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Sample records for under-recognized familial syndrome

  1. Genitourinary malformations: an under-recognized feature of ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate syndrome.

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    Hyder, Zerin; Beale, Victoria; O'Connor, Ruth; Clayton-Smith, Jill

    2017-04-01

    The ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate (EEC) syndrome describes the association of ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and orofacial clefting. As with many autosomal dominant disorders, there is variability in expression and not all of these three core features are present in every individual with the condition. Moreover, there may be additional associated features, which are under-recognized. One of these is the presence of genitourinary anomalies, some of which cause significant morbidity. This report details a further two patients with EEC syndrome and genitourinary involvement, including flaccid megacystis with detrusor muscle failure, bilateral hydronephrosis and megaureter, requiring significant renal and urological involvement during their childhood. We go on to review the literature on the diagnosis and management of genitourinary malformations in EEC syndrome.

  2. Wernicke-Korsakoff-syndrome: under-recognized and under-treated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg-Grzeda, Elie; Kutner, Haley E; Nicolson, Stephen E

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a well described syndrome of neurological and cognitive problems that comprises both Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) and Korsakoff syndrome (KS). WE is an acute neuropsychiatric disorder caused by thiamine deficiency. KS is a chronic consequence of thiamine deficiency with prominent impairment in memory formation. The authors review the literature on the pathophysiology, presentation, and treatment of WKS, focusing on the acute identification and treatment of WE. Most cases of WE are missed by clinicians, likely because patients do not present with the classic signs associated with the condition. Attaining high serum levels of thiamine during treatment may be important to restore cognitive function as quickly as possible, though the exact dosing and route needed for effective treatment is unknown. Data indicates that the administration of intravenous (IV) thiamine has little risk. In order to prevent this potentially devastating disease, physicians should have a high index of suspicion for WKS and dose thiamine accordingly. Copyright © 2012 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: An Under-recognized Cause of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Adolescents Admitted to a Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslyanskaya, Sofya; Talib, Hina J; Northridge, Jennifer L; Jacobs, Amanda M; Coble, Chanelle; Coupey, Susan M

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate whether ovulatory dysfunction due to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common underlying etiology of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) in adolescents who require hospitalization and to explore etiology, treatment, and complications of AUB with severe anemia in adolescents. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We identified female patients aged 8-20 years admitted to a children's hospital for treatment of AUB from January 2000 to December 2014. Our hospital protocol advises hormonal testing for PCOS and other disorders before treatment for AUB. We reviewed medical records and recorded laboratory evaluations, treatments, and final underlying diagnoses as well as recurrences of AUB and readmissions in the subsequent year. Of the 125 subjects, the mean age was 16.5 ± 2.9 years; mean hemoglobin level was 7.0 ± 1.8 g/dL; 54% were overweight/obese; and 41% sexually active. PCOS accounted for 33% of admissions; hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis immaturity 31%; endometritis 13%; bleeding disorders 10%. Girls with PCOS were more likely to be overweight/obese (74% vs 46%; P < .01) and girls with hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis immaturity had lower hemoglobin levels (6.4 g/dL vs 7.4 g/dL; P < .05), than girls with all other etiologies of AUB. Treating physicians failed to diagnose endometritis as the etiology for AUB in 4 of 8 girls with positive tests for sexually transmitted infection and no other etiology. PCOS was the most common underlying etiology in adolescents hospitalized with AUB. Screening for hyperandrogenemia is important for early diagnosis of PCOS to allow ongoing management and prevention of comorbidities. Endometritis was frequently underestimated as an etiology for AUB. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Familial Wolfram syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessahraoui, M; Paquis, V; Rouzier, C; Bouziane-Nedjadi, K; Naceur, M; Niar, S; Zennaki, A; Boudraa, G; Touhami, M

    2014-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive progressive neurodegenerative disorder, and it is mainly characterized by the presence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Other symptoms such as diabetes insipidus, deafness, and psychiatric disorders are less frequent. The WFS1 gene, responsible for the disease and encoding for a transmembrane protein called wolframin, was localized in 1998 on chromosome 4p16. In this report, we present a familial observation of Wolfram syndrome (parents and three children). The propositus was a 6-year-old girl with diabetes mellitus and progressive visual loss. Her family history showed a brother with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness since childhood and a sister with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and bilateral hydronephrosis. Thus, association of these familial and personal symptoms is highly suggestive of Wolfram syndrome. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis (biology), which showed the presence of WFS1 homozygous mutations c.1113G>A (p.Trp371*) in the three siblings and a heterozygote mutation in the parents. Our observation has demonstrated that pediatricians should be aware of the possibility of Wolfram syndrome when diagnosing optic atrophy in diabetic children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Burnout syndrome among family physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cruz, Juan; Mugártegui-Sánchez, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    burnout syndrome is a state of physical and emotional exhaustion that can occur among workers who interact directly with others. This could affect job performance. The objective was to determine the prevalence of this syndrome and its associated factors among family physicians. a cross-sectional survey applying the Maslach Burnout Inventory was conducted in a selected convenience non-probability sampling of family physicians. Central tendency and dispersion measures were used in determining the prevalence of burnout syndrome; the associated factors were analysed by χ(2) test. there were 59 cases of burnout syndrome, 36 had involvement in a single component, 15 in 2 and 8 were affected in 3 components; we observed that 35 % of positive cases reported doing an average of 10 extra shifts a month (p = 0.013). Having a second job was associated with positive cases of burnout syndrome. the results are consistent with similar studies. Working extra shifts or having a second job were the related factors most associated to this syndrome.

  6. Family perspectives about Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotko, Brian G; Levine, Susan P; Macklin, Eric A; Goldstein, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    National medical organizations recommend that during prenatal counseling sessions, healthcare providers discuss how having a child with Down syndrome (DS) might impact the family unit. Few studies, to date, have surveyed families about their life experiences. For this investigation, we examined 41 family attitudes, which were obtained from mailed questionnaires completed by 1,961 parents/guardians, 761 brothers/sisters, and 283 people with DS who were members of six DS non-profit organizations, chosen for their size, ethnic/racial diversities, and geographic distribution throughout the United States. About 83% of families reported to all being proud of the family member with DS, and 87% reported to all feeling love for the member with DS. Younger siblings (ages 9-11) were more likely to feel embarrassed by their sibling with DS if their parents/guardians also did. If one or more parents/guardians felt that their children without DS did have a good relationship with their child with DS, siblings were more likely to report that they loved and liked their brother/sister with DS. Overall, our data demonstrate that positive themes tend to dominate within modern-day families who have members with DS, although challenges were not insignificant for some. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pediatric rheumatology: An under-recognized subspecialty in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhila Kavirayani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatrics in India at the levels of both undergraduate and postgraduate training is often viewed upon as an acute disease specialty with little emphasis on chronic medical musculoskeletal diseases. Pediatric rheumatology is an under-recognized subspecialty of pediatrics which deals specifically with childhood arthritis, noninflammatory joint pains, connective tissue diseases, autoimmune diseases, vasculitis, and other rare inflammatory disorders. This article aims to give a bird's eye view of the repertoire of commonly encountered problems seen by a pediatric rheumatologist, via a classical case vignette for each topic followed by discussion. There is also mention of some rare diseases managed within pediatric rheumatology to give a flavor of the spectrum of diseases encountered. This is to raise awareness of the importance of pediatric rheumatology as a subspecialty within India and to prompt readers to seek specialist advice when encountering challenging cases. Pediatric rheumatologists network and work collaboratively with many other specialties such as ophthalmology, dermatology, neurology, orthopedics, nephrology, infectious diseases, immunology, and gastroenterology for combined care of diverse conditions. There is an unmet need in India to develop a training program for pediatric rheumatology so that shared care pathways with sensitized pediatricians and other specialists can be developed nationwide, to serve these children better to achieve optimal outcomes.

  8. Waardenburg syndrome and myelomeningocele in a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatkupt, S; Chatkupt, S; Johnson, W G

    1993-01-01

    We report the first family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and myelomeningocele in which more than one subject was affected with both disorders. The possible association is discussed. Prenatal screening for myelomeningocele is suggested for a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Images PMID:8423616

  9. Waardenburg syndrome and myelomeningocele in a family.

    OpenAIRE

    Chatkupt, S; Chatkupt, S; Johnson, W G

    1993-01-01

    We report the first family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and myelomeningocele in which more than one subject was affected with both disorders. The possible association is discussed. Prenatal screening for myelomeningocele is suggested for a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

  10. Modeling Family Adaptation to Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspa, Melissa; Bailey, Donald, Jr.; Bann, Carla; Bishop, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Using data from a survey of 1,099 families who have a child with Fragile X syndrome, we examined adaptation across 7 dimensions of family life: parenting knowledge, social support, social life, financial impact, well-being, quality of life, and overall impact. Results illustrate that although families report a high quality of life, they struggle…

  11. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have......-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2...... families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families) comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM) we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age...

  12. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2016-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflammatory response. Monarch-1 is involved in the inhibition of the inflammatory response. Mutations in the NLRP12 ... cold autoinflammatory syndrome Orphanet: Familial cold urticaria Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Autoinflammatory Alliance National ...

  14. Munchausen syndrome by proxy: a family anthology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickford, E; Buchanan, N; McLaughlan, S

    1988-06-20

    While the Munchausen-by-proxy syndrome is well recognized, the story of one family has been related to describe some remarkable features. These include the psychopathology of the mother, the involvement of both children in the family, the great difficulty in obtaining proof of child abuse and, finally, the prosecution of the mother in the criminal court.

  15. Family Demands, Social Support and Family Functioning in Taiwanese Families Rearing Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, C-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) affects not only children but also their families. Much remains to be learned about factors that influence how families of children with DS function, especially families in non-Western populations. The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to examine how family demographics, family demands and…

  16. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

    OpenAIRE

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S.; Karimi, Masoud; Silander, Gustav; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Aravidis, Christos; Nilbert, Mef; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, ha...

  17. Familial prune belly syndrome in a Nigerian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibadin, Michael Okoeguale; Ademola, Ade Adeyekun; Ofovwe, Gabriel Egberue

    2012-03-01

    A case of Prune Belly Syndrome in an infant, the second in a middle class family with both parents in their late thirties, is presented because of its rarity. Constraints in the management are discussed and relevant literature reviewed. This is intended to awaken interest and sharpen indices of suspicion that would facilitate early diagnosis, enhance management, and mitigate prejudices.

  18. Familial occurrence of pigment dispersion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovell, A M; Damji, K F; Dohadwala, A A; Hodge, W G; Allingham, R R

    2001-02-01

    Pigment dispersion syndrome affects up to 4% of the white population. It is characterized by the presence of transillumination defects, Krukenberg's spindle and dense trabecular meshwork pigmentation. Open-angle glaucoma will develop in as many as 50% of affected patients. In this study we describe the familial occurrence of pigment dispersion syndrome in six North American pedigrees and the phenotypic characteristics with respect to pigment dispersion syndrome and glaucoma. Probands with pigment dispersion syndrome were identified in glaucoma clinics at university eye centres in Ottawa and Durham, NC. Families with two or more affected members were evaluated. All willing members in each family underwent a thorough clinical examination and were classified as affected with pigment dispersion syndrome, suspect or unaffected. The previous medical records were reviewed to obtain the past medical and ocular history, including risk factors for glaucoma. All six families are white. Three families show at least two generations of affected members. Of the 43 subjects examined 58% were women. All 14 affected members showed moderate to heavy trabecular meshwork pigmentation and either Krukenberg's spindle or transillumination defects. The affected members were also considerably more myopic (mean spherical equivalent for the right eye -4.72 dioptres) than the suspect group or the unaffected group (mean spherical equivalent -0.79 D and +1.19 D respectively) (p pigment dispersion syndrome. Our ultimate goal is to identify the gene(s) that causes this disorder in order to clarify its molecular etiology and pathophysiology. This may give rise to a molecular classification of the disease as well as provide the foundation for genetic testing and new treatment approaches.

  19. Intra-abdominal hypertension in fulminant Clostridium difficile infection--an under-recognized treatable complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Lavi

    2010-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhea in adults, with recent reports of increased severity and case fatality. Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are increasingly recognized and treatable complications of severe illness in medical patients, and are independent predictors of mortality. Patients with severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are at increased risk for IAH and ACS. However, ACS has been only rarely described in this population. We report a case of a 61 year-old morbidly obese, chronically ill, ventilator dependent patient, who developed fulminant CDI, including progressive colonic distension, acute renal failure and intra-abdominal fluid sequestration. Her clinical course worsened abruptly, with new shock, worsening hypoxic respiratory failure, increased peak airway pressures and reduced tidal volumes. Intra-abdominal pressure was 30 mm Hg. The patient was not considered a surgical candidate, was refractory to escalating non-surgical support, and died following withdrawal of life support. Although patients with fulminant CDI share many risk factors for IAH and ACS, these conditions were rarely reported in this population and are likely under recognized, as was the case with the present patient. Increased vigilance for IAH is needed in this at-risk population.

  20. Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy: A Family Affair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Albert L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The article reports on a case of Munchausen syndrome by proxy in which chronic illicit insulin was administered to a one-year-old child by her mother. Factitious illnesses continued despite psychiatric intervention. Retrospective review of medical records suggested 30 previous episodes of factitious illness within the family. (DB)

  1. Fragile X Syndrome in a Colombian Family

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    Saldarriaga Gil, Wilmar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was performed on a family from Cali, Colombia in which nine patients were evaluated, three of which presented with intellectual disability with no previous etiological diagnosis. The proband was diagnosed with Fragile X syndrome by DNA molecular testing and, cascade testing, performed on all available family members, identifying two additional individuals with the full mutation and four carriers of a premutation allele. With this report we seek to contribute to Colombian epidemiology of the syndrome and emphasize the importance of diagnosis to provide a comprehensive and specific treatment to those affected. Further we seek to identify premutation carriers in their families or women with a full mutation without the classic phenotype for genetic counseling and education about potential associated pathologies.

  2. [Family medicine and functional somatic syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nago, Naoki

    2009-09-01

    Between psychosomatic medicine and psychiatry, FSS (functional somatic syndromes) patients are often visiting a family doctor. For FSS, the role of family physicians is large, but the family physicians are not required for the role of diagnosis and treatment of FSS. Rather, appropriate referral to a specialist to exclude organic disease is important and a role as the coordinator is large to the patient to refuse a psychiatric consultation. To serve as a role for such coordination, a family physician has to response the patient's emotional side and focus on the construction of the doctor-patient relationship and response. I also think of structuralism medicine approach to describe disease from the meta-level as a new procedure to the patient. This approach consists of 4 components, 'entity', 'phenomenon', 'words', and 'I'. This may be a useful approach to family physicians who coordinate the overall for FSS patients' management.

  3. Familial prune belly syndrome in a Nigerian family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Okoeguale Ibadin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Prune Belly Syndrome in an infant, the second in a middle class family with both parents in their late thirties, is presented because of its rarity. Constraints in the manage-ment are discussed and relevant literature reviewed. This is intended to awaken interest and sharpen indices of suspicion that would facilitate early diagnosis, enhance management, and mitigate prejudices.

  4. a family doctor look for metabolic syndrome?

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    Izabela Maria Banaś

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The asymptomatic course, early genesis, multifactorial onset, and the lack of a single definition of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents make it difficult to assess its prevalence. Metabolic syndrome developed in childhood increases cardiovascular risk in adulthood. Objectives. The evaluation of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome based on age, sex, weight and abdominal obesity in a population of children and adolescents in a family doctor’s practice. Material and methods. The study group comprised 325 children and adolescents (177♀, 148♂ aged 7, 13 and 16 years. Anthropometric measurements (height, weight, waist circumference were made, along with the determination of blood pressure, fasting glucose and lipid levels. Overweight states and obesity were assessed according to the IOTF criteria. Abdominal obesity and hypertension were evaluated using growth charts appropriate for the age, gender and height of the children of Lodz. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed based on the NCEP/AT P III criteria. Results . Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 6.5% of the subjects. In children aged 13 and 16 years – 7.6% (p > 0.05 vs. 7 years, aged 7 years – 3.9% (p > 0.05 vs. 13, 16 years, boys (8.8%; p > 0.05, girls (4.5%; p > 0.05. Among children with excessive body weight, metabolic syndrome was observed in every fourth child (25.4%, more often in those with obesity (44.1% than with abdominal obesity (32% and those who were overweight (19.2%, respectively (p < 0.001 vs. metabolic syndrome. The number of components of metabolic syndrome elevated with increasing body weight (p < 0.001. Abdominal obesity was observed in 17.5% of the subjects. Children with abdominal obesity had higher levels of triglycerides (p < 0.05 and lower HDL cholesterol (p 110 mg/dl in 85 (26.1% and excessive body weight in 71 subjects (21.8%. Conclusions . The presence of metabolic syndrome correlated with overweight state, obesity and abdominal obesity

  5. Familial occurrence of cerebral gigantism, Sotos' syndrome.

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    Hansen, F J; Friis, B

    1976-05-01

    Since the original description of cerebral gigantism, about 85 cases have been reported. Four papers comment on familial occurrence but never in parents and their children. This paper describes the syndrome in a mother and her child, which, together with facts pointing towards prenatal etiology, such as excessive birthweight, striking mutual resemblance and abnormal dermatoglyphics, points to a genetic defect. Previous endocrine studies are enlarged by the findings of normal serum somatomedin and serum prolactin.

  6. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny von Salomé

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, has been suggested in LS. Anticipation is a well-known phenomenon in e.g neurodegenerative diseases and several reports have studied anticipation in heritable cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anticipation can be shown in a nationwide cohort of Swedish LS families referred to the regional departments of clinical genetics in Lund, Stockholm, Linköping, Uppsala and Umeå between the years 1990-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2 families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171, or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years/generation for NREM and hazard ratio of 1.33 for COX-R and PMS2 (7.3 years/generation and hazard ratio of 1.86. The estimated anticipation effects for MLH1

  7. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud; Silander, Gustav; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Aravidis, Christos; Nilbert, Mef; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina

    2017-10-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, has been suggested in LS. Anticipation is a well-known phenomenon in e.g neurodegenerative diseases and several reports have studied anticipation in heritable cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anticipation can be shown in a nationwide cohort of Swedish LS families referred to the regional departments of clinical genetics in Lund, Stockholm, Linköping, Uppsala and Umeå between the years 1990-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2 families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families) comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM) we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R) estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171), or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years/generation for NREM and hazard ratio of 1.33 for COX-R) and PMS2 (7.3 years/generation and hazard ratio of 1.86). The estimated anticipation effects for MLH1 and MSH6 are

  8. Familial Brugada syndrome uncovered by hyperkalaemic diabetic ketoacidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Pieter G.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; DeVries, J. Hans; Tan, Hanno L.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of diabetic ketoacidosis with concomitant hyperkalaemia that uncovered a typical Brugada syndrome electrocardiogram (ECG). Further provocation testing in the patient and his son confirmed familial Brugada syndrome. Diabetic ketoacidosis with hyperkalaemia may uncover an

  9. A Korean family with the Muenke syndrome.

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    Yu, Jae Eun; Park, Dong Ha; Yoon, Soo Han

    2010-07-01

    The Muenke syndrome (MS) is characterized by unicoronal or bicoronal craniosynostosis, midfacial hypoplasia, ocular hypertelorism, and a variety of minor abnormalities associated with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. The birth prevalence is approximately one in 10,000 live births, accounting for 8-10% of patients with coronal synostosis. Although MS is a relatively common diagnosis in patients with craniosynostosis syndromes, with autosomal dominant inheritance, there has been no report of MS, in an affected Korean family with typical cephalo-facial morphology that has been confirmed by molecular studies. Here, we report a familial case of MS in a female patient with a Pro250Arg mutation in exon 7 (IgII-IGIII linker domain) of the FGFR3 gene. This patient had mild midfacial hypoplasia, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, a beak shaped nose, plagio-brachycephaly, and mild neurodevelopmental delay. The same mutation was confirmed in the patient's mother, two of the mother's sisters and the maternal grandfather. The severity of the cephalo-facial anomalies was variable among these family members.

  10. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: four families.

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    Trivedi, Amit; Waters, Karen; Suresh, Sadasivam; Nair, Rashmi

    2011-12-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare condition that usually presents soon after birth and is potentially life-shortening if not treated. The defining abnormality is hypoventilation during sleep which requires life-long treatment with artificial ventilation. This syndrome may also be associated with generalised dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system and a sub-group with associated Hirschsprung's disease. The genetic basis of CCHS has been identified as mutations in the PHOX2B gene. We present four families, three with autosomal dominant inheritance and familial clustering, and one with a de novo mutation resulting in CCHS. We demonstrate that nasal mask ventilation from birth can provide adequate treatment and improved quality of life for these children. Phenotypic variability in expression of disease is seen in families with the same mutations in PHOX2B gene. The psychosocial costs of the disease and the unrecognised 'morbidity barter' that is part of current management needs to be factored into in all stages of management from childhood to adolescence to adulthood.

  11. Superior Canal Dehiscence Syndrome Affecting 3 Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Katherine D; Kileny, Paul R; Ahmed, Sameer; El-Kashlan, Hussam K; Melendez, Tori L; Basura, Gregory J; Lesperance, Marci M

    2017-07-01

    Superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) is an increasingly recognized cause of hearing loss and vestibular symptoms, but the etiology of this condition remains unknown. To describe 7 cases of SCDS across 3 families. This retrospective case series included 7 patients from 3 different families treated at a neurotology clinic at a tertiary academic medical center from 2010 to 2014. Patients were referred by other otolaryngologists or were self-referred. Each patient demonstrated unilateral or bilateral SCDS or near dehiscence. Clinical evaluation involved body mass index calculation, audiometry, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing, electrocochleography, and multiplanar computed tomographic (CT) scan of the temporal bones. Zygosity testing was performed on twin siblings. The diagnosis of SCDS was made if bone was absent over the superior semicircular canal on 2 consecutive CT images, in addition to 1 physiologic sign consistent with labyrinthine dehiscence. Near dehiscence was defined as absent bone on only 1 CT image but with symptoms and at least 1 physiologic sign of labyrinthine dehiscence. A total of 7 patients (5 female and 2 male; age range, 8-49 years) from 3 families underwent evaluation. Family A consisted of 3 adult first-degree relatives, of whom 2 were diagnosed with SCDS and 1 with near dehiscence. Family B included a mother and her child, both of whom were diagnosed with unilateral SCDS. Family C consisted of adult monozygotic twins, each of whom was diagnosed with unilateral SCDS. For all cases, dehiscence was located at the arcuate eminence. Obesity alone did not explain the occurrence of SCDS because 5 of the 7 cases had a body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) less than 30.0. Superior canal dehiscence syndrome is a rare, often unrecognized condition. This report of 3 multiplex families with SCDS provides evidence in support of a potential genetic contribution to the etiology

  12. Childhood cancers in families with and without Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, John A; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Durno, Carol A; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2015-12-01

    Inheritance of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes or the EPCAM gene is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and other adult malignancies (Lynch syndrome). The risk of childhood cancers in Lynch syndrome families, however, is not well studied. Using data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we compared the proportion of childhood cancers (diagnosed before 18 years of age) in the first-, second-, and third-degree relatives of 781 probands with a pathogenic mutation in one of the MMR genes; MLH1 (n = 275), MSH2 (n = 342), MSH6 (n = 99), or PMS2 (n = 55) or in EPCAM (n = 10) (Lynch syndrome families), with that of 5073 probands with MMR-deficient colorectal cancer (non-Lynch syndrome families). There was no evidence of a difference in the proportion of relatives with a childhood cancer between Lynch syndrome families (41/17,230; 0.24%) and non-Lynch syndrome families (179/94,302; 0.19%; p = 0.19). Incidence rate of all childhood cancers was estimated to be 147 (95% CI 107-206) per million population per year in Lynch syndrome families and 115 (95% CI 99.1-134) per million population per year in non-Lynch syndrome families. There was no evidence for a significant increase in the risk of all childhood cancers, hematologic cancers, brain and central nervous system cancers, Lynch syndrome-associated cancers, or other cancers in Lynch syndrome families compared with non-Lynch syndrome families. Larger studies, however, are required to more accurately define the risk of specific individual childhood cancers in Lynch syndrome families.

  13. Pisotriquetral joint disorders: an under-recognized cause of ulnar side wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraux, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Imagerie Medicale Jacquemars Gielee, Lille (France); Lefebvre, G.; Pansini, V.; Aucourt, J.; Vandenbussche, L.; Cotten, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Demondion, X. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Pole Recherche Faculte de Medecine de Lille, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Lille (France)

    2014-06-15

    Pisotriquetral joint disorders are often under-recognized in routine clinical practice. They nevertheless represent a significant cause of ulnar side wrist pain. The aim of this article is to present the main disorders of this joint and discuss the different imaging modalities that can be useful for its assessment. (orig.)

  14. Familial deletion 18p syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemyre Emmanuelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion 18p is a frequent deletion syndrome characterized by dysmorphic features, growth deficiencies, and mental retardation with a poorer verbal performance. Until now, five families have been described with limited clinical description. We report transmission of deletion 18p from a mother to her two daughters and review the previous cases. Case presentation The proband is 12 years old and has short stature, dysmorphic features and moderate mental retardation. Her sister is 9 years old and also has short stature and similar dysmorphic features. Her cognitive performance is within the borderline to mild mental retardation range. The mother also presents short stature. Psychological evaluation showed moderate mental retardation. Chromosome analysis from the sisters and their mother revealed the same chromosomal deletion: 46, XX, del(18(p11.2. Previous familial cases were consistent regarding the transmission of mental retardation. Our family differs in this regard with variable cognitive impairment and does not display poorer verbal than non-verbal abilities. An exclusive maternal transmission is observed throughout those families. Women with del(18p are fertile and seem to have a normal miscarriage rate. Conclusion Genetic counseling for these patients should take into account a greater range of cognitive outcome than previously reported.

