))) in exons 15 and 13, respectively, with the latter being reported for the first time. Conclusion. Although EvC has been largely described in the medical literature, clinical features of this syndrome vary. While more research is required to explore other genes involved in EvC, early diagnosis and therapeutic care are important to achieve a better quality of life.

  9. Turner Syndrome: A Guide for Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... healthy, age-appropriate sexuality (in the context of personal family values) is important to create the foundation for dating ... and promotion of coping skills is very important. Career counseling and preparation for ... Encourage personal responsibility for her locker or cubby, her room, ...

  10. Urological cancer related to familial syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Henriques da Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cancer related to hereditary syndromes corresponds to approximately 5-10% of all tumors. Among those from the genitourinary system, many tumors had been identified to be related to genetic syndromes in the last years with the advent of new molecular genetic tests. New entities were described or better characterized, especially in kidney cancer such as hereditary leiomyomatosis renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC, succinate dehydrogenase kidney cancer (SDH-RCC, and more recently BAP1 germline mutation related RCC. Among tumors from the bladder or renal pelvis, some studies had reinforced the role of germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR genes, especially in young patients. In prostate adenocarcinoma, besides mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes that are known to increase the incidence of high-risk cancer in young patients, new studies have shown mutation in other gene such as HOXB13 and also polymorphisms in MYC, MSMB, KLK2 and KLK3 that can be related to hereditary prostate cancer. Finally, tumors from testis that showed an increased in 8 - 10-fold in siblings and 4 - 6-fold in sons of germ cell tumors (TGCT patients, have been related to alteration in X chromosome. Also genome wide association studies GWAS pointed new genes that can also be related to increase of this susceptibility.

  11. Stickler syndrome: an underdiagnosed disease. Report of a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyzer, T H W; De Veuster, I; Smets, R-M E

    2011-01-01

    To report a family diagnosed with Stickler syndrome. To emphasize that early recognition of patients with Stickler syndrome could improve the visual outcome. Case report. A 14 year old girl of Mahgrebian origin presented with a longstanding subtotal RRD in the right eye. Subsequently 6 family members in 3 generations have been identified with the same COL2A1 mutation. 4 eyes lost perception of light and 1 eye was enucleated. Stickler syndrome is the commonest inherited cause of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). These tend to be complex and to occur at young age, frequently affecting both eyes. Other ocular features consist of high myopia, optically empty vitreous cavity, posterior radial paravascular lattice-type degeneration, cataract and glaucoma. Non-ocular findings include midface hypoplasia, musculoskeletal changes and hearing loss. In severe cases the disorder will readily be suspected. In mildly affected patients, clinical diagnosis can be quite difficult. Therefore, all family members of a Stickler patient should be offered molecular genetic testing. Stickler patients benefit from a multidisciplinary approach, including audiologic examination. They should be informed about the symptoms associated with retinal tears and retinal detachment and have priviliged access to the ophthalmic care unit. In case of RRD, vitrectomy is the preferred surgery. Prophylaxis of RRD in Stickler syndrome patients consisting of a 360 degrees peripheral cryotherapy or photocoagulation has been proposed. Practical guidelines for follow up or thresholds for initiating treatment have not been formulated. Stickler syndrome remains under-diagnosed. Hightened awareness of Stickler syndrome could improve visual outcome in affected individuals and makes genetic counseling possible

  12. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53).

  13. Berry syndrome in association with familial limb malformation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shahdadpuri, R

    2012-02-01

    We describe a newborn boy diagnosed with Berry syndrome consisting of a distal aortopulmonary septal defect, aortic origin of the right pulmonary artery, and interruption of the aorta. The child was noted to have reduplication of the right thumb. The child\\'s mother had a claw malformation of her left hand but a normal cardiovascular status. Genetic analysis for TBX5 and SALL4 mutations were negative in both the patient and his mother. This case describes the first ever report of Berry syndrome in an infant with reduplication of the right thumb and familial limb malformation.

  14. Familial Kleine-Levin Syndrome: A Specific Entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang Tuan Remy; Groos, Elisabeth; Leclair-Visonneau, Laurène; Monaca-Charley, Christelle; Rico, Tom; Farber, Neal; Mignot, Emmanuel; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare, mostly sporadic disorder, characterized by intermittent episodes of hypersomnia plus cognitive and behavior disorders. Although its cause is unknown, multiplex families have been described. We contrasted the clinical and biological features of familial versus sporadic KLS. Two samples of patients with KLS from the United States and France (n = 260) were studied using clinical interviews and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping. A multiplex family contained two or more first- or second-degree affected relatives (familial cases). Twenty-one patients from 10 multiplex families (siblings: n = 12, including two pairs of monozygotic twins; parent-child: n = 4; cousins: n = 2; uncle-nephews: n = 3) and 239 patients with sporadic KLS were identified, yielding to 4% multiplex families and 8% familial cases. The simplex and multiplex families did not differ for autoimmune, neurological, and psychiatric disorders. Age, sex ratio, ethnicity, HLA typing, karyotyping, disease course, frequency, and duration of KLS episodes did not differ between groups. Episodes were less frequent in familial versus sporadic KLS (2.3 ± 1.8/y versus 3.8 ± 3.7/y, P = 0.004). Menses triggered more frequently KLS onset in the nine girls with familial KLS (relative risk, RR = 4.12, P = 0.03), but not subsequent episodes. Familial cases had less disinhibited speech (RR = 3.44, P = 0.049), less combined hypophagia/hyperphagia (RR = 4.38, P = 0.006), more abrupt termination of episodes (RR = 1.45, P = 0.04) and less postepisode insomnia (RR = 2.16, P = 0.008). There was similar HLA DQB1 distribution in familial versus sporadic cases and no abnormal karyotypes. Familial KLS is mostly present in the same generation, and is clinically similar to but slightly less severe than sporadic KLS. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  15. Marfan Syndrome in an Iranian Family: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Davari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is a genetic disorder which is inherited by autosomal dominant traits. In MFS, lens displacement and cardiovascular involvement are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the clinical course of the disease. In this case study, the ocular involvement in a family with severe penetration of MFS is reported. Twelve members of a family (father, two daughters, three sons, and six grandchildren had MFS. Lens ectopia was the most common ophthalmic involvement among the family (100%. Other ocular involvements were as follows; Hypoplastic iris or ciliary’s muscle hypoplasia (50%, on gated eyeball (42%, flat cornea (30%, glaucoma and cataract (25%, retinal detachment (16%. Three members of the family underwent eye surgery including lens extraction, glaucoma surgery and retinal surgery.

  16. Leisure time of families with children suffering from Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zumarova M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asperger' s syndrome is one of the pervasive developmental disorders according to the International Classification of Diseases (tenth revision. Problems of this type of disability are found in many areas, for example – the system of care, diagnosis, education, the number of organizations that deal with this condition and provide these services. Recent research has shown an increase in autism spectrum disorders (every hundredth child is born with this diagnosis. Children with Asperger syndrome are intrinsically “blind” in public and seem rude, and these situations are not easy for their parents. The most difficult area for parents is free time. Children cannot organize their leisure time, plus the ability to meaningfully spend their time is very limited. Incidence of organizations offering leisure activities for people with autism is usually larger in big cities, because the concentration of these children is greater. The aim of this paper is to characterize the basic theoretical background and find out what leisure time possibilities exist for a family having a child with Asperger's syndrome. How can a family with a child with Asperger's syndrome spend leisure time?

  17. Gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Sarmento, Melina Vaz; Polli, Janaina Borges; Groff, Daniela de Paoli; Petry, Patrícia; de Mattos, Vinícius Freitas; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Trevisan, Patrícia; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome (PS). METHODS: The study enrolled patients with PS consecutively evaluated during 38 years in a Clinical Genetics Service of a pediatric referral hospital in Southern Brazil. The clinical data and the results of cytogenetic analysis were collected from the medical records. For statistical analysis, the two-tailed Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test with Yates' correction were used, b...

  18. Writing problems in developmental dyslexia: under-recognized and under-treated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berninger, Virginia W; Nielsen, Kathleen H; Abbott, Robert D; Wijsman, Ellen; Raskind, Wendy

    2008-02-01

    The International Dyslexia Association defines dyslexia as unexpected problems of neurobiological origin in accuracy and rate of oral reading of single real words, single pseudowords, or text or of written spelling. However, prior research has focused more on the reading than the spelling problems of students with dyslexia. A test battery was administered to 122 children who met inclusion criteria for dyslexia and qualified their families for participation in a family genetics study that has been ongoing for over a decade. Their parents completed the same test battery. Although a past structural equation modeling study of typically developing children identified a significant path from handwriting to composition quality, the current structural equation modeling study identified a significant path from spelling to composition for children and their parents with dyslexia. Grapho-motor planning did not contribute uniquely to their composition, showing that writing is not just a motor skill. Students with dyslexia do have a problem in automatic letter writing and naming, which was related to impaired inhibition and verbal fluency, and may explain their spelling problems. Results are discussed in reference to the importance of providing explicit instruction in the phonological, orthographic, and morphological processes of spelling and in composition to students with dyslexia and not only offering accommodation for their writing problems.

  19. Reproductive coercion: an under-recognized challenge for primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sharon J; Bennett, Ariana H; Hacker, Michele R; Gold, Marji

    2016-06-01

    Reproductive coercion impacts many women of reproductive age. We sought to explore how reproductive coercion, including pregnancy coercion and birth control sabotage, impacts women in a primary care population. We administered a survey to women accessing care at a family medicine clinic in the Bronx, NY. Reproductive coercion was defined as a positive response to at least one of five questions adapted from previous studies. We assessed the association of reproductive and demographic characteristics with a lifetime history of reproductive coercion. At least one form of reproductive coercion was reported by 24% of the 97 respondents. Current lack of personal safety and a history of transactional sex for money or a place to stay were significantly associated with having experienced reproductive coercion (all P ≤ 0.02). Reproductive coercion was common among women of reproductive age at this urban family medicine clinic in an underserved community, and was associated with other forms of control and violence. Clinicians are advised to discuss birth control sabotage and pregnancy coercion with their patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Hand-arm vibration syndrome: What family physicians should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shixin Cindy; House, Ronald A

    2017-03-01

    To provide family physicians with an understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, symptoms, diagnosis, and management of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS), an important and common occupational disease in Canada. A MEDLINE search was conducted for research and review articles on HAVS. A Google search was conducted to obtain gray literature relevant to the Canadian context. Additional references were obtained from the articles identified. Hand-arm vibration syndrome is a prevalent occupational disease affecting workers in multiple industries in which vibrating tools are used. However, it is underdiagnosed in Canada. It has 3 components-vascular, in the form of secondary Raynaud phenomenon; sensorineural; and musculoskeletal. Hand-arm vibration syndrome in its more advanced stages contributes to substantial disability and poor quality of life. Its diagnosis requires careful history taking, in particular occupational history, physical examination, laboratory tests to rule out alternative diagnoses, and referral to an occupational medicine specialist for additional investigations. Management involves reduction of vibration exposure, avoidance of cold conditions, smoking cessation, and medication. To ensure timely diagnosis of HAVS and improve prognosis and quality of life, family physicians should be aware of this common occupational disease and be able to elicit the relevant occupational history, refer patients to occupational medicine clinics, and appropriately initiate compensation claims. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  1. Chronic idiopathic urticaria and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): an under-recognized comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Gupta, Aditya K

    2012-01-01

    A large body of literature supports the role of psychologic stress in urticaria; however, the comorbidity between chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a classic stress-mediated syndrome, has received little attention. The underlying etiology of urticaria is not identifiable in about 70% of patients, possibly because of difficulties with identification of a direct cause-and-effect relationship between a potential causative factor and the onset of urticaria. The core features of PTSD (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision [DSMIV-TR]) that are important in urticaria include (1) autonomic nervous system reactivity and state of sympathetic hyperarousal that can manifest as CIU, and (2) the persistent re-experiencing of the traumatic events in PTSD, which can manifest as urticaria or angioedema, or both, affecting a previously traumatized body region (eg, urticarial wheals affecting the body region where the patient had been stabbed years earlier). The following features of PTSD make it difficult to use the cause-and-effect model for the determination of causation: (1) PTSD may first emerge years after the initial trauma and is classified as PTSD with Delayed Onset (DSMIV-TR); and (2) the traumatic triggers that precipitate the PTSD symptoms may be unique and idiosyncratic to the patient and not even qualify as stressful or traumatic by standard criteria (eg, precipitating events for the PTSD may include smell of a certain cologne that was used by the perpetrator or witnessing a scene in a movie that was reminiscent of the location where the abuse occurred). Finally, in PTSD with Delayed Onset, patients may not make a conscious association between their recurrent urticaria and their earlier traumas because they can develop classically conditioned associations between stimuli that are reminiscent of the original abuse situation and their somatic reactions such as urticaria. The clinician

  2. Late-onset ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency: An under recognized cause of metabolic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric T Rush

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is the most common inherited disorder of the urea cycle, has a variable phenotype, and is caused by mutations in the OTC gene. We report three cases of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency to illustrate the late-onset presentation of this disorder and provide strategies for diagnosis and treatment. The patients were maternal first cousins, presenting with hyperammonemia and obtundation. Urea cycle disorder was not initially suspected in the first patient, delaying diagnosis. Results: Sequencing of the OTC gene showed a novel missense mutation, c.563G > C (p.G188A. Numerous family members were found to carry this mutation, which shows a trend toward later onset. Each urea cycle disorder has its own unique pattern of biochemical abnormalities, which differ from non-metabolic causes of critical illness. Conclusion: Regardless of age, clinical suspicion of a urea cycle disorder is important in encephalopathic patients to ensure quick diagnosis and definitive treatment of the underlying inborn error of metabolism.

  3. Cardiovascular Manifestation of a Family with Marfan’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Reza Rezvani

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Marfan’s syndrome (MFS is a genetic disorder associated with autosomal dominant inheritance. In MFS, the most prevalent cause of death is cardiovascular involvement. Here we introduce a family with a severe penetration of MFS. Eleven members of this family have MFS (father, two daughters, three sons, and five grandchildren. The most common cardiac involvement in our patients was mitral valve prolapse as manifested by mitral regurgitation. At ten years’ follow-up, two patients had aortic root dilatation running the risk of aortic dissection; they were, therefore, scheduled for cardiac surgery, during which the Bental procedure was successfully performed. Fortunately, all of the members of this family are currently alive.

  4. Cardiovascular Manifestation of a Family with Marfan’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Davari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Marfan’s syndrome (MFS is a genetic disorder associated with autosomal dominant inheritance. In MFS, the most prevalent cause of death is cardiovascular involvement. Here we introduce a family with a severe penetration of MFS. Eleven members of this family have MFS (father, two daughters, three sons, and five grandchildren. The most common cardiac involvement in our patients was mitral valve prolapse as manifested by mitral regurgitation. At ten years’ follow-up, two patients had aortic root dilatation running the risk of aortic dissection; they were, therefore, scheduled for cardiac surgery, during which the Bental procedure was successfully performed. Fortunately, all of the members of this family are currently alive.

  5. Molecular Pathogenesis of Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Miyamotoa

    2018-01-01

    Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease and consists of a small percentage of WPW syndrome which exhibits ventricular pre-excitation by development of accessory atrioventricular pathway. A series of mutations in PRKAG2 gene encoding gamma2 subunit of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as the cause of familial WPW syndrome. AMPK is one of the most important metabolic regulators of carbohydrates and lipids in many types of tissues including cardiac and skeletal muscles. Patients and animals with the mutation in PRKAG2 gene exhibit aberrant atrioventricular conduction associated with cardiac glycogen overload. Recent studies have revealed "novel" significance of canonical pathways leading to glycogen synthesis and provided us profound insights into molecular mechanism of the regulation of glycogen metabolism by AMPK. This review focuses on the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cardiac abnormality due to PRKAG2 mutation and will provide current overviews of the mechanism of glycogen regulation by AMPK. J. Med. Invest. 65:1-8, February, 2018.

  6. Clinical and genetic aspects of Marfan syndrome and familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns the clinical and genetic aspects of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, in particular in Marfan syndrome. It includes the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome. These guidelines contain practical directions for

  7. Does familial breast cancer and thymoma suggest a cancer syndrome? A family perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Wei; Ding, Yibing; Zhou, Lixing; Chen, Qiuyan; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Yongzheng; Mei, Yuna; Jin, Yu; Gao, Qian; Yi, Long

    2015-12-01

    Concurrence of breast cancer or thymoma with other malignancies in individual families is often observed, but the familial concurrence of breast cancer and thymoma has not yet been reported. Herein we reported a family encompassing five breast/ovarian cancer patients and two thymoma patients. Whole genome linkage analysis detected no haplotype co-segregating with both types of the tumors. In all patients with breast/ovarian cancer, genetic analysis revealed a clinically untested variant c.5141T>G in exon 18 of the BRCA1 gene, which could be a cancer-causing variant based on the functional study of Lee et al. (2010) and our current pedigree analysis. In the two thymoma patients in our family, targeted sequencing of RAD51L1 and BMP2 genes in and near the translocation site of chromosome 14 and 20 previously reported in two thymoma families, did not find any pathogenic mutation. In the present study, we identified a clinically unconfirmed BRCA1 variant segregating with breast/ovarian cancer patients in an individual family, suggesting it to be clinically functional. Our evidence, however, did not support the notion that the concurrent appearance of breast cancer and thymoma in our family represents a familial cancer syndrome caused by the same genetic disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Familial myelodysplastic syndromes, monosomy 7/trisomy 8, and mutator effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserati, Emanuela; Minelli, Antonella; Menna, Giuseppe; Cecchini, Maria Paola; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Rossi, Gabriele; De Filippi, Paola; Lo Curto, Francesco; Danesino, Cesare; Locatelli, Franco; Pasquali, Francesco

    2004-01-15

    A family is reported, in which two sisters presented with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), namely refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-t), and refractory anemia (RA). Bone marrow chromosome changes were present in both: trisomy and tetrasomy 8 (with a pericentric inversion of one chromosome 8) in the older sister, and monosomy 7 (with clones with additional trisomies 19 and 21) in the younger one. Molecular data were obtained on the parental chromosome involved in these numerical anomalies, which proved to be of paternal origin in these cases. The observations of this family, and a review of familial cases of MDS/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), led us to consider that they may be divided into two groups: those which arise on the basis of a Mendelian predisposing disorder exerting a mutator effect, often with the acquisition of monosomy 7, and those in which no specific Mendelian predisposing disease is recognized, as the familial monosomy 7 cases and the one reported here. We postulate that in these families an inherited mutator effect is present and that it causes a karyotype instability, which leads to MDS/AML, often through the acquisition of monosomy 7 and trisomy 8.

  9. The Importance of Family Interview for Shaken Baby Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Akkuzu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Shaken baby syndrome (SBS is caused by vigorous shaking of an infant by the arms, legs, chest, or shoulders. It must be thought when there is a suspicious story, subdural hemorrhage, bilateral retinal hemorrhage, cranial bone and or skeletal fracture, and ecchymosis. Here, we report a patient, who presented with seizures, with a family history of similar findings in his brother. Most of the efforts were given to find an organic reason to explain the patient’s findings due to the history of similar presentation of the sibling with an impression of inherited neuro-metabolic disorders and a negative result of a previous evaluation of the patient and the family for SBS at another hospital. Striking findings of SBS including subdural hematomas of different ages, occipital bone fracture, and retinal hemorrhages directed us to re-evaluate the family for SBS. After multiple episodes of family interviews, clues leading to injury through SBS were discovered. A single family interview may not be sufficient to exclude SBS especially in the presence of clinical findings. SBS is a diagnosis that should always be kept in mind in such patients, especially those with no organic cause.

  10. Case Report : A Relieved Family with the Diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Kokurcan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS is a diagnosis formed from Wernicke ensephalopathy and Korsakoff Syndrome together. WKS is usually a chronic syndrome beginning acutely. Wernicke%u2019s encephalopathy is an acute syndrome composed of the triad of oculomotor signs; ataxia and confusion. B vitamines especially tiamine are considered to cause the syndrome. Korsakoff syndrome is a syndrome presenting with amnesia and amnesia is permanent in many cases. While Korsakoff syndrome is a continuation form of Wernicke; the syndromes are admitted as the acute and chronic conditions of the same pathophysiology. WKS syndrome means despair for many psychiatrists and the family unless treatment is initiated in the acute phase and irreversible cognitive impairment is prevented. We will discuss a case of WKS pleasing his family as nervousness has improved with cognitive impairment.

  11. Mcleod syndrome: Report of an Indian family with phenotypic heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Ambar; Bhattacharya, P.; Banerjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.

    2011-01-01

    The present report deals with the clinical phenomenology of three members (brothers) of one family with McLeod syndrome (MLS). In two, the clinical pictures were of choreiform disorders with amyotrophy, which were found to be neurogenic in origin by detailed electrophysiological study. The index case had peripheral acanthocytosis; immunohematological and molecular genetic studies confirmed diagnosis of MLS. However, one brother only had a slowly progressive motor neuron disease like picture but no abnormal movement disorder. He had peripheral acanthocytes as well. The inheritance seems to be X-linked recessive in nature. The affected family members exhibited much phenotypic heterogeneity. This appears to be the first report of MLS from India. PMID:21655208

  12. Night Eating Syndrome: Report of a family case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevinçer, Güzin M; Allison, Kelly C

    2016-08-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) represents a circadian delay in the pattern of eating. As there are genetic links for other eating- and circadian-based disorders, it is likely that there is a genetic basis for NES as well. We present a family case study of three identified patients and their extensive family history of NES and co-morbid mood disorders. This case report suggested that NES may have a heritable feature, particularly nocturnal ingestions. Of the seven identified cases, four had co-morbid mood disorders, and all descended from a couple with bipolar disorder and delusional disorder. More work is needed to understand the extent of genetic influence on NES, and the relationship between NES and other psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic heterogeneity of usher syndrome type 1 in French families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larget-Piet, D.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M. (INSERM, Paris (France)); Bonneau, D. (Clinique Medicale Infantile, Poitiers (France)); Marc, S.; Weissenbach, J. (Genethon, Evry (France)); Ghazi, I.; Dufier, J.L. (Hopital Laeennec, Paris (France)); David, A. (Service de Pediatrie III, Nantes (France)); Bitoun, P. (Service de Pediatrie, Bondy (France)) (and others)

    1994-05-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 (US1) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by profound congenital hearing impairment with unintelligible speech, early retinitis pigmentosa, and constant vestibular dysfunction. Three localizations have been described in US1: USH1A, 14q32; USH1B, 11q13.5; and USH1C, 11p15. Studying a series of 33 affected individuals belonging to 20 US1 pedigrees of French ancestry, the authors found that none of the three localizations accounted for all US1 families in the series. However, when the sample was split into two groups according to the geographic origin of the probands' grandparents, they were able to confirm the presence of a gene for US1 on chromosome 14q32 (USH1A) in 9 families originating from the Poitou region in Western France. Moreover, they refined the genetic mapping of USH1A by showing that the disease gene maps to the D14S13 locus, within the genetic interval defined by loci D14S78 and D14S250 (location score in log base 10 = 4.90). Consistent with this, nonsignificant lod score values for linkage to either USH1B or USH1C were found in this group. With regard to US1 families of other geographic origin (Normandy and Northern France, 11 families), nonsignificant lod scores for linkage to chromosome 11q13.5 were observed. However, the HOMOG test suggested that USH1B might account for the disease in 9/11 families in the series (families 10-19), the latter two families possibly being accounted for by USH1C (maximum likelihood for heterogeneity = 7.91 in lnL; heterogeneity versus homogeneity, P = 0.01; heterogeneity versus nonlinkage, P < 0.01). The present study supports the view that Usher syndrome type 1 is a genetically heterogeneous condition that is caused by at least three genes and possibly many more. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Johnson-McMillin microtia syndrome: New additional family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa Abdel-Meguid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtia is a congenital anomaly that is found with different prevalence among various populations. The exact etiology of ear anomalies is still unknown. We describe a new additional family with this rare disorder; Johnson-McMillin syndrome (JMS where mother, son, and distant grandmother have multiple features of JMS in the form of microtia, facial asymmetry, ear malformation, hearing defect, and hypotrichosis. Variable presentations in this family could be referred to phenotype variation supporting an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. We observed that the mother was very sad and suffered from feelings of guilt. We found that she had isolated herself from family and community out of fear of being stigmatized and hurt. We concluded that the occurrence of microtia is of public health importance, adhering to traditional marriage customs in Egypt increases women′s risk of giving birth to a disabled child, yet the mothers are blamed and shamed for their children′s birth defects by their husbands, families, and communities, while the fathers are not stigmatized.

  15. Johnson-McMillin Microtia Syndrome: New Additional Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Meguid, Nagwa; Gebril, Ola Hosny; Abdelraouf, Ehab Ragaa; Shafie, Mohammed Akmal; Bahgat, Mohammed

    2014-07-01

    Microtia is a congenital anomaly that is found with different prevalence among various populations. The exact etiology of ear anomalies is still unknown. We describe a new additional family with this rare disorder; Johnson-McMillin syndrome (JMS) where mother, son, and distant grandmother have multiple features of JMS in the form of microtia, facial asymmetry, ear malformation, hearing defect, and hypotrichosis. Variable presentations in this family could be referred to phenotype variation supporting an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. We observed that the mother was very sad and suffered from feelings of guilt. We found that she had isolated herself from family and community out of fear of being stigmatized and hurt. We concluded that the occurrence of microtia is of public health importance, adhering to traditional marriage customs in Egypt increases women's risk of giving birth to a disabled child, yet the mothers are blamed and shamed for their children's birth defects by their husbands, families, and communities, while the fathers are not stigmatized.

  16. The severely under-recognized public health risk of strongyloidiasis in North American cities-A One Health approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariwala, S; Redding, L; Hewitt, D

    2017-12-01

    Strongyloides and other soil-transmitted helminths represent a severely under-recognized zoonotic public health risk, especially in North American cities. They are present throughout North America, including in urban areas, causing morbidity and mortality in human and non-human animals. Epidemiological "masking" of strongyloidiasis due to overlapping symptoms with other systemic diseases, including allergies, and diagnostic limitations complicate our understanding of the epidemiological extent of this disease, and auto-infection allows long-term persistence of individual infections. Zoonotic transmission and environmental transmission are critical components in the epidemiology of strongyloidiasis, and other diseases caused by soil-transmitted helminths. In this review, we bring together medical, veterinary and environmental expertise in a "One Health" context, to document and analyse this under-recognized risk. We also present implementable opportunities for action with respect to diagnostics, treatment, community engagement and land management to mitigate the impact and transmission of strongyloidiasis and other diseases caused by soil-transmitted helminths. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Marfan syndrome and cardiovascular complications: results of a family investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Simon Antoine; Djibrilla, Siddikatou; Aw, Fatou; Bodian, Malick; Babaka, Kana; Ngaidé, Aliou Alassane; Dioum, Momar; Ba, Serigne Abdou

    2017-07-19

    Cardiovascular complications in Marfan syndrome (MFS) make all its seriousness. Taking as a basis the Ghent criteria, we conducted a family screening from an index case. The objective was to describe the clinical characteristics of MFS anomalies and to detect cardiovascular complications in our patients. Six subjects were evaluated. Patients had to be in the same uterine siblings of the index case or be a descendant. The objective was to search for MFS based on the diagnostic criteria of Ghent and, subsequently, detecting cardiovascular damage. The average age was 24 years. The examination revealed three cases of sudden death in a context of chest pain. Five subjects had systemic involvement with a score ≥ 7 that allowed to the diagnosis of MFS. Two patients had simultaneously ectopia lentis and myopia. In terms of cardiovascular damage, there were three cases of dilatation of the aortic root, two cases of aortic dissection of Stanford's type A with severe aortic regurgitation in one case and moderate in the other. There were three patients with moderate mitral regurgitation with a case by valve prolapse. The family screening is crucial in Marfan syndrome. It revealed serious cardiovascular complications including sudden death and aortic dissection.

  18. Family perspectives in lynch syndrome becoming a family at risk, patterns of communication and influence on relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartuma Katarina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of individuals are diagnosed with hereditary cancer. Though increased levels of anxiety and depression have been demonstrated around the time of genetic counselling, most individuals handle life at increased risk well. Data have, however, been collected on individual basis, which led us to focus on family perspectives of hereditary cancer. Methods Lynch syndrome represents a major type of hereditary colorectal and gynaecological cancer. We preformed open-ended interviews with 27 informants from 9 Lynch syndrome families. Inductive content analysis revealed three major themes: transition to a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations and individual roles. Results Family members described how learning about Lynch syndrome shifted focus from daily issues to concerns about cancer. Changes in communication related to difficulties in talking to children about heredity and informing new family members and distant relatives about an increased risk of cancer. Influence on relations was exemplified by family members taking on different roles, e.g. females often being responsible for coordinating information about heredity and providing support. Families in which members had experienced cancer at young age typically informed children soon after learning about heredity and at young age, whereas families with experience of cancer at higher age postponed information and thereby also genetic counselling. Conclusions Three major family perspectives are described in Lynch syndrome families; becoming a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations. Since these issues are central, our findings suggests that such family perspectives should be considered during genetic counselling in order to contribute to information spread, help family members cope with the increased risk, and motivate family members at risk to undergo surveillance.

  19. Family perspectives in lynch syndrome becoming a family at risk, patterns of communication and influence on relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartuma, Katarina; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2012-05-25

    A growing number of individuals are diagnosed with hereditary cancer. Though increased levels of anxiety and depression have been demonstrated around the time of genetic counselling, most individuals handle life at increased risk well. Data have, however, been collected on individual basis, which led us to focus on family perspectives of hereditary cancer. Lynch syndrome represents a major type of hereditary colorectal and gynaecological cancer. We preformed open-ended interviews with 27 informants from 9 Lynch syndrome families. Inductive content analysis revealed three major themes: transition to a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations and individual roles. Family members described how learning about Lynch syndrome shifted focus from daily issues to concerns about cancer. Changes in communication related to difficulties in talking to children about heredity and informing new family members and distant relatives about an increased risk of cancer. Influence on relations was exemplified by family members taking on different roles, e.g. females often being responsible for coordinating information about heredity and providing support. Families in which members had experienced cancer at young age typically informed children soon after learning about heredity and at young age, whereas families with experience of cancer at higher age postponed information and thereby also genetic counselling. Three major family perspectives are described in Lynch syndrome families; becoming a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations. Since these issues are central, our findings suggests that such family perspectives should be considered during genetic counselling in order to contribute to information spread, help family members cope with the increased risk, and motivate family members at risk to undergo surveillance.

  20. Family Environment and Behavior Problems in Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jan S.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Baker, Jason K.; Smith, Leann E.; Warren, Steven F.; Brady, Nancy; Hong, Jinkuk

    2012-01-01

    We examine how the family environment is associated with aspects of the Fragile X syndrome phenotype during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Mothers of children (n = 48), adolescents (n = 85), and adults (n = 34) with Fragile X syndrome participated in a multisite study. For children and adults with Fragile X syndrome, the presence of warmth…

  1. Relationship between family quality of life and day occupations of young people with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kitty-Rose; Girdler, Sonya; Downs, Jenny; Jacoby, Peter; Bourke, Jenny; Lennox, Nick; Einfeld, Stewart; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Parmenter, Trevor R; Leonard, Helen

    2014-09-01

    To explore relationships between family quality of life, day occupations and activities of daily living (ADL) of young persons with Down syndrome. Data were collected from 150 families with a young person with Down syndrome aged 16-30 years participating in the Down syndrome "Needs Opinions Wishes" database. Data described the young person's characteristics (including functional abilities, behaviour and day occupations) and family characteristics (including income, family and community supports and quality of life). Compared to families of young people attending open employment, families of young people participating in sheltered employment tended to report poorer family quality of life, after adjusting for personal characteristics, behaviour and income (coeff -6.78, 95 % CI -14.38, 0.81). Family supports reduced this relationship (coeff -6.00, 95 % CI -12.76, 0.76). Families of young people with greater functioning in ADL reported better family quality of life regardless of personal and environmental factors (coeff 0.45, 95 % CI 0.05, 0.85) and inclusion of family factors such as family supports reduced this association (coeff 0.29, 95 % CI -0.10, 0.67). Participation of young people with Down syndrome in open employment may positively influence family quality of life. Services that facilitate functioning in ADL and assist the families in accessing suitable family supports have the potential to positively influence family quality of life.

  2. Constitutional SAMD9L mutations cause familial myelodysplastic syndrome and transient monosomy 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastor, Victor B; Sahoo, Sushree; Boklan, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Familial myelodysplastic syndromes arise from haploinsufficiency of genes involved in hematopoiesis and are primarily associated with early-onset disease. Here we describe a familial syndrome in 7 patients from 4 unrelated pedigrees presenting with myelodisplastic syndrome and loss of chromosome 7...... patients, pointing to the notion that myelodisplasia with monosomy 7 can be a sole manifestation of SAMD9L disease. Collectively, our results define a new subtype of familial myelodisplastic syndrome and provide an explanation for the phenomenon of transient monosomy 7. www.clinicaltrials.gov; #NCT00047268....

  3. Audiometric Characteristics of a Dutch Family with a New Mutation in GATA3 Causing HDR Syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beelen, E. van; Leijendeckers, J.M.; Admiraal, R.J.C.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Snik, A.F.M.; Kunst, H.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a Dutch family with a new mutation (c523_528dup) in GATA3 causing HDR syndrome. HDR syndrome is characterised by hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal defects. In this study, we describe the audiometric characteristics of 5 patients from this family. Their hearing impairment

  4. Experiences of Supporting People with Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease in Aged Care and Family Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling-Jenkins, Rachel; Torr, Jennifer; Iacono, Teresa; Bigby, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Research addressing the experiences of families of adults with Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease in seeking diagnosis and gaining support is limited. The aim of this study was to gain a greater understanding of these processes by exploring the experiences of families and carers in supporting people with Down syndrome and…

  5. Identification of a novel FBN1 gene mutation in a large Pakistani family with Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micheal, S.; Khan, M.I.; Akhtar, F.; Weiss, M.M.; Islam, F.; Ali, M.; Qamar, R.; Maugeri, A.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a novel mutation in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene in a large Pakistani family with autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome (MFS). METHODS: Blood samples were collected of 11 family members affected with Marfan syndrome, and DNA was isolated by phenol-extraction. The coding exons of

  6. Gene screening in a Chinese family with Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jiao Xia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To analyze the causative gene mutation for Marfan syndrome(MFSwith autosomal dominant hereditary in a Chinese family in Liaoning Province,China. METHODS: Venous blood was collected and candidate gene was selected to design primers according to the clinical phenotype. With genomic polymerase chain reaction(PCRperformed, the coding exons and their flanking intron in sequences of candidate gene were sequenced,DNA fragments separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing method was used to determine the pathogenic gene.RESULTS:Phenotype of the proband was presented as ectopic lentis. Sequencing of the coding regions of FBN1 gene showed the presence of a heterozygous A→G transversion at nucleotide 640 in the 7 exon of FBN1 and the missense mutation made for Glycine into Serine(G214S. CONCLUSION:A heterozygous mutation of FBN1 c.A640G(p.G214Sis responsible for the Marfan syndrome in the four generation Chinese pedigree.

  7. The Coffin-Siris syndrome: report of a family and further delineation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haspeslagh, M; Fryns, J P; van den Berghe, H

    1984-10-01

    The familial occurrence of the Coffin-Siris syndrome, combining a typical facial appearance with hypoplastic or absent fifth finger- or toenails, is reported. The full expression of the syndrome was present in two sisters, and partial clinical manifestations were present in their mentally borderline father. The relevant literature is reviewed, and the relation and confusion with other mental retardation syndromes, mainly the Coffin-Lowry syndrome, is discussed.

  8. Gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome (PS. METHODS: The study enrolled patients with PS consecutively evaluated during 38 years in a Clinical Genetics Service of a pediatric referral hospital in Southern Brazil. The clinical data and the results of cytogenetic analysis were collected from the medical records. For statistical analysis, the two-tailed Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test with Yates' correction were used, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The sample was composed of 27 patients, 63% were male, with a median age of nine days at the first evaluation. Full trisomy of chromosome 13 was the main cytogenetic finding (74%. Only six patients were submitted to obstetric ultrasound and none had prenatal diagnosis of PS. The patients' demographic characteristics, compared to born alive infants in the same Brazilian state showed a higher frequency of: mothers with 35 years old or more (37.5%; multiparous mothers (92.6%; vaginal delivery (77%; preterm birth (34.6%; birth weight <2500g (33.3%, and Apgar scores <7 in the 1st (75% and in the 5th minute (42.9%. About half of them (53% died during the first month of life. CONCLUSIONS: The understanding of the PS patients' gestational, perinatal and family findings has important implications, especially on the decision about the actions to be taken in relation to the management of these patients.

  9. Button cholecystostomy for management of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Matthew S; Romero, Rene; Ricketts, Richard R

    2011-02-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis syndromes are characterized by impaired bile acid secretion resulting in pruritus, coagulopathy, diarrhea, and malnutrition leading to progressive liver failure and death in childhood. Partial internal or external biliary drainage can relieve symptoms and slow the progression of the disease. Objections to partial external biliary drainage include the need for a permanent biliary stoma with all the inherent complications of a stoma. We propose a novel approach to these diseases--placement of a "button" cholecystostomy tube. Under general anesthesia and through a small right subcostal incision, a MIC-KEY button (Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc, Draper, UT) is inserted into the mobilized fundus of the gallbladder and secured with 2 purse-string sutures. Time of drainage is adjusted to relieve pruritus. Three children with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis achieved adequate bile drainage via the cholecystostomy button to relieve pruritus for 1, 2, and 2 ½ years postoperatively, with drainage periods of 12 to 14 hours per day. There were no episodes of cholangitis. Dislodged tubes can be replaced, or stones can be retrieved via the tract that is formed. Patient (parent) acceptance has been excellent. Button cholecystostomy is simple to perform, relieves pruritus with intermittent (nighttime) drainage, avoids complications of a permanent stoma, avoids an enteric anastomosis, and is accepted by parents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M; Sarmento, Melina Vaz; Polli, Janaina Borges; Groff, Daniela de Paoli; Petry, Patrícia; Mattos, Vinícius Freitas de; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M; Trevisan, Patrícia; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G

    2013-12-01

    To describe gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome (PS). The study enrolled patients with PS consecutively evaluated during 38 years in a Clinical Genetics Service of a pediatric referral hospital in Southern Brazil. The clinical data and the results of cytogenetic analysis were collected from the medical records. For statistical analysis, the two-tailed Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test with Yates' correction were used, being significant p<0.05. The sample was composed of 27 patients, 63% were male, with a median age of nine days at the first evaluation. Full trisomy of chromosome 13 was the main cytogenetic finding (74%). Only six patients were submitted to obstetric ultrasound and none had prenatal diagnosis of PS. The patients' demographic characteristics, compared to born alive infants in the same Brazilian state showed a higher frequency of: mothers with 35 years old or more (37.5%); multiparous mothers (92.6%); vaginal delivery (77%); preterm birth (34.6%); birth weight <2500g (33.3%), and Apgar scores <7 in the 1st (75%) and in the 5th minute (42.9%). About half of them (53%) died during the first month of life. The understanding of the PS patients' gestational, perinatal and family findings has important implications, especially on the decision about the actions to be taken in relation to the management of these patients.

  11. Behaviour Problems, Maternal Internalising Symptoms and Family Relations in Families of Adolescents and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J. K.; Seltzer, M. M.; Greenberg, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Studies have linked the behaviour problems of children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) to maternal well-being, but less is known about how behaviour problems relate to important family factors such as marital satisfaction and family cohesion. Methods: Married mothers of 115 adolescents and adults with FXS completed questionnaires and…

  12. Sessile serrated polyps of the colorectum are rare in patients with Lynch syndrome and in familial colorectal cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S H; Lykke, E; Folker, M B

    2008-01-01

    the sporadic MSI-H counterpart. Recent studies have, however, challenged such simple one-pathway models, inviting the consideration of alternative, unexpected pathways. Here, the issue as to the possible role of SSP, primarily in the context of Lynch syndrome, but also in subjects from familial CRC families...

  13. Acute heart failure syndrome | Ker | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: acute heart failure syndrome, acute coronary syndrome, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  14. The Importance of Older Family Members in Providing Social Resources and Promoting Cancer Screening in Families with a Hereditary Cancer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Hadley, Donald W.; Goergen, Andrea F.; Skapinsky, Kaley F.; Devlin, Hillary C.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the role of older family members as providers of social resources within familial network systems affected by an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome. Design and Methods: Respondents who previously participated in a study that involved genetic counseling and testing for Lynch syndrome and their family network…

  15. Gastrointestinal Polyposis Syndromes : Clinical and molecular aspects of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Juvenile Polyposis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, L.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important cause death. In the Netherlands, approximately 10.000 patients are diagnosed with CRC each year. Rare hereditary gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes predisposing to CRC, including familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), juvenile polyposis (JPS) and

  16. (GPR98) gene in an Iranian family with Usher syndrome type II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-04

    Dec 4, 2014 ... Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by bilateral sensorineural ... Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) which is manifested by severe to profound congenital ... down-sloping moderate sensorineural HL across all frequencies in this family. (c) Segregation of c.10019T>G (p.

  17. Early onset of renal cancer in a family with Birt-Hogg-DubE syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijt, I; Jong, D.; Teertstra, H.J.; Axwijk, P.H.; Gille, J.J.P.; Bell, K.; Rens, van A.; Velden, van der A.W.G.; Middelton, L.; Horenblas, S.

    2009-01-01

    Sons A/S, 2009 Birt-Hogg-DubE syndrome is a hereditary syndrome characterized by benign disease of skin and lungs and a risk of malignant renal tumors. We describe a clinical and genetic study of a large Dutch family with a novel mutation in the FLCN gene. Renal cancer at very young age occurred in

  18. A new mutation causing autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome in a Danish family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyhreter, Heike; Schwartz, Marianne; Kristensen, Tim D

    2003-01-01

    We describe four members in a family of 8 individuals over 3 generations with the autosomal dominant inherited periodic fever syndrome tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). The patients had recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain, arthritis, and rash. We examined...

  19. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  20. Adaptation in families of children with Down syndrome in East Asian countries: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunkyung; Van Riper, Marcia

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this integrative literature review was to understand the experiences of East Asian families of children with Down syndrome and identify factors affecting their adaptation in the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment and Adaptation. Socio-cultural factors influence how well families adapt following the birth of a child with Down syndrome. Existing literature in this area has focused primarily on families from Western cultures. This is problematic because nurses care for families from all over the world. Therefore, the focus of this review is on families of children with Down syndrome living in East Asia, where Confucianism is dominant. Integrative literature review. Online databases (i.e. PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO) and a public search engine (i.e. Google Scholar) were used along with manual searches of reference lists and major journals. Studies were limited to original publications written in English and published between 1990-2014. Two authors independently performed integrative review processes proposed by Whittemore and Knafl and a quality assessment using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Like families in Western cultures, some East Asian families of children with Down syndrome adapted well and even thrived while others struggled. Various socio-cultural factors, including some associated with Confucianism, played a role in how individuals, dyads and families adapted. An understanding of socio-cultural influences can help nurses implement culturally sensitive family-centred interventions with families of children with Down syndrome. It may also facilitate policy changes concerning resources for these families. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in a patient presenting with familial spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Andrew; Roberts, David H; Gangadharan, Sidhu P; Kent, Michael S

    2014-07-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is a recently discovered autosomal-dominant disease caused by a mutation in the folliculin gene. We report a patient with familial spontaneous pneumothorax who was found to have BHD syndrome. Patients with a personal and family history of pneumothoraces and computed tomographic (CT) findings of multiple pulmonary cysts should alert the thoracic surgeon to this syndrome; additional evaluation and testing may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Like Father, Like Daughter-inherited cutis aplasia occurring in a family with Marfan syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Yasmin Florence Khodeja; Williams, Charles A; Schoch, Jennifer Jane; Andrews, Israel David

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a newborn with co-occurrence of Marfan syndrome and aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and a family history significant for Marfan syndrome and ACC in the father. This case details a previously unreported mutation in Marfan syndrome and describes a novel coinheritance of Marfan syndrome and ACC.

  3. Mutation spectrum in South American Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Nilbert, Mef; Wernhoff, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system.......Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system....

  4. Waardenburg's Syndrome in a Nigerian Family | Onabolu | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both girls presented with white forelock, heterochromia irides and sensorineural deafness. WS is inherited as an ... Deafness, which is the most disabling feature of this syndrome should be identified early to prepare the child for proper education. KEY WORDS: Waardenburg's Syndrome, genetic mutation, deafness. [Nig.

  5. Williams Syndrome: Daily Challenges and Positive Impact on the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallan, Susan; Senior, Joyce; Reilly, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the distinctive physical, cognitive, personality and behavioural characteristics associated with Williams syndrome, few studies to date have examined parental experiences of raising a child with this genetic syndrome. Methods: This explorative pilot study employed predominantly qualitative methodologies via face-to-face…

  6. Divorce in families of children with Down syndrome: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Richard C; Hodapp, Robert M

    2007-07-01

    In this study, we examined the nature, timing, and correlates of divorce in families of children with Down syndrome (647), other birth defects (10,283) and no identified disability (361,154). Divorce rates among families of children with Down syndrome were lower than in the other two groups. When divorce did occur in the Down syndrome group, however, a higher proportion occurred within the first 2 years after the child's birth. Mothers and fathers of children with Down syndrome were much more likely to divorce if they were younger, had not graduated from high school, and if fathers were less educated and lived in a rural area. Few effects on divorce were noted for a variety of family structure variables.

  7. Use of Equipment and Respite Services and Caregiver Health among Australian Families Living with Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Downs, Jenny; Bebbington, Ami; Jacoby, Peter; Girdler, Sonya; Leonard, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed factors that could influence equipment and respite services use among Australian families caring for a girl/woman with Rett syndrome and examined relationships between use of these resources and the health of female caregivers. Data was sourced from questionnaires completed by families (n=170) contributing to the Australian…

  8. FAMILIAL CASE OF CHROMOSOME 22q11.2 DELETION SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tuzankina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The work represents a family which includes two siblings with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Their mother carries the same chromosome anomaly, but with apparently normal phenotype. Hence, this interesting case of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome exists in 2 generations of the same family. The aim of this study was analysis of phenotypic manifestations in the family members with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Clinical examination of the patients, their life story and pedigree and, along with routine clinical and biochemical analysis, and immune state testing, along with ultrasound imaging of thymus and thyroid glands, heart and abdominal cavity. We made conclusions that the phenotypic features associated with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion may be different for distinct family members. Further studies are required to determine length of deleted segment and the genes affected, as well as to establish the genotype-phenotype interactions and disease prognosis.

  9. No evidence of genetic anticipation in a large family with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupart, D; Goldberg, P; Algar, U; Vorster, A; Ramesar, R

    2014-03-01

    Lynch syndrome is the commonest inherited cause of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genetic anticipation occurs when the age of onset of a disorder decreases in successive generations. It is controversial whether this occurs in Lynch syndrome. Previous studies have included heterogenous groups of subjects from multiple families, including subjects with a clinical diagnosis (based on family history) as well as those with proven germline mismatch repair gene mutations. The purpose of this study was to determine whether genetic anticipation occurs in mismatch repair gene carriers from a single Lynch syndrome family. This study includes members of a single family known to carry an MLH1 gene mutation who are proven germline mutation carriers or obligate carriers (based on their offspring's mutation status). Evidence of genetic anticipation (determined by age of onset of first CRC) was sought in two ways: Firstly, subjects were grouped as parent-child pairs and individuals were compared with their own offspring; secondly they were grouped by generation within the family tree. The Kaplan-Meier technique was used to adjust for variable follow up times. The family tree consisted of 714 subjects. Ninety-two subjects over five generations were included in the study. There was no evidence of genetic anticipation over the generations. (P = 0.37). Similarly, in the 75 parent-child pairs identified, age of onset of CRC was similar for parents and children (P = 0.51). We could not identify any evidence of genetic anticipation in mutation carriers from a single family with Lynch syndrome.

  10. A Danish family with dominant deafness-onychodystrophy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, Dina; Torring, Pernille M

    2013-01-01

    The rare hereditary disorder "dominant deafness and onychodystrophy (DDOD) syndrome" (OMIM 124480) has been described in a few case reports. No putative DDOD gene or locus has been mapped and the cause of the disorder remains unknown.......The rare hereditary disorder "dominant deafness and onychodystrophy (DDOD) syndrome" (OMIM 124480) has been described in a few case reports. No putative DDOD gene or locus has been mapped and the cause of the disorder remains unknown....

  11. Possible bradycardic mode of death and successful pacemaker treatment in a large family with features of long QT syndrome type 3 and Brugada syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M. P.; Wilde, A. A.; Viersma, T. J. W.; Brouwer, J.; Haaksma, J.; van der Hout, A. H.; Stolte-Dijkstra, I.; Bezzina, C. R.; van Langen, I. M.; Beaufort-Krol, G. C.; Cornel, J. H.; Crijns, H. J.

    2001-01-01

    We recently identified a novel mutation of SCN5A (1795insD) in a large family with features of both long QT syndrome type 3 and the Brugada syndrome. The purpose of this study was to detail the clinical features and efficacy of pacemaker therapy in preventing sudden death in this family. The study

  12. A novel NHS mutation causes Nance-Horan Syndrome in a Chinese family

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Qi; Li, Yunping; Kousar, Rizwana; Guo, Hui; Peng, Fenglan; Zheng, Yu; Yang, Xiaohua; Long, Zhigao; Tian, Runyi; Xia, Kun; Lin, Haiying; Pan, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Background Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) (OMIM: 302350) is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, with occasional dental anomalies, characteristic dysmorphic features, brachymetacarpia and mental retardation. Carrier females exhibit similar manifestations that are less severe than in affected males. Methods Here, we report a four-generation Chinese family with multiple affected individuals presenting Nance-Horan Syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing co...

  13. Identification of three novel NHS mutations in families with Nance-Horan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Kristen M.; Wu, Junhua; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Stambolian, Dwight

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is an infrequent and often overlooked X-linked disorder characterized by dense congenital cataracts, microphthalmia, and dental abnormalities. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the NHS gene, whose function is not known. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and distribution of NHS gene mutations and compare genotype with Nance-Horan phenotype in five North American NHS families. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from white blood cells f...

  14. Dual Familial Roles: An Asperger's Syndrome Case Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Julie K.; Ward, A. Kris

    2010-01-01

    Sibling interactions are challenges that all families face on a daily basis. These interactions are significantly more difficult when one child has autism. With the apparent increase in diagnoses of autism, there are more families each year who are dealing with issues of relationships. Children learn, as part of the growing up experience, how to…

  15. Neonatal familial Evans syndrome associated with joint hypermobility and mitral valve regurgitation in three siblings in a Saudi Arab family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Fathelrahman E.; AlBakrah, Mohameed S.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia in the absence of a known underlying cause led to the diagnosis of Evans syndrome in a 9 month old male. Subsequently, a similar diagnosis was made in two siblings (a 3 year old boy and a 1 day old girl). The 9 month old had a chronic course with exacerbations. He was treated with steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin and colchiccine with a variable response. He died of congestive heart failure at the age of 8 years. The brother's disease course was one of remission and exacerbation. With time, remissions were prolonged and paralleled an improvement in joint hypermobility. The sister died of sepsis after a chronic course with severe exacerbattions. Only two families with Evans syndrome have been reported in the English medical literature. In one report (in a Saudi Arab family), the disease was associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia. (author)

  16. Dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias: under-recognized movement disorders in domestic animals? A comparison with human dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eRichter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia is defined as a neurological syndrome characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting, often repetitive movements and postures. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders encompassing dystonia, chorea, athetosis and ballism in conscious individuals. Several decades of research have enhanced the understanding of the etiology of human dystonia and dyskinesias that are associated with dystonia, but the pathophysiology remains largely unknown. The spontaneous occurrence of hereditary dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesia is well documented in rodents used as animal models in basic dystonia research. Several hyperkinetic movement disorders, described in dogs, horses and cattle, show similarities to these human movement disorders. Although dystonia is regarded as the third most common movement disorder in humans, it is often misdiagnosed because of the heterogeneity of etiology and clinical presentation. Since these conditions are poorly known in veterinary practice, their prevalence may be underestimated in veterinary medicine. In order to attract attention to these movement disorders, i.e. dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias associated with dystonia, and to enhance interest in translational research, this review gives a brief overview of the current literature regarding dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesia in humans, and summarizes similar hereditary movement disorders reported in domestic animals.

  17. Genotype–phenotype correlation in long QT syndrome families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera Fatima Qureshi

    2015-11-01

    Of the 46 families screened, 18 probands revealed novel variations/compound heterozygosity in the gene/s screened. Families 1–4 revealed probands carrying novel variations in KCNQ1 gene along with compound heterozygosity of risk genotypes of the SCN5A, KCNE1 and NPPA gene/s polymorphisms screened. It was also observed that families- 5, 6 and 7 were typical cases of “anticipation” in which both mother and child were diagnosed with congenital LQTS (cLQTS. Families- 16 and 17 represented aLQTS probands with variations in IKs and INa encoding genes. First degree relatives (FDRs carrying the same haplotype as the proband were also identified which may help in predictive testing and management of LQTS. Most of the probands exhibiting a family history were found to be genetic compounds which clearly points to the role of cardiac genes and their modifiers in a recessive fashion in LQTS manifestation.

  18. Waardenburg syndrome with familial unilateral renal agenesis: a new syndrome variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Katie M; Smith, Alisha J; Dansby, Linda M; Diskin, Charles J

    2015-06-01

    A 64-year-old man with Waardenburg syndrome presented with anuria and was subsequently discovered by renal ultrasound to have unilateral renal agenesis. The patient is one of three generations with incidental finding of renal agenesis also marked by the presence of Waardenburg syndrome. To our knowledge, there has been no mention elsewhere in the scientific literature of a variant of Waardenburg syndrome with associated renal agenesis. © 2014 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2014 International Society for Apheresis.