  15. Indsigter og udfordringer i danske Lynch-syndrom-familier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Timshel, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-01-01

    identified 88 unique mutations in 164 Danish families delineated as Lynch syndrome families. Predictive genetic diagnostics enables the identification of high risk individuals, who are offered participation in surveillance programmes that effectively reduce morbidity and mortality in colorectal cancer....

  16. Bilateral perisylvian ulegyria: an under-recognized, surgically remediable epileptic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Lucas P; Kieling, Renata R; Pascoal, Tharick A; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Lee, Min Cheol; Kim, Yun Hee; Paglioli, Eliseu; Neto, Pedro R; Costa, Jaderson C; Palmini, Andre

    2013-08-01

    Interest in the association of epilepsy and pseudobulbar palsy was rekindled since the identification through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria (PMG). Seizures are often intractable, but resective epilepsy surgery has not been recommended. However, a similar clinical picture can be encountered in patients with bilateral perisylvian destructive lesions, which fit the description of ulegyria (ULG). We report a series of patients with epilepsy and pseudobulbar palsy due to bilateral perisylvian ULG (BP-ULG), show that hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is often associated and highlight the fact that in this entity, unlike in malformative bilateral perisylvian PMG, seizures may be surgically treated. The motor, cognitive, epileptologic, and imaging features of 12 patients with perisylvian ULG followed at three institutions are described. For patients with refractory seizures, we detail extracranial and intracranial electrographic recordings, surgical strategies, histopathologic analyses of the resected tissue, and outcome of surgical treatment. Descriptive statistics were used for quantitative and categorical variables. Student's t-test was used to compare means, and a p Dual pathology with associated unilateral HS was present in four. One patient with dual pathology had a temporolimbic electroclinical picture and had an anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) based upon noninvasive evaluation. The other four had ictal semiology suggesting involvement of both temporolimbic and perisylvian cortex. Intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) showed concomitant seizure onset in the anterior temporal region and in the ipsilateral ULG in three of the four with dual pathology and in the ulegyric cortex in the one without HS. Resection guided by a combination of semiology, MRI, and extra and intracranial EEG led to complete seizure control in two and almost complete seizure control (Engel class II) in two other patients. The only surgical failure was an isolated ATL in a patient with dual pathology, and concomitant seizure onset in both lesions according to semiology and intracranial EEG. Our findings suggest that BP-ULG mimics the clinical features of bilateral perisylvian PMG. In patients with refractory seizures, recognition of this entity should lead to consideration of resective surgery despite the bilateral ULG. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Prader Willi Syndrome: A Family's Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Walker

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic research has offered, and continues to offer, a medical explanation of chromosomal disorders such as Down Syndrome and Asberger Syndrome and more recently the rare chromosomal disorder Prader Willi Syndrome. This research gives a pathogenic explanation of disorders which includes historical background, genetic defects and clinical features. This study set out to offer an insight into the effects of PWS on the child and his/her family. It also aimed to highlight what support systems are in place in the Co. Louth area of Ireland for individuals with PWS. Unfortunately, PWS is not curable at this time. Between 1995-2003 there were 39 diagnosed cases of PWS in Ireland, an average of 4.3 per year. On average there are four infants or children diagnosed in Ireland with PWS per year (Turner, 2004, National Centre for Medical Genetics. This study is an exploratory and descriptive case study. This case study drew on multiple sources of evidence to construct a valid and unique illustration of PWS. The primary source of data was derived from in-depth interviews with the parents of a 3-year-old girl who has PWS. She was diagnosed during the third week of life. The evidence of this study suggests that non-specialist medical staff are not generally familiar with PWS. Training in relation to diagnostic criteria for chromosomal disorders would be extremely beneficial to them and to familes that are affected by the syndrome. This study highlights the need for parents to be their own child's advocate in obtaining desired support services for their area. Support services in the North East region have been greatly increased due to the setting up of the North Eastern Health Board (now known as Health Service Executive, North East Region Early Intervention Services (EIS in 2000.

  18. Recognizing Family Dynamics in the Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Len

    2012-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is an increasingly common chronic medical condition that affects not only patients but also their families. Because family dynamics, particularly the family life cycle, can and does influence the disease process, those providing counseling to CFS patients and their families would do well to recognize these dynamics.…

  19. Radiological features of familial Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Shruthi; Shetty, Shishir Ram

    2012-03-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and skeletal anomalies. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by dentist because keratocystic odontogenic tumors are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment are of utmost importance in reducing the severity of long term sequelae of this syndrome. This report presents a rare event of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome occurring in a 39-year-old male and his 8-year-old daughter. The clinical and investigative features of this familial disorder has been described in detail.

  20. Radiological features of familial Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, Shruthi; Shetty, Shishir Ram [AB Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Nitte University, Mangalore (India)

    2012-03-15

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and skeletal anomalies. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by dentist because keratocystic odontogenic tumors are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment are of utmost importance in reducing the severity of long term sequelae of this syndrome. This report presents a rare event of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome occurring in a 39-year-old male and his 8-year-old daughter. The clinical and investigative features of this familial disorder has been described in detail.

  1. Radiological features of familial Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, Shruthi; Shetty, Shishir Ram

    2012-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and skeletal anomalies. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by dentist because keratocystic odontogenic tumors are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment are of utmost importance in reducing the severity of long term sequelae of this syndrome. This report presents a rare event of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome occurring in a 39-year-old male and his 8-year-old daughter. The clinical and investigative features of this familial disorder has been described in detail.

  2. Familial steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome: seven cases from three families in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Xia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Familial steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome is rare, and only approximately 3% of patients have affected siblings. METHODS: Herein, we report seven cases of patients with steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome from three Chinese families. Mutational screening of the Nphs2 gene was performed in all the patients. RESULTS: All seven of the familial steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome cases in our sample exhibited minimal change disease, and one case also presented with mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, according to the renal pathology. No significant was associations were found between Nphs2 gene mutations and the onset of proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome in these familial cases. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of minimal change disease is important, but it is not an unusual finding in patients with familial steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, which appears to be clinically benign and genetically distinct from other types of nephrosis.

  3. Investigation of two families with nail-patella syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Alzen, G.; Ittel, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    The radiological and clinical features of two families with a nail-patella syndrome are described. Our findings emphasize the varying expressivity of the syndrome, which has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and a penetrance of 100%. It is important for the radiologist to be aware of the syndrome's stigmata so that renal failure can be detected as early as possible after the diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia. (orig.) [de

  4. Divorce in families of children with Down Syndrome or Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Vivian Renne Gerber; Alves, Bianca dos Santos; Negrão, Juliana; Maria, Juliana Negrão; Schwartzman, José Salomão; D'Antino, Maria Eloisa Famá; Brunoni, Decio

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the impact in the stability and management of the marriage of parents of a child with Down or Rett Syndrome. Morbidity of the syndromes and the marital status of the couples before and after the birth of the affected children were considered variables. The divorce rate in families with Down syndrome was 10%, similar to the Brazilian rate population. In Rett Syndrome, the divorce rate was significantly higher, 23.5%. The higher morbidity of Rett Syndrome, and the moment of diagnosis could be relevant factors for the increased divorce rate related to this syndrome.

  5. Two pedigrees of familial advanced sleep phase syndrome in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kohtoku; Mishima, Kazuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Ebisawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2003-06-15

    To determine whether a known missense mutation (bp2106 A/G) in hPer2 (a human homolog of the Drosophila period gene) for familial advanced sleep phase syndrome in a Caucasian family is involved in Japanese familial advanced sleep phase syndrome pedigrees. We identified 2 new Japanese families with advanced sleep phase syndrome, and a systematic survey was carried out in 28 relatives of theses 2 families. A total of 9 affected subjects were identified. The affected members showed significantly strong morningness tendencies compared with the unaffected members in various circadian parameters including the Horne-Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire score (77.3 +/- 4.8 vs 57.5 +/- 7.6, p sleep-onset time (20:45 +/- 75 min vs 23:16 +/- 64 min, p DNA samples were obtained from 7 affected and 7 unaffected subjects. None of the tested subjects possessed the missense mutation (bp2106 A/G) in hPer2. Furthermore, there is no significant linkage between affected subjects with hPer2 region by 2-point mapping and by direct sequencing of 23 exons of hPer2. These findings support the notion of genetic heterogeneity of familial advanced sleep phase syndrome cases in humans. The search for more familial advanced sleep phase syndrome cases and for loci other than hPer2 are necessary to further examine the roles of circadian-related genes in genetically determined human circadian rhythm disorders.

  6. EEC syndrome sans clefting: Variable clinical presentations in a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakkar Sejal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft palate/lip syndrome (EEC is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome with varied presentation and is actually a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome leading to intra- and interfamilial differences in severity because of its variable expression and reduced penetrance. The cardinal features include ectrodactyly, sparse, wiry, hypopigmented hair, peg-shaped teeth with defective enamel and cleft palate/lip. A family comprising father, daughter and son presented to us with split hand-split foot deformity (ectrodactyly, epiphora, hair changes and deafness with variable involvement in each family member.

  7. [Atypical manifestations in familial type 1 Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans, B; Calvas, P; Bazex, J

    1998-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder. Four clinical types are recognized. Three responsible genes have been identified (PAX 3: for type I syndrome, MITF and EDN3 for types II and IV respectively). We report the case of a patient with Waardenburg type I morphotype who had atypical neurological manifestations. Decisive elements for diagnosis were the presence of Waardenburg syndrome in the family and, in affected kin, a mutation causing a shift in PAX 3 gene reading. This case confirms the variability of Waardenburg signs within one family. The association of unusual neurological manifestations in the proband suggested that Vogt Koyanagi Harada disease may have been associated and may show some relationship with familial Waardenburg syndrome.

  8. Family Therapy of Terroristic Trauma: Psychological Syndromes and Treatment Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Reviews pertinent literature on terroristic trauma and combines this information with the author's experience in treating adults, children, and family victims and survivors of recent terrorist attacks. Describes the psychological syndromes resulting from terrorism and discusses the relevant individual and family therapy modalities for treating…

  9. Modeling Family Dynamics in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S.; Burns, David D.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2007-01-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of children with genetic disorders and their unaffected siblings on family functioning. In this study, the reciprocal causal links between problem behaviors and maternal distress were investigated in 150 families containing a child with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and an unaffected sibling. Both children's…

  10. Nonorganic Failure-to-Thrive Syndrome and the Family System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderette, Paula; deGraffenried, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that nonorganic failure-to-thrive syndrome (NFTT) in infants is the result of family disengagement--the family system's maladaptive style of interaction. Proposes a systems-based approach to diagnosis and to treatment, focusing on the process of disengagement and other interaction factors. (Author/ABB)

  11. Families of 30-35-Year Olds with Down's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Background: The families of a population sample of people with Down's syndrome (DS), and of their non-disabled controls, have been followed since early childhood, and the families have now been seen again as their sons and daughters reached age 30 and 35 years. Methods: A semi-structured interview schedule was used, including items from the…

  12. Family functioning in families with a child with Down syndrome: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povee, K; Roberts, L; Bourke, J; Leonard, H

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the factors that predict functioning in families with a child with Down syndrome using a mixed methods design. The quantitative component examined the effect of maladaptive and autism-spectrum behaviours on the functioning of the family while the qualitative component explored the impact of having a child with Down syndrome on family holidays, family activities and general family functioning. Participants in this study were 224 primary caregivers of children with Down syndrome aged 4-25 years (57.1% male; 42.9% female) currently residing in Western Australia (74.0% in metropolitan Perth and 26.0% in rural Western Australia). Maladaptive and autism-spectrum behaviour were associated with poorer family functioning. Mean total scores on the measures of family functioning and marital adjustment were comparable to that of families of typically developing children. Consistent with the quantitative findings, normality was the most common theme to emerge in the qualitative data. Child problem behaviours were also identified by parents/carers as having a negative impact on the family. This study has implications for the development of programs to support families with a child with Down syndrome and may dispel some of the myths surrounding the impact of intellectual disability on the family. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. [Gardner syndrome--parent alienation syndrome (PAS). Diagnosis or family reality?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namysłowska, Irena; Heitzman, Janusz; Siewierska, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The authors present characteristics of Parental Alienation Syndrome (PAS) proposed by Gardner as well as data, which may help to differentiate that syndrome with real psychological, physical and sexual abuse. The consequences of Gardner Syndrome for legal decisions in the court cases of child custody and the critique of this syndrome in forensic and psychiatric literature are also discussed, and several questions posed. Authors propose to treat Gardner Syndrome not as as a child disorder but as a specific, dynamic family situation, which occurs sometimes, during divorce and fight about child custody.

  14. Indsigter og udfordringer i danske Lynch-syndrom-familier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Timshel, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-01-01

    The Danish Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) Register is a national resource that registers families with hereditary colorectal cancer. HNPCC is the most common type of hereditary colorectal cancer and carries an increased risk of other tumor types. Genetic diagnostics has...... identified 88 unique mutations in 164 Danish families delineated as Lynch syndrome families. Predictive genetic diagnostics enables the identification of high risk individuals, who are offered participation in surveillance programmes that effectively reduce morbidity and mortality in colorectal cancer....

  15. Potential Allergens in Disposable Diaper Wipes, Topical Diaper Preparations, and Disposable Diapers: Under-recognized Etiology of Pediatric Perineal Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, JiaDe; Treat, James; Chaney, Keri; Brod, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis in young children may be an under-recognized cause of perineal dermatitis. The diapered infant skin is uniquely susceptible to allergic contact dermatitis because of more permeable neonatal skin, a moist environment, frequent contact with irritants and resultant skin barrier breakdown, and exposure to topical products such as diaper wipes, diaper preparations, and disposable diapers. To our knowledge, potential allergens in these products have not been thoroughly catalogued or studied. We explore and review potential allergenic ingredients in diaper wipes, topical diaper preparations, and disposable diapers. We analyzed 63 diaper wipes, 41 topical diaper preparations, and the 3 top selling diaper brands available from two of the largest retailers in the United States. Each potential allergen is discussed, and epidemiologic studies of rates of sensitization to potential allergens in children are also reported. Botanical extracts, including members of the Compositae family, were the most commonly represented potential allergen in both diaper wipes and topical preparations. Other potential allergens identified with high frequency include α-tocopherol, fragrances, propylene glycol, parabens, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, and lanolin. Frequent culprits such as formaldehyde releasers and methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone were not prevalent in our analyzed products.

  16. A Danish family with dominant deafness-onychodystrophy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vind-Kezunovic, Dina; Torring, Pernille M

    2013-01-01

    The rare hereditary disorder "dominant deafness and onychodystrophy (DDOD) syndrome" (OMIM 124480) has been described in a few case reports. No putative DDOD gene or locus has been mapped and the cause of the disorder remains unknown. We present here three male family members in three generations with sensori-neural deafness, onychodystrophy and brachydactyly inherited via autosomal dominant transmission. The family members presented with absent fingernails on the first and fifth digits. As to the feet, there were absent nails on second to fifth toes in two family members, whereas the third family member only had absent nails on the fifth toe. The proband had late dentition and his father a history of late dentition, but otherwise the teeth appeared normal. Comparative genomic hybridization array analysis (Agilent 400k oligoarray) of the proband did not detect any copy number variation. This Danish family fits within the spectrum of dominant deafness and onychodystrophy syndrome and further characterises this rare disorder.

  17. Familial cryptic translocation in Angelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyerts, L.K.; Wiley, J.E.; Loud, K.M. [ECU School of Medicine, Greenville, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The majority of patients with Angelman syndrome have been shown to have a cytogenetic or molecular deletion on the maternally derived chromosome 15. We report on a case of Angelman syndrome in which this deletion occurs as an unbalanced cryptic translocation involving chromosomes 14 and 15. The proband was diagnosed clinically as having Angelman syndrome. Multiple cytogenetic studies were done without detecting any deletion. When DNA probes (Oncor) specific for the Prader Willi/Angelman locus became available, the patient was restudied and found to be deleted for {open_quotes}region A{close_quotes} (D15S11) but not for {open_quotes}region B{close_quotes} (GABRB3). No other abnormality was detected. The proband`s mother was then studied. The chromosome 15 marker probe and D15S11 were detected on different chromosomes. Using alpha-satellite probes, a cryptic 14;15 translocation was uncovered. This balanced translocation was also found to be carried by the sister of the proband. This case, along with a case presented at the 1993 ASHG meeting, illustrates the need for using acrocentric probes when studying Angelman syndrome patients. The proband was studied using additional probes specific for this region and found to be deleted for SNRPN but not for D15S10. The breakpoint of the translocation in this patient delineates the smallest deletion of the Angelman syndrome region reported to date and therefore may represent the specific gene involved.

  18. Rhombencephalosynapsis as a cause of aqueductal stenosis: an under-recognized association in hydrocephalic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Grimm, John; Nelson, Marvin D.

    2014-01-01

    Rhombencephalosynapsis is a rare genetic aberration characterized by variable vermian hypoplasia/aplasia in conjunction with united cerebellar hemispheres. Genetic defects in the isthmic organizer at the mesencephalic-metencephalic junction are presumably responsible for the associated aqueductal stenosis. We performed a retrospective review of 20 children with rhombencephalosynapsis to evaluate for and emphasize the association of aqueductal stenosis and hydrocephalus. We retrospectively reviewed the MR and CT images of 20 children (0-11 years old) with rhombencephalosynapsis encountered at two academic children's hospitals. Rhombencephalosynapsis spectrum severity was graded based on pre-existing literature. We analyzed examinations for ventriculomegaly and degree of aqueductal stenosis. The collicular distances were measured from the collicular apices. Imaging studies were also analyzed for malformations of cortical and cerebellar development. Thirteen of the 20 children (65%) with rhombencephalosynapsis presented with clinical or imaging evidence of hydrocephalus and aqueductal stenosis, principally involving the caudal cerebral aqueduct. All children with aqueductal stenosis had collicular fusion. All six children with complete rhombencephalosynapsis had aqueductal stenosis. The cerebral aqueduct varied from normal to stenotic in children with incomplete rhombencephalosynapsis. Corpus callosum dysgenesis was present in four children. Aqueductal stenosis in the setting of rhombencephalosynapsis is an under-recognized cause of noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Our findings support the hypothesis that a defect involving the common gene(s) responsible for the differentiation and development of both the roof plate and midline cerebellar primordium at the mesencephalon/first rhombomere junction may be responsible for the association of aqueductal stenosis and rhombencephalosynapsis. (orig.)

  19. Turner Syndrome: A Guide for Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of direction) · Problems with nonverbal problem-solving (particularly math) · Clumsiness (coordination problems and poor hand/finger skills) · ... syndrome.” These include: high blood pressure; abnormal blood levels of lipids (such as cholesterol); non- insulin-dependent ...

  20. Angelman syndrome in an inbred family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Beuten (Joke); R.C.M. Hennekam (Raoul); B. van Roy (Bernadette); K. Mangelschots (Kathelijne); J.S. Sutcliffe (James); D.J.J. Halley (Dicky); R.C.M. Hennekam (Raoul); L. Beaudet (Lucille); P.J. Willems (Patrick)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractAngelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe mental retardation, absent speech, puppet-like movements, inappropriate laughter, epilepsy, and abnormal electroencephalogram. The majority of AS patients (≃ 65%) have a maternal deficiency within chromosomal region 15q11-q13, caused by

  1. Angelman syndrome in an inbred family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuten, J.; Hennekam, R. C.; van Roy, B.; Mangelschots, K.; Sutcliffe, J. S.; Halley, D. J.; Hennekam, F. A.; Beaudet, A. L.; Willems, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe mental retardation, absent speech, puppet-like movements, inappropriate laughter, epilepsy, and abnormal electroencephalogram. The majority of AS patients (approximately 65%) have a maternal deficiency within chromosomal region 15q11-q13, caused by

  2. A new familial intrauterine growth retardation syndrome the "3-M syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spranger, J; Opitz, J M; Nourmand, A

    1976-09-01

    Two pairs of siblings are described with proportionate dwarfism due to skeletal hypoplasia of prenatal onset. The head size was normal for age and disproportionately large for height. The patients had a characteristic face different from that seen in the Silver-Russell syndrome. The family data are in accordance with autosomal recessive inheritance. In spite of some similarities, the bulk of clinical and genetic evidence suggests that the described intrauterine growth retardation syndrome is different from the Silver-Russell syndrome and presents an apparently "new" entity which has been designated 3-M syndrome.

  3. Rhombencephalosynapsis as a cause of aqueductal stenosis: an under-recognized association in hydrocephalic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Matthew T. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Choudhri, Asim F. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); Grimm, John; Nelson, Marvin D. [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Rhombencephalosynapsis is a rare genetic aberration characterized by variable vermian hypoplasia/aplasia in conjunction with united cerebellar hemispheres. Genetic defects in the isthmic organizer at the mesencephalic-metencephalic junction are presumably responsible for the associated aqueductal stenosis. We performed a retrospective review of 20 children with rhombencephalosynapsis to evaluate for and emphasize the association of aqueductal stenosis and hydrocephalus. We retrospectively reviewed the MR and CT images of 20 children (0-11 years old) with rhombencephalosynapsis encountered at two academic children's hospitals. Rhombencephalosynapsis spectrum severity was graded based on pre-existing literature. We analyzed examinations for ventriculomegaly and degree of aqueductal stenosis. The collicular distances were measured from the collicular apices. Imaging studies were also analyzed for malformations of cortical and cerebellar development. Thirteen of the 20 children (65%) with rhombencephalosynapsis presented with clinical or imaging evidence of hydrocephalus and aqueductal stenosis, principally involving the caudal cerebral aqueduct. All children with aqueductal stenosis had collicular fusion. All six children with complete rhombencephalosynapsis had aqueductal stenosis. The cerebral aqueduct varied from normal to stenotic in children with incomplete rhombencephalosynapsis. Corpus callosum dysgenesis was present in four children. Aqueductal stenosis in the setting of rhombencephalosynapsis is an under-recognized cause of noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Our findings support the hypothesis that a defect involving the common gene(s) responsible for the differentiation and development of both the roof plate and midline cerebellar primordium at the mesencephalon/first rhombomere junction may be responsible for the association of aqueductal stenosis and rhombencephalosynapsis. (orig.)

  4. Small bowel endoscopy in familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan Jacob

    Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and patients with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of developing small intestinal neoplasia. In both conditions, the lifetime risk to develop small bowel cancer is estimated to be around 5%. In FAP, this risk is associated with the degree of

  5. Urological cancer related to familial syndromes

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    Walter Henriques da Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cancer related to hereditary syndromes corresponds to approximately 5-10% of all tumors. Among those from the genitourinary system, many tumors had been identified to be related to genetic syndromes in the last years with the advent of new molecular genetic tests. New entities were described or better characterized, especially in kidney cancer such as hereditary leiomyomatosis renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC, succinate dehydrogenase kidney cancer (SDH-RCC, and more recently BAP1 germline mutation related RCC. Among tumors from the bladder or renal pelvis, some studies had reinforced the role of germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR genes, especially in young patients. In prostate adenocarcinoma, besides mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes that are known to increase the incidence of high-risk cancer in young patients, new studies have shown mutation in other gene such as HOXB13 and also polymorphisms in MYC, MSMB, KLK2 and KLK3 that can be related to hereditary prostate cancer. Finally, tumors from testis that showed an increased in 8 - 10-fold in siblings and 4 - 6-fold in sons of germ cell tumors (TGCT patients, have been related to alteration in X chromosome. Also genome wide association studies GWAS pointed new genes that can also be related to increase of this susceptibility.

  6. Stickler syndrome: an underdiagnosed disease. Report of a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyzer, T H W; De Veuster, I; Smets, R-M E

    2011-01-01

    To report a family diagnosed with Stickler syndrome. To emphasize that early recognition of patients with Stickler syndrome could improve the visual outcome. Case report. A 14 year old girl of Mahgrebian origin presented with a longstanding subtotal RRD in the right eye. Subsequently 6 family members in 3 generations have been identified with the same COL2A1 mutation. 4 eyes lost perception of light and 1 eye was enucleated. Stickler syndrome is the commonest inherited cause of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). These tend to be complex and to occur at young age, frequently affecting both eyes. Other ocular features consist of high myopia, optically empty vitreous cavity, posterior radial paravascular lattice-type degeneration, cataract and glaucoma. Non-ocular findings include midface hypoplasia, musculoskeletal changes and hearing loss. In severe cases the disorder will readily be suspected. In mildly affected patients, clinical diagnosis can be quite difficult. Therefore, all family members of a Stickler patient should be offered molecular genetic testing. Stickler patients benefit from a multidisciplinary approach, including audiologic examination. They should be informed about the symptoms associated with retinal tears and retinal detachment and have priviliged access to the ophthalmic care unit. In case of RRD, vitrectomy is the preferred surgery. Prophylaxis of RRD in Stickler syndrome patients consisting of a 360 degrees peripheral cryotherapy or photocoagulation has been proposed. Practical guidelines for follow up or thresholds for initiating treatment have not been formulated. Stickler syndrome remains under-diagnosed. Hightened awareness of Stickler syndrome could improve visual outcome in affected individuals and makes genetic counseling possible

  7. Berry syndrome in association with familial limb malformation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shahdadpuri, R

    2012-02-01

    We describe a newborn boy diagnosed with Berry syndrome consisting of a distal aortopulmonary septal defect, aortic origin of the right pulmonary artery, and interruption of the aorta. The child was noted to have reduplication of the right thumb. The child\\'s mother had a claw malformation of her left hand but a normal cardiovascular status. Genetic analysis for TBX5 and SALL4 mutations were negative in both the patient and his mother. This case describes the first ever report of Berry syndrome in an infant with reduplication of the right thumb and familial limb malformation.