  19. Familial Peters Plus syndrome with absent anal canal, sacral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here we report an 8 month old boy with typical features of Peters Plus syndrome including eye anomalies, dysmorphic features, global developmental delay, growth retardation, bilateral talipes equinovarus, complex renal anomalies, absent anal canal, sacral agenesis and sensorineural hearing loss. To our knowledge, the ...

  20. Allgrove syndrome: an Egyptian family with two affected siblings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ola H. Gebril

    2013-11-15

    Nov 15, 2013 ... Abstract Background: Allgrove or AAA (Triple A) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive dis- ease characterized by achalasia, alacrima, adrenocorticotrophic insufficiency and some neurologic abnormalities. Case report: Here we report two brothers 13 and 15 years old, with variable features of the syn-.

  1. Familial Peters Plus syndrome with absent anal canal, sacral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2013-07-23

    Jul 23, 2013 ... Hydrocephalus, agenesis of the corpus callosum, · and cleft lip/palate represent frequent associations in fetuses with · Peters' plus syndrome and B3GALTL mutations. Fetal PPS · phenotypes, expanded by Dandy Walker cyst and encephalocele. Prenat Diagn 2013;33:75–80. 428. R.M. Shawky et al.

  2. Two new Rett syndrome families and review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Kirstine; Roende, Gitte; Duno, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder, which is usually caused by de novo mutations in the MECP2 gene. More than 70% of the disease causing MECP2 mutations are eight recurrent C to T transitions, which almost exclusively arise on the paternally derived X chromosome...

  3. Intrafamilial and interfamilial variability of phenotype in familial velo-cardio-facial syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajianpour, M.J. [Alfigen/The Genetics Institute, Pasadena, CA (United States); Lamb, A. [Integrated Genetics, Santa Fe, NM (United States); Covle, M.

    1994-09-01

    Two half-sisters and their mother from one family, and two full-brothers and their mother from another family presented with features of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCSF)/DiGeorge syndrome (DS) with intrafamilial and interfamilial variability of phenotypic expression. None of these patients had an apparent cleft palate. Cardiac anomaly, jejunal atresia and hypocalcemia were present only in the newborn patient. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for VCFS/DS with probe D22S75 showed a deletion in the 22q11.2 region in patients available for the study.

  4. Maternal Parenting Stress in Families with a Child with Angelman Syndrome or Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulffaert, Josette; Scholte, Evert M.; Van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Parenting stress was investigated in mothers with a child with Angelman syndrome (AS) or Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), which are genetically related. Method: Mothers of 24 children with AS and 23 children with PWS (2-12 years) completed the Nijmegen Parenting Stress Index-Short, Developmental Behaviour Checklist, and Vineland Screener…

  5. Unsupportive parenting moderates the effects of family psychosocial intervention on metabolic syndrome in African American youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, E; Miller, G E; Yu, T; Brody, G H

    2017-10-06

    Family relationships have been linked to obesity and related disorders in youth, but few studies have provided causal evidence of this association. This study tested the impact of a family psychosocial intervention on components of metabolic syndrome-a condition driven largely by abdominal obesity-in African American youth. In particular, the study tested whether effects were strongest among those who started at highest risk, that is, with high levels of unsupportive parenting at baseline. Randomized clinical trial of a community sample of 391 African American youth (mean age=11.2 years) conducted in 2001-2002, with follow-up metabolic syndrome assessment in 2014-2015. Participants were assigned either to receive a weekly family intervention or to a control group. The primary study outcome was the number of components of metabolic syndrome that were clinically elevated at age 25, including central adiposity, blood pressure, triglycerides, glucose and low high-density lipoproteins. Unsupportive parenting was measured by questionnaires at baseline. Significant interaction effects were found between group assignment and baseline unsupportive parenting on counts of metabolic syndrome components in youth (beta=-0.17, P=0.03). Among those who started with higher levels of unsupportive parenting at age 11, participation in the family intervention reduced the number of clinically elevated components of the metabolic syndrome at age 25 relative to the control group. No such effect was seen among those who started with good parenting. Mediation analyses suggested that changes in the psychosocial targets of the parenting intervention partially accounted for the effects amongst those high in unsupportive parenting at baseline (effect size=-0.350, s.e.=0.178). These findings suggest that efforts to improve family relationships may be able to ameliorate the detrimental effects that harsh and unsupportive parenting have on obesity-related outcomes such as metabolic syndrome in

  6. A FBN1 mutation association with different phenotypes of Marfan syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yapeng; Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Mingjie; Du, Binbin; Li, Qiaoli; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Yanzhou

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that patients with different FBN1 mutations often present more considerable phenotypic variation compared to different members of the related family carrying a same mutation. The purpose of our study was to identify pathogenic mutation and provide more information about genotype-phenotypic correlations in a large Chinese family with Marfan syndrome. 15 related family members from a Chinese 4-generation pedigree with Marfan syndrome underwent physical, ophthalmologic, radiological and cardiovascular examinations. The propositus has De Bakey III aortic dissection and didn't fulfill the revised Ghent criteria for Marfan syndrome. Nine family members have ectopia lentis and their echocardiogram was normal. Five other family members have no evidence of Marfan syndrome. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes. The exome sequencing was employed on the propositus, then the Sanger sequencing was conducted for mutation verification in other 14 participants of this family. The causative mutation in FBN1 discovered in the propositus was a known heterozygous missense mutation, c.1633T>G (p.R545C), in exon 14 (NM 000138). This same mutation was also identified in all 9 ectopia lentis patients and one unaffected 8-year-old girl. However, the same mutation was not discovered in other 4 unaffected family members. Our data enhance the information of genotype-phenotype correlation owing to FBN1 mutations. To our current knowledge, we firstly reported that the same FBN1 mutation, c. 1633C>T (Arg545Cys), was detected simultaneously in three different cardinal phenotypes (ectopia lentis, aortic dissection and unaffected) within one family. The unaffected girl with FBN1 mutation may presumably represent a rare case of nonpenetrance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome or Syndromic Diarrhea—Report of Three Members in a Family, First Report from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. E. Mahjoub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intractable diarrhea of infancy (IDI includes several types of early onset diarrhea; one of the rare etiologies is trichohepatoenteric (THE syndrome, also known as syndromic diarrhea (SD which was primarily described by Stankler et al. Hereby we report a family with several affected members which to our knowledge is the first case report from Iran. Report of Cases. A three-year-old boy referred with short stature, poor weight gain, and intermittent steatotic diarrhea to our center. He was born to healthy, relative parents (cousins. He did not gain any weight after four months of age and began having intermittent steatotic diarrhea, abdominal distension, and fever. He was hospitalized several times. Two other children in the family also showed somewhat similar symptoms. Two sweat tests were negative for cystic fibrosis. Workup for Celiac disease was performed several times which was negative; however, gluten-free diet was tried several times which was not effective. Workup for Hirschsprung’s disease was performed but colon was ganglionic. Evidence of liver involvement was approved by elevated liver enzymes and coarse echo of liver on sonography. Discussion. Trichoenterohepatic syndrome should be put in mind in cases of intractable diarrhea presenting in a family with several affected members. Early diagnosis would save patients from unnecessary workups.

  8. Behaviour Problems in the Siblings of Children with Down Syndrome: Associations with Family Responsibilities and Parental Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuskelly, Monica; Hayes, Alan; Chant, David

    1998-01-01

    Forty-five Australian families with children with Down syndrome and 88 comparison families provided information about their children's behavior problems and involvement in household tasks. For the brothers of children with Down syndrome, significant negative correlations between household tasks and behavior problems were found on fathers' reports.…

  9. Germinal mosaicism in a family with BO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Hattori, Mitsuru; Takumi, Yutaka; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2015-05-01

    To clarify the existence of germinal mosaicism, we performed a genetic analysis of 2 siblings identified with an EYA1 mutation associated with branchiooto (BO) syndrome but who were born from normal parents. Detailed data from the 2 affected siblings were collected for clinical diagnosis, with haplotype analysis also performed to prove germinal mosaicism. The 2 sisters showed characteristic clinical features of BO syndrome (middle and inner ear anomalies, microtia, and auditory canal stenosis/atresia). Haplotype analysis confirmed the genetic relationship between the affected sisters and their parents. The younger sister with auditory canal atresia received a bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha), a transcutaneous bone conduction hearing device, resulting in a good hearing outcome. Based on the results of haplotype analysis, we proved that the BO syndrome in these cases was caused by germinal mosaicism of the EYA1 gene in either the mother or father. We also demonstrated that the bone-conduction hearing implant is a good option for BO patients with complex outer, middle, and inner ear anomalies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. [CARDIORENAL SYNDROME: CLINICAL FEATURES, EARLY DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT AT FAMILY MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, B Bergman

    2016-12-01

    The interdependent damage to the heart and kidney organ systems is defined as cardiorenal syndrome, a complex pathophysiological disorder of the heart and kidney in which acute or chronic dysfunction of one organ can lead to acute or chronic damage to the other. Identification and early diagnosis of some subtypes of cardiorenal syndrome very often begin at family physician office, however, the use of simple and reliable diagnostic procedures such as MICE score using ECG and biomarkers has not been implemented yet. The clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment vary according to the 5 cardiorenal syndrome subtypes, as described herein. Rational diagnosis of heart failure at family medicine office should include biomarkers (BNP and NT-pro BNP) before performing ultrasound of the heart, while for kidneys creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate are still in use, but not cysteine C and NGAL. Diagnostic procedure for suspected heart failure at family medicine office should include kidney function estimate and vice versa. Access to treatment of cardiorenal syndrome differs depending on the specialty to which the patient is referred first, i.e. consultant examination, cardiologist or nephrologist. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment of cardiorenal syndrome is still lacking.

  11. Family-Based Genetic Association Study of DLGAP3 in Tourette Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crane, J.; Fagerness, J.; Osiecki, L.; Gunnell, B.; Stewart, S.E.; Pauls, D.L.; Scharf, J.M.; Heutink, P.

    2011-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder that is familial and highly heritable. Although genetic influences are thought to play a significant role in the development of TS, no definite TS susceptibility genes have been identified to date. TS is believed to be genetically

  12. Nance-Horan syndrome: linkage analysis in a family from The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, A. A.; ten Brink, J.; Schuurman, E. J.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    Linkage analysis was carried out in a Dutch family with Nance-Horan (NH) syndrome. Close linkage without recombination between NH and the Xp loci DXS207, DXS43, and DXS365 (zmax = 3.23) was observed. Multipoint linkage analysis and the analysis of recombinations in multiple informative meioses

  13. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florijn, Ralph J.; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J. J. M.; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the

  14. Family and Professional Congruence in Communication Assessments of Preschool Boys with Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sandra C.; Roberts, Joanne E.

    1999-01-01

    A study compared family and professional assessment of the communication skills of 34 preschool males with Fragile X syndrome. Moderate agreement was found for expressive communication ratings, whereas agreement for receptive communication ratings was low to moderate. Parents rated their children significantly higher than did professionals for…

  15. [From gene to disease; tumor necrosis factor receptor and a syndrome of familial periodic fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2001-01-01

    Familial Hibernian fever (FHF) is a rare hereditary syndrome that causes periodic attacks of fever and inflammation. It is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder. The gene involved in FHF encodes for a receptor for tumour necrosis factor (TNFR1). These mutations are thought to result in impaired

  16. Heritability of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in a Dutch Twin-family study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.M.; Sadrzadeh, S.; Lambalk, C.B.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders among women of reproductive age. There is evidence for a genetic component in PCOS based on familial clustering of cases. Objective: In the present study, the heritability of PCOS was estimated.

  17. Senior-Loken syndrome: A novel NPHP5 gene mutation in a family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Makia J Marafie

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... is Senior-Loken syndrome, a hereditary heterogeneous multiorgan disorder, which combines neph- ronophthisis with ... Case report: Here, we are reporting two children from an Arab family with a novel frameshift mutation found in ..... diseases, which are scattered in the Arab world and Middle. East to help ...

  18. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome: A Long-Term Study in a Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santana Santos, Thiago; Vajgel, André; Martins-Filho, Paulo Ricardo Saquete; de Albuquerque Maranhao Filho, Almir Walter; De Holanda Vasconcellos, Ricardo José; Frota, Riedel; Filho, José Rodrigues Laureano

    2015-01-01

    We present a family case series with 10 individuals having nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) with a 10-year follow-up. All articles published in the literature between 1967 and 2011 on familial Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in any language were surveyed to determine the mapping of cases per country of occurrence of this disease. All patients in the present series were presented with calcification of the falx cerebri, mild hypertelorism, and frontal bossing. Odontogenic keratocystic tumors, palmar and plantar pits, and multiple basal cell carcinomas occurred in 90, 40, and 20%, respectively, of the patients. One of the patients died of skin cancer. Diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst tumors was confirmed by histopathological examination. NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome; it is important to recognize it when a patient has multiple odontogenic keratocyst tumors because life-long monitoring is essential for patient management. PMID:26889355

  19. Coexistence of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D Syndrome in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resul Yilmaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available     Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are Mendelian inherited single gene diseases which are also known as hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and inflammation. Familial Mediterranean Fever and Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome are prototypes and are inherited autosomal recessively. The diagnosis is based on clinical course, family history and is confirmed with genetic mutation analysis. We describe a 5- year-old boy who had recurrent attacks of fever, skin rash, and cervical lymphadenopathy since he was 2 years old. His genetic analysis revealed homozygous M694V and V377I for MEFV and MVK gene respectively. Due to our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient who has both HIDS and FMF clinical and genetic features.

  20. Comparison Groups in Autism Family Research: Down Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, and Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Abbeduto, Leonard; Krauss, Marty Wyngaarden; Greenberg, Jan; Swe, April

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines methodological challenges inherent in conducting research on families of children with autism and in comparing these families with others who are coping with different types of disabilities or who have nondisabled children. Although most comparative research has contrasted families whose child has autism with those whose child…

  1. Genetic analysis of a Chinese family with members affected with Usher syndrome type II and Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueling; Lin, Xiao-Jiang; Tang, Xiangrong; Chai, Yong-Chuan; Yu, De-Hong; Chen, Dong-Ye; Wu, Hao

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of a family presenting with multiple symptoms overlapping Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4). Targeted next-generation sequencing including the exon and flanking intron sequences of 79 deafness genes was performed on the proband. Co-segregation of the disease phenotype and the detected variants were confirmed in all family members by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The affected members of this family had two different recessive disorders, USH2 and WS4. By targeted next-generation sequencing, we identified that USH2 was caused by a novel missense mutation, p.V4907D in GPR98; whereas WS4 due to p.V185M in EDNRB. This is the first report of homozygous p.V185M mutation in EDNRB in patient with WS4. This study reported a Chinese family with multiple independent and overlapping phenotypes. In condition, molecular level analysis was efficient to identify the causative variant p.V4907D in GPR98 and p.V185M in EDNRB, also was helpful to confirm the clinical diagnosis of USH2 and WS4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A family with Townes-Brocks syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism and a novel mutation of the SALL1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Ik; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Han Wook; Oh, Sung Hee

    2010-12-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is a rare autosomal dominant congenital disorder caused by mutations in the SALL1 gene. Its signs and symptoms overlap with other genetic syndromes, including VACTERL association, Pendred syndrome, Baller-Gerold syndrome, and cat eye syndrome. Structural vertebral abnormalities, hypoplasia of the thumb, and radial bone abnormalities, which are not usually associated with TBS, help in the differential diagnosis of these syndromes. We report the case of a family whose members were diagnosed with TBS with congenital hypothyroidism and had a novel SALL1 gene mutation.

  3. COCKAYNE SYNDROME: REPORT OF TWO CASES WITHIN A FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohammadi

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and phenotypic features of two siblings (a 12 years old girl and her 7 year old brother with Cockayne syndrome are described. The main problems were mild to moderate mental retardation, dwarfism, clumsy gait, photosensitive skin lesions and progeroid (senile like appearance. Brain CT - scans revealed symmetrical, well defined areas of calcification mainly located at lenticular nuclei, in both patients. Vie brainstem auditory responses also showed increased hearing thresholds and absolute wave latencies, that were more prominent in the older sister. The older patient had a healthy twin sister with normal mental function and phenotypic appearance.

  4. Association of Family Composition and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Adults Aged over 45 Years Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ju

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the relationship between family composition and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome by gender in Korean adults aged 45 years and older. The sample consisted of 11,291 participants in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2010 to 2012. We used complex sample analyses, including strata, cluster, and sample weighting, to allow generalization to the Korean population. Complex samples crosstabs and chi-square tests were conducted to compare the percentage of sociodemographic characteristics to the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components by gender and family composition. Next, a complex sample logistic regression was performed to examine the association between family composition and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome by gender. The percentage of adults living alone was 5.6% for men and 13.9% for women. Slightly more women (14.0%) than men (10.1%) reported living with three generations. The percentage of metabolic syndrome in Korean adults aged 45 years and older was 53.2% for men and 35.7% for women. For women, we found that living with one or three generations was significantly associated with a higher risk of metabolic syndrome, blood pressure, and triglyceride abnormality after adjusting for age, education, household income, smoking, physical activity, and body mass index, when compared to living alone. No significant relationships were found for men. A national strategy, tailored on gender and family composition, needs to be developed in order to prevent the increase of metabolic syndrome in Korean women over middle age. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Muckle-Wells syndrome in an Indian family associated with NLRP3 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M C Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muckle - Wells syndrome (MWS is a rare autosomal dominant disease that belongs to a group of hereditary periodic fever syndromes. It is part of the wider spectrum of the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS which has only rarely been described in non-Caucasian individuals. It is characterized by recurrent self-limiting episodes of fever, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia and conjunctivitis from childhood. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss and amyloidosis are two late complications. MWS is caused by gain of function mutations in the NLRP3 gene, which encodes cryopyrin, a protein involved in regulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines. We report two patients with MWS in an Indian family associated with the p.D303N mutation in the NLRP3 gene. These findings promote awareness of these hereditary periodic fever syndromes as a cause for recurrent fevers from childhood in the Indian population.

  6. Indsigter og udfordringer i danske Lynch-syndrom-familier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Timshel, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-01-01

    The Danish Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) Register is a national resource that registers families with hereditary colorectal cancer. HNPCC is the most common type of hereditary colorectal cancer and carries an increased risk of other tumor types. Genetic diagnostics has identif...

  7. Immotile cilia syndrome: A recombinant family at HLA-linked gene locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparini, P.; Grifa, A.; Oggiano, N.; Fabbrizzi, E.; Giorgi, P.L. [Univsita di Ancona (Israel)

    1994-02-15

    The immotile-cilia syndrome (ICS) is an autosomal recessive trait of congenital dismobility or even complete immobility of cilia in the ciliated epithelia (MIM 244400). Recurrent upper respiratory infections in early childhood are the most common clinical findings. Recently a disease locus was mapped by sib pair analysis in two unrelated families on 6p tightly linked to HLA class II loci, such as DR and DQ. In order to confirm this assignment and to test the presence of possible heterogeneity, the authors analyzed several ICS families utilizing DNA makers of HLA class II region. Here they report the identification of a recombinant family at this locus. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Osteochondritis dissecans and Osgood Schlatter disease in a family with Stickler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaushofer Klaus

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Stickler syndrome is among the most common autosomal dominant connective tissue disorders but is often unrecognised and therefore not diagnosed by clinicians. Despite much speculation, the cause of osteochondrosis in general and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS in particular remain unclear. Etiological understanding is essential. We describe a pair of family subjects presented with OCD and OSS as a symptom complex rather than a diagnosis. Methods Detailed clinical and radiographic examinations were undertaken with emphasis on the role of MRI imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging may allow early prediction of articular lesion healing potential in patients with Stickler syndrome. Results The phenotype of Stickler syndrome can be diverse and therefore misleading. The expectation that the full clinical criteria of any given genetic disorder such as Stickler syndrome will always be present can easily lead to an underestimation of these serious inheritable disorders. We report here two family subjects, a male proband and his aunt (paternal sister, both presented with the major features of Stickler syndrome. Tall stature with marfanoid habitus, astigmatism/congenital vitreous abnormality and submucus cleft palate/cleft uvula, and enlarged painful joints with early onset osteoarthritis. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS were the predominating joint abnormalities. Conclusion We observed that the nature of the articular and physeal abnormalities was consistent with a localised manifestation of a more generalised epiphyseal dysplasia affecting the weight-bearing joints. In these two patients, OCD and OSS appeared to be the predominant pathologic musculoskeletal consequences of an underlying Stickler's syndrome. It is empirical to consider generalised epiphyseal dysplasia as a major underlying causation that might drastically affect the weight-bearing joints.

  9. Osteochondritis dissecans and Osgood Schlatter disease in a family with Stickler syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2009-02-04

    Stickler syndrome is among the most common autosomal dominant connective tissue disorders but is often unrecognised and therefore not diagnosed by clinicians. Despite much speculation, the cause of osteochondrosis in general and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS) in particular remain unclear. Etiological understanding is essential. We describe a pair of family subjects presented with OCD and OSS as a symptom complex rather than a diagnosis. Detailed clinical and radiographic examinations were undertaken with emphasis on the role of MRI imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging may allow early prediction of articular lesion healing potential in patients with Stickler syndrome. The phenotype of Stickler syndrome can be diverse and therefore misleading. The expectation that the full clinical criteria of any given genetic disorder such as Stickler syndrome will always be present can easily lead to an underestimation of these serious inheritable disorders. We report here two family subjects, a male proband and his aunt (paternal sister), both presented with the major features of Stickler syndrome. Tall stature with marfanoid habitus, astigmatism/congenital vitreous abnormality and submucus cleft palate/cleft uvula, and enlarged painful joints with early onset osteoarthritis. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS) were the predominating joint abnormalities. We observed that the nature of the articular and physeal abnormalities was consistent with a localised manifestation of a more generalised epiphyseal dysplasia affecting the weight-bearing joints. In these two patients, OCD and OSS appeared to be the predominant pathologic musculoskeletal consequences of an underlying Stickler's syndrome. It is empirical to consider generalised epiphyseal dysplasia as a major underlying causation that might drastically affect the weight-bearing joints.

  10. Family-based cardiac screening in relatives of victims of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGorrian, Catherine

    2013-02-03

    AIMS: Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) occurs when a person suffers a sudden, unexpected death, with no cause found at postmortem examination. We aimed to describe the cardiac screening outcomes in a population of relatives of SADS victimsMETHODS AND RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective cohort study of consecutive families attending the Family Heart Screening clinic at the Mater Misericordiae Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, from January 2007 to September 2011. Family members of SADS victims underwent a standard screening protocol. Adjunct clinical and postmortem information was sought on the proband. Families who had an existing diagnosis, or where the proband had epilepsy, were excluded. Of 115 families identified, 73 were found to fit inclusion criteria and were retained for analysis, with data available on 262 relatives. Over half of the screened family members were female, and the mean age was 38.6 years (standard deviation 15.6). In 22 of 73 families (30%), and 36 of 262 family members (13.7%), a potentially inheritable cause of SADS was detected. Of the population screened, 32 patients (12.2%) were treated with medication, and 5 (1.9%) have received implantable cardiac defibrillators. Of the five families with long QT syndrome (LQTS) who had a pathogenic gene mutation identified, three carried two such mutations.CONCLUSION: In keeping with international estimates, 30% of families of SADS victims were found to have a potentially inherited cardiac disease. The most common positive finding was LQTS. Advances in postmortem standards and genetic studies may assist in achieving more diagnoses in these families.

  11. Identification of three novel NHS mutations in families with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kristen M; Wu, Junhua; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Lewis, Richard Alan; Stambolian, Dwight

    2007-03-27

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is an infrequent and often overlooked X-linked disorder characterized by dense congenital cataracts, microphthalmia, and dental abnormalities. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the NHS gene, whose function is not known. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and distribution of NHS gene mutations and compare genotype with Nance-Horan phenotype in five North American NHS families. Genomic DNA was isolated from white blood cells from NHS patients and family members. The NHS gene coding region and its splice site donor and acceptor regions were amplified from genomic DNA by PCR, and the amplicons were sequenced directly. We identified three unique NHS coding region mutations in these NHS families. This report extends the number of unique identified NHS mutations to 14.

  12. A novel mutation in PAX3 associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun; Luo, Jianfen; Zhang, Fengguo; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Mingming; Ma, Yalin; Xu, Lei; Bai, Xiaohui; Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    The novel compound heterozygous mutation in PAX3 was the key genetic reason for WS1 in this family, which was useful to the molecular diagnosis of WS1. Screening the pathogenic mutations in a four generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1). WS1 was diagnosed in a 4-year-old boy according to the Waardenburg syndrome Consortium criteria. The detailed family history revealed four affected members in the family. Routine clinical, audiological examination, and ophthalmologic evaluation were performed on four affected and 10 healthy members in this family. The genetic analysis was conducted, including the targeted next-generation sequencing of 127 known deafness genes combined with Sanger sequencing, TA clone and bioinformatic analysis. A novel compound heterozygous mutation c.[169_170insC;172_174delAAG] (p.His57ProfsX55) was identified in PAX3, which was co-segregated with WS1 in the Chinese family. This mutation was absent in the unaffected family members and 200 ethnicity-matched controls. The phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of Pax3 protein further confirmed that the novel compound heterozygous mutation was pathogenic.

  13. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  14. Seip-lawrence Syndrome (Three Cases in a Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S.N. Reddy

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available A, rare episode of Seip-Lawrence syndrome manifesting in all three case siblings of consanpinous parents is reported. Two children we′re male and one female. They exhibited low intelligence,′ gaunt facies, depressed bridge of nose, large low-sct ears, thick lips and protruberant abdomen. Skin was showing hypermelanosis, hypertrichosis, absence of subcutaneous fat and acan nigricaFNx01s with′ very prominent perianal rUgO6itiS In addition, the first child was short statured having hypertrophic Clitoris, hepatomcoy, left ventricular hypertro hy, hyperglycaemia and glycossuria- without ketoacidosis. The second child was, having enlargement of penis, left ventricular hypertrophy,,hepatospienomegaly and abnormal GTT. The third and the youngest child was having only cutaneous changes and no viscoromegaly or biochemical abnormality. Nou Of these patients were having gigantism and advanced bone age.

  15. The non-syndromic familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections maps to 15q21 locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandok Gurangad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD is a critical condition that often goes undiagnosed with fatal consequences. While majority of the cases are sporadic, more than 20% are inherited as a single gene disorder. The most common familial TAA is Marfan syndrome (MFS, which is primarily caused by mutations in fibrillin-1 (FBN1 gene. Patients with FBN1 mutations are at higher risk for dissection compared to other patients with similar size aneurysms. Methods Fifteen family members were genotyped using Affymetrix-10K genechips. A genome-wide association study was carried out using an autosomal dominant model of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Mutation screening of all exons and exon-intron boundaries of FBN1 gene which reside near the peak Lod score was carried out by direct sequencing. Results The index case presented with agonizing substernal pain and was found to have TAAD by transthoracic echocardiogram. The family history was significant for 3 first degree relatives with TAA. Nine additional family members were diagnosed with TAA by echocardiography examinations. The affected individuals had no syndromic features. A genome-wide analysis of linkage mapped the disease gene to a single locus on chromosome 15q21 with a peak Lod score of 3.6 at fibrillin-1 (FBN1 gene locus (odds ratio > 4000:1 in favour of linkage, strongly suggesting that FBN1 is the causative gene. No mutation was identified within the exons and exon-intron boundaries of FBN1 gene that segregated with the disease. Haplotype analysis identified additional mutation carriers who had previously unknown status due to borderline dilation of the ascending aorta. Conclusions A familial non-syndromic TAAD is strongly associated with the FBN1 gene locus and has a malignant disease course often seen in MFS patients. This finding indicates the importance of obtaining detailed family history and echocardiographic screening of extended relatives of patients

  16. Imprinting mutations suggested by abnormal DNA methylation patterns in familial angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, A. (Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany)); Dittrich, B.; Buiting, K.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Horsthemke, B. (Institut fuer Humangenetik, Essen (United Kingdom)); Greger, V.; Lalande, M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Anvret, M. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1994-05-01

    The D15S9 and D15S63 loci in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on chromosome 15 are subject to parent-of-origin-specific DNA methylation. The authors have found two Prader-Willi syndrome families in which the patients carry a maternal methylation imprint on the paternal chromosome. In one of these families, the patients have a small deletion encompassing the gene for the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N, which maps 130 kb telomeric to D15S63. Furthermore, they have identified a pair of nondeletion Angelman syndrome sibs and two isolated Angelman syndrome patients who carry a paternal methylation imprint on the maternal chromosome. These Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients may have a defect in the imprinting process in 15q11-13. The authors propose a model in which a cis-acting mutation prevents the resetting of the imprinting signal in the germ line and thus disturbs the expression of imprinted genes in this region. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Quantitative and qualitative insights into the experiences of children with Rett syndrome and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Jenny; Leonard, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene. It is associated with severe functional impairments and medical comorbidities such as scoliosis and poor growth. The population-based and longitudinal Australian Rett Syndrome Database was established in 1993 and has supported investigations of the natural history of Rett syndrome and effectiveness of treatments, as well as a suite of qualitative studies to identify deeper meanings. This paper describes the early presentation of Rett syndrome, including regression and challenges for families seeking a diagnosis. We discuss the importance of implementing strategies to enhance daily communication and movement, describe difficulties interpreting the presence of pain and discomfort, and argue for a stronger evidence base in relation to management. Finally, we outline a framework for understanding quality of life in Rett syndrome and suggest areas of life to which we can direct efforts in order to improve quality of life. Each of these descriptions is illustrated with vignettes of child and family experiences. Clinicians and researchers must continue to build this framework of knowledge and understanding with efforts committed to providing more effective treatments and supporting the best quality of life for those affected.

  18. Possible bradycardic mode of death and successful pacemaker treatment in a large family with features of long QT syndrome type 3 and Brugada syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, Maarten P.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Viersma, Jan Willem; Brouwer, Jan; Haaksma, Jaap; Van Der Hout, Annemieke H.; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Bezzina, Connie R.; Van Langen, Irene M.; Beaufort-Krol, Gertie C. M.; Hein Cornel, J.A.N.; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.

    Introduction: We recently identified a novel mutation of SCN5A (1795insD) in a large family with features of both long QT syndrome type 3 and the Brugada syndrome. The purpose of this study was to detail the clinical features and efficacy of pacemaker therapy in preventing sudden death in this

  19. Familial 22q11.2 deletion syndrome with autosomal dominant inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Gokturk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the most frequent microdeletion syndrome in humans and caused by hemizygote deletion on only one chromosome. Most of probands have a de novo deletion of 22q11.2, but 8-20% have inherited the 22q11.2 deletion from a parent (autosomal dominant mutation. Genotype-phenotype correlation is weak in this patient group. We aimed to present three members in the same family due to an autosomal dominant inheritance with 22q11.2 deletion and different clinical findings. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 379-385

  20. WAGNER syndrome: anatomic, functional and genetic characterization of a Portuguese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Joana R; Tavares-Ferreira, João; Estrela-Silva, Sérgio; Rocha, Paulo; Brandão, Elisete; Faria, Pedro Alves; Falcão-Reis, Fernando; Rocha-Sousa, Amândio

    2018-01-01

    To report the clinical (anatomic and functional) and genetic findings of Wagner Syndrome (WS) in a Portuguese family. Nine members of the family agreed to be examined. All had complete clinical eye examinations. The proband and selected patients underwent color fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), automatic static white-on-white computerized perimetry, and electrophysiology assessment (flash ERG, multifocal(mf) ERG and dark adaptometry). A pedigree was constructed based on interviews with known affected subjects. Genomic DNA samples derived from venous blood were collected from all affected family members examined. Twenty-eight family members are affected. This family has the typical features of Wagner Syndrome, namely an empty vitreous cavity with veils, mild myopia and cataract. Four examined patients underwent vitreoretinal surgery due to abnormal peripheral vitreoretinal adhesions with peripheral retinal traction (n = 3). Retinal detachment was observed in 5 of the examined subjects. Four of them occurred between the ages of 5 and 15 years. Chorioretinal atrophy is also a frequent finding which results in moderate to severe visual field and advanced rod-cone dystrophy from younger ages, also confirmed by absence of scotopic function on dark adaptation. The macular dysfunction on mfERG was profound and of early onset. A heterozygous mutation in intron 7 of the VCAN gene (c.4004-1G > A) was found. We described a rare autosomal dominant vitreoretinopathy with near complete penetrance in a Portuguese family. Abnormal peripheral vitreoretinal adhesions, retinal detachment and chorioretinal atrophy are present in most of the examined individuals at young ages. Early onset of advanced visual field and electrophysiologic abnormalities were observed in this family. We also added relevant information to the literature by reporting our experience in surgical management of Wagner Syndrome patients with, and at risk of, retinal

  1. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Sibele-Nascimento; Paranaíba, Lívia-Maris-R.; Gomes, Andreia; dos-Santos-Neto, Pedro; Coletta, Ricardo-D.; Cardoso, Aline-Francoise; Frota, Ana-Cláudia; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. Material and Methods To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. Results The pedigree of the family,including the last four generations, was constructed and revealed non-consanguineous marriages. Out of 29 descendants, 16 family members showed features of WS1, with 9 members showing two major criteria indicative of WS1. Five patients showed white forelock and iris hypopigmentation, and four showed dystopia canthorum and iris hypopigmentation. Two patients had hearing loss. Dental abnormalities were identified in three family members, including dental agenesis, conical teeth and taurodontism. Sequencing analysis failed to identify mutations in the PAX3 gene. Conclusions These results confirm that WS1 was transmitted in this family in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and high penetrance. The presence of dental manifestations, especially tooth agenesis and conical teeth which resulted in considerable aesthetic impact on affected individuals was a major clinical feature. Clinical relevance: This article reveals the presence of well-defined dental changes associated with WS1 and tries to establish a possible association between these two entities showing a new spectrum of WS1. Key words:Waardenburg syndrome, hearing loss, oral manifestations, mutation. PMID:27031059

  2. Novel compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations in Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Bakhchane

    Full Text Available The MYO7A gene encodes a protein belonging to the unconventional myosin super family. Mutations within MYO7A can lead to either non syndromic hearing loss or to the Usher syndrome type 1B (USH1B. Here, we report the results of genetic analyses performed on Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non syndromic hearing loss that identified two families with compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations. Five mutations (c.6025delG, c.6229T>A, c.3500T>A, c.5617C>T and c.4487C>A were identified in these families, the latter presenting two differently affected branches. Multiple bioinformatics programs and molecular modelling predicted the pathogenic effect of these mutations. In conclusion, the absence of vestibular and retinal symptom in the affected patients suggests that these families have the isolated non-syndromic hearing loss DFNB2 (nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss presentation, instead of USH1B.

  3. Non-Syndromic Familial Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour: A Rare Case Report in Japanese Identical Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruoka, Yutaka; Yamaji, Iena; Kawai, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour (KCOT) is unicystic or multicystic intraosseous benign tumour of odontogenic origin that recurs due to locally destructive behaviour. KCOTs are usually the first manifestation of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS), an autosomal dominant disorder also known as Gorlin’s syndrome and they are most frequently observed familial symptom regardless of patients’ nationality. In addition, the recurrence rate and multiplicity of KCOTs is relatively high as compared to that of other sporadic carcinomas. KCOT has been considered as a non-hereditary lesion and its familial onset is an extremely rare event in non-NBCCS cases. Here, we describe previously unreported non-syndromic multiple KCOT cases in identical twins in a Japanese family. The subjects were female Japanese identical twins who were 26 and 27 years old, respectively, at the time of diagnosis for KCOT. They had no major or minor features of NBCCS other than KCOT. Although there were lesions that were likely to be dentigerous cysts based on radiographic findings, one of them was KCOT. This case report highlights the importance of precise diagnosis, choice of surgical method and careful observation for multiplicity or familial onset in sporadic KCOT cases without NBCCS. PMID:27656582

  4. Employment Impact and Financial Burden for Families of Children with Fragile X Syndrome: Findings from the National Fragile X Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, L.; Grosse, S.; Raspa, M.; Bailey, D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The employment impact and financial burden experienced by families of children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) has not been quantified in the USA. Method: Using a national fragile X family survey, we analysed data on 1019 families with at least one child who had a full FXS mutation. Out-of-pocket expenditures related to fragile X were…

  5. FURTHER EVIDENCE FOR DOMINANT INHERITANCE AT THE CHROMOSOME-15Q11-13 LOCUS IN FAMILIAL ANGELMAN SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CLAYTONSMITH, J; WEBB, T; ROBB, SA; DIJKSTRA, [No Value; WILLEMS, P; CHENG, XJ; PEMBREY, ME; MALCOLM, S

    1992-01-01

    Eleven patients with Angelman syndrome (AS) and their parents from 5 families have been studied with high resolution chromosome analysis and molecular probes from region 15q11-13 in an attempt to elucidate the mode of inheritance in familial AS. No deletions were detected. All families were

  6. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in two Chinese families with mutations in the FLCN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaocan; Zhou, Yuan; Peng, Yun; Qiu, Rong; Xia, Kun; Tang, Beisha; Zhuang, Wei; Jiang, Hong

    2018-01-22

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an autosomal dominant hereditary condition caused by mutations in the folliculin-encoding gene FLCN (NM_144997). It is associated with skin lesions such as fibrofolliculoma, acrochordon and trichodiscoma; pulmonary lesions including spontaneous pneumothorax and pulmonary cysts and renal cancer. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral venous blood samples of the propositi and their family members. Genetic analysis was performed by whole exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing aiming at corresponding exons in FLCN gene to explore the genetic mutations of these two families. In this study, we performed genetic analysis by whole exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing aiming at corresponding exons in FLCN gene to explore the genetic mutations in two Chinese families. Patients from family 1 mostly suffered from pneumothorax and pulmonary cysts, several of whom also mentioned skin lesions or kidney lesions. While in family 2, only thoracic lesions were found in the patients, without any other clinical manifestations. Two FLCN mutations have been identified: One is an insertion mutation (c.1579_1580insA/p.R527Xfs on exon 14) previously reported in three Asian families (one mainland family and two Taiwanese families); while the other is a firstly reviewed mutation in Asian population (c.649C > T / p.Gln217X on exon 7) that ever been detected in a French family. Overall, The detection of these two mutations expands the spectrum of FLCN mutations and will provide insight into genetic diagnosis and counseling of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

  7. NHS Gene Mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish Families with Nance-Horan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshany, Nadav; Avni, Isaac; Morad, Yair; Weiner, Chen; Einan-Lifshitz, Adi; Pras, Eran

    2017-09-01

    To describe ocular and extraocular abnormalities in two Ashkenazi Jewish families with infantile cataract and X-linked inheritance, and to identify their underlying mutations. Seven affected members were recruited. Medical history, clinical findings, and biometric measurements were recorded. Mutation analysis of the Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) gene was performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified exons. An unusual anterior Y-sutural cataract was documented in the affected male proband. Other clinical features among examined patients included microcorneas, long and narrow faces, and current or previous dental anomalies. A nonsense mutation was identified in each family, including a previously described 742 C>T, p.(Arg248*) mutation in Family A, and a novel mutation 2915 C>A, p.(Ser972*) in Family B. Our study expands the repertoire of NHS mutations and the related phenotype, including newly described anterior Y-sutural cataract and dental findings.

  8. Parental perceptions of the impact of Down syndrome in the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura SERRANO FERNÁNDEZ

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Parenting a child with Down syndrome is a challenge, not only for parents, but also for the whole family system. The present research aims to analyse, from a qualitative point of view, the vision that the parents themselves have of the impact, both positive and negative, that the presence of a child with DS causes in the family. To this end, interviews with 10 participants (3 parents, 3 mothers and 4 professionals in the field of special education have been analysed. The results reveal that, although the diagnosis of SD in a child is an unexpected and stressful event for the family, the general perception of the family impact is positive.

  9. GDNF Gene Is Associated With Tourette Syndrome in a Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Pascual, Alberto; Tischfield, Jay A.; King, Robert A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Mir, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by persistent motor and vocal tics, and frequently accompanied by the comorbidities attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Impaired synaptic neurotransmission has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the association of 28 candidate genes, including genes related to synaptic neurotransmission and neurotrophic factors, with Tourette syndrome. Methods We genotyped 506 polymorphisms in a discovery cohort from the United States composed of 112 families and 47 unrelated singletons with Tourette syndrome (201 cases and 253 controls). Genes containing significant polymorphisms were imputed to fine-map the signal(s) to potential causal variants. Allelic analyses in Tourette syndrome cases were performed to check the role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities. Target polymorphisms were further studied in a replication cohort from southern Spain composed of 37 families and three unrelated singletons (44 cases and 73 controls). Results The polymorphism rs3096140 in glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF) was significant in the discovery cohort after correction (P = 1.5 × 10−4). No linkage disequilibrium was found between rs3096140 and other functional variants in the gene. We selected rs3096140 as target polymorphism, and the association was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). No association with any comorbidity was found. Conclusions As a conclusion, a common genetic variant in GDNF is associated with Tourette syndrome. A defect in the production of GDNF could compromise the survival of parvalbumin interneurons, thus altering the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the corticostriatal circuitry. Validation of this variant in other family cohorts is necessary. PMID:26096985

  10. Spinal fusion in girls with Rett syndrome: post-operative recovery and family experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, C; Leonard, H; Torode, I; Downs, J

    2015-11-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder mainly affecting females and scoliosis is a common co-morbidity. Spinal fusion may be recommended if the scoliosis is progressive. This qualitative study investigated recovery of girls with Rett syndrome during the first 12 post-operative months and explored family perspectives and coping around the time of surgery. Parents registered with the population-based Australian Rett Syndrome Database were recruited to this study if their daughter had a confirmed pathogenic MECP2 mutation and spinal fusion between 2006 and 2012. Twenty-five interviews were conducted to determine their daughter's recovery and parental stresses and coping. Themes in the interview data were identified with content analysis, and the regaining of gross motor skills over the first 12 post-operative months was described with time-to-event (survival) analysis. Pain and energy levels, appetite, mood and coinciding health issues influenced their daughter's post-operative recovery. The majority of girls recovered preoperative sitting (88%), standing (81%) and walking (80%) by 12 months. The decision to proceed with surgery was associated with feelings of fear, obligation, relief and guilt for families. Development of complications, poor support and feelings of isolation increased their emotional burden whereas adequate information and discharge preparation, confidence in self and staff, and balancing personal needs with their daughter's care relieved this burden. Our study identified clinical practice issues in relation to families whose daughter with Rett syndrome undergoes spinal fusion, issues that are also relevant to other severe disabilities. Return of wellness and gross motor skills following spinal fusion in girls with Rett syndrome occurred within the first 12 post-operative months in most cases. Parents require information and practical support to alleviate their emotional burden. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Two TP53 germline mutations in a classical Li-Fraumeni syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hest, Liselotte P; Ruijs, Mariëlle W G; Wagner, Anja; van der Meer, Conny A; Verhoef, Senno; van't Veer, Laura J; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a combination of tumors including sarcoma, breast cancer, brain tumors, adrenocortical carcinoma and leukemia. Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 are associated with LFS. We present a family with LFS in which initially a novel germline TP53 intron 5 splice site mutation was found. A second germline TP53 mutation, the exon 7 Asn235Ser (704A-->G) mutation, was detected in this family through pre-symptomatic DNA testing. This latter mutation has been reported repeatedly in the literature as a pathogenic mutation involved in LFS. We provide evidence for pathogenicity of the novel intron 5 splice site mutation, whereas this evidence is lacking for the exon 7 Asn235Ser (704A-->G) mutation. Our findings emphasize the importance of performing additional tests in case of germline sequence variants with uncertain functional effects.

  12. A report of a probable case of familial Guillain Barre syndrome

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    Mohammad Barzegar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although it is a sporadic disease, few studies have reported cases of Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS in families which postulate a genetic susceptibility. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA typing is an area of discussion in GBS though none of them are considered definitive. In recent years, more studies have evaluated HLA typing in sporadic cases while rarely it has been assessed in familial ones. We report a woman and her daughter experiencing GBS and their HLA typing in a 2-year interval.

  13. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florijn, Ralph J; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J J M; Mannens, Marcel M A M; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Bergen, Arthur A B

    2006-09-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the Netherlands, by dHPLC and direct sequencing. We identified an unique mutation in each family. Three out of these four mutations were not reported before. We report here the first splice site sequence alteration mutation and three protein truncating mutations. Our results suggest that X-linked cataract and NHS are allelic disorders.

  14. Predictive factors for familiality in a Danish clinical cohort of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Nanette M M M; Hjalgrim, Helle; Skov, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a chronic, neurobiological disease, characterized by the presence of motor and vocal tics and it is often accompanied by associated symptoms. The two best-known co-morbidities are Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD...... have examined a large Danish clinical cohort of children with TS (N=307). Validated diagnostic instruments were used to assess the presence of co-morbidities in the children with TS. A three-generation pedigree was drawn for all the probands and through reports from the family, a family history...

  15. Keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness syndrome: first affected family reported in the Middle East

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    Al Fahaad H

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hamad Al FahaadDepartment of Dermatology, College of Medicine, Najran University, Najran, Saudi ArabiaIntroduction: Keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness (KID syndrome is a rare congenital multisystem disorder affecting certain tissues of ectodermal origin such as epidermis, cochlea, and cornea, leading mainly to palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, ichthyosiform scaling, deafness, and blindness. The author reports for the first time in the Middle East three family members suffering from KID syndrome in the southwestern part of Saudi Arabia.Case presentation: Three patients from one family (ages 26, 16, and 14 years of apparently normal parents, with the two eldest being females and the youngest being male. All three patients were referred from a peripheral hospital to our dermatology clinic due to recurrent cutaneous fungal infections on their trunk, forearms, legs, and nails. On full assessment, they also found to have nearly similar cutaneous problems manifested by palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, generalized ichthyosiform scaling, subungual hyperkeratosis, and nail dystrophies. All patients suffered from total hearing loss in both ears since childhood as confirmed by pure tune audiometry. However, there was no blindness in any case; blepharitis with marked photophobia was the only ocular complaint. All these features are classically suggestive of KID syndrome.Keywords: connexin 26, GJB2, ichthyosis, KID syndrome, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis

  16. Growth hormone deficiency and pituitary malformation in a recurrent Cat-Eye syndrome: a family report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedraszak, Guillaume; Braun, Karine; Receveur, Aline; Decamp, Matthieu; Andrieux, Joris; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Copin, Henri; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Mathieu, Michèle; Rochette, Jacques; Morin, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone deficiency affects roughly between one in 3000 and one in 4000 children with most instances of growth hormone deficiency being idiopathic. Growth hormone deficiency can also be associated with genetic diseases or chromosome abnormalities. Association of growth hormone deficiency together with hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation and Cat-Eye syndrome is a very rare condition. We report a family with two brothers presenting with growth delay due to a growth hormone deficiency associated with a polymalformation syndrome. They both displayed pre-auricular pits and tags, imperforate anus and Duane retraction syndrome. Both parents and a third unaffected son displayed normal growth pattern. Cerebral MRI showed a hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation in the two affected brothers. Cytogenetic studies revealed a type I small supernumerary marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22 resulting in a tetrasomy 22pter-22q11.21 characteristic of the Cat-Eye syndrome. The small supernumerary marker chromosome was present in the two affected sons and the mother in a mosaic state. Patients with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency should be evaluated for chromosomal abnormality. Family study should not be underestimated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of Family Composition and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Adults Aged over 45 Years Old

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Ju Kim, RN, ACNP, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between family composition and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome by gender in Korean adults aged 45 years and older. Methods: The sample consisted of 11,291 participants in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2010 to 2012. We used complex sample analyses, including strata, cluster, and sample weighting, to allow generalization to the Korean population. Complex samples crosstabs and chi-square tests were conduc...

  18. The phenotypic spectrum of Schaaf-Yang syndrome – 18 new affected individuals from 14 families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Michael D.; Aten, Emmelien; Cho, Megan T.; Juusola, Jane; Walkiewicz, Magdalena A.; Ray, Joseph W.; Xia, Fan; Yang, Yaping; Graham, Brett H.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Potocki, Lorraine; van Haeringen, Arie; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A.L.; Mancias, Pedro; Northrup, Hope; Kukolich, Mary K.; Weiss, Marjan M.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M.A.; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Levesque, Sebastien; Meeks, Naomi; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Lemke, Danielle; Hamosh, Ada; Lewis, Suzanne K.; Race, Simone; Stewart, Laura L.; Hay, Beverly; Lewis, Andrea M.; Guerreiro, Rita L.; Bras, Jose T.; Martins, Marcia P.; Derksen-Lubsen, Gerarda; Peeters, Els; Stumpel, Connie; Stegmann, Sander; Bok, Levinus A.; Santen, Gijs W.E.; Schaaf, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Truncating mutations in the maternally imprinted, paternally expressed gene MAGEL2, which is located in the Prader-Willi critical region 15q11-13, have recently been reported to cause Schaaf-Yang syndrome, a Prader-Willi-like disease, manifesting developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and autism spectrum disorder. The causality of the reported variants in the context of the patients’ phenotypes was questioned, as MAGEL2 whole gene deletions appear to cause little to no clinical phenotype. Methods Here we report a total of 18 new individuals with Schaaf-Yang syndrome from 14 families, including one family with three individuals found to be affected with a truncating variant of MAGEL2, 11 individuals clinically affected, but not tested molecularly, and a presymptomatic fetal sibling with carrying the pathogenic MAGEL2 variant. Results All cases harbor truncating mutations of MAGEL2, and nucleotides c.1990-1996 arise as a mutational hotspot, with 10 individuals and one fetus harboring a c.1996dupC (p.Q666fs) mutation and two fetuses harboring a c.1996delC (p.Q666fs). The phenotypic spectrum of Schaaf-Yang syndrome ranges from fetal akinesia to individuals with neurobehavioral disease and contractures of the small finger joints. Conclusion This study provides strong evidence for the pathogenicity of truncating mutations of the paternal allele of MAGEL2, refines the associated clinical phenotypes, and highlights implications for genetic counseling of affected families. PMID:27195816

  19. A novel NHS mutation causes Nance-Horan Syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qi; Li, Yunping; Kousar, Rizwana; Guo, Hui; Peng, Fenglan; Zheng, Yu; Yang, Xiaohua; Long, Zhigao; Tian, Runyi; Xia, Kun; Lin, Haiying; Pan, Qian

    2017-01-07

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) (OMIM: 302350) is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, with occasional dental anomalies, characteristic dysmorphic features, brachymetacarpia and mental retardation. Carrier females exhibit similar manifestations that are less severe than in affected males. Here, we report a four-generation Chinese family with multiple affected individuals presenting Nance-Horan Syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing combined with RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing was used to search for a genetic cause underlying the disease phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing identified in all affected individuals of the family a novel donor splicing site mutation (NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A) in intron 4 of the gene NHS, which maps to chromosome Xp22.13. The identified mutation results in an RNA processing defect causing a 416-nucleotide addition to exon 4 of the mRNA transcript, likely producing a truncated NHS protein. The donor splicing site mutation NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A of the NHS gene is the causative mutation in this Nance-Horan Syndrome family. This research broadens the spectrum of NHS gene mutations, contributing to our understanding of the molecular genetics of NHS.

  20. Clinical Auditory Phenotypes Associated with GATA3 Gene Mutations in Familial Hypoparathyroidism-deafness-renal Dysplasia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Lin, Qiong-Fen; Wang, Hong-Yang; Guan, Jing; Lan, Lan; Xie, Lin-Yi; Yu, Lan; Yang, Ju; Zhao, Cui; Liang, Jin-Long; Zhou, Han-Lin; Yang, Huan-Ming; Xiong, Wen-Ping; Zhang, Qiu-Jing; Wang, Da-Yong; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hypoparathyroidism-deafness-renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder primarily caused by haploinsufficiency of GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) gene mutations, and hearing loss is the most frequent phenotypic feature. This study aimed at identifying the causative gene mutation for a three-generation Chinese family with HDR syndrome and analyzing auditory phenotypes in all familial HDR syndrome cases. Methods: Three affected family members underwent otologic examinations, biochemistry tests, and other clinical evaluations. Targeted genes capture combining next-generation sequencing was performed within the family. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the causative mutation. The auditory phenotypes of all reported familial HDR syndrome cases analyzed were provided. Results: In Chinese family 7121, a heterozygous nonsense mutation c.826C>T (p.R276*) was identified in GATA3. All the three affected members suffered from sensorineural deafness and hypocalcemia; however, renal dysplasia only appeared in the youngest patient. Furthermore, an overview of thirty HDR syndrome families with corresponding GATA3 mutations revealed that hearing impairment occurred earlier in the younger generation in at least nine familial cases (30%) and two thirds of them were found to carry premature stop mutations. Conclusions: This study highlights the phenotypic heterogeneity of HDR and points to a possible genetic anticipation in patients with HDR, which needs to be further investigated. PMID:28303854

  1. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenkraft, A.; Pode-Shakked, B.; Goldstein, N.; Shpirer, Z.; Bokhoven, H. van; Anikster, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish

  2. A family with Parkinsonism, essential tremor, restless legs syndrome, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, A; Pfeiffer, R F; Stoessl, A J; Kuriakose, R; Lash, J L; Searcy, J A; Strongosky, A J; Vilariño-Güell, C; Farrer, M J; Ross, O A; Dickson, D W; Wszolek, Z K

    2011-05-10

    Previous epidemiologic and genetic studies have suggested a link between Parkinson disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), and restless legs syndrome (RLS). We describe the clinical, PET, and pathologic characteristics of an extensive kindred from Arkansas with hereditary PD, ET, and RLS. The pedigree contains 138 individuals. Sixty-five family members were examined neurologically up to 3 times from 2004 to 2010. Clinical data were collected from medical records and questionnaires. Genetic studies were performed. Five family members underwent multitracer PET. Two individuals with PD were examined postmortem. Eleven family members had PD with generally mild and slowly progressive symptoms. Age at onset was between 39 and 74 years (mean 59.1, SD 13.4). All individuals treated with l-dopa responded positively. Postural or action tremor was present in 6 individuals with PD, and in 19 additional family members. Fifteen persons reported symptoms of RLS. PET showed reduced presynaptic dopamine function typical of sporadic PD in a patient with PD and ET, but not in persons with ET or RLS. The inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant for PD and RLS. No known pathogenic mutation in PD-related genes was found. Fourteen of the family members with PD, ET, or RLS had depression. Neuropathologic examination revealed pallidonigral pigment spheroid degeneration with ubiquitin-positive axonal spheroids, TDP43-positive pathology in the basal ganglia, hippocampus, and brainstem, and only sparse Lewy bodies. Familial forms of PD, ET, RLS, and depression occur in this family. The genetic cause remains to be elucidated.