  8. [Dementias: impact on the family and prevention of caregivers' syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater Mateu, M P; López Cortacans, G

    1998-11-01

    This article deals with the impact dementia can cause in a family in our modern society, an impact which often leads to a crisis or a rupture in a family. Due to the evolution in family structure in Spain over the last few decades, as evidenced by separations, divorces, reconstructed families, a descent in birth rate, and especially by women joining the work force, the possibilities for traditional family care of the elderly have become complicated and have been reduced, which leads to a tremendous physical and psychological wear on the person who takes on the largest part of this care, the so-called main caretaker, usually a woman. In consequence to this situation, dysfunctional behaviors may develop in this caretaker which, if not treated, may early or later on develop into the caretaker syndrome. The effects of this syndrome include subjective ones such as emotional suffering and objective ones such as a loss of health. This article presents a proposal for action by nurses acting out of primary health care centers which leads to a series of measures providing containing methods and formal support structures, in other words prevention, for the family and especially for the main caretaker of patients suffering from dementia.

  9. Familial Kleine-Levin Syndrome: A Specific Entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang Tuan Remy; Groos, Elisabeth; Leclair-Visonneau, Laurène; Monaca-Charley, Christelle; Rico, Tom; Farber, Neal; Mignot, Emmanuel; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare, mostly sporadic disorder, characterized by intermittent episodes of hypersomnia plus cognitive and behavior disorders. Although its cause is unknown, multiplex families have been described. We contrasted the clinical and biological features of familial versus sporadic KLS. Two samples of patients with KLS from the United States and France (n = 260) were studied using clinical interviews and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping. A multiplex family contained two or more first- or second-degree affected relatives (familial cases). Twenty-one patients from 10 multiplex families (siblings: n = 12, including two pairs of monozygotic twins; parent-child: n = 4; cousins: n = 2; uncle-nephews: n = 3) and 239 patients with sporadic KLS were identified, yielding to 4% multiplex families and 8% familial cases. The simplex and multiplex families did not differ for autoimmune, neurological, and psychiatric disorders. Age, sex ratio, ethnicity, HLA typing, karyotyping, disease course, frequency, and duration of KLS episodes did not differ between groups. Episodes were less frequent in familial versus sporadic KLS (2.3 ± 1.8/y versus 3.8 ± 3.7/y, P = 0.004). Menses triggered more frequently KLS onset in the nine girls with familial KLS (relative risk, RR = 4.12, P = 0.03), but not subsequent episodes. Familial cases had less disinhibited speech (RR = 3.44, P = 0.049), less combined hypophagia/hyperphagia (RR = 4.38, P = 0.006), more abrupt termination of episodes (RR = 1.45, P = 0.04) and less postepisode insomnia (RR = 2.16, P = 0.008). There was similar HLA DQB1 distribution in familial versus sporadic cases and no abnormal karyotypes. Familial KLS is mostly present in the same generation, and is clinically similar to but slightly less severe than sporadic KLS. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. Marfan Syndrome in an Iranian Family: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Davari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is a genetic disorder which is inherited by autosomal dominant traits. In MFS, lens displacement and cardiovascular involvement are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the clinical course of the disease. In this case study, the ocular involvement in a family with severe penetration of MFS is reported. Twelve members of a family (father, two daughters, three sons, and six grandchildren had MFS. Lens ectopia was the most common ophthalmic involvement among the family (100%. Other ocular involvements were as follows; Hypoplastic iris or ciliary’s muscle hypoplasia (50%, on gated eyeball (42%, flat cornea (30%, glaucoma and cataract (25%, retinal detachment (16%. Three members of the family underwent eye surgery including lens extraction, glaucoma surgery and retinal surgery.

  11. Leisure time of families with children suffering from Asperger syndrome

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    Zumarova M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asperger' s syndrome is one of the pervasive developmental disorders according to the International Classification of Diseases (tenth revision. Problems of this type of disability are found in many areas, for example – the system of care, diagnosis, education, the number of organizations that deal with this condition and provide these services. Recent research has shown an increase in autism spectrum disorders (every hundredth child is born with this diagnosis. Children with Asperger syndrome are intrinsically “blind” in public and seem rude, and these situations are not easy for their parents. The most difficult area for parents is free time. Children cannot organize their leisure time, plus the ability to meaningfully spend their time is very limited. Incidence of organizations offering leisure activities for people with autism is usually larger in big cities, because the concentration of these children is greater. The aim of this paper is to characterize the basic theoretical background and find out what leisure time possibilities exist for a family having a child with Asperger's syndrome. How can a family with a child with Asperger's syndrome spend leisure time?

  12. The familial hyperchylomicronemia syndrome: New insights into underlying genetic defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamarina-Fojo, S.; Brewer, H.B. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-02-20

    This case history reports the diagnosis of familial hyperchylomicronemia, a rare genetic syndrome inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. It is characterized by severe fasting hypertriglyceridemia and massive accumulations of chylomicrons in plasma. The two major molecular defects in the disease are a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase or of apo C-II. The location of the mutations in the human apolipoprotein (apo) C-II gene are identified.

  13. The impact of pediatric nephrotic syndrome on families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sulagna; Banerjee, Sushmita

    2011-08-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the psychologic and economic effects of pediatric nephrotic syndrome (NS) on caregivers. Caregivers of 50 children with NS were compared with a control group of 50 families of children with minor illnesses attending the same outpatient facility. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) IA was used to assess the mental status of the primary caregiver. The socioeconomic status of the family was assessed using the modified Kuppuswamy scale. Expenditure for the illness was calculated during parent interviews. The difference between groups was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test. BDI scores signified moderate to severe depression in 48% of NS caregivers compared with 12% controls. The mean BDI score was significantly higher in NS caregivers, correlating positively with disease severity and negatively with socioeconomic status. Expenditure for disease also was significantly higher in families with NS patients, varying between 30% and 60% of monthly income depending on disease severity compared with 6.9% in controls. In 10% of NS families, it was more than total income, forcing families to break into savings or go into debt. Although pediatric NS most commonly has an excellent long-term outcome, it causes significant mental and economic stress on families. Severe forms should be categorized as a chronic illness and be eligible for disability benefits and subsidized travel and medical care. Establishing support groups and supportive care at local levels would help reduce the burden on families of patients wtih NS.

  14. Chronic idiopathic urticaria and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): an under-recognized comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Gupta, Aditya K

    2012-01-01

    A large body of literature supports the role of psychologic stress in urticaria; however, the comorbidity between chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a classic stress-mediated syndrome, has received little attention. The underlying etiology of urticaria is not identifiable in about 70% of patients, possibly because of difficulties with identification of a direct cause-and-effect relationship between a potential causative factor and the onset of urticaria. The core features of PTSD (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision [DSMIV-TR]) that are important in urticaria include (1) autonomic nervous system reactivity and state of sympathetic hyperarousal that can manifest as CIU, and (2) the persistent re-experiencing of the traumatic events in PTSD, which can manifest as urticaria or angioedema, or both, affecting a previously traumatized body region (eg, urticarial wheals affecting the body region where the patient had been stabbed years earlier). The following features of PTSD make it difficult to use the cause-and-effect model for the determination of causation: (1) PTSD may first emerge years after the initial trauma and is classified as PTSD with Delayed Onset (DSMIV-TR); and (2) the traumatic triggers that precipitate the PTSD symptoms may be unique and idiosyncratic to the patient and not even qualify as stressful or traumatic by standard criteria (eg, precipitating events for the PTSD may include smell of a certain cologne that was used by the perpetrator or witnessing a scene in a movie that was reminiscent of the location where the abuse occurred). Finally, in PTSD with Delayed Onset, patients may not make a conscious association between their recurrent urticaria and their earlier traumas because they can develop classically conditioned associations between stimuli that are reminiscent of the original abuse situation and their somatic reactions such as urticaria. The clinician

  15. Late-onset ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency: An under recognized cause of metabolic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric T Rush

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is the most common inherited disorder of the urea cycle, has a variable phenotype, and is caused by mutations in the OTC gene. We report three cases of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency to illustrate the late-onset presentation of this disorder and provide strategies for diagnosis and treatment. The patients were maternal first cousins, presenting with hyperammonemia and obtundation. Urea cycle disorder was not initially suspected in the first patient, delaying diagnosis. Results: Sequencing of the OTC gene showed a novel missense mutation, c.563G > C (p.G188A. Numerous family members were found to carry this mutation, which shows a trend toward later onset. Each urea cycle disorder has its own unique pattern of biochemical abnormalities, which differ from non-metabolic causes of critical illness. Conclusion: Regardless of age, clinical suspicion of a urea cycle disorder is important in encephalopathic patients to ensure quick diagnosis and definitive treatment of the underlying inborn error of metabolism.

  16. Molecular Pathogenesis of Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Miyamotoa

    2018-01-01

    Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease and consists of a small percentage of WPW syndrome which exhibits ventricular pre-excitation by development of accessory atrioventricular pathway. A series of mutations in PRKAG2 gene encoding gamma2 subunit of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as the cause of familial WPW syndrome. AMPK is one of the most important metabolic regulators of carbohydrates and lipids in many types of tissues including cardiac and skeletal muscles. Patients and animals with the mutation in PRKAG2 gene exhibit aberrant atrioventricular conduction associated with cardiac glycogen overload. Recent studies have revealed "novel" significance of canonical pathways leading to glycogen synthesis and provided us profound insights into molecular mechanism of the regulation of glycogen metabolism by AMPK. This review focuses on the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cardiac abnormality due to PRKAG2 mutation and will provide current overviews of the mechanism of glycogen regulation by AMPK. J. Med. Invest. 65:1-8, February, 2018.

  17. Clinical and genetic aspects of Marfan syndrome and familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns the clinical and genetic aspects of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, in particular in Marfan syndrome. It includes the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome. These guidelines contain practical directions for

  18. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP and Other Polyposis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Rodney J

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There have been significant advances in our knowledge about the molecular changes that precede and accompany the development of inherited predispositions to colorectal cancer. In this review the clinical relationship to the molecular changes associated with the polyposis syndromes is presented. The aim is to put into context the diverse findings that have been shown to be associated with the development of colorectal cancer in persons who harbor a predisposition to develop disease at unusually early ages. The main focus will be on familial adenomatous polyposis as it serves as a model disease and is the most extensively studied of all of the polyposis syndromes. In addition some information is provided that explains the relationship between a germline change in one gene and what consequences that can have for a particular cell and the development of disease.

  19. Case Report : A Relieved Family with the Diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

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    Ahmet Kokurcan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS is a diagnosis formed from Wernicke ensephalopathy and Korsakoff Syndrome together. WKS is usually a chronic syndrome beginning acutely. Wernicke%u2019s encephalopathy is an acute syndrome composed of the triad of oculomotor signs; ataxia and confusion. B vitamines especially tiamine are considered to cause the syndrome. Korsakoff syndrome is a syndrome presenting with amnesia and amnesia is permanent in many cases. While Korsakoff syndrome is a continuation form of Wernicke; the syndromes are admitted as the acute and chronic conditions of the same pathophysiology. WKS syndrome means despair for many psychiatrists and the family unless treatment is initiated in the acute phase and irreversible cognitive impairment is prevented. We will discuss a case of WKS pleasing his family as nervousness has improved with cognitive impairment.

  20. Developmental expression of Drosophila Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome family proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Mesa, Evelyn; Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Rosales-Nieves, Alicia E.; Parkhurst, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WASP) family proteins participate in many cellular processes involving rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. To the date, four WASP subfamily members have been described in Drosophila: Wash, WASp, SCAR, and Whamy. Wash, WASp, and SCAR are essential during early Drosophila development where they function in orchestrating cytoplasmic events including membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. A mutant for Whamy has not yet been reported. Results We generated monoclonal antibodies that are specific to Drosophila Wash, WASp, SCAR, and Whamy, and use these to describe their spatial and temporal localization patterns. Consistent with the importance of WASP family proteins in flies, we find that Wash, WASp, SCAR, and Whamy are dynamically expressed throughout oogenesis and embryogenesis. For example, we find that Wash accumulates at the oocyte cortex. WASp is highly expressed in the PNS, while SCAR is the most abundantly expressed in the CNS. Whamy exhibits an asymmetric subcellular localization that overlaps with mitochondria and is highly expressed in muscle. Conclusion All four WASP family members show specific expression patterns, some of which reflect their previously known roles and others revealing new potential functions. The monoclonal antibodies developed offer valuable new tools to investigate how WASP family proteins regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics. PMID:22275148

  1. Johnson-McMillin microtia syndrome: New additional family

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    Nagwa Abdel-Meguid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtia is a congenital anomaly that is found with different prevalence among various populations. The exact etiology of ear anomalies is still unknown. We describe a new additional family with this rare disorder; Johnson-McMillin syndrome (JMS where mother, son, and distant grandmother have multiple features of JMS in the form of microtia, facial asymmetry, ear malformation, hearing defect, and hypotrichosis. Variable presentations in this family could be referred to phenotype variation supporting an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. We observed that the mother was very sad and suffered from feelings of guilt. We found that she had isolated herself from family and community out of fear of being stigmatized and hurt. We concluded that the occurrence of microtia is of public health importance, adhering to traditional marriage customs in Egypt increases women′s risk of giving birth to a disabled child, yet the mothers are blamed and shamed for their children′s birth defects by their husbands, families, and communities, while the fathers are not stigmatized.

  2. Marfan syndrome and cardiovascular complications: results of a family investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Simon Antoine; Djibrilla, Siddikatou; Aw, Fatou; Bodian, Malick; Babaka, Kana; Ngaidé, Aliou Alassane; Dioum, Momar; Ba, Serigne Abdou

    2017-07-19

    Cardiovascular complications in Marfan syndrome (MFS) make all its seriousness. Taking as a basis the Ghent criteria, we conducted a family screening from an index case. The objective was to describe the clinical characteristics of MFS anomalies and to detect cardiovascular complications in our patients. Six subjects were evaluated. Patients had to be in the same uterine siblings of the index case or be a descendant. The objective was to search for MFS based on the diagnostic criteria of Ghent and, subsequently, detecting cardiovascular damage. The average age was 24 years. The examination revealed three cases of sudden death in a context of chest pain. Five subjects had systemic involvement with a score ≥ 7 that allowed to the diagnosis of MFS. Two patients had simultaneously ectopia lentis and myopia. In terms of cardiovascular damage, there were three cases of dilatation of the aortic root, two cases of aortic dissection of Stanford's type A with severe aortic regurgitation in one case and moderate in the other. There were three patients with moderate mitral regurgitation with a case by valve prolapse. The family screening is crucial in Marfan syndrome. It revealed serious cardiovascular complications including sudden death and aortic dissection.

  3. Family Environment and Behavior Problems in Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jan S.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Baker, Jason K.; Smith, Leann E.; Warren, Steven F.; Brady, Nancy; Hong, Jinkuk

    2012-01-01

    We examine how the family environment is associated with aspects of the Fragile X syndrome phenotype during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Mothers of children (n = 48), adolescents (n = 85), and adults (n = 34) with Fragile X syndrome participated in a multisite study. For children and adults with Fragile X syndrome, the presence of warmth…

  4. Family perspectives in lynch syndrome becoming a family at risk, patterns of communication and influence on relations

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    Bartuma Katarina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of individuals are diagnosed with hereditary cancer. Though increased levels of anxiety and depression have been demonstrated around the time of genetic counselling, most individuals handle life at increased risk well. Data have, however, been collected on individual basis, which led us to focus on family perspectives of hereditary cancer. Methods Lynch syndrome represents a major type of hereditary colorectal and gynaecological cancer. We preformed open-ended interviews with 27 informants from 9 Lynch syndrome families. Inductive content analysis revealed three major themes: transition to a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations and individual roles. Results Family members described how learning about Lynch syndrome shifted focus from daily issues to concerns about cancer. Changes in communication related to difficulties in talking to children about heredity and informing new family members and distant relatives about an increased risk of cancer. Influence on relations was exemplified by family members taking on different roles, e.g. females often being responsible for coordinating information about heredity and providing support. Families in which members had experienced cancer at young age typically informed children soon after learning about heredity and at young age, whereas families with experience of cancer at higher age postponed information and thereby also genetic counselling. Conclusions Three major family perspectives are described in Lynch syndrome families; becoming a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations. Since these issues are central, our findings suggests that such family perspectives should be considered during genetic counselling in order to contribute to information spread, help family members cope with the increased risk, and motivate family members at risk to undergo surveillance.

  5. Relationship between family quality of life and day occupations of young people with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kitty-Rose; Girdler, Sonya; Downs, Jenny; Jacoby, Peter; Bourke, Jenny; Lennox, Nick; Einfeld, Stewart; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Parmenter, Trevor R; Leonard, Helen

    2014-09-01

    To explore relationships between family quality of life, day occupations and activities of daily living (ADL) of young persons with Down syndrome. Data were collected from 150 families with a young person with Down syndrome aged 16-30 years participating in the Down syndrome "Needs Opinions Wishes" database. Data described the young person's characteristics (including functional abilities, behaviour and day occupations) and family characteristics (including income, family and community supports and quality of life). Compared to families of young people attending open employment, families of young people participating in sheltered employment tended to report poorer family quality of life, after adjusting for personal characteristics, behaviour and income (coeff -6.78, 95 % CI -14.38, 0.81). Family supports reduced this relationship (coeff -6.00, 95 % CI -12.76, 0.76). Families of young people with greater functioning in ADL reported better family quality of life regardless of personal and environmental factors (coeff 0.45, 95 % CI 0.05, 0.85) and inclusion of family factors such as family supports reduced this association (coeff 0.29, 95 % CI -0.10, 0.67). Participation of young people with Down syndrome in open employment may positively influence family quality of life. Services that facilitate functioning in ADL and assist the families in accessing suitable family supports have the potential to positively influence family quality of life.

  6. Identification of a novel FBN1 gene mutation in a large Pakistani family with Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micheal, S.; Khan, M.I.; Akhtar, F.; Weiss, M.M.; Islam, F.; Ali, M.; Qamar, R.; Maugeri, A.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a novel mutation in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene in a large Pakistani family with autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome (MFS). METHODS: Blood samples were collected of 11 family members affected with Marfan syndrome, and DNA was isolated by phenol-extraction. The coding exons of

  7. Bartsocas-Papas Syndrome: Unusual Findings in the First Reported Egyptian Family

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla, E. M.; Morsy, H.

    2011-01-01

    Bartsocas-Papas syndrome (BPS) is an autosomal recessive syndrome with severe craniofacial, limb, and genital abnormalities. As of 2011, 24 published cases and families were registered in the Orphanet Report Series. Compared to other disorders characterized by pterygia, the condition is usually more severe and often lethal: most affected patients die in utero or shortly after birth. We report the first Egyptian family with Bartsocas-Papas syndrome comprising three cases; our proband who was ...

  8. Gene screening in a Chinese family with Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jiao Xia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To analyze the causative gene mutation for Marfan syndrome(MFSwith autosomal dominant hereditary in a Chinese family in Liaoning Province,China. METHODS: Venous blood was collected and candidate gene was selected to design primers according to the clinical phenotype. With genomic polymerase chain reaction(PCRperformed, the coding exons and their flanking intron in sequences of candidate gene were sequenced,DNA fragments separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing method was used to determine the pathogenic gene.RESULTS:Phenotype of the proband was presented as ectopic lentis. Sequencing of the coding regions of FBN1 gene showed the presence of a heterozygous A→G transversion at nucleotide 640 in the 7 exon of FBN1 and the missense mutation made for Glycine into Serine(G214S. CONCLUSION:A heterozygous mutation of FBN1 c.A640G(p.G214Sis responsible for the Marfan syndrome in the four generation Chinese pedigree.

  9. The Coffin-Siris syndrome: report of a family and further delineation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haspeslagh, M; Fryns, J P; van den Berghe, H

    1984-10-01

    The familial occurrence of the Coffin-Siris syndrome, combining a typical facial appearance with hypoplastic or absent fifth finger- or toenails, is reported. The full expression of the syndrome was present in two sisters, and partial clinical manifestations were present in their mentally borderline father. The relevant literature is reviewed, and the relation and confusion with other mental retardation syndromes, mainly the Coffin-Lowry syndrome, is discussed.

  10. Gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome (PS. METHODS: The study enrolled patients with PS consecutively evaluated during 38 years in a Clinical Genetics Service of a pediatric referral hospital in Southern Brazil. The clinical data and the results of cytogenetic analysis were collected from the medical records. For statistical analysis, the two-tailed Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test with Yates' correction were used, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The sample was composed of 27 patients, 63% were male, with a median age of nine days at the first evaluation. Full trisomy of chromosome 13 was the main cytogenetic finding (74%. Only six patients were submitted to obstetric ultrasound and none had prenatal diagnosis of PS. The patients' demographic characteristics, compared to born alive infants in the same Brazilian state showed a higher frequency of: mothers with 35 years old or more (37.5%; multiparous mothers (92.6%; vaginal delivery (77%; preterm birth (34.6%; birth weight <2500g (33.3%, and Apgar scores <7 in the 1st (75% and in the 5th minute (42.9%. About half of them (53% died during the first month of life. CONCLUSIONS: The understanding of the PS patients' gestational, perinatal and family findings has important implications, especially on the decision about the actions to be taken in relation to the management of these patients.

  11. The Importance of the Family History in Caring for Families With Long QT Syndrome and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, J.S.; Berkenbosch-Nieuwhof, K.; van den Berg, M.P.; van Dijk, R.; Middel, B.; van Tintelen, J.P.

    In potentially inherited cardiac diseases, the family history is of great importance. We looked at the way cardiologists take a family history in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) or long QT syndrome (LQTS) and whether this led to screening of relatives or other follow-up. We

  12. Familial Recurrence of 3MC Syndrome in Consanguineous Families: A Clinical and Molecular Diagnostic Approach With Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Olivia K; Haynes, Karla; Schweitzer, Daniela; Johns, Alexis; Magee, William P; Urata, Mark M; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A

    2017-11-01

    We report four individuals from two unrelated consanguineous families with 3MC syndrome. In the first family, chromosome microarray data revealed that the two affected sisters, born to first-cousin parents, shared a unique homozygous C-terminal deletion in the COLEC11 gene. Two affected brothers from a second family, also born to first-cousin parents, shared a region of homozygosity that included the second gene known to cause the 3MC syndrome, MASP1. We discuss the diagnostic approach of craniofacial disorders born to consanguineous parents and highlight a literature search and reference a helpful dysmorphology solution powered by FDNA (Facial Dysmorphology Novel Analysis) technology.

  13. CT characteristics of Morel-Lavallee lesions: an under-recognized but significant finding in acute trauma imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, Gavin A.; Niederhauser, Blake D.; Collins, Mark S.; Howe, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    To highlight the significance and imaging characteristics of Morel-Lavallee (ML) lesions, which have been well characterized on MRI, but are potentially under-recognized on CT. Twenty-eight Morel-Lavallee lesions were identified in 18 patients and were all clinically or surgically confirmed. Lesions were grouped into acute (<3 days), subacute (3-30 days), and chronic (>30 days) at the time of CT imaging. Charts were reviewed to gather patient characteristics, injury patterns, radiologist interpretation, treatment, and outcomes. Sixteen male and 2 female patients with a mean age of 50 years (range 19-80) at the date of their initial evaluation were identified. All patients had significant trauma that accounted for 28 ML lesions, all of which were in a characteristic subcutaneous location overlying the muscular fascial plane. Lesions on CT went through an evolution from hyperdense, poorly or moderately marginated without a pseudocapsule to being hypodense, with internal fat globules or septations and well marginated with a complete enhancing pseudocapsule. Only 1 (4 %) of the ML lesions was suggested and 7 (25 %) lesions were not commented on at all by the interpreting radiologist. Morel-Lavallee lesions are post-traumatic closed, internal, soft-tissue, degloving lesions that are potentially underrecognized on CT. Most acute ML lesions are nonspecific, resembling simple hematomas or contusions. ML lesions evolve as they age with subacute and chronic lesions demonstrating the known features described on MR imaging that should allow for an accurate imaging diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. CT characteristics of Morel-Lavallée lesions: an under-recognized but significant finding in acute trauma imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Gavin A; Niederhauser, Blake D; Collins, Mark S; Howe, Benjamin M

    2016-08-01

    To highlight the significance and imaging characteristics of Morel-Lavallée (ML) lesions, which have been well characterized on MRI, but are potentially under-recognized on CT. Twenty-eight Morel-Lavallée lesions were identified in 18 patients and were all clinically or surgically confirmed. Lesions were grouped into acute (30 days) at the time of CT imaging. Charts were reviewed to gather patient characteristics, injury patterns, radiologist interpretation, treatment, and outcomes. Sixteen male and 2 female patients with a mean age of 50 years (range 19-80) at the date of their initial evaluation were identified. All patients had significant trauma that accounted for 28 ML lesions, all of which were in a characteristic subcutaneous location overlying the muscular fascial plane. Lesions on CT went through an evolution from hyperdense, poorly or moderately marginated without a pseudocapsule to being hypodense, with internal fat globules or septations and well marginated with a complete enhancing pseudocapsule. Only 1 (4 %) of the ML lesions was suggested and 7 (25 %) lesions were not commented on at all by the interpreting radiologist. Morel-Lavallée lesions are post-traumatic closed, internal, soft-tissue, degloving lesions that are potentially underrecognized on CT. Most acute ML lesions are nonspecific, resembling simple hematomas or contusions. ML lesions evolve as they age with subacute and chronic lesions demonstrating the known features described on MR imaging that should allow for an accurate imaging diagnosis.

  15. The Hereditary Hyperferritinemia-Cataract Syndrome in 2 Italian Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Perruccio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two 8- and 9-year-old brothers were referred to the Pediatric Oncology Unit, Perugia General Hospital, because of hyperferritinemia. Both had a history of bilateral cataract and epilepsy. Genetic investigation revealed two distinct mutations in iron haemostasis genes; homozygosity for the HFE gene H63D mutation in the younger and heterozygosity in the elder. Both displayed heterozygosity for C33T mutation in the ferritin light chain iron response element. A 7-year-old boy from another family was referred to our unit because of hyperferritinemia. Genetic analyses did not reveal HFE gene mutations. Family history showed that his mother was also affected by hyperferritinemia without HFE gene mutations. Magnetic resonance imaging in the mother was positive for iron overload in the spleen. Cataract was diagnosed in mother and child. Further genetic investigation revealed the C29G mutation of the ferritin light chain iron response element. C33T and C29G mutations in the ferritin light chain iron response element underlie the Hereditary Hyperferritinemia-Cataract Syndrome (HHCS. The HFE gene H63D mutation underlies Hereditary Haemochromatosis (HH, which needs treatment to prevent organ damages by iron overload. HHCS was definitively diagnosed in all three children. HHCS is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by increased L-ferritin production. L-Ferritin aggregates accumulate preferentially in the lens, provoking bilateral cataract since childhood, as unique known organ damage. Epilepsy in one case and the spleen iron overload in another could suggest the misleading diagnosis of HH. Consequently, the differential diagnosis between alterations of iron storage system was essential, particularly in children, and required further genetic investigation.

  16. The Importance of Older Family Members in Providing Social Resources and Promoting Cancer Screening in Families with a Hereditary Cancer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Hadley, Donald W.; Goergen, Andrea F.; Skapinsky, Kaley F.; Devlin, Hillary C.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the role of older family members as providers of social resources within familial network systems affected by an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome. Design and Methods: Respondents who previously participated in a study that involved genetic counseling and testing for Lynch syndrome and their family network…

  17. The Perlman syndrome: familial renal dysplasia with Wilms tumor, fetal gigantism and multiple congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, G; Martini-Neri, M E; Katz, B E; Opitz, J M

    1984-09-01

    We describe a familial syndrome of renal dysplasia, Wilms tumor, hyperplasia of the endocrine pancreas, fetal gigantism, multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. This condition was previously described by Perlman et al [1973, 1975] and we propose to call it the "Perlman syndrome." It appears to be transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. The possible relationships between dysplasia, neoplasia and malformation are discussed.

  18. A new mutation causing autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome in a Danish family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyhreter, Heike; Schwartz, Marianne; Kristensen, Tim D

    2003-01-01

    We describe four members in a family of 8 individuals over 3 generations with the autosomal dominant inherited periodic fever syndrome tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). The patients had recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain, arthritis, and rash. We examined...

  19. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  20. Refeeding syndrome: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, Clare; Farrer, Kirstine; Harper, Lindsay; Lal, Simon

    2010-12-01

    Refeeding syndrome can result in a wide variety of complications and may be life threatening. Although well described in hospital practice, refeeding syndrome is often under-recognized and inadequately treated.

  1. Molekulargenetische Charakterisierung einer Familie mit Usher-Syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, AJ; Arndt, S; Aschendorff, A; Birkenhäger, R

    2009-01-01

    Einleitung: Das Usher-Syndrom definiert eine genetisch und klinisch heterogene autosomal rezessiv vererbte Erkrankung mit dem gleichzeitigen Auftreten von Innenohrschwerhörigkeit bis hin zur Taubheit, teilweise Vestibularisausfall und Netzhautdegeneration (Retinitis Pigmentosa). Bisher wird das Usher-Syndrom in drei verschiedene Hauptgruppen (USH1-3) mit unterschiedlicher phänotypischer Ausprägung eingeteilt. Für das Usher-Syndrom sind 12 Genorte bekannt, für die bereits acht Gene identifizi...

  2. Adaptation in families of children with Down syndrome in East Asian countries: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunkyung; Van Riper, Marcia

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this integrative literature review was to understand the experiences of East Asian families of children with Down syndrome and identify factors affecting their adaptation in the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment and Adaptation. Socio-cultural factors influence how well families adapt following the birth of a child with Down syndrome. Existing literature in this area has focused primarily on families from Western cultures. This is problematic because nurses care for families from all over the world. Therefore, the focus of this review is on families of children with Down syndrome living in East Asia, where Confucianism is dominant. Integrative literature review. Online databases (i.e. PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO) and a public search engine (i.e. Google Scholar) were used along with manual searches of reference lists and major journals. Studies were limited to original publications written in English and published between 1990-2014. Two authors independently performed integrative review processes proposed by Whittemore and Knafl and a quality assessment using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Like families in Western cultures, some East Asian families of children with Down syndrome adapted well and even thrived while others struggled. Various socio-cultural factors, including some associated with Confucianism, played a role in how individuals, dyads and families adapted. An understanding of socio-cultural influences can help nurses implement culturally sensitive family-centred interventions with families of children with Down syndrome. It may also facilitate policy changes concerning resources for these families. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Like Father, Like Daughter-inherited cutis aplasia occurring in a family with Marfan syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Yasmin Florence Khodeja; Williams, Charles A; Schoch, Jennifer Jane; Andrews, Israel David

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a newborn with co-occurrence of Marfan syndrome and aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and a family history significant for Marfan syndrome and ACC in the father. This case details a previously unreported mutation in Marfan syndrome and describes a novel coinheritance of Marfan syndrome and ACC.

  4. Bartsocas-papas syndrome: unusual findings in the first reported egyptian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, E M; Morsy, H

    2011-01-01

    Bartsocas-Papas syndrome (BPS) is an autosomal recessive syndrome with severe craniofacial, limb, and genital abnormalities. As of 2011, 24 published cases and families were registered in the Orphanet Report Series. Compared to other disorders characterized by pterygia, the condition is usually more severe and often lethal: most affected patients die in utero or shortly after birth. We report the first Egyptian family with Bartsocas-Papas syndrome comprising three cases; our proband who was a female infant with severe craniofacial and limb anomalies typical of Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, a similarly affected female fetus which died in utero at the 7th gestational month, and a 16-year-old mentally retarded uncle who presented with some of the typical features of Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, including syndactyly, thumb hypoplasia, and microphthalmia. This male patient actually did not present with pterygia, however, we find his clinical description noteworthy.

  5. Divorce in families of children with Down syndrome: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Richard C; Hodapp, Robert M

    2007-07-01

    In this study, we examined the nature, timing, and correlates of divorce in families of children with Down syndrome (647), other birth defects (10,283) and no identified disability (361,154). Divorce rates among families of children with Down syndrome were lower than in the other two groups. When divorce did occur in the Down syndrome group, however, a higher proportion occurred within the first 2 years after the child's birth. Mothers and fathers of children with Down syndrome were much more likely to divorce if they were younger, had not graduated from high school, and if fathers were less educated and lived in a rural area. Few effects on divorce were noted for a variety of family structure variables.

  6. Sessile serrated polyps of the colorectum are rare in patients with Lynch syndrome and in familial colorectal cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S H; Lykke, E; Folker, M B

    2008-01-01

    Whereas the generally accepted carcinogenesis pathway of the microsatellite instabile high (MSI-H) colorectal carcinoma (CRC) involves the traditional adenoma in patients with Lynch syndrome, a serrate pathway involving serrate adenomas (SA) and sessile serrate polyps (SSP) characterize...... the sporadic MSI-H counterpart. Recent studies have, however, challenged such simple one-pathway models, inviting the consideration of alternative, unexpected pathways. Here, the issue as to the possible role of SSP, primarily in the context of Lynch syndrome, but also in subjects from familial CRC families...... (FCF) is addressed. Polyps coded as hyperplastic polyps (HP) from subjects with Lynch syndrome and FCF enrolled in the HNPCC-register at the Hvidovre University Hospital as well as adenomas from this population were retrieved and reviewed for features of SSP. Ninety-eight polyps coded as HP and 41...

  7. Waardenburg's Syndrome in a Nigerian Family | Onabolu | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both girls presented with white forelock, heterochromia irides and sensorineural deafness. WS is inherited as an ... Deafness, which is the most disabling feature of this syndrome should be identified early to prepare the child for proper education. KEY WORDS: Waardenburg's Syndrome, genetic mutation, deafness. [Nig.

  8. Williams Syndrome: Daily Challenges and Positive Impact on the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallan, Susan; Senior, Joyce; Reilly, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the distinctive physical, cognitive, personality and behavioural characteristics associated with Williams syndrome, few studies to date have examined parental experiences of raising a child with this genetic syndrome. Methods: This explorative pilot study employed predominantly qualitative methodologies via face-to-face…

  9. Mutation spectrum in South American Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Nilbert, Mef; Wernhoff, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system.......Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system....

  10. Parents of Children with Asperger Syndrome or with Learning Disabilities: Family Environment and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Tali; Berger, Ornit

    2008-01-01

    The study examined the family environment and perceived social support of 33 parents with a child diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and 43 parents with a child with learning disability, which were compared to 45 parents of children without disabilities as a control group. Parents completed the Family Environment Scale and Social Support Scale…

  11. Infantile Pain Episodes Associated with Novel Nav1.9 Mutations in Familial Episodic Pain Syndrome in Japanese Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Hiroko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Kondo, Daiki; Harada, Kouji H; Youssefian, Shohab; Shioi, Hirotomo; Kabata, Risako; Domon, Yuki; Kubota, Kazufumi; Kitano, Yutaka; Takayama, Yasunori; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Ohno, Kousaku; Saito, Yoshiaki; Asano, Takeshi; Tominaga, Makoto; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy has been correlated with various voltage-gated sodium channel mutations in sensory neurons. Recently Nav1.9, a voltage-gated sodium channel subtype, has been established as a genetic influence for certain peripheral pain syndromes. In this study, we performed a genetic study in six unrelated multigenerational Japanese families with episodic pain syndrome. Affected participants (n = 23) were characterized by infantile recurrent pain episodes with spontaneous mitigation around adolescence. This unique phenotype was inherited in an autosomal-dominant mode. Linkage analysis was performed for two families with 12 affected and nine unaffected members, and a single locus was identified on 3p22 (LOD score 4.32). Exome analysis (n = 14) was performed for affected and unaffected members in these two families and an additional family. Two missense variants were identified: R222H and R222S in SCN11A. Next, we generated a knock-in mouse model harboring one of the mutations (R222S). Behavioral tests (Hargreaves test and cold plate test) using R222S and wild-type C57BL/6 (WT) mice, young (8-9 weeks old; n = 10-12 for each group) and mature (36-38 weeks old; n = 5-6 for each group), showed that R222S mice were significantly (p pain. The mouse model developed here will be useful for drug screening for familial episodic pain syndrome associated with SCN11A mutations.

  12. A family of a Child with Down Syndrome in Terms of Interpersonal Relationships Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brazgun T.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the study of interpersonal relationships of families with disabled children. The birth of a baby with a disability can be a traumatic event for parents and can have profound effects on the entire family. In this regard, it is especially important to provide the specialist with the opportunity to identify the characteristics of intra-family relations in order to create an effective program for correcting disharmonious patterns of behavior in the family. The authors present the program of studies of the interpersonal relationships and the case of relationships research of the family who is parenting a child with Down syndrome.

  13. A Danish family with dominant deafness-onychodystrophy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, Dina; Torring, Pernille M

    2013-01-01

    The rare hereditary disorder "dominant deafness and onychodystrophy (DDOD) syndrome" (OMIM 124480) has been described in a few case reports. No putative DDOD gene or locus has been mapped and the cause of the disorder remains unknown.......The rare hereditary disorder "dominant deafness and onychodystrophy (DDOD) syndrome" (OMIM 124480) has been described in a few case reports. No putative DDOD gene or locus has been mapped and the cause of the disorder remains unknown....

  14. Two families from New England with usher syndrome type IC with distinct haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, M M; McGee, T L; Keats, B J; Slim, R; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    2001-03-01

    To search for patients with Usher syndrome type IC among those with Usher syndrome type I who reside in New England. Genotype analysis of microsatellite markers closely linked to the USH1C locus was done using the polymerase chain reaction. We compared the haplotype of our patients who were homozygous in the USH1C region with the haplotypes found in previously reported USH1C Acadian families who reside in southwestern Louisiana and from a single family residing in Lebanon. Of 46 unrelated cases of Usher syndrome type I residing in New England, two were homozygous at genetic markers in the USH1C region. Of these, one carried the Acadian USH1C haplotype and had Acadian ancestors (that is, from Nova Scotia) who did not participate in the 1755 migration of Acadians to Louisiana. The second family had a haplotype that proved to be the same as that of a family with USH1C residing in Lebanon. Each of the two families had haplotypes distinct from the other. This is the first report that some patients residing in New England have Usher syndrome type IC. Patients with Usher syndrome type IC can have the Acadian haplotype or the Lebanese haplotype compatible with the idea that at least two independently arising pathogenic mutations have occurred in the yet-to-be identified USH1C gene.

  15. The Perlman syndrome: familial renal dysplasia with Wilms tumor, fetal gigantism and multiple congenital anomalies. 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Giovanni; Martini-Neri, Maria Enrica; Katz, Ben E; Opitz, John M

    2013-11-01

    The ensuing paper by Professor Giovanni Neri and colleagues was originally published in 1984, American Journal of Medical Genetics 19:195–207. The original article described a new family with a condition that the authors designated as the Perlman syndrome. This disorder, while uncommon, is an important multiple congenital anomaly and dysplasia syndrome; the causative gene was recently identified. This paper is a seminal work and is graciously republished by Wiley-Blackwell in the Special Festschrift issue honoring Professor Neri. We describe a familial syndrome of renal dysplasia, Wilms tumor, hyperplasia of the endocrine pancreas, fetal gigantism, multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. This condition was previously described by Perlman et al. [1973, 1975] and we propose to call it the "Perlman syndrome." It appears to be transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. The possible relationships between dysplasia, neoplasia and malformation are discussed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Unusual association of turner syndrome and hypopituitarism in a Tunisian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougacha-Elleuch, N; Elleuch, M; Charfi, N; Mnif, F; Belghith, N; Abdelhedi, F; Kammoun, H; Hachicha, M; Mnif, M; Abid, M

    2016-01-01

    Familial occurrence of either Turner syndrome or hypopituitarism is very rare. Particularly, their association is an uncommon finding. In this context, we describe for the first time 4 sisters with Turner syndrome, hypopituitarism was reported in three among them. Our cohort consists of four Tunisian adult sisters belonging to a consanguineous family. Biochemical analysis, resonance magnetic imaging and cytogenetic analyses were performed. Turner syndrome was diagnosed at the ages of 14, 17, 31 and 43 years in cases 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively. They suffered from short stature, dysmorphic syndrome and/or delayed puberty. Interestingly, 3 among them showed also hypopituitarism, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and central hypothyroidism. Somatotropic insufficiency was proven in one case. Pituitary MRI has shown an empty sella turcica with hypoplastic pituitary gland in three cases. Their karyotypes were compatible with 45X in one case, 45X/46XX in the second and 45X/46XX/47XXY with x label in two cases. Hence, the presence of these familial cases of TS must evoke new etiopathogenetic arguments. Coincidence of hypopituitarism in this family, might suggest common genetic background for the two diseases. This particular family would be a precious tool for an extensive molecular analysis. More attention should be given to other family's members mainly in the presence of delayed puberty and sterility in other members. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of three novel NHS mutations in families with Nance-Horan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Kristen M.; Wu, Junhua; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Stambolian, Dwight

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is an infrequent and often overlooked X-linked disorder characterized by dense congenital cataracts, microphthalmia, and dental abnormalities. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the NHS gene, whose function is not known. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and distribution of NHS gene mutations and compare genotype with Nance-Horan phenotype in five North American NHS families. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from white blood cells f...

  18. Common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in familial Lynch syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jisha Elias; Coral Karunakaran; Snigdha Majumder; Malini Manoharan; Rakshit Shah; Yogesh Mistry; Rajesh Ramanuj; Niraj Bhatt; Arati Khanna- Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (Hereditary Non Polyposis Colorectal Cancer, HNPCC) is one of the most common hereditary familial colorectal cancers (CRC) with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. It accounts for 2-5% of the total CRCs reported worldwide. Although a lower incidence for CRCs have been observed in India, the last decade has shown a remarkable increase of CRC incidences (2-4 %). Features of Lynch syndrome associated colorectal cancer include early age of cancer onset, accelerated car...

  19. A novel 5-bp deletion in Clarin 1 in a family with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoury, Elie; El Zir, Elie; Mansour, Ahmad; Mégarbané, André; Majewski, Jacek; Slim, Rima

    2011-11-01

    To identify the genetic defect in a Lebanese family with two sibs diagnosed with Usher Syndrome. Exome capture and sequencing were performed on DNA from one affected member using Agilent in solution bead capture, followed by Illumina sequencing. This analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous 5-bp deletion, in Clarin 1 (CLRN1), a known gene responsible for Usher syndrome type III. The deletion is inherited from both parents and segregates with the disease phenotype in the family. The 5-bp deletion, c.301_305delGTCAT, p.Val101SerfsX27, is predicted to result in a frameshift and protein truncation after 27 amino acids. Sequencing all the coding regions of the CLRN1 gene in the proband did not reveal any other mutation or variant. Here we describe a novel deletion in CLRN1. Our data support previously reported intra familial variability in the clinical features of Usher syndrome type I and III.

  20. Familial Churg-Strauss Syndrome in a Sister and Brother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyasin, Soheyla; Khoshkhui, Maryam; Amin, Reza

    2015-06-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a granulomatous small vessel vasculitis. It is characterized by asthma, allergic granulomatosis and vasculitis. This syndrome is rare in children. A 5 years old boy was admitted with cough, fever and dyspnea for 2 weeks. On the basis of laboratory data (peripheral eosinophilia), associated with skin biopsy, and history of CSS in his sister, this disease was eventually diagnosed. The patient had good response to corticosteroid. In every asthmatic patient with prolonged fever, eosinophilia and multisystemic involvment, CSS should be considered.

  1. Metabolic syndrome in patients with hypertension attending a family practice clinic in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasein, N; Ahmad, M; Matrook, F; Nasir, L; Froelicher, E S

    2010-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is being reported more frequently in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Patients with hypertension attending family practice clinics in the University of Jordan Hospital between February and July 2006 were assessed for the frequency of metabolic syndrome and its individual components. Of 345 patients studied, 65% had metabolic syndrome. Females were more likely to meet Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria for the diagnosis. Diabetes mellitus was the most frequent component of metabolic syndrome in males, while low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high waist circumference ranked first and second in females. Primary care providers should be alert to the importance of screening patients with hypertension for metabolic syndrome to prevent and manage these combined conditions.

  2. Common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in familial Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisha Elias

    2017-12-01

    In this study we identified three families with Lynch syndrome from a rural cancer center in western India (KCHRC, Goraj, Gujarat, where 70-75 CRC patients are seen annually. DNA isolated from the blood of consented family members of all three families (8-10 members/family was subjected to NGS sequencing methods on an Illumina HiSeq 4000 platform. We identified unique mutations in the MLH1 gene in all three HNPCC family members. Two of the three unrelated families shared a common mutation (154delA and 156delA. Total 8 members of a family were identified as carriers for 156delA mutation of which 5 members were unaffected while 3 were affected (age of onset: 1 member <30yrs & 2 were>40yr. The family with 154delA mutation showed 2 affected members (>40yr carrying the mutations.LYS618DEL mutation found in 8 members of the third family showed that both affected and unaffected carried the mutation. Thus the common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in two unrelated families had a high risk for lynch syndrome especially above the age of 40.

  3. Usher syndrome with psychotic symptoms: two cases in the same family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Ying; Chiu, Chih-Chiang

    2006-10-01

    Usher syndrome is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hearing and visual sensory impairment. Retinitis pigmentosa is essential for its diagnosis. There are only a few reports describing patients with Usher syndrome presenting with psychotic features and the etiology of its psychiatric manifestation is still unknown. Herein, the authors report variable congenital hearing impairment and progressive visual loss occurring in five of seven family members and two of them meeting the diagnostic criteria of Usher syndrome with psychotic features. Furthermore, the authors compare their psychiatric symptoms with other reports and the possible etiologies of psychotic symptoms are discussed.

  4. Waardenburg syndrome with familial unilateral renal agenesis: a new syndrome variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Katie M; Smith, Alisha J; Dansby, Linda M; Diskin, Charles J

    2015-06-01

    A 64-year-old man with Waardenburg syndrome presented with anuria and was subsequently discovered by renal ultrasound to have unilateral renal agenesis. The patient is one of three generations with incidental finding of renal agenesis also marked by the presence of Waardenburg syndrome. To our knowledge, there has been no mention elsewhere in the scientific literature of a variant of Waardenburg syndrome with associated renal agenesis. © 2014 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2014 International Society for Apheresis.

  5. Neonatal familial Evans syndrome associated with joint hypermobility and mitral valve regurgitation in three siblings in a Saudi Arab family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Fathelrahman E.; AlBakrah, Mohameed S.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia in the absence of a known underlying cause led to the diagnosis of Evans syndrome in a 9 month old male. Subsequently, a similar diagnosis was made in two siblings (a 3 year old boy and a 1 day old girl). The 9 month old had a chronic course with exacerbations. He was treated with steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin and colchiccine with a variable response. He died of congestive heart failure at the age of 8 years. The brother's disease course was one of remission and exacerbation. With time, remissions were prolonged and paralleled an improvement in joint hypermobility. The sister died of sepsis after a chronic course with severe exacerbattions. Only two families with Evans syndrome have been reported in the English medical literature. In one report (in a Saudi Arab family), the disease was associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia. (author)

  6. Familial associations between polycystic ovarian syndrome and common diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moini, Ashraf; Eslami, Bita

    2009-03-01

    The goal of this study was focused on two subjects. First, to determine possible association between PCOS and family history of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, heart attack, thrombosis, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Second, to evaluate maternal and paternal transmission in PCOS patients with positive family history of a disease. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 549 infertile women (273 with PCOS and 276 controls) in Arash hospital of Tehran, Iran, between 2007 and 2008 by using questionnaire. In this analysis, there were significantly increased number of women with the positive family history of diabetes among PCOS group (28.21% vs. 19.20%, p=0.01). Meanwhile, four women in PCOS group had self history of diabetes while no one in the control group reported diabetes. A statistically significant positive family history of breast cancer was found among the control group (4.35% vs. 1.30%, p=0.02). Endometrial cancer and diabetes were observed in mother or mother's side of the family but heart attack and thrombosis manifested in father or father's side of the family more. There were no statistically significant differences in a positive individual or family history of ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, heart attack, thrombosis and CVD between the two groups. In the present study, women and their relatives with PCOS had an increased prevalence of diabetes and it is more common in mother's side of the family.

  7. Alport syndrome in a Kazakh family: a case study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    exons of the COL4A5 gene in a total of 18 family members. ... During the study of family history we found that the patient's sister also have ... on 3730XL Genetic Analyzer, Applied Biosystems, Foster. City, USA. ... cedures were followed in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experi-.

  8. The importance of the family history in caring for families with long QT syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiter, Jolien S; Berkenbosch-Nieuwhof, Karin; van den Berg, Maarten P; van Dijk, Rene; Middel, Berrie; van Tintelen, J Peter

    2010-03-01

    In potentially inherited cardiac diseases, the family history is of great importance. We looked at the way cardiologists take a family history in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) or long QT syndrome (LQTS) and whether this led to screening of relatives or other follow-up. We performed retrospective cross-sectional analyses of adult index patients with DCM or LQTS in a general hospital (GH) or a University Medical Center (UMC). We identified 82 index patients with DCM (34 GH; 48 UMC) and 20 with LQTS (all UMC) between 1996 and 2005. Mean follow-up was 58 months. A family history was recorded in 90% of both LQTS and DCM patients most of the cases restricted to first-degree family members. The genetic aspects, counseling and screening of family members was discussed significantly more often with LQTS than DCM patients (all P family members, DNA analysis and referral) was performed significantly more often in LQTS than DCM patients. Cardiologists in the UMC referred DCM index patients for genetic counseling more often than those in the GH (25% vs. 6%; P familial. Since early recognition and treatment may reduce morbidity and mortality we recommend cardiologists take a more thorough family history and always consider referring to a clinical genetics department in such index patients. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Allgrove syndrome: an Egyptian family with two affected siblings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ola H. Gebril

    2013-11-15

    Nov 15, 2013 ... The neurological symptoms are variable and may affect the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous system [4,5]. Seri- ous reported neurological manifestations include dementia,. Wernicke's encephalopathy [6], optic atrophy, cerebellar atax- ia, and Parkinsonism [7]. The syndrome has been mapped to ...

  10. Two new Rett syndrome families and review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Kirstine; Roende, Gitte; Duno, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder, which is usually caused by de novo mutations in the MECP2 gene. More than 70% of the disease causing MECP2 mutations are eight recurrent C to T transitions, which almost exclusively arise on the paternally derived X chromosome...

  11. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: Kartagener syndrome in a family with a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Makia J. Marafie

    2014-12-22

    Dec 22, 2014 ... flagella of sperm tail, brain and spinal cord ependyma [2]. Many syndromes are linked to ... VC) to left sided superior caval vein (right sided inferior caval vein), and with S/P left .... east: nature versus nurture. Open Complement ...