  3. A Chinese family with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome: report of the clinical and genetic findings

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    Da-Peng Sun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To describe a Chinese family affected by a severe form of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS and characterize the molecular defect in PITX2 in the family. METHODS: Patients presented with typical ARS from a Chinese family were investigated. We performed genome-wide linkage scan and exome sequencing to identify the pathogenic mutations. Candidate mutations were verified for co-segregation in the whole pedigree using Sanger sequencing. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to verify the expression of the pathogenic gene. RESULTS: Genome-wide linkage and exome sequencing analyses showed PITX2 as the disease candidate gene. A>G substitution at position -11 of 3’ss of exon 5 (IVS5-11A>G that co-segregated with the disease phenotype was discovered in the family. The PITX2 messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels were about 50% lower in patients with ARS than in unaffected family members in the family. CONCLUSION: Our findings implicate the first intronic mutation of the PITX2 gene in the pathogenesis of a severe form of ARS in a Chinese family. This study highlights the importance of a systematic search for intronic mutation in ARS cases for which no mutations in the exons of PITX2 have been found.

  4. Attitudes toward prenatal genetic testing for Treacher Collins syndrome among affected individuals and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rebecca L; Lawson, Cathleen S; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Sanderson, Saskia C

    2012-07-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a craniofacial syndrome that is both phenotypically variable and heterogeneous, caused by mutations in the TCOF1, POLR1C, and POLR1D genes. We examined attitudes towards TCS prenatal genetic testing among affected families using a telephone questionnaire. Participants were 31 affected adults and relatives recruited primarily through families cared for in the mid-Atlantic region. Nineteen participants (65%) reported that they would take a TCS prenatal genetic test which could not predict degree of disease severity. Interest in TCS genetic testing was associated with higher income, higher concern about having a child with TCS, lower religiosity, lower concern about genetic testing procedures, and having a sporadic rather than familial mutation. Over half reported that their decision to have TCS genetic testing would be influenced a great deal by their desire to relieve anxiety and attitudes toward abortion. Ten participants (32%) reported that they would be likely to end the pregnancy upon receiving a positive test result; this was lower amongst TCS affected individuals and higher amongst participants with children with TCS. Genetics healthcare providers need to be aware of affected individuals' and families' attitudes and interest in prenatal genetic testing for TCS, and the possible implications for other craniofacial disorders, so that patients' information needs can be met. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Study of gene mutation and pathogenetic mechanism for a family with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Liao, Xinbin; Liu, Yalan; He, Chufeng; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Lu; Feng, Yong; Mei, Lingyun

    2017-08-10

    To explore the pathogenetic mechanism of a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome. Clinical data of the family was collected. Potential mutation of the MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were screened. Plasmids for wild type (WT) and mutant MITF proteins were constructed to determine their exogenous expression and subcellular distribution by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. A heterozygous c.763C>T (p.R255X) mutation was detected in exon 8 of the MITF gene in the proband and all other patients from the family. No pathological mutation of the SOX10 and SNAI2 genes was detected. The DNA sequences of plasmids of MITF wild and mutant MITF R255X were confirmed. Both proteins were detected with the expected size. WT MITF protein only localized in the nucleus, whereas R255X protein showed aberrant localization in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. The c.763C>T mutation of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in this family. The mutation can affect the subcellular distribution of MITF proteins in vitro, which may shed light on the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome caused by mutations of the MITF gene.

  6. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhou, Jianda; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia‑associated transcription factor (MITF), sex‑determining region Y‑box 10 (SOX10) and snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The heterozygous mutation, c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 1; however, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (MITF, SNAI2, SOX10 or PAX3) was detected in pedigrees 2 and 3. The heterozygous mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene is therefore considered the disease‑causing mutation in pedigree 1. However, there are novel disease‑causing genes in Waardenburg syndrome type II, which require further research.

  7. A complex microcephaly syndrome in a Pakistani family associated with a novel missense mutation in RBBP8 and a heterozygous deletion in NRXN1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agha, Z.; Iqbal, Z.; Azam, M.; Siddique, M.; Willemsen, M.H.; Kleefstra, T.; Zweier, C.; Leeuw, N. de; Qamar, R.; Bokhoven, H. van

    2014-01-01

    We report on a consanguineous Pakistani family with a severe congenital microcephaly syndrome resembling the Seckel syndrome and Jawad syndrome. The affected individuals in this family were born to consanguineous parents of whom the mother presented with mild intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy

  8. Hereditary Melanoma: Update on Syndromes and Management - Genetics of familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soura, E.; Eliades, P.; Shannon, K.; Stratigos, A.; Tsao, H.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is considered the most lethal skin cancer if not detected and treated at its early stages. About 10% of melanoma patients report a family history of melanoma; however, individuals with features of true hereditary melanoma (i.e. unilateral lineage, multi-generational, multiple primary lesions, and early onset of disease) are in fact quite rare. Although many new loci have been implicated in hereditary melanoma, CDKN2A mutations remain the most common. Familial melanoma in the presence of multiple atypical nevi should raise suspicion for a germline CDKN2A mutation. Such patients have a high risk of developing multiple primary melanomas and internal organ malignancies especially pancreatic cancer; thus, a multidisciplinary approach is necessary in many cases. The value of dermoscopy examination and total body photography performed at regular intervals has been suggested by a number of studies, and should therefore be considered for these patients and their first degree relatives. In addition, genetic counseling with the possibility of testing can be a valuable adjunct for familial melanoma patients. But, this must be performed with care and only by qualified individuals trained in cancer risk analysis. PMID:26892650

  9. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: a large single family cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnik, Kate; Tsai, Willis H; Dornan, Kimberly; Perrier, Renée; Burrowes, Paul W; Davidson, Warren J

    2016-02-29

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by dermatologic lesions, pulmonary manifestations, and renal tumors. The syndrome arises from germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene. We present findings from the single largest family BHD cohort described to date. Primary objectives were to characterize cystic lung changes on computed tomography (CT) chest scanning and identify features that stratify patients at higher risk of pneumothorax. Secondary objectives entailed description of the following: type and natural history of BHD-associated pneumothorax, pulmonary function characteristics, and relationship between cystic lung changes and pulmonary function. The study was a retrospective chart review for a case series of a single family. Over 70 family members of a proband with documented BHD were identified, 68 of which consented to genetic testing. All those with confirmed BHD were offered a clinical assessment by the Medical Genetics and Pulmonary services which included a history, physical exam, complete pulmonary function tests, and computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest and abdomen. Thirty-six individuals had a heterozygous mutation in the FLCN gene (c.59delT). Of these, 100 % (28/28) had pulmonary cysts, 41 % (13/32) had spontaneous pneumothoraces, 26 % (8/31) had kidney cysts, 3 % (1/31) had renal tumors, and 53 % (18/34) had dermatologic manifestations. Recurrent pneumothoraces were common (40 %). Cyst size (OR 3.23, 95 % CI 1.35-7.73) and extent of lower lung zone disease (OR 6.43, 95 % CI 1.41-29.2) were the only findings associated with pneumothorax. The size or extent of cystic disease did not correlate with lung function results. This is the largest single family cohort of patients with BHD syndrome documented to date. We found that all individuals had pulmonary cysts, pneumothoraces were common, and cyst size and lower lobe predominant disease were associated with pneumothorax. Lung function was generally

  10. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for Waardenburg syndrome type I and II in Chinese families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Qin, Litao; Li, Tao; Liu, Hongjian; Ma, Lingcao; Li, Wan; Wu, Dong; Wang, Hongdan; Guo, Qiannan; Guo, Liangjie; Liao, Shixiu

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation. The present study aimed to investigate the underlying molecular pathology and provide a method of prenatal diagnosis of WS in Chinese families. A total of 11 patients with WS from five unrelated Chinese families were enrolled. A thorough clinical examination was performed on all participants. Furthermore, patients with WS underwent screening for mutations in the following genes: Paired box 3 (PAX3), melanogenesis associated transcription factor (MITF), SRY-box 10, snail family transcriptional repressor 2 and endothelin receptor type B using polymerase chain reaction sequencing. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization was used for specific patients whose sequence results were normal. Following identification of the genotype of the probands and their parents, prenatal genetic diagnosis was performed for family 01 and 05. According to the diagnostic criteria for WS, five cases were diagnosed as WS1, while the other six cases were WS2. Genetic analysis revealed three mutations, including a nonsense mutation PAX3 c.583C>T in family 01, a splice-site mutation MITF c.909G>A in family 03 and an in-frame deletion MITF c.649_651delGAA in family 05. To the best of the authors' knowledge the mutations (c.583C>T in PAX3 and c.909G>A in MITF) were reported for the first time in Chinese people. Mutations in the gene of interest were not identified in family 02 and 04. The prenatal genetic testing of the two fetuses was carried out and demonstrated that the two babies were normal. The results of the present study expanded the range of known genetic mutations in China. Identification of genetic mutations in these families provided an efficient way to understand the causes of WS and improved genetic counseling. PMID:29115496

  11. FTL c.-168G>C Mutation in Hereditary Hyperferritinemia Cataract Syndrome: A New Italian Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Elisa; Capra, Anna Paola; Zirilli, Giuseppina; Meduri, Alessandro; Urso, Mario; Briuglia, Silvana; La Rosa, Maria Angela

    2018-01-01

    We describe a new Italian family with 7 members affected by hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS), an uncommon autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations of the iron-responsive element (IRE) of the ferritin light chain (FTL) gene determining its overexpression. The family diagnosis of HHCS took place after finding high ferritin levels in a 6-year-old girl. Seven members of the family had bilateral and symmetrical cataracts, normal iron, and hematological parameters except for high serum ferritin levels. About 160 families/unrelated cases with HHCS are known worldwide. This report documents a second Italian family, with a c.-168G>C mutation that is located in the highly conserved 3-nucleotide bulge structure of the FTL in the 5' untranslated region. This case shows how important the family history is in reaching a correct diagnosis and avoiding unnecessary and invasive analysis. HHCS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of childhood hyperferritinemia, especially in the presence of normal transferrin saturation.

  12. A family with fragile X syndrome, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and ichthyosis transmitted by an asymptomatic carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorova, A; Litvinenko, I; Todorov, T; Tincheva, R; Avdjieva, D; Tincheva, S; Mitev, V

    2014-03-01

    The human X chromosome carries regions prone to genomic instability: deletions in the Xp22.31 region, involving the steroid sulfatase gene (STS) cause X-linked ichthyosis; rearrangements in the Xp21.2 region are associated with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD or BMD); and the Xq27.3 unstable region, containing the (CGG)n repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene is associated with fragile X syndrome. We report on a family with two affected boys, the elder diagnosed with fragile X syndrome, the younger with DMD, and both suffering from severe ichthyosis. The family was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and haplotype analysis. The mother proved to be an asymptomatic carrier of all three non-contiguous mutation events, involving the STS gene, the DMD gene and a FMR1 expansion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of an asymptomatic carrier of three different X-linked disorders, involving severe genetic rearrangements on both long and short arms of the X chromosomes. The boy with fragile X syndrome has inherited a triple recombinant maternal X chromosome, this way inheriting the FMR1 expansion and ichthyosis, originating most probably from different maternal Xes and excluding the DMD gene deletion. The transmission of these extremely defective maternal chromosomes to the next generation involved several recombinations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Audiometric characteristics of a dutch family with a new mutation in GATA3 causing HDR syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beelen, E; Leijendeckers, J M; Admiraal, R J C; Huygen, P L M; Hoefsloot, L H; Pennings, R J E; Snik, A F M; Kunst, H P M

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a Dutch family with a new mutation (c523_528dup) in GATA3 causing HDR syndrome. HDR syndrome is characterised by hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal defects. In this study, we describe the audiometric characteristics of 5 patients from this family. Their hearing impairment was congenital, bilateral and symmetric. Audiograms showed mild-to-moderate hearing impairment with a flat audiogram configuration. Higher frequencies tended to be affected more strongly. Cross-sectional analyses showed no progression, and a mean audiogram was established. Psychophysical measurements in 3 HDR patients - including speech reception in noise, loudness scaling, gap detection and difference limen for frequency - were obtained to assess hearing function in greater detail. Overall, the results of the psychophysical measurements indicated characteristics of outer hair cell loss. CT scanning showed no anomalies in 3 of the HDR patients. Although 2 patients displayed vestibular symptoms, no anomalies in the vestibular system were found by vestibulo-ocular examination. Our results are in agreement with the theory that outer hair cell malfunctioning can play a major role in HDR syndrome.

  14. Familial DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome with deletions of chromosome area 22q11.2: Report of five families with a review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J.; Pangkanon, Suthipong; Eanet, K.R. [Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-11

    The DiGeorge (DG), velocardiofacial (VCF), and conotruncal anomaly-face (CTAF) syndromes were originally described as distinct disorders, although overlapping phenotypes have been recognized. It is now clear that all three syndromes result from apparently similar or identical 22q11.2 deletions, suggesting that they represent phenotypic variability of a single genetic syndrome. We report on 12 individuals in five families with del(22)(q11.2) by fluorescent in situ hybridization, and define the frequency of phenotypic abnormalities in those cases and in 70 individuals from 27 del(22)(q11.2) families from the literature. Common manifestations include mental impairment (97%), abnormal face (93%), cardiac malformations (681%), thymic (64%) and parathyroid (63%) abnormalities, and cleft palate or velopharyngeal insufficiency (48%). Familial DG, VCF, and CTAF syndromes due to del(22)(q11.2) show significant inter- and intrafamilial clinical variability consistent with the hypothesis that a single gene or group of tightly linked genes is the common cause of these syndromes. Up to 25% of 22q deletions are inherited, indicating that parents of affected children warrant molecular cytogenetic evaluation. We propose use of the compound term {open_quotes}DiGeorge/velocardiofacial (DGNCF) syndrome{close_quotes} in referring to this condition, as it calls attention to the phenotypic spectrum using historically familiar names. 41 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. [Triplet expansion cytosine-guanine-guanine: Three cases of OMIM syndrome in the same family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, Jesús; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Silvia; Fuertes-Rodrigo, Cristina; Monge-Galindo, Lorena; Peña-Segura, José Luis; López-Pisón, Francisco Javier

    2016-04-01

    The dynamic increase in the number of triplet repeats of cytosine-guanine-guanine (CGG) in the FMR1 gene mutation is responsible for three OMIM syndromes with a distinct clinical phenotype: Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and two pathologies in adult carriers of the premutation (55-200 CGG repeats): Primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) and tremor-ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) associated with FXS. CGG mutation dynamics of the FMR1 gene were studied in DNA samples from peripheral blood from the index case and other relatives of first, second and third degree by TP-PCR, and the percentage methylation. Diagnosis of FXS was confirmed in three patients (21.4%), eight patients (57.1%) were confirmed in the premutation range transmitters, one male patient with full mutation/permutation mosaicism (7.1%) and two patients (14.3%) with normal study. Of the eight permutated patients, three had FXPOI and one male patient had FXTAS. Our study suggests the importance of making an early diagnosis of SXF in order to carry out a family study and genetic counselling, which allow the identification of new cases or premutated patients with FMR1 gene- associated syndromes (FXTAS, FXPOI). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Familial Mediterranean fever, Inflammation and Nephrotic Syndrome: Fibrillary Glomerulopathy and the M680I Missense Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semerdjian Ronald J

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by inflammatory serositis (fever, peritonitis, synovitis and pleuritis. The gene locus responsible for FMF was identified in 1992 and localized to the short arm of chromosome 16. In 1997, a specific FMF gene locus, MEFV, was discovered to encode for a protein, pyrin that mediates inflammation. To date, more than forty missense mutations are known to exist. The diversity of mutations identified has provided insight into the variability of clinical presentation and disease progression. Case Report We report an individual heterozygous for the M680I gene mutation with a clinical diagnosis of FMF using the Tel-Hashomer criteria. Subsequently, the patient developed nephrotic syndrome with biopsy-confirmed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN. Further diagnostic studies were unremarkable with clinical workup negative for amyloidosis or other secondary causes of nephrotic syndrome. Discussion Individuals with FMF are at greater risk for developing nephrotic syndrome. The most serious etiology is amyloidosis (AA variant with renal involvement, ultimately progressing to end-stage renal disease. Other known renal diseases in the FMF population include IgA nephropathy, IgM nephropathy, Henoch-Schönlein purpura as well as polyarteritis nodosa. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first association between FMF and the M680I mutation later complicated by nephrotic syndrome and fibrillary glomerulonephritis.

  17. Chromosomal fragility syndrome and family history of radiosensitivity as indicators for radiotherapy dose modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsbeih, Ghazi; Story, Michael D.; Maor, Moshe H.; Geara, Fady B.; Brock, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Beside a few known radiosensitive syndromes, a patient's reaction to radiotherapy is difficult to predict. In this report we describe the management of a pediatric cancer patient presented with a family history of radiosensitivity and cancer proneness. Laboratory investigations revealed a chromosomal fragility syndrome and an increased cellular radiosensitivity in vitro. AT gene sequencing revealed no mutations. The patient was treated with reduced radiation doses to avoid the presumed increased risks of toxicity to normal tissues. The patient tolerated well the treatment with no significant acute or late radiation sequelae. Five years later, the patient remains both disease and complications free. While an accurate laboratory test for radiosensitivity is still lacking, assessments of chromosomal fragility, cell survival and clinical medicine will continue to be useful for a small number of patients

  18. Primary generalized familial and sporadic glucocorticoid resistance (Chrousos syndrome) and hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Kino, Tomoshige; Chrousos, George P

    2013-01-01

    Familial or sporadic primary generalized glucocorticoid resistance or Chrousos syndrome is a rare genetic condition characterized by generalized, partial, target-tissue insensitivity to glucocorticoids and a consequent hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Primary generalized glucocorticoid hypersensitivity (PGGH) represents the mirror image of the former, and is characterized by generalized, partial, target-tissue hypersensitivity to glucocorticoids, and compensatory hypoactivation of the HPA axis. The molecular basis of both conditions has been ascribed to mutations in the human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR) gene, which impair the molecular mechanisms of hGR action and alter tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. This review summarizes the pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms and clinical aspects of Chrousos syndrome and PGGH. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Anakinra induces complete remission of nephrotic syndrome in a patient with familial mediterranean fever and amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano, Ángel M; Hernandez, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Esther; Mateo, Isabel; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Morales, Enrique; Praga, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Renal amyloidosis is one of the most severe complications of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Colchicine has reduced the incidence of this complication, which now only appears in untreated, under-treated and resistant patients, but it is usually ineffective in patients with advanced amyloidosis. Here we report a patient with FMF and biopsy-proven amyloidosis who presented with nephrotic syndrome despite colchicine treatment. Anakinra (an interleukin-1β inhibitor) was started and a dramatic complete remission of nephrotic syndrome was observed in the following months. Anakinra can be an effective treatment for FMF patients with severe secondary amyloidosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic linkage analysis in 26 families with Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A.F.; Bruford, E.A.; Mansfield, D.C. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by polydactyly, obesity, hypogonadism, retinitis pigmentosa, renal anomalies and mental retardation. Clinical heterogeneity is quite marked both within and between families. Linkage has been reported between Bardet-Biedl syndrome and the D16408 marker in chromosomal region 16q21 in an extended Bedouin kindred and, more recently, in a subset of 17 out of 31 families using the PYGM/D11S913 markers in chromosomal region 11q13. We have analyzed linkage to the 16q21 and 11q13 regions and used markers covering chromosomes 2, 3, 17 and 18 in a set of 26 Bardet-Biedl families, each containing at least two affected individuals, with a total of 57 affected members. Evidence of linkage to the D11S527 locus has been identified assuming linkage homogeneity with a lod score of 2.72 at a recombination fraction of 0.11 (95% limits 0.03-0.25).

  1. Family Cluster Analysis of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Infection in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jeong Rae; Heo, Sang Taek; Park, Dahee; Kim, Hyemin; Fukuma, Aiko; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Shimojima, Masayuki; Lee, Keun Hwa

    2016-12-07

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is tick-borne viral disease that was first suspected in China in 2009. The causative virus (SFTSV) was isolated in 2009 and reported in 2011, and SFTSV expanded its geographic distribution in 2012-2013, from China to South Korea and Japan. Most SFTSV infections occur through Haemaphysalis longicornis However, SFTSV infection can also occur between family members, and nosocomial transmission of SFTSV is also possible through close contact with a patient. In this study, we first analyzed clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory data for SFTS patients and family members of an index patient in Korea. The S segment of SFTSV was amplified from the sera of three patients, and the S segment of SFTSV and IgG specific to SFTSV were detected in the serum from one family member; although this individual had no history of exposure to H. longicornis, she frequently had close contact with the index patient. In Korea, SFTSV infection among family members does not have to be reported, and we suggest that person-to-person transmission of SFTSV among family members is possible in Korea. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. Nance-Horan syndrome: Linkage analysis in a family from the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergen, A.A.B.; Brink, J.T.; Schuurman, E.J.M.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E.M. (Netherlands Ophthalmic Research Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1994-05-01

    Linkage analysis was carried out in a Dutch family with Nance-Horan (NH) syndrome. Close linkage without recombination between NH and the Xp loci DXS207, DXS43, and DXS365 (z[sub max] = 3.23) was observed. Multipoint linkage analysis and the analysis of recombinations in multiple informative meioses suggest the genetic order Xcen-DMD (exon 49)-DXS451-(NH, DXS207, DXS365, DXS43)-(STS, DXF30)-Xpter. These data refine the localization of the NH locus on the distal Xp. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Nance-Horan syndrome: linkage analysis in a family from The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, A A; ten Brink, J; Schuurman, E J; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E M

    1994-05-01

    Linkage analysis was carried out in a Dutch family with Nance-Horan (NH) syndrome. Close linkage without recombination between NH and the Xp loci DXS207, DXS43, and DXS365 (zmax = 3.23) was observed. Multipoint linkage analysis and the analysis of recombinations in multiple informative meioses suggest the genetic order Xcen-DMD (exon 49)-DXS451-(NH, DXS207, DXS365, DXS43)-(STS, DXF30)-Xpter. These data refine the localization of the NH locus on the distal Xp.

  4. Fatal familial cholestatic syndrome in Greenland Eskimo children. A histomorphological analysis of 16 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornvold, K; Nielsen, I M; Poulsen, H

    1989-01-01

    We report the first detailed study of hepatic morphology in 28 biopsies from 16 Greenland Eskimo children with fatal familial cholestatic syndrome. The changes were categorized as early, intermediate and late. In the early stage, until 5 months of age, changes were restricted to zone 3, consisting...... rosette formation followed by zone 3 fibrosis, zone 1 fibrosis, and, cirrhosis. Other characteristics are the virtual absence of inflammation and the lack of anatomical abnormalities such as paucity of bile ducts. The changes and their progression resemble those of Byler disease. Clinical and biochemical...

  5. Peculiarities of family doctors' medical assistance for persons with 'Chernobyl syndrome'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margine, Le.; Tintiuc, D.; Grejdeanu, T.; Margine, Lu.; Badan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Medical and social protection and rehabilitation of patients with 'Chernobyl syndrome' is provided by legislation of the Republic of Moldova, which is reflected in a comprehensive action plan for rehabilitation and protection of this category of citizens. This plan includes such medical activities as detailed medical ambulatory and stationary examination, purchase prescription drugs, annual sanatorium treatment, annual compensation recovery in the value of 2 average monthly salaries for health improvement. The role of family doctors' medical assistance for persons suffered due to the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is very important in this plan implementation.

  6. Mutation spectrum and risk of colorectal cancer in African American families with Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindalini, Rodrigo Santa Cruz; Win, Aung Ko; Gulden, Cassandra; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Haile, Robert W.; Raymond, Victoria; Stoffel, Elena; Hall, Michael; Llor, Xavier; Ukaegbu, Chinedu I.; Solomon, Ilana; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Kalady, Matthew; Blanco, Amie; Terdiman, Jonathan; Shuttlesworth, Gladis A.; Lynch, Patrick M.; Hampel, Heather; Lynch, Henry T.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Kupfer, Sonia S.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims African Americans (AAs) have the highest incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the United States (US). Few data are available on genetic and non-genetic risk factors for CRC among AAs. Little is known about cancer risks and mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes in AAs with the most common inherited CRC syndrome, Lynch syndrome. We aimed to characterize phenotype, mutation spectrum, and risk of CRC in AAs with Lynch Syndrome. Methods We performed a retrospective study of AAs with mutations in MMR genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) using databases from 13 US referral centers. We analyzed data on personal and family histories of cancer. Modified segregation analysis conditioned on ascertainment criteria was used to estimate age- and sex-specific CRC cumulative risk studying members of the mutation-carrying families. Results We identified 51 AA families with deleterious mutations that disrupt function of the MMR gene product: 31 in MLH1 (61%), 11 in MSH2 (21%), 3 in MSH6 (6%), and 6 in PMS2 (12%); 8 mutations were detected in more than 1 individual and 11 have not been previously reported. In the 920 members of the 51 families with deleterious mutations, the cumulative risks of CRC at an age of 80 y were estimated to be 36.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.5%–83.9%) for men and 29.7% (95% CI, 8.31%–76.1%) for women. CRC risk was significantly higher among individuals with mutations in MLH1 or MSH2 (hazard ratio, 13.9; 95% CI, 3.44–56.5). Conclusions We estimate the cumulative risk for CRC in AAs with MMR gene mutations to be similar to that of individuals of European descent with Lynch syndrome. Two-thirds of mutations were found in MLH1—some were found in multiple individuals and some have not been previously reported. Differences in the mutation spectrum are likely to reflect the genetic diversity of this population. PMID:26248088

  7. Lennox–Gastaut syndrome: impact on the caregivers and families of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson PA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patricia A Gibson Epilepsy Information Service, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS has a major impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQL of the affected children as well as their caregivers. The primary caregiver in the family is generally the mother, with support from the father and siblings. The burden of care and the effects of the disease on the child necessitate adjustments in virtually all aspects of the lives of their family. These adjustments inevitably affect the physical, emotional, social, and financial health of the whole family. Numerous sources of support for families can help to ease the burden of care. Improvements in the treatment of LGS, in addition to helping the child with LGS, would likely help improve the HRQL of the family members. This pilot parent survey was designed to explore the impact of epilepsy on caregiver HRQL. Parents of children with epilepsy who had contacted the Epilepsy Information Service at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA, were sent questionnaires comprising open- and closed-ended questions. A total of 200 surveys were distributed, with a return rate of 48%. The results revealed that 74% of the parents believed that having a child with epilepsy brought them and their partner closer together. However, when the parents were asked to explain the manner in which epilepsy affected their families, answers included continuous stress, major financial distress, and lack of time to spend with other children. Information and resources for the families of children with LGS could help improve the HRQL of both the patients and their relatives. Keywords: health-related quality of life, HRQL, epilepsy, relatives, siblings

  8. Novel association of neurofibromatosis type 1-causing mutations in families with neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekvall, Sara; Sjörs, Kerstin; Jonzon, Anders; Vihinen, Mauno; Annerén, Göran; Bondeson, Marie-Louise

    2014-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome (NFNS) is a rare condition with clinical features of both neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Noonan syndrome (NS). All three syndromes belong to the RASopathies, which are caused by dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK pathway. The major gene involved in NFNS is NF1, but co-occurring NF1 and PTPN11 mutations in NFNS have been reported. Knowledge about possible involvement of additional RASopathy-associated genes in NFNS is, however, very limited. We present a comprehensive clinical and molecular analysis of eight affected individuals from three unrelated families displaying features of NF1 and NFNS. The genetic etiology of the clinical phenotypes was investigated by mutation analysis, including NF1, PTPN11, SOS1, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, RAF1, SHOC2, SPRED1, MAP2K1, MAP2K2, and CBL. All three families harbored a heterozygous NF1 variant, where the first family had a missense variant, c.5425C>T;p.R1809C, the second family a recurrent 4bp-deletion, c.6789_6792delTTAC;p.Y2264Tfs*6, and the third family a splice-site variant, c.2991-1G>A, resulting in skipping of exon 18 and an in-frame deletion of 41 amino acids. These NF1 variants have all previously been reported in NF1 patients. Surprisingly, both c.6789_6792delTTAC and c.2991-1G>A are frequently associated with NF1, but association to NFNS has, to our knowledge, not previously been reported. Our results support the notion that NFNS represents a variant of NF1, genetically distinct from NS, and is caused by mutations in NF1, some of which also cause classical NF1. Due to phenotypic overlap between NFNS and NS, we propose screening for NF1 mutations in NS patients, preferentially when café-au-lait spots are present. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Novel partial duplication of EYA1 causes branchiootic syndrome in a large Brazilian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Vitor G L; Freitas, Erika L; Della-Rosa, Valter A; Lezirovitz, Karina; de Moraes, Ana Maria S M; Ramos, Silvia B; Oiticica, Jeanne; Alves, Leandro U; Pearson, Peter L; Rosenberg, Carla; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2015-01-01

    To identify novel genetic causes of syndromic hearing loss in Brazil. To map a candidate chromosomal region through linkage studies in an extensive Brazilian family and identify novel pathogenic variants using sequencing and array-CGH. Brazilian pedigree with individuals affected by BO syndrome characterized by deafness and malformations of outer, middle and inner ear, auricular and cervical fistulae, but no renal abnormalities. Whole genome microarray-SNP scanning on samples of 11 affected individuals detected a multipoint Lod score of 2.6 in the EYA1 gene region (chromosome 8). Sequencing of EYA1 in affected patients did not reveal pathogenic mutations. However, oligonucleotide-array-CGH detected a duplication of 71.8Kb involving exons 4 to 10 of EYA1 (heterozygous state). Real-time-PCR confirmed the duplication in fourteen of fifteen affected individuals and absence in 13 unaffected individuals. The exception involved a consanguineous parentage and was assumed to involve a different genetic mechanism. Our findings implicate this EYA1 partial duplication segregating with BO phenotype in a Brazilian pedigree and is the first description of a large duplication leading to the BOR/BO syndrome.

  10. [PAX3 gene mutation analysis for two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ families and their prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Yan, J; Qin, Z B; Wang, B

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To analyze the mutations of PAX3 gene in two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ (WS1) pedigrees and make prenatal diagnosis for the high-risk 18-week-old fetus. Methods: PAX3 gene was first analyzed by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA) for detecting pathogenic mutation of the probands of the two pedigrees. The mutations were confirmed by MLPA and Sanger in parents and unrelated healthy individuals.Prenatal genetic diagnosis for the high-risk fetus was performed by amniotic fluid cell after genotyping. Results: A heterozygous PAX3 gene gross deletion (E7 deletion) was identified in all patients from WS1-01 family, and not found in 20 healthy individuals.Prenatal diagnosis in WS1-01 family indicated that the fetus was normal. Molecular studies identified a novel deletion mutation c. 1385_1386delCT within the PAX3 gene in all affected WS1-02 family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives and 200 healthy individuals. Conclusions: PAX3 gene mutation is etiological for two WS1 families. Sanger sequencing plus MLPA is effective and accurate for making gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.

  11. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  12. FROM FAMILIES SYNDROMES TO GENES… THE FIRST CLINICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF HEREDITARY SYNDROMES PREDISPOSING TO CANCER: WHAT WAS THE BEGINNING?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charité Ricker, MS, LCGC

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessment for hereditary susceptibility to cancer is considered standard of care, as it impacts not only a clinician's understanding of cancer causation but also options for prevention and treatment. The roots of our current knowledge about hereditary cancer syndromes can be traced to early reports of families with striking cancer histories. The purpose of this article is to review the historical timeline of the two most commonly assessed hereditary cancer syndromes, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC and Lynch syndrome (LS. While many individuals identified with these syndromes today come from families similar to those seen in the early historical reports, our understanding of these syndromes, their expression and penetrance, has evolved over the years. In addition, the increased utilization of broad multi-gene panels continues to add to the complexity of defining associated phenotypes. These findings can lead to challenges with translating results to clinical management for patients and families, but also provide an opportunity to continue to gain understanding of the genetic underpinnings of cancer etiology.

  13. A family of oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) with a novel BCOR mutation and genomic rearrangements involving NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yukiko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Ryoo, Na-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-01

    Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) is an X-linked dominant disorder associated with male lethality, presenting with congenital cataract, dysmorphic face, dental abnormalities and septal heart defects. Mutations in BCOR (encoding BCL-6-interacting corepressor) cause OFCD. Here, we report on a Korean family with common features of OFCD including bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects in three affected females (mother and two daughters). Through the mutation screening and copy number analysis using genomic microarray, we identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.888delG, in the BCOR gene and two interstitial microduplications at Xp22.2-22.13 and Xp21.3 in all the three affected females. The BCOR mutation may lead to a premature stop codon (p.N297IfsX80). The duplication at Xp22.2-22.13 involved the NHS gene causative for Nance-Horan syndrome, which is an X-linked disorder showing similar clinical features with OFCD in affected males, and in carrier females with milder presentation. Considering the presence of bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects, which is unique to OFCD, the mutation in BCOR is likely to be the major determinant for the phenotypes in this family.

  14. Novel oncogene amplifications in tumors from a family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieber, Juliane; Remke, Marc; Hartmann, Christian; Korshunov, Andrey; Burkhardt, Birgit; Sturm, Dominik; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Wittmann, Andrea; Greil, Johann; Blattmann, Claudia; Witt, Olaf; Behnisch, Wolfgang; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Orakcioglu, Berk; von Deimling, Andreas; Lichter, Peter; Kulozik, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan

    2009-07-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) represents an inherited tumor syndrome that is typically caused by germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene TP53. TP53 dysfunction secondarily disturbs the genetic integrity of the cell. Here, we report a family with LFS harboring a germline TP53 mutation (R248W) located in the functional domain of the protein that binds to the minor groove of the DNA. In this family, tumors of the central nervous system were diagnosed as primary malignancies in all carriers of the mutation. The index patient developed an anaplastic medulloblastoma with unusual genomic profile exhibiting six distinct high-level genomic amplifications, two of them targeting the MYCN and GLI2 genes, respectively. In an extrarenal rhabdoid tumor from the same patient, we found a novel high-level amplification of the MYC oncogene. The father of this patient was diagnosed with myxopapillary ependymoma (WHO degrees I), whereas a brother died from an early relapse of a choroid plexus carcinoma. The analysis of this LFS familiy thus revealed novel oncogene amplifications as different second hits that are likely to also play a role in the pathogenesis of their sporadic counterparts.

  15. Fragile X syndrome in females - a familial case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stembalska, Agnieszka; Łaczmańska, Izabela; Gil, Justyna; Pesz, Karolina A

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), one of the manifestations of FMR1-related disorders, is one of the most frequent genetic causes of intellectual disability. In over 99% of all cases it results from the expansion of CGG repeats in the 5'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene and presents in males and in about 50% of the females with an FMR1 full mutation, usually with a milder phenotype. Although the morphologic and behavioral phenotype in males is a well-recognized entity, the presentation in females is variable and not as specific. The objective of this paper is to present a family with quite a severe expression of the disorder in two sisters with a full mutation. We report on a two-generation family where both males and females were found to be affected by FXS. We also present the diagnostic pathway and methods that led to the diagnosis of fragile X syndrome in the two sisters, as well as the method that explained the normal phenotype in their mother. The CGG repeats analysis in the FMR1 gene showed one normal allele and one allele with a full mutation in both sisters (probands) and their mother. A full mutation was also found in three male cousins of the probands. The analysis of the X-chromosome methylation status has shown a random X inactivation in proband 1 and 2 and a non-random one in the proband's mother, with the normal allele predominantly active. The reasons for different clinical presentations are discussed; moreover a review of the literature on females with FXS is presented. We hope that this paper will facilitate the future diagnosis of fragile X syndromes in females.

  16. Reverse-namaskar: A new sign in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A family pedigree study of four generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is a rare group of inheritable connective tissue disorder of defective collagen. Skin, joints and blood vessels are most commonly affected. Clinical signs such as Gorlin sign and Metenier sign have been described in this syndrome. We report another new clinical sign called ′Reverse-Namaskar′ sign as an important clinical finding in EDS, based on the family pedigree study of the proband.

  17. De novo dominant mutation of SOX10 gene in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Liu, Min; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zou, Wenting; Jiang, Hongyan

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The condition is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigment disturbances of the hair, skin, and iris. The de novo mutation in the SOX10 gene, responsible for Waardenburg syndrome type II, is rarely seen. The present study aimed to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese family. Clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. A novel SOX10 heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation was identified. Heterozygosity was not observed in the parents and sister of the proband, indicating that the mutation has arisen de novo. The novel frameshift mutation, located in exon 3 of the SOX10 gene, disrupted normal amino acid coding from Leu87, leading to premature termination at nucleotide 396 (TGA). The high mobility group domain of SOX10 was inferred to be partially impaired. The novel heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation in the SOX10 gene was considered to be the cause of Waardenburg syndrome in the proband. The clinical and genetic characterization of this family would help elucidate the genetic heterogeneity of SOX10 in Waardenburg syndrome type II. Moreover, the de novo pattern expanded the mutation data of SOX10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Speech and language abilities of children with the familial form of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

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    Rakonjac Marijana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS, which encompasses Shprintzen syndrome, DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome, is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans with an estimated incidence of approximately 1/4000 per live births. After Down syndrome, it is the second most common genetic syndrome associated with congenital heart malformations. The mode of inheritance of the 22q11.2DS is autosomal dominant. In approximately 72 - 94% of the cases the deletion has occurred de novo, while in 6 to 28% of patients deletion was inherited from a parent. As a part of a multidisciplinary study we examined the speech and language abilities of members of two families with inherited form of 22q11.2DS. The presence of 22q11.2 microdeletion was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. In one family we detected 1.5 Mb 22q11.2 microdeletion, while in the other family we found 3Mb microdeletion. Patients from both families showed delays in cognitive, socio-emotional, speech and language development. Furthermore, we found considerable variability in the phenotypic characteristics of 22q11.2DS and the degree of speech-language pathology not only between different families with 22q11.2 deletion, but also among members of the same family. In addition, we detected no correlation between the phenotype and the size of 22q11.2 microdeletion.

  19. Flecainide provocation reveals concealed brugada syndrome in a long QT syndrome family with a novel L1786Q mutation in SCN5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, Jørgen K; Yuan, Lei; Hedley, Paula L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in SCN5A can result in both long QT type 3 (LQT3) and Brugada syndrome (BrS), and a few mutations have been found to have an overlapping phenotype. Long QT syndrome is characterized by prolonged QT interval, and a prerequisite for a BrS diagnosis is ST elevation in the right...... precordial leads of the electrocardiogram. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a Danish family suffering from long QT syndrome, a novel missense mutation in SCN5A, changing a leucine residue into a glutamine residue at position 1786 (L1786Q), was found to be present in heterozygous form co-segregating with prolonged QT......, a negative shift in inactivation properties and a positive shift in activation properties, compatible with BrS. Furthermore, the sustained (I(Na,late)) tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current was found to be drastically increased, explaining the association between the mutation and LQT syndrome. CONCLUSIONS...

  20. Prenatal detection of congenital bilateral cataract leading to the diagnosis of Nance-Horan syndrome in the extended family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Adi; Yaron, Yuval; Burdon, Kathryn; Crystal-Shalit, Ornit; Kidron, Dvora; Malcov, Mira; Tepper, Ron

    2007-07-01

    To describe a family in which it was possible to perform prenatal diagnosis of Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS). The fetus was evaluated by 2nd trimester ultrasound. The family underwent genetic counseling and ophthalmologic evaluation. The NHS gene was sequenced. Ultrasound demonstrated fetal bilateral congenital cataract. Clinical evaluation revealed other family members with cataract, leading to the diagnosis of NHS in the family. Sequencing confirmed a frameshift mutation (3908del11bp) in the NHS gene. Evaluation of prenatally diagnosed congenital cataract should include a multidisciplinary approach, combining experience and input from sonographer, clinical geneticist, ophthalmologist, and molecular geneticist.

  1. Targeted next-generation sequencing of 22 mismatch repair genes identifies Lynch syndrome families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talseth-Palmer, Bente A; Bauer, Denis C; Sjursen, Wenche; Evans, Tiffany J; McPhillips, Mary; Proietto, Anthony; Otton, Geoffrey; Spigelman, Allan D; Scott, Rodney J

    2016-05-01

    Causative germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes can only be identified in ~50% of families with a clinical diagnosis of the inherited colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC)/Lynch syndrome (LS). Identification of these patients are critical as they are at substantially increased risk of developing multiple primary tumors, mainly colorectal and endometrial cancer (EC), occurring at a young age. This demonstrates the need to develop new and/or more thorough mutation detection approaches. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to screen 22 genes involved in the DNA MMR pathway in constitutional DNA from 14 HNPCC and 12 sporadic EC patients, plus 2 positive controls. Several softwares were used for analysis and functional annotation. We identified 5 exonic indel variants, 42 exonic nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and 1 intronic variant of significance. Three of these variants were class 5 (pathogenic) or class 4 (likely pathogenic), 5 were class 3 (uncertain clinical relevance) and 40 were classified as variants of unknown clinical significance. In conclusion, we have identified two LS families from the sporadic EC patients, one without a family history of cancer, supporting the notion for universal MMR screening of EC patients. In addition, we have detected three novel class 3 variants in EC cases. We have, in addition discovered a polygenic interaction which is the most likely cause of cancer development in a HNPCC patient that could explain previous inconsistent results reported on an intronic EXO1 variant. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Familial Risks of Tourette Syndrome and Chronic Tic Disorders. A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Cols, David; Isomura, Kayoko; Pérez-Vigil, Ana; Chang, Zheng; Rück, Christian; Larsson, K Johan; Leckman, James F; Serlachius, Eva; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Tic disorders, including Tourette syndrome (TS) and chronic tic disorders (CTDs), are assumed to be strongly familial and heritable. Although gene-searching efforts are well under way, precise estimates of familial risk and heritability are lacking. Previous controlled family studies were small and typically conducted within specialist clinics, resulting in potential ascertainment biases. They were also underpowered to disentangle genetic from environmental factors that contribute to the observed familiality. Twin studies have been either very small or based on parent-reported tics in population-based (nonclinical) twin samples. To provide unbiased estimates of familial risk and heritability of tic disorders at the population level. In this population cohort, multigenerational family study, we used a validated algorithm to identify 4826 individuals diagnosed as having TS or CTDs (76.2% male) in the Swedish National Patient Register from January 1, 1969, through December 31, 2009. We studied risks for TS or CTDs in all biological relatives of probands compared with relatives of unaffected individuals (matched on a 1:10 ratio) from the general population. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate the heritability of tic disorders. The risk for tic disorders among relatives of probands with tic disorders increased proportionally to the degree of genetic relatedness. The risks for first-degree relatives (odds ratio [OR], 18.69; 95% CI, 14.53-24.05) were significantly higher than for second-degree relatives (OR, 4.58; 95% CI, 3.22-6.52) and third-degree relatives (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 2.08-4.51). First-degree relatives at similar genetic distances (eg, parents, siblings, and offspring) had similar risks for tic disorders despite different degrees of shared environment. The risks for full siblings (50% genetic similarity; OR, 17.68; 95% CI, 12.90-24.23) were significantly higher than those for maternal half siblings (25% genetic similarity; OR, 4.41; 95

  3. Genetic spectrum of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss in Pakistani families.

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    Sobia Shafique

    Full Text Available The frequency of inherited bilateral autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL in Pakistan is 1.6/1000 individuals. More than 50% of the families carry mutations in GJB2 while mutations in MYO15A account for about 5% of recessive deafness. In the present study a cohort of 30 ARNSHL families was initially screened for mutations in GJB2 and MYO15A. Homozygosity mapping was performed by employing whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping in the families that did not carry mutations in GJB2 or MYO15A. Mutation analysis was performed for the known ARNSHL genes present in the homozygous regions to determine the causative mutations. This allowed the identification of a causative mutation in all the 30 families including 9 novel mutations, which were identified in 9 different families (GJB2 (c.598G>A, p.Gly200Arg; MYO15A (c.9948G>A, p.Gln3316Gln; c.3866+1G>A; c.8767C>T, p.Arg2923* and c.8222T>C, p.Phe2741Ser, TMC1 (c.362+18A>G, BSND (c.97G>C, p.Val33Leu, TMPRSS3 (c.726C>G, p.Cys242Trp and MSRB3 (c.20T>G, p.Leu7Arg. Furthermore, 12 recurrent mutations were detected in 21 other families. The 21 identified mutations included 10 (48% missense changes, 4 (19% nonsense mutations, 3 (14% intronic mutations, 2 (9% splice site mutations and 2 (9% frameshift mutations. GJB2 accounted for 53% of the families, while mutations in MYO15A were the second most frequent (13% cause of ARNSHL in these 30 families. The identification of novel as well as recurrent mutations in the present study increases the spectrum of mutations in known deafness genes which could lead to the identification of novel founder mutations and population specific mutated deafness genes causative of ARNSHL. These results provide detailed genetic information that has potential diagnostic implication in the establishment of cost-efficient allele-specific analysis of frequently occurring variants in combination with other reported mutations in Pakistani populations.

  4. Clinical and genetic description of a family with a high prevalence of autosomal dominant restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jessica E; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Lin, Siong-Chi; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Farrer, Matthew J

    2009-02-01

    To conduct clinical and molecular genetic analyses of the members of an extended family in Central Indiana with a high prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS). From February 1, 2006, through August 31, 2008, we collected data from members of this family, which is of English descent. Genealogical methods were used to expand the family tree, and family members were screened with an RLS questionnaire. Telephone interviews and personal examinations were performed at Mayo Clinic and during a field trip to Central Indiana. Blood samples were collected for molecular genetic analysis. A follow-up telephone interview was conducted 1 year later. The family tree spans 7 generations with 88 living members, 30 of whom meet the criteria for diagnosis of RLS established by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. Three affected family members also have Parkinson disease or essential tremor. The mode of RLS inheritance is compatible with an autosomal dominant pattern. The affected family members do not exhibit linkage to the 5 known RLS loci or mutations in the RLS susceptibility genes MEIS1 and BTBD9. Of 88 members of this single extended family in Central Indiana, 30 were diagnosed as having RLS. Because our analysis shows that the disease is not linked to any of the known RLS loci or risk-associated genes, we postulate that members of this family may carry a gene mutation in a novel genetic locus.

  5. Investigating Seven Recently Identified Genes in 100 Iranian Families with Autosomal Recessive Non-syndromic Hearing Loss

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    Reihaneh Alikhani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hearing loss (HL is the most common sensory disorder, and affects 1 in 1000 newborns. About 50% of HL is due to genetics and 70% of them are non-syndromic with a recessive pattern of inheritance. Up to now, more than 50 genes have been detected which are responsible for autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss, (ARNSHL. In  Iran, HL is one of the most common disabilities due to consanguineous marriages. The aim was to investigate the prevalence of three new ARHL genes (GJB4, GJC3, and SLITRK6 reported in neighboring countries among Iranian families with ARNSHL. Methods: One hundred unrelated families with at least two affected siblings in consanguineous marriage, who were negative for GJB2 gene mutations, were selected. By using three STR markers for each gene, homozygosity mapping was performed. Results: Two families showed linkage to GJB4, six families were linked to GJC3 and only one family linked to SLITRK6. The samples of these families who showed linkage were sent for Sanger sequencing to detect the causative mutations. However, after analyzing the sequencing results, no mutation could be detected in either of the families. Molecular analysis for these nine families is underway in order to determine the pathogenic mutations using whole exome sequencing. Discussion: These data demonstrate a very low prevalence of mutation in these three genes (GJB4, GJC3, and SLITRK6 in the Iranian population, since no mutation was detected in our study group of 100 families.

  6. Mutation analysis of GJB2 gene and prenatal diagnosis in a non-syndromic deafness family

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    Xiao-hua CHEN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To identify the pathogenic gene in a non-syndromic deafness family, provide an accurate genetic consultation and early intervention for deaf family to reduce the incidence of congenital deafness. Methods Mutation analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction followed by DNA sequencing of coding region of GJB2 gene. The fetal DNA was extracted from the amniotic fluid cells by amniocentesis at 20 weeks during pregnancy. The genotype of the fetus was characterized for predicting the status of hearing. Results Complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp were detected in the proband of the family, heterozygous mutation 176-191del16bp was detected in the father, and 235delC was detected in the mother. Fetus carried 235delC heterozygous mutation inherited from his mother. Conclusions The proband's hearing loss is resulted from the complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp in GJB2 gene. Fetus is a heterozygous mutation 235delC carrier. Prenatal diagnosis for deafness assisted by genetic test can provide efficient guidance about offspring's hearing condition, and prevent another deaf-mute member from birth. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.07.09

  7. Novel Genetic Findings in a Chinese Family with Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome

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    Kuanshu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe a Chinese family with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS and report our novel genetic findings. Methods. Nine members of the same family underwent complete ophthalmologic examinations and genetic analysis. Genomic DNA was isolated from veinal blood and amplifed using PCR; the products of PCR were sequenced and compared with FOXC1 and PITX2 genes, from which the mutations were found. Results. Through the ophthalmologic examinations, 8 subjects were diagnosed as ARS and 1 subject was normal. A homozygous mutation c.1139_1141dupGCG(p.Gly380_Ala381insGly and a heterozygous mutation c.1359_1361dupCGG(p.Gly456_Gln457insGly in FOXC1 were identified in all subjects. The mutation (c.-10-30T>C was identified in PITX2 in subjects III-1 and III-3. Conclusions. We found novel gene mutations in a Chinese family with ARS, which provides us with a better understanding of the gene mutation spectrum of ARS and the assistance for the genetic counseling and gene-specific therapy in the future.

  8. Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Review of Its Genetic and Clinical Aspects

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    Fengxiao Bu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare renal disease (two per one million in the USA characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Both sporadic (80% of cases and familial (20% of cases forms are recognized. The study of familial aHUS has implicated genetic variation in multiple genes in the complement system in disease pathogenesis, helping to define the mechanism whereby complement dysregulation at the cell surface level leads to both sporadic and familial disease. This understanding has culminated in the use of Eculizumab as first-line therapy in disease treatment, significantly changing the care and prognosis of affected patients. However, even with this bright outlook, major challenges remain to understand the complexity of aHUS at the genetic level. It is possible that a more detailed picture of aHUS can be translated to an improved understanding of disease penetrance, which is highly variable, and response to therapy, both in the short and long terms.

  9. Germline mutation in NLRP2 (NALP2 in a familial imprinting disorder (Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome.

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    Esther Meyer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS is a fetal overgrowth and human imprinting disorder resulting from the deregulation of a number of genes, including IGF2 and CDKN1C, in the imprinted gene cluster on chromosome 11p15.5. Most cases are sporadic and result from epimutations at either of the two 11p15.5 imprinting centres (IC1 and IC2. However, rare familial cases may be associated with germline 11p15.5 deletions causing abnormal imprinting in cis. We report a family with BWS and an IC2 epimutation in which affected siblings had inherited different parental 11p15.5 alleles excluding an in cis mechanism. Using a positional-candidate gene approach, we found that the mother was homozygous for a frameshift mutation in exon 6 of NLRP2. While germline mutations in NLRP7 have previously been associated with familial hydatidiform mole, this is the first description of NLRP2 mutation in human disease and the first report of a trans mechanism for disordered imprinting in BWS. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that NLRP2 has a previously unrecognised role in establishing or maintaining genomic imprinting in humans.

  10. A hypothesis-generating search for new genetic breast cancer syndromes - a national study in 803 Swedish families

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    von Wachenfeldt Anna

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among Swedish families with an inherited predisposition for breast cancer, less than one third segregate mutations in genes known to be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in combination with other types of tumours. In a search for new putative familial breast cancer syndromes we studied Swedish families undergoing genetic counselling during 1992-2000. Four thousand families from counselling clinics in Sweden were eligible for study. Families with breast cancer only were excluded, as were families with mutations in genes already known to be associated with malignant diseases. We identified 803 families with two or more cases of breast cancer and at least one other type of cancer. The observed proportion of different types of non-breast cancer was compared with the percentage distribution of non-breast cancer tumours in Sweden in 1958 and 1999. We found tumours in the colon, ovary, endometrium, pancreas and liver, as well as leukaemia in a significantly larger proportion of the study population than in the general population in both years. These tumours were also seen among families where several members had one additional tumour, suggesting that malignancies at these sites, in combination with breast tumours, could constitute genetic syndromes. Endometrial carcinoma has not previously been described in the context of breast cancer syndromes and the excess of malignancies at this site could not be explained by secondary tumours. Thus, we suggest that endometrial carcinoma and breast cancer constitute a new breast cancer syndrome. Further investigation is warranted to categorize phenotypes of both breast and endometrial tumours in this subgroup.