  12. Dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias: under-recognized movement disorders in domestic animals? A comparison with human dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eRichter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia is defined as a neurological syndrome characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting, often repetitive movements and postures. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders encompassing dystonia, chorea, athetosis and ballism in conscious individuals. Several decades of research have enhanced the understanding of the etiology of human dystonia and dyskinesias that are associated with dystonia, but the pathophysiology remains largely unknown. The spontaneous occurrence of hereditary dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesia is well documented in rodents used as animal models in basic dystonia research. Several hyperkinetic movement disorders, described in dogs, horses and cattle, show similarities to these human movement disorders. Although dystonia is regarded as the third most common movement disorder in humans, it is often misdiagnosed because of the heterogeneity of etiology and clinical presentation. Since these conditions are poorly known in veterinary practice, their prevalence may be underestimated in veterinary medicine. In order to attract attention to these movement disorders, i.e. dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias associated with dystonia, and to enhance interest in translational research, this review gives a brief overview of the current literature regarding dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesia in humans, and summarizes similar hereditary movement disorders reported in domestic animals.

  13. Unsupportive parenting moderates the effects of family psychosocial intervention on metabolic syndrome in African American youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, E; Miller, G E; Yu, T; Brody, G H

    2018-04-01

    Family relationships have been linked to obesity and related disorders in youth, but few studies have provided causal evidence of this association. This study tested the impact of a family psychosocial intervention on components of metabolic syndrome-a condition driven largely by abdominal obesity-in African American youth. In particular, the study tested whether effects were strongest among those who started at highest risk, that is, with high levels of unsupportive parenting at baseline. Randomized clinical trial of a community sample of 391 African American youth (mean age=11.2 years) conducted in 2001-2002, with follow-up metabolic syndrome assessment in 2014-2015. Participants were assigned either to receive a weekly family intervention or to a control group. The primary study outcome was the number of components of metabolic syndrome that were clinically elevated at age 25, including central adiposity, blood pressure, triglycerides, glucose and low high-density lipoproteins. Unsupportive parenting was measured by questionnaires at baseline. Significant interaction effects were found between group assignment and baseline unsupportive parenting on counts of metabolic syndrome components in youth (beta=-0.17, P=0.03). Among those who started with higher levels of unsupportive parenting at age 11, participation in the family intervention reduced the number of clinically elevated components of the metabolic syndrome at age 25 relative to the control group. No such effect was seen among those who started with good parenting. Mediation analyses suggested that changes in the psychosocial targets of the parenting intervention partially accounted for the effects amongst those high in unsupportive parenting at baseline (effect size=-0.350, s.e.=0.178). These findings suggest that efforts to improve family relationships may be able to ameliorate the detrimental effects that harsh and unsupportive parenting have on obesity-related outcomes such as metabolic syndrome in

  14. Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome or Syndromic Diarrhea—Report of Three Members in a Family, First Report from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. E. Mahjoub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intractable diarrhea of infancy (IDI includes several types of early onset diarrhea; one of the rare etiologies is trichohepatoenteric (THE syndrome, also known as syndromic diarrhea (SD which was primarily described by Stankler et al. Hereby we report a family with several affected members which to our knowledge is the first case report from Iran. Report of Cases. A three-year-old boy referred with short stature, poor weight gain, and intermittent steatotic diarrhea to our center. He was born to healthy, relative parents (cousins. He did not gain any weight after four months of age and began having intermittent steatotic diarrhea, abdominal distension, and fever. He was hospitalized several times. Two other children in the family also showed somewhat similar symptoms. Two sweat tests were negative for cystic fibrosis. Workup for Celiac disease was performed several times which was negative; however, gluten-free diet was tried several times which was not effective. Workup for Hirschsprung’s disease was performed but colon was ganglionic. Evidence of liver involvement was approved by elevated liver enzymes and coarse echo of liver on sonography. Discussion. Trichoenterohepatic syndrome should be put in mind in cases of intractable diarrhea presenting in a family with several affected members. Early diagnosis would save patients from unnecessary workups.

  15. Proliferative vasculopathy and hydranencephaly-hydrocephaly syndrome or Fowler syndrome: Report of a family and insight into the disease's mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radio, Francesca Clementina; Di Meglio, Lavinia; Agolini, Emanuele; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Rinelli, Martina; Toscano, Paolo; Boldrini, Renata; Novelli, Antonio; Di Meglio, Aniello; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2018-03-03

    Fowler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hydranencephaly-hydrocephaly and multiple pterygium due to fetal akinesia. To date, around 45 cases from 27 families have been reported, and the pathogenic bi-allelic mutations in FLVCR2 gene described in 15 families. The pathogenesis of this condition has not been fully elucidated so far. We report on an additional family with two affected fetuses carrying a novel homozygous mutation in FLVCR2 gene, and describe the impact of known mutants on the protein structural and functional impairment. The present report confirms the genetic homogeneity of Fowler syndrome and describes a new FLVCR2 mutation affecting the protein function. The structural analysis of the present and previously published FLVCR2 mutations supports the hypothesis of a reduced heme import as the underlying disease's mechanism due to the stabilization of the occluded conformation or a protein misfolding. Our data suggest the hypothesis of heme deficiency as the major pathogenic mechanism of Fowler syndrome. © 2018 The Authors. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Behaviour Problems in the Siblings of Children with Down Syndrome: Associations with Family Responsibilities and Parental Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuskelly, Monica; Hayes, Alan; Chant, David

    1998-01-01

    Forty-five Australian families with children with Down syndrome and 88 comparison families provided information about their children's behavior problems and involvement in household tasks. For the brothers of children with Down syndrome, significant negative correlations between household tasks and behavior problems were found on fathers' reports.…

  17. A family with Wagner syndrome with uveitis and a new versican mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Rothschild, Pierre-Rapha?l; Br?zin, Antoine P.; Nedelec, Brigitte; des Roziers, Cyril Burin; Ghiotti, Tiffany; Orhant, Lucie; Boimard, Mathieu; Valleix, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical and molecular findings of a kindred with Wagner syndrome (WS) revealed by intraocular inflammatory features. Methods Eight available family members underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, including laser flare cell meter measurements. Collagen, type II, alpha 1, versican (VCAN), frizzled family receptor 4, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5, tetraspanin 12, and Norrie disease (pseudoglioma) genes were screened with direct sequencing. Resul...

  18. A FBN1 mutation association with different phenotypes of Marfan syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yapeng; Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Mingjie; Du, Binbin; Li, Qiaoli; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Yanzhou

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that patients with different FBN1 mutations often present more considerable phenotypic variation compared to different members of the related family carrying a same mutation. The purpose of our study was to identify pathogenic mutation and provide more information about genotype-phenotypic correlations in a large Chinese family with Marfan syndrome. 15 related family members from a Chinese 4-generation pedigree with Marfan syndrome underwent physical, ophthalmologic, radiological and cardiovascular examinations. The propositus has De Bakey III aortic dissection and didn't fulfill the revised Ghent criteria for Marfan syndrome. Nine family members have ectopia lentis and their echocardiogram was normal. Five other family members have no evidence of Marfan syndrome. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes. The exome sequencing was employed on the propositus, then the Sanger sequencing was conducted for mutation verification in other 14 participants of this family. The causative mutation in FBN1 discovered in the propositus was a known heterozygous missense mutation, c.1633T>G (p.R545C), in exon 14 (NM 000138). This same mutation was also identified in all 9 ectopia lentis patients and one unaffected 8-year-old girl. However, the same mutation was not discovered in other 4 unaffected family members. Our data enhance the information of genotype-phenotype correlation owing to FBN1 mutations. To our current knowledge, we firstly reported that the same FBN1 mutation, c. 1633C>T (Arg545Cys), was detected simultaneously in three different cardinal phenotypes (ectopia lentis, aortic dissection and unaffected) within one family. The unaffected girl with FBN1 mutation may presumably represent a rare case of nonpenetrance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Adams Oliver syndrome: Description of a new phenotype with cerebellar abnormalities in a family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Amico, Alessandra; Melis, Daniela; D’Arco, Felice; Di Paolo, Nilde; Carotenuto, Barbara; D’Anna, Gennaro; Russo, Carmela; Boemio, Pasquale; Brunetti, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    To describe cerebellar abnormalities in a family composed by a father and two affected sibs with Adams Oliver syndrome (AOS) (OMIM 100300). Brain MRI and MR angiography were performed at 1.5T. The siblings presented cerebellar cortex dysplasia characterized by the presence of cysts. Abnormalities of CNS are an unusual manifestation of AOS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cerebellar cortical dysplasia in a family with AOS

  20. Senior-Loken syndrome: A novel NPHP5 gene mutation in a family from Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Marafie, Makia J; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rare autosomal recessive disorders of variable severity are segregating in many highly consanguineous families from the Arab population. One of these deleterious diseases is Senior-Loken syndrome, a hereditary heterogeneous multiorgan disorder, which combines nephronophthisis with retinal dystrophy, leading to blindness and eventually end stage renal failure. This disorder has been reported in many cases worldwide, including two unrelated families from Arabian Gulf countries, whic...

  1. PRKAR1A-negative familial Cushing's syndrome: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lee Ling; Kitan, Normayah; Paramasivam, Sharmila Sunita; Ratnasingam, Jeyakantha; Ibrahim, Luqman; Chan, Siew Pheng; Tan, Alexander Tong Boon; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna

    2015-12-01

    Determining the etiology of Cushing's syndrome is very challenging to endocrinologists, with most of the difficulty arising from subtype differentiation of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's syndrome. We present the pitfalls of evaluating a rare cause of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome in the transition period between adolescence and adulthood. A sibling pair with familial isolated primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease is described. The index case, a 20-year-old Chinese woman, presented with premenopausal osteoporosis with T12 compression fracture and young hypertension. Biochemical analysis confirmed adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome (elevated 0800 h plasma cortisol 808 nmol/L with suppressed adrenocorticotropic hormone level Cushing's syndrome at age 18 years, with typical cushingoid habitus, but no osteoporosis or hypertension. His adrenal computed tomographic scans showed micronodularities over bilateral adrenal glands. He was successfully treated with bilateral adrenalectomy. Screening for Carney's complex and PRKAR1A gene mutation was negative. Signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome resolved after bilateral adrenalectomy for both patients. They were placed on lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy and long-term surveillance for Carney's complex. The cases of these two patients illustrate the difficulties involved in diagnosing primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, a variant of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome that is managed with bilateral adrenalectomy. A high index of suspicion for this disease is needed, especially in adolescents with adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome who have a significant family history, features of Carney's complex, and no resolution of Cushing's syndrome after unilateral adrenalectomy. Patients with primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease can either have

  2. Waardenburg Syndrome: A Report of Two Familial Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Safal Khanal, BOptom; Pragati Gautam, MD; Nabin Paudel, BOptom

    2013-01-01

    Background: Waardenburg syndrome is a rare autosomally-inherited developmental disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness in association with pigmentary anomalies comprising various ocular features including dystopia canthorum, iris heterochromia, eyebrow flare, and fundus alterations. It is a congenital non-progressive genetic disorder that has been found to result in hearing loss, reduced vision, reduced self esteem, problems related to appearance, and decreased intellectual functioni...

  3. Genotype by energy expenditure interaction with metabolic syndrome traits: the Portuguese healthy family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Daniel M V; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Diego, Vincent P; Souza, Michele C; Chaves, Raquel N; Blangero, John; Maia, José A R

    2013-01-01

    Moderate-to-high levels of physical activity are established as preventive factors in metabolic syndrome development. However, there is variability in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome under distinct physical activity conditions. In the present study we applied a Genotype X Environment interaction method to examine the presence of GxEE interaction in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome. A total of 958 subjects, from 294 families of The Portuguese Healthy Family study, were included in the analysis. Total daily energy expenditure was assessed using a 3 day physical activity diary. Six metabolic syndrome related traits, including waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, glucose, HDL cholesterol, total cholesterol and triglycerides, were measured and adjusted for age and sex. GxEE examination was performed on SOLAR 4.3.1. All metabolic syndrome indicators were significantly heritable. The GxEE interaction model fitted the data better than the polygenic model (pmetabolic syndrome traits expression is significantly influenced by the interaction established between total daily energy expenditure and genotypes. Physical activity may be considered an environmental variable that promotes metabolic differences between individuals that are distinctively active.

  4. Genotype by energy expenditure interaction with metabolic syndrome traits: the Portuguese healthy family study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M V Santos

    Full Text Available Moderate-to-high levels of physical activity are established as preventive factors in metabolic syndrome development. However, there is variability in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome under distinct physical activity conditions. In the present study we applied a Genotype X Environment interaction method to examine the presence of GxEE interaction in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome. A total of 958 subjects, from 294 families of The Portuguese Healthy Family study, were included in the analysis. Total daily energy expenditure was assessed using a 3 day physical activity diary. Six metabolic syndrome related traits, including waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, glucose, HDL cholesterol, total cholesterol and triglycerides, were measured and adjusted for age and sex. GxEE examination was performed on SOLAR 4.3.1. All metabolic syndrome indicators were significantly heritable. The GxEE interaction model fitted the data better than the polygenic model (p<0.001 for waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides. For waist circumference, glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides, the significant GxEE interaction was due to rejection of the variance homogeneity hypothesis. For waist circumference and glucose, GxEE was also significant by the rejection of the genetic correlation hypothesis. The results showed that metabolic syndrome traits expression is significantly influenced by the interaction established between total daily energy expenditure and genotypes. Physical activity may be considered an environmental variable that promotes metabolic differences between individuals that are distinctively active.

  5. A familial study of Hallermann–Streiff–François syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epée E

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available E Epée,1 D Beleho,2 AT Bitang,3 VA Njami,4 C Bengondo,5 Côme Ebana Mvogo1 1Ophthalmology Department, Yaoundé University Teaching Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 2Ophthalmology Department, Okola District Hospital, Okola, Cameroon; 3Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 4Higher Institute of Health Sciences, Université des Montagnes, Bangangté, Cameroon; 5Stomatology Department, Yaoundé University Teaching Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon Abstract: Hallermann–Streiff–François syndrome is a rare sporadic genetic pathology characterized by a phenotype consisting of growth retardation, ocular abnormalities, and a “bird-like head”. We hereby report a case of this syndrome found in three generations of the same family – father, daughter, and grand-daughter – who presented with a short stature and facial dysmorphic features, nystagmus, cataract, and bilateral microphthalmia. The discussion is based on the clinical and genetic aspects, and the challenges in management of this oculo-mandibulo-facial syndrome. The association of congenital cataract, facial dysmorphic features, and microphthalmia, should guide the diagnosis of dysmorphic syndromes such as Hallermann–Streiff–François syndrome. Keywords: Hallermann–Streiff–François syndrome, familial cataract, dysmorphic features, rare, Cameroon

  6. Nance-Horan syndrome: linkage analysis in a family from The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, A. A.; ten Brink, J.; Schuurman, E. J.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    Linkage analysis was carried out in a Dutch family with Nance-Horan (NH) syndrome. Close linkage without recombination between NH and the Xp loci DXS207, DXS43, and DXS365 (zmax = 3.23) was observed. Multipoint linkage analysis and the analysis of recombinations in multiple informative meioses

  7. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florijn, Ralph J.; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J. J. M.; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the

  8. Heritability of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in a Dutch Twin-family study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.M.; Sadrzadeh, S.; Lambalk, C.B.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders among women of reproductive age. There is evidence for a genetic component in PCOS based on familial clustering of cases. Objective: In the present study, the heritability of PCOS was estimated.

  9. The Impact of Tourette's Syndrome in the School and the Family: Perspectives from Three Stakeholder Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Navarro, Jesús; Cubo, Esther; Almazán, Javier

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the perceptions of Spanish health professionals, children with Tourette's Syndrome (TS) and their parents about social, school and family problems related to the disorder. A qualitative research methodology was used involving Focus Groups (FGs) made up of children with TS (× 2 FGs), parents/caregivers of persons with TS (× 2…

  10. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) linked to chromosome 3q in an Italian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, P; De Fazio, A; Croce, A I; Stanziale, P; Zelante, L

    1998-08-01

    We report an Italian family affected by Usher type III syndrome. Linkage study, performed using markers corresponding to the Usher loci already mapped, clearly showed linkage with markers on chromosome 3q24-25. Our data further support the presence of an Usher III locus on chromosome 3, as recently reported in a Finnish population.

  11. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) linked to chromosome 3q in an Italian family.

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparini, P; De Fazio, A; Croce, A I; Stanziale, P; Zelante, L

    1998-01-01

    We report an Italian family affected by Usher type III syndrome. Linkage study, performed using markers corresponding to the Usher loci already mapped, clearly showed linkage with markers on chromosome 3q24-25. Our data further support the presence of an Usher III locus on chromosome 3, as recently reported in a Finnish population.

  12. Chorioretinal dysplasia-microcephaly-mental retardation syndrome : Another family with autosomal dominant inheritance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, R; VandeLogt, F; Houtman, WA; VanEssen, AJ

    1996-01-01

    We describe a boy and his father with the chorioretinal dysplasia-microcephaly-mental retardation syndrome (CDMMS). Our report extends the phenotypic spectrum of autosomal dominant CDMMS by describing microphthalmia for the first time in an autosomal dominant family. The boy was also severely

  13. Senior-Loken syndrome: A novel NPHP5 gene mutation in a family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Makia J Marafie

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Case report: Here, we are reporting two children from an Arab family with a novel frameshift ... Senior-Loken (S-L) is an autosomal recessive syndrome and a ..... diseases, which are scattered in the Arab world and Middle.

  14. Bilateral familial vertical Duane Syndrome with synergistic convergence, aberrant trigeminal innervation, and facial hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvika Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year-old girl presented with bilateral familial vertical  Duane retraction syndrome with alternating esotropia, elevation deficit, Marcus gunn phenomenon, and facial hypoplasia. Abnormal adducting downshoots on attempting abduction suggestive of a synergistic convergence were noted. Hypothesis suggests aberrant innervations or peripheral anatomic connections between inferior and medial recti.

  15. Familial concordance of metabolic syndrome in Korean population--Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Ha; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Thomas, G Neil; Ahn, Song Vogue; Hur, Nam Wook; Choi, Dong Phil; Suh, Il

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the familial concordance of metabolic syndrome and its components in a nationally representative survey in Korean. We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), a nationwide survey examining the general health and nutritional status of the Korean people. We enrolled 1641 married couples and 1527 parents-1342 offspring. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 17.1% for husbands, 11.7% for wives, 14.3% for parents, and 7.2% for offspring. After adjustment for age, there were strong positive correlations between family members for the metabolic variables. Compared with husbands whose wives did not have metabolic syndrome, adjusted odds ratio in husbands whose wives had metabolic syndrome was 1.43 (95% CI: 1.10-1.87) for the risk of having metabolic syndrome. Similarly, wives whose husbands had metabolic syndrome had 1.41 (95% CI: 1.08-1.84) times higher risk of having metabolic syndrome. Compared with children whose parents did not have metabolic syndrome, adjusted odds ratio in children with at least one parent with the metabolic syndrome was 2.56 (95% CI: 1.09-5.98) for the metabolic syndrome. Our study revealed that there is significant familial concordance for metabolic syndrome and its components in Korean families. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic syndrome in family practice in Jordan: a study of high-risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasein, N; Masa'd, D

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, and its components, as defined by Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in Jordanian patients attending a family practice clinic for management of cardiovascular risk factors. The sample was 730 randomly selected patients aged > or = 25 years. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 37.4% (31.7% in men; 41.0% in women). The prevalence increased with age in the total sample and in both sexes. High waist circumference showed the highest prevalence in the total sample (61.6%). Among females it ranked as the first criterion (73.5%). High serum triglyceride level showed the highest prevalence in males (50.2%). Differences between the sexes were significant. Family practitioners should be alerted to the importance of multiple risk factors in the metabolic syndrome.

  17. Genetic analysis of a Chinese family with members affected with Usher syndrome type II and Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueling; Lin, Xiao-Jiang; Tang, Xiangrong; Chai, Yong-Chuan; Yu, De-Hong; Chen, Dong-Ye; Wu, Hao

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of a family presenting with multiple symptoms overlapping Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4). Targeted next-generation sequencing including the exon and flanking intron sequences of 79 deafness genes was performed on the proband. Co-segregation of the disease phenotype and the detected variants were confirmed in all family members by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The affected members of this family had two different recessive disorders, USH2 and WS4. By targeted next-generation sequencing, we identified that USH2 was caused by a novel missense mutation, p.V4907D in GPR98; whereas WS4 due to p.V185M in EDNRB. This is the first report of homozygous p.V185M mutation in EDNRB in patient with WS4. This study reported a Chinese family with multiple independent and overlapping phenotypes. In condition, molecular level analysis was efficient to identify the causative variant p.V4907D in GPR98 and p.V185M in EDNRB, also was helpful to confirm the clinical diagnosis of USH2 and WS4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of Family Composition and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Adults Aged over 45 Years Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ju

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the relationship between family composition and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome by gender in Korean adults aged 45 years and older. The sample consisted of 11,291 participants in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2010 to 2012. We used complex sample analyses, including strata, cluster, and sample weighting, to allow generalization to the Korean population. Complex samples crosstabs and chi-square tests were conducted to compare the percentage of sociodemographic characteristics to the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components by gender and family composition. Next, a complex sample logistic regression was performed to examine the association between family composition and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome by gender. The percentage of adults living alone was 5.6% for men and 13.9% for women. Slightly more women (14.0%) than men (10.1%) reported living with three generations. The percentage of metabolic syndrome in Korean adults aged 45 years and older was 53.2% for men and 35.7% for women. For women, we found that living with one or three generations was significantly associated with a higher risk of metabolic syndrome, blood pressure, and triglyceride abnormality after adjusting for age, education, household income, smoking, physical activity, and body mass index, when compared to living alone. No significant relationships were found for men. A national strategy, tailored on gender and family composition, needs to be developed in order to prevent the increase of metabolic syndrome in Korean women over middle age. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Muckle-Wells syndrome in an Indian family associated with NLRP3 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M C Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muckle - Wells syndrome (MWS is a rare autosomal dominant disease that belongs to a group of hereditary periodic fever syndromes. It is part of the wider spectrum of the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS which has only rarely been described in non-Caucasian individuals. It is characterized by recurrent self-limiting episodes of fever, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia and conjunctivitis from childhood. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss and amyloidosis are two late complications. MWS is caused by gain of function mutations in the NLRP3 gene, which encodes cryopyrin, a protein involved in regulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines. We report two patients with MWS in an Indian family associated with the p.D303N mutation in the NLRP3 gene. These findings promote awareness of these hereditary periodic fever syndromes as a cause for recurrent fevers from childhood in the Indian population.

  20. COCKAYNE SYNDROME: REPORT OF TWO CASES WITHIN A FAMILY

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    M. Mohammadi

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and phenotypic features of two siblings (a 12 years old girl and her 7 year old brother with Cockayne syndrome are described. The main problems were mild to moderate mental retardation, dwarfism, clumsy gait, photosensitive skin lesions and progeroid (senile like appearance. Brain CT - scans revealed symmetrical, well defined areas of calcification mainly located at lenticular nuclei, in both patients. Vie brainstem auditory responses also showed increased hearing thresholds and absolute wave latencies, that were more prominent in the older sister. The older patient had a healthy twin sister with normal mental function and phenotypic appearance.

  1. Immotile cilia syndrome: A recombinant family at HLA-linked gene locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparini, P.; Grifa, A.; Oggiano, N.; Fabbrizzi, E.; Giorgi, P.L. [Univsita di Ancona (Israel)

    1994-02-15

    The immotile-cilia syndrome (ICS) is an autosomal recessive trait of congenital dismobility or even complete immobility of cilia in the ciliated epithelia (MIM 244400). Recurrent upper respiratory infections in early childhood are the most common clinical findings. Recently a disease locus was mapped by sib pair analysis in two unrelated families on 6p tightly linked to HLA class II loci, such as DR and DQ. In order to confirm this assignment and to test the presence of possible heterogeneity, the authors analyzed several ICS families utilizing DNA makers of HLA class II region. Here they report the identification of a recombinant family at this locus. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Genetic Heterogeneity of Usher Syndrome: Analysis of 151 Families with Usher Type I

    OpenAIRE

    Astuto, Lisa M.; Weston, Michael D.; Carney, Carol A.; Hoover, Denise M.; Cremers, Cor W.R.J.; Wagenaar, Mariette; Moller, Claes; Smith, Richard J.H.; Pieke-Dahl, Sandra; Greenberg, Jacquie; Ramesar, Raj; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Ayuso, Carmen; Heckenlively, John R.; Tamayo, Marta

    2000-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is an autosomal recessive disorder marked by hearing loss, vestibular areflexia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six Usher I genetic subtypes at loci USH1A–USH1F have been reported. The MYO7A gene is responsible for USH1B, the most common subtype. In our analysis, 151 families with Usher I were screened by linkage and mutation analysis. MYO7A mutations were identified in 64 families with Usher I. Of the remaining 87 families, who were negative for MYO7A mutations, 54 were info...