  11. Gastric adenocarcinoma arising from fundic gland polyps in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrean, Sean; Hering, Justin; Saied, Abdul; Jani, Jigna; Espat, N Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a rare hereditary syndrome characterized by multiple colorectal polyps and early development of colorectal cancer. Although FAP uniformly involves the large bowel, it may also produce lesions in the stomach and upper intestinal tract. Fundic gland polyps are the most common gastric lesion in FAP. In the general population, these polyps are considered benign and have no malignant potential. However, in FAP patients, fundic gland polyps have been occasionally recognized as precursor lesions from which invasive cancer may develop. Herein, we present a case of gastric adenocarcinoma arising from fundic gland polyps in an FAP patient. We also review reported cases of gastric cancer in FAP and FAP variant patients in an effort to better understand the pathology, clinical course, and optimal screening and treatment strategies for this disease manifestation.

  12. Síndrome nefrótico familiar Familial nephrotic syndrome

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    Sandalio Durán Álvarez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se han identificado mutaciones en genes que codifican proteínas podocitarias y existen evidencias que sugieren que el defecto primario del síndrome nefrótico idiopático con lesión mínima pueda estar en el podocito. Se analizó el grado de parentesco de 12 pacientes con síndrome nefrótico (hermanos o padres y se destacaron las principales características clínicas e histológicas. Entre los 334 niños nefróticos estudiados encontramos a 12, correspondientes a 7 familias, con síndrome nefrótico córtico-sensible (3,6 %. Hubo predomino del sexo masculino (relación 2:1. En 4 familias sin antecedentes de la enfermedad hallamos a 9 niños afectados, dos de ellos, gemelos idénticos. En las tres familias restantes, dos de las madres y un padre, habían padecido la enfermedad. Todos los niños respondieron al tratamiento con esteroides y en los tres pacientes con estos antecedentes, la evolución fue similar a la de sus progenitores. El síndrome nefrótico con lesión mínima y buena respuesta a los esteroides que se presenta en las familias puede no ser un hecho casual y su aparición clínica puede estar relacionada con alguna mutación genética que la condicione. Para definir claramente este aspecto se necesitan más investigaciones sobre el tema.Gene mutations that codify podocytary proteins have been identified, and there are evidences that suggest that the primary defect of their idiopathic nephrotic syndrome with minimal injury may be in the podocyte. The kinship degree of 12 patients with nephrotic syndrome (siblings or parents was analyzed, and the main clinical and histological characteristics were stressed. Among the 334 nephrotyic children studied, we found 12, corresponding to 7 families, with corticosensitive nephrotic syndrome (3.6 %. There was a prevalence of males (ratio 2:1. In 4 families without history of the disease there were 9 children affected, two of them, identical twins. In the other three families, two of the

  13. Analysis of unstable DNA sequence in FRM1 gene in Polish families with fragile X syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milewski, Michal; Bal, Jerzy; Obersztyn, Ewa; Bocian, Ewa; Mazurczak, Tadeusz; Zygulska, Marta; Horst, Juergen; Deelen, Wout H.; Halley, Dicky J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The unstable DNA sequence in the FMR1 gene was analyzed in 85 individuals from Polish families with fragile X syndrome in order to characterize mutations responsible for the disease in Poland. In all affected individuals classified on the basis of clinical features and expression of the fragile site at X(q27.3) a large expansion of the unstable sequence (full mutation) was detected. About 5% (2 of 43) of individuals with full mutation did not express the fragile site. Among normal alleles, ranging in size from 20 to 41 CGC repeats, allele with 29 repeats was the most frequent (37%). Transmission of premutated and fully mutated alleles to the offspring was always associated with size increase. No change in repeat number was found when normal alleles were transmitted. (author). 19 refs., 4 figs, 1 tab

  14. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and family planning: the attitude towards prenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.F. van Lier (Margot); S.E. Korsse (Susanne); E.M.H. Mathus-Vliegen (Elisabeth); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); K. Vanheusden (Kathleen); M.E. van Leerdam (Monique); A. Wagner (Anja)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPeutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a hereditary disorder caused by LKB1 gene mutations, and is associated with considerable morbidity and decreased life expectancy. This study was conducted to assess the attitude of PJS patients towards family planning, prenatal diagnosis (PND) and

  15. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and family planning: the attitude towards prenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lier, Margot G. F.; Korsse, Susanne E.; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Vanheusden, Kathleen; van Leerdam, Monique E.; Wagner, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a hereditary disorder caused by LKB1 gene mutations, and is associated with considerable morbidity and decreased life expectancy. This study was conducted to assess the attitude of PJS patients towards family planning, prenatal diagnosis (PND) and pregnancy

  16. Psychological Well-Being of Mothers and Siblings in Families of Girls and Women with Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfaglione, Rina; Hastings, Richard P.; Felce, David; Clarke, Angus; Kerr, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Few published studies have reported on the psychological well-being of family members of individuals with Rett syndrome (RTT). Eighty-seven mothers of girls and women with RTT completed a questionnaire survey about their daughters' behavioral phenotype, current health, and behavior problems, and their own and a sibling's well-being. Mothers…

  17. Clinical and oral findings in an Afro-Brazilian family with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Pierro, Viviane Santos; Marins, Marcello Roter; Borges de Oliveira, Renata Cabral; Cortezzi, Wladimir; Janini, Maria Elisa; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) seems to be unusual in black persons. The authors present an Afro-Brazilian family case report of GGS. The main complaint of the index case was a painless swelling of the left mandible, which was diagnosed as an odontogenic keratocyst. Further classical features of the Syndrome were present in this patient. Other two family members were diagnosed as cases of GGS and one of them presented 11 clinical findings characteristic of the syndrome. From the three cases reported, two of them presented five major diagnostic criteria for the GGS, and the diagnosis was only made because of an oral complaint. This case series emphasizes the importance of carefully examining the patient and close relatives for signs of GGS, even if they belong to an ethnic group in which this diagnosis is unusual. © 2014 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The fragile X syndrome in a large family. II. Psychological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenema, H; Veenema, T; Geraedts, J P

    1987-01-01

    Intelligence levels and intelligence profiles were investigated in 52 members of a large family with the fragile X syndrome. The mental abilities were evaluated by the three Wechsler intelligence tests (WAIS, WISC-R, and WPPSI). Chromosomal and psychological data were then compared. In 22 non-retarded fra(X) negative family members, a mean IQ of 102 was found (males 97, females 106). Eleven non-retarded carrier females had IQs between 70 and 110 (mean 86.8), which is 20 points below the mean of normal women (alpha = 0.01). One non-retarded male with 6% fra(X) positive cells had an IQ of 98. His intelligence profile closely resembled the profile in the non-retarded female carriers. The highest IQ in the group of retarded males was 31. The mentally retarded females scored IQs between 26 and 41. In male and female patients verbal intelligence substantially exceeded performance abilities. There was a considerable gap between the highest IQ in the group of retarded females and the lowest IQ in the group of non-retarded carriers (41 and 71 respectively) and a considerable overlap was found between the IQ levels of the non-retarded carriers and normal women. PMID:3806640

  19. Mental retardation in Nance-Horan syndrome: clinical and neuropsychological assessment in four families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutain, A; Ayrault, A D; Moraine, C

    1997-08-22

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked condition comprising congenital cataract with microcornea, distinctive dental, and evocative facial anomalies. Intellectual handicap was mentioned in seven published NHS patients. We performed a clinical study focused on psychomotor development, intellectual abilities, and behavior in 13 affected males in four NHS families, and present the results of a neuropsychological evaluation in 7 of them. Our study confirms that mental retardation (MR) can be a major component of the NHS. Combining our data with those from the literature leads to a frequency of MR in NHS of around 30%. In most cases, MR is mild or moderate (80%) and not associated with motor delay. Conversely, a profound mental handicap associated with autistic traits may be observed. MR has intra- and inter-familial variability but does not appear to be expressed in carriers. Awareness of MR in NHS may be of importance in the management of the patients, especially in terms of education. Cloning and characterization of the gene and analysis of mutations will be an important step towards understanding the molecular basis of mental deficiency in NHS, and in delineation from the other XLMR conditions at Xp22.

  20. Familial clustering of recurrent pericarditis may disclose tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarini, Luca; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Laghi Pasini, Franco; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Although several causes of recurrent pericarditis have been identified, the etiology remains obscure in most cases. The tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is the most common autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder and is caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene encoding the 55-kD receptor for tumour necrosis factor-(TNF)-alpha. Serosal membrane inflammation is a common feature of TRAPS, usually in the form of polyserositis. In addition, patients affected with recurrent pericarditis as the only clinical manifestation of TRAPS have been recently described. Our aim was to investigate the possible involvement of mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene in a cohort of patients affected with idiopathic recurrent pericarditis. Twenty consecutive patients diagnosed with idiopathic recurrent pericarditis were enrolled. Each patient underwent detailed examinations in order to rule out underlying diseases such as infections, connective tissue disorders and malignancies, and mutations of the TNFRSF1A gene were searched for by amplifying, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), genomic DNA, and direct sequencing. TNFRSF1A mutations were found in 2 of the 20 patients. They were siblings, and they both carried a heterozygous low-penetrance R92Q mutation in the TNFRSF1A gene. Familial clustering has been recently reported in up to 10% of patients with recurrent pericarditis, thus suggesting in some cases a possible genetic predisposition. Our study suggests that familial clustering may represent a clue for investigating mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene in these patients and eventually disclose TRAPS.

  1. Familial Angelman syndrome with a crossover in the critical deletion region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelen, M.R.; Van der Burgt, C.J.A.M.; Nillesen, W.N.; Smeets, H.J.M. [University Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vis, A. [Institute for Mentally Handicapped De Winckelsteegh, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    1994-09-01

    More than two thirds of the patients with Angelman syndrome (AS) carry a deletion or other chromosomal abnormality in the 15q11-13 region. A much less frequent cause (4%) is paternal uniparental disomy of the entire chromosome. In general no abnormalities are detectable in familial cases and an inherited submicroscopic deletion was described only once. Here a familial case of 2 sibs with AS is reported. No major cytogenetic or molecular abnormality was identified, but a recombination event had occurred in the AS critical region. The AS locus, D15S113, D15S10, D15S11, and D15S18 mapped proximal and the GABRB3 gene, D15S97, and GABRA5 gene, and D15S12 distal to the crossover site. This recombination within the AS critical region confirmed the exclusion of GABRB3 as a candidate gene for AS. Other markers and candidate genes can be tested genetically as well for a possible role in AS. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome and Bell's palsy: familial history and recurrence tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baochun; Zhou, Chengyong; Han, Zeli

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare genetic predilection and recurrence tendency between facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome (MRS) and Bell's palsy We carried out an investigation on patients with facial palsy in MRS and those with Bell's palsy who visited the outpatient department in our hospital between February 2009 and February 2013. They were asked about familial history and whether it was the first episode, with the results recorded and compared. There were 16 patients with facial palsy in MRS and 860 patients with Bell's palsy involved in the study. Familial history was positive in 5 of 16 patients (31.3%) with facial palsy in MRS and 56 of 860 patients (6.5%) with Bell's palsy (P palsy in MRS and 88 of 860 cases (10.2%) with Bell's palsy had a history of facial palsy in the past (P Bell's palsy, facial palsy in MRS has an obvious genetic predilection and recurrence tendency. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Angelman Syndrome due to familial translocation: unexpected additional results characterized by Microarray-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama-Rebollar, Emiy; Ruiz-Herrera, Adriana; Lieberman-Hernández, Esther; Del Castillo-Ruiz, Victoria; Sánchez-Sandoval, Silvia; Ávila-Flores, Silvia M; Castrillo, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The 15q11q13 region is subject to imprinting and is involved in various structural rearrangements. Less than 1% of Angelman Syndrome patients are due to translocations involving 15q11q13. These translocations can arise de novo or result from the segregation of chromosomes involved in a familial balanced translocation. A 5-year-old Mexican girl presented with developmental delay, minor dysmorphic features and history of exotropia. G-banding chromosome analysis established the diagnosis of Angelman Syndrome resulting from a familial translocation t(10;15) involving the 15q11.2 region. The available family members were studied using banding and molecular cytogenetic techniques, including Microarray-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization, which revealed additional unexpected results: a coincidental and smaller 15q deletion, asymptomatic duplications in 15q11.2 and Xp22.31 regions. This report demonstrates the usefulness of array CGH for a detailed characterization of familial translocations, including the detection of submicroscopic copy number variations, which would otherwise be missed by karyotype analysis alone. Our report also expands two molecularly characterized rare patient cohorts: Angelman Syndrome patients due to familial translocations and patients with 15q11.2 duplications of paternal origin.

  4. A novel mutation of the adrenocorticotropin receptor (ACTH-R) gene in a family with the syndrome of isolated glucocorticoid deficiency, but no ACTH-R abnormalities in two families with the triple A syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsigos, C.; Arai, K.; Latronico, A.C. [National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Isolated glucocorticoid deficiency (IGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary adrenocortical insufficiency, usually without mineralocorticoid deficiency. Occasionally, the disorder is associated with alacrima and achalasia of the esophagus (triple A syndrome), suggesting potential heterogeneity in its etiology. Mutations in the ACTH receptor gene have been reported in several families with IGD. We have amplified and directly sequenced the entire intronless ACTH receptor gene in 1 other family with IGD and 2 famlies with triple A syndrome. The proband with IGD was a homozygote for an A {r_arrow}G substitution, changing tyrosine 254 to cysteine in the third extracellular loop of the receptor protein, probably interfering with ligand binding. Both of her parents were heterozygotes for this mutation, which was not detected in 100 normal alleles. No mutations were identified in the entire coding area of the ACTH receptor in the 2 families with triple A syndrome, supporting the idea of a developmental or postreceptor defect in this syndrome. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Dermal Ultrastructure in Low Beighton Score Members of 17 Families with Hypermobile-Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinh Hermanns-Lê

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobile type (EDSH and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare skin ultrastructural abnormalities of EDSH and BJHS among different families. Skin of 23 EDSH, 27 BJHS, and 41 asymptomatic subjects from 17 families was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Similar ultrastructural abnormalities were found irrespective of the Beighton score. Flower-like collagen fibrils represented the key change and elastic fibers were altered as well. Beighton score is a clinical parameter rating joint mobility that appeared unrelated to quantitative and qualitative collagen ultrastructural alterations in the skin. Some EDSH family members fit with BJHS diagnosis. BJHS possibly represents a mild variant of EDSH.

  6. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  7. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  8. Observations on Copy Number Variations in a Kidney-yang Deficiency Syndrome Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have performed an analysis of a family with kidney-yang deficiency syndrome (KDS in order to determine the structural genomic variations through a novel approach designated as “copy number variants” (CNVs. Twelve KDS subjects and three healthy spouses from this family were included in this study. Genomic DNA samples were genotyped utilizing an Affymetrix 100 K single nucleotide polymorphism array, and CNVs were identified by Copy Number Algorithm (CNAT4.0, Affymetrix. Our results demonstrate that 447 deleted and 476 duplicated CNVs are shared among KDS subjects within the family. The homologus ratio of deleted CNVs was as high as 99.78%. One-copy-duplicated CNVs display mid-range homology. For two copies of duplicated CNVs (CNV4, a markedly heterologous ratio was observed. Therefore, with the important exception of CNV4, our data shows that CNVs shared among KDS subjects display typical Mendelian inheritance. A total of 113 genes with established functions were identified from the CNV flanks; significantly enriched genes surrounding CNVs may contribute to certain adaptive benefit. These genes could be classified into categories including: binding and transporter, cell cycle, signal transduction, biogenesis, nerve development, metabolism regulation and immune response. They can also be included into three pathways, that is, signal transduction, metabolic processes and immunological networks. Particularly, the results reported here are consistent with the extensive impairments observed in KDS patients, involving the mass-energy-information-carrying network. In conclusion, this article provides the first set of CNVs from KDS patients that will facilitate our further understanding of the genetic basis of KDS and will allow novel strategies for a rational therapy of this disease.

  9. A new germline TP53 gene mutation in a family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B; Wolff, J; Poremba, C; Schäfer, K L; Ritter, J; Gullotta, F; Jürgens, H; Böcker, W

    1996-07-01

    This report describes an unusual clinical presentation of Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Family history revealed a mild aggregation of adult cancers in one generation, and an unusual clustering of brain tumours of early childhood in the following generation. In order to evaluate the genetic basis for cancer predisposition in this family, molecular genetic analysis for the occurrence of germline TP53 tumour suppressor gene mutations was performed on 12 siblings of two generations. Indirect mutation analysis was performed by the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. Alterations were characterised by automated direct fluorescence sequencing analysis. Tumour material was also examined for p53 protein accumulation by immunohistochemistry. Initially, a TP53 gene germline missense mutation was detected in an 11-year-old kindred with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) following intensive treatment of a brain tumour. In peripheral blood and bone marrow samples of this proband, a reduction to hemizygosity occurred. During AML treatment, detection of LOH of 17p was used as a marker for clonality and treatment control. The mutation was found to be inherited from the proband's mother, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 48 years. Further, three siblings were carriers, and two are apparently healthy at the age of 21 and 23 years. Knowledge of germline mutations may allow accurate DNA-based carrier diagnosis which is of important clinical significance for treatment strategy and control. Furthermore, the occurrence of unaffected carriers in this family raises questions about appropriate methods of cancer surveillance and counselling for these people.

  10. EstimatingTP53Mutation Carrier Probability in Families with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome Using LFSPRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Gang; Bojadzieva, Jasmina; Ballinger, Mandy L; Li, Jialu; Blackford, Amanda L; Mai, Phuong L; Savage, Sharon A; Thomas, David M; Strong, Louise C; Wang, Wenyi

    2017-06-01

    Background: Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is associated with germline TP53 mutations and a very high lifetime cancer risk. Algorithms that assess a patient's risk of inherited cancer predisposition are often used in clinical counseling. The existing LFS criteria have limitations, suggesting the need for an advanced prediction tool to support clinical decision making for TP53 mutation testing and LFS management. Methods: Based on a Mendelian model, LFSPRO estimates TP53 mutation probability through the Elston-Stewart algorithm and consequently estimates future risk of cancer. With independent datasets of 1,353 tested individuals from 867 families, we evaluated the prediction performance of LFSPRO. Results: LFSPRO accurately predicted TP53 mutation carriers in a pediatric sarcoma cohort from MD Anderson Cancer Center in the United States, the observed to expected ratio (OE) = 1.35 (95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.80); area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.85 (0.75-0.93); a population-based sarcoma cohort from the International Sarcoma Kindred Study in Australia, OE = 1.62 (1.03-2.55); AUC = 0.67 (0.54-0.79); and the NCI LFS study cohort, OE = 1.28 (1.17-1.39); AUC = 0.82 (0.78-0.86). LFSPRO also showed higher sensitivity and specificity than the classic LFS and Chompret criteria. LFSPRO is freely available through the R packages LFSPRO and BayesMendel. Conclusions: LFSPRO shows good performance in predicting TP53 mutations in individuals and families in varied situations. Impact: LFSPRO is more broadly applicable than the current clinical criteria and may improve clinical management for individuals and families with LFS. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 837-44. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Pendred syndrome in two Galician families: insights into clinical phenotypes through cellular, genetic, and molecular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palos, Fernando; García-Rendueles, María E R; Araujo-Vilar, David; Obregon, Maria Jesús; Calvo, Rosa Maria; Cameselle-Teijeiro, Jose; Bravo, Susana B; Perez-Guerra, Oscar; Loidi, Lourdes; Czarnocka, Barbara; Alvarez, Paula; Refetoff, Samuel; Dominguez-Gerpe, Lourdes; Alvarez, Clara V; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    We studied two families from Galicia (northwest Spain) with Pendred syndrome (PS) and unusual thyroid phenotypes. In family A, the proposita had a large goiter and hypothyroxinemia but normal TSH and free T3 (FT3). In family B, some affected members showed deafness but not goiter. Our objective was to identify the mutations causing PS and molecular mechanisms underlying the thyroid phenotypes. Interventions included extraction of DNA and of thyroid tissue. Propositi and 10 members of the two families participated in the study. Main outcome measures included SLC26A4 gene analysis, deiodinase activities in thyroid tissue, and c.416-1G-->A effects on SLC26A4 splicing. In addition, a primary PS thyrocyte culture, T-PS2, was obtained from propositus B and compared with another culture of normal human thyrocytes, NT, by Western blotting, confocal microscopy, and iodine uptake kinetics. Proposita A was heterozygous for c.578C-->T and c.279delT, presented with goiter, and had normal TSH and FT3 but low FT4 attributable to high type 1 and type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase activities in the goiter. Propositus B bore c.279delT and a novel mutation c.416-1G-->A; some deaf relatives were homozygous for c.416-1G-->A but did not present goiter. The c.279delT mutation was associated with identical haplotype in the two families. T-PS2 showed truncated pendrin retained intracellularly and high iodine uptake with low efflux leading to iodine retention. c.279delT is a founder mutation in Galicia. Proposita A adapted to poor organification by increasing deiodinase activities in the goiter, avoiding hypothyroidism. Lack of goiter in subjects homozygous for c.416-1G-->A was due to incomplete penetrance allowing synthesis of some wild-type pendrin. Intracellular iodine retention, as seen in T-PS2, could play a role in thyroid alterations in PS.

  12. Analysis of four families with the Stickler syndrome by linkage studies. Identification of a new premature stop codon in the COL2A1 gene in a family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaventure, J.; Lasselin, C. [Hopital Necker, Paris (France); Toutain, A. [CHU Bretonneau, Tours (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy which associates progressive myopia with vitreal degeneration and retinal detachment. Cleft palate, cranio-facial abnormalities, deafness and osteoarthritis are often associated symptoms. Genetic heterogeneity of this autosomal dominant disease was consistent with its large clinical variability. Linkage studies have provided evidence for cosegregation of the disease with COL2A1, the gene coding for type II collagen, in about 50% of the families. Four additional families are reported here. Linkage analyses by using a VNTR located in the 3{prime} region of the gene were achieved. In three families, positive lod scores were obtained with a cumulative maximal value of 3.5 at a recombination fraction of 0. In one of these families, single strand conformation analysis of 25 exons disclosed a new mutation in exon 42. Codon for glutamic acid at position a1-803 was converted into a stop codon. The mutation was detected in DNA samples from all the affected members of the family but not in the unaffected. This result confirms that most of the Stickler syndromes linked to COL2A1 are due to premature stop codons. In a second family, an abnormal SSCP pattern of exon 34 was detected in all the affected individuals. The mutation is likely to correspond to a splicing defect in the acceptor site of intron 33. In one family the disease did not segregate with the COL2A1 locus. Further linkage studies with intragenic dimorphic sites in the COL10A1 gene and highly polymorphic markers close to the COL9A1 locus indicated that this disorder did not result from defects in these two genes.

  13. A Turkish family with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome caused by a novel ALDH3A2 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS is an inherited neurocutaneous disorder caused by mutations in the aldehyde dehydrogenase family 3 member A2 (ALDH3A2 gene that encodes fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase. Affected patients display ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia. More than 70 mutations in ALDH3A2 have been discovered in SLS patients. We diagnosed two brothers age of 12 and 20 years with characteristic features of this rare syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed demyelinating disease in both of them. We described a novel homozygous, c. 835 T > A (p.Y279N mutation in exon 6 in two patients.

  14. Chocolate consumption and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the NHLBI Family Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokede, Oluwabunmi A.; Ellison, Curtis R.; Pankow, James S.; North, Kari E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Arnett, Donna K.; Djoussé, Luc

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background & aims Previous studies have suggested that cocoa products, which are rich sources of flavonoids, may lower blood pressure, serum cholesterol, fasting blood glucose and improve endothelial function. However, it is unclear whether consumption of cocoa products including chocolate influences the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS). In a cross-sectional design, we sought to examine the association between chocolate consumption and the prevalence of MetS. Methods We studied 4098 participants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Family Heart Study aged 25–93 years. Chocolate consumption was assessed using a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. MetS was defined using the NCEP III criteria. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate prevalence odds ratios of MetS according to frequency of chocolate intake. Results Of the 4098 participants (mean age 51.7 y) included in the analyses, 2206 (53.8%) were female. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our population was 30.2%. Compared with those who did not consume any chocolate, multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for MetS were 1.26 (0.94, 1.69), 1.15 (0.85, 1.55), and 0.99 (0.66, 1.51) among women who reported chocolate consumption of 1–3 times/ month, 1–4 times/week, and 5+ times/week, respectively. Corresponding values for men were: 1.13 (0.82, 1.57), 1.02 (0.74, 1.39), and 1.21 (0.79, 1.85). Conclusion These data do not support an association between chocolate intake and the prevalence of MetS in US adult men and women. PMID:25126517

  15. Unusual presentation of Kallmannn syndrome with contiguous gene deletion in three siblings of a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Venkat Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of 3 brothers aged 34, 24, and 22 years, unmarried, who presented to our endocrinology clinic with absence of secondary sexual characters. There was no such history in other siblings, but their maternal uncle had similar complaints. On examination, all 3 had pre-pubertal appearance, voice, and genitalia along with anosmia and bimanual synkinesia. Cryptorchidism was noticed in 2 while third person had small hypoplastic testes. It was also noted that all 3 patients had icthyosis mainly involving trunk, back, and limbs. The hormonal assays were consistent with isolated hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. IQ testing revealed mental retardation in the 2 patients. Ultrasound showed ectopic right kidney in one patient, atrophic right kidney in the second patient while the third patient had normal kidneys. MRI brain of all the patients showed poorly visualized olfactory tract and bulb. Kallmann syndrome (KS was diagnosed based on hormonal evaluation and MRI results. Of the four types of KS: Synkinesia, renal anomaly, and X-linked pedigree pattern in our patients pointed towards X-linked type 1 KS as the possible cause. But, icthyosis and mental retardation are not usual presentation of type 1 KS. They are usually seen as a result of contiguous gene deletion of KAL1, steroid sulfatase (STS, and mental retardation (MRX gene on X chromosome. Hence, the possible gene defect in our cases is inherited defect in contiguous gene deletion. The contiguous gene deletion as the cause of KS in 3 patients of same family is very rare and worth reporting. Also, the significance of phenotype-genotypic association in Kallmann syndrome is discussed

  16. Chocolate consumption and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the NHLBI Family Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokede, Oluwabunmi A; Ellison, Curtis R; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Hunt, Steven C; Kraja, Aldi T; Arnett, Donna K; Djoussé, Luc

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that cocoa products, which are rich sources of flavonoids, may lower blood pressure, serum cholesterol, fasting blood glucose and improve endothelial function. However, it is unclear whether consumption of cocoa products including chocolate influences the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS). In a cross-sectional design, we sought to examine the association between chocolate consumption and the prevalence of MetS. We studied 4098 participants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Family Heart Study aged 25-93 years. Chocolate consumption was assessed using a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. MetS was defined using the NCEP III criteria. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate prevalence odds ratios of MetS according to frequency of chocolate intake. Of the 4098 participants (mean age 51.7 y) included in the analyses, 2206 (53.8%) were female. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our population was 30.2%. Compared with those who did not consume any chocolate, multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for MetS were 1.26 (0.94, 1.69), 1.15 (0.85, 1.55), and 0.99 (0.66, 1.51) among women who reported chocolate consumption of 1-3 times/ month, 1-4 times/week, and 5+ times/week, respectively. Corresponding values for men were: 1.13 (0.82, 1.57), 1.02 (0.74, 1.39), and 1.21 (0.79, 1.85). These data do not support an association between chocolate intake and the prevalence of MetS in US adult men and women.

  17. Genetic Information-Seeking Behaviors and Knowledge among Family Members and Patients with Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jada G; Hutson, Sadie P; Frohnmayer, Amy E; Han, Paul K J; Peters, June A; Carr, Ann G; Alter, Blanche P

    2015-10-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) including Fanconi anemia, dyskeratosis congenita, Diamond-Blackfan anemia, and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome are rare genetic disorders characterized by hematologic complications and increased risk of cancer. Patients and their families likely experience obstacles in obtaining sufficient health information given their disorders' rarity. To investigate this possibility, we examined information-seeking behaviors and levels of general and disorder-specific genetic knowledge among 315 members of 174 families with an IBMFS, and how information-seeking behaviors and socio-demographic factors may be associated with their genetic knowledge. Cross-sectional survey data indicated that participants were most likely to have ever used the Internet or healthcare providers for genetic information. On average, participants correctly answered 57 % of items assessing general genetic knowledge and 49-59 % of disorder-specific knowledge items. Greater knowledge was associated with greater education and ever experiencing genetic counseling, attending a scientific meeting, and seeking information from the Internet and scientific literature. Among families with Fanconi anemia (whose family support organization has the longest history of providing information), greater disorder-specific genetic knowledge was also associated with seeking information from support groups and other affected families. Results suggest that families with IBMFS have uncertainty regarding genetic aspects of their disorder, and highlight potential channels for delivering educational resources.

  18. A novel missense mutation of the paired box 3 gene in a Turkish family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Filiz; Ozturk, A Taylan; Adibelli, Hamit; Unal, Nurettin; Tukun, Ajlan

    2013-01-01

    Screening of mutations in the paired box 3 (PAX3) gene in three generations of a Turkish family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). WS1 was diagnosed in a 13-month-old girl according to the WS Consortium criteria. Detailed family history of the proband revealed eight affected members in three generations. Routine clinical and audiological examination and ophthalmologic evaluation were performed on eight affected and five healthy members of the study family. Dystopia canthorum was detected in all affected patients; however, a brilliant blue iris was present in five patients who also had mild retinal hypopigmentation. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of affected and unaffected individuals in the family as well as 50 unrelated healthy volunteers. All coding exons and adjacent intronic regions of PAX3 were sequenced directly. A novel missense heterozygous c.788T>G mutation was identified in eight patients. This nucleotide alteration was not found in unaffected members of the study family or in the 50 unrelated control subjects. The mutation causes V263G amino-acid substitution in the homeodomain of the PAX3 protein, which represents the 45(th) residue of helix 3. We identified a novel missense c.788T>G mutation in PAX3 in a family with Waardenburg syndrome with intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity.

  19. Mutations in SLC29A3, encoding an equilibrative nucleoside transporter ENT3, cause a familial histiocytosis syndrome (Faisalabad histiocytosis and familial Rosai-Dorfman disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil V Morgan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The histiocytoses are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by an excessive number of histiocytes. In most cases the pathophysiology is unclear and treatment is nonspecific. Faisalabad histiocytosis (FHC (MIM 602782 has been classed as an autosomal recessively inherited form of histiocytosis with similarities to Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD (also known as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML. To elucidate the molecular basis of FHC, we performed autozygosity mapping studies in a large consanguineous family and identified a novel locus at chromosome 10q22.1. Mutation analysis of candidate genes within the target interval identified biallelic germline mutations in SLC29A3 in the FHC kindred and in two families reported to have familial RDD. Analysis of SLC29A3 expression during mouse embryogenesis revealed widespread expression by e14.5 with prominent expression in the central nervous system, eye, inner ear, and epithelial tissues including the gastrointestinal tract. SLC29A3 encodes an intracellular equilibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT3 with affinity for adenosine. Recently germline mutations in SLC29A3 were also described in two rare autosomal recessive disorders with overlapping phenotypes: (a H syndrome (MIM 612391 that is characterised by cutaneous hyperpigmentation and hypertrichosis, hepatomegaly, heart anomalies, hearing loss, and hypogonadism; and (b PHID (pigmented hypertrichosis with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus syndrome. Our findings suggest that a variety of clinical diagnoses (H and PHID syndromes, FHC, and familial RDD can be included in a new diagnostic category of SLC29A3 spectrum disorder.

  20. Six uneventful pregnancy outcomes in an extended vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Annette F; Spiering, Wilko; Moll, Frans L; Page-Christiaens, Lieve; Beenakkers, Ingrid C M; Dooijes, Dennis; Vonken, Evert-Jan P A; van der Smagt, Jasper J; Knoers, Nine V; Koenen, Steven V; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj

    2017-02-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (vEDS) is caused by heterozygous mutations in COL3A1 and is characterized by fragile vasculature and hollow organs, with a high risk of catastrophic events at a young age. During pregnancy and delivery, maternal mortality rates up until 25% have been reported. However, recent pedigree analysis reported a substantial lower pregnancy-related mortality rate of 4.9%. Here, we describe an extended vEDS family with multiple uneventful pregnancy outcomes. In the proband, a 37-year-old woman, DNA-analysis because of an asymptomatic iliac artery dissection revealed a pathogenic mutation in COL3A1 (c.980G>A; p. Gly327Asp). She had had three uneventful vaginal deliveries. At the time of diagnosis, her 33-year-old niece was 25 weeks pregnant. She had had one uneventful vaginal delivery. Targeted DNA-analysis revealed that she was carrier of the COL3A1 mutation. Ultrasound detected an aneurysm in the abdominal aorta with likely a dissection. An uneventful elective cesarean section was performed at a gestational age of 37 weeks. The 40-year-old sister of our proband had had one uneventful vaginal delivery and an active pregnancy wish. Cascade DNA-screening showed her to carry the COL3A1 mutation. Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) of her aorta revealed a type B dissection with the most proximal entry tear just below the superior mesenteric artery. Pregnancy was therefore discouraged. This familial case illustrates the complexity and challenges of reproductive decision-making in a potentially lethal condition as vEDS, and highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach. Moreover, it suggests that previous pregnancy-related risks of vEDS may be overestimated. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Detection of Folliculin Gene Mutations in Two Chinese Families with Birt-Hogg-Dube Syndrome

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    Lv Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHD, OMIM#135150 is a rare disease in clinic; it is characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts with an increased risk of recurrent pneumothorax, renal cysts, and renal neoplasms. Previous studies have demonstrated that variants in folliculin (FLCN, NM_144997 are mainly responsible for this disease. In this research, we enrolled two BHD families and applied direct sequencing of FLCN to explore the genetic lesions in them. Two FLCN mutations were identified: one is a novel deletion variant (c.668delA/p.N223TfsX19, while the other is a previously reported insertion mutation (c.1579_1580insA/p.R527QfsX75. And the pathogenicity of both variants was confirmed by cosegregation assay. Bioinformatics analysis showed that c.668delA may lead to functional haploinsufficiency of FLCN because mRNA carrying this mutation exhibits a faster degradation rate comparing to the wild type. Real-time qPCR also confirmed that the mRNA level of FLCN expression in the proband was decreased significantly compared with the controls, which may disrupt the mTOR pathway and lead to BHD. The insertion mutation (c.1579_1580insA was predicted to cause a prolonged amino acid sequence of FLCN. The present identification of two mutations not only further supports the important role of tumor suppressor FLCN in BHD and primary spontaneous pneumothorax, but also expands the spectrum of FLCN mutations and will provide insight into genetic diagnosis and counseling of families with BHD.

  2. Identification of a Novel Androgen Receptor Mutation in a Family With Multiple Components Compatible With the Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottrup, Grete; Jørgensen, Anne; Nielsen, John E.

    2013-01-01

    showed features consistent with insufficient testis development and TDS.Conclusion: The presence of all hallmarks of TDS, including germ cell cancer, in a family with a novel AR mutation causing a partial decrease in AR function is in line with the concept that reduced androgen signaling may contribute......Context: Androgen signaling via the androgen receptor (AR) is essential for normal testis development and male reproductive functions. We describe a rare family with 3 males affected by a mild disorder of sex determination compatible with testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS), including subfertility.......Participants: The proband, his first cousin, and a nephew underwent a detailed clinical investigation including genetic tests, whereas four female members of the family were tested for the specific AR mutation.Results: A novel AR mutation, c.2214T>G;p.Ile738Met, was identified in the affected family members. Functional...

  3. Autosomal recessive long QT syndrome, type 1 in eight families from Saudi Arabia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bdier, Amnah Y.; Al-Ghamdi, Saleh; Verma, Prashant K.; Dagriri, Khalid; Alshehri, Bandar; Jiman, Omamah A.; Ahmed, Sherif E.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common primary cardiac arrhythmia syndromes is autosomal dominant long QT syndrome, type 1 (LQT1), chiefly caused by mono-allelic mutations in the KCNQ1 gene. Bi-allelic mutations in the KCNQ1 gene are causal to Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), characterized by severe and

  4. Xp22. 3 deletions in isolated familial Kallmann's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardelin, J.P.; Levilliers, J.; Legouis, R.; Petit, C. (Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)); Young, J.; Pholsena, M.; Schaison, G. (Centre Hospitalier de Bicetre, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)); Kirk, J.; Bouloux, P. (Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-04-01

    Several familial cases of Kallmann's syndrome (KS) have been reported, among which the X-chromosome-linked mode of inheritance is the most frequent. The gene responsible for the X-linked KS has been localized to the terminal part of the X-chromosome short arm (Xp22.3 region), immediately proximal to the steroid sulfatase gene responsible for X-linked ichthyosis. Large deletions of this region have been previously shown in patients affected with both X-linked ichthyosis and KS. The authors report here the search for Xp22.3 deletions in 20 unrelated males affected with isolated X-linked KS. Only 2 deletions were found using Southern blot analysis, indicating that large deletions are uncommon in patients affected with KS alone. Both deletions were shown to include the entire KAL gene responsible for X-linked KS. The patients carrying these deletions exhibit additional clinical anomalies, which are discussed: unilateral renal aplasia, unilateral absence of vas deferens, mirror movements, and sensory neural hearing loss. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Identification of a novel NHS mutation in a Chinese family with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aijun; Li, Bingzhen; Wu, Lemeng; Yang, Liping; Chen, Ningning; Ma, Zhizhong

    2015-04-01

    To identiy the disease causing mutation in a Chinese family presenting with early-onset cataract and dental anomalies. A specific Hereditary Eye Disease Enrichment Panel (HEDEP) (personalized customization by MyGenostics, Baltimore, MD) based on targeted exome capture technology was used to collect the protein coding regions of 30 early-onset cataract associated genes, and high throughput sequencing was done with Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The identified variant was confirmed with Sanger sequencing. A novel deletion in exon 4 (c.852delG) of NHS gene was identified; the identified 1 bp deletion altered the reading frame and was predicted to result in a premature stop codon after the addition of twelve novel amino acid (p.S285PfsX13). This mutation co-segregated in affected males and obligate female carriers, but was absent in 100 matched controls. Our findings broaden the spectrum of NHS mutations causing Nance-Horan syndrome and phenotypic spectrum of the disease in Chinese patients.

  6. Family History of Type 2 Diabetes is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Female Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ticiana Costa Rodrigues

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the family history (FH of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MetS in a group of non-diabetic obese female subjects. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 239 female patients with obesity, regularly attending the Internal Medicine Division’s outpatient clinic (Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Brazil. The inclusion criteria were patients with body mass index ?30 kg/m2 and absence of type 2 diabetes. The FH was considered positive if a first degree relative had a diagnosis of diabetes. Seventy-four of 239 patients evaluated (30% had a positive FH for type 2 diabetes. Patients with positive FH had higher waist/hip ratio and MetS more often than patients with negative FH. FH of type 2 diabetes was associated with MetS in this sample of non-diabetic obese female patients. Waist/hip ratio and fasting plasma glucose, markers of insulin resistance, were also associated with FH of type 2 diabetes. The simple question: “Do you have a FH of type 2 diabetes?” may help to identify the obese patients that should be better evaluated and intensively treated with the objective of preventing type 2 diabetes.

  7. Are we ready for a new epidemic of under recognized liver disease in South Asia especially in Pakistan? Non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Om; Hamid, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasingly recognized as an important public health problem nowadays. NAFLD encompass a variety of liver pathologies including simple steatosis, NASH, fibrosis, cirrhosis and finally cancer. It is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidaemia, Insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes. It is the most common chronic liver disease in USA and considered to be increasing in Asia Pacific region including South Asia however there is no community based study from Pakistan. Customarily NAFLD had been regarded as a benign disease; however clinical as well as epidemiological studies had contradicted this belief because approximately 20% of the patients with NAFLD had NASH which has propensity to develop cirrhosis and ultimately to HCC. The diagnosis of NAFLD is made most of the times incidentally on abdominal imaging which is done for other purposes. Despite its prevalence, treatment options are very limited. However modification of risk factors such as dyslipidemia, diabetes control and weight reduction does help in NAFLD. Fatty liver results due to lack of physical activity; hence foremost step to manage such patients would be to develop the healthy life style. We need population based studies in our country so that we can protect our population from a new epidemic.

  8. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome associated with male gender identity or female precocious puberty in the same family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez de la Vega, José A; Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Bernal, Susana; Audí, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In 4 complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) members of one family, 2 presented extreme and unusual clinical features: male gender identity disorder (case 1) and female precocious central puberty (case 2). The AR gene carried the mutation c.1752C>G, p.Phe584Leu. Gender dysphoria in CAIS may be considered as a true transgender and has been described in 3 other cases. Central precocious puberty has only been described in 1 case; Müllerian ducts in case 2 permitted menarche. Despite the common CAIS phenotype, there was a familial disparity for gender identity adequacy and timing and type of puberty.

  9. Novel mutations in PRG4 gene in two Indian families with camptodactyly-arthropathy- coxa vara- pericarditis (CACP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashree S Nandagopalan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Camptodactyly - arthropathy- coxa vara- pericarditis (CACP syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the PRG4 (proteoglycan 4 gene. Hallmarks of the syndrome include congenital or early-onset camptodactyly and arthropathy with synovial hyperplasia, progressive coxa vara deformity and non-inflammatory pericardial effusions. Till date only around 25 pathogenic mutations have been reported in this gene and none have been reported from India. We report here the mutations in the PRG4 gene in three patients of CACP from two unrelated families from India. Methods: Molecular genetic studies were done for the three patients with the CACP syndrome, from two unrelated Indian families, through sequence analysis of all coding exons and the exon-intron boundaries of the PRG4 gene. Results: Two novel frame-shift deletion mutations leading to premature protein termination were found. One patient was identified to be homozygous for a 2 base pair deletion in exon 6 (c.2645_2646delGA and the two affected siblings from the other family were found to be homozygous for a 4 base pair deletion in exon 6 (c.2883_2886delAAGA. Conclusions: This is perhaps the first report of PRG4 mutations from India. Further mutation studies in Indian CACP cases will help to determine the mutation spectrum of the PRG4 gene in the Indian population and also help to further elucidate the molecular pathology and the genotype-phenotype correlation of this rare disease.

  10. Relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support and job satisfaction to burnout syndrome among medical workers in southwest China: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shujuan; Liu, Danping; Liu, Hongbo; Zhang, Juying; Duan, Zhanqi

    2017-01-01

    Burnout is a psychosomatic syndrome widely observed in Chinese medical workers due to the increasing cost of medical treatment, excessive workload, and excessive prescribing behavior. No studies have evaluated the interrelationship among occupational burnout, work-family conflict, social support, and job satisfaction in medical workers. The aim of this study was to evaluate these relationships among medical workers in southwest China. This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2013 and December 2013, and was based on the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS). A total of 1382 medical workers were enrolled in the study. Pearson correlation analysis and general linear model univariate analysis were used to evaluate the relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction with burnout syndrome in medical workers. We observed that five dimensions of job satisfaction and self-reported social support were negatively associated with burnout syndrome, whereas three dimensions of work-family conflict showed a positive correlation. In a four-stage general linear model analysis, we found that demographic factors accounted for 5.4% of individual variance in burnout syndrome (F = 4.720, Pburnout syndrome, and medical workers without administrative duties had more serious burnout syndrome than those with administrative duties. In conclusion, the present study suggests that work-family conflict and self-reported social support slightly affect the level of burnout syndrome, and that job satisfaction is a much stronger influence on burnout syndrome in medical workers of southwest China.

  11. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family reveals a novel non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation locus on 11p15-tel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Shoaib ur; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Eiberg, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal recessive inherited mental retardation is an extremely heterogeneous disease and accounts for approximately 25% of all non-syndromic mental retardation cases. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family revealed a novel locus for non-syndromic autosomal recessive men...

  12. Association between the Eating Family Meal and the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Using Data from Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Ae; Park, Woo-Chul; Kwon, Yu-Jin; Shim, Jae-Yong

    2017-05-01

    Several studies have shown that family meals promote a well-balanced and healthier diet and weight status. Metabolic syndrome is related to eating behavior. This study investigated the association between eating family meals and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. This cross-sectional study included 4,529 subjects who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV and V (2007-2012). A self-reported questionnaire was used to assess dietary status. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the guidelines of the modified version of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. We compared the overall quality of dietary intake in family meal. Nutritional adequacy ratios for energy, protein, calcium, vitamin A, vitamin B 1 , vitamin B 2 , vitamin C, niacin, and potassium, and the mean adequacy ratio were significantly higher in the family meal group (Pmetabolic syndrome was lower in the family meal group (Pmetabolic syndrome. This study demonstrated that eating family meals appeared to be associated with nutrient adequacy. However, we observed no significant differences in prevalence of metabolic syndrome between the 2 groups.

  13. Flecainide provocation reveals concealed brugada syndrome in a long QT syndrome family with a novel L1786Q mutation in SCN5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, Jørgen K.; Yuan, Lei; Hedley, Paula L

    2014-01-01

    precordial leads of the electrocardiogram. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a Danish family suffering from long QT syndrome, a novel missense mutation in SCN5A, changing a leucine residue into a glutamine residue at position 1786 (L1786Q), was found to be present in heterozygous form co-segregating with prolonged QT......: The L1786Q mutation is associated with a combined LQT3 and concealed BrS phenotype explained by gating characteristics of the mutated ion channel protein. Hence, sodium channel blockade should be considered in clinical evaluation of apparent LQT3 patients....

  14. Exclusion of TCOF1 mutations in a case of bilateral Goldenhar syndrome and one familial case of microtia with meatal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Christian T; Rosanowski, Frank; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Reis, André; Rauch, Anita

    2005-04-01

    A number of different disorders involving first and second branchial arch anomalies have been described as distinct entities, including Treacher-Collins-Franceschetti syndrome, Goldenhar syndrome, Nager syndrome and Miller syndrome. The significant phenotypic overlap between these disorders raises the issue of a common developmental origin. After the identification of mutations in TCOF1 as a general cause of the Treacher-Collins-Franceschetti syndrome, TCOF1 mutations were excluded in patients with unilateral signs of the Goldenhar syndrome spectrum. We also present two rare cases of bilateral Goldenhar syndrome and familial microtia with meatal atresia, respectively, in whom we also excluded TCOF1 mutations. Thus, genetic heterogeneity in different disorders of the first and second branchial arch development is supported.

  15. Prevalence and management of familial hypercholesterolaemia in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanchen, David; Gencer, Baris; Auer, Reto; Räber, Lorenz; Stefanini, Giulio G; Klingenberg, Roland; Schmied, Christian M; Cornuz, Jacques; Muller, Olivier; Vogt, Pierre; Jüni, Peter; Matter, Christian M; Windecker, Stephan; Lüscher, Thomas F; Mach, François; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2015-09-21

    We aimed to assess the prevalence and management of clinical familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) among patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We studied 4778 patients with ACS from a multi-centre cohort study in Switzerland. Based on personal and familial history of premature cardiovascular disease and LDL-cholesterol levels, two validated algorithms for diagnosis of clinical FH were used: the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network algorithm to assess possible (score 3-5 points) or probable/definite FH (>5 points), and the Simon Broome Register algorithm to assess possible FH. At the time of hospitalization for ACS, 1.6% had probable/definite FH [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-2.0%, n = 78] and 17.8% possible FH (95% CI 16.8-18.9%, n = 852), respectively, according to the Dutch Lipid Clinic algorithm. The Simon Broome algorithm identified 5.4% (95% CI 4.8-6.1%, n = 259) patients with possible FH. Among 1451 young patients with premature ACS, the Dutch Lipid Clinic algorithm identified 70 (4.8%, 95% CI 3.8-6.1%) patients with probable/definite FH, and 684 (47.1%, 95% CI 44.6-49.7%) patients had possible FH. Excluding patients with secondary causes of dyslipidaemia such as alcohol consumption, acute renal failure, or hyperglycaemia did not change prevalence. One year after ACS, among 69 survivors with probable/definite FH and available follow-up information, 64.7% were using high-dose statins, 69.0% had decreased LDL-cholesterol from at least 50, and 4.6% had LDL-cholesterol ≤1.8 mmol/L. A phenotypic diagnosis of possible FH is common in patients hospitalized with ACS, particularly among those with premature ACS. Optimizing long-term lipid treatment of patients with FH after ACS is required. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. A novel mutation in the PAX3 gene causes Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayyeb; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Sensorineural hearing impairment (HI) is one of the most frequent congenital defects, with a prevalence of 1 in 500 among neonates. Although there are over 400 syndromes involving HI, most cases of HI are nonsyndromic (70%), 20% of which follow autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Waardenburg syndrome (WS) ranks first among autosomal dominant syndromic forms of HI. WS is characterized by sensorineural hearing impairment, pigmentation abnormalities of hair and skin and hypoplastic blue eyes or heterochromia iridis. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4. WS1 is diagnosed by the presence of dystopia canthorum and PAX3 is the only gene involved. This study aims to determine the pathogenic mutation in a large Iranian pedigree affected with WS1 in order to further confirm the clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a family segregating HI was ascertained in a genetic counseling center. Upon clinical inspection, white forelock, dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys, characteristic of WS1 were evident. In order to clarify the genetic etiology and confirm the clinical data, primers were designed to amplify exons and exon-intron boundaries of the responsible gene, PAX3 with 10 exons, followed by the Sanger DNA sequencing method. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed a novel mutation in PAX3 (c.1024_1040 del AGCACGATTCCTTCCAA). Our data provide genotype-phenotype correlation for the mutation in PAX3 and WS1 in the studied family, with implications for genetic counseling, which necessitates detailed clinical inspection of HI patients to distinguish syndromic HI from the more common non-syndromic cases. Our results reveal the value of phenotype-directed genetic analysis and could further expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Heritability and genetic correlation between GERD symptoms severity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammation markers in families living in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding-Bernal, Arturo; Sánchez-Pedraza, Valentin; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Sobrino-Cossio, Sergio; Tejero-Barrera, María Elizabeth; Burguete-García, Ana Isabel; León-Hernández, Mireya; Serratos-Canales, María Fabiola; Duggirala, Ravindranath; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the heritability (h2) and genetic correlation (ρG) between GERD symptoms severity, metabolic syndrome components, and inflammation markers in Mexican families. Cross-sectional study which included 32 extended families resident in Mexico City. GERD symptoms severity was assessed by the ReQuest in Practice questionnaire. Heritability and genetic correlation were determined using the Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines software. 585 subjects were included, the mean age was 42 (±16.7) years, 57% were women. The heritability of the severity of some GERD symptoms was h2 = 0.27, 0.27, 0.37, and 0.34 (p-value <1.0x10-5) for acidity complaints, lower abdominal complaints, sleep disturbances, and total ReQuest score, respectively. Heritability of metabolic syndrome components ranged from 0.40 for fasting plasma glucose to 0.61 for body mass index and diabetes mellitus. The heritability for fibrinogen and C-reactive protein was 0.64 and 0.38, respectively. Statistically significant genetic correlations were found between acidity complaints and fasting plasma glucose (ρG = 0.40); sleep disturbances and fasting plasma glucose (ρG = 0.36); acidity complaints and diabetes mellitus (ρG = 0.49) and between total ReQuest score and fasting plasma glucose (ρG = 0.43). The rest of metabolic syndrome components did not correlate with GERD symptoms. Genetic factors substantially explain the phenotypic variance of the severity of some GERD symptoms, metabolic syndrome components and inflammation markers. Observed genetic correlations suggest that these phenotypes share common genes. These findings suggest conducting further investigation, as the determination of a linkage analysis in order to identify regions of susceptibility for developing of GERD and metabolic syndrome.

  18. A novel syndrome of lethal familial hyperekplexia associated with brain malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidahmed Mohammed

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperekplexia (HPX is a rare non-epileptic disorder manifesting immediately after birth with exaggerated persistent startle reaction to unexpected auditory, somatosensory and visual stimuli, and non-habituating generalized flexor spasm in response to tapping of the nasal bridge (glabellar tap which forms its clinical hallmark. The course of the disease is usually benign with spontaneous amelioration with age. The disorder results from aberrant glycinergic neurotransmission, and several mutations were reported in the genes encoding glycine receptor (GlyR α1 and β subunits, glycine transporter GlyT2 as well as two other proteins involved in glycinergic neurotransmission gephyrin and collybistin. Methods The phenotype of six newborns, belonging to Saudi Arabian kindred with close consanguineous marriages, who presented with hyperekplexia associated with severe brain malformation, is described. DNA samples were available from two patients, and homozygosity scan to determine overlap with known hyperkplexia genes was performed. Results The kindred consisted of two brothers married to their cousin sisters, each with three affected children who presented antenatally with excessive fetal movements. Postnatally, they were found to have microcephaly, severe hyperekplexia and gross brain malformation characterized by severe simplified gyral pattern and cerebellar underdevelopment. The EEG was normal and they responded to clonazepam. All of the six patients died within six weeks. Laboratory investigations, including metabolic screen, were unremarkable. None of the known hyperkplexia genes were present within the overlapping regions of homozygosity between the two patients for whom DNA samples were available. Conclusions We present these cases as a novel syndrome of lethal familial autosomal recessive hyperekplexia associated with microcephaly and severe brain malformation.

  19. Cardiovascular Effects of Energy Drinks in Familial Long QT Syndrome: A Randomized Cross-Over Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Belinda; Ingles, Jodie; Medi, Caroline; Driscoll, Timothy; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-03-15

    Caffeinated energy drinks may trigger serious cardiac effects. The aim of this study was to determine the cardiovascular effects of caffeinated energy drink consumption in patients with familial long QT syndrome (LQTS). From 2014-2016, 24 LQTS patients aged 16-50 years were recruited to a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study of energy drink (ED) versus control (CD) with participants acting as their own controls (one week washout). The primary study outcome was an increase in corrected QT interval (QTc) by >20ms. Secondary outcomes were changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. In 24 patients with LQTS (no dropout), mean age was 29±9 years, 13/24 (54%) were female, and 8/24 (33%) were probands. Intention to treat analysis revealed no significant change in QTc with ED compared with CD (12±28ms vs 16±27ms, 3% vs 4%, p=0.71). The systolic and diastolic blood pressure significantly increased with ED compared to CD (peak change 7±16mmHg vs 1±16mmHg, 6% vs 0.8%, p=0.046 and 8±10 vs 2±9mmHg, 11% vs 3% p=0.01 respectively). These changes correlated with significant increases in serum caffeine (14.6±11.3 vs 0.5±0.1μmol/L, penergy drink consumption. Caffeinated energy drinks have significant haemodynamic effects in patients with LQTS, especifically an acute increase in blood pressure. Since dangerous QTc prolongation was seen in some LQTS patients, we recommend caution in young patients with LQTS consuming energy drinks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Parent training education program: a pilot study, involving families of children with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodra, Yllka; Kondili, Loreta A; Ferraroni, Alessia; Serra, Maria Antonietta; Caretto, Flavia; Ricci, Maria Antonietta; Taruscio, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by severe hypotonia during the neonatal period and the first two years of life, the onset of hyperphagia with a risk of obesity during infancy and adulthood, learning difficulties and behavioral or severe psychiatric problems. This complex disease has severe consequences and difficult management issues also for patients' families. Parents of children with PWS need appropriate psychoeducational intervention in order to better manage their children with PWS. The purpose of this study was the implementation and evaluation of a PWS psychoeducational parent training program. The Italian National Center for Rare Diseases implemented a pilot parent training program offered to parents of children with PWS. The intervention's effects was evaluated using questionnaires comprised of 11 items rated on a 7 point Likert scale. The intervention was offered to 43 parents. The behavior problems management, dietary restrictions, autonomy and relationships were indicated by parents as the priority topics which needed to be addressed. Evaluations, immediately post-intervention and after 6 months, were reported by parents, fulfilling specific questionnaires. 90% of parents involved in the study, appreciated the methodology, 86% felt more informed about PWS, 47-62% felt more capable to better approach behaviour's problems, 20-25% felt better about the child's health situation and future expectations. Feeling more capable to help the child autonomy and relationships were reported in 62% and 63% of parents respectively, which decreased significantly (p children with behavior's problems. Interventions with a behaviorally oriented program, addressed to parents of PWS affected children, is a useful tool in increasing their ability to manage the problems related to the disease.

  1. Association between two common polymorphisms of PPARgamma gene and metabolic syndrome families in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li Lan; Hua, Qi; Liu, Rong Kun; Yang, Zheng

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the association between the two common polymorphisms, C1431T and Pro12Ala of PPARgamma gene, and metabolic syndrome (MS) in a Chinese population. We included 423 subjects with MS and families without MS. Subjects were divided into three groups: MS probands and first- and second-degree relatives of probands, spouses and controls. Each group was then divided into two subgroups according to genotype (Pro/Pro and Pro/Ala for Pro12Ala, CC and CT + TT for 1431C/T). Anthropometric indices, fasting plasma glucose, lipid profile, Sv1 + Rv5 of electrocardiogram and single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected. Frequencies of C1431T genotypes, but not Pro12Ala, were different among the three groups. MS patients with Pro/Ala genotype had higher fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels and Sv1 + Rv5. Controls with Ala allele had lower total cholesterol levels. In relatives, Ala carriers had higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) levels. BMI of the different groups were not significant. MS patients with T allele had higher FBS and Sv1 + Rv5. In relatives of MS subjects, T-allele carriers had lower blood uric acid, creatinine and higher HDL-c levels and Sv1 + Rv5. C1431T, but not Pro12Ala polymorphisms, are associated with MS in a Chinese population. In MS patients, Ala allele and T allele are both associated with higher fasting blood sugar and higher left ventricular voltage. In controls, Ala carriers have lower total cholesterol. In MS relatives, Ala carriers had higher HDL-c levels and T-allele carriers had lower uric acid, creatinine and higher HDL-c levels and left ventricular voltage.

  2. Gynecologic cancer prevention in Lynch syndrome/hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee-may; Yang, Kathleen Y; Little, Sarah E; Cheung, Michael K; Caughey, Aaron B

    2007-07-01

    Women from Lynch syndrome/hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch/HNPCC) families have an increased lifetime risk of developing endometrial and ovarian cancer. This study models a comparison of management strategies for women who carry a Lynch/HNPCC mutation. A decision analytic model with three arms was designed to compare annual gynecologic examinations with annual screening (ultrasonography, endometrial biopsy, CA 125) and with hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy at age 30 years The existing literature was searched for studies on the accuracy of endometrial and ovarian cancer screening using endometrial biopsy, transvaginal ultrasonography, and serum CA 125. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database from 1988 to 2001 was used to estimate cancer mortality outcomes. In the surgical arm, 0.0056% of women were diagnosed with ovarian cancer and 0.0060% of women with endometrial cancer. These numbers increased to 3.7% and 18.4% in women being screened, and 8.3% and 48.7% in women undergoing annual examinations, respectively. Surgical management led to the longest expected survival time at 79.98 years, followed by screening at 79.31 years, and annual examinations at 77.41 years. If starting at age 30 and discounting life years at 3%, surgery still leads to the greatest expected life years. When comparing prophylactic surgery with the screening option, one would need to perform 75 surgeries to save one woman's entire life. For cancer prevention, however, only 28 and 6 prophylactic surgeries would need to be performed to prevent one case of ovarian and endometrial cancer, respectively. Risk-reducing hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy may be considered in women with Lynch/HNPCC to prevent gynecologic cancers and their associated morbidities.

  3. Comparison of clinical features between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome in Japanese patients with colorectal cancer: a cross-sectional study conducted by the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuro; Furukawa, Yoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsubara, Nagahide; Ishikawa, Hideki; Arai, Masami; Tomita, Naohiro; Tamura, Kazuo; Sugano, Kokichi; Ishioka, Chikashi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Moriya, Yoshihiro; Ishida, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2015-02-01

    The characteristics of familial colorectal cancer type X are poorly defined. Here we aimed to clarify the differences in clinical features between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome in Japanese patients. We performed germline mutation analyses of mismatch repair genes in 125 patients. Patients who met the Amsterdam Criteria I but lacked mismatch repair gene mutations were diagnosed with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X. We identified 69 patients with Lynch syndrome and 25 with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X. The frequencies of gastric and extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancers were lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The number of organs with Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The cumulative incidence of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. We estimated that the median cancer risk in 60-year-old patients with Lynch syndrome was 89, 36 and 24% for colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancers, respectively. Analyses of family members, including probands, revealed that the median age at diagnosis of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly older with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The frequency of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. A significant difference in extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was evident between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A Follow-up Study in a Taiwanese Family with Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like Episodes Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Yuan Li

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: This study underlines the importance of early detection of extraneuromuscular symptoms in the members of a family with MELAS syndrome by adequate follow-up. The age of onset of stroke-like episode in MELAS syndrome may be as late as 62 years. We suggest that the manifestations of MELAS syndrome in this family might be associated with the additional ∼260 bp tandem duplication in the D-loop region and the coexistence of C3093G mutation in the 16S rRNA gene with the A3243G mutation of mtDNA.

  5. Characterization of a novel mutation in PAX9 gene in a family with non-syndromic dental agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddaji Mastouri, Marwa; De Coster, Peter; Zaghabani, Aicha; Trabelsi, Saoussen; May, Yosra; Saad, Ali; Coucke, Paul; H'mida Ben Brahim, Dorra

    2016-11-01

    Dental agenesis is the most common developmental anomaly in man and may present either as an isolated trait or as part of a syndrome, such as ectodermal dysplasia. Until now, the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms responsible for dental agenesis are still largely unknown. Several genetic and molecular studies have demonstrated that at least 300 genes are involved in tooth formation and development, coding for specific transcriptional factors, receptors or growth factors that are expressed at specific developmental stages. Dental agenesis in this respect is believed to result from altered expression of one or more of these factors during initiation and early morphogenesis of the tooth germ, and the first actors identified were MSX1 and PAX9. In this study, we focalized on a Tunisian family with a non-syndromic autosomal dominant form of tooth agenesis. In order to screen for the eventual genetic cause of dental agenesis in this family we sequenced 4 genes; PAX9, WNT10A, MSX1 and AXIN2 using Sanger sequencing. Direct Screening analysis of PAX9 gene, revealed a novel mutation p.Asp200Serfs*13. It consists of a duplication of 5 basepairs leading to a codon stop 13 position downstream. This novel mutation was found in all affected family members. In this report, we present the first genetic study of a Tunisian family with a non-syndromic autosomal dominant form of tooth agenesis, in which we identified in PAX9 gene a novel mutation. It most likely results in nonsense mediated RNA decay and haploinsifficiency that reduce the transactivation capacity of PAX9. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Truncating mutation in the NHS gene: phenotypic heterogeneity of Nance-Horan syndrome in an asian Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasad, Vedam Lakshmi; Thool, Alka; Murugan, Sakthivel; Nancarrow, Derek; Vyas, Prateep; Rao, Srinivas Kamalakar; Vidhya, Authiappan; Ravishankar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2005-01-01

    A four-generation family containing eight affected males who inherited X-linked developmental lens opacity and microcornea was studied. Some members in the family had mild to moderate nonocular clinical features suggestive of Nance-Horan syndrome. The purpose of the study was to map genetically the gene in the large 57-live-member Asian-Indian pedigree. PCR-based genotyping was performed on the X-chromosome, by using fluorescent microsatellite markers (10-cM intervals). Parametric linkage analysis was performed by using two disease models, assuming either recessive or dominant X-linked transmission by the MLINK/ILINK and FASTLINK (version 4.1P) programs (http:www.hgmp.mrc.ac.uk/; provided in the public domain by the Human Genome Mapping Project Resources Centre, Cambridge, UK). The NHS gene at the linked region was screened for mutation. By fine mapping, the disease gene was localized to Xp22.13. Multipoint analysis placed the peak LOD of 4.46 at DSX987. The NHS gene mapped to this region. Mutational screening in all the affected males and carrier females (heterozygous form) revealed a truncating mutation 115C-->T in exon 1, resulting in conversion of glutamine to stop codon (Q39X), but was not observed in unaffected individuals and control subjects. conclusions. A family with X-linked Nance-Horan syndrome had severe ocular, but mild to moderate nonocular, features. The clinical phenotype of the truncating mutation (Q39X) in the NHS gene suggests allelic heterogeneity at the NHS locus or the presence of modifier genes. X-linked families with cataract should be carefully examined for both ocular and nonocular features, to exclude Nance-Horan syndrome. RT-PCR analysis did not suggest nonsense-mediated mRNA decay as the possible mechanism for clinical heterogeneity.

  7. Is thyroidectomy necessary in RET mutations carriers of the familial medullary thyroid carcinoma syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H S; Torring, H; Godballe, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The results and consequences of genetic testing in a family with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) are described. METHODS: In the screening of relatives, serum calcitonin is replaced by RET mutation analysis that was performed in families suspected of hereditary medullary...... thyroid carcinoma (MTC). In 4 of 10 families, mutation in exon 10 was found in codon 611. RESULTS: One hundred fifty persons belonging to 30 families were tested, of which 10 families were carriers of RET mutation in exon 10. In 1 of these families with MTC only, 2 brothers were gene carriers of a RET...

  8. Two TP53 germline mutations in a classical Li-Fraumeni syndrome family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hest, Liselotte P.; Ruijs, Mariëlle W. G.; Wagner, Anja; van der Meer, Conny A.; Verhoef, Senno; van 't Veer, Laura J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a combination of tumors including sarcoma, breast cancer, brain tumors, adrenocortical carcinoma and leukemia. Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 are associated with LFS.

  9. Living with Lowe's Syndrome. A Guide for Families, Friends, and Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe's Syndrome Association, Inc., West Lafayette, IN.

    The document describes Lowe's syndrome, a hereditary condition that affects only males and is typically diagnosed during the first year of life. Effects of Lowe's syndrome on the eyes (cataracts, glaucoma, corneal degeneration, and strabismus) are discussed, as well as related problems with the central nervous system, muscles, kidneys, bones, and…

  10. Clinical course and images of four familial cases of Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome with a novel monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Onuma, Akira; Inui, Takehiko; Wakusawa, Keisuke; Tanaka, Soichiro; Shimojima, Keiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Haginoya, Kazuhiro

    2014-09-01

    Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, an X-linked condition characterized by severe intellectual disability, dysarthria, athetoid movements, muscle hypoplasia, and spastic paraplegia, is associated with defects in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene (MCT8). The long-term prognosis of Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome remains uncertain. We describe the clinical features and course of four adults in a family with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome with athetoid type cerebral palsy. We identified an MCT8 gene mutation in this family. Two of the four affected family members died at 32 and 24 years of age. Individuals with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome are at increased risk for recurrent infection, such as aspiration pneumonia. These individuals require careful management with consideration for this increased risk of recurrent infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stress, Locus of Control, and Family Cohesion and Adaptability in Parents of Children with Down, Williams, Fragile X, and Prader-Willi Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Silvia; Vianello, Renzo

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzes differences in parental stress in families of children with Down, Williams, Fragile X, and Prader-Willi syndromes, exploring factors that influence parental stress, such as child's characteristics, parental locus of control, and family cohesion and adaptability. Differences between mothers and fathers are also…

  12. Family perspectives in lynch syndrome becoming a family at risk, patterns of communication and influence on relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartuma, Katarina; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of individuals are diagnosed with hereditary cancer. Though increased levels of anxiety and depression have been demonstrated around the time of genetic counselling, most individuals handle life at increased risk well. Data have, however, been collected on individual basis, which...... led us to focus on family perspectives of hereditary cancer....

  13. Genetic counseling for a three-generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II associated with a rare SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The SOX10 mutation related with Waardenburg syndrome type II is rare in Chinese. This study aimed to uncover the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation family to improve genetic counseling. Complete clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a three-generation Han Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. Targeted genetic counseling was provided to this family. We identified a rare heterozygous dominant mutation c.621C>A (p.Y207X) in SOX10 gene in this family. The premature termination codon occurs in exon 4, 27 residues downstream of the carboxyl end of the high mobility group box. Bioinformatics prediction suggested this variant to be disease-causing, probably due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Useful genetic counseling was given to the family for prenatal guidance. Identification of a rare dominant heterozygous SOX10 mutation c.621C>A in this family provided an efficient way to understand the causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II and improved genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mothers and fathers of young Dutch adolescents with Down syndrome: Health related quality of life and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Jan Pieter; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; van Trotsenburg, A S Paul; Grootenhuis, Martha A

    2016-12-01

    Like any child, children with Down syndrome (DS) affect the lives of their families. Most studies focus on the adaptation of parents and families of young children with DS, while relatively few studies include the perspective of fathers. To determine 1) whether mothers and fathers of 11 to 13-year-olds with DS differ from reference parents in health related quality of life (HRQoL) and family functioning, and 2) whether HRQoL in parents of children with DS changes over time, from when the child was 6-8 years old to when the child was 11-13 years old. 80 mothers and 44 fathers completed HRQoL and family functioning questionnaires. 58 parents (53 mothers) had completed the HRQoL-questionnaire in a previous study. Mothers differed from reference mothers in one HRQoL-domain (Sexuality), while fathers' HRQoL did not significantly differ from reference fathers. Both mothers and fathers scored in the (sub)clinical range more frequently than reference parents in Total family functioning, and in the domains Partner relation and Social network. Furthermore, fathers scored in the (sub)clinical range more frequently than reference parents in Responsiveness and Organization. HRQoL showed no significant change over time. Our findings indicate frequent family functioning problems but few HRQoL problems in parents and families of children with DS. In offering care, a family based approach with special attention for partner relation and social functioning is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel fibrillin-1 mutation in an egyptian marfan family: A proband showing nephrotic syndrome due to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Al-Haggar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS, the founding member of connective tissue disorder, is an autosomal dominant disease; it is caused by a deficiency of the microfibrillar protein fibrillin-1 (FBN1 and characterized by involvement of three main systems; skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular. More than one thousand mutations in FBN1 gene on chromosome 15 were found to cause MFS. Nephrotic syndrome (NS had been described in very few patients with MFS being attributed to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis secondary to infective endocarditis. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS had been reported in NS in conjunction with MFS without confirming the diagnosis by mutational analysis of FBN1. We hereby present an Egyptian family with MFS documented at the molecular level; it showed a male proband with NS secondary to FSGS, unfortunately, we failed to make any causal link between FBN dysfunction and FSGS. In this context, we review the spectrum of renal involvements occurring in MFS patients.

  16. Expansion of the clinical ocular spectrum of Wolfram Syndrome in a family carrying a novel WFS1 gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Oscar; Arce-Gonzalez, Rocio; Granillo-Alvarez, Mariella; Flores-Limas, Sanjuanita; Ramírez, Magdalena; Zenteno, Juan C

    2013-12-01

    To present the results of the clinical and molecular analyses of a familial case of Wolfram Syndrome (WFS) associated with a novel ocular anomaly. Full ophthalmologic examination was performed in two WFS siblings. Visante OCT imaging was used for assessing anterior segment anomalies. Genetic analysis included PCR amplification and exon-by-exon nucleotide sequencing of the WFS1 gene. Ocular anomalies in both affected siblings included congenital cataract, glaucoma, and optic atrophy. Interestingly, microspherophakia, a feature that has not been previously associated with WFS, was observed in both siblings. Genetic analysis disclosed a novel c.1525_1539 homozygous deletion in exon 8 of WFS1 in DNA from both affected patients. The recognition of microspherophakia in two siblings carrying a novel WFS1 mutation expands the clinical and molecular spectrum of Wolfram syndrome.

  17. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A Associated with Usher syndrome 1 in a Chinese family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gao

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, age-dependent retinitis pigmentosa (RP, and occasionally vestibular dysfunction. The most severe form is Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1. Mutations in the MYO7A gene are responsible for USH1 and account for 29-55% of USH1 cases. Here, we characterized a Chinese family (no. 7162 with USH1. Combining the targeted capture of 131 known deafness genes, next-generation sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis, we identified two deleterious compound heterozygous mutations in the MYO7A gene: a reported missense mutation c.73G>A (p.G25R and a novel nonsense mutation c.462C>A (p.C154X. The two compound variants are absent in 219 ethnicity-matched controls, co-segregates with the USH clinical phenotypes, including hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and age-dependent penetrance of progressive RP, in family 7162. Therefore, we concluded that the USH1 in this family was caused by compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A.

  18. Serrated Polyposis Syndrome in a Single-Center 10-Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Young Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Serrated polyposis syndrome is a disease that is often missed in the clinical setting and is associated with colorectal cancer. We investigated the prevalence of SPS and the association between colorectal or other cancers in a 10-year, retrospective data analysis. Methods: We reviewed complete colonoscopy data obtained from January 2005 through January 2015 at a health-screening centre. Serrated polyposis syndrome was defined on the basis of the criteria established by the 2010 World Health Organization. Results: Of a total of 53.842 consecutive subjects who underwent complete colonoscopy, 12 (0.022% patients had serrated polyposis syndrome. All of these cases were under-recognized by the endoscopist or referring physician. The mean patient age was 58.6 years; 67% of the patients were men and 33% were women. No serrated polyposis syndrome patients had a first-degree relative with serrated polyposis syndrome, and no serrated polyposis syndrome patients had colorectal cancer. Two cases (17% had extra-colonic cancers (prostate cancer and thyroid cancer. Eight cases (67% had a family history of cancer (stomach, breast, lung, pancreas, prostate and colorectal cancer. Conclusion: Serrated polyposis syndrome was a rare condition in a 10-year database, and it was diagnosed late in all cases. Serrated polyposis syndrome may be associated with an increased risk of extra-colonic cancer

  19. Identification of a novel mutation in a Chinese family with Nance-Horan syndrome by whole exome sequencing*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nan; Chen, Yan-hua; Xie, Chen; Xu, Bai-sheng; Huang, Hui; Li, Xin; Yang, Yue-qing; Huang, Ying-ping; Deng, Jian-lian; Qi, Ming; Gu, Yang-shun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital nuclear cataracts, dental anomalies, and craniofacial dysmorphisms. Mental retardation was present in about 30% of the reported cases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic and clinical features of NHS in a Chinese family. Methods: Whole exome sequencing analysis was performed on DNA from an affected male to scan for candidate mutations on the X-chromosome. Sanger sequencing was used to verify these candidate mutations in the whole family. Clinical and ophthalmological examinations were performed on all members of the family. Results: A combination of exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing revealed a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in exon 1 of NHS gene, co-segregating with the disease in the family. The nonsense mutation led to the conversion of glutamic acid to a stop codon (E108X), resulting in truncation of the NHS protein. Multiple sequence alignments showed that codon 108, where the mutation (c.322G>T) occurred, was located within a phylogenetically conserved region. The clinical features in all affected males and female carriers are described in detail. Conclusions: We report a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in a Chinese family with NHS. Our findings broaden the spectrum of NHS mutations and provide molecular insight into future NHS clinical genetic diagnosis. PMID:25091991

  20. Identification of a novel mutation in a Chinese family with Nance-Horan syndrome by whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nan; Chen, Yan-hua; Xie, Chen; Xu, Bai-sheng; Huang, Hui; Li, Xin; Yang, Yue-qing; Huang, Ying-ping; Deng, Jian-lian; Qi, Ming; Gu, Yang-shun

    2014-08-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital nuclear cataracts, dental anomalies, and craniofacial dysmorphisms. Mental retardation was present in about 30% of the reported cases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic and clinical features of NHS in a Chinese family. Whole exome sequencing analysis was performed on DNA from an affected male to scan for candidate mutations on the X-chromosome. Sanger sequencing was used to verify these candidate mutations in the whole family. Clinical and ophthalmological examinations were performed on all members of the family. A combination of exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing revealed a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in exon 1 of NHS gene, co-segregating with the disease in the family. The nonsense mutation led to the conversion of glutamic acid to a stop codon (E108X), resulting in truncation of the NHS protein. Multiple sequence alignments showed that codon 108, where the mutation (c.322G>T) occurred, was located within a phylogenetically conserved region. The clinical features in all affected males and female carriers are described in detail. We report a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in a Chinese family with NHS. Our findings broaden the spectrum of NHS mutations and provide molecular insight into future NHS clinical genetic diagnosis.

  1. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and family planning: the attitude towards prenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lier, Margot G F; Korsse, Susanne E; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M H; Kuipers, Ernst J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Vanheusden, Kathleen; van Leerdam, Monique E; Wagner, Anja

    2012-02-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a hereditary disorder caused by LKB1 gene mutations, and is associated with considerable morbidity and decreased life expectancy. This study was conducted to assess the attitude of PJS patients towards family planning, prenatal diagnosis (PND) and pregnancy termination, and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). In a cross-sectional study, 61 adult PJS patients were asked to complete a questionnaire concerning genetic testing, family planning, PND and PGD. The questionnaire was completed by 52 patients (85% response rate, 44% males) with a median age of 44 (range 18-74) years. A total of 37 (71%) respondents had undergone genetic testing. In all, 24 respondents (46%, 75% males) had children. A total of 15 (29%) respondents reported that their diagnosis of PJS had influenced their decisions regarding family planning, including 10 patients (19%, 9/10 females) who did not want to have children because of their disease. Termination of pregnancy after PND in case of a foetus with PJS was considered 'acceptable' for 15% of the respondents, whereas 52% considered PGD acceptable. In conclusion, the diagnosis of PJS influences the decisions regarding family planning in one third of PJS patients, especially in women. Most patients have a negative attitude towards pregnancy termination after PND, while PGD in case of PJS is judged more acceptable. These results emphasise the importance of discussing aspects regarding family planning with PJS patients, including PND and PGD.

  2. A novel TP53 germline inframe deletion identified in a Spanish series of Li-fraumeni syndrome suspected families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llovet, Patricia; Illana, Francisco J; Martín-Morales, Lorena; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garre, Pilar; Ibañez-Royo, M Dolores; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Caldés, Trinidad; García-Barberán, Vanesa

    2017-10-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominant, inherited tumor predisposition syndrome associated with heterozygous germline mutations in the TP53 gene. The molecular diagnosis of LFS is important to develop strategies for early detection and access to the genetic counseling. Our study evaluated germline TP53 mutations in Spanish families with a history suggestive of LFS. Germline TP53 alterations in 22 families with a history suggestive of LFS were evaluated by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Loss of heterozygosity analysis and immunohistochemistry of the protein in the tumor were performed in order to evaluate the pathogenicity of a novel alteration detected. A total of seven TP53 mutations were detected, six point mutations (4 missense and 2 nonsense) and a novel inframe deletion. 93% of mutation carriers developed at least one malignancy (mainly breast cancer and sarcomas), with a mean age at diagnosis of the first tumor of 30.2 years. Two missense mutations acted as dominant-negative. The novel inframe mutation c.437_445del was located in the DNA-binding domain. This mutation segregated with cancer in the family, and both high expression of the protein and loss of the wild-type TP53 allele were detected in the tumor of the carrier. We have found a novel inframe deletion in TP53 that likely results in the loss of p53 function and acts in a non-dominant negative way, although further studies are necessary to clarify this issue. The identification of novel TP53 alterations is crucial for a personalized cancer-risk management of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

  3. Is thyroidectomy necessary in RET mutations carriers of the familial medullary thyroid carcinoma syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H S; Torring, H; Godballe, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The results and consequences of genetic testing in a family with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) are described. METHODS: In the screening of relatives, serum calcitonin is replaced by RET mutation analysis that was performed in families suspected of hereditary medullary th...

  4. A genetic Assay of Three Patients in the Same Family with Holt-Oram Syndrome; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ebrahimzadeh-Vesal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS is a developmental disorder inherited in an autosomal-dominant pattern. Affected organs are the heart and forelimbs with upper extremity skeletal defects and congenital heart malformation. In this study we present three cases of HOS in the same family. In one of these three individuals we detected a transition of C to T (CTG-GTT, V205V in exon 7 of the TBX5 gene. This nucleotide change causes no amino acid change and potential pathologic effects remain unknown.

  5. Long QT syndrome and left ventricular noncompaction in 4 family members across 2 generations with KCNQ1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbanda, Mira; Hunter, Amanda; Tennant, Stephen; Moore, David; Curtis, Stephanie; Hancox, Jules C; Murday, Victoria

    2017-05-01

    The association of long QT syndrome and left ventricular noncompaction is uncommon, with only a handful of previous reports, and only one reported case in association with a mutation in KCNQ1. Here we present genetic and phenotypic data for 4 family members across 2 generations who all have evidence of prolonged QT interval and left ventricular noncompaction in association with a pathogenic mutation in KCNQ1, and discuss the potential mechanisms of this association. In conclusion, we suggest that it may be helpful to consider looking for mutations in KCNQ1 in similar patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. The cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: third report of familial occurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.; Beemer, F. A.; Huijbers, W. A.; Hustinx, P. A.; van Sprang, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two male sibs with cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome and spina bifida are described. The parents are physically and radiologically normal. A short review of the pertinent literature is given with special emphasis on the mode of inheritance

  7. A comparison of salivary IgA in children with Down syndrome and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Karthika; Milne, Trudy J; Drummond, Bernadette K; Cullinan, Mary P; Coates, Dawn E

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare total IgA in the whole saliva of children with Down syndrome with levels in sibling and parent groups. IgA measurements were presented as the concentration in saliva (μg/ml) and also adjusted for salivary flow rate (SFR; μg/min). Twenty children with Down syndrome, ten siblings and twenty parents were recruited. Stimulated whole saliva was collected from the participants and SFR calculated. The measurement of salivary IgA (sIgA) was carried out using an indirect competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. The difference in the mean SFR between children with Down syndrome, parents and siblings were not statistically significant. The mean salivary concentration of IgA was higher in children with Down syndrome (95.1 μg/ml) compared with siblings (48.3 μg/ml; p=0.004). When adjusted for SFR children with Down syndrome had mean sIgA levels of 98.8 μg/min and the siblings 48.6 μg/min (p=0.008). The children with Down syndrome had sIgA levels similar to those of the parents (92.5 μg/ml; 93.2 μg/min). There was a positive correlation between age and sIgA concentration in the siblings (p=0.008) but not for children with Down syndrome (p=0.363). This suggests that under similar environmental influences, the levels of sIgA in children with Down syndrome are higher than in the siblings, from a very young age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. How Do Families of Children with Down Syndrome Perceive Speech Intelligibility in Turkey?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Toğram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood verbal apraxia has not been identified or treated sufficiently in children with Down syndrome but recent research has documented that symptoms of childhood verbal apraxia can be found in children with Down syndrome. But, it is not routinely diagnosed in this population. There is neither an assessment tool in Turkish nor any research on childhood verbal apraxia although there is a demand not only for children with Down syndrome but also for normally developing children. The study examined if it was possible to determine oral-motor difficulties and childhood verbal apraxia features in children with Down syndrome through a survey. The survey was a parental report measure. There were 329 surveys received. Results indicated that only 5.6% of children with Down syndrome were diagnosed with apraxia, even though many of the subject children displayed clinical features of childhood verbal apraxia. The most frequently reported symptoms of childhood verbal apraxia in literature were displayed by the children with Down syndrome in the study. Parents could identify childhood verbal apraxia symptoms using parent survey. This finding suggests that the survey can be developed that could serve as a screening tool for a possible childhood verbal apraxia diagnosis in Turkey.

  9. 12q14 microdeletion syndrome: A family with short stature and Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS)-like phenotype and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Frederik; Wallaschek, Hannah; Ripperger, Tim; Morlot, Susanne; Illig, Thomas; Eggermann, Thomas; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Scholz, Caroline; Steinemann, Doris

    2018-03-01

    We report here on the first family with short stature and Silver-Russell-like phenotype due to a microdeletion in 12q14.3. The Netchine-Harbison clinical scoring system was used for the clinical diagnosis of Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). The three affected first-degree relatives (index patient, mother and brother) presented with prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, feeding difficulties, a prominent forehead and a failure to thrive, but did not show relative macrocephaly. In addition, our index patient showed dysmorphic facial features, periodically increased sweating, and scoliosis. Learning problems and cardiac arrhythmia presented as additional features of her brother. Using high-resolution array-CGH, heterozygosity for a 1.67 Mb deletion in 12q14.3 was detected in the index patient. The heterozygous loss was confirmed by MLPA in the index patient and the other two affected family members. The deletion includes the genes HMGA2, LLPH, TMBIM4, IRAK3, HELB, GRIP1, and the pseudogene RPSAP52. We conclude from these results and from the data of other patients reported in the literature that haploinsufficiency of HMGA2 leads to the short stature in this family. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Familial gigantism

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    Wouter W. de Herder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  11. Familial gigantism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. de Herder (Wouter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractFamilial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  12. Reproductive aspects and knowledge of family planning among women with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ivana Cristina Vieira de; Cunha, Maria da Conceição Dos Santos Oliveira; Cunha, Gilmara Holanda da; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz

    2017-05-25

    To analyze the reproductive aspects and knowledge of family planning among women with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Cross-sectional and descriptive study carried out from January to December, 2015, in the outpatient care of infectious disease unit in a hospital located in Fortaleza, Ceará. Data were collected through a form applied by interview in a private setting. 102 women participated in the study. Most were aware that they were serologically positive with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during prenatal care (96.1%) and did not intend to have more children (63.7%). Women who were less than 39 years of age, had a higher educational level, and a shorter time of antiretroviral therapy had better chances of having children (p≤0.05). Having a steady partner increased the chance of desiring to have children, while tubal ligation was higher among women that did not receive counseling on family planning. Knowledge of family planning was limited because of lack of assistance provided by health professionals. Analisar aspectos reprodutivos e conhecimento sobre planejamento familiar de mulheres com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida (Aids). Estudo transversal, descritivo, realizado de janeiro a dezembro de 2015, no ambulatório de infectologia de um hospital em Fortaleza, Ceará. Os dados foram coletados por meio de formulário, aplicado por entrevista em ambiente privativo. Participaram do estudo 102 mulheres. A maioria delas teve conhecimento da sorologia positiva para vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV) durante o pré-natal (96,1%), e estas não pretendiam mais ter filhos (63,7%). Mulheres com idade menor que 39 anos, maior escolaridade e menor tempo de terapia antirretroviral tiveram maiores chances de ter filhos (p≤0,05). Mulheres com idade menor que 39 anos e maior escolaridade tiveram maiores chances de ter informações corretas sobre ter filhos na vigência do HIV (p≤0,05). Ter parceiro fixo aumentou a chance de desejar ter

  13. VEGFA polymorphisms and cardiovascular anomalies in 22q11 microdeletion syndrome: a case-control and family-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN FRANCISCO CALDERÓN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microdeletion 22q11 in humans causes velocardiofacial and DiGeorge syndromes. Most patients share a common 3Mb deletion, but the clinical manifestations are very heterogeneous. Congenital heart disease is present in 50-80% of patients and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The phenotypic variability suggests the presence of modifiers. Polymorphisms in the VEGFA gene, coding for the vascular endothelial growth factor A, have been associated with non-syndromic congenital heart disease, as well as with the presence of cardiovascular anomalies in patients with microdeletion 22q11. We evaluated the association of VEGFA polymorphisms c.-2578C>A (rs699947, c.-1154G>A (rs1570360 and c.-634C>G (rs2010963 with congenital heart disease in Chilean patients with microdeletion 22q11. The study was performed using case-control and family-based association designs. We evaluated 122 patients with microdeletion 22q11 and known anatomy of the heart and great vessels, and their parents. Half the patients had congenital heart disease. We obtained no evidence of association by either method of analysis. Our results provide further evidence of the incomplete penetrance of the cardiovascular phenotype of microdeletion 22ql 1, but do not support association between VEGFA promoter polymorphisms and the presence of congenital heart disease in Chilean patients with this syndrome.

  14. The first two confirmed sub-Saharan African families with germline TP53 mutations causing Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, Shelley; Goodyear, Quintin Clive; Kruger, Mia; Chen, Wenlong; Essop, Fahmida; Krause, Amanda

    2018-02-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome is a rare inherited cancer syndrome characterised by the early onset of specific cancers. Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is associated with germline mutations in the tumour suppressor gene, TP53. This study reports the first cases of molecularly confirmed LFS germline mutations in sub-Saharan Africa. Three black African patients, all with LFS-associated cancers, were seen through the Clinical and Counselling Section of the Division of Human Genetics at the National Health Laboratory Service and University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, during 2011-2012. All three patients (two were related) were recruited into this research study. Sequence analysis of the coding region of the TP53 gene identified a Class IV (likely pathogenic) variant, c.326T > C (p.Phe109Ser), in the two related patients, and a known pathogenic mutation, c.1010G > A (p.Arg337His), also referred to as the Brazilian founder mutation, in the other patient. A confirmed diagnosis in these patients will assist in tailored medical management (it is recommended that individuals carrying a germline TP53 mutation avoid radiotherapy as this might cause secondary radiotherapy-induced malignancies) and in addition, genetic testing of at-risk family members can be offered. Very little is known and documented on LFS in African individuals. Despite the small number of patients in this study, the results support the need for diagnostic genetic testing for LFS in South Africa.

  15. Clinical and molecular findings in a Moroccan family with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adadi, N; Lahrouchi, N; Bouhouch, R; Fellat, I; Amri, R; Alders, M; Sefiani, A; Bezzina, C; Ratbi, I

    2017-04-02

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man 220400) is a rare autosomal recessive cardioauditory ion channel disorder that affects 1/200,000 to 1/1,000,000 children. It is characterized by congenital profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, a long QT interval, ventricular tachyarrhythmias, and episodes of torsade de pointes on an electrocardiogram. Cardiac symptoms arise mostly in early childhood and consist of syncopal episodes during periods of stress, exercise, or fright and are associated with a high risk of sudden cardiac death. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in KCNQ1 on 11p15.5 or KCNE1 on 1q22.1-q22.2. We report the case of a 10-year-old Moroccan boy with congenital hearing loss and severely prolonged QT interval who presented with multiple episodes of syncope. His parents are first-degree cousins. We performed Sanger sequencing and identified a homozygous variant in KCNQ1 (c.1343dupC, p.Glu449Argfs*14). The identification of the genetic substrate in this patient confirmed the clinical diagnosis of Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome and allowed us to provide him with appropriate management and genetic counseling to his family. In addition, this finding contributes to our understanding of genetic disease in the Moroccan population.

  16. Easing the Burden: Describing the Role of Social, Emotional and Spiritual Support in Research Families with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, June A; Kenen, Regina; Bremer, Renee; Givens, Shannon; Savage, Sharon A; Mai, Phuong L

    2016-06-01

    This study presents findings of a mixed-method descriptive exploration of the role of friends and spirituality/religiosity in easing the burden of families with the rare inherited disorder, Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS). LFS is caused by germline mutations in the TP53 gene and is associated with very high lifetime risk of developing one or more malignancies. During the first clinical visit we assessed several types of social support among a subset of study participants (N = 66) using an established interactive research tool called the Colored Eco-Genetic Relationship Map (CEGRM). We performed both quantitative and qualitative analyses of social relationships with LFS family members and close non-kin. Distress scores (N = 59) were mostly low normal, with some outliers. We found that reported friendships varied widely, that the friendships were often deep and enduring, and were important sources of informational, tangible, emotional and spiritual support. Confidantes tended to be best friends and/or spouses. Organized religion was important in selected families, typically from mainstream traditions. However, a number of people identified themselves as "spiritual" and reported spiritual and humanist explorations. Our results shed preliminary light on how some people in families with LFS cope in the face of tremendous medical, social and emotional challenges.

  17. Dusart Syndrome in a Scandinavian family characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis at young age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanathan, Ramshanker; Gram, Jørgen; Feddersen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    by a single base substitution in the gene coding for the Aα-chain of the fibrinogen molecule. OBJECTIVES: To diagnose the first Scandinavian family with Fibrinogen Paris V affecting several family members; the proband, a seven-year-old boy with cerebral vein thrombosis. METHODS: The diagnosis was established...... following the ISTH guideline for laboratory testing supplemented with fibrin structure analysis and fibrinogen gene analysis. RESULTS: Prolonged thrombin time and reduced ratio between the functional and the protein concentration of fibrinogen were observed in four family members who also were characterized...... of the family members carried the Fibrinogen Paris V mutation. All laboratory tests were normal in the family members carrying the wild type of the fibrinogen gene. Four of the affected patients had suffered from thrombotic episodes. A noticeable feature in the present family was the presence of both venous...

  18. The first missense mutation of NHS gene in a Tunisian family with clinical features of NHS syndrome including cardiac anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chograni, Manèl; Rejeb, Imen; Jemaa, Lamia Ben; Châabouni, Myriam; Bouhamed, Habiba Chaabouni

    2011-08-01

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) or X-linked cataract-dental syndrome is a disease of unknown gene action mechanism, characterized by congenital cataract, dental anomalies, dysmorphic features and, in some cases, mental retardation. We performed linkage analysis in a Tunisian family with NHS in which affected males and obligate carrier female share a common haplotype in the Xp22.32-p11.21 region that contains the NHS gene. Direct sequencing of NHS coding exons and flanking intronic sequences allowed us to identify the first missense mutation (P551S) and a reported SNP-polymorphism (L1319F) in exon 6, a reported UTR-SNP (c.7422 C>T) and a novel one (c.8239 T>A) in exon 8. Both variations P551S and c.8239 T>A segregate with NHS phenotype in this family. Although truncations, frame-shift and copy number variants have been reported in this gene, no missense mutations have been found to segregate previously. This is the first report of a missense NHS mutation causing NHS phenotype (including cardiac defects). We hypothesize also that the non-reported UTR-SNP of the exon 8 (3'-UTR) is specific to the Tunisian population.

  19. Novel and recurrent mutations in the TAT gene in Tunisian families affected with Richner-Hanhart syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyacoub, Yosra; Zribi, Hela; Azzouz, Hatem; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Abdelaziz, Rim Ben; Kacem, Monia; Rekaya, Ben; Messaoud, Olfa; Romdhane, Lilia; Charfeddine, Cherine; Bouziri, Mustapha; Bouziri, Sonia; Tebib, Neji; Mokni, Mourad; Kaabachi, Naziha; Boubaker, Samir; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2013-10-15

    Tyrosinemia type II, also designated as oculocutaneous tyrosinemia or Richner-Hanhart syndrome (RHS), is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder. In the present study, we report clinical features and molecular genetic investigation of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in two young patients, both born to consanguineous unions between first-degree cousins. These two unrelated families originated from Northern and Southern Tunisia. The clinical diagnosis was based on the observation of several complications related to Richner-Hanhart syndrome: recurrent eye redness, tearing and burning pain, photophobia, bilateral pseudodendritic keratitis, an erythematous and painful focal palmo-plantar hyperkeratosis and a mild delay of mental development. The diagnosis was confirmed by biochemical analysis. Sequencing of the TAT gene revealed the presence of a previously reported missense mutation (c.452G>A, p.Cys151Tyr) in a Tunisian family, and a novel G duplication (c.869dupG, p.Trp291Leufs 6). Early diagnosis of RHS and protein-restricted diet are crucial to reduce the risk and the severity of long-term complications of hypertyrosinemia such as intellectual disability. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Heterozygous deletion at the SOX10 gene locus in two patients from a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzhi, He; Ruijin, Wen; Jieliang, Li; Xiaoyan, Ma; Haibo, Liu; Xiaoman, Wang; Jiajia, Xian; Shaoying, Li; Shuanglin, Li; Qing, Li

    2015-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disease characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigment disturbance. To date, almost 100 mutations have been reported, but few reports on cases with SOX10 gene deletion. The inheritance pattern of SOX10 gene deletion is still unclear. Our objective was to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a two-generation Chinese family. Clinical evaluations were conducted in both of the patients. Microarray analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were performed to identify disease-related copy number variants (CNVs). DNA sequencing of the SOX10, MITF and SNAI2 genes was performed to identify the pathogenic mutation responsible for WS2. A 280kb heterozygous deletion at the 22q13.1 chromosome region (including SOX10) was detected in both of the patients. No mutation was found in the patients, unaffected family members and 30 unrelated healthy controls. This report is the first to describe SOX10 heterozygous deletions in Chinese WS2 patients. Our result conform the thesis that heterozygous deletions at SOX10 is an important pathogenicity for WS, and present as autosomal dominant inheritance. Nevertheless, heterozygous deletion of the SOX10 gene would be worth investigating to understand their functions and contributions to neurologic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A clinical case study of a Wolfram syndrome-affected family: pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials and electroretinography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Broniek-Kowalik, Karina; Szulborski, Kamil

    2012-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS), or DIDMOAD, is a rare (1/100 000 to 1/770 000), progressive neurodegenerative disorder. In its early stages, it is characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and loss of sensorineural hearing-this is followed by diabetes insipidus, progressive neurological abnormalities and other endocrine abnormalities, which occur in later years. The aim of this study was to report on the clinical and electrophysiological findings from a family with the WFS1 mutation. The five family members were subjected to a complete ophthalmic examination, which included a flash full-field electroretinogram and pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) performed according to ISCEV standards. Optic atrophy was confirmed in two homozygotic patients, where P100 latencies were significantly delayed-up to 146 ms in PVEP. P100 latencies were normal in the three heterozygotic patients we examined. Curve morphology abnormalities were observed in all five patients we examined. No literature describing the morphology of PVEP in Wolfram syndrome patients was found. In flash electroretinography, scotopic and photopic responses appeared in normal morphology and value. Diabetic retinopathy was not observed in the diabetes mellitus patients.

  2. International Retrospective Chart Review of Treatment Patterns in Severe Familial Mediterranean Fever, Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome, and Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency/Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Seza; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin B; Cimaz, Rolando; Livneh, Avi; Quartier, Pierre; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Zeft, Andrew; Spalding, Steve; Gul, Ahmet; Hentgen, Veronique; Savic, Sinisa; Foeldvari, Ivan; Frenkel, Joost; Cantarini, Luca; Patel, Dony; Weiss, Jeffrey; Marinsek, Nina; Degun, Ravi; Lomax, Kathleen G; Lachmann, Helen J

    2017-04-01

    Periodic fever syndrome (PFS) conditions are characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and localized inflammation. This study examined the diagnostic pathway and treatments at tertiary centers for familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), and mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD)/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS). PFS specialists at medical centers in the US, the European Union, and the eastern Mediterranean participated in a retrospective chart review, providing de-identified data in an electronic case report form. Patients were treated between 2008 and 2012, with at least 1 year of followup; all had clinical and/or genetically proven disease and were on/eligible for biologic treatment. A total of 134 patients were analyzed: FMF (n = 49), TRAPS (n = 47), and MKD/HIDS (n = 38). Fever was commonly reported as severe across all indications. Other frequently reported severe symptoms were serositis for FMF patients and elevated acute-phase reactants and gastrointestinal upset for TRAPS and MKD/HIDS. A long delay from disease onset to diagnosis was seen within TRAPS and MKD/HIDS (5.8 and 7.1 years, respectively) compared to a 1.8-year delay in FMF patients. An equal proportion of TRAPS patients first received anti-interleukin-1 (anti-IL-1) and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) biologic agents, whereas IL-1 blockade was the main choice for FMF patients resistant to colchicine and MKD/HIDS patients. For TRAPS patients, treatment with anakinra versus anti-TNF treatments as first biologic agent resulted in significantly higher clinical and biochemical responses (P = 0.03 and P patterns and diagnostic delays highlight the need for greater awareness and improved diagnostics for PFS. This real-world treatment assessment supports the need for further refinement of treatment practices. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Identification of a novel frameshift mutation in PITX2 gene in a Chinese family with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hou-fa; Fang, Xiao-yun; Jin, Chong-fei; Yin, Jin-fu; Li, Jin-yu; Zhao, Su-juan; Miao, Qi; Song, Feng-wei

    2014-01-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) is phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. In this study, we identified the underlying genetic defect in a Chinese family with ARS. A detailed family history and clinical data were recorded. The ocular phenotype was documented using slit-lamp photography and systemic anomalies were also documented where available. The genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. All coding exons and intron-exon junctions of paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) gene and the forkhead box C1 (FOXC1) gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and screened for mutation by direct DNA sequencing. Variations detected in exon 5 of PITX2 were further evaluated with cloning sequencing. The exon 5 of PITX2 was also sequenced in 100 healthy controls, unrelated to the family, for comparison. Structural models of the wild type and mutant homeodomain of PITX2 were investigated by SWISS-MODEL. Affected individuals exhibited variable ocular phenotypes, whereas the systemic anomalies were similar. After direct sequencing and cloning sequencing, a heterozygous deletion/insertion mutation c.198_201delinsTTTCT (p.M66Ifs*133) was revealed in exon 5 of PITX2. This mutation co-segregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not found either in unaffected family members or in 100 unrelated controls. We detected a novel frameshift mutation p.M66Ifs*133 in PITX2 in a Chinese family with ARS. Although PITX2 mutations and polymorphisms have been reported from various ethnic groups, we report for the first time the identification of a novel deletion/insertion mutation that causes frameshift mutation in the homeodomain of PITX2 protein.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis and a donor splice site mutation in fibrillin in a family with Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, M.; Vandemark, N.; Wang, M.; Han, J.; Rao, V.H. (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha (United States)); Velinov, M.; Tsipouras, P. (Univ. of Connecticut Health Sciences Center, Farmington (United States)); Wargowski, D.; Becker, J.; Robertson, W.; Droste, S. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The Marfan syndrome, an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder, is manifested by abnormalities in the cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. Recently, fibrillin, an elastic-associated microfibrillar glycoprotein, has been linked to the Marfan syndrome, and fibrillin mutations in affected individuals have been documented. In this study, genetic linkage analysis with fibrillin-specific markers was used to establish the prenatal diagnosis in an 11-wk-gestation fetus in a four-generation Marfan kindred. At birth, skeletal changes suggestive of the Marfan syndrome were observed. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification of the fibrillin gene mRNA detected a deletion of 123 bp in one allele in affected relatives. This deletion corresponds to an exon encoding an epidermal growth factor-like motif. Examination of genomic DNA showed a G[yields]C transversion at the +1 consensus donor splice site. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Family of Warmblood Horses Caused by a 25-bp Deletion of the DNA-Binding Domain of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eastman Welsford, G.; Munk, Rikke; Villagómez, Daniel A.F.

    2017-01-01

    Testicular feminization, an earlier term coined for describing a syndrome resulting from failure of masculinization of target organs by androgen secretions during embryo development, has been well documented not only in humans but also in the domestic horse. The pathology, actually referred...... pedigree segregating AIS, where the molecular analyses of the androgen receptor gene in the family provided evidences that a 25-bp deletion of the DNA-binding domain is causative of this equine syndrome....

  6. Whole-exome sequencing analysis of Waardenburg syndrome in a Chinese family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dezhong; Zhao, Na; Wang, Jing; Li, Zhuoyu; Wu, Changxin; Fu, Jie; Xiao, Han

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a dominantly inherited, genetically heterogeneous auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by non-progressive sensorineural hearing loss and iris discoloration. By whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified a nonsense mutation (c.598C>T) in PAX3 gene, predicted to be disease causing by in silico analysis. This is the first report of genetically diagnosed case of WS PAX3 c.598C>T nonsense mutation in Chinese ethnic origin by WES and in silico functional prediction methods. PMID:28690861

  7. Very high risk of cancer in familial Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giardiello, F. M.; Brensinger, J. D.; Tersmette, A. C.; Goodman, S. N.; Petersen, G. M.; Booker, S. V.; Cruz-Correa, M.; Offerhaus, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    The Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant polyposis disorder with increased risk of multiple cancers, but literature estimates of risk vary. We performed an individual patient meta-analysis to determine the relative risk (RR) of cancer in patients with PJS compared with the general

  8. Marfan Syndrome: A Study of a Nigerian Family and Review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Marfan's syndrome is a connective tissue disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder. It causes a myriad of distinct clinical problems, of which the musculoskeletal, cardiac, and ocular system problems predominate. Nearly 50 percent of patients have to undergo aortic surgery in their lifetime ...

  9. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: clinical and genetic studies of 20 families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leter, Edward M.; Koopmans, A. Karijn; Gille, Johan J. P.; van Os, Theo A. M.; Vittoz, Gabriëlle G.; David, Eric F. L.; Jaspars, Elisabeth H.; Postmus, Pieter E.; van Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A.; Craanen, Mikael E.; Starink, Theo M.; Menko, Fred H.

    2008-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is an autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas and an increased risk of spontaneous pneumothorax, renal and possibly other tumors. A causative gene (FLCN) on chromosome 17p has recently been identified. We here report clinical and

  10. Prune belly syndrome in a set of twins, a family tragedy: Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report prune belly syndrome, a rare congenital malformation, in a set of twins delivered to a young couple with a history of three previous first trimester spontaneous abortions, discordant HIV seropositivity and antenatal ultrasound report that indicated renal abnormalities in only one of the twins. The challenges of ...

  11. Is surveillance of the small bowel indicated for Lynch syndrome families?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kate, G. L.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Nagengast, F. M.; Craanen, M.; Cats, A.; Menko, F. H.; Vasen, H. F. A.

    Background: Small bowel cancer (SBC) is one of the tumours associated with Lynch syndrome (LS). To advise on screening for this tumour it is paramount to be informed about the lifetime risk. The aim of this study was to calculate the lifetime risk of SBC in LS and to identify possible risk factors.

  12. Brittle cornea syndrome ZNF469 mutation carrier phenotype and segregation analysis of rare ZNF469 variants in familial keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Alice E; Borasio, Edmondo; Liskova, Petra; Khan, Arif O; Hassan, Hala; Cheetham, Michael E; Plagnol, Vincent; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Tuft, Stephen J; Hardcastle, Alison J

    2015-01-06

    Brittle cornea syndrome 1 (BCS1) is a rare recessive condition characterized by extreme thinning of the cornea and sclera, caused by mutations in ZNF469. Keratoconus is a relatively common disease characterized by progressive thinning and ectasia of the cornea. The etiology of keratoconus is complex and not yet understood, but rare ZNF469 variants have recently been associated with disease. We investigated the phenotype of BCS1 carriers with known pathogenic ZNF469 mutations, and recruited families in which aggregation of keratoconus was observed to establish if rare variants in ZNF469 segregated with disease. Patients and family members were recruited and underwent comprehensive anterior segment examination, including corneal topography. Blood samples were donated and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequence and splice sites of ZNF469 were PCR amplified and Sanger sequenced. Four carriers of three BCS1-associated ZNF469 loss-of-function mutations (p.[Glu1392Ter], p.[Gln1930Argfs*6], p.[Gln1930fs*133]) were examined and none had keratoconus. One carrier had partially penetrant features of BCS1, including joint hypermobility. ZNF469 sequencing in 11 keratoconus families identified 9 rare (minor allele frequency [MAF] ≤ 0.025) variants predicted to be potentially damaging. However, in each instance the rare variant(s) identified, including two previously reported as potentially keratoconus-associated, did not segregate with the disease. The presence of heterozygous loss-of-function alleles in the ZNF469 gene did not cause keratoconus in the individuals examined. None of the rare nonsynonymous ZNF469 variants identified in the familial cohort conferred a high risk of keratoconus; therefore, genetic variants contributing to disease pathogenesis in these 11 families remain to be identified. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  13. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel splice-site mutation in ADAMTS17 in an Indian family with Weill-Marchesani syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mohd Hussain; Bhat, Vishwanath; Shetty, Jyoti S; Kumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a rare connective tissue disorder, characterized by short stature, microspherophakic lens, and stubby hands and feet (brachydactyly). WMS is caused by mutations in the FBN1, ADAMTS10, and LTBP2 genes. Mutations in the LTBP2 and ADAMTS17 genes cause a WMS-like syndrome, in which the affected individuals show major features of WMS but do not display brachydactyly and joint stiffness. The main purpose of our study was to determine the genetic cause of WMS in an Indian family. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was used to identify the genetic cause of WMS in the family. The cosegregation of the mutation was determined with Sanger sequencing. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis was used to assess the effect of a splice-site mutation on splicing of the ADAMTS17 transcript. The WES analysis identified a homozygous novel splice-site mutation c.873+1G>T in a known WMS-like syndrome gene, ADAMTS17, in the family. RT-PCR analysis in the patient showed that exon 5 was skipped, which resulted in the deletion of 28 amino acids in the ADAMTS17 protein. The mutation in the WMS-like syndrome gene ADAMTS17 also causes WMS in an Indian family. The present study will be helpful in genetic diagnosis of this family and increases the number of mutations of this gene to six.