  3. Familial aggregation and linkage analysis with covariates for metabolic syndrome risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Parisa; Khodakarim, Soheila; Guity, Kamran; Daneshpour, Maryam S

    2018-06-15

    Mechanisms of metabolic syndrome (MetS) causation are complex, genetic and environmental factors are important factors for the pathogenesis of MetS In this study, we aimed to evaluate familial and genetic influences on metabolic syndrome risk factor and also assess association between FTO (rs1558902 and rs7202116) and CETP(rs1864163) genes' single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with low HDL_C in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS). The design was a cross-sectional study of 1776 members of 227 randomly-ascertained families. Selected families contained at least one affected metabolic syndrome and at least two members of the family had suffered a loss of HDL_C according to ATP III criteria. In this study, after confirming the familial aggregation with intra-trait correlation coefficients (ICC) of Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the quantitative lipid traits, the genetic linkage analysis of HDL_C was performed using conditional logistic method with adjusted sex and age. The results of the aggregation analysis revealed a higher correlation between siblings than between parent-offspring pairs representing the role of genetic factors in MetS. In addition, the conditional logistic model with covariates showed that the linkage results between HDL_C and three marker, rs1558902, rs7202116 and rs1864163 were significant. In summary, a high risk of MetS was found in siblings confirming the genetic influences of metabolic syndrome risk factor. Moreover, the power to detect linkage increases in the one parameter conditional logistic model regarding the use of age and sex as covariates. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Parental burden, coping, and family functioning in primary caregivers of children with Joubert syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luescher, J L; Dede, D E; Gitten, J C; Fennell, E; Maria, B L

    1999-10-01

    Children with Joubert syndrome have physical and intellectual disabilities. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of Joubert syndrome on parental burden, coping, and family functioning. Forty-nine primary caregivers were surveyed. Forty-three primary caregivers were mothers and six were fathers; their mean age was 34 years. The following measures were used: Beck Depression Inventory, Child Development Inventory, Caregiver Strain Index, Family Assessment Device, and Ways of Coping Checklist-Revised. The data show that caregiver burden is not related to the severity of the child's illness, but that caregivers report significant burden. Higher burden was associated with the use of palliative coping methods, and family functioning was problematic. The results of this study suggest that for parents of children with Joubert syndrome, degree of parental burden depends more on the parents' coping skills and the level of family functioning rather than on the degree of the child's impairment. These findings highlight the importance of assessing caregiver burden, as well as decreased family functioning or coping abilities, since these problems often can be managed with psychologic intervention.

  5. Identification of three novel NHS mutations in families with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kristen M; Wu, Junhua; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Lewis, Richard Alan; Stambolian, Dwight

    2007-03-27

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is an infrequent and often overlooked X-linked disorder characterized by dense congenital cataracts, microphthalmia, and dental abnormalities. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the NHS gene, whose function is not known. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and distribution of NHS gene mutations and compare genotype with Nance-Horan phenotype in five North American NHS families. Genomic DNA was isolated from white blood cells from NHS patients and family members. The NHS gene coding region and its splice site donor and acceptor regions were amplified from genomic DNA by PCR, and the amplicons were sequenced directly. We identified three unique NHS coding region mutations in these NHS families. This report extends the number of unique identified NHS mutations to 14.

  6. Family-based cardiac screening in relatives of victims of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGorrian, Catherine

    2013-02-03

    AIMS: Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) occurs when a person suffers a sudden, unexpected death, with no cause found at postmortem examination. We aimed to describe the cardiac screening outcomes in a population of relatives of SADS victimsMETHODS AND RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective cohort study of consecutive families attending the Family Heart Screening clinic at the Mater Misericordiae Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, from January 2007 to September 2011. Family members of SADS victims underwent a standard screening protocol. Adjunct clinical and postmortem information was sought on the proband. Families who had an existing diagnosis, or where the proband had epilepsy, were excluded. Of 115 families identified, 73 were found to fit inclusion criteria and were retained for analysis, with data available on 262 relatives. Over half of the screened family members were female, and the mean age was 38.6 years (standard deviation 15.6). In 22 of 73 families (30%), and 36 of 262 family members (13.7%), a potentially inheritable cause of SADS was detected. Of the population screened, 32 patients (12.2%) were treated with medication, and 5 (1.9%) have received implantable cardiac defibrillators. Of the five families with long QT syndrome (LQTS) who had a pathogenic gene mutation identified, three carried two such mutations.CONCLUSION: In keeping with international estimates, 30% of families of SADS victims were found to have a potentially inherited cardiac disease. The most common positive finding was LQTS. Advances in postmortem standards and genetic studies may assist in achieving more diagnoses in these families.

  7. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the family members of women with polycystic ovary syndrome from North India

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    Iram Shabir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most complex and common endocrine disorder of women in reproductive years. In addition to irregular menstrual cycles, chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism, it has many metabolic manifestations such as obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease or possibly endometrial cancer. Familial clustering of PCOS in consistence with the genetic susceptibility has been described. Materials and Methods: The present study assessed the clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters including prevalence of metabolic syndrome by two different criteria in the first- degree relatives of patients with PCOS. Results: The average age of 37 index patients was 23 ± 3.6 years, with the mean age of menarche as 13.3 ± 1.2 years. The mean age and age of menarche in mothers (n = 22 was 48.8 ± 5.1 and 13 ± 1.3 years, respectively, whereas as it was 23.5 ± 4.7 and 13.3 ± 1.2 years in sisters (n = 22, respectively. Metabolic syndrome (MS defined by International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria was present in 10 index patients, 1 brother, 4 sisters, 17 mothers and 15 fathers while as by Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III it was in 8 index patients, 5 sisters, 16 mothers and 11 fathers. Conclusion: The presence of MS or related metabolic derangements is high in the family members of women with PCOS.

  8. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the family members of women with polycystic ovary syndrome from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabir, Iram; Ganie, Mohd Ashraf; Zargar, Mohd Afzal; Bhat, Dilafroz; Mir, Mohd Muzzafar; Jan, Aleem; Shah, Zaffar Amin; Jan, Vicar; Rasool, Riyaz; Naqati, Andleeb

    2014-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most complex and common endocrine disorder of women in reproductive years. In addition to irregular menstrual cycles, chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism, it has many metabolic manifestations such as obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease or possibly endometrial cancer. Familial clustering of PCOS in consistence with the genetic susceptibility has been described. The present study assessed the clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters including prevalence of metabolic syndrome by two different criteria in the first- degree relatives of patients with PCOS. The average age of 37 index patients was 23 ± 3.6 years, with the mean age of menarche as 13.3 ± 1.2 years. The mean age and age of menarche in mothers (n = 22) was 48.8 ± 5.1 and 13 ± 1.3 years, respectively, whereas as it was 23.5 ± 4.7 and 13.3 ± 1.2 years in sisters (n = 22), respectively. Metabolic syndrome (MS) defined by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria was present in 10 index patients, 1 brother, 4 sisters, 17 mothers and 15 fathers while as by Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) it was in 8 index patients, 5 sisters, 16 mothers and 11 fathers. The presence of MS or related metabolic derangements is high in the family members of women with PCOS.

  9. A novel mutation in PAX3 associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun; Luo, Jianfen; Zhang, Fengguo; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Mingming; Ma, Yalin; Xu, Lei; Bai, Xiaohui; Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    The novel compound heterozygous mutation in PAX3 was the key genetic reason for WS1 in this family, which was useful to the molecular diagnosis of WS1. Screening the pathogenic mutations in a four generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1). WS1 was diagnosed in a 4-year-old boy according to the Waardenburg syndrome Consortium criteria. The detailed family history revealed four affected members in the family. Routine clinical, audiological examination, and ophthalmologic evaluation were performed on four affected and 10 healthy members in this family. The genetic analysis was conducted, including the targeted next-generation sequencing of 127 known deafness genes combined with Sanger sequencing, TA clone and bioinformatic analysis. A novel compound heterozygous mutation c.[169_170insC;172_174delAAG] (p.His57ProfsX55) was identified in PAX3, which was co-segregated with WS1 in the Chinese family. This mutation was absent in the unaffected family members and 200 ethnicity-matched controls. The phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of Pax3 protein further confirmed that the novel compound heterozygous mutation was pathogenic.

  10. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  11. Seip-lawrence Syndrome (Three Cases in a Family

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    B.S.N. Reddy

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available A, rare episode of Seip-Lawrence syndrome manifesting in all three case siblings of consanpinous parents is reported. Two children we′re male and one female. They exhibited low intelligence,′ gaunt facies, depressed bridge of nose, large low-sct ears, thick lips and protruberant abdomen. Skin was showing hypermelanosis, hypertrichosis, absence of subcutaneous fat and acan nigricaFNx01s with′ very prominent perianal rUgO6itiS In addition, the first child was short statured having hypertrophic Clitoris, hepatomcoy, left ventricular hypertro hy, hyperglycaemia and glycossuria- without ketoacidosis. The second child was, having enlargement of penis, left ventricular hypertrophy,,hepatospienomegaly and abnormal GTT. The third and the youngest child was having only cutaneous changes and no viscoromegaly or biochemical abnormality. Nou Of these patients were having gigantism and advanced bone age.

  12. Familial cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome in a father and a son with a novel MEK2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaer, Kadri; Lissewski, Christina; Zenker, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a rare genetic disorder belonging to the group of RASopathies. It is typically characterized by congenital heart defects, short stature, dysmorphic craniofacial features, intellectual disability, failure to thrive, and ectodermal abnormalities such as hyperkeratosis and sparse, brittle, curly hair. CFC syndrome is caused by dominant mutations in one of the four genes BRAF, MEK1, MEK2, and KRAS. Only three familial cases of CFC syndrome have been reported to date, whereas the vast majorities are sporadic cases due to de novo mutations. We report on a fourth familial case with transmission of CFC syndrome from father to son due to a novel heterozygous sequence change c.376A>G (p.N126D) in exon 3 of MEK2 gene. This observation further documents the possibility of vertical transmission of CFC syndrome, which appears to be associated with rare mutations and relatively mild intellectual disability in affected individual. The hypomorphic effect of specific mutations particularly regarding neurocognitive issues may be related to the variable fertility of affected individuals. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Novel compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations in Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

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    Amina Bakhchane

    Full Text Available The MYO7A gene encodes a protein belonging to the unconventional myosin super family. Mutations within MYO7A can lead to either non syndromic hearing loss or to the Usher syndrome type 1B (USH1B. Here, we report the results of genetic analyses performed on Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non syndromic hearing loss that identified two families with compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations. Five mutations (c.6025delG, c.6229T>A, c.3500T>A, c.5617C>T and c.4487C>A were identified in these families, the latter presenting two differently affected branches. Multiple bioinformatics programs and molecular modelling predicted the pathogenic effect of these mutations. In conclusion, the absence of vestibular and retinal symptom in the affected patients suggests that these families have the isolated non-syndromic hearing loss DFNB2 (nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss presentation, instead of USH1B.

  14. Employment Impact and Financial Burden for Families of Children with Fragile X Syndrome: Findings from the National Fragile X Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, L.; Grosse, S.; Raspa, M.; Bailey, D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The employment impact and financial burden experienced by families of children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) has not been quantified in the USA. Method: Using a national fragile X family survey, we analysed data on 1019 families with at least one child who had a full FXS mutation. Out-of-pocket expenditures related to fragile X were…

  15. [Analysis of USH2A gene mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Mingchang; Wang, Qiufen; Liu, Mugen

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the disease-causing mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome type II. All of the 11 members from the family underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examination and hearing test, and their genomic DNA were isolated from venous leukocytes. PCR and direct sequencing of USH2A gene were performed for the proband. Wild type and mutant type minigene vectors containing exon 42, intron 42 and exon 43 of the USH2A gene were constructed and transfected into Hela cells by lipofectamine reagent. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was carried out to verify the splicing of the minigenes. Pedigree analysis and clinical diagnosis indicated that the patients have suffered from autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type II. DNA sequencing has detected a homozygous c.8559-2A>G mutation of the USH2A gene in the proband, which has co-segregated with the disease in the family. The mutation has affected a conserved splice site in intron 42, which has led to inactivation of the splice site. Minigene experiment has confirmed the retaining of intron 42 in mature mRNA. The c.8559-2A>G mutation in the USH2A gene probably underlies the Usher syndrome type II in this family. The splice site mutation has resulted in abnormal splicing of USH2A pre-mRNA.

  16. Nevoid Basal-Cell Syndrome: literature review and case report in a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfio José Tincani

    Full Text Available The Nevoid Basal-Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCC, or as it is also referred to, basal-cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, is characterized by multiple early-appearing basal cell carcinomas, keratocytosis of the mandible, and anomalies of the ocular, skeletal reproductive system. We describe four patients in the same family, all of them possessing a large number of skin tumors associated with other typical clinical and X-Ray anomalies of NBCC. The definitive treatment of NBCC has yet to be established, however, early diagnosis is very important as well as the periodical follow-up examination of ten patients, mainly due to the transformations in the skin lesions that may occur.

  17. 3M Syndrome: A Report of Four Cases in Two Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebeci, Ayşe Nurcan

    2011-01-01

    3M syndrome is a rare entity characterized by severe growth retardation, dysmorphic features and skeletal changes as its major components. It is differentiated from other types of dwarfism by its clinical features and by the typical slender long bones and foreshortened vertebral bodies that can be visualized radiographically. 3M syndrome has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. An early diagnosis is important for genetic counseling. In this report, we present four children (3 males, 1 female) from two families who were aged between 411/12 and 1011/12 years and had clinical findings of 3M syndrome. One of these patients had received growth hormone (GH) treatment which was discontinued due to an inadequate height gain. Physicians should be aware of this entity in the differential diagnosis of children with severe short stature and mild skeletal changes. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21911330

  18. Usher syndrome in four siblings from a consanguineous family of Pakistani origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trop, I; Schloss, M D; Polomeno, R; Der Kaloustian, V

    1995-04-01

    Usher syndrome is a heterogeneous group of disorders of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by retinitis pigmentosa and congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Two types are accepted clinically: type I is associated with profound congenital deafness with progressive pigmentary retinopathy and total loss of vestibular function. Type II is a milder form, with moderate-to-profound hearing loss and a milder form of retinitis pigmentosa. Vestibular function is preserved. A total of five loci have been identified as accounting for the two distinct phenotypic presentations. We describe a consanguineous family of Pakistani origin whose four children all are affected with Usher syndrome type I. DNA analysis showed non-linkage to any of the loci already identified as tightly linked to the Usher syndrome type I.

  19. NHS Gene Mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish Families with Nance-Horan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshany, Nadav; Avni, Isaac; Morad, Yair; Weiner, Chen; Einan-Lifshitz, Adi; Pras, Eran

    2017-09-01

    To describe ocular and extraocular abnormalities in two Ashkenazi Jewish families with infantile cataract and X-linked inheritance, and to identify their underlying mutations. Seven affected members were recruited. Medical history, clinical findings, and biometric measurements were recorded. Mutation analysis of the Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) gene was performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified exons. An unusual anterior Y-sutural cataract was documented in the affected male proband. Other clinical features among examined patients included microcorneas, long and narrow faces, and current or previous dental anomalies. A nonsense mutation was identified in each family, including a previously described 742 C>T, p.(Arg248*) mutation in Family A, and a novel mutation 2915 C>A, p.(Ser972*) in Family B. Our study expands the repertoire of NHS mutations and the related phenotype, including newly described anterior Y-sutural cataract and dental findings.

  20. Parental perceptions of the impact of Down syndrome in the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura SERRANO FERNÁNDEZ

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Parenting a child with Down syndrome is a challenge, not only for parents, but also for the whole family system. The present research aims to analyse, from a qualitative point of view, the vision that the parents themselves have of the impact, both positive and negative, that the presence of a child with DS causes in the family. To this end, interviews with 10 participants (3 parents, 3 mothers and 4 professionals in the field of special education have been analysed. The results reveal that, although the diagnosis of SD in a child is an unexpected and stressful event for the family, the general perception of the family impact is positive.

  1. GDNF gene is associated with tourette syndrome in a family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Pascual, Alberto; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A; Heiman, Gary A; Mir, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by persistent motor and vocal tics, and frequently accompanied by the comorbidities attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Impaired synaptic neurotransmission has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the association of 28 candidate genes, including genes related to synaptic neurotransmission and neurotrophic factors, with Tourette syndrome. We genotyped 506 polymorphisms in a discovery cohort from the United States composed of 112 families and 47 unrelated singletons with Tourette syndrome (201 cases and 253 controls). Genes containing significant polymorphisms were imputed to fine-map the signal(s) to potential causal variants. Allelic analyses in Tourette syndrome cases were performed to check the role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities. Target polymorphisms were further studied in a replication cohort from southern Spain composed of 37 families and three unrelated singletons (44 cases and 73 controls). The polymorphism rs3096140 in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF) was significant in the discovery cohort after correction (P = 1.5 × 10(-4) ). No linkage disequilibrium was found between rs3096140 and other functional variants in the gene. We selected rs3096140 as target polymorphism, and the association was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). No association with any comorbidity was found. As a conclusion, a common genetic variant in GDNF is associated with Tourette syndrome. A defect in the production of GDNF could compromise the survival of parvalbumin interneurons, thus altering the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the corticostriatal circuitry. Validation of this variant in other family cohorts is necessary. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  2. GDNF Gene Is Associated With Tourette Syndrome in a Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Pascual, Alberto; Tischfield, Jay A.; King, Robert A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Mir, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by persistent motor and vocal tics, and frequently accompanied by the comorbidities attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Impaired synaptic neurotransmission has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the association of 28 candidate genes, including genes related to synaptic neurotransmission and neurotrophic factors, with Tourette syndrome. Methods We genotyped 506 polymorphisms in a discovery cohort from the United States composed of 112 families and 47 unrelated singletons with Tourette syndrome (201 cases and 253 controls). Genes containing significant polymorphisms were imputed to fine-map the signal(s) to potential causal variants. Allelic analyses in Tourette syndrome cases were performed to check the role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities. Target polymorphisms were further studied in a replication cohort from southern Spain composed of 37 families and three unrelated singletons (44 cases and 73 controls). Results The polymorphism rs3096140 in glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF) was significant in the discovery cohort after correction (P = 1.5 × 10−4). No linkage disequilibrium was found between rs3096140 and other functional variants in the gene. We selected rs3096140 as target polymorphism, and the association was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). No association with any comorbidity was found. Conclusions As a conclusion, a common genetic variant in GDNF is associated with Tourette syndrome. A defect in the production of GDNF could compromise the survival of parvalbumin interneurons, thus altering the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the corticostriatal circuitry. Validation of this variant in other family cohorts is necessary. PMID:26096985

  3. [Genetic analysis of a family with Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente-Sanchis, Aránzazu; Cuevas, José M; Alemany, Pilar; Cremades, Antonio; Zúñiga, Ángel

    Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease associated with mutations in the VHL tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 3p25. VHL is characterized by the development of multiple malignant and benign tumours in the central nervous system and internal organs, including liver, pancreas and the adrenal gland. More than 823 different mutations of the VHL gene have currently been identified. In the present study we describe the case of a family affected by VHL treated at the University Hospital of La Ribera and the results of the genetic analysis of three relatives, identifying the mutation R167G in exon 3 of VHL gene as the cause of VHL syndrome in this family. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anatomía Patológica. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Family history of type 2 diabetes and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in adult Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mithun; Pal, Susil; Ghosh, Arnab

    2012-04-01

    Our objective was to test the association between familial risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in adult Asian Indians. A total of 448 adult (>30 years) individuals (257 males and 191 females) participated in the study. Familial risk of T2DM was classified into three groups viz., 1=both parents affected; 2=parent and/or siblings affected and 3=none or no family history for T2DM. Anthropometric measures, blood pressures, fasting blood glucose and metabolic profiles were studied using standard techniques. MS was defined accordingly. The prevalence of MS phenotypes was estimated and compared among the three familial risk strata. Individuals with a history of both parents affected from diabetes had significantly higher (Pfamily history of T2DM. Significant difference was also noticed between individuals with and without MS according to the family history of diabetes (Pfamily history of T2DM. Family history of T2DM had significant effect on individuals with MS as compared to their counterparts (individuals having no family history of T2DM). It therefore seems reasonable to argue that family history of T2DM could be useful as a predictive tool for early diagnosis and prevention of MS in Asian Indian population.

  5. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florijn, Ralph J; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J J M; Mannens, Marcel M A M; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Bergen, Arthur A B

    2006-09-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the Netherlands, by dHPLC and direct sequencing. We identified an unique mutation in each family. Three out of these four mutations were not reported before. We report here the first splice site sequence alteration mutation and three protein truncating mutations. Our results suggest that X-linked cataract and NHS are allelic disorders.

  6. A report of a probable case of familial Guillain Barre syndrome

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    Mohammad Barzegar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although it is a sporadic disease, few studies have reported cases of Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS in families which postulate a genetic susceptibility. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA typing is an area of discussion in GBS though none of them are considered definitive. In recent years, more studies have evaluated HLA typing in sporadic cases while rarely it has been assessed in familial ones. We report a woman and her daughter experiencing GBS and their HLA typing in a 2-year interval.

  7. Keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness syndrome: first affected family reported in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Fahaad H

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hamad Al FahaadDepartment of Dermatology, College of Medicine, Najran University, Najran, Saudi ArabiaIntroduction: Keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness (KID syndrome is a rare congenital multisystem disorder affecting certain tissues of ectodermal origin such as epidermis, cochlea, and cornea, leading mainly to palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, ichthyosiform scaling, deafness, and blindness. The author reports for the first time in the Middle East three family members suffering from KID syndrome in the southwestern part of Saudi Arabia.Case presentation: Three patients from one family (ages 26, 16, and 14 years of apparently normal parents, with the two eldest being females and the youngest being male. All three patients were referred from a peripheral hospital to our dermatology clinic due to recurrent cutaneous fungal infections on their trunk, forearms, legs, and nails. On full assessment, they also found to have nearly similar cutaneous problems manifested by palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, generalized ichthyosiform scaling, subungual hyperkeratosis, and nail dystrophies. All patients suffered from total hearing loss in both ears since childhood as confirmed by pure tune audiometry. However, there was no blindness in any case; blepharitis with marked photophobia was the only ocular complaint. All these features are classically suggestive of KID syndrome.Keywords: connexin 26, GJB2, ichthyosis, KID syndrome, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis

  8. Growth hormone deficiency and pituitary malformation in a recurrent Cat-Eye syndrome: a family report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedraszak, Guillaume; Braun, Karine; Receveur, Aline; Decamp, Matthieu; Andrieux, Joris; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Copin, Henri; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Mathieu, Michèle; Rochette, Jacques; Morin, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone deficiency affects roughly between one in 3000 and one in 4000 children with most instances of growth hormone deficiency being idiopathic. Growth hormone deficiency can also be associated with genetic diseases or chromosome abnormalities. Association of growth hormone deficiency together with hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation and Cat-Eye syndrome is a very rare condition. We report a family with two brothers presenting with growth delay due to a growth hormone deficiency associated with a polymalformation syndrome. They both displayed pre-auricular pits and tags, imperforate anus and Duane retraction syndrome. Both parents and a third unaffected son displayed normal growth pattern. Cerebral MRI showed a hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation in the two affected brothers. Cytogenetic studies revealed a type I small supernumerary marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22 resulting in a tetrasomy 22pter-22q11.21 characteristic of the Cat-Eye syndrome. The small supernumerary marker chromosome was present in the two affected sons and the mother in a mosaic state. Patients with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency should be evaluated for chromosomal abnormality. Family study should not be underestimated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Papillon-Lefévre Syndrome: Report of Two Cases in a Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents two cases of Papillon-Lefévre syndrome (PLS affecting two girls among five siblings belonging to a south Indian Muslim family. The patients were 12 and 14 years old. The patients presented with palmar-plantar hyperkeratosis which started around the age of two years. The elder patient was edentulous due to severe destructive periodontitis causing premature loss of teeth. The younger patient had severe destructive periodontitis with multiple periodontal abscess and loose teeth.

  10. Type III Bartter-like syndrome in an infant boy with Gitelman syndrome and autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnara, Milena; Gaudino, Rossella; Tedeschi, Silvana; Syrèn, Marie-Louise; Perrotta, Silverio; Maines, Evelina; Zaffanello, Marco

    2014-09-01

    We report the case of an infant boy with polyuria and a familial history of central diabetes insipidus. Laboratory blood tests disclosed hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperreninemia, and hyperaldosteronism. Plasma magnesium concentration was slightly low. Urine analysis showed hypercalciuria, hyposthenuria, and high excretion of potassium. Such findings oriented toward type III Bartter syndrome (BSIII). Direct sequencing of the CLCNKB gene revealed no disease-causing mutations. The water deprivation test was positive. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a lack of posterior pituitary hyperintensity. Finally, direct sequencing of the AVP-NPII gene showed a point mutation (c.1884G>A) in a heterozygous state, confirming an autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI). This condition did not explain the patient's phenotype; thus, we investigated for Gitelman syndrome (GS). A direct sequencing of the SLC12A3 gene showed c.269A>C and c.1205C>A new mutations. In conclusion, the patient had a genetic combination of GS and adFNDI with a BSIII-like phenotype.

  11. A novel NHS mutation causes Nance-Horan Syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qi; Li, Yunping; Kousar, Rizwana; Guo, Hui; Peng, Fenglan; Zheng, Yu; Yang, Xiaohua; Long, Zhigao; Tian, Runyi; Xia, Kun; Lin, Haiying; Pan, Qian

    2017-01-07

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) (OMIM: 302350) is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, with occasional dental anomalies, characteristic dysmorphic features, brachymetacarpia and mental retardation. Carrier females exhibit similar manifestations that are less severe than in affected males. Here, we report a four-generation Chinese family with multiple affected individuals presenting Nance-Horan Syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing combined with RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing was used to search for a genetic cause underlying the disease phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing identified in all affected individuals of the family a novel donor splicing site mutation (NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A) in intron 4 of the gene NHS, which maps to chromosome Xp22.13. The identified mutation results in an RNA processing defect causing a 416-nucleotide addition to exon 4 of the mRNA transcript, likely producing a truncated NHS protein. The donor splicing site mutation NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A of the NHS gene is the causative mutation in this Nance-Horan Syndrome family. This research broadens the spectrum of NHS gene mutations, contributing to our understanding of the molecular genetics of NHS.