  14. Wide clinical variability in cat eye syndrome patients: four non-related patients and three patients from the same family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belangero, S I; Pacanaro, A N X; Bellucco, F T; Christofolini, D M; Kulikowski, L D; Guilherme, R S; Bortolai, A; Dutra, A R N; Piazzon, F B; Cernach, M C; Melaragno, M I

    2012-01-01

    A small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC) derived from chromosome 22 is a relatively common cytogenetic finding. This sSMC typically results in tetrasomy for a chromosomal region that spans the chromosome 22p arm and the proximal 2 Mb of 22q11.21. Using classical cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and array techniques, 7 patients with sSMCs derived from chromosome 22 were studied: 4 non-related and 3 from the same family (mother, daughter, and son). The sSMCs in all patients were dicentric and bisatellited chromosomes with breakpoints in the chromosome 22 low-copy repeat A region, resulting in cat eye syndrome (CES) due to chromosome 22 partial tetrasomy 22pter→q11.2 including the cat eye chromosome region. Although all subjects presented the same chromosomal abnormality, they showed a wide range of phenotypic differences, even in the 3 patients from the same family. There are no previous reports of CES occurring within 3 patients in the same family. Thus, the clinical and follow-up data presented here contribute to a better delineation of the phenotypes and outcomes of CES patients and will be useful for genetic counseling. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of a familial duplication of chromosome 13q: A recognizable syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, Inge B.; Hoovers, Jan M. N.; Mul, Adri N. P. M.; Man, Hai-Yen; Ket, Jan L.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a family with six persons in three generations who have mild mental retardation, behavioral problems, seizures, hearing loss, strabismus, dental anomalies, hypermobility, juvenile hallux valgus, and mild dysmorphic features. Classical cytogenetic analysis showed a partial duplication of

  16. Senior-Loken syndrome: A novel NPHP5 gene mutation in a family from Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makia J Marafie

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Identification of this pathogenic mutation helped in confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in providing a proper pre-marital genetic counselling and testing for a couple embarking on marriage from this highly consanguineous high-risk family.

  17. A Turkish family with Nance-Horan Syndrome due to a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tug, Esra; Dilek, Nihal F; Javadiyan, Shahrbanou; Burdon, Kathryn P; Percin, Ferda E

    2013-08-01

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked syndrome characterized by congenital cataract which leads to profound vision loss, characteristic dysmorphic features and specific dental anomalies. Microcornea, microphthalmia and mild or moderate mental retardation may accompany these features. Heterozygous females often manifest similarly but with less severe features than affected males. We describe two brothers who have the NHS phenotype and their carrier mother who had microcornea but not cataract. We identified a previously unreported frameshift mutation (c.558insA) in exon 1 of the NHS gene in these patients and their mother which is predicted to result in the incorporation of 11 aberrant amino acids prior to a stop codon (p.E186Efs11X). We also discussed genotype-phenotype correlation according to relevant literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Phenotypic discordance in a family with monozygotic twins and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyszynski, D.F. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lewanda, A.F. [Johnson Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Children`s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Beaty, T.H. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Balitomre, MD (United States)

    1996-12-30

    Despite considerable research, the cause of non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is still an enigma. Case-control and cohort studies have searched for environmental factors that might influence the development of this common malformation, such as maternal cigarette smoking, periconceptional supplementation of folic acid and multivitamins, agricultural chemical use, and place of residence, among others. However, these studies are subject to numerous biases, and their results have often been contradictory and inconclusive. 41 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Case Report: Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome: Two Cases from One Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Karim-Zadeh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren–Larsson Syndrome (SLS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by generalized Ichthyosis, mental retardation, spastic diplegia or tetraplegia and epilepsy. This is a rare syndrome that caused by mutation in the ALDH3A2 gene, on chromosome 17p11.2. That encodes fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FAIDH, an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of medium – long chain aldehydes derived from lipid metabolism. Neuroimaging (MRI shows retardation of myelination and a mild myelin deficit. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS shows the peak of lipids that accumulate because of fatty alchohols. We report two cases that they are siblings from relative parents. The Brother is 4 years old and his sister is 3 years old. , The clinical findings are developmental delay, mental retardation, spastic Tetraplegia and refractory seizure. The most important finding in these two siblings was generalized Icthyosis. MRI showed hyper signality in white matter and MRS showed the peak of accumulated lipids that confirmed the diagnosis of "Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome".

  20. Two new Rett syndrome families and review of the literature: expanding the knowledge of MECP2 frameshift mutations

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    Eiklid Kristin L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rett syndrome (RTT is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder, which is usually caused by de novo mutations in the MECP2 gene. More than 70% of the disease causing MECP2 mutations are eight recurrent C to T transitions, which almost exclusively arise on the paternally derived X chromosome. About 10% of the RTT cases have a C-terminal frameshift deletion in MECP2. Only few RTT families with a segregating MECP2 mutation, which affects female carriers with a phenotype of mental retardation or RTT, have been reported in the literature. In this study we describe two new RTT families with three and four individuals, respectively, and review the literature comparing the type of mutations and phenotypes observed in RTT families with those observed in sporadic cases. Based on these observations we also investigated origin of mutation segregation to further improve genetic counselling. Methods MECP2 mutations were identified by direct sequencing. XCI studies were performed using the X-linked androgen receptor (AR locus. The parental origin of de novo MECP2 frameshift mutations was investigated using intronic SNPs. Results In both families a C-terminal frameshift mutation segregates. Clinical features of the mutation carriers vary from classical RTT to mild mental retardation. XCI profiles of the female carriers correlate to their respective geno-/phenotypes. The majority of the de novo frameshift mutations occur on the paternally derived X chromosome (7/9 cases, without a paternal age effect. Conclusions The present study suggests a correlation between the intrafamilial phenotypic differences observed in RTT families and their respective XCI pattern in blood, in contrast to sporadic RTT cases where a similar correlation has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, we found de novo MECP2 frameshift mutations frequently to be of paternal origin, although not with the same high paternal occurrence as in sporadic cases with C to T

  1. Two new Rett syndrome families and review of the literature: expanding the knowledge of MECP2 frameshift mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder, which is usually caused by de novo mutations in the MECP2 gene. More than 70% of the disease causing MECP2 mutations are eight recurrent C to T transitions, which almost exclusively arise on the paternally derived X chromosome. About 10% of the RTT cases have a C-terminal frameshift deletion in MECP2. Only few RTT families with a segregating MECP2 mutation, which affects female carriers with a phenotype of mental retardation or RTT, have been reported in the literature. In this study we describe two new RTT families with three and four individuals, respectively, and review the literature comparing the type of mutations and phenotypes observed in RTT families with those observed in sporadic cases. Based on these observations we also investigated origin of mutation segregation to further improve genetic counselling. Methods MECP2 mutations were identified by direct sequencing. XCI studies were performed using the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) locus. The parental origin of de novo MECP2 frameshift mutations was investigated using intronic SNPs. Results In both families a C-terminal frameshift mutation segregates. Clinical features of the mutation carriers vary from classical RTT to mild mental retardation. XCI profiles of the female carriers correlate to their respective geno-/phenotypes. The majority of the de novo frameshift mutations occur on the paternally derived X chromosome (7/9 cases), without a paternal age effect. Conclusions The present study suggests a correlation between the intrafamilial phenotypic differences observed in RTT families and their respective XCI pattern in blood, in contrast to sporadic RTT cases where a similar correlation has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, we found de novo MECP2 frameshift mutations frequently to be of paternal origin, although not with the same high paternal occurrence as in sporadic cases with C to T transitions. This suggests

  2. Complex regional pain syndrome in an 8-year-old female with emotional stress during deployment of a family member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Ryan D; Bailey, Justin

    2011-08-01

    This pediatric case of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) illustrates the need to expand the typical age range and raise awareness of the psychological impact military deployment may have on its development. An emotional 8-year-old female, with a recently deployed father, presented with left foot pain. Over an 11-week-period, she developed symptoms, signs, and radiologic findings consistent with CRPS. Pediatric CRPS is characterized by ecchymosis, edema, allodynia, mottling, and abnormal hair growth in the region of pain after minor trauma. It occurs predominately in adolescent females, mainly affects the lower limbs, and is associated with psychological stressors. This patient with CRPS presents several years younger than what is commonly described in the literature in the stressful setting of a deployed parent. CRPS can occur in younger than expected age ranges of children who experience the unique emotional stressor of a deployed family member.

  3. Family reinforcement of illness behavior: a comparison of adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome, juvenile arthritis, and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, M J; Scott Smith, M; McCauley, E; Sherry, D D

    2000-10-01

    Parental encouragement of illness behavior is hypothesized to correlate with psychosocial dysfunction in adolescents with chronic illness. To explore this hypothesis, adolescents aged 11 to 17 years with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) (n = 10), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) (n = 16), and healthy adolescents (n = 14) were recruited for the study. Measures included the Achenbach parent and youth self report forms, the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale-II (FACES II), the Children's Depression Rating Scale, and number of days absent from school. The Illness Behavior Encouragement Scale (IBES) generated measures of parental reinforcement of illness behavior. As predicted, the teens with CFS scored statistically higher on measures of depression, total competence, and number of days of school missed in the previous 6 months (mean = 40). Children with JRA scored significantly lower than the CFS group on the measure of parental reinforcement of illness behavior. The healthy group produced intermediate scores. Results and implications for future clinical and research activity are discussed.

  4. An amino acid deletion inSZT2 in a family with non-syndromic intellectual disability.

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    Michelle Falcone

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ID is characterized by extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, three mutations in SZT2 were reported in two unrelated children with unexplained infantile epileptic encephalopathy with severe ID. Here we report a European American family with three children having non-syndromic mild or moderate ID without seizures. Whole-exome sequencing of three affected siblings revealed a three base pair deletion (c.4202_4204delTTC located in a 19 mb autozygous region on chromosome 1, leading to an amino acid deletion (p.Phe1401del in SZT2. All three children were homozygous for the deletion and their parents were heterozygous as expected in autosomal recessive inheritance. SZT2 is highly expressed in neuronal tissues and regulates seizure threshold and neuronal excitation in mice. We conclude that the disruption of SZT2 with some residual function might lead to mild or moderate ID without seizures.

  5. PHOX2B mutation-confirmed congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in a Chinese family: presentation from newborn to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peilin; Su, Yi-Ning; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Huey-Dong

    2009-02-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is characterized by compromised chemoreflexes resulting in sleep hypoventilation. We report a Chinese family with paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B) mutation-confirmed CCHS, with a clinical spectrum from newborn to adulthood, to increase awareness of its various manifestations. After identifying central hypoventilation in an adult man (index case), clinical evaluation was performed on the complete family, which consisted of the parents, five siblings, and five offspring. Pulmonary function tests, overnight polysomnography, arterial blood gas measurements, hypercapnia ventilatory response, and PHOX2B gene mutation screening were performed on living family members. Brain MRI, 24-h Holter monitoring, and echocardiography were performed on members with clinically diagnosed central hypoventilation. The index patient and four offspring manifested clinical features of central hypoventilation. The index patients had hypoxia and hypercapnia while awake, polycythemia, and hematocrit levels of 70%. The first and fourth children had frequent cyanotic spells, and both died of respiratory failure. The second and third children remained asymptomatic until adulthood, when they experienced impaired hypercapnic ventilatory response. The third child had nocturnal hypoventilation with nadir pulse oximetric saturation of 59%. Adult-onset CCHS with PHOX2B gene mutation of the + 5 alanine expansions were confirmed in the index patient and the second and third children. The index patient and the third child received ventilator support system bilevel positive airway pressure treatment, which improved the hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and polycythemia without altering their chemosensitivity. Transmission of late-onset CCHS is autosomal-dominant. Genetic screening of family members of CCHS probands allows for early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Extending the spectrum of Ellis van Creveld syndrome: a large family with a mild mutation in the EVC gene

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    Cockerham John

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails and teeth and is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We report a family with complex septal cardiac defects, rhizomelic limb shortening, and polydactyly, without the typical lip, dental, and nail abnormalities of EvC. The phenotype was inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, with one instance of pseudodominant inheritance. Methods Because of the phenotypic overlap with EvC, microsatellite markers were used to test for linkage to the EVC/EVC2 locus. The results did not exclude linkage, so samples were sequenced for mutations. Results We identified a c.1868T>C mutation in EVC, which predicts p.L623P, and was homozygous in affected individuals. Conclusion We conclude that this EVC mutation is hypomorphic and that such mutations can cause a phenotype of cardiac and limb defects that is less severe than typical EvC. EVC mutation analysis should be considered in patients with cardiac and limb malformations, even if they do not manifest typical EvC syndrome.

  7. Extending the spectrum of Ellis van Creveld syndrome: a large family with a mild mutation in the EVC gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulucan, Hakan; Gül, Davut; Sapp, Julie C; Cockerham, John; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2008-10-23

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails and teeth and is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We report a family with complex septal cardiac defects, rhizomelic limb shortening, and polydactyly, without the typical lip, dental, and nail abnormalities of EvC. The phenotype was inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, with one instance of pseudodominant inheritance. Because of the phenotypic overlap with EvC, microsatellite markers were used to test for linkage to the EVC/EVC2 locus. The results did not exclude linkage, so samples were sequenced for mutations. We identified a c.1868T>C mutation in EVC, which predicts p.L623P, and was homozygous in affected individuals. We conclude that this EVC mutation is hypomorphic and that such mutations can cause a phenotype of cardiac and limb defects that is less severe than typical EvC. EVC mutation analysis should be considered in patients with cardiac and limb malformations, even if they do not manifest typical EvC syndrome.

  8. A novel missense mutation in the EVC gene underlies Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in a Pakistani family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umm-E-Kalsoom; Wasif, Naveed; Tariq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim

    2010-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skeletal, ectodermal and cardiac defects. This syndrome is caused by mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes, which are separated by 2.6 kb of genomic sequence on chromosome 4p16. In the present study we ascertained a four-generation pedigree of Pakistani origin with features of EVC. Linkage was searched by genotyping microsatellite markers linked to chromosome 4p16. Affected individuals showed homozygosity to the microsatellite markers tightly linked to EVC and EVC2 genes on chromosome 4p16. It was then subjected to direct sequencing of the EVC and EVC2 genes. Mutation analysis of the EVC and EVC2 genes identified a novel missense change (c.617G>A; p.S206N) in the EVC gene. We herein report on the first family from Pakistan with a large number of individuals affected by EVC. DNA sequence analysis led to the identification of the fifth missense mutation in the EVC gene.

  9. A novel mutation in the endothelin B receptor gene in a moroccan family with shah-waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubaj, Yassamine; Pingault, Véronique; Elalaoui, Siham C; Ratbi, Ilham; Azouz, Mohamed; Zerhouni, Hicham; Ettayebi, Fouad; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2015-02-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a neurocristopathy disorder combining sensorineural deafness and pigmentary abnormalities. The presence of additional signs defines the 4 subtypes. WS type IV, also called Shah-Waardenburg syndrome (SWS), is characterized by the association with congenital aganglionic megacolon (Hirschsprung disease). To date, 3 causative genes have been related to this congenital disorder. Mutations in the EDNRB and EDN3 genes are responsible for the autosomal recessive form of SWS, whereas SOX10 mutations are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. We report here the case of a 3-month-old Morrocan girl with WS type IV, born to consanguineous parents. The patient had 3 cousins who died in infancy with the same symptoms. Molecular analysis by Sanger sequencing revealed the presence of a novel homozygous missense mutation c.1133A>G (p.Asn378Ser) in the EDNRB gene. The proband's parents as well as the parents of the deceased cousins are heterozygous carriers of this likely pathogenic mutation. This molecular diagnosis allows us to provide genetic counseling to the family and eventually propose prenatal diagnosis to prevent recurrence of the disease in subsequent pregnancies.

  10. A de novo deletion mutation in SOX10 in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong; Zhu, Yaowu; Shen, Na; Peng, Jing; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Haiyi; Lu, Yanjun

    2017-01-27

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) or Waardenburg-Shah syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with a prevalence of <1/1,000,000 and characterized by the association of congenital sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities, and intestinal aganglionosis. There are three types of WS4 (WS4A-C) caused by mutations in endothelin receptor type B, endothelin 3, and SRY-box 10 (SOX10), respectively. This study investigated a genetic mutation in a Chinese family with one WS4 patient in order to improve genetic counselling. Genomic DNA was extracted, and mutation analysis of the three WS4 related genes was performed using Sanger sequencing. We detected a de novo heterozygous deletion mutation [c.1333delT (p.Ser445Glnfs*57)] in SOX10 in the patient; however, this mutation was absent in the unaffected parents and 40 ethnicity matched healthy controls. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional modelling of the SOX10 protein confirmed that the c.1333delT heterozygous mutation was pathogenic, indicating that this mutation might constitute a candidate disease-causing mutation.

  11. Familiality of Tourette Syndrome, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Heritability Analysis in a Large Sib-Pair Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Carol A.; Grados, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a genetic component that is highly comorbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic relations between these disorders have not been clearly elucidated. This study examined the familial relations among TS,…

  12. The presence of a widened vestibular aqueduct and progressive sensorineural hearing loss in the branchio-oto-renal syndrome. A family study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stinckens, C.I.C.; Standaert, L.; Casselman, J.W.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Kumar, S.; Wallen, J. van de; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A new large family with the BOR syndrome is reported with special reference to the presence of a widened vestibular aqueduct and a progressive sensorineural component in the mixed hearing loss. A review of the BOR literature of 184 patients is given. Setting: University Hospitals.

  13. Phenotypic Variation in Patients with Homozygous c.1678G>T Mutation in EVC Gene: Report of Two Mexican Families with Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Ramirez, Marisol; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Lugo-Trampe, Jose; Martínez-Garza, Laura E; Martinez-Glez, Víctor; Valencia-Benitez, María; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ruiz-Peréz, Víctor

    2017-12-12

    BACKGROUND Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is an autosomal recessive chondro-ectodermal dysplasia characterized by disproportionate short stature, limb shortening, narrow chest, postaxial polydactyly and dysplastic nails and teeth. In addition, 60% of cases present congenital heart defects. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is predominantly caused by mutations in the EVC or EVC2 (4p16) genes, with only a few cases caused by mutations in WDR35.  CASE REPORT Here, we report on two Mexican families with patients diagnosed with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Family 1 includes four patients: three females of 15, 18, and 23 years of age and a 7-year old male. Family 2 has only one affected newborn male. All patients exhibited multiple features including hypodontia, dysplastic teeth, extra frenula, mild short stature, distal limb shortening, postaxial polydactyly of hands and feet, nail dystrophy, and knee joint abnormalities. Only two patients had an atrial septal defect. In all cases, molecular analysis by Sanger sequencing identified the same homozygous mutation in exon 12 of EVC, c.1678G>T, which leads to a premature stop codon.  CONCLUSIONS The mutation c.1678G>T has been previously reported in another Mexican patient and it appears to be a recurrent mutation in Mexico which could represent a founder mutation. The large number of patients in this case allows the clinical variability and spectrum of manifestations present in individuals with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome even if they carry the same homozygous mutation in a same family.

  14. Association of the Family Environment with Behavioural and Cognitive Outcomes in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, T. M.; Hersh, J.; Schoch, K.; Curtiss, K.; Hooper, S. R.; Shashi, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) are at risk for social-behavioural and neurocognitive sequelae throughout development. The current study examined the impact of family environmental characteristics on social-behavioural and cognitive outcomes in this paediatric population. Method: Guardians of children with 22q11DS…

  15. Familial Sotos syndrome caused by a novel missense mutation, C2175S, in NSD1 and associated with normal intelligence, insulin dependent diabetes, bronchial asthma, and lipedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, Ulrich; Kohlschmidt, Nicolai; Kempf, Olga; Gebauer, Konstanze; Haug, Karsten; Engels, Hartmut; Haaf, Thomas; Bartsch, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    We report a familial Sotos syndrome in two children, boy and girl, aged 17 and 8 years, and in their 44 year old mother, who displayed normal intelligence at adult age, but suffered from insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, bronchial asthma, and severe lipedema. The underlying missense mutation, C2175S, occurred in a conserved segment of the NSD1 gene. Our findings confirm that familial cases of SS are more likely to carry missense mutations. This case report may prove useful to avoid underestimation of the recurrence rate of SS, and to demonstrate that the developmental delay may normalize, enabling an independent life and having an own family.

  16. Clinical heterogeneity in a family with DKC1 mutation, dyskeratosis congenita and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome in first cousins

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    Cristina Olivieri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis congenita (DC is an inherited bone marrow failure disorder characterized by mucocutaneous features (skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and oral leukoplakia, pulmonary fibrosis, hematologic and solid malignancies. Its severe form, recognized as Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS, also includes cerebellar hypoplasia, microcephaly, developmental delay and prenatal growth retardation. In literature phenotypic variability among DC patients sharing the same mutation is wellknown. To our knowledge this report describes for the first time a family of DC patients, characterized by a member with features of classic DC and another one with some features of HHS, both with the same mutation in DKC1. Our family confirms again that one mutation can be associated with different phenotypes and different hematological manifestations. It’s possible to speculate that there are likely to be patients who do not clinically fit neatly into either classical DC or HHS, but whose clinical features are due to mutations in DKC1 or in genes responsible for autosomal DC/HHS.

  17. Subjective face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility, sleeping disturbances and aberrant eating habits in families with Asperger syndrome

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    Källman Tiia

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether a set of clinical features, which are not included in the DSM-IV or ICD-10 for Asperger Syndrome (AS, are associated with AS in particular or whether they are merely a familial trait that is not related to the diagnosis. Methods Ten large families, a total of 138 persons, of whom 58 individuals fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for AS and another 56 did not to fulfill these criteria, were studied using a structured interview focusing on the possible presence of face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility and eating habits and sleeping disturbances. Results The prevalence for face recognition difficulties was 46.6% in individuals with AS compared with 10.7% in the control group. The corresponding figures for subjectively reported presence of aberrant sensibilities were 91.4% and 46.6%, for sleeping disturbances 48.3% and 23.2% and for aberrant eating habits 60.3% and 14.3%, respectively. Conclusion An aberrant processing of sensory information appears to be a common feature in AS. The impact of these and other clinical features that are not incorporated in the ICD-10 and DSM-IV on our understanding of AS may hitherto have been underestimated. These associated clinical traits may well be reflected by the behavioural characteristics of these individuals.

  18. Linkage analysis in a family with Stickler syndrome leads to the exclusion of the COL2A1 locus

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    Mottes, M.; Zolezzi, F.; Pignatti, P.F. [Univ. of Verona (Italy)

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary arthro-ophtalmopathy (AO) or Stickler Syndrome (MIM No. 10830) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by vitro-retinal degeneration and other connective tissue disturbances. Mutations in the COL2A1 gene, coding for type II collagen chains, have been described in a few patients. The wide spectrum of clinical manifestations is presumably due to genetic heterogeneity, since only about 50% of the Stickler families so far studied show cosegregation of the disease with the COL2A1 locus. We have investigated a large pedigree (19 individuals of whom 9 are affected) in which severe myopia with vitro-retinal degeneration consegregated with joint laxity, recurrent inguinal hernias, and degenerative changes of the hip and the knee. The 3{prime} end COL2A1 VNTR polymorphism was utilized for linkage analysis. In order to get the maximum informativity, we have analyzed the allelic microheterogeneity of this VNTR, due to the repeat sequence variation, by means of a single strand polymorphism. Mendelian inheritance of the different single strands was observed as expected. Discordance of segregation between the disease and the COL2A1 locus was thus established inequivocally in this family.

  19. Further delineation of the oculoauricular syndrome phenotype: A new family with a novel truncating HMX1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Mehrez, Mennat I; Kamal, Ahmad M; Taher, Mohamed B; Afifi, Hanan H

    2018-04-01

    Biallelic HMX1 mutations cause a very rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder termed as oculoauricular syndrome (OAS) because it is characterized only by the combination of eye and ear anomalies. We identified a new family bringing to three the total families reported with this disorder. Our proband presented with anteriorly protruded ears and malformed ear pinnae in association with microphthalmia, congenital cataract, microcornea, and iris and optic disc colobomata. Additionally, he had high and broad forehead with asymmetry giving a recognizable facial gestalt. Further, short left mandibular ramus and bifid cingulum in the boy and short right mandibular ramus in his father were observed. Mutation analysis revealed a novel homozygous nonsense mutation c.487G>T in the second exon of the HMX1 that predicted to introduce a premature stop codon at position 163 (p.E163*). Parents showed the heterozygous state of the detected mutation. Investigations in a process as complex as craniofacial development suggest that there are still additional, as yet unidentified, genes that play in orchestrate to determine the final phenotype.

  20. Subjective face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility, sleeping disturbances and aberrant eating habits in families with Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen-von Wendt, Taina; Paavonen, Juulia E; Ylisaukko-Oja, Tero; Sarenius, Susan; Källman, Tiia; Järvelä, Irma; von Wendt, Lennart

    2005-01-01

    Background The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether a set of clinical features, which are not included in the DSM-IV or ICD-10 for Asperger Syndrome (AS), are associated with AS in particular or whether they are merely a familial trait that is not related to the diagnosis. Methods Ten large families, a total of 138 persons, of whom 58 individuals fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for AS and another 56 did not to fulfill these criteria, were studied using a structured interview focusing on the possible presence of face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility and eating habits and sleeping disturbances. Results The prevalence for face recognition difficulties was 46.6% in individuals with AS compared with 10.7% in the control group. The corresponding figures for subjectively reported presence of aberrant sensibilities were 91.4% and 46.6%, for sleeping disturbances 48.3% and 23.2% and for aberrant eating habits 60.3% and 14.3%, respectively. Conclusion An aberrant processing of sensory information appears to be a common feature in AS. The impact of these and other clinical features that are not incorporated in the ICD-10 and DSM-IV on our understanding of AS may hitherto have been underestimated. These associated clinical traits may well be reflected by the behavioural characteristics of these individuals. PMID:15826308

  1. Identification of KCNQ1 compound heterozygous mutations in three Chinese families with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuicui; Lu, Yu; Cheng, Jing; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Wei; Peng, Weihua; Zhang, Di; Duan, Hong; Han, Dongyi; Yuan, Huijun

    2017-05-01

    Besides expanding the spectrum of KCNQ1 mutations causing Jervell and Lange-Nielsen Syndrome (JLNS), the results showed diversity of its phenotypes, and emphasized the importance of molecular genetic analysis in confirming clinical diagnosis and making diagnosis possible before the emergency symptoms for deaf individuals. This study aimed to investigate four patients from three Chinese families with congenital hearing loss clinically and genetically. Genetic analysis of previously reported deafness genes based on massively parallel sequencing was conducted in more than five thousand Chinese hearing loss patients. Detailed clinical features of the patients with compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations of KCNQ1 gene were collected and analyzed. Compound mutations of KCNQ1 were found to be the genetic etiology of four patients from three families. Among the six KCNQ1 mutations, c.546C > A was identified as a novel mutation, c.965C > T had been reported in JLNS, while c.683 + 5G > A, c.1484_1485delCT, c.905C > T and c.1831G > A were previously reported in LQT1. In addition to congenital profound hearing loss in all subjects, two sibling subjects showed typical JLNS cardiac phenotype of prolonged QTc and recurrent syncopal episodes. One subject presented not only JLNS, but also iron-deficiency anemia and epilepsy. The other subject did not present any cardiac phenotype.

  2. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for a Chinese family with autosomal recessive Meckel-Gruber syndrome type 3 (MKS3.

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    Yanping Lu

    Full Text Available Meckel-Gruber syndrome type 3 is an autosomal recessive genetic defect caused by mutations in TMEM67 gene. In our previous study, we have identified a homozygous TMEM67 mutation in a Chinese family exhibiting clinical characteristics of MKS3, which provided a ground for further PGD procedure. Here we report the development and the first clinical application of the PGD for this MKS3 family. Molecular analysis protocol for clinical PGD procedure was established using 50 single cells in pre-clinical set-up. After whole genomic amplification by multiple displacement amplification with the DNA from single cells, three techniques were applied simultaneously to increase the accuracy and reliability of genetic diagnosis in single blastomere, including real-time PCR with Taq Man-MGB probe, haplotype analysis with polymorphic STR markers and Sanger sequencing. In the clinical PGD cycle, nine embryos at cleavage-stage were biopsied and subjected to genetic diagnosis. Two embryos diagnosed as free of TMEM67 mutation were transferred and one achieving normal pregnancy. Non-invasive prenatal assessment of trisomy 13, 18 and 21 by multiplex DNA sequencing at 18 weeks' gestation excluded the aneuploidy of the analyzed chromosomes. A healthy boy was delivered by cesarean section at 39 weeks' gestation. DNA sequencing from his cord blood confirmed the result of genetic analysis in the PGD cycle. The protocol developed in this study was proved to be rapid and safe for the detection of monogenic mutations in clinical PGD cycle.

  3. [Alcohol dependence syndrome and BDIM (before-discharge intervention method)--report 4, the family members' self-reports about BDIM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Aro; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Yamashiro, Kazunori; Cho, Tetsuji; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2005-02-01

    One hundred fifty-three inpatients with alcohol dependence syndrome were treated with the structured BDIM (Before-Discharge Intervention Method). 82 patients of them have participated to self-help group meetings or kept having therapy as our outpatients or inpatients during the study period. We chose the families of the 82 patients as our study subject Out of the study subjects who took part in BDIM, 64 families (117 persons) answered our questionnaire. Among them 63 families (101 persons) gave their described answers of impressions and opinions about BDIM, which were summarized as follows. (1) Through BDIM the family members gained second thought on their alcoholic family member (IP: identified patient) and they could tell their new view to IP. BDIM enabled them to tell IP their sincere feeling and hope for recovery of IP. BDIM empowered both IP and IP's family members. (2) The family members became to know IP's orientation on his or her disease. They came to know IP's denial and understand him or her as he or she was. (3) The family members felt emotional ties among themselves and IP through BDIM. When the family members of a dysfunctional family took part together in BDIM, they could know the feelings, thoughts, experiences and hopes one another. The family members had a precious experience of mutual understanding among themselves and IP to hope for recovery together. (4) The family members appreciated BDIM as a effective therapy. In BDIM many of them regarded highly of giving their letters to IP as a useful method to convey their feeling and thoughts calmly to IP. (5) On the other hand some family members pointed out the difficulty for themselves to write on BDIM. For family members who are not good at writing a letter or tend only to blame IP through their letters, writing and giving letters to IP is not appropriate as a therapy. If family members feel strong anxiety or fear, it is safe not to practice BDIM.

  4. Novel homozygous mutations in the EVC and EVC2 genes in two consanguineous families segregating autosomal recessive Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Abdul; Raza, Syed I; Ali, Salman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, teeth, oral and cardiac abnormalities. It is caused by biallelic mutations in the EVC or EVC2 gene, separated by 2.6 kb of genomic sequence on chromosome 4p16. In the present study, we have investigated two consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, segregating EVC in autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 4p16. Subsequently, sequence analysis identified a novel nonsense mutation (p.Trp234*) in exon 8 of the EVC2 gene and 15 bp duplication in exon 14 of the EVC gene in the two families. This further expands the mutations in the EVC or EVC2 genes resulting in the EVC syndrome.

  5. Relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support and job satisfaction to burnout syndrome among medical workers in southwest China: A cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujuan Yang

    Full Text Available Burnout is a psychosomatic syndrome widely observed in Chinese medical workers due to the increasing cost of medical treatment, excessive workload, and excessive prescribing behavior. No studies have evaluated the interrelationship among occupational burnout, work-family conflict, social support, and job satisfaction in medical workers. The aim of this study was to evaluate these relationships among medical workers in southwest China.This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2013 and December 2013, and was based on the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS. A total of 1382 medical workers were enrolled in the study. Pearson correlation analysis and general linear model univariate analysis were used to evaluate the relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction with burnout syndrome in medical workers.We observed that five dimensions of job satisfaction and self-reported social support were negatively associated with burnout syndrome, whereas three dimensions of work-family conflict showed a positive correlation. In a four-stage general linear model analysis, we found that demographic factors accounted for 5.4% of individual variance in burnout syndrome (F = 4.720, P<0.001, R2 = 0.054, and that work-family conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction accounted for 2.6% (F = 5.93, P<0.001, R2 = 0.080, 5.7% (F = 9.532, P<0.001, R2 = 0.137 and 17.8% (F = 21.608, P<0.001, R2 = 0.315 of the variance, respectively. In the fourth stage of analysis, female gender and a lower technical title correlated to a higher level of burnout syndrome, and medical workers without administrative duties had more serious burnout syndrome than those with administrative duties.In conclusion, the present study suggests that work-family conflict and self-reported social support slightly affect the level of burnout syndrome, and that job satisfaction is a much stronger influence on burnout syndrome

  6. A Rating Scale for the Functional Assessment of Patients with Familial Dysautonomia (Riley Day Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B.; Rolnitzky, Linda; von Simson, Gabrielle Gold; Berlin, Dena; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop a reliable rating scale to assess functional capacity in children with familial dysautonomia, evaluate changes over time and determine whether severity within a particular functional category at a young age affected survival. Study design Ten functional categories were retrospectively assessed in 123 patients with familial dysautonomia at age 7 years ± 6 months. Each of the ten Functional Severity Scale (FuSS) categories (motor development, cognitive ability, psychological status, expressive speech, balance, oral coordination, frequency of dysautonomic crisis, respiratory, cardiovascular and nutritional status) was scored from 1 (worst or severely affected) to 5 (best or no impairment). Changes over time were analyzed further in 22 of the 123 patients who were also available at ages 17 and 27 years. Results Severely impaired cardiovascular function and high frequency of dysautonomic crisis negatively affected survival (pdysautonomia. The scale may prove useful in providing prognosis and as a complementary endpoint in clinical trials. PMID:22727867

  7. Identification of 17 novel mutations in 40 Argentinean unrelated families with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Amartino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS. The human IDS gene is located in chromosome Xq28. This is the first report of genotype and phenotype characterization of 49 Hunter patients from 40 families of Argentina. Thirty different alleles have been identified, and 57% were novel. The frequency of de novo mutations was 10%. Overall, the percentage of private mutations in our series was 75%.

  8. Predictive factors for familiality in a Danish clinical cohort of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Nanette M M M; Hjalgrim, Helle; Skov, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a chronic, neurobiological disease, characterized by the presence of motor and vocal tics and it is often accompanied by associated symptoms. The two best-known co-morbidities are Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD...... and the frequency of affected relatives was noted. The rates of tics, symptoms of OCD, and ADHD among relatives are similar to the rates found in other countries and are higher than in the general population. Although the role of sex in determining the phenotype has to be examined more thoroughly, we found...... that male relatives were more likely to have tics and female relatives were more likely to have symptoms of OCD. When comparing the relatives to male patients with relatives to female patients, there were no differences in the rates of symptoms, apart from symptoms of ADHD that were more frequent in second...

  9. Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome: clinical evaluation of 17 families with a rare disorder of lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khnykin, Denis; Rønnevig, Jørgen; Johnsson, Margareta; Sitek, Jan C; Blaas, Harm-Gerd K; Hausser, Ingrid; Johansen, Finn-Eirik; Jahnsen, Frode L

    2012-04-01

    Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS) is classified as a syndromic congenital ichthyosis based on the presence of skin changes at birth, ultrastructural abnormalities in the epidermis, and extracutaneous manifestations. Recently, mutations in the fatty acid transporter protein 4 gene have been identified in patients with IPS. We sought to perform a detailed clinical evaluation of patients with IPS identified in Norway. Clinical examination and follow-up of all patients (n = 23) and light and electron microscopic examination of skin biopsy specimens were performed. IPS was characterized prenatally by ultrasound findings of polyhydramnios, separation of membranes, echogenic amniotic fluid, and clear chorionic fluid. All patients were born prematurely with sometimes life-threatening neonatal asphyxia; this was likely caused by aspiration of corneocyte-containing amniotic fluid as postmortem examination of lung tissue in two patients revealed keratin debris filling the bronchial tree and alveoli. The skin appeared erythrodermic, swollen, and covered by a greasy, thick vernix caseosa-like "scale" at birth, and evolved rapidly to a mild chronic ichthyosis. Many patients subsequently had chronic, severe pruritus. Histopathologic and ultrastructural examination of skin biopsy specimens showed hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, dermal inflammation, and characteristic aggregates of curved lamellar structures in the upper epidermis. Peripheral blood eosinophilia was invariably present and most patients had increased serum immunoglobulin E levels. Over 70% of the patients had a history of respiratory allergy and/or food allergy. The study included only 23 patients because of the rarity of the disease. IPS is characterized by defined genetic mutations, typical ultrastructural skin abnormalities, and distinct prenatal and postnatal clinical features. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Familial cryptic translocation resulting in Angelman syndrome: Implications for imprinting or location of the Angelman gene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, L.W.; Wiley, J.E.; Smith, A.J.W.; Kushnick, T. [East Carolina Univ. School of Medicine, Greenville, NC (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is associated with a loss of maternal genetic information, which typically occurs as a result of a deletion at 15q11-q13 or paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. We report a patient with AS as a result of an unbalanced cryptic translocation whose breakpoint, at 15q11.2, falls within this region. The proband was diagnosed clinically as having Angelman syndrome, but without a detectable cytogenetic deletion, by using high-resolution G-banding. FISH detected a deletion of D15S11 (IR4-3R), with an intact GABRB3 locus. Subsequent studies of the proband`s mother and sister detected a cryptic reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 14 and 15 with the breakpoint being between SNRPN and D15S10. The proband was found to have inherited an unbalanced form, being monosomic from 15pter through SNRPN and trisomic for 14pter to 14q11.2. DNA methylation studies showed that the proband had a paternal-only DNA methylation pattern at SNRPN, D15S63 (PW71), and ZNF127. The mother and unaffected sister, both having the balanced translocation, demonstrated normal DNA methylation patterns at all three loci. These data suggest that the gene for AS most likely lies proximal to D15S10, in contrast to the previously published position, although a less likely possibility is that the maternally inherited imprinting center acts in trans in the unaffected balanced translocation carrier sister. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Screening for urinary tract cancer with urine cytology in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myrhøj, T; Andersen, M-B; Bernstein, I

    2008-01-01

    ) UC lead to a false positive screening diagnosis. During the study period fourteen persons (1.4%) developed a UTC and five of these were interval tumours. The sensitivity of UC in diagnosing asymptomatic UTC in HNPCC patients was 29%. Twelve of the tumours were found in persons from families......-the National Danish Pathology database. All UC and UTC (Urinary Tract Tumours) were listed and evaluated. RESULTS: 977 persons had a total of 1,868 screening procedures performed. Two of these procedures (0.1%) lead to diagnosis of an asymptomatic urothelial tumour. In ten times as many procedures (22 persons...

  12. Linkage analysis in a family with the Opitz GBBB syndrome refines the location of the gene in Xp22 to a 4 cM region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M.; Schwartz, C. [J.C. Self Research Inist., Greenwood, SC (United States); Huston, S.; Schwartz, C. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    The Opitz GBBB syndrome (OS) is characterized in part by widely spaced inner ocular canthi and hypospadias. Recently, linkage analysis showed that the gene for the X-linked form to be located in an 18 cM region spanning Xp22. We have now conducted linkage analysis in a family previously published as having the BBB syndrome and found tight linkage to DXS7104 (Z = 3.3, {theta} = 0.0). Our data narrows the candidate region to 4 cM and should facilitate the identification and characterization of one of the genes involved in midline development. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Mother to son amplification of a small subtelomeric deletion: a new mechanism of familial recurrence in microdeletion syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravelli, Francesca; Murdolo, Marina; Marangi, Giuseppe; Bricarelli, Franca Dagna; Di Rocco, Maja; Zollino, Marcella

    2007-06-01

    A 2.8-Mb 4p16.3 terminal deletion, with proximal breakpoint at locus D4S182, was diagnosed by FISH in a 16-year-old boy who presented with a typical Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) phenotype. The deletion, which was maternally derived, was isolated, and a balanced translocation was ruled out in both parents by FISH with probe 33c6 (locus D4S43) falling within the patient's deletion interval, at a distance of about 2.3 Mb from the telomere. His older brother, who died from pneumonia at the age of 18 years, also presented with clinical signs consistent with WHS, including typical facial appearance and major malformations, but the genetic test was not performed. A smaller 4p deletion, spanning the 1.5 Mb region from locus D4S96 to the telomere was detected in the healthy mother. When critically analyzed, after the FISH results, she was noted to present with partial WHS facial "gestalt," borderline mental delay, a few episodes of seizures as a child, normal weight and head circumference, and height at the lower limit of normal range. This report highlights a previously undescribed mechanism of familial recurrence of a microdeletion syndrome. Potential meiotic amplification is to be considered for different subtelomeric deletions that are currently interpreted as population polymorphisms. At the same time, the present report adds new insights to mapping some peculiar WHS clinical signs, such as seizures and severe growth delay. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Pigmentary Markers in Danes--Associations with Quantitative Skin Colour, Nevi Count, Familial Atypical Multiple-Mole, and Melanoma Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Johansen

    Full Text Available To investigate whether pigmentation genes involved in the melanogenic pathway (melanogenesis contributed to melanoma predisposition, we compared pigmentary genetics with quantitative skin pigmentation measurements, the number of atypical nevi, the total nevus count, and the familial atypical multiple mole and melanoma (FAMMM syndrome. We typed 32 pigmentary SNP markers and sequenced MC1R in 246 healthy individuals and 116 individuals attending periodic control for malignant melanoma development, 50 of which were diagnosed with FAMMM. It was observed that individuals with any two grouped MC1R variants (missense, NM_002386:c. 456C > A (p.TYR152*, or NM_002386:c.83_84insA (p.Asn29Glnfs*14 had significantly (p<0.001 lighter skin pigmentation of the upper-inner arm than those with none or one MC1R variant. We did not observe any significant association of the MC1R variants with constitutive pigmentation measured on the buttock area. We hypothesize that the effect of MC1R variants on arm pigmentation is primarily reflecting the inability to tan when subjected to UVR. A gender specific effect on skin pigmentation was also observed, and it was found that the skin pigmentation of females on average were darker than that of males (p<0.01. We conclude that MC1R variants are associated with quantitative skin colour in a lightly pigmented Danish population. We did not observe any association between any pigmentary marker and the FAMMM syndrome. We suggest that the genetics of FAMMM is not related to the genetics of the pigmentary pathway.

  15. [Description of a new TP53 gene germline mutation in a family with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genetic counselling to healthy mutation carriers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmaña, Judith; Nomdedéu, Josep; Díez, Orland; Sabaté, Josep Maria; Balil, Anna; Pericay, Carles; López López, Juan José; Brunet, Joan; Baiget, Montse; Alonso, Carmen

    2002-10-19

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by early-onset breast cancer, soft-tissue sarcomas and osteosarcomas, acute leukemia, adrenocortical neoplasms and central nervous system tumors. Germline mutations in gene TP53 are identified in a percentage of affected families. Eight families with aggregation of childhood sarcomas, brain tumors, breast cancers in pre-menopausal women, and renal tumors were screened for TP53 germ-line mutations. SSCP and posterior direct sequencing were performed for genetic analysis. We also report a previously undescribed family with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome carrying a germline mutation. Seven families fulfilled so-called Li-Fraumeni like criteria and one fulfilled classical criteria. A new germ-line mutation in codon 238 at exon 7 of the gene TP53 was identified in the family fulfilling classical criteria. This mutation has not been previously reported. The clinical heterogeneity as well as the molecular complexity and consequences of mutation analysis and genetic counseling make it necessary to develop protocols in this area. A multidisciplinary approach is needed; this approach should be coordinated by a Familial Cancer Genetic Counseling Unit.

  16. X-linked hyper-immunoglobulin M syndrome: molecular genetic study and long-time follow-up of three generations of a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sheng-Chieh; Shyur, Shyh-Dar; Lee, Wen-I; Ma, Yi-Chun; Huang, Li-Hsin

    2006-01-01

    X-linked hyper-immunoglobulin M (IgM) syndrome (XHIGM) is a rare immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations of the CD40 ligand gene. Patients are subject to recurrent infections and have normal or elevated levels of IgM but markedly decreased serum IgG. We describe molecular genetic studies and clinical manifestations in three generations of one family, as well as results of long-term treatment of 2 young men with the disorder. Of 37 living family members, mutational analysis of the CD40 ligand gene was performed in 36 members. Laboratory data for patients and carriers were reviewed. Four male family members had died of unexplained causes. The 3 patients with XHIGM syndrome and the 5 carriers all had a novel mutation located at Tyr 169 Asn (T526A) in exon 5, the tumor necrosis factor domain of the CD40 ligand gene. In the 3 patients, CD40 ligand expression in activated CD4+ T cells was below 1%. In the carriers, about half of activated CD4+ cells expressed CD40 ligand. One carrier had malignant lymphoma. Long-term (>20 years) intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in 2 patients improved IgG levels but did not fully suppress the high levels of IgM, nor did it prevent late complications (bronchiectasis and sclerosing cholangitis). Diagnosis of a genetic immunodeficiency, especially an X-linked disease such as XHIGM syndrome, should prompt a survey of the entire family. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. "Homozygous, and compound heterozygous mutation in 3 Turkish family with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome: case reports".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Fahrettin; Turkgenc, Burcu; Toksoy, Guven; Bostan, Ozlem M; Evke, Elif; Uyguner, Oya; Yakicier, Cengiz; Kayserili, Hulya; Cil, Ergun; Temel, Sehime G

    2017-10-16

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) isa recessive model of long QT syndrome which might also be related to possible hearing loss. Although the syndrome has been demonstrated to be originated from homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in either the KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes, additional mutations in other genetic loci should be considered, particularly in malignant course patients. Three patients were admitted into hospital due to recurrent seizures/syncope, intrauterine and postnatal bradycardia respectively; moreover all three patients had congenital sensorineural hearing-loss. Their electrocardiograms showed markedly prolonged QT interval. Implantable defibrillator was implanted and left cardiac sympathetic denervation was performed due to the progressive disease in case 1. She had countless ventricular fibrillation and appropriate shock while using an implantable defibrillator. The DNA sequencing analysis of the KCNQ1 gene disclosed a homozygous c.728G > A (p.Arg243His) missense mutation in case1. Further targeted next generation sequencing of cardiac panel comprising 68 gene revealed a heterozygous c.1346 T > G (p.Ile449Arg) variant in RYR2 gene and a heterozygous c.809G > A (p.Cys270Tyr) variant in NKX2-5 gene in the same patient. Additional gene alterations in RYR2 and NKX2-5 genes were thought to be responsible for progressive and malignant course of the disease. As a result of DNA sequencing analysis of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 genes, a compound heterozygosity for two mutations had been detected in KCNQ1 gene in case 2: a maternally derived c.477 + 1G > A splice site mutation and a paternally derived c.520C > T (p.Arg174Cys) missense mutation. Sanger sequencing of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 genes displayed a homozygous c.1097G > A (p.Arg366Gln) mutation in KCNQ1 gene in case 3. β-blocker therapy was initiated to all the index subjects. Three families of JLNS who presented with long QT and deafness and who carry homozygous, or compound heterozygous

  18. CYFIP family proteins between autism and intellectual disability: links with Fragile X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eBardoni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual disability (ID and autism spectrum disorders (ADS have in common alterations in some brain circuits and brain abnormalities, such as synaptic transmission and dendritic spines morphology. Recent studies have indicated a differential expression for specific categories of genes as a cause for both types of disease, while an increasing number of genes is recognized to produce both disorders. An example is the Fragile X Mental retardation gene, FMR1, whose silencing causes the Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of intellectual disability and autism, also characterized by physical hallmarks. FMRP, the protein encoded by FMR1, is an RNA-binding protein with an important role in translational control. Among the interactors of FMRP, CYFIP1/2 proteins are good candidates for intellectual disability and autism, on the bases of their genetic implication and functional properties, even if the precise functional significance of the CYFIP/FMRP interaction is not understood yet. CYFIP1 and CYFIP2 represent a link between Rac1, the Wave complex and FMRP, favoring the cross talk between actin polymerization and translational control

  19. Pulmonary histopathology in dalmatians with familial acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjä, P; Saari, S; Rajamäki, M; Saario, E; Järvinen, A-K

    2009-11-01

    The histopathological changes in the lungs of 12 related Dalmatians with idiopathic acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are described. Affected dogs had multiple foci of marked atypical hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, patchy ongoing fibrosis with myofibroblastic metaplasia, smooth muscle hyperplasia and occasional honeycombing of alveolar walls, and hyperplasia of atypical type II pneumocytes. There was an abrupt transition between these proliferative lesions and areas of acute alveolar oedema with hyaline membranes in partially normal lung. Diseased areas were associated with moderate lymphohistiocytic interstitial inflammation. Immunohistochemical labelling for cytokeratin expression indicated that the metaplastic epithelium was of bronchiolar origin and that it extended into peribronchiolar alveolar spaces. Some of the bronchiolar lesions were pre-neoplastic and one adult dog suffered from bronchoalveolar carcinoma. These lesions are compared with the two forms of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia reported as causes of ARDS in man: acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) and acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The observed lesions in the Dalmatians are distinct from the diffuse alveolar damage that characterizes AIP, but show some histological similarities to the usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) that occurs in IPF with acute exacerbation in man. UIP has not previously been described in the dog.

  20. [Prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome in 4 family practices in Leiden].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, R G; de Waal, M W; Opmeer, C; Petri, H; Springer, M P

    1997-08-02

    To determine the prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in general practice. Descriptive. General practice and primary health care centres in Leyden region, the Netherlands. RNUH-LEO is a computerized database which contains the anonymous patient information of one general practice (with two practitioners) and four primary health care centres. The fourteen participating general practitioners were asked what International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC) code they used to indicate a patient with chronic fatigue or with CFS. With these codes and with the code for depression patients were selected from the database. It then was determined whether these patients met the criteria of CFS by Holmes et al. The general practitioners used 10 codes. Including the code for depression a total of 601 patients were preselected from a total of 23,000 patients in the database. Based on the information from the patients' records in the database, 42 of the preselected patients were selected who might fulfill the Holmes' criteria of CFS. According to the patients' own general practitioner, 25 of the 42 patients would fulfil the Holmes' criteria. The men:women ratio was 1:5. The prevalence of CFS in the population surveyed was estimated to be at least 1.1 per 1,000 patients.

  1. Possible effect of SNAIL family transcriptional repressor 1 polymorphisms in non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cura, Francesca; Palmieri, Annalisa; Girardi, Ambra; Carinci, Francesco; Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Nouri, Nayereh; Pezzetti, Furio; Scapoli, Luca; Martinelli, Marcella

    2018-01-27

    Orofacial development is a complex process subjected to failure impairing. Indeed, the cleft of the lip and/or of the palate is among the most frequent inborn malformations. The JARID2 gene has been suggested to be involved in non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (nsCL/P) etiology. JARID2 interacts with the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in regulating the expression patterns of developmental genes by modifying the chromatin state. Genes coding for the PRC2 components, as well as other genes active in cell differentiation and embryonic development, were selected for a family-based association study to verify their involvement in nsCL/P. A total of 632 families from Italy and Asia participated to the study. Evidence of allelic association was found with polymorphisms of SNAI1; in particular, the rs16995010-G allele was undertransmitted to the nsCL/P cases [P = 0.004, odds ratio = 0.69 (95% C.I. 0.54-0.89)]. However, the adjusted significance value corrected for all the performed tests was P = 0.051. The findings emerging by the present study suggest for the first time an involvement of SNAI1 in the nsCL/P onset. Interestingly, SNAI1 is known to promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition by repressing E-cadherin expression, but it needs an intact PRC2 to act this function. Alterations of this process could contribute to the complex etiology of nsCL/P.

  2. Familial Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with lethal arterial events caused by a mutation in COL5A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Glen R; Harakalova, Magdalena; van der Crabben, Saskia N; Majoor-Krakauer, Danielle; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Moll, Frans L; Oranen, Björn I; Dooijes, Dennis; Vink, Aryan; Knoers, Nine V; Maugeri, Alessandra; Pals, Gerard; Nijman, Isaac J; van Haaften, Gijs; Baas, Annette F

    2015-06-01

    Different forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) exist, with specific phenotypes and associated genes. Vascular EDS, caused by heterozygous mutations in the COL3A1 gene, is characterized by fragile vasculature with a high risk of catastrophic vascular events at a young age. Classic EDS, caused by heterozygous mutations in the COL5A1 or COL5A2 genes, is characterized by fragile, hyperextensible skin and joint laxity. To date, vessel rupture in four unrelated classic EDS patients with a confirmed COL5A1 mutation has been reported. We describe familial occurrence of a phenotype resembling vascular EDS in a mother and her two sons, who all died at an early age from arterial ruptures. Diagnostic Sanger sequencing in the proband failed to detect aberrations in COL3A1, COL1A1, COL1A2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, SMAD3, and ACTA2. Next, the proband's DNA was analyzed using a next-generation sequencing approach targeting 554 genes linked to vascular disease (VASCULOME project). A novel heterozygous mutation in COL5A1 was detected, resulting in an essential glycine substitution at the C-terminal end of the triple helix domain (NM_000093.4:c.4610G>T; p.Gly1537Val). This mutation was also present in DNA isolated from autopsy material of the index's brother. No material was available from the mother, but the mutation was excluded in her parents, siblings and in the father of her sons, suggesting that the COL5A1 mutation occurred in the mother's genome de novo. In conclusion, we report familial occurrence of lethal arterial events caused by a COL5A1 mutation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Two sisters with clinical diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: Is the condition in the family autosomal recessive?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, T.; Hayashi, K.; Matsumoto, T. [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

    1995-10-09

    We report two sisters in a family representing manifestations of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-linked immunodeficiency disorder. An elder sister had suffered from recurrent infections, small thrombocytopenic petechiae, purpura, and eczema for 7 years. The younger sister had the same manifestations as the elder sister`s for a 2-year period, and died of intracranial bleeding at age 2 years. All the laboratory data of the two patients were compatible with WAS, although they were females. Sialophorin analysis with the selective radioactive labeling method of this protein revealed that in the elder sister a 115-KD band that should be specific for sialophorin was reduced in quantity, and instead an additional 135-KD fragment was present as a main band. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the sialophorin gene and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the PCR product demonstrated that there were no detectable size-change nor electrophoretic mobility change in the DNA from both patients. The results indicated that their sialophorin gene structure might be normal. Studies on the mother-daughter transmission of X chromosome using a pERT84-MaeIII polymorphic marker mapped at Xp21 and HPRT gene polymorphism at Xq26 suggested that each sister had inherited a different X chromosome from the mother. Two explanations are plausible for the occurrence of the WAS in our patients: the WAS in the patients is attributable to an autosomal gene mutation which may regulate the sialophorin gene expression through the WAS gene, or, alternatively, the condition in this family is an autosomal recessive disorder separated etiologically from the X-linked WAS. 17 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Single TCR-Vβ2 evaluation discloses the circulating T cell clone in Sezary syndrome: one family fits all!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Enrico; Abeni, Damiano; Pomponi, Debora; Russo, Nicoletta; Russo, Giandomenico; Narducci, Maria Grazia

    2015-08-01

    Sézary Syndrome (SS/L-CTCL) is a rare but aggressive variant of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), characterized by erythroderma, lymphadenopathy, and the presence of a circulating memory CD4(+) T cell malignant clone with a skin homing behavior, lacking CD26 and CD49d and over-expressing CD60. The availability of a panel of monoclonal antibodies recognizing distinct TCR-Vβ families, allows to typify the clone by flow cytometry in about 70 % of cases. The TCR-Vβ repertoire of 533 individuals, comprising 308 patients affected by CTCL, 50 healthy donors, and subjects affected by various non-neoplastic dermatological affections was evaluated by flow cytometry. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical software package for Microsoft Windows (SPSS, version 21, Chicago, IL). TCR-Vβ2 levels below 5.4 % or above 39.5 %, within total CD4(+) T cells, showed the best balance between sensitivity (98.1 %) and specificity (96 %) to identify the presence of a clone in the peripheral blood of patients affected by SS. Based on this observation, a "two-step" procedure in the detection of the malignant T cell clone in CTCLs is herein suggested. TCR-Vβ2 assessment in all cases (first step). In the case of TCR-Vβ2 levels above 39.5 %, the presence of a clonal expansion of this family is suggested, deserving further confirmation by means of T cell gene rearrangement evaluation. In patients having a TCR-Vβ2 reactivity below 5.4 % (second step), the entire TCR-Vβ repertoire should be evaluated to typify the expanded clone. In conclusion, the single TCR-Vβ2 expression check, instead of the entire repertoire assessment, represents an easy and cost-effective method for the recognition of CTCL aggressive leukemic variant.

  5. Osteoporosis in Stickler syndrome. A new family case with bone histology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insalaco, P; Legrand, E; Bouvard, B; Audran, M

    2017-03-01

    The Stickler syndrome (SS) has been described as a "hereditary progressive arthro-ophtalmopathy" by Stickler in 1965, due to mutations on the collagen genes. Currently about 40 different genes have been identified which encode for at least 27 different collagens. The majority of mutations occur in the COL2A1 gene on chromosome 12q13 (SS type I). Mutations in COL11A1 are less frequent (SS type II). More recently, mutations in COL11A2 and in the COL9A1 gene have been reported with particular phenotypes. The main features of this autosomal inherited disease are ocular, auditory with orofacial abnormalities and early-onset osteoarthritis. We report the clinical presentation of an adult and his son, with a particular focus on the bone status of the father, radiography, bone densitometry and transiliac bone biopsy showing that he was suffering from osteoporosis. The lumbar bone mineral density was low with a Z-score at -2.9. Transiliac bone biopsy showed a dramatic decrease of trabecular bone volume (8.6%; Nl: 19.5±4.9%), thin trabeculae and a disorganized trabecular network. A slight increase of osteoid parameters was observed. Bone resorption was markedly increased with an excessive number of active (TRAcP+) osteoclasts. The cortical width was normal, but a slight increase of cortical porosity was found. Osteoporosis has been rarely described in the SS. It might be useful to systematically perform a bone densitometry in all patients with SS and to discuss the indication of a transiliac bone biopsy in severe cases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Identification of a novel KCNQ1 mutation associated with both Jervell and Lange-Nielsen and Romano-Ward forms of long QT syndrome in a Chinese family

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    Liu Jing

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS is a cardiac disorder characterized by prolonged QT intervals on electrocardiograms (ECG, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death. Clinically, two inherited forms of LQTS have been defined: autosomal dominant LQTS or Romano-Ward syndrome (RWS not associated with deafness and autosomal recessive LQTS or Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS associated with deafness. Methods A Chinese family with both RWS and JLNS was identified. Family members were diagnosed based on the presence of a prolonged QT interval as seen on a 12-lead ECG and a medical history of syncope, palpitation, and deafness. Mutational studies in the KCNQ1 potassium channel gene were performed using direct DNA sequence analysis and restriction length polymorphism analysis. Results The proband in the Chinese family and her brother had previously been diagnosed with JLNS, and two other members were affected with RWS. The proband was also affected with atrial fibrillation. A single nucleotide substitution of C to T at nucleotide 965 of KCNQ1 was identified, and the mutation resulted in the substitution of a threonine residue at codon 322 by a methionine residue (T322M. The novel heterozygous T322M mutation was identified in two patients with RWS, one member with borderline QTc, and two normal family members. The two JLNS patients in the family carried the homozygous T322M mutation. The T322M mutation was not found in 200 Chinese normal controls. Conclusion Our results suggest that T322M is a novel mutation that caused RWS with high intrafamilial variability in the heterozygous carriers and typical JLNS in the homozygous carriers within this Chinese family. The T322M mutation is the first mutation identified for JLNS in the Chinese population.

  7. Assessing the reliability of the five minute speech sample against the Camberwell family interview in a chronic fatigue syndrome sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, Rebecca; Chadwick, Ella; Hickman, Hannah; Barrowclough, Christine; Wearden, Alison

    2016-05-01

    The current study aimed to examine the reliability of the Five Minute Speech Sample (FMSS) for assessing relative Expressed Emotion (EE) compared with the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI) in a sample of relatives of adult patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). 21 relatives were recruited and completed both assessments. The CFI was conducted first for all participants, with the FMSS conducted approximately one month later. Trained raters independently coded both EE measures; high levels of rating reliability were established for both measures. Comparisons were conducted for overall EE status, emotional over-involvement (EOI) and criticism. The distribution of high and low-EE was equivalent across the two measures, with the FMSS correctly classifying EE is 71% of cases (n=15). The correspondence between the FMSS and CFI ratings was found to be non-significant for all categorical variables. However, the number of critical comments made by relatives during the FMSS significantly correlated with the number of critical comments made during the CFI. The poorest correspondence between the measures was observed for the EOI dimension. The findings suggest that the FMSS may be a useful screening tool for identifying high-EE, particularly criticism, within a sample of relatives of patients with CFS. However, the two measures should not be assumed equivalent, and the CFI should be used where possible, particularly with respect to understanding EOI. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute metabolic decompensation and sudden death in Barth syndrome: report of a family and a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ting-Yu; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Lin, Ming-Tai; Tsao, Lon-Yen; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun; Lee, Ni-Chung

    2008-08-01

    Barth syndrome presents in infancy with hypotonia, dilated cardiomyopathy, and neutropenia. We report a patient whose family history included two males who had died suddenly at the age of 15 days and 2 years, respectively. The index case presented with acute metabolic decompensation at 13 days of age. Within 8 h of presenting with metabolic acidosis (pH 7.13), lactic acidemia (18.5 mmol/l), hyperammonemia (375 microg/dl), hypoglycemia (25 mg/dl), and coagulopathy, the patient developed respiratory failure and required intubation. The diagnosis was established by the presence of left ventricular noncompaction and molecular analysis (c.C153G or Y51X mutation of the TAZ gene). The gene product, taffazin, is a homologue of the glycerolipid transferases involved in the phospholipid metabolism as tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin, a component of the mitochondrial inner membrane. In conclusion, mutations in taffazin impair mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, which may results in the acute metabolic decompensation and sudden death; cardiac transplantation is the only possibility at the present time.

  9. Genetically diagnosed Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome and familial cerebral cavernous malformations in the same individual: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, James; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Skytte, Anne-Bine

    2017-01-01

    When faced with an unusual clinical feature in a patient with a Mendelian disorder, the clinician may entertain the possibilities of either the feature representing a novel manifestation of that disorder or the co-existence of a different inherited condition. Here we describe an individual with a submandibular oncocytoma, pulmonary bullae and renal cysts as well as multiple cerebral cavernous malformations and haemangiomas. Genetic investigations revealed constitutional mutations in FLCN, associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) and CCM2, associated with familial cerebral cavernous malformation. Intracranial vascular pathologies (but not cerebral cavernous malformation) have recently been described in a number of individuals with BHD (Kapoor et al. in Fam Cancer 14:595-597, 10.1007/s10689-015-9807-y , 2015) but it is not yet clear whether they represent a genuine part of that conditions' phenotypic spectrum. We suggest that in such instances of potentially novel clinical features, more extensive genetic testing to consider co-existing conditions should be considered where available. The increased use of next generation sequencing applications in diagnostic settings is likely to lead more cases such as this being revealed.

  10. A novel mutation of the MITF gene in a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 2: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfang; Li, Xiaozhou; Ju, Duan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiuling; Zhang, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with varying degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, and accumulation of pigmentation in hair, skin and iris. There are four types of WS (WS1-4) with differing characteristics. Mutations in six genes [paired box gene 3 ( PAX3 ), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor ( MITF ), endothelin 3 ( END3 ), endothelin receptor type B ( EDNRB ), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 10 ( SOX10 ) and snail homolog 2 ( SNAI2 )] have been identified to be associated with the various types. This case report describes the investigation of genetic mutations in three patients with WS2 from a single family. Genomic DNA was extracted, and the six WS-related genes were sequenced using next-generation sequencing technology. In addition to mutations in PAX3, EDNRB and SOX10, a novel heterozygous MITF mutation, p.Δ315Arg (c.944_946delGAA) on exon 8 was identified. This is predicted to be a candidate disease-causing mutation that may affect the structure and function of the enzyme.

  11. A family with osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome due to compound heterozygosity of two novel mutations in the LRP5 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, W M W; Jin, L Y; Smith, D K; Cheung, P T; Kwan, E Y W; Low, L; Kung, A W C

    2006-09-01

    Osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) is an autosomal recessive disorder due to mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. Here, we report two novel missense mutations found in a southern Chinese family of a non-consanguineous marriage. Three out of four children had blindness, low bone mineral density (BMD) and multiple fractures in their childhood. Genotyping by DNA sequencing demonstrated 2 new mutations in exon 7 of the LRP5 gene. Tryptophans at amino acid residue positions 478 and 504 were replaced by arginine (W478R) and cysteine (W504C), respectively. While the parents that possessed either heterozygous W478R or W504C were apparently normal, all affected subjects were compound heterozygotes for the W478R and W504C mutations in the LRP5 gene. W478R is located immediately C-terminal to the third YWTD repeat of the second YWTD/EGF domain in LRP5, while W504C is located between the third and the fourth YWTD repeats of the second YWTD/EGF domain in LRP5. Using LRP5-related proteins, such as the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and nidogen as reference models, a homology model of LRP5 suggested that the observed mutations may affect the molecular interactions of LRP5 and so lead to the observed OPPG phenotypes.

  12. Novel c.300_301delinsT mutation in PITX2 in a Korean family with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jae Won; Cho, Hyun-Kyung; Oh, Soo-Young; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kee, Changwon

    2013-09-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) is characterized by anomalies of the anterior segment of the eye and systemic abnormalities. Mutations in the FOXC1 and PITX2 genes are underlying causes of ARS, but there has been few reports on genetically confirmed ARS in Korea. We identified a novel PITX2 mutation (c.300_301delinsT) in 2 Korean patients from a family with ARS. We expand the spectrum of PITX2 mutations and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first confirmed family of PITX2-related ARS in Korea.

  13. Genetic syndromes in the family : child characteristics and parenting stress in Angelman, CHARGE, Cornelia de Lange, Prader-Willi, and Rett syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulffaert, Josette

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the dissertation: To expand the knowledge on the behavioural phenotypes, level of parenting stress and the relationship between child characteristics and parenting stress in five genetic syndromes. The included syndromes are Angelman, CHARGE, Cornelia de Lange, Prader-Willi, and Rett

  14. Identification of a novel germ-line mutation in the TP53 gene in a Mexican family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taja-Chayeb, Lucia; Vidal-Millán, Silvia; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Olga; Trejo-Becerril, Catalina; Pérez-Cárdenas, Enrique; Chávez-Blanco, Alma; de la Cruz-Hernández, Erick; Dueñas-González, Alfonso

    2009-12-17

    Germ-line mutations of the TP53 gene are known to cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome, an autosomal, dominantly inherited, high-penetrance cancer-predisposition syndrome characterized by the occurrence of a variety of cancers, mainly soft tissue sarcomas, adrenocortical carcinoma, leukemia, breast cancer, and brain tumors. Mutation analysis was based on Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) screening of exons 2-11 of the TP53 gene, sequencing, and cloning of DNA obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes. We report herein on Li Fraumeni syndrome in a family whose members are carriers of a novel TP53 gene mutation at exon 4. The mutation comprises an insertion/duplication of seven nucleotides affecting codon 110 and generating a new nucleotide sequence and a premature stop codon at position 150. With this mutation, the p53 protein that should be translated lacks the majority of the DNA binding domain. To our knowledge, this specific alteration has not been reported previously, but we believe it is the cause of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome in this family.

  15. Identification of a novel germ-line mutation in the TP53 gene in a Mexican family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

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    de la Cruz-Hernández Erick

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germ-line mutations of the TP53 gene are known to cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome, an autosomal, dominantly inherited, high-penetrance cancer-predisposition syndrome characterized by the occurrence of a variety of cancers, mainly soft tissue sarcomas, adrenocortical carcinoma, leukemia, breast cancer, and brain tumors. Methods Mutation analysis was based on Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC screening of exons 2-11 of the TP53 gene, sequencing, and cloning of DNA obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Results We report herein on Li Fraumeni syndrome in a family whose members are carriers of a novel TP53 gene mutation at exon 4. The mutation comprises an insertion/duplication of seven nucleotides affecting codon 110 and generating a new nucleotide sequence and a premature stop codon at position 150. With this mutation, the p53 protein that should be translated lacks the majority of the DNA binding domain. Conclusion To our knowledge, this specific alteration has not been reported previously, but we believe it is the cause of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome in this family.

  16. Rapidly progressive renal disease as part of Wolfram syndrome in a large inbred Turkish family due to a novel WFS1 mutation (p.Leu511Pro).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuca, Sevil Ari; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Boulahbel, Houda; Lodahl, Marianne; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Cesur, Yasar; Dogan, Murat; Yilmaz, Cahide; Akgun, Cihangir; Acikgoz, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome, also named "DIDMOAD" (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness), is an inherited association of juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy as key diagnostic criteria. Renal tract abnormalities and neurodegenerative disorder may occur in the third and fourth decade. The wolframin gene, WFS1, associated with this syndrome, is located on chromosome 4p16.1. Many mutations have been described since the identification of WFS1 as the cause of Wolfram syndrome. We identified a new homozygous WFS1 mutation (c.1532T>C; p.Leu511Pro) causing Wolfram syndrome in a large inbred Turkish family. The patients showed early onset of IDDM, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, sensorineural hearing impairment and very rapid progression to renal failure before age 12 in three females. Ectopic expression of the wolframin mutant in HEK cells results in greatly reduced levels of protein expression compared to wild-type wolframin, strongly supporting that this mutation is disease-causing. The mutation showed perfect segregation with disease in the family, characterized by early and severe clinical manifestations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Exclusion of Linkage to the CDL1 Gene Region on Chromosome 3q26.3 in Some Familial Cases of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Ian D.; Tonkin, Emma; Smith, Melanie; Devoto, Marcella; Bottani, Armand; Simpson, Claire; Hofreiter, Mary; Abraham, Vinod; Jukofsky, Lori; Conti, Brian P.; Strachan, Tom; Jackson, Laird

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a complex developmental disorder consisting of characteristic facial features, limb abnormalities, hirsutism, ophthalmologic involvement, gastroesophageal dysfunction, hearing loss, as well as growth and neuro-developmental retardation. Most cases of CdLS appear to be sporadic. Familial cases are rare and indicate autosomal dominant inheritance. Several individuals with CdLS have been reported with chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting candidate genomic regions within which the causative gene(s) may lie. A CdLS gene location (CDL1) has been assigned to 3q26.3 based on phenotypic overlap with the duplication 3q syndrome (critical region 3q26.2-q27) and the report of a CdLS individual with a balanced de novo t(3;17)(q26.3;q23.1). It has been postulated that a gene within the dup3q critical region results in the CdLS when deleted or mutated. We have performed a linkage analysis to the minimal critical region for the dup3q syndrome (that encompasses the translocation breakpoint) on chromosome 3q in 10 rare familial cases of CdLS. Nineteen markers spanning a region of approximately 40 Mb (37 cM) were used. Results of a multipoint linkage analysis demonstrated total lod-scores that were negative across the chromosome 3q26-q27 region. In 4/10 families, lod-scores were less than −2 in the 2 cM region encompassing the translocation, while in the remaining 6/10 families, lod-scores could not exclude linkage to this region. These studies indicate that in some multicase families, the disease gene does not map to the CDL1 region at 3q26.3. PMID:11391654

  18. Genetic homogeneity in Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome: Linkage to chromosome 17p in families of different non-Swedish ethnic origins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, G.R.; Lee, M.; Compton, J.G. [and others

    1995-11-01

    Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by congenital ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia or tetraplegia. Three United States families, three Egyptian families, and one Israeli Arab family were investigated for linkage of the SLS gene to a region of chromosome 17. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis with nine markers mapped the SLS gene to the same region of the genome as that reported in Swedish SLS pedigrees. Examination of recombinants by haplotype analysis showed that the gene lies in the region containing the markers D17S953, D17S805, D17S689, and D17S842. D17S805 is pericentromeric on 17p. Patients in two consanguineous Egyptian families were homozygous at the nine marker loci tested, and another patient from a third family was homozygous for eight of the nine, suggesting that within each of these families the region of chromosome 17 carrying the SLS gene is identical by descent. Linkage of the SLS gene to chromosome 17p in families of Arabic, mixed European, Native American, and Swedish descent provides evidence for a single SLS locus and should prove useful for diagnosis and carrier detection in worldwide cases. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Birth of a child with Down syndrome in a family transmitting an unusual chromosome 22 arising from a translocation between chromosomes 21 and an inverted chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aviv, H.A.; Desposito, F. [UMDNJ-NJ Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States); Lieber, C. [Hackensack Medical Center, NJ (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal analysis of a child with Down syndrome resulted in the identification of a family with an unusual translocation and in the definition of the translocation breakpoints. Studies were performed on the child, his siblings, mother, mother`s sister, and grandmother. All of the family members were carriers of the translocation. We performed G-banding, silver stain, C-banding, and hybridization with the following FISH probes (Oncor): {alpha}-satellite 13/21; {beta}-satellite, coatasome 21 and 22, and the probes for chromosome 22 at 22q11 (DiGeorge region) and 22q13.3 (control region). Using the banding techniques and probes, we characterized the karyotype as: 45,XX,-21,-22,+der(22),t(21;22)(22qter{r_arrow}22q11.2::22p13{r_arrow}22q11.2::21q11.2{r_arrow}21qter). The effect of deletion of 21q11.2 and the break of chromosome 22 in the DiGeorge region in this family is not clear. However, the presence of the translocation increases the risk of family members of conceiving children with Down syndrome.

  20. The metabolic syndrome and risk of myocardial infarction in familial hypertension (hypertension heredity in Malmö evaluation study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorowski, Artur; Burri, Philippe; Hulthén, Lennart; Melander, Olle

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether three main definitions of the metabolic syndrome (MetS)--WHO, National Cholesterol Education Program--Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation--identify the same individuals and are able to predict incident myocardial infarction (MI) in families with essential hypertension. The tested definitions were prospectively related to data on MI in a cohort of approximately 1700 individuals with overt essential hypertension and their normotensive first-degree relatives. At baseline, 616 participants had MetS, yet only 209 of them (33.9%) were identified by all definitions, and compatibility rate for each pair of definitions was approximately 50%. During follow-up (Tmean approximately 6.6 years) 53 participants developed MI and they were generally older and more dysmetabolic than the rest of the cohort. There were also more men, smokers and diabetic individuals in this group. After adjustment for all conventional cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension and diabetes, only the National Cholesterol Education Program definition could predict the increased risk of MI [odds ratio (OR) = 2.2, confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-4.0, P = 0.01]. Among individual MetS components, incident MI was independently associated with three of them: low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (OR = 2.03, CI = 1.09-3.78, P = 0.025) insulin resistance (OR = 2.02, CI = 1.08-3.78, P = 0.028) and increased albumin excretion rate (OR = 1.24, CI = 0.99-1.55, P = 0.060). The presence of MetS in hypertensive and genetically hypertension prone individuals may signal the increased risk of future MI. However, only the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria appear to have a sufficient predictive accuracy.

  1. Prevention of cold-associated acute inflammation in familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome by interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Hal M; Rosengren, Sanna; Boyle, David L; Cho, Jae Y; Nayar, Jyothi; Mueller, James L; Anderson, Justin P; Wanderer, Alan A; Firestein, Gary S

    Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by recurrent episodes of rash, arthralgia, and fever after cold exposure. The genetic basis of this disease has been elucidated. Cryopyrin, the protein that is altered in FCAS, is one of the adaptor proteins that activate caspase 1, resulting in release of interleukin 1. An experimental cold challenge protocol was developed to study the acute inflammatory mechanisms occurring after a general cold exposure in FCAS patients and to investigate the effects of pretreatment with an antagonist of interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1Ra). ELISA, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry were used to measure cytokine responses. After cold challenge, untreated patients with FCAS developed rash, fever, and arthralgias within 1-4 h. Significant increases in serum concentrations of interleukin 6 and white-blood-cell counts were seen 4-8 h after cold challenge. Serum concentrations of interleukin 1 and cytokine mRNA in peripheral-blood leucocytes were not raised, but amounts of interleukin 1 protein and mRNA were high in affected skin. IL-1Ra administered before cold challenge blocked symptoms and increases in white-blood-cell counts and serum interleukin 6. The ability of IL-1Ra to prevent the clinical features and haematological and biochemical changes in patients with FCAS indicates a central role for interleukin 1beta in this disorder. Involvement of cryopyrin in activation of caspase 1 and NF-kappaB signalling suggests that it might have a role in many chronic inflammatory diseases. These findings support a new therapy for a disorder with no previously known acceptable treatment. They also offer insights into the role of interleukin 1beta in more common inflammatory diseases.

  2. Comparison of Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Pediatric Patients with Metabolic Syndrome, Heterozygous Familial Hyperlipidemia and Normals

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    Arvind Vijayasarathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Our goal was to compare the carotid intimal-medial thickness (CIMT of untreated pediatric patients with metabolic syndrome (MS, heterozygous familial hyperlipidemia (heFH, and MS+heFH against one another and against a control group consisting of healthy, normal body habitus children. Methods. Our population consisted of untreated pediatric patients (ages 5–20 yrs who had CIMT measured in a standardized manner. Results. Our population included 57 with MS, 23 with heFH, and 10 with MS+heFH. The control group consisted of 84 children of the same age range. Mean CIMT for the MS group was 469.8 μm (SD = 67, 443.8 μm (SD = 61 for the heFH group, 478.3 μm (SD = 70 for the MS+heFH group, and 423.2 μm (SD = 45 for the normal control group. Significance differences between groups occurred for heFH versus MS (P=0.022, heFH versus control (P=0.038, MS versus control (P=9.0E-10, and MS+heFH versus control (P=0.003. Analysis showed significant negative correlation between HDL and CIMT (r=-0.32,  P=0.03 but not for LDL, triglycerides, BP, waist circumference, or BMI. Conclusion. For pediatric patients, the thickest CIMT occurred for patients with MS alone or for those with MS+heFH. This indicates that MS, rather than just elevated LDL, accounts for more rapid thickening of CIMT in this population.

  3. Multiple loss-of-function mechanisms contribute to SCN5A-related familial sick sinus syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhong Gui

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify molecular mechanisms underlying SCN5A-related sick sinus syndrome (SSS, a rare type of SSS, in parallel experiments we elucidated the electrophysiological properties and the cell surface localization of thirteen human Na(v1.5 (hNa(v1.5 mutant channels previously linked to this disease.Mutant hNa(v1.5 channels expressed by HEK293 cells and Xenopus oocytes were investigated by whole-cell patch clamp and two-microelectrode voltage clamp, respectively. HEK293 cell surface biotinylation experiments quantified the fraction of correctly targeted channel proteins. Our data suggested three distinct mutant channel subtypes: Group 1 mutants (L212P, P1298L, DelF1617, R1632H gave peak current densities and cell surface targeting indistinguishable from wild-type hNa(v1.5. Loss-of-function of these mutants resulted from altered channel kinetics, including a negative shift of steady-state inactivation and a reduced voltage dependency of open-state inactivation. Group 2 mutants (E161K, T220I, D1275N gave significantly reduced whole-cell currents due to impaired cell surface localization (D1275N, altered channel properties at unchanged cell surface localization (T220I, or a combination of both (E161K. Group 3 mutant channels were non-functional, due to an almost complete lack of protein at the plasma membrane (T187I, W1421X, K1578fs/52, R1623X or a probable gating/permeation defect with normal surface localisation (R878C, G1408R.This study indicates that multiple molecular mechanisms, including gating abnormalities, trafficking defects, or a combination of both, are responsible for SCN5A-related familial SSS.

  4. Prevalence, management, and outcomes of familial hypercholesterolemia in patients with acute coronary syndromes in the Arabian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Almahmeed, Wael; Rashed, Wafa; Ridha, Mustafa; Santos, Raul D; Zubaid, Mohammad

    2018-02-14

    Information on the epidemiology of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in the Arabian Gulf region, which has an elevated rate of consanguinity and type II diabetes, is scarce. To assess the prevalence of FH, its management, and impact on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) outcomes in a multicenter cohort of Arabian Gulf patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Patients (N = 3224) hospitalized with ACS were studied. FH was diagnosed using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network criteria. A composite endpoint of nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischemic attack, and mortality between the "probable/definite" and the "unlikely" FH patients was assessed after 1 year. Analyses were performed using univariate and multivariate statistical techniques. At admission, the proportion of "probable/definite", "possible", and "unlikely" FH in ACS patients was 3.7% (n = 119), 28% (n = 911), and 68% (n = 2194), respectively. Overall, 54% (n = 1730) of patients had diabetes, whereas 24% (n = 783) were current smokers. The "probable/definite" FH group was younger (50 vs 63 years; P definite" FH cohort had worse lipid control (13% vs 23%; P < .001) and presented with a greater association with the composite ASCVD endpoint when compared with the "unlikely" FH group (odds ratio: 1.85; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-3.38; P = .047) after multivariable adjustment. In Arabian Gulf citizens, FH was common in ACS patients, was undertreated, and was associated with a worse 1-year prognosis. Copyright © 2018 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Families with children with Down syndrome in a situation of economic crisis and social and moralchange [Rodziny z dzieckiem z zespołem Downa w sytuacji kryzysu ekonomicznego, przemian społecznych i obyczajowych

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Maria MINCZAKIEWICZ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of this comparison is an attempt to present the life situation and the quality of the functioning of families with a child with Down syndrome against the background of the statistical situation of Polish families raising a child with normal development of a comparable age. The aim of the study was to answer the following questions: — Are there impacts and, if so, to what extent of the coming into the world and the existence of a family of a child with Down syndrome on the organization and the standard of living and in the family ties and cohesion among its members? — Whether and to what extent the situation of families with a child with Down syndrome is different from that of ordinary, contemporary Polish families? As a basis for these studies the diagnostic survey method was used, which was subordinated to the techniques of observation, targeted interviews and intelligence. The empirical material was collected using several tools (mostly drawn from the planned research program. The study included 186 families, including 86 (46.2% of families with a child with Down’s syndrome (primary group – P and 100 (53.8% of families statistical reference (control group – K. The results were empirical and statistical verification in order to develop on the basis of their importance to the practice of generalizations and conclusions.

  6. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and social development; hypotonia (low muscle tone), and speech impairments. Clumsiness, an awkward gait, and unusual aggressiveness or irritability may also occur. Although most cases of Sotos syndrome occur sporadically (meaning they are not known to be inherited), familial ...

  7. Infant care practices related to sudden infant death syndrome in South Asian and White British families in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Helen L; Moya, Eduardo; Fairley, Lesley; Westman, Janette; Oddie, Sam; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, infants of South Asian parents have a lower rate of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) than White British infants. Infant care and life style behaviours are strongly associated with SIDS risk. This paper describes and explores variability in infant care between White British and South Asian families (of Bangladeshi, Indian or Pakistani origin) in Bradford, UK (the vast majority of which were Pakistani) and identifies areas for targeted SIDS intervention. A cross-sectional telephone interview study was conducted involving 2560 families with 2- to 4-month-old singleton infants enrolled in the Born in Bradford cohort study. Outcome measures were prevalence of self-reported practices in infant sleeping environment, sharing sleep surfaces, breast feeding, use of dummy or pacifier, and life style behaviours. We found that, compared with White British infants, Pakistani infants were more likely to: sleep in an adult bed (OR = 8.48 [95% CI 2.92, 24.63]); be positioned on their side for sleep (OR = 4.42 [2.85, 6.86]); have a pillow in their sleep environment (OR = 9.85 [6.39, 15.19]); sleep under a duvet (OR = 3.24 [2.39, 4.40]); be swaddled for sleep (OR = 1.49 [1.13, 1.97]); ever bed-share (OR = 2.13 [1.59, 2.86]); regularly bed-share (OR = 3.57 [2.23, 5.72]); ever been breast-fed (OR = 2.00 [1.58, 2.53]); and breast-fed for 8+ weeks (OR = 1.65 [1.31, 2.07]). Additionally, Pakistani infants were less likely to: sleep in a room alone (OR = 0.05 [0.03, 0.09]); use feet-to-foot position (OR = 0.36 [0.26, 0.50]); sleep with a soft toy (OR = 0.52 [0.40, 0.68]); use an infant sleeping bag (OR = 0.20 [0.16, 0.26]); ever sofa-share (OR = 0.22 [0.15, 0.34]); be receiving solid foods (OR = 0.22 [0.17, 0.30]); or use a dummy at night (OR = 0.40 [0.33, 0.50]). Pakistani infants were also less likely to be exposed to maternal smoking (OR = 0.07 [0.04, 0.12]) and to alcohol consumption by either parent. No difference was found in the prevalence of prone sleeping (OR = 1

  8. Exome sequencing identifies a novel missense mutation of WFS1 as the cause of non-syndromic low-frequency hearing loss in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhijie; Feng, Yong; Hu, Zhengmao; Li, Jiada; Sun, Jie; Chen, Hongsheng; He, Chufeng; Wang, Xueping; Jiang, Lu; Liu, Yalan; Cai, Xinzhang; Wang, Lili; Cai, Yuxiang; Liu, Xuezhong; Mei, Lingyun

    2017-09-01

    Autosomal dominant non-syndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) DFNA6/14/38 is an uncommon type of hearing loss that classically affects low frequencies of 2000 Hz and below, demonstrating an ascending configuration. The current study aimed to investigate the cause of LFSNHL in a five-generation Chinese family. The phenotype of the Chinese family was characterized using audiologic testing and pedigree analysis. The combined approach of array screening and whole-exome sequencing was used to identify the disease-causing gene in this family. This pedigree, in which the affected subjects presented isolated low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment with childhood onset, was associated with autosomal dominant inheritance of the c.2591A > G mutation in exon 8 of the Wolframin syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene which was not present in 286 unrelated controls with matched ancestry and is highly conserved across species. In addition, several mutations affecting the Glu864 residue have been previously identified in different populations, suggesting that this site is likely to be a mutational hot spot. We identified a novel substitution, Glu864Gly, of WFS1 as the causative variant for this pedigree. Our data extend the mutation spectrum of the WFS1 gene in Chinese individuals and may contribute to establishing a better genotype-phenotype correlation for LFSNHL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Significant expressivity of Wolfram syndrome: phenotypic assessment of two known and one novel mutation in the WFS1 gene in three Iranian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rajab, Asadollah; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness) is a rare neurodegenerative autosomal recessive disorder. There is evidence of variable expressivity both in patients and heterozygous carriers. In this study, we describe three Persian Wolfram syndrome families with differences in the age of onset, signs and symptoms of the disease. We clinically evaluated affected families for verifying WS clinical diagnosis. After linkage analysis via 5 STR markers, molecular analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing for patients and available family members. Three homozygous mutations were identified including c.1885 C>T, c.2205C>A both in exon 8 and c.460+1G>A in intron 4. The mutation c.2205C>A was found to be novel. We report interesting phenotype-genotype correlations: homozygous c.1885C>T and c.2205C>A variants were correlated with quite different disease severity and onset in the siblings. We report a rare case of WS with homozygous c.1885C>T who is married and has a healthy child. c.460+1G>A showed a possible partial dominant inheritance put forth by a heterozygous parent showing partial WS symptoms while her daughter displayed typical WS symptoms. Due to variable expressivity, detailed clinical examination and molecular diagnostics should be used to confirm WS and a more exact recurrence risk data.

  10. Familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism/hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome caused by germline gross deletion or point mutations of CDC73 gene in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jing; Wang, Ou; Nie, Min; Shi, Jie; Hu, Yingying; Jiang, Yan; Li, Mei; Xia, Weibo; Meng, Xunwu; Xing, Xiaoping

    2014-08-01

    Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome (HPT-JT) and familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) are two subtypes of familial primary hyperparathyroidism, which are rarely reported in Chinese population. Here, we reported three FIHP families and one HPT-JT family with long-term follow-up and genetic analysis. A total of 22 patients, from four FIHP/HPT-JT families of Chinese descent, were recruited and genomic DNA was extracted from their peripheral blood lymphocytes. Direct sequencing for MEN1, CDC73, CASR gene was conducted. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to study the effect of splice site mutations and gross deletion mutations. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyse parafibromin expression in parathyroid tumours. Genotype-phenotype correlations were assessed through clinical characteristics and long-term follow-up data. Genetic analysis revealed four CDC73 germline mutations that were responsible for the four kindreds, including two novel point mutation (c.157 G>T and IVS3+1 G>A), one recurrent point mutation (c.664 C>T) and one deletion mutation (c.307+?_513-?del exons 4, 5, 6). RT-PCR confirmed that IVS3+1 G>A generated an aberrant transcript with exon3 deletion. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated reduced nuclear parafibromin expression in tumours supporting the pathogenic effects of these mutations. This study supplies information on mutations and phenotypes of HPT-JT/FIHP syndrome in Chinese. Screening for gross deletion and point mutations of the CDC73 gene is necessary in susceptible subjects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. An evaluation of the metabolic syndrome in a large multi-ethnic study: the Family Blood Pressure Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quertermous Thomas

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Family Blood Pressure Program is an ongoing, NHLBI-sponsored, multi-center program to study the genetic determinants of high blood pressure. The goal of this particular study was to study patterns of metabolic syndrome (MetS in four ethnic groups: African Americans, Caucasians, Hispanics, and Asians. Methods A major part of participants in three networks GENOA, HyperGEN and SAPPHIRe were recruited mainly through hypertensive probands. MetS was defined as a categorical trait following the National Cholesterol Education Program definition (c-MetS. MetS was also characterized quantitatively through multivariate factor analyses (FA of 10 risk variables (q-MetS. Logistic regression and frequency tables were used for studying associations among traits. Results Using the NCEP definition, the Hispanic sample, which by design was enriched for type 2 diabetes (T2D, had a very high prevalence of MetS (73%. In contrast, its prevalence in Chinese was the lowest (17%. In African Americans and Hispanics, c-MetS was more prevalent in women than in men. Association of c-MetS with type 2 diabetes (T2D was prominent in the Hispanics and African Americans, less pronounced in the Whites and Japanese, (although still significant, and weakest in the Chinese sample. Using FA without rotation, we found that the main factor loaded obesity (OBS and blood pressure (BP in African Americans; OBS and insulin (INS in Hispanics, in Japanese, and in Whites; and OBS alone in Chinese. In Hispanics, Whites, and Japanese, BP loaded as a separate factor. Lipids in combination with INS also loaded in a separate factor. Using FA with Varimax rotation, 4 independent factors were identified: "Obesity-INS," "Blood pressure," "Lipids-INS," and "Central obesity." They explained about 60% of the variance present in the original risk variables. Conclusion MetS ethnic differences were identified. Ascertaining for hypertension or T2D increased the MetS prevalence in

  12. Identification of a novel mutation in SLC26A4 gene in a Chinese family with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengguo; Bai, Xiaohui; Xiao, Yun; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Guodong; Li, Jianfeng; Xu, Lei; Wang, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the genetic causes of hearing loss in a two generation Chinese family with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome (EVAS). Clinical and genetic evaluations were conducted in a deaf proband and her normal-hearing parents. Sanger sequencing analysis of all the 21 exons, the exon-intron boundaries and the promoter in SLC26A4 gene was performed to detect the pathogenic mutations. PCR-restricted fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used to further identify the mutation. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out with multiple sequence alignment using BioEdit software. Three-dimensional (3D) modeling of the human wild-type and mutant SLC26A4 (NP_000432.1) was carried out using I-TASSER (http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/). Clinical examinations showed that the proband suffered from typical features of sensorineural hearing loss with enlarged vestibular aqueduct. A novel nonsense mutation c.2118C>A (p.C706X) in exon 19 was identified in compound heterozygosity with the splice-site mutation c.919-2A>G in the proband by using Sanger sequencing. The mother was a heterozygous carrier of c.919-2A>G in intron 7, while the father was a heterozygous carrier of c.2118C>A. The mutation c.2118C>A was not found in 200 unrelated controls using Sanger sequencing. PCR-RFLP showed the PCR product of the proband was not digested at 2110 by Fau I because of the c.2118C>A mutation. 3D-structure modeling indicated that the mutation c.2118C>A resulted in a truncate Pendrin protein. Protein alignment indicated high conservation of p.C706 residue in healthy Homo, Nomascus, Pan, Macaca, Canis, Sus, Mus, Rattus, Cricetulus and Xenopus. This study revealed a novel heterozygous mutation c.2118C>A (p.C706X) compound with c.919-2A>G in SLC26A4 gene in a patient with EVAS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The presence of two rare genomic syndromes, 1q21 deletion and Xq28 duplication, segregating independently in a family with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyungsoo; Shen, Yiping; Graves, Tyler; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2016-01-01

    1q21 microdeletion syndrome is a rare contiguous gene deletion disorder with de novo or autosomal dominant inheritance patterns and its phenotypic features include intellectual disability, distinctive facial dysmorphism, microcephaly, cardiac abnormalities, and cataracts. MECP2 duplication syndrome is an X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, global developmental delay, and other neurological complications including late-onset seizures. Previously, these two different genetic syndromes have not been reported segregating independently in a same family. Here we describe two siblings carrying either a chromosome 1q21 microdeletion or a chromosome Xq28 duplication. Using a comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array, we identified a 1.24 Mb heterozygous deletion at 1q21 resulting in the loss of 9 genes in a girl with learning disability, hypothyroidism, short stature, sensory integration disorder, and soft dysmorphic features including cupped ears and a unilateral ear pit. We also characterized a 508 kb Xq28 duplication encompassing MECP2 in her younger brother with hypotonia, poor speech, cognitive and motor impairment. The parental CGH and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses revealed that the 1q21 deletion in the elder sister is de novo , but the Xq28 duplication in the younger brother was originally inherited from the maternal grandmother through the mother, both of whom are asymptomatic carriers. RT-qPCR assays revealed that the affected brother has almost double the amount of MECP2 mRNA expression compared to other family members of both genders including maternal grandmother and mother who have the same Xq28 duplication with no phenotype. This suggests the X chromosome with an Xq28 duplication in the carrier females is preferentially silenced. From our understanding, this would be the first report showing the independent segregation of two genetically unrelated syndromes, 1q21 microdeletion and Xq28 duplication

  14. Colorectal cancer in the course of familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome (“de novo” pathogenic mutation of APC gene): case report, review of the literature and genetic commentary

    OpenAIRE

    Stec, Rafał; Pławski, Andrzej; Synowiec, Agnieszka; Mączewski, Michał; Szczylik, Cezary

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignant tumours in Poland. Annually approximately 11 000 new cases of CRC are diagnosed, while the number of deaths caused by CRC approaches 8 000. Five-year survival does not exceed 20%. Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is responsible for about 1% of new cases of CRC. The risk of CRC in FAP syndrome is 100%, and the average age of CRC development is 39 years. Early colectomy is the most effective method of CRC prevention. We report an a...

  15. A putative Lynch syndrome family carrying MSH2 and MSH6 variants of uncertain significance-functional analysis reveals the pathogenic one

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantelinen, Jukka; Hansen, Thomas V O; Kansikas, Minttu

    2011-01-01

    Inherited pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 predispose to Lynch syndrome (LS). However, the finding of a variant or variants of uncertain significance (VUS) in affected family members complicates the risk assessment. Here, we describe a putative LS...... and the tumor pathological data suggested that the missense variation in MSH2, the more common susceptibility gene in LS, would be the predisposing alteration. However, MSH2 VUS was surprisingly found to be MMR proficient in an in vitro MMR assay and a tolerant alteration in silico. By supplying evidence...... identified VUS before predictive gene testing and genetic counseling are offered to a family....

  16. A Microdeletion of Chromosome 9q33.3 Encompasses the Entire LMX1B Gene in a Chinese Family with Nail Patella Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujuan Jiang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nail patella syndrome (NPS is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by nail malformations, patellar apoplasia, or patellar hypoplasia. Mutations within the LMX1B gene are found in 85% of families with NPS; thus, this gene has been characterized as the causative gene of NPS. In this study, we identified a heterozygous microdeletion of the entire LMX1B gene using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA in a Chinese family with NPS. The determination of the deletion breakpoints by Illumina genome-wide DNA analysis beadchip showed that the deletion was located in chromosome 9q33.3 and spanned about 0.66 Mb in size. This heterozygous deletion provides strong evidence for haploinsufficiency as the pathogenic mechanism of NPS.

  17. Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss is caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations in TMC1 from a Tibetan Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fangzhu; Li, Dejun; Wang, Ping; Fan, Dongyan; De, Ji; Zhu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder worldwide. Biallelic mutations in 42 different genes have been identified as associated with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL). One of the common genes responsible for ARNSHL is TMC1. TMC1 mutations have been reported to cause non-syndromic hearing loss in a variety of populations. The current study is designed to investigate mutations prevalent among Chinese ethnic groups with ARNSHL. Targeted exome sequencing (TES) was employed to study the genetic causes of two siblings with ARNSHL in a Tibetan Chinese family. Variants identified by TES were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing. We identified two distinct variants in the TMC1 gene in two deaf siblings of one Tibetan Chinese family using TES. Both siblings inherited a paternal allele containing a deletion of c.1396_1398AAC (p.Asn466del) and a maternal allele containing an insertion of c.2210_2211insCT (p.Glu737HisfsX2). The former disrupts a highly conserved residue in the large intracellular loop domain adjacent to the fourth transmembrane domain, and the latter causes a truncation of a portion of the C-terminal domain. These variants were compound heterzygous and segregated with the hearing impairment in this family. The novel compound heterozygous mutant alleles of TMC1 identified in this study were responsible for the ARNSHL in this Tibetan Chinese family. Although compound heterozygous mutations in TMC1 occurring in different TMC1 domains have been previously described in Han Chinese; this result suggests that the TMC1 variants contributing to hereditary deafness in Chinese populations may be more complex than initially assumed and that sequence-based diagnostics will be required for a comprehensive evaluation of ARNSHL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Absence of family history and phenotype-genotype correlation in pediatric Brugada syndrome: more burden to bear in clinical and genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimi, Houria; Khelil, Amel Haj; Ben Hamda, Khaldoun; Aranega, Amelia; Chibani, Jemni B E; Franco, Diego

    2015-06-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an autosomal-dominant genetic cardiac disorder caused in 18-30 % of the cases by SCN5A gene mutations and manifested by an atypical right bundle block pattern with ST segment elevation and T wave inversion in the right precordial leads. The syndrome is usually detected after puberty. The identification of BrS in pediatric patients is thus a rare occurrence, and most of the reported cases are unmasked after febrile episodes. Usually, having a family history of sudden death represents the first reason to perform an ECG in febrile children. However, this practice makes the sporadic cases of cardiac disease and specially the asymptomatic ones excluded from this diagnosis. Here, we report a sporadic case of a 2-month-old male patient presented with vaccination-related fever and ventricular tachycardia associated with short breathing, palpitation and cold sweating. ECG changes were consistent with type 1 BrS. SCN5A gene analysis of the proband and his family revealed a set of mutations and polymorphisms differentially distributed among family members, however, without any clear genotype-phenotype correlation. Based on our findings, we think that genetic testing should be pursued as a routine practice in symptomatic and asymptomatic pediatric cases of BrS, with or without family history of sudden cardiac death. Similarly, our study suggests that pediatrician should be encouraged to perform an ECG profiling in suspicious febrile children and quickly manage fever since it is the most important factor unmasking BrS in children.

  19. The original family revisited after 37 years: odontoma-dysphagia syndrome is most likely caused by a microduplication of chromosome 11q13.3, including the FGF3 and FGF4 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebart, Thomas; Draenert, Florian G; Galetzka, Danuta; Babaryka, Gregor; Schmidseder, Ralf; Wagner, Wilfried; Bartsch, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors consist of receptor tyrosine kinase binding proteins involved in growth, differentiation, and regeneration of a variety of tissues of the head and neck. Their role in the development of teeth has been documented, and their presence in human odontogenic cysts and tumors has previously been investigated. Odontoma–dysphagia syndrome (OMIM 164330) is a very rare disorder characterized by clustering of teeth as compound odontoma, dysplasia and aplasia of teeth, slight craniofacial abnormalities, and dysphagia. We have followed the clinical course of the disease in a family over more than 30 years and have identified a genetic abnormality segregating with the disorder. We evaluated clinical data from nine different family members and obtained venous blood probes for genetic studies from three family members (two affected and one unaffected). The present family with five patients in two generations has remained one out of only two known cases with this very rare syndrome. All those affected showed teeth dysplasia, oligodontia, and dysplasia and odontoma of the upper and lower jaw. Additional signs included dysphagia and strictures of the oesophagus. Comorbidity in one patient included aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease, requiring coronary bypasses and aortic valve replacement. Genome-wide SNP array analyses in three family members (two affected and one unaffected) revealed a microduplication of chromosome 11q13.3 spanning 355 kilobases (kb) and including two genes in full length, fibroblast growth factors 3 (FGF3) and 4 (FGF4). The microduplication identified in this family represents the most likely cause of the odontoma–dysphagia syndrome and implies that the syndrome is caused by a gain of function of the FGF3 and FGF4 genes. Mutations of FGF receptor genes can cause craniofacial syndromes such as odontoma–dysphagia syndrome. Following this train of thought, an evaluation of FGF gene family in sporadic odontoma could be

  20. COL5A1: Genetic mapping and exclusion as candidate gene in families with nail-patella syndrome, tuberous sclerosis 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, D.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Northrup, H.; Au, K.S. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-10

    COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, has been considered a candidate gene for certain diseases based on chromosomal location and/or disease phenotype. We have employed 3{prime}-untranslated region RFLPs to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis 1, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type H, and nail-patella syndrome. In addition, we describe a polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) within a COL5A1 intron. This SSR is used to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Rendu-Weber disease) and to add COL5A1 to the existing map of {open_quotes}index{close_quotes} markers of chromosome 9 by evaluation of the COL5A1 locus on the CEPH 40-family reference pedigree set. This genetic mapping places COL5A1 between markers D9S66 and D9S67. 14 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Phenotype of Usher syndrome type II assosiated with compound missense mutations of c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T in MYO7A in a Chinese Usher syndrome family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To identify the pathogenic mutations in a Chinese pedigree affected with Usher syndrome type II (USH2.METHODS:The ophthalmic examinations and audiometric tests were performed to ascertain the phenotype of the family. To detect the genetic defect, exons of 103 known RDs -associated genes including 12 Usher syndrome (USH genes of the proband were captured and sequencing analysis was performed to exclude known genetic defects and find potential pathogenic mutations. Subsequently, candidate mutations were validated in his pedigree and 100 normal controls using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Sanger sequencing.RESULTS:The patient in the family occurred hearing loss (HL and retinitis pigmentosa (RP without vestibular dysfunction, which were consistent with standards of classification for USH2. He carried the compound heterozygous mutations, c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T, in the MYO7A gene and the unaffected members carried only one of the two mutations. The mutations were not present in the 100 normal controls.CONCLUSION:We suggested that the compound heterozygous mutations of the MYO7A could lead to USH2, which had revealed distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A and expanded the spectrum of clinical phenotypes of the MYO7A mutations.

  2. A 600 kb triplication in the cat eye syndrome critical region causes anorectal, renal and preauricular anomalies in a three-generation family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knijnenburg, Jeroen; van Bever, Yolande; Hulsman, Lorette O M; van Kempen, Chantal A P; Bolman, Galhana M; van Loon, Rosa Laura E; Beverloo, H Berna; van Zutven, Laura J C M

    2012-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is caused by a gain of the proximal part of chromosome 22. Usually, a supernumerary marker chromosome is present, containing two extra copies of the chromosome 22q11.1q11.21 region. More sporadically, the gain is present intrachromosomally. The critical region for CES is currently estimated to be about 2.1 Mb and to contain at least 14 RefSeq genes. Gain of this region may cause ocular coloboma, preauricular, anorectal, urogenital and congenital heart malformations. We describe a family in which a 600 kb intrachromosomal triplication is present in at least three generations. The copy number alteration was detected using MLPA and further characterized with interphase and metaphase FISH and SNP-array. The amplified fragment is located in the distal part of the CES region. The family members show anal atresia and preauricular tags or pits, matching part of the phenotype of this syndrome. This finding suggests that amplification of the genes CECR2, SLC25A18 and ATP6V1E1, mapping within the critical region for CES, may be responsible for anorectal, renal and preauricular anomalies in patients with CES.

  3. A nonsense mutation in the COL4A5 collagen gene in a family with X-linked juvenile Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Heiskari, N; Zhou, J

    1995-01-01

    The X-linked form of Alport syndrome is associated with mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding the alpha 5-chain of type IV collagen. By using PCR-amplification and direct sequencing we identified a novel mutation involving a deletion of the last two bases in the codon GGA for Glycine-1479 in exon...... 47 of the COL4A5 gene in a patient with a juvenile form of X-linked Alport syndrome with deafness. This two base deletion caused a shift in the reading frame and introduced a premature stop codon which resulted in an alpha 5(IV)-chain shortened by 202 residues and lacking almost the entire NC1 domain....... The mutation was found to co-segregate with the disease in the family. The information of the sequence variation in this family was used to perform carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis and direct sequencing of PCR amplified exon 47. Prenatal...

  4. Double PALB2 and BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers are rare in breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer syndrome families from the French Canadian founder population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancot, Frédéric; Arcand, Suzanna L; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane M; Tonin, Patricia N

    2015-06-01

    French Canadian families with breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer syndrome harbor specific BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 germline mutations, which have been attributed to common founders. Mutations in these genes confer an increased risk to breast and ovarian cancers, and have been identified to play a role in and directly interact with the common homologous recombination DNA repair pathways. Our previous study described the case of a female diagnosed with breast cancer at 45 years old, who harbored the PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] and BRCA2:c.9004G>A [p.E3002K] germline mutations, which have been found to recur in the French Canadian cancer families. As the frequency of double heterozygous carriers of breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles is unknown, and due to the possibility that there may be implications for genetic counseling and management for these carriers, the present study investigated the co-occurrence of BRCA1/BRCA2 and PALB2 mutations in the French Canadian cancer families. The PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation, which is the only PALB2 mutation to have been identified in French Canadian cancer families, was screened in 214 breast cancer cases and 22 breast-ovarian cancer cases from 114 BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation-positive French Canadian breast cancer (n=61) and breast-ovarian cancer (n=53) families using a tailored polymerase chain reaction-based TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assay. No additional PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation carriers were identified among the BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers. The results suggest that carriers of the PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation rarely co-occur in French Canadian breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer families harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

  5. Two novel heterozygous mutations of EVC2 cause a mild phenotype of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenjing; Han, Dong; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Hongshan; Feng, Hailan

    2011-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, chondroectodermal dysplasia; OMIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia with associated multisystem involvement. The syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, and abnormal teeth. Congenital heart defects occur in 50-60% of cases. In this study, we report EvC in a 6-year-old Chinese girl with hypodontia and polydactyly, mild short stature, and abnormalities of the knee joints. No signs of short ribs, narrow thorax, or congenital heart defects were found in this patient. The EvC phenotype shares some similarity with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyer; OMIM 193530), an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by mild short stature, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, and dysplastic teeth. Mutations in EVC or EVC2 are associated with both EvC syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis, but the two conditions differ in the severity of the phenotype and their pattern of inheritance. In this study, two novel heterozygous EVC2 mutations, IVS5-2A > G and c.2653C > T (Arg885X), were identified in the patient. The IVS5-2A > G mutation was inherited from the patient's mother and the c.2653C > T from her father. Her parents have no phenotypic symptoms similar to those of the patient. These findings extend the mutation spectrum of this malformation syndrome and provide the possibility of prenatal diagnosis for future offspring in this family. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. A Dutch family with progressive autosomal dominant non-syndromic sensorineural hearing impairment linked to DFNA13.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensink, R.J.H.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Snoeckx, R.L.; Caethoven, G.; Camp, G. van; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2001-01-01

    We present a Dutch family with autosomal dominantly inherited mid-frequency and high-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment. Genetic linkage analysis in this family indicated linkage to DFNA13 with logarithm of the odds ratio (LOD) scores > +4. The majority of the affected persons presented

  7. Novel mutations including deletions of the entire OFD1 gene in 30 families with type 1 orofaciodigital syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisschoff, Izak J; Zeschnigk, Christine; Horn, Denise

    2013-01-01

    have studied 55 sporadic and six familial cases of suspected OFD1. Comprehensive mutation analysis in OFD1 revealed mutations in 37 female patients from 30 families; 22 mutations have not been previously described including two heterozygous deletions spanning OFD1 and neighbouring genes. Analysis...