  12. Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells (UCOCGC) of the pancreas associated with the familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome (FAMMM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorstra, Jan-Bart M.; Maitra, Anirban; Morsink, Folkert H. M.; Drillenburg, Paul; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, Johan A.

    2008-01-01

    The familial atypical multiple mole melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome is caused by a germline mutation of p16. More than 90% of the sporadic pancreatic carcinomas contain genetic alterations that inactivate p16. Patients with the FAMMM syndrome have an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Ductal

  13. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenkraft, A.; Pode-Shakked, B.; Goldstein, N.; Shpirer, Z.; Bokhoven, H. van; Anikster, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish

  14. [Considerations on family dynamics and the malnutrition syndrome in Mexican children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar Manuel; González-Rico, José Luis; Romero-Velarde, Enrique; Sánchez-Talamantes, Eva; Navarro-Lozano, María Eugenia; Nápoles-Rodríguez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 1990s we noted that family dysfunction was more common in children with severe primary malnutrition than in children admitted to the hospital without malnutrition. Defects on feeding habits during the first year of life, especially early weaning and inadequate complementary feeding were more common in dysfunctional families. We also observed that chronic malnutrition in preschool children, and overweight and obesity in schoolchildren were more common in children from dysfunctional families. Once the association between dysfunctional family dynamics and obesity in schoolchildren was demonstrated, it was observed that low education of fathers and mothers increased twofold the possibility of family dysfunction: OR: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.37-3.10 and OR: 2.47; 95% CI: 1.57-3.89, respectively. In addition, the low-income and the lower purchasing power of foods were associated to family dysfunction (pdysfunction in composite, extended, single-parent families where there exist other persons vulnerable to the different entities of malnutrition syndrome and indeed depend on adults for their care, food and nutrition.

  15. Family factors, emotional functioning, and functional impairment in juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Lynch, Anne M; Slater, Shalonda; Graham, T Brent; Swain, Nicole F; Noll, Robert B

    2008-10-15

    Family factors and emotional functioning can play an important role in the ability of adolescents with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS) to cope with their condition and function in their everyday lives. The primary objectives of this study were to determine 1) whether adolescents with JPFS and their caregivers differed from healthy age-matched comparison peers and their caregivers in terms of emotional distress and functional impairment; 2) whether there were any differences in the family environment of adolescents with JPFS compared with healthy comparison peers; and 3) which individual-, caregiver-, and family-level variables were associated with functional impairment in adolescents with JPFS. Participants were 47 adolescents with JPFS recruited from a pediatric rheumatology clinic and 46 comparison peers without chronic illness matched for age, sex, and race. Participants and their caregivers (all mothers) completed a battery of standardized measures administered in their homes. Adolescents with JPFS had greater internalizing and externalizing symptoms than healthy comparison peers. Mothers of adolescents with JPFS reported twice as many pain conditions and significantly greater depressive symptoms than mothers of comparison peers. The JPFS group also had poorer overall family functioning and more conflicted family relationships. In adolescents with JPFS, maternal pain history was associated with significantly higher functional impairment. Increased distress and chronic pain are evident in families of adolescents with JPFS, and family relationships are also impacted. Implications for child functional impairment and the need for inclusion of caregivers in treatment are discussed.

  16. A family with Parkinsonism, essential tremor, restless legs syndrome, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, A; Pfeiffer, R F; Stoessl, A J; Kuriakose, R; Lash, J L; Searcy, J A; Strongosky, A J; Vilariño-Güell, C; Farrer, M J; Ross, O A; Dickson, D W; Wszolek, Z K

    2011-05-10

    Previous epidemiologic and genetic studies have suggested a link between Parkinson disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), and restless legs syndrome (RLS). We describe the clinical, PET, and pathologic characteristics of an extensive kindred from Arkansas with hereditary PD, ET, and RLS. The pedigree contains 138 individuals. Sixty-five family members were examined neurologically up to 3 times from 2004 to 2010. Clinical data were collected from medical records and questionnaires. Genetic studies were performed. Five family members underwent multitracer PET. Two individuals with PD were examined postmortem. Eleven family members had PD with generally mild and slowly progressive symptoms. Age at onset was between 39 and 74 years (mean 59.1, SD 13.4). All individuals treated with l-dopa responded positively. Postural or action tremor was present in 6 individuals with PD, and in 19 additional family members. Fifteen persons reported symptoms of RLS. PET showed reduced presynaptic dopamine function typical of sporadic PD in a patient with PD and ET, but not in persons with ET or RLS. The inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant for PD and RLS. No known pathogenic mutation in PD-related genes was found. Fourteen of the family members with PD, ET, or RLS had depression. Neuropathologic examination revealed pallidonigral pigment spheroid degeneration with ubiquitin-positive axonal spheroids, TDP43-positive pathology in the basal ganglia, hippocampus, and brainstem, and only sparse Lewy bodies. Familial forms of PD, ET, RLS, and depression occur in this family. The genetic cause remains to be elucidated.

  17. Family history of cancer predicts endometrial cancer risk independently of Lynch Syndrome: Implications for genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Tan, Yen Y; Buchanan, Daniel D; Bowman, Michael; Walters, Rhiannon J; Obermair, Andreas; Quinn, Michael A; Blomfield, Penelope B; Brand, Alison; Leung, Yee; Oehler, Martin K; Kirk, Judy A; O'Mara, Tracy A; Webb, Penelope M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2017-11-01

    To determine endometrial cancer (EC) risk according to family cancer history, including assessment by degree of relatedness, type of and age at cancer diagnosis of relatives. Self-reported family cancer history was available for 1353 EC patients and 628 controls. Logistic regression was used to quantify the association between EC and cancer diagnosis in ≥1 first or second degree relative, and to assess whether level of risk differed by degree of relationship and/or relative's age at diagnosis. Risk was also evaluated for family history of up to three cancers from known familial syndromes (Lynch, Cowden, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) overall, by histological subtype and, for a subset of 678 patients, by EC tumor mismatch repair (MMR) gene expression. Report of EC in ≥1 first- or second-degree relative was associated with significantly increased risk of EC (P=3.8×10 -7 ), independent of lifestyle risk factors. There was a trend in increasing EC risk with closer relatedness and younger age at EC diagnosis in relatives (P Trend =4.43×10 -6 ), and with increasing numbers of Lynch cancers in relatives (P Trend ≤0.0001). EC risk associated with family history did not differ by proband tumor MMR status, or histological subtype. Reported EC in first- or second-degree relatives remained associated with EC risk after conservative correction for potential misreported family history (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.24-3.37, P=0.004). The strongest predictor of EC risk was closer relatedness and younger EC diagnosis age in ≥1 relative. Associations remained significant irrespective of proband MMR status, and after excluding MMR pathogenic variant carriers, indicating that Lynch syndrome genes do not fully explain familial EC risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7 in clinical evaluation of families with suspected Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, Maureen E; Rodriguez, Andrea; Taggart, Melissa W; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Lynch, Patrick M; Bannon, Sarah A; You, Y Nancy; Vilar, Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    Traditional germline sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis does not detect Lynch syndrome-causing mutations in all individuals whose colorectal or endometrial tumors demonstrate mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. Unique inversions and other rearrangements of the MMR genes have been reported in families with Lynch syndrome. In 2014, a recurrent inversion of MSH2 exons 1-7 was identified in five families suspected to have Lynch syndrome. We aimed to describe our clinical experience in identifying families with this specific inversion. Four probands whose Lynch syndrome-associated tumors demonstrated absence of MSH2/MSH6 staining and who had negative MMR germline testing were evaluated for the MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7, offered during initial genetic workup or upon routine clinical follow-up. All four probands tested positive for the MSH2 inversion. Proband cancer diagnoses included colon and endometrial adenocarcinoma and sebaceous adenoma. A variety of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers were reported in the family histories, although only one family met Amsterdam II criteria. Thirteen at-risk relatives underwent predictive testing. MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7 was found in four probands previously suspected to have Lynch syndrome based on family history and tumor testing. This testing should be offered routinely to patients with tumors demonstrating loss of MSH2/MSH6 staining.

  19. A complex microcephaly syndrome in a Pakistani family associated with a novel missense mutation in RBBP8 and a heterozygous deletion in NRXN1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agha, Z.; Iqbal, Z.; Azam, M.; Siddique, M.; Willemsen, M.H.; Kleefstra, T.; Zweier, C.; Leeuw, N. de; Qamar, R.; Bokhoven, H. van

    2014-01-01

    We report on a consanguineous Pakistani family with a severe congenital microcephaly syndrome resembling the Seckel syndrome and Jawad syndrome. The affected individuals in this family were born to consanguineous parents of whom the mother presented with mild intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy

  20. [Study of gene mutation and pathogenetic mechanism for a family with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Liao, Xinbin; Liu, Yalan; He, Chufeng; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Lu; Feng, Yong; Mei, Lingyun

    2017-08-10

    To explore the pathogenetic mechanism of a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome. Clinical data of the family was collected. Potential mutation of the MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were screened. Plasmids for wild type (WT) and mutant MITF proteins were constructed to determine their exogenous expression and subcellular distribution by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. A heterozygous c.763C>T (p.R255X) mutation was detected in exon 8 of the MITF gene in the proband and all other patients from the family. No pathological mutation of the SOX10 and SNAI2 genes was detected. The DNA sequences of plasmids of MITF wild and mutant MITF R255X were confirmed. Both proteins were detected with the expected size. WT MITF protein only localized in the nucleus, whereas R255X protein showed aberrant localization in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. The c.763C>T mutation of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in this family. The mutation can affect the subcellular distribution of MITF proteins in vitro, which may shed light on the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome caused by mutations of the MITF gene.

  1. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhou, Jianda; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia‑associated transcription factor (MITF), sex‑determining region Y‑box 10 (SOX10) and snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The heterozygous mutation, c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 1; however, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (MITF, SNAI2, SOX10 or PAX3) was detected in pedigrees 2 and 3. The heterozygous mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene is therefore considered the disease‑causing mutation in pedigree 1. However, there are novel disease‑causing genes in Waardenburg syndrome type II, which require further research.

  2. Two truncating USH3A mutations, including one novel, in a German family with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebermann, Inga; Wilke, Robert; Lauhoff, Thomas; Lübben, Dirk; Zrenner, Eberhart; Bolz, Hanno Jörn

    2007-08-30

    To identify the genetic defect in a German family with Usher syndrome (USH) and linkage to the USH3A locus. DNA samples of five family members (both parents and the three patients) were genotyped with polymorphic microsatellite markers specific for eight USH genes. Three affected family members underwent detailed ocular and audiologic characterization. Symptoms in the patients were compatible with Usher syndrome and show intrafamilial variation, for both hearing loss (ranging from severe to profound with non-linear progression) and vision. Genotyping of microsatellite markers for the different USH loci was in line with a defect in the USH3A gene on chromosome 3q25. Sequence analysis of the USH3A gene revealed two truncating mutations; c.149_152delCAGGinsTGTCCAAT, which has been described previously, and a novel mutation, c.502_503insA, segregating with the phenotype. To date, only 11 USH3A mutations have been described. This is the first description of a German family with USH due to USH3A mutations, including one novel. Our findings indicate that also in the Central European population, USH3A mutations should be considered in cases of USH.

  3. Compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations segregating Usher syndrome type 2 in a Han family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Ling; Chen, Kaitian; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2016-11-01

    Identification of rare deafness genes for inherited congenital sensorineural hearing impairment remains difficult, because a large variety of genes are implicated. In this study we applied targeted capture and next-generation sequencing to uncover the underlying gene in a three-generation Han family segregating recessive inherited hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. After excluding mutations in common deafness genes GJB2, SLC26A4 and the mitochondrial gene, genomic DNA of the proband of a Han family was subjected to targeted next-generation sequencing. The candidate mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and subsequently analyzed with in silico tools. An unreported splice site mutation c.3924+1G > C compound with c.6028G > A in the MYO7A gene were detected to cosegregate with the phenotype in this pedigree. Both mutations, located in the evolutionarily conserved FERM domain in myosin VIIA, were predicted to be pathogenic. In this family, profound sensorineural hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa without vestibular disorder, constituted the typical Usher syndrome type 2. Identification of novel mutation in compound heterozygosity in MYO7A gene revealed the genetic origin of Usher syndrome type 2 in this Han family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Peeling skin syndrome in eight cases of four different families from India and Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu Sarma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peeling skin syndrome (PSS is a rare recessively inherited ichthyosiform genodermatoses characterized by superficial skin peeling. This has 2 subtypes, acral (APSS; OMIM 609796 and generalized form (OMIM 270300. The later has been subdivided into type A (non-inflammatory and type B (inflammatory. Eight cases of peeling skin syndrome in 4 families were recorded over a period of 5 years. They were diagnosed clinically and confirmed histopathologically. Disease onset ranged from birth to childhood age (mean 5.25 ± 4.528 years and age at presentation ranged from 7-35 years (mean 23.25 ± 10.471 years. Males outnumbered females (M:F - 5:3. All had non-inflammatory generalized disease of type-A PSS variety, except one who had type-B PSS. Two Muslim families (1 st and 2 nd family, total 5 patients came from nearby country Bangladesh, and the 2 Hindu families were Indian. Higher severity over acral areas in generalized type, possible autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and improvement with age as found in this series were new manifestations and possibly unreported previously. The disease was found to be poorly responsive to oral retinoids. Prevalence of the disease may be higher than expected. Importance of mutational analysis was also highlighted.

  5. Peeling skin syndrome in eight cases of four different families from India and Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Nilendu; Boler, Anup Kumar; Bhanja, Dulal Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare recessively inherited ichthyosiform genodermatoses characterized by superficial skin peeling. This has 2 subtypes, acral (APSS; OMIM 609796) and generalized form (OMIM 270300). The later has been subdivided into type A (non-inflammatory) and type B (inflammatory). Eight cases of peeling skin syndrome in 4 families were recorded over a period of 5 years. They were diagnosed clinically and confirmed histopathologically. Disease onset ranged from birth to childhood age (mean 5.25 ± 4.528 years) and age at presentation ranged from 7-35 years (mean 23.25 ± 10.471 years). Males outnumbered females (M:F - 5:3). All had non-inflammatory generalized disease of type-A PSS variety, except one who had type-B PSS. Two Muslim families (1 st and 2 nd family, total 5 patients) came from nearby country Bangladesh, and the 2 Hindu families were Indian. Higher severity over acral areas in generalized type, possible autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and improvement with age as found in this series were new manifestations and possibly unreported previously. The disease was found to be poorly responsive to oral retinoids. Prevalence of the disease may be higher than expected. Importance of mutational analysis was also highlighted.

  6. Germ line p53 mutations in a familial syndrome of breast cancer, sarcomas, and other neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, D; Li, F P; Strong, L C; Fraumeni, J F; Nelson, C E; Kim, D H; Kassel, J; Gryka, M A; Bischoff, F Z; Tainsky, M A

    1990-11-30

    Familial cancer syndromes have helped to define the role of tumor suppressor genes in the development of cancer. The dominantly inherited Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is of particular interest because of the diversity of childhood and adult tumors that occur in affected individuals. The rarity and high mortality of LFS precluded formal linkage analysis. The alternative approach was to select the most plausible candidate gene. The tumor suppressor gene, p53, was studied because of previous indications that this gene is inactivated in the sporadic (nonfamilial) forms of most cancers that are associated with LFS. Germ line p53 mutations have been detected in all five LFS families analyzed. These mutations do not produce amounts of mutant p53 protein expected to exert a trans-dominant loss of function effect on wild-type p53 protein. The frequency of germ line p53 mutations can now be examined in additional families with LFS, and in other cancer patients and families with clinical features that might be attributed to the mutation.

  7. Constitutional SAMD9L mutations cause familial myelodysplastic syndrome and transient monosomy 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Victor B; Sahoo, Sushree S; Boklan, Jessica; Schwabe, Georg C; Saribeyoglu, Ebru; Strahm, Brigitte; Lebrecht, Dirk; Voss, Matthias; Bryceson, Yenan T; Erlacher, Miriam; Ehninger, Gerhard; Niewisch, Marena; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Achermann, John C; Shimamura, Akiko; Hochrein, Jochen; Tedgård, Ulf; Nilsson, Lars; Hasle, Henrik; Boerries, Melanie; Busch, Hauke; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Wlodarski, Marcin W

    2018-03-01

    Familial myelodysplastic syndromes arise from haploinsufficiency of genes involved in hematopoiesis and are primarily associated with early-onset disease. Here we describe a familial syndrome in seven patients from four unrelated pedigrees presenting with myelodysplastic syndrome and loss of chromosome 7/7q. Their median age at diagnosis was 2.1 years (range, 1-42). All patients presented with thrombocytopenia with or without additional cytopenias and a hypocellular marrow without an increase of blasts. Genomic studies identified constitutional mutations (p.H880Q, p.R986H, p.R986C and p.V1512M) in the SAMD9L gene on 7q21, with decreased allele frequency in hematopoiesis. The non-random loss of mutated SAMD9L alleles was attained via monosomy 7, deletion 7q, UPD7q, or acquired truncating SAMD9L variants p.R1188X and p.S1317RfsX21. Incomplete penetrance was noted in 30% (3/10) of mutation carriers. Long-term observation revealed divergent outcomes with either progression to leukemia and/or accumulation of driver mutations (n=2), persistent monosomy 7 (n=4), and transient monosomy 7 followed by spontaneous recovery with SAMD9L -wildtype UPD7q (n=2). Dysmorphic features or neurological symptoms were absent in our patients, pointing to the notion that myelodysplasia with monosomy 7 can be a sole manifestation of SAMD9L disease. Collectively, our results define a new subtype of familial myelodysplastic syndrome and provide an explanation for the phenomenon of transient monosomy 7. Registered at: www.clinicaltrials.gov; #NCT00047268 . Copyright© 2018 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  8. THE PREVALENCE OF STRESS AND BURNOUT SYNDROME IN HOSPITAL DOCTORS AND FAMILY PHYSICIANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanetic, Kosana D; Savic, Suzana M; Racic, Maja

    2016-11-01

    Introducti on. Burnout syndrome is the result of chronic emotional stress. It is characterized by high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and reduced level of personal accomplishment. The aim of this study was to determine the level of stress and risk ror burnout syndrome in doctors employed in health centers and hospitals, and to investigate the impact of socio-derrdgraphic characteristics on the level of stress and the o ccurrence of burnout syndrome. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the period from October I to December 31, 2015 in three health centers and in the University Clinical Center of the Republic of Srpska. The survey was anonymous. A socio-demographic questionnaire and a questionnaire for self-assessment of the level of stress and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used as research instruments. Out of 151 doctors included in the study, 49% were family physicians, and 51% were hospital doctors. The analysis of responses to questionnaires for self-assessment of stress level revealed that 51.7% of participants had high levels of stress (52.7% of family physicians, 50.6% of doctors working in hospital). A high degree of emotional exhaustion was found in 27.2% of participants (29.7% of fam ily physicians, 24.6% of doctors working in hospital), high depersonalization was found in 23.8% of participants (25.7% of family physicians, 22. 1% of doctors working in hospital), a low level of personal accomplishment was found in 39.7% of participants (37.8% of family physicians. 41.6% of doctors working in hospital). No statistically significant difference regarding stress degree, emotional exhaustion and depersonalizaion and personal accomplishment was found between hospital doctors and family physicians. The physicians aged over 45 years had a significantly (p = 0.030) higher level of emotional exhaustion than their younger colleagues. This study found that there was a high risk of burnout syndrome in physicians in the Republic of Srpska

  9. Familial pulmonary arterial hypertension, leucopenia, and atrial septal defect: a probable new familial syndrome with multisystem involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Ali; Ozgul, R Koksal; Soydas, Asli; Tugrul, Tugba; Gurgey, Aytemiz; Celiker, Alpay; Barst, Robyn J; Knowles, James A; Mahesh, Mansukhani; Morse, Jane H

    2009-01-01

    We present two siblings with identical clinical findings that seem to represent a previously unreported familial syndrome. Major findings involve three systems: pulmonary arterial hypertension, cardiac abnormalities including secundum-type atrial septal defect, and the hematopoietic system with intermittent neutropenia, lymphopenia, monocytosis, and anemia. The siblings also shared several minor abnormalities: pectus carinatum, long fingers, proximally placed thumb, broad nasal bridge, and high-arched palate. The male proband also had bilateral inguinal hernias and undescended testes. The same findings in two siblings suggest a genetic cause--either an autosomal recessive disorder or germline mosaicism in one parent for a dominant mutation. Investigations revealed a bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 polymorphism in intron 4 in only one sibling, which was also present in unaffected maternal relatives.

  10. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for Waardenburg syndrome type I and II in Chinese families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Qin, Litao; Li, Tao; Liu, Hongjian; Ma, Lingcao; Li, Wan; Wu, Dong; Wang, Hongdan; Guo, Qiannan; Guo, Liangjie; Liao, Shixiu

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation. The present study aimed to investigate the underlying molecular pathology and provide a method of prenatal diagnosis of WS in Chinese families. A total of 11 patients with WS from five unrelated Chinese families were enrolled. A thorough clinical examination was performed on all participants. Furthermore, patients with WS underwent screening for mutations in the following genes: Paired box 3 (PAX3), melanogenesis associated transcription factor (MITF), SRY-box 10, snail family transcriptional repressor 2 and endothelin receptor type B using polymerase chain reaction sequencing. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization was used for specific patients whose sequence results were normal. Following identification of the genotype of the probands and their parents, prenatal genetic diagnosis was performed for family 01 and 05. According to the diagnostic criteria for WS, five cases were diagnosed as WS1, while the other six cases were WS2. Genetic analysis revealed three mutations, including a nonsense mutation PAX3 c.583C>T in family 01, a splice-site mutation MITF c.909G>A in family 03 and an in-frame deletion MITF c.649_651delGAA in family 05. To the best of the authors' knowledge the mutations (c.583C>T in PAX3 and c.909G>A in MITF) were reported for the first time in Chinese people. Mutations in the gene of interest were not identified in family 02 and 04. The prenatal genetic testing of the two fetuses was carried out and demonstrated that the two babies were normal. The results of the present study expanded the range of known genetic mutations in China. Identification of genetic mutations in these families provided an efficient way to understand the causes of WS and improved genetic counseling. PMID:29115496

  11. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sólia-Nasser, L; de Aquino, S-N; Paranaíba, L-M R; Gomes, A; Dos-Santos-Neto, P; Coletta, R-D; Cardoso, A-F; Frota, A-C; Martelli-Júnior, H

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. The pedigree of the family,including the last four generations, was constructed and revealed non-consanguineous marriages. Out of 29 descendants, 16 family members showed features of WS1, with 9 members showing two major criteria indicative of WS1. Five patients showed white forelock and iris hypopigmentation, and four showed dystopia canthorum and iris hypopigmentation. Two patients had hearing loss. Dental abnormalities were identified in three family members, including dental agenesis, conical teeth and taurodontism. Sequencing analysis failed to identify mutations in the PAX3 gene. These results confirm that WS1 was transmitted in this family in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and high penetrance. The presence of dental manifestations, especially tooth agenesis and conical teeth which resulted in considerable aesthetic impact on affected individuals was a major clinical feature. This article reveals the presence of well-defined dental changes associated with WS1 and tries to establish a possible association between these two entities showing a new spectrum of WS1.