  8. Clinical and molecular findings in a Moroccan family with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adadi, N.; Lahrouchi, N.; Bouhouch, R.; Fellat, I.; Amri, R.; Alders, M.; Sefiani, A.; Bezzina, C.; Ratbi, I.

    2017-01-01

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man 220400) is a rare autosomal recessive cardioauditory ion channel disorder that affects 1/200,000 to 1/1,000,000 children. It is characterized by congenital profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, a long QT interval,

  9. Diurnal variation of ventricular repolarization in a large family with LQT3-Brugada syndrome characterized by nocturnal sudden death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, MP; Haaksma, J; Veeger, NJGM; Wilde, AAM

    BACKGROUND In patients with long-QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3), symptoms occur particularly at rest or during sleep. As to the underlying mechanism, excessive prolongation of the QT interval at slow heart rates probably plays a role. OBJECTIVES The purpose of the present study was to investigate QT

  10. Identification of a novel EYA1 splice-site mutation in a Danish branchio-oto-renal syndrome family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann Marie; Tümer, Zeynep; Tommerup, Niels

    2004-01-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by variable clinical manifestations including branchial fistulae, preauricular pits, ear malformations, hearing impairment, and renal anomalies. BOR is caused by mutations in the genes EYA1 and SIX1. A Danish BOR fa...

  11. Insulin-resistance and metabolic syndrome are related to executive function in women in a large family-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schuur (Maaike); P. Henneman (Peter); J.C. van Swieten (John); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); I. de Koning (Inge); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); R.R. Frants (Rune); B.A. Oostra (Ben); J.A.P. Willems van Dijk (Ko); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWhile type 2 diabetes is well-known to be associated with poorer cognitive performance, few studies have reported on the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and contributing factors, such as insulin-resistance (HOMA-IR), low adiponectin-, and high C-reactive protein (CRP)- levels.

  12. The Empty Nest Syndrome in Midlife Families: A Multimethod Exploration of Parental Gender Differences and Cultural Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Barbara A.; Lovegreen, Loren D.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores parental health and well-being in relation to "empty nest" transitions. Focus is placed on the purported empty nest syndrome (i.e., self-reported experiences of depression and emotional distress when children leave home) and variations by parental gender and cultural background. This study is primarily based on…

  13. Microduplication of 15q13.3 and Xq21.31 in a family with tourette syndrome and comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchior, Linea; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder. Although it is widely accepted that genetic factors play a significant role in TS pathogenesis the etiology of this disorder is largely unknown. Identification of rare copy number variations (CNVs) as susceptibility factors...

  14. Angelman syndrome without detectable chromosome 15q11-13 anomaly: clinical study of familial and isolated cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, L. A.; Halley, D. J.; den Boer, A. T.; Hennekam, R. C.; Renier, W. O.; Brouwer, O. F.

    1998-01-01

    The clinical findings in 12 Angelman syndrome (AS) patients (4 sib pairs and 4 sporadic cases, aged 12-55 years) without a cytogenetic or molecular detectable defect at the AS locus were compared to those of 28 AS patients (aged 11-50 years) with a deletion, in order to determine whether the

  15. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in seven Danish Wolfram syndrome families; four new mutations identified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Eiberg, Hans Rudolf Lytchoff; Barrett, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a neuro-degenerative autosomal recessive (AR) disorder (OMIM #222300) caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene on 4p16.1. More than 120 mutations have been identified in WFS1 associated with AR WS, as well as autosomal dominant nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing...

  16. Down syndrome in the family : What to do when the karyotype of the proband is not available

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuerlings, JHAM; Oosterwijk, JC; TenKate, LP

    There is as yet no clear protocol available for counselling a person who has one or more relatives with Down syndrome of unknown genotype. Counsellors use different approaches based on their own experience. We present a protocol for practical use which can be helpful in making a decision in clinical

  17. Familial Melanoma Associated with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome and Atypical Mole Syndrome: Total-body Digital Photography, Dermoscopy and Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavedoni, Priscila; Ririe, Marnie; Carrera, Cristina; Puig, Susana; Malvehy, Josep

    2017-06-09

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by a mutation in the p53 gene. Melanoma is considered to be a rare, controversial component of LFS. The aim of this study is to describe the utility of systematic screening for melanoma in patients with LFS and atypical mole syndrome. Two 28-year-old identical twin sisters with LFS and atypical moles were monitored by physical examination, total-body digital photography and dermoscopy be-tween 2006 and 2014. A total of 117, predominantly dark-brown, reticular naevi were identified on case 1 and 105 on case 2. Excisions were performed during the evaluation period of 1 in-situ melanoma and 3 basal cell carcinomas in case 1, and 1 in-situ melanoma and 1 early invasive melanoma in case 2. The remaining melanocytic lesions in both patients were stable during follow-up. The 3 melanomas were new atypical lesions detected with total-body photography and dermoscopy. In conclusion, monitoring LFS patients with total-body photography and dermoscopy may be useful to detect early melanoma.

  18. Familial Melanoma Associated with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome and Atypical Mole Syndrome: Total-body Digital Photography, Dermoscopy and Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Giavedoni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by a mutation in the p53 gene. Melanoma is considered to be a rare, controversial component of LFS. The aim of this study is to describe the utility of systematic screening for melanoma in patients with LFS and atypical mole syndrome. Two 28-year-old identical twin sisters with LFS and atypical moles were monitored by physical examination, total-body digital photography and dermoscopy be­tween 2006 and 2014. A total of 117, predominantly dark-brown, reticular naevi were identified on case 1 and 105 on case 2. Excisions were performed during the evaluation period of 1 in-situ melanoma and 3 basal cell carcinomas in case 1, and 1 in-situ melanoma and 1 early invasive melanoma in case 2. The remaining melanocytic lesions in both patients were stable during follow-up. The 3 melanomas were new atypical lesions detected with total-body photography and dermoscopy. In conclusion, monitoring LFS patients with total-body photography and dermoscopy may be useful to detect early melanoma.

  19. Differing definition-based prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the women of Oman family study: a function of multiparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-barwani, Sulayma A; Bayoumi, Riad A; Jaju, Deepali; Al-Yahyaee, Saeed A S; Al-Hadabi, Saleh; Lopez-Alvarenga, Juan C; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Hassan, Mohammed O

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate causes of the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in multiparous Omani Arab women using the International Diabetes Federation definition (IDF). Of 392 married women (mean age 40 years), 354 (90%) were multiparous with an average parity of 8. They were divided into four parity groups: Para 0, Para 1-3, Para 4-6, and Para >6. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, fasting, and 2-hour glucose and insulin, plasma lipids, serum leptin, and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured. In the whole cohort, the IDF definition identified 28% women with the metabolic syndrome, whereas it identified 48% in Para >6. In comparison, the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) definition identified 21% and 39%, respectively (kappa = 0.642). Waist circumference was positively associated with the number of live births (beta = 0.78, p = 0.0001). Compared to other individual IDF criteria, only age-adjusted large waist circumference carried the highest risk for having the metabolic syndrome in all groups (odds ratio [OR], 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-5.4, 3.2, CI, 1.3-8 and 4.8, CI, 2.1-11.2). The high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in multiparous Omani Arab women appeared to be influenced by the parity-related large waist circumference. The high dependency of the IDF criteria on waist circumference for the definition of the metabolic syndrome in this population has led to the misclassification of such women.

  20. Familial co-segregation of Coffin-Lowry syndrome inherited from the mother and autosomal dominant Waardenburg type IV syndrome due to deletion of EDNRB inherited from the father.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupe, Jacob; Sampath, Srirangan; Lacassie, Yves

    2014-10-01

    We report an African-American family that was identified after the proposita was referred for diagnostic evaluation at 4½ months with a history of Hirschsprung and dysmorphic features typical of Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Family evaluation revealed that the father had heterochromidia irides and hypertelorism supporting the clinical diagnosis of WS; however, examination of the mother revealed characteristic facial and digital features of Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS). Molecular testing of the mother identified a novel 2 bp deletion (c.865_866delCA) in codon 289 of RPS6KA3 leading to a frame-shift and premature termination of translation 5 codons downstream (NM_004586.2:p.Gln289ValfsX5). This deletion also was identified in the proposita and her three sisters with a clinical suspicion of CLS, all of whom as carriers for this X-linked disorder had very subtle manifestations. The molecular confirmation of WS type 4 (Shah-Waardenburg; WS4) was not as straightforward. To evaluate WS types 1-4, multiple sequential molecular tests were requested, including Sanger sequencing of all exons, and deletion/duplication analysis using MLPA for PAX3, MITF, SOX10, EDN3 and EDNRB. Although sequencing did not identify any disease causing variants, MLPA identified a heterozygous deletion of the entire EDNRB in the father. This deletion was also found in the proposita and the oldest child. Since the heterozygous deletion was the only change identified in EDNRB, this family represents one of the few cases of an autosomal dominant inheritance of WS4 involving the endothelin pathway. Altogether, clinical evaluation of the family revealed one child to be positive for WS4 and two positive for CLS, while two children were positive for both diseases simultaneously (including the proposita) while another pair test negative for either disease. This kinship is an example of the coincidence of two conditions co-segregating in one family, with variable phenotypes requiring molecular testing to

  1. Evaluating the performance of clinical criteria for predicting mismatch repair gene mutations in Lynch syndrome: a comprehensive analysis of 3,671 families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Verena; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Loeffler, Markus; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Schackert, Hans K; Görgens, Heike; Pox, Christian; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; von Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus; Büttner, Reinhard; Propping, Peter; Engel, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    Carriers of mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations have a high lifetime risk for colorectal and endometrial cancers, as well as other malignancies. As mutation analysis to detect these patients is expensive and time-consuming, clinical criteria and tumor-tissue analysis are widely used as pre-screening methods. The aim of our study was to evaluate the performance of commonly applied clinical criteria (the Amsterdam I and II Criteria, and the original and revised Bethesda Guidelines) and the results of tumor-tissue analysis in predicting MMR gene mutations. We analyzed 3,671 families from the German HNPCC Registry and divided them into nine mutually exclusive groups with different clinical criteria. A total of 680 families (18.5%) were found to have a pathogenic MMR gene mutation. Among all 1,284 families with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) colorectal cancer, the overall mutation detection rate was 53.0%. Mutation frequencies and their distribution between the four MMR genes differed significantly between clinical groups (p small-bowel cancer (p small-bowel cancer were clinically relevant predictors for Lynch syndrome. © 2013 UICC.

  2. Large intragenic deletion of CDC73 (exons 4-10) in a three-generation hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT) syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Vito; Seaberg, Raewyn M; Kelly, Catherine; Jean Davidson, M; Raphael, Simon; Shuen, Andrew Y; Baorda, Filomena; Palumbo, Orazio; Scillitani, Alfredo; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Cole, David E C

    2017-08-03

    Inactivating mutations of CDC73 cause Hyperparathyroidism-Jaw Tumour syndrome (HPT-JT), Familial Isolated Hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) and sporadic parathyroid carcinoma. We conducted CDC73 mutation analysis in an HPT-JT family and confirm carrier status of the proband's daughter. The proband had primary hyperparathyroidism (parathyroid carcinoma) and uterine leiomyomata. Her father and daughter had hyperparathyroidism (parathyroid adenoma) but no other manifestations of HPT-JT. CDC73 mutation analysis (sequencing of all 17 exons) and whole-genome copy number variation (CNV) analysis was done on leukocyte DNA of the three affecteds as well as the proband's unaffected sister. A novel deletion of exons 4 to 10 of CDC73 was detected by CNV analysis in the three affecteds. A novel insertion in the 5'UTR (c.-4_-11insG) that co-segregated with the deletion was identified. By in vitro assay the 5'UTR insertion was shown to significantly impair the expression of the parafibromin protein. Screening for the mutated CDC73 confirmed carrier status in the proband's daughter and the biochemistry and ultrasonography led to pre-emptive surgery and resolution of the hyperparathyroidism. A novel gross deletion mutation in CDC73 was identified in a three-generation HPT-JT family emphasizing the importance of including screening for large deletions in the molecular diagnostic protocol.

  3. [Burnout Syndrome, Family and Work Related Variables on General Practitioners in Bogota. A Strategy of Work Quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre Roldán, Adriana María; Quijano Barriga, Ana María

    2015-01-01

    The burnout syndrome is a set of work-related symptoms related to weariness and exhaustion, in response to the emotional stress at work and its consequences. The aim of the study was to measure the frequency of burnout in General Practitioners (GPs) from 3 private institutions in Bogotá, Colombia and to determine the associated factors according to the variables taken into account. It is a descriptive cross-sectional study which was used to analyse the Questionnaire for Burnout Syndrome (CESQT). The population was 106 GPs. The level of burnout was at a critical level in 6.6% of the GP population. The variables showed that having a stable partner and children are a protective factor. By contrast, work in emergency rooms is a risk factor. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Rare form of autosomal dominant familial Cornelia de Lange syndrome due to a novel duplication in SMC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Elena; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; El-Gharbawy, Areeg

    2017-08-01

    Clinical features are variable in patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). Milder forms exist with structural maintenance of chromosomes 3 (SMC3) mutations. Inherited milder forms of CdLS are uncommon and may be missed if genetic testing is limited to Nipped-B-like protein (NIPBL) and SMC1A. Parental studies should be pursued if there is a history of learning disabilities and/or dysmorphic features.

  5. Huntington's disease-like and ataxia syndromes: identification of a family with a de novo SCA17/TBP mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Sara; Petersen, Thor; Nørremølle, Anne

    2010-01-01

    with a Huntington's disease-like phenotype without the HD-gene mutation and 178 patients with genetically unclassified cerebellar ataxia for the mutation in TBP. A 33-year old woman presenting with an HD like phenotype with a de novo 54 CAG/CAA repeat expansion was identified. Her normal allele included 38 repeats......-like phenotypes and ataxia syndromes, also in isolated cases....

  6. A possible new syndrome with growth-hormone secreting pituitary adenoma, colonic polyposis, lipomatosis, lentigines and renal carcinoma in association with familial testicular germ cell malignancy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Phuong L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germ-cell testicular cancer has not been definitively linked to any known hereditary cancer susceptibility disorder. Familial testicular cancer in the presence of other findings in affected and unaffected family members might indicate a previously-unidentified hereditary cancer syndrome. Case presentation The patient was diagnosed with a left testicular seminoma at age 28, and treated with left orchiectomy followed by adjuvant cobalt radiation. His family history is significant for testicular seminoma in his son, bladder cancer in his sister, and lipomatosis in his father. His evaluation as part of an etiologic study of familial testicular cancer revealed multiple colon polyps (adenomatous, hyperplastic, and hamartomatous first found in his 50 s, multiple lipomas, multiple hyperpigmented skin lesions, left kidney cancer diagnosed at age 64, and a growth-hormone producing pituitary adenoma with associated acromegaly diagnosed at age 64. The patient underwent genetic testing for Cowden syndrome (PTEN gene, Carney complex (PRKAR1A gene, and multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1 (MEN1 gene; no deleterious mutations were identified. Discussion The constellation of benign and malignant neoplasms in the context of this patient's familial testicular cancer raised the possibility that these might be manifestations of a known hereditary susceptibility cancer syndrome; however, genetic testing for the three syndromes that were most likely to explain these findings did not show any mutation. Alternatively, this family's phenotype might represent a novel neoplasm susceptibility disorder. This possibility cannot be evaluated definitively on the basis of a single case report; additional observations and studies are necessary to investigate this hypothesis further.

  7. Characterization of a DNA sequence family in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome chromosome region in 15q11-q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, B.; Knoblauch, H.; Buiting, K.; Horsthemke, B. (Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany))

    1993-04-01

    IR4-3R (D15S11) is an anonymous DNA sequence from human chromosome 15. Using YAC cloning and restriction enzyme analysis, the authors have found that IR4-3R detects five related DNA sequences, which are spread over 700 kb within the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome chromosome region in 15q11-q 13. The RsaI and StyI polymorphisms, which were described previously, are associated with the most proximal copy of IR4-3R and are in strong linkage disequilibrium. IR4-3R represents the third DNA sequence family that has been identified in 15q11-q13. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The brain finger protein gene (ZNF179), a member of the RING finger family, maps within the Smith-Magenis syndrome region at 17p11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Inazawa, Johji [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-31

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SAIS) is caused by a microdeletion of 17p11.2 and comprises developmental and growth delay, facial abnormalities, unusual behavior and sleep problems. This phenotype may be due to haploinsufficiency of several contiguous genes. The human brain finger protein gene (ZNF179), a member of the RING finger protein family, has been isolated and mapped to l7p11.2. FISH analyses of metaphase or interphase chromosomes of 6 patients with SMS show that ZNF179 was deleted in one of the 2 homologs (17p11.2), indicating a possible association of the defect of this gene with the pathogenesis of SMS. Furthermore, using a prophase FISH ordering system, we sublocalized ZNF179 proximally to LLGL which lies on the critical region for SMS. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Clinical, Cytogenetic, and Biochemical Analyses of a Family with a t(3;13(q26.2;p11.2: Further Delineation of 3q Duplication Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abreu-González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities that result in genomic imbalances are a major cause of congenital and developmental anomalies. Partial duplication of chromosome 3q syndrome is a well-described condition, and the phenotypic manifestations include a characteristic facies, microcephaly, hirsutism, synophrys, broad nasal bridge, congenital heart disease, genitourinary disorders, and mental retardation. Approximately 60%–75% of cases are derived from a balanced translocation. We describe a family with a pure typical partial trisomy 3q syndrome derived from a maternal balanced translocation t(3;13(q26.2;p11.2. As the chromosomal rearrangement involves the short arm of an acrocentric chromosome, the phenotype corresponds to a pure trisomy 3q26.2-qter syndrome. There are 4 affected individuals and several carriers among three generations. The report of this family is relevant because there are few cases of pure duplication 3q syndrome reported, and the cases described here contribute to define the phenotype associated with the syndrome. Furthermore, we confirmed that the survival until adulthood is possible. This report also identified the presence of glycosaminoglycans in urine in this family, not related to the chromosomal abnormality or the phenotype.

  10. Discovering the Unexpected with the Utilization of NGS in Diagnostics of Non-syndromic Hearing Loss Disorders: The Family Case ofILDR1-Dependent Hearing Loss Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, Jernej; Klančar, Gašper; Trebušak Podkrajšek, Katarina; Battelino, Saba

    2017-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a heterogeneous family of hearing disabilities with congenital (including genetic) as well as acquired etiology. Congenital SNHL of genetic etiology is further sub-divided into autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked SNHL. More than 60 genes are involved in the etiology of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) commonly manifesting as heterogeneous pre-lingual profound to severe non-progressive clinical phenotype. ILDR1 -dependent ARNSHL (DFNB42, OMIM: # 609646) is a very rare sub-type of hearing disability, with unknown prevalence, caused by function-damaging genetic variants in ILDR1 gene reported in families of Middle-Eastern origin. ILDR1 (Immunoglobulin-Like Domain-containing Receptor 1) is involved in the development of semicircular canal, tricellular tight junction and auditory hair cells. An apparently non-consanguineous family of European ancestry with two affected siblings with profound progressive hearing loss characterized in their infancy and successfully treated with cochlear implants (CI) is presented. Genetic analysis of common ARNSHL genetic causes in the population of origin was negative, thus the next-generation sequencing (NGS) and family segregation analysis to identify underlying causative genetic variant was performed. Unexpectedly and atypical for the population of origin a homozygous non-sense variant ILDR1 c.942C > A (p.Cys314Ter) inherited from both heterozygous parents was identified in both patients. Contrary to the commonly reported phenotype, indices of a progressive hearing loss and potential compensatory mechanism of vestibular function were revealed with the analysis of clinical data. The utilization of NGS was demonstrated as an invaluable tool for the detection of atypical rare variants in diagnostics of unidentified hearing loss disorders.

  11. Discovering the Unexpected with the Utilization of NGS in Diagnostics of Non-syndromic Hearing Loss Disorders: The Family Case of ILDR1-Dependent Hearing Loss Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Kovač

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is a heterogeneous family of hearing disabilities with congenital (including genetic as well as acquired etiology. Congenital SNHL of genetic etiology is further sub-divided into autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked SNHL. More than 60 genes are involved in the etiology of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL commonly manifesting as heterogeneous pre-lingual profound to severe non-progressive clinical phenotype. ILDR1-dependent ARNSHL (DFNB42, OMIM: # 609646 is a very rare sub-type of hearing disability, with unknown prevalence, caused by function-damaging genetic variants in ILDR1 gene reported in families of Middle-Eastern origin. ILDR1 (Immunoglobulin-Like Domain-containing Receptor 1 is involved in the development of semicircular canal, tricellular tight junction and auditory hair cells. An apparently non-consanguineous family of European ancestry with two affected siblings with profound progressive hearing loss characterized in their infancy and successfully treated with cochlear implants (CI is presented. Genetic analysis of common ARNSHL genetic causes in the population of origin was negative, thus the next-generation sequencing (NGS and family segregation analysis to identify underlying causative genetic variant was performed. Unexpectedly and atypical for the population of origin a homozygous non-sense variant ILDR1 c.942C > A (p.Cys314Ter inherited from both heterozygous parents was identified in both patients. Contrary to the commonly reported phenotype, indices of a progressive hearing loss and potential compensatory mechanism of vestibular function were revealed with the analysis of clinical data. The utilization of NGS was demonstrated as an invaluable tool for the detection of atypical rare variants in diagnostics of unidentified hearing loss disorders.

  12. Multiplex families with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afawi, Zaid; Oliver, Karen L.; Kivity, Sara; Mazarib, Aziz; Blatt, Ilan; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Helbig, Katherine L.; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Misk, Adel J.; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kahana, Esther; Masalha, Rafik; Kramer, Uri; Ekstein, Dana; Shorer, Zamir; Wallace, Robyn H.; Mangelsdorf, Marie; MacPherson, James N.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie; Gecz, Jozef; Heron, Sarah E.; Corbett, Mark; Mulley, John C.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Korczyn, Amos D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical syndromes and inheritance patterns of multiplex families with epilepsy toward the ultimate aim of uncovering the underlying molecular genetic basis. Methods: Following the referral of families with 2 or more relatives with epilepsy, individuals were classified into epilepsy syndromes. Families were classified into syndromes where at least 2 family members had a specific diagnosis. Pedigrees were analyzed and molecular genetic studies were performed as appropriate. Results: A total of 211 families were ascertained over an 11-year period in Israel. A total of 169 were classified into broad familial epilepsy syndrome groups: 61 generalized, 22 focal, 24 febrile seizure syndromes, 33 special syndromes, and 29 mixed. A total of 42 families remained unclassified. Pathogenic variants were identified in 49/211 families (23%). The majority were found in established epilepsy genes (e.g., SCN1A, KCNQ2, CSTB), but in 11 families, this cohort contributed to the initial discovery (e.g., KCNT1, PCDH19, TBC1D24). We expand the phenotypic spectrum of established epilepsy genes by reporting a familial LAMC3 homozygous variant, where the predominant phenotype was epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, and a pathogenic SCN1A variant in a family where in 5 siblings the phenotype was broadly consistent with Dravet syndrome, a disorder that usually occurs sporadically. Conclusion: A total of 80% of families were successfully classified, with pathogenic variants identified in 23%. The successful characterization of familial electroclinical and inheritance patterns has highlighted the value of studying multiplex families and their contribution towards uncovering the genetic basis of the epilepsies. PMID:26802095

  13. Germ-line TP53 mutations in Finnish cancer families exhibiting features of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome and negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huusko, P; Castrén, K; Launonen, V; Soini, Y; Pääkkönen, K; Leisti, J; Vähäkangas, K; Winqvist, R

    1999-07-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for a large portion of the inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer. It was recently discovered that mutations in these two genes are less common in the Finnish population than expected. Because the genetic background of breast cancer, in particular, is largely obscure, it became necessary to search for mutations in other susceptibility genes. Because seven of our BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative families fulfilled the criteria of either Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) or Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (LFL), we decided to screen them for germ-line TP53 mutations in exons 5-8 using a dual-temperature single-strand conformation polymorphism assay (SSCP). Two missense mutations (Asn235Ser and Tyr220Cys) were identified. The clinical significance of these findings was evaluated by comparison to previously reported germ-line TP53 mutation data, and by using the tumor loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis. In addition, an immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from mutation-positive individuals was performed. Our results suggest that the observed missense mutations confer susceptibility to cancer, and that germ-line TP53 mutations would therefore explain an additional fraction of hereditary breast cancer in Finland.

  14. An 11p15 imprinting centre region 2 deletion in a family with Beckwith Wiedemann syndrome provides insights into imprinting control at CDKN1C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Algar

    Full Text Available We report a three generation family with Beckwith Wiedemann syndrome (BWS in whom we have identified a 330 kb deletion within the KCNQ1 locus, encompassing the 11p15.5 Imprinting Centre II (IC2. The deletion arose on the paternal chromosome in the first generation and was only associated with BWS when transmitted maternally to subsequent generations. The deletion on the maternal chromosome was associated with a lower median level of CDKN1C expression in the peripheral blood of affected individuals when compared to a cohort of unaffected controls (p<0.05, however was not significantly different to the expression levels in BWS cases with loss of methylation (LOM within IC2 (p<0.78. Moreover the individual with a deletion on the paternal chromosome did not show evidence of elevated CDKN1C expression or features of Russell Silver syndrome. These observations support a model invoking the deletion of enhancer elements required for CDKN1C expression lying within or close to the imprinting centre and importantly extend and validate a single observation from an earlier study. Analysis of 94 cases with IC2 loss of methylation revealed that KCNQ1 deletion is a rare cause of loss of maternal methylation, occurring in only 3% of cases, or in 1.5% of BWS overall.

  15. Combined gating and trafficking defect in Kv11.1 manifests as a malignant long QT syndrome phenotype in a large Danish p.F29L founder family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, Jørgen K.; Skibsbye, Lasse; Hedley, Paula L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary cardiac channelopathy characterized by delayedventricular repolarization, syncope, torsades de pointes and sudden cardiac death. Thirty-three members of fi ve apparently‘ unrelated ’Danish families carry the KCNH2:c.87C A; p.F29L...

  16. Family-focused cognitive behaviour therapy versus psycho-education for adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome: long-term follow-up of an RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Samantha; Chalder, Trudie; Rimes, Katharine A

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the long term efficacy of family-focused cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) compared with psycho-education in improving school attendance and other secondary outcomes in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). A 24 month follow-up of a randomised controlled trial was carried out. Participants received either 13 one-hour sessions of family-focused CBT or four one-hour sessions of psycho-education. Forty-four participants took part in the follow-up study. The proportion of participants reporting at least 70% school attendance (the primary outcome) at 24 months was 90% in CBT group and 84% in psycho-education group; the difference between the groups was not statistically significant (OR = 1.29, p = 0.80). The proportion of adolescents who had recovered in the family-focused CBT group was 79% compared with 64% in the psycho-education, according to a definition including fatigue and school attendance. This difference was not statistically significant (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.34). Family-focused CBT was associated with significantly better emotional and behavioural adjustment at 24 month follow-up compared to psycho-education, as reported by both adolescents (F = 6.49, p = 0.02) and parents (F = 4.52, P = 0.04). Impairment significantly decreased in both groups between six and 24 month follow-ups, with no significant group difference in improvement over this period. Gains previously observed for other secondary outcomes at six month follow-up were maintained at 24 month follow-up with no further significant improvement or group differences in improvement. In conclusion, gains achieved by adolescents with CFS who had undertaken family-focused CBT and psycho-education generally continued or were maintained at two-year follow-up. The exception was that family-focused CBT was associated with maintained improvements in emotional and behavioural difficulties whereas psycho-education was associated with

  17. Pigmentary Markers in Danes – Associations with Quantitative Skin Colour, Nevi Count, Familial Atypical Multiple-Mole, and Melanoma Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Peter; Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg; Madsen, Linnea Nørgård

    2016-01-01

    pigmentation measured on the buttock area. We hypothesize that the effect of MC1R variants on arm pigmentation is primarily reflecting the inability to tan when subjected to UVR. A gender specific effect on skin pigmentation was also observed, and it was found that the skin pigmentation of females on average...... were darker than that of males (pcolour in a lightly pigmented Danish population. We did not observe any association between any pigmentary marker and the FAMMM syndrome. We suggest that the genetics of FAMMM is not related...

  18. Diagnosis of Familial Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome due to a Paternal Cryptic Chromosomal Rearrangement by Conventional and Molecular Cytogenetic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Venegas-Vega

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional cytogenetic techniques in combination with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarrays is necessary for the identification of cryptic rearrangements in the diagnosis of chromosomal syndromes. We report two siblings, a boy of 9 years and 9 months of age and his 7-years- and 5-month-old sister, with the classic Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS phenotype. Using high-resolution GTG- and NOR-banding karyotypes, as well as FISH analysis, we characterized a pure 4p deletion in both sibs and a balanced rearrangement in their father, consisting in an insertion of 4p material within a nucleolar organizing region of chromosome 15. Copy number variant (CNV analysis using SNP arrays showed that both siblings have a similar size of 4p deletion (~6.5 Mb. Our results strongly support the need for conventional cytogenetic and FISH analysis, as well as high-density microarray mapping for the optimal characterization of the genetic imbalance in patients with WHS; parents must always be studied for recognizing cryptic balanced chromosomal rearrangements for an adequate genetic counseling.

  19. A Family with Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome: The Findings of Indium-111 Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy, Iodine-123 Metaiodobenzylguanidine Scintigraphy and Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Arıcan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHLS is an autosomal dominant hereditary familial disorder characterized by development of malignant and benign neoplasms. Differential diagnosis of the adrenal and pancreatic masses are difficult in patients with VHLS. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-123 MIBG and indium-111 somatostatin receptor scintigraphies (In-111 SRS have important roles in the differential diagnosis of adrenal and pancreatic masses in those patients. In this case report, we present the findings of I-123 MIBG single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT/CT and In-111 SRS SPECT/CT in three members of a family with VHLS. In case 1, a residual neuroendocrine tumor (NET was detected in the head of pancreas on In-111 SRS SPECT/CT images. In case 2 and 3, I-123 MIBG SPECT/CT confirmed the adrenal masses as pheochromocytoma, and the extra-adrenal mass as NET, before surgery. We thought that In-111 SRS and I-123 MIBG scan might be helpful in the routine work up of VHLS patients for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Hybrid SPECT/CT system may improve diagnostic accuracy of planar images since it assesses morphologic and functional information together.

  20. Case report of a 3-year-old girl with pleuropulmonary blastoma and family history of a tumor predisposition syndrome with c. 2830 gene mutation in DICER1

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    Y. Puckett

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB is a childhood mesenchymal pleural-based tumor that is associated with a germline mutation in DICER1 gene in familial PPB. It occurs most commonly in children between the ages of 2 and 5. Approximately 25% of patients have familial cancer syndrome which can include different combinations of PPB, lung cysts, thyroid tumors, cystic nephroma, Wilms tumor, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, juvenile granulosa cell tumor, gynandroblastoma, medulloblastoma, other childhood central nervous system tumors, nasal chondral mesenchymal hamartoma, and small bowel polyps. Our case report presents a child diagnosed with PPB with maternal history of bilateral ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors and papillary carcinoma of the thyroid. Molecular analysis performed on the patient and mother showed a specific gene change (c. 2830 in the DICER1 gene. The patient underwent surgical resection of the tumor and five cycles of chemotherapy. Despite this aggressive treatment, she eventually succumbed to brain metastases and was made comfort care after suffering a massive brain hemorrhage several months after the initial diagnosis of her disease.

  1. A molecular deletion of distal chromosome 4p in two families with a satellited chromosome 4 lacking the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrooks, L L; Lamb, A N; Kirkman, H N; Callanan, N P; Rao, K W

    1992-11-01

    We report two families with a satellited chromosome 4 short arm (4ps). Satellites and stalks normally occur on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes; however, the literature cites several reports of satellited nonacrocentric chromosomes, which presumably result from a translocation with an acrocentric chromosome. This is the first report of 4ps chromosomes. Our families are remarkable in that both unaffected and affected individuals carry the 4ps chromosome. The phenotypes observed in affected individuals, although dissimilar, were sufficient to encourage a search for a deletion of chromosome 4p. By Southern blot analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, a deletion of material mapping approximately 150 kb from chromosome 4pter was discovered. This deletion is notable because it does not result in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and can result in an apparently normal phenotype. We speculate that homology between subterminal repeat sequences on 4p and sequences on the acrocentric short arms may explain the origin of the rearrangement and that position effect may play a role in the expression of the abnormal phenotype.

  2. Vascular Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome in siblings with biallelic COL3A1 sequence variants and marked clinical variability in the extended family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Agnete; Fagerheim, Toril; Rand-Hendriksen, Svend; Lunde, Per I; Vorren, Torgrim O; Pepin, Melanie G; Leistritz, Dru F; Byers, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome (vEDS), also known as EDS type IV, is considered to be an autosomal dominant disorder caused by sequence variants in COL3A1, which encodes the chains of type III procollagen. We identified a family in which there was marked clinical variation with the earliest death due to extensive aortic dissection at age 15 years and other family members in their eighties with no complications. The proband was born with right-sided clubfoot but was otherwise healthy until he died unexpectedly at 15 years. His sister, in addition to signs consistent with vascular EDS, had bilateral frontal and parietal polymicrogyria. The proband and his sister each had two COL3A1 sequence variants, c.1786C>T, p.(Arg596*) in exon 26 and c.3851G>A, p.(Gly1284Glu) in exon 50 on different alleles. Cells from the compound heterozygote produced a reduced amount of type III procollagen, all the chains of which had abnormal electrophoretic mobility. Biallelic sequence variants have a significantly worse outcome than heterozygous variants for either null mutations or missense mutations, and frontoparietal polymicrogyria may be an added phenotype feature. This genetic constellation provides a very rare explanation for marked intrafamilial clinical variation due to sequence variants in COL3A1. PMID:25205403

  3. The Use of High-Density SNP Array to Map Homozygosity in Consanguineous Families to Efficiently Identify Candidate Genes: Application to Woodhouse-Sakati Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly B. Sheridan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two consanguineous Qatari siblings presented for evaluation: a 17-4/12-year-old male with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, alopecia, intellectual disability, and microcephaly and his 19-year-old sister with primary amenorrhea, alopecia, and normal cognition. Both required hormone treatment to produce secondary sex characteristics and pubertal development beyond Tanner 1. SNP array analysis of both probands was performed to detect shared regions of homozygosity which may harbor homozygous mutations in a gene causing their common features of abnormal pubertal development, alopecia, and variable cognitive delay. Our patients shared multiple homozygous genomic regions; ten shared regions were >1 Mb in length and constituted 0.99% of the genome. DCAF17, encoding a transmembrane nuclear protein of uncertain function, was the only gene identified in a homozygous region known to cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. DCAF17 mutations are associated with Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by alopecia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, and extrapyramidal movements. Sequencing of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions of DCAF17 in the proband revealed homozygosity for a previously described founder mutation (c.436delC. Targeted DCAF17 sequencing of his affected sibling revealed the same homozygous mutation. This family illustrates the utility of SNP array testing in consanguineous families to efficiently and inexpensively identify regions of genomic homozygosity in which genetic candidates for recessive conditions can be identified.

  4. Resequencing DCDC5 in the Flanking Region of an LD-SNP Derived from a Kidney-Yang Deficiency Syndrome Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ping Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore the genetic traits of Kidney-yang deficiency syndrome (KDS. Design. Twelve KDS subjects and three spouses from a typical KDS family were recruited. Their genomic DNA samples were genotyped by Affymetrix 100K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays. The linkage disequilibrium (LD SNPs were generated using GeneChip DNA analysis software (GDAS, Affymetrix. Genes located within 100 bp of the flanks of LD SNPs were mined via GeneView. 29 exons of the doublecortin domain containing 5 (DCDC5, a representative gene within the flank of an LD SNP, were resequenced. Results. Five LD SNPs display midrange linkage with KDS. Two genes with established functions, DCDC5 and Leucyl-tRNA synthetase, were mined in the flanks of LD SNPs. Resequencing of DCDC5 revealed a nonsynonymous variation, in which 3764T/A was replaced by C/G. Accordingly, the Ser1172 was substituted by Pro1172. The S1172P substitution effect was evaluated as “possibly damaging” by PolyPhen. Conclusion. We have identified a genomic variation of DCDC5 based on the LD SNPs derived from a KDS family. DCDC5 and other genes surrounding these SNPs display some relationships with key symptoms of KDS.

  5. Family of Crouzon Syndrome Represents the Evolution of the Frontofacial Monobloc Advancement Technique: From Immediate Movement to Monobloc Distraction to Monobloc Bipartition Distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Denadai, Rafael; Ghizoni, Enrico; Buzzo, Celso Luiz; Raposo-Amaral, Cesar Augusto

    2015-09-01

    Crouzon syndrome (CS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by premature fusion of cranial sutures, midface and supraorbital ridge retrusion, exorbitism, and in some clinical scenarios strabismus, parrot-beaked nose, short upper lip and hypertelorbitism. Treatment of CS is overlapped with the beginning of craniofacial surgery and is grounded on morphologic and functional objectives. The authors reported on the outcomes and complications of family members (mother and 2 siblings) with CS, who were operated on by different techniques of frontofacial advancement and have attained skeletal maturity. Operations were performed in different moments throughout the last 3 decades of craniofacial surgery history. A 10-year-old Crouzon progenitor underwent a monobloc osteotomy with acute advancement, using rigid fixation and bone grafting in the osteotomy sites. An 8-year-old Crouzon daughter underwent gradual lengthening of a monobloc segment, using an external, institutionally made distracter device. In addition, a 10-year-old Crouzon son underwent gradual lengthening of a monobloc segment associated to facial bipartition, using an internal distracter device. After 30 years, the mother presented a mild relapse on the orbit level, but her children had satisfactory stable outcomes. The family members with CS have undergone different modifications of the monobloc approach based on different chronological momentum, from acute monobloc advancement, to monobloc distraction, to monobloc facial bipartition distraction.

  6. A novel syndrome of paediatric cataract, dysmorphism, ectodermal features, and developmental delay in Australian Aboriginal family maps to 1p35.3-p36.32

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    Gecz Jozef

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A novel phenotype consisting of cataract, mental retardation, erythematous skin rash and facial dysmorphism was recently described in an extended pedigree of Australian Aboriginal descent. Large scale chromosomal re-arrangements had previously been ruled out. We have conducted a genome-wide scan to map the linkage region in this family. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP markers on the Affymetrix 10K SNP array was conducted and analysed using MERLIN. Three positional candidate genes (ZBTB17, EPHA2 and EPHB2 were sequenced to screen for segregating mutations. Results Under a fully penetrant, dominant model, the locus for this unique phenotype was mapped to chromosome 1p35.3-p36.32 with a maximum LOD score of 2.41. The critical region spans 48.7 cM between markers rs966321 and rs1441834 and encompasses 527 transcripts from 364 annotated genes. No coding mutations were identified in three positional candidate genes EPHA2, EPHB2 or ZBTB17. The region overlaps with a previously reported region for Volkmann cataract and the phenotype has similarity to that reported for 1p36 monosomy. Conclusions The gene for this syndrome is located in a 25.6 Mb region on 1p35.3-p36.32. The known cataract gene in this region (EPHA2 does not harbour mutations in this family, suggesting that at least one additional gene for cataract is present in this region.

  7. West syndrome associated with a novel chromosomal anomaly; partial trisomy 8P together with partial monosomy 9P, resulting from a familial unbalanced reciprocal translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ilknur; Saygı, Semra; Demir, Şenay; Alehan, Fusun; Sahin, Feride Iffet

    2015-01-01

    West syndrome is classified according to the underlying etiology into an acquired West syndrome, a congenital/developmental West syndrome, and West syndrome of unknown etiology. Causes of a congenital/developmental West syndrome are extensive and include chromosomal anomalies. We report on a patient carrying a derivative chromosome originating from the reciprocal unbalanced translocation t (8;9) (p11.2;p22) and presenting with macrocephaly, West syndrome, severe mental motor retardation and hypotonia. As far as we know, this is a new chromosomal anomaly associated with West syndrome.

  8. Fanconi Bickel Syndrome: Novel Mutations in GLUT 2 Gene Causing a Distinguished Form of Renal Tubular Acidosis in Two Unrelated Egyptian Families

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    Mohammad Al-Haggar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fanconi-Bickel syndrome (FBS is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects in facilitative glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2 or SLC2A2 gene mapped on chromosome 3q26.1-26.3, that codes for the glucose transporter protein 2. Methods. Two unrelated Egyptian families having suspected cases of FBS were enrolled after taking a written informed consent; both had positive consanguinity, and index cases had evidences of proximal renal tubular defects with hepatomegaly; they were subjected to history taking, signs of rickets as well as anthropometric measurements. Laboratory workup included urinalysis, renal and liver function tests including fasting and postprandial blood sugar; serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, sodium and potassium, lipid profile, and detailed blood gas. Imaging including bone survey and abdominal ultrasound, and liver biopsy were done to confirm diagnosis. Molecular analysis of the GLUT2 gene was done for DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood leukocyte. All coding sequences, including flanking introns in GLUT2 gene, were amplified using PCR followed by direct sequencing. Results. Two new mutations had been detected, one in each family, in exon 3 two bases (GA were deleted (c.253 254delGA and in exon 6 in the second family, G-to-C substitution at position-1 of the splicing acceptor site (c.776-1G>C or IVS5-1G>A. Conclusion. FBS is a rare disease due to mutation in GLUT2 gene; many mutations were reported, about half were novel mutations; yet none of these mutations is more frequent. A more extensive survey for the most frequent mutations among FBS has to be contemplated to allow for use of molecular screening tests like ARMS.

  9. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  10. Gorlin syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    develop medulloblastomas and are treated with radiation, it is mandatory that they be monitored for the development of BCCs in the radiation field. Management of a patient or family with this syndrome should include genetic counselling and neurological evaluations to detect medulloblastoma until the age of 7, after which ...

  11. Further evidence of the association between LQT syndrome and epilepsy in a family with KCNQ1 pathogenic variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiron, Coloma; de Llano, Coloma Tiron; Campuzano, Oscar; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Mademont, Irene; Coll, Monica; Allegue, Catarina; Iglesias, Anna; Partemi, Sara; Striano, Pasquale; Oliva, Antonio; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-02-01

    Ion channels are expressed both in the heart and in the brain, being advocated as responsible for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy but few pathogenic mutations have been identified. We aim to identify a novel gen associated with channelopathies and epilepsy in a family. We assessed a family showing epilepsy concomitant with LQTS. Index case showed prolonged QT interval. His father suffers of LQT and epilepsy. We performed a direct sequencing analysis of KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1, KCNE2 and SCN5A genes. We identified a non-synonymous heterozygous missense pathogenic mutation (p.L273F) in exon 6 of the KCNQ1 gene. All clinically affected relatives carried the same mutation. We report, for a first time, a KCNQ1 mutation in a family suffering of both phenotypes, suggesting that KCNQ1 genetic variations may confer susceptibility for recurrent seizure activity increasing the risk or lead to sudden death. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of a microdeletion at Xp22.13 in a Taiwanese family presenting with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Niu, Dau-Ming; Chen, Yan-Jang; Fang, Jye-Siung; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, dental anomalies and mental retardation. The disease has been linked to a novel gene termed NHS located at Xp22.13. The majority of pathogenic mutations of the disease include nonsense mutations and small deletions and insertions that lead to truncation of the NHS protein. In this study, we identified a microdeletion of ∼ 0.92 Mb at Xp22.13 detected by array-based comparative genomic hybridization in two brothers presenting congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphisms and mental retardation. The deleted region encompasses the REPS2, NHS, SCML1 and RAI2 genes, and was transmitted from their carrier mother who presented only mild cataract. Our findings are in line with several recent case reports to indicate that genomic rearrangement involving the NHS gene is an important genetic etiology underlying NHS.

  13. [The International Classification of Diseases, the Family of International Classifications, the ICD-11, and post-polio syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenti, Ruy; Nubila, Heloisa Brunow Ventura Di; Quadros, Abrahão Augusto Joviniano; Conde, Mônica Tilli Reis Pessoa; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle

    2013-09-01

    The first International Classification of Diseases (ICD) was approved in 1893 and since then it has been periodically reviewed. The last, 10th revision (ICD-10), was approved in 1989. Since 1989, it was possible to update from ICD revisions, which did not happen before. The next revision (ICD-11) would probably be published in 2015. In 1989, mechanisms were established to update ICD-10, through the creation of the Morbidity Reference Group (MbRG) in 1997 and the Update and Revision Committee (URC) in 2000. The Morbidity Reference Group (MbRG) was created in 2007 to discuss in more detail the issues to update morbidity. A specific code in ICD was not included in the revision of ICD-10 in 1989 for the post-polio syndrome (PPS). However, the ICD new code G14 for PPS was included in ICD-10 since 2010.

  14. Identification of one novel mutation in the EVC2 gene in a Chinese family with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zeng; Bao, Kun; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2012-12-15

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, and dysplastic nails and teeth. It is caused by biallelic mutations in the EVC or EVC2 gene. Here, we identified a novel nonsense mutation p.W828X (c.2484G>A) in exon 14 and a recurrent nonsense mutation p. R399X (c.1195C>T) in exon 10 of EVC2 gene in a Chinese boy with EvC. Identification of a novel genotype in EvC will provide clues to the phenotype-genotype relations and may assist not only in the clinical diagnosis of EvC but also in the interpretation of genetic information used for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The potential impact of family history of metabolic syndrome and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: In a highly endogamous population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Bener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to determine the potential impact of positive family history of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS among two generations, on developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM and the potential relation of consanguineous marriage among patients with MetS to the risk of developing T2DM among a sample of Qataris. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Primary healthcare (PHC centers. Materials and Methods: The survey and measurement were conducted from April 2011 to December 2012 among Qatari nationals above 20 years of age. Of the 2,182 subjects, who were approached to participate in the study, 1,552 (71% gave their consent. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire followed by anthropometric measurements and laboratory tests. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program-Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III as well as International Diabetes Federation (IDF. Results: Overall, the prevalence of MetS was 26.2% according to ATP III and 36.9% according to IDF (P < 0.0001. The mean age of MetS patients with T2DM was significantly higher than those without T2DM (Mean 48 ± 9.9 vs. 42.5 ± 9.2; P < 0.001. The proportion of females was higher among MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (61% vs. 51%; P = 0.053. In addition, there were significant differences between MetS patients with and without DM in terms of co-morbidities of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and high cholesterol. The proportion of MetS patients with positive family history for MetS was significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (46.7% vs. 33.8%; P = 0.009. The proportion of positive family history of MetS among fathers (35% vs. 21.9%; P = 0.005, mothers (30.5% vs. 18.8%; P = 0.008, maternal aunt (18.3% vs. 11.2%; P = 0.055, and maternal grand father (19.5% vs. 10%; P = 0.010 were significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to the

  16. Arrhythmia-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Prevalent, Under-recognized, Reversible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Rahul; Gopinathannair, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Arrhythmia-induced cardiomyopathy (AIC) is a clinical condition in which a persistent tachyarrhythmia or frequent ectopy contribute to ventricular dysfunction leading to systolic heart failure. AIC can be partially or completely corrected with adequate treatment of the culprit arrhythmia. Several molecular and cellular alterations by which tachyarrhythmias lead to cardiomyopathy have been identified. AIC can affect children and adults, can be clinically silent in the form of asymptomatic tachycardia with cardiomyopathy, or can present with manifest heart failure. A high index of suspicion for AIC and aggressive treatment of the culprit arrhythmia can result in resolution of heart failure symptoms and improvement in cardiac function. Recurrent arrhythmia, following recovery from the index episode, can hasten the left ventricular dysfunction and result in HF, suggesting persistent adverse remodeling despite recovery of left ventricular function. Several aspects of AIC, such as predisposing factors, early diagnosis, preventive measures to avoid adverse remodeling, and long-term prognosis, remain unclear, and need further research.

  17. Two families with isolated cat cry without the cri-du-chat syndrome phenotype have an inherited 5p15.3 deletion: Delineation of the larynx malformation region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gersh, M.; Overhauser, J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pasztor, L.M. [Children`s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome that results from a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p). Patients present with a cat-like cry at birth that is usually considered diagnostic of this syndrome. Additional features of the syndrome include failure to thrive, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and severe mental retardation. We report on two families in which the patients with 5p deletions have only the characteristic cat-like cry with normal to mildly delayed development. One family has three children with varying levels of developmental delay and a deletion of 5p15.3 that was inherited from the father. The second family has a mother and daughter both presenting with a cat-like cry and normal intelligence. A de novo deletion in a patient with isolated cat cry and mild developmental delay was also identified. The precise locations of the deletions in each family were determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization using lambda phage, cosmids, and YAC clones. Cryptic translocations and mosaicism were not detected in the parents transmitting the deletion. All of the deletion breakpoints map distal to the previously defined cri-du-chat critical region. A YAC contig has been constructed for the chromosomal region implicated in the larynx malformation. DNA clones mapping in this region will be useful diagnostic tools for delineating 5p deletions that result in the typical features of cri-du-chat syndrome with deletions that result in the isolated cat-like cry feature which is associated with a better prognosis.

  18. Síndrome de Muckle-Wells em quatro membros de uma família Four cases of Muckle-Wells syndrome within the same family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Francisca Junqueira Ribeiro Pereira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Muckle-Wells é doença autossômica dominante rara, incluída no grupo das síndromes febris hereditárias. Caracteriza-se por episódios recorrentes e autolimitados de febre, urticária, artralgia, mialgia e conjuntivite, desde a infância, relacionados com a exposição ao frio. Mais tardiamente, há perda auditiva neurossensorial progressiva. Amiloidose, a principal complicação, desenvolve-se em cerca de 25% dos casos. Associa-se a mutações no gene NLRP3 (antes CIAS1 que codifica a criopirina, proteína reguladora da produção de citocinas pró-inflamatórias, como a interleucina-1beta. Relata-se a ocorrência dessa doença incomum em quatro membros de uma única família.Muckle-Wells syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that belongs to a group of hereditary febrile syndromes. It is characterized by recurrent and self-limited episodes of fever, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia and conjunctivitis since childhood, which are related to exposure to cold temperatures. Lately, progressive sensorineural hearing loss occurs. Amyloidosis is the main complication and can be found in about 25% of the cases. It has been demonstrated that there is an association with mutations in the NLRP3 gene, which codifies cryopyrin, a protein responsible for regulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1Beta. The authors report four cases of the disease within a family.

  19. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Dabal Laila

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is becoming a major medical concern in several parts of the world, with huge economic impacts on health- care systems, resulting mainly from increased cardiovascular risks. At the same time, obesity leads to a number of sleep-disordered breathing patterns like obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS, leading to increased morbidity and mortality with reduced quality of life. OHS is distinct from other sleep- related breathing disorders although overlap may exist. OHS patients may have obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea with hypercapnia and sleep hypoventilation, or an isolated sleep hypoventilation. Despite its major impact on health, this disorder is under-recognized and under-diagnosed. Available management options include aggressive weight reduction, oxygen therapy and using positive airway pressure techniques. In this review, we will go over the epidemiology, pathophysiology, presentation and diagnosis and management of OHS.

  20. Q8IYL2 is a candidate gene for the familial epilepsy syndrome of Partial Epilepsy with Pericentral Spikes (PEPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschziner, Guy D; Coffey, Alison J; Andrew, Toby; Gregorio, Sheila P; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Calafato, Maria; Bentley, David R; Kinton, Lucy; Sander, Josemir W; Johnson, Michael R

    2011-09-01

    Partial Epilepsy with Pericentral Spikes (PEPS) is a novel Mendelian idiopathic epilepsy with evidence of linkage to Chromosome 4p15. Our aim was to identify the causative mutation in this epilepsy syndrome. We re-annotated all 42 genes in the linked chromosomal region and sequenced all genes within the linked interval. All exons, intron-exon boundaries and untranslated regions were sequenced in the original pedigree, and novel changes segregating correctly were subjected to bioinformatic analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to examine for potential copy number variation (CNV). 29 previously undescribed variants correctly segregating with the linked haplotype were identified. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that six variants were non-synonymous coding sequence polymorphisms, one of which, in Q8IYL2 (Gly400Ala), was found in neither Caucasian (n=243) and ancestry-matched Brazilian (n=180) control samples, nor subjects from the 1000 Genome Project. No gene duplications or deletions were identified in the linked region. We postulate that Q8IYL2 is a causative gene for PEPS, after exhaustive resequencing and bioinformatic analysis. The function of this gene is unknown, but it is expressed in brain tissue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.