  12. Causes of Cancer Death Among First-Degree Relatives in Japanese Families with Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanakaya, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Tatsuro; Ishikawa, Hideki; Hinoi, Takao; Furukawa, Yoichi; Hirata, Keiji; Saida, Yoshihisa; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Arai, Masami; Matsubara, Nagahide; Tomita, Naohiro; Tamura, Kazuo; Sugano, Kokichi; Ishioka, Chikashi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Ishida, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the causes of cancer death in Japanese families with Lynch syndrome (LS). The distributions of cancer deaths in 485 individuals from 67 families with LS (35, 30, and two families with MutL homologue 1 (MLH1), MSH2, and MSH6 gene mutations, respectively), obtained from the Registry of the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum were analyzed. Among 98 cancer deaths of first-degree relatives of unknown mutation status, 53%, 19%, 13% (among females), 7% (among females) and 5% were due to colorectal, gastric, uterine, ovarian, and hepatobiliary cancer, respectively. The proportion of deaths from extra-colonic cancer was significantly higher in families with MSH2 mutation than in those with MLH1 mutation (p=0.003). In addition to colonic and uterine cancer, management and surveillance targeting gastric, ovarian and hepatobiliary cancer are considered important for Japanese families with LS. Extra-colonic cancer in families with MSH2 mutation might require for more intensive surveillance. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Gardner's syndrome: a ten year follow up survey of 12 subjects in a family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Kaimin; Si Liya; Wu Zhiqiang; Lu Xuan; Meng Liancheng

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study the development of Gardner's syndrome by following up 12 subjects in a family for ten years. Methods: 12 subjects with Gardner's syndrome of 4 generations in a family were studied. Six were male and six female. The age of the patients was from 9 to 74 years, with average of 38 years. The examinations consisted of air-barium double contrast radiography of colon, fiber-optic colonoscopy, plain X-ray and body photography. Results: Triology was present in 8 cases (66.7%) and the double signs in 4 cases (33.3%). 4 patients (33.3%) died of malignant degeneration of colonic polyp in 10 years, all occurring in rectum and sigmoid colon, the oldest one was 74 years and the youngest 35 years. Conclusion: The incidence of malignant degeneration of colonic polyp is very high in patients with Gardner's syndrome and may occur in patients older than 30 years, with the peak incidence in the sixth decade. Preventive resection of colonic polyp is still the best treatment

  14. Exome analysis of a family with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome identifies a novel disease locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Neil E; Jou, Chuanchau J; Arrington, Cammon B; Kennedy, Brett J; Earl, Aubree; Matsunami, Norisada; Meyers, Lindsay L; Etheridge, Susan P; Saarel, Elizabeth V; Bleyl, Steven B; Yost, H Joseph; Yandell, Mark; Leppert, Mark F; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Gruber, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia that carries a risk of sudden cardiac death. To date, mutations in only one gene, PRKAG2, which encodes the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase subunit γ-2, have been identified as causative for WPW. DNA samples from five members of a family with WPW were analyzed by exome sequencing. We applied recently designed prioritization strategies (VAAST/pedigree VAAST) coupled with an ontology-based algorithm (Phevor) that reduced the number of potentially damaging variants to 10: a variant in KCNE2 previously associated with Long QT syndrome was also identified. Of these 11 variants, only MYH6 p.E1885K segregated with the WPW phenotype in all affected individuals and was absent in 10 unaffected family members. This variant was predicted to be damaging by in silico methods and is not present in the 1,000 genome and NHLBI exome sequencing project databases. Screening of a replication cohort of 47 unrelated WPW patients did not identify other likely causative variants in PRKAG2 or MYH6. MYH6 variants have been identified in patients with atrial septal defects, cardiomyopathies, and sick sinus syndrome. Our data highlight the pleiotropic nature of phenotypes associated with defects in this gene. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Exome Analysis of a Family with Wolff–Parkinson–White Syndrome Identifies a Novel Disease Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Neil E.; Jou, Chuanchau J.; Arrington, Cammon B.; Kennedy, Brett J.; Earl, Aubree; Matsunami, Norisada; Meyers, Lindsay L.; Etheridge, Susan P.; Saarel, Elizabeth V.; Bleyl, Steven B.; Yost, H. Joseph; Yandell, Mark; Leppert, Mark F.; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Gruber, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Wolff–Parkinson–White (WPW) syndrome is a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia that carries a risk of sudden cardiac death. To date, mutations in only one gene, PRKAG2, which encodes the 5’ -AMP-activated protein kinase subunit γ-2, have been identified as causative for WPW. DNA samples from five members of a family with WPW were analyzed by exome sequencing. We applied recently designed prioritization strategies (VAAST/pedigree VAAST) coupled with an ontology-based algorithm (Phevor) that reduced the number of potentially damaging variants to 10: a variant in KCNE2 previously associated with Long QT syndrome was also identified. Of these 11 variants, only MYH6 p.E1885K segregated with the WPW phenotype in all affected individuals and was absent in 10 unaffected family members. This variant was predicted to be damaging by in silico methods and is not present in the 1,000 genome and NHLBI exome sequencing project databases. Screening of a replication cohort of 47 unrelated WPW patients did not identify other likely causative variants in PRKAG2 or MYH6. MYH6 variants have been identified in patients with atrial septal defects, cardiomyopathies, and sick sinus syndrome. Our data highlight the pleiotropic nature of phenotypes associated with defects in this gene. PMID:26284702

  16. Bartsocas-Papas syndrome with variable expressivity in an Egyptian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, M S; Kamel, A K; Effat, L K; El-Ruby, M O

    2012-01-01

    Bartsocas-Papas syndrome (BPS) is an autosomal recessively inherited sublethal popliteal pterygium condition characterized by intrauterine or neonatal death, severe popliteal webbing, oligosyndactyly, ankyloblepharon, orofacial clefts, intraoral filiform bands and genital anomalies. Internal organ involvement has seldom been identified. We report on a 3 years old female patient of healthy first cousin parents with BPS. She presented with orofacial clefting, severe popliteal webs, club feet, oligosyndactyly of the toes, hypogenitalism and normal hands and internal organs. Ankyloblepharon and filiform bands between the alveolar ridges were evident at birth. Pedigree analysis revealed a more severely affected female sib, who died a few minutes after birth with additional manifestations including near complete lip fusion without oral cleft, complete syndactyly in both hands and an omphalocele. Linkage was excluded to the IRF6 gene; a candidate gene implicated in the Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndromes, with overlapping features with BPS. To our knowledge, this is the 5th surviving patient with this syndrome in the literature. In this report, we also discuss the proposed pathogenetic mechanisms for BPS and compare our patients with similarly described cases as well as overlapping spectrum of other popliteal pterygium syndromes. Our findings provide further evidence of intrafamilial clinical heterogeneity in families with BPS.

  17. [Triplet expansion cytosine-guanine-guanine: Three cases of OMIM syndrome in the same family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, Jesús; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Silvia; Fuertes-Rodrigo, Cristina; Monge-Galindo, Lorena; Peña-Segura, José Luis; López-Pisón, Francisco Javier

    2016-04-01

    The dynamic increase in the number of triplet repeats of cytosine-guanine-guanine (CGG) in the FMR1 gene mutation is responsible for three OMIM syndromes with a distinct clinical phenotype: Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and two pathologies in adult carriers of the premutation (55-200 CGG repeats): Primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) and tremor-ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) associated with FXS. CGG mutation dynamics of the FMR1 gene were studied in DNA samples from peripheral blood from the index case and other relatives of first, second and third degree by TP-PCR, and the percentage methylation. Diagnosis of FXS was confirmed in three patients (21.4%), eight patients (57.1%) were confirmed in the premutation range transmitters, one male patient with full mutation/permutation mosaicism (7.1%) and two patients (14.3%) with normal study. Of the eight permutated patients, three had FXPOI and one male patient had FXTAS. Our study suggests the importance of making an early diagnosis of SXF in order to carry out a family study and genetic counselling, which allow the identification of new cases or premutated patients with FMR1 gene- associated syndromes (FXTAS, FXPOI). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Familial Mediterranean fever, Inflammation and Nephrotic Syndrome: Fibrillary Glomerulopathy and the M680I Missense Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semerdjian Ronald J

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by inflammatory serositis (fever, peritonitis, synovitis and pleuritis. The gene locus responsible for FMF was identified in 1992 and localized to the short arm of chromosome 16. In 1997, a specific FMF gene locus, MEFV, was discovered to encode for a protein, pyrin that mediates inflammation. To date, more than forty missense mutations are known to exist. The diversity of mutations identified has provided insight into the variability of clinical presentation and disease progression. Case Report We report an individual heterozygous for the M680I gene mutation with a clinical diagnosis of FMF using the Tel-Hashomer criteria. Subsequently, the patient developed nephrotic syndrome with biopsy-confirmed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN. Further diagnostic studies were unremarkable with clinical workup negative for amyloidosis or other secondary causes of nephrotic syndrome. Discussion Individuals with FMF are at greater risk for developing nephrotic syndrome. The most serious etiology is amyloidosis (AA variant with renal involvement, ultimately progressing to end-stage renal disease. Other known renal diseases in the FMF population include IgA nephropathy, IgM nephropathy, Henoch-Schönlein purpura as well as polyarteritis nodosa. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first association between FMF and the M680I mutation later complicated by nephrotic syndrome and fibrillary glomerulonephritis.

  19. Familial DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome with deletions of chromosome area 22q11.2: Report of five families with a review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J.; Pangkanon, Suthipong; Eanet, K.R. [Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-11

    The DiGeorge (DG), velocardiofacial (VCF), and conotruncal anomaly-face (CTAF) syndromes were originally described as distinct disorders, although overlapping phenotypes have been recognized. It is now clear that all three syndromes result from apparently similar or identical 22q11.2 deletions, suggesting that they represent phenotypic variability of a single genetic syndrome. We report on 12 individuals in five families with del(22)(q11.2) by fluorescent in situ hybridization, and define the frequency of phenotypic abnormalities in those cases and in 70 individuals from 27 del(22)(q11.2) families from the literature. Common manifestations include mental impairment (97%), abnormal face (93%), cardiac malformations (681%), thymic (64%) and parathyroid (63%) abnormalities, and cleft palate or velopharyngeal insufficiency (48%). Familial DG, VCF, and CTAF syndromes due to del(22)(q11.2) show significant inter- and intrafamilial clinical variability consistent with the hypothesis that a single gene or group of tightly linked genes is the common cause of these syndromes. Up to 25% of 22q deletions are inherited, indicating that parents of affected children warrant molecular cytogenetic evaluation. We propose use of the compound term {open_quotes}DiGeorge/velocardiofacial (DGNCF) syndrome{close_quotes} in referring to this condition, as it calls attention to the phenotypic spectrum using historically familiar names. 41 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Long-Term Outcomes in a Family with Nephrogenic Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hi Cho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a familial case of the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD, including 30-year followup data on two patients. The proband and one maternal uncle presented in their infancy with severe recurrent hyponatremia, and clinical pictures consistent with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH in the absence of an elevated ADH level. They were both confirmed to be hemizygous for the R137C mutation on the V2R gene (AVPR2, the same locus of the gain of function mutation demonstrated in the original reports of this condition. The proband's mother was identified as an asymptomatic carrier of this X-linked condition. Our case describes a favourable long-term outcome for NSIAD, in particular, successful treatment with oral urea during the infancy period, and with self-regulated precautions on fluid intake into adult life.

  1. Long-Term Outcomes in a Family with Nephrogenic Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenthal Stephen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a familial case of the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD, including 30-year followup data on two patients. The proband and one maternal uncle presented in their infancy with severe recurrent hyponatremia, and clinical pictures consistent with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH in the absence of an elevated ADH level. They were both confirmed to be hemizygous for the R137C mutation on the V2R gene (AVPR2, the same locus of the gain of function mutation demonstrated in the original reports of this condition. The proband's mother was identified as an asymptomatic carrier of this X-linked condition. Our case describes a favourable long-term outcome for NSIAD, in particular, successful treatment with oral urea during the infancy period, and with self-regulated precautions on fluid intake into adult life.

  2. Chromosomal fragility syndrome and family history of radiosensitivity as indicators for radiotherapy dose modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsbeih, Ghazi; Story, Michael D.; Maor, Moshe H.; Geara, Fady B.; Brock, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Beside a few known radiosensitive syndromes, a patient's reaction to radiotherapy is difficult to predict. In this report we describe the management of a pediatric cancer patient presented with a family history of radiosensitivity and cancer proneness. Laboratory investigations revealed a chromosomal fragility syndrome and an increased cellular radiosensitivity in vitro. AT gene sequencing revealed no mutations. The patient was treated with reduced radiation doses to avoid the presumed increased risks of toxicity to normal tissues. The patient tolerated well the treatment with no significant acute or late radiation sequelae. Five years later, the patient remains both disease and complications free. While an accurate laboratory test for radiosensitivity is still lacking, assessments of chromosomal fragility, cell survival and clinical medicine will continue to be useful for a small number of patients

  3. Anakinra induces complete remission of nephrotic syndrome in a patient with familial mediterranean fever and amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano, Ángel M; Hernandez, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Esther; Mateo, Isabel; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Morales, Enrique; Praga, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Renal amyloidosis is one of the most severe complications of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Colchicine has reduced the incidence of this complication, which now only appears in untreated, under-treated and resistant patients, but it is usually ineffective in patients with advanced amyloidosis. Here we report a patient with FMF and biopsy-proven amyloidosis who presented with nephrotic syndrome despite colchicine treatment. Anakinra (an interleukin-1β inhibitor) was started and a dramatic complete remission of nephrotic syndrome was observed in the following months. Anakinra can be an effective treatment for FMF patients with severe secondary amyloidosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. GATA3 mutation in a family with hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zi-Yang; Zhou, Qiao-Li; Ni, Shi-Ning; Gu, Wei

    2014-08-01

    The hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder primarily caused by GATA3 gene mutation. We report here a case that both of a Chinese boy and his father had HDR syndrome which caused by a novel mutation of GATA3. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing was performed to detect the exons of the GATA3 gene for mutation analysis. Sequence analysis of GATA3 revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation in this family: a mutation of GATA3 at exon 2 (c.515C >A) that resulted in a premature stop at codon 172 (p.S172X) with a loss of two zinc finger domains. We identified a novel nonsense mutation which will expand the spectrum of HDR-associated GATA3 mutations.

  5. Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES and cleft lip and palate. Report of two Brazilian families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Kokitsu-Nakata

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available We have evaluated a girl and a boy with the blepharophimosis, ptosis and epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES. The girl presented cleft palate and the boy showed cleft lip and palate as additional clinical signs. Both showed familial recurrence in fourth and third generations, respectively. The other family members also presented blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus, but without lip and palatal involvement. There were no additional clinical signs nor infertility in these patients. To our knowledge this is the first instance of cleft lip and palate reported as additional signs of the BPES syndrome.Os autores descrevem uma menina e um menino com a síndrome de blefarofimose, ptose e epicanto inverso (BPES. A menina apresentou fissura de palato e o menino mostrou fissura de lábio e palato como sinais clínicos adicionais. Ambos mostraram recorrência familial em quatro e três gerações, respectivamente. Outros membros de ambas as famílias apresentaram também blefarofimose, ptose e epicanto inverso, mas sem envolvimento de lábio e palato. Não existem sinais clínicos adicionais nem infertilidade nestes pacientes. De acordo com o nosso conhecimento, este é o primeiro relato de fissura de lábio e palato registrada como sinal adicional na síndrome BPES.

  6. Maternal perceptions of sibling adaptation in Korean families of children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H; Van Riper, M

    2014-10-01

    It is estimated that more than 500 infants with Down syndrome (DS) are born each year in Korea. DS affects not only these individuals, but family members as well. Some siblings deal successfully with the challenges of living with a child with DS and adapt well while others struggle or fail to adapt. The aims of this descriptive study were to explore how Korean mothers of children with DS perceive the adaptation of their typically developing (TD) children aged 4 to 19 and how family variables contribute to sibling adaptation. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted with 105 Korean mothers. Most mothers indicated that their TD children were not experiencing psychological or behavioural problems; however, many described problems in the sibling relationship. It was found that family factors (i.e. condition management effort, condition management ability, child's daily life, parental mutuality, family hardiness and social support) were strong predictors of sibling psychological, behavioural and relational adaptation. Demographic characteristics of the child with DS, the mother and the family appeared to significantly influence sibling adaptation. These findings highlight the importance of familial contexts in understanding sibling adaptation. Knowledge of family factors associated with better adaptation in Korean siblings of child with DS will facilitate the development of culturally appropriate interventions for these children and their families. In addition, an awareness of demographic characteristics associated with sibling adaptation will help health care professionals identify siblings who are at increased risk of experiencing difficulties in adapting. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Genetic counseling in Usher syndrome: linkage and mutational analysis of 10 Colombian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, M L; Lopez, G; Gelvez, N; Medina, D; Kimberling, W J; Rodríguez, V; Tamayo, G E; Bernal, J E

    2008-01-01

    Usher Syndrome (US), an autosomal recessive disease, is characterized by retinitis pigmentosa (RP), vestibular dysfunction, and congenital sensorineural deafness. There are three recognized clinical types of the disorder. In order to improve genetic counseling for affected families, we conducted linkage analysis and DNA sequencing in 10 Colombian families with confirmed diagnosis of US (4 type I and 6 type II). Seventy-five percent of the US1 families showed linkage to locus USH1B, while the remaining 25% showed linkage to loci USH1B and USH1C. Among families showing linkage to USH1B we found two different mutations in the MYO7A gene: IVS42-26insTTGAG in exon 43 (heterozygous state) and R634X (CGA-TGA) in exon 16 (homozygous state). All six US2 families showed linkage to locus USH2A. Of them, 4 had c.2299delG mutation (1 homozygote state and 3 heterozygous); in the remaining 2 we did not identify any pathologic DNA variant. USH2A individuals with a 2299delG mutation presented a typical and homogeneous retinal phenotype with bilateral severe hearing loss, except for one individual with a heterozygous 2299delG mutation, whose hearing loss was asymmetric, but more profound than in the other cases. The study of these families adds to the genotype-phenotype characterization of the different types and subtypes of US and facilitates genetic counseling in these families. We would like to emphasize the need to perform DNA studies as a prerequisite for genetic counseling in affected families.

  8. [Clinical and genetic investigation of families with Waardenburg syndrome type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H S; Liao, X B; Liu, Y L; He, C F; Zhang, H; Jiang, L; Feng, Y; Mei, L Y

    2016-12-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical chacteration and molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 in seven families, and provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Method: Clinical data of seven families with WS2(14 patients)were collected. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF), sex-determining region Y-box 10(SOX10), snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) and endothelin receptor type B(EDNRB)were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Then the raw data was analyzed. Result: The most common manifestations of WS2 are sensorineural hearing loss(10/14,71.4%), freckle(7/14, 50.0%),heterochromia iridis(6/14, 42.9%) and premature greying(5/14,35.7%). All the deafness phenotype is congenital, bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss. Freckles phenotype is different from cutaneous pigment abnormalities of WS in Westerners. The heterozygous mutation, c.328C>T in exon 3 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 2. However, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (SOX10,SNAI2 and EDNRB) was detected in other pedigrees. Conclusion: There are obvious variations in clinical features of WS, while freckles may be a special subtype of cutaneous pigment disturbances. The MITF gene mutation, R110X,is therefore considered the disease causing mutation in pedigree WS02.However, there are novel disease causing genes or copy number variations in Waardenburg syndrome type 2, which require further research. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.

  9. Percutenous Catheter Ablation of the Accessory Pathway in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Associated with Familial Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cay, Serkan; Topaloglu, Serkan; Aras, Dursun

    2008-01-01

    Percutenous catheter ablation of the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a highly successful mode of therapy. Sudden cardiac arrest survivors associated with WPW syndrome should undergo radiofrequency catheter ablation. WPW syndrome associated with familial atrial fibrillation is a very rare condition. Herein, we describe a case who presented with sudden cardiac arrest secondary to WPW syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation and treated via radiofrequency catheter ablation. PMID:18379660

  10. Percutenous Catheter Ablation of the Accessory Pathway in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Associated with Familial Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Cay

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Percutenous catheter ablation of the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a highly successful mode of therapy. Sudden cardiac arrest survivors associated with WPW syndrome should undergo radiofrequency catheter ablation. WPW syndrome associated with familial atrial fibrillation is a very rare condition. Herein, we describe a case who presented with sudden cardiac arrest secondary to WPW syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation and treated via radiofrequency catheter ablation.

  11. Gain of chromosomal region 20q and loss of 18 discriminates between Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Jönsson, Göran; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X, FCCTX, represent the two predominant colorectal cancer syndromes. Whereas Lynch syndrome is clinically and genetically well defined, the genetic cause of FCCTX is unknown and genomic differences between Lynch syndrome and FCCTX tumours...... are largely unknown. We applied array-based comparative genomic hybridisation to 23 colorectal cancers from FCCTX with comparison to 23 Lynch syndrome tumours and to 45 sporadic colorectal cancers. FCCTX tumours showed genomic complexity with frequent gains on chromosomes 20q, 19 and 17 and losses of 18, 8p...... and 15. Gain of genetic material in two separate regions encompassing, 20q12-13.12 and 20q13.2-13.32, was identified in 65% of the FCCTX tumours. Gain of material on chromosome 20q and loss on chromosome 18 significantly discriminated colorectal cancers associated with FCCTX from Lynch syndrome, which...

  12. Hearing impairment caused by mutations in two different genes responsible for nonsyndromic and syndromic hearing loss within a single family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepokój, Katarzyna; Rygiel, Agnieszka M; Jurczak, Piotr; Kujko, Aleksandra A; Śniegórska, Dominika; Sawicka, Justyna; Grabarczyk, Alicja; Bal, Jerzy; Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna

    2018-02-01

    Usher syndrome is rare genetic disorder impairing two human senses, hearing and vision, with the characteristic late onset of vision loss. This syndrome is divided into three types. In all cases, the vision loss is postlingual, while loss of hearing is usually prelingual. The vestibular functions may also be disturbed in Usher type 1 and sometimes in type 3. Vestibular areflexia is helpful in making a proper diagnosis of the syndrome, but, often, the syndrome is misdiagnosed as a nonsyndromic hearing loss. Here, we present a Polish family with hearing loss, which was clinically classified as nonsyndromic. After excluding mutations in the DFNB1 locus, we implemented the next-generation sequencing method and revealed that hearing loss was syndromic and mutations in the USH2A gene indicate Usher syndrome. This research highlights the importance of molecular analysis in establishing a clinical diagnosis of congenital hearing loss.

  13. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome with Ventricular Hypertrophy in a Brazilian Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steld, Lenises de Paula; Campuzano, Oscar; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Moura de Barros Zamorano, Mabel; Sousa Matos, Selma; Brugada, Ramon

    2017-07-10

    BACKGROUND PRKAG2 syndrome diagnosis is already well-defined as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW), ventricular hypertrophy (VH) due to glycogen accumulation, and conduction system disease (CSD). Because of its rarity, there is a lack of literature focused on the treatment. The present study aimed to describe appropriate strategies for the treatment of affected family members with PRKAG2 syndrome with a long follow-up period. CASE REPORT We studied 60 selected individuals from 84 family members (32 males, 53.3%) (mean age 27±16 years). Patients with WPW and/or VH were placed in a group of 18 individuals, in which 11 (61.1%) had VH and WPW, 6 (33.3%) had isolated WPW, and 1 (5.6%) had isolated VH. Palpitations occurred in 16 patients (88.9%), chest pain in 11 (61.1%), dizziness in 13 (72.2%), syncope in 15 (83.3%), and dyspnea in 13 (72%). Sudden cardiac death (SCD) occurred in 2 (11.1%), and 2 patients with cardiac arrest (CA) had asystole and pre-excited atrial flutter-fibrillation (AFL and AF) as the documented mechanism. Transient ischemic attack (TIA) and learning/language disabilities with delayed development were observed. Genetic analysis identified a new missense pathogenic variant (p.K290I) in the PRKAG2 gene. Cardiac histopathology demonstrated the predominance of vacuoles containing glycogen derivative and fibrosis. The treatment was based on hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) control, antiarrhythmic drugs (AD), anticoagulation, and radiofrequency catheter ablation (RCA). Six patients (33.3%) underwent pacemaker implantation (PM). CONCLUSIONS The present study describes the clinical treatment for a rare cardiac syndrome caused by a PRKAG2 mutation.

  14. A family with Wagner syndrome with uveitis and a new versican mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Pierre-Raphaël; Brézin, Antoine P; Nedelec, Brigitte; Burin des Roziers, Cyril; Ghiotti, Tiffany; Orhant, Lucie; Boimard, Mathieu; Valleix, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    To report the clinical and molecular findings of a kindred with Wagner syndrome (WS) revealed by intraocular inflammatory features. Eight available family members underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, including laser flare cell meter measurements. Collagen, type II, alpha 1, versican (VCAN), frizzled family receptor 4, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5, tetraspanin 12, and Norrie disease (pseudoglioma) genes were screened with direct sequencing. The index case was initially referred for unexplained severe and chronic postoperative bilateral uveitis following a standard cataract surgery procedure. Clinical examination of the proband revealed an optically empty vitreous with avascular vitreous strands and veils, features highly suggestive of WS. The systematic familial ophthalmologic examination identified three additional unsuspected affected family members who also presented with the WS phenotype, including uveitis for one of them. We identified a novel c.4004-6T>A nucleotide substitution at the acceptor splice site of intron 7 of the VCAN gene that segregated with the disease phenotype. We present a family with WS with typical WS features and intraocular inflammatory manifestations associated with a novel splice site VCAN mutation. Beyond the structural role in the retinal-vitreous architecture, versican is also emerging as a pivotal mediator of the inflammatory response, supporting uveitis predisposition as a clinical manifestation of WS.

  15. Systems biological approach to investigate the lack of familial link between Down's Syndrome & Neural Tube Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragunath, Pk; Abhinand, Pa

    2013-01-01

    Systems Biology involves the study of the interactions of biological systems and ultimately their functions. Down's syndrome (DS) is one of the most common genetic disorders which are caused by complete, or occasionally partial, triplication of chromosome 21, characterized by cognitive and language dysfunction coupled with sensory and neuromotor deficits. Neural Tube Disorders (NTDs) are a group of congenital malformations of the central nervous system and neighboring structures related to defective neural tube closure during the first trimester of pregnancy usually occurring between days 18-29 of gestation. Several studies in the past have provided considerable evidence that abnormal folate and methyl metabolism are associated with onset of DS & NTDs. There is a possible common etiological pathway for both NTDs and Down's syndrome. But, various research studies over the years have indicated very little evidence for familial link between the two disorders. Our research aimed at the gene expression profiling of microarray datasets pertaining to the two disorders to identify genes whose expression levels are significantly altered in these conditions. The genes which were 1.5 fold unregulated and having a p-value disorders were recognized and over representation analysis was carried out for each of the constituent genes. The comprehensive manual analysis of these genes yields a hypothetical understanding of the lack of familial link between DS and NTDs. There were no genes involved with folic acid present in the dense cliques. Only - CBL, EGFR genes were commonly present, which makes the allelic variants of these genes - good candidates for future studies regarding the familial link between DS and NTDs. NTD - Neural Tube Disorders, DS - Down's Syndrome, MTHFR - Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, MTRR- 5 - methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase reductase.

  16. Nance-Horan syndrome: linkage analysis in a family from The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, A A; ten Brink, J; Schuurman, E J; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E M

    1994-05-01

    Linkage analysis was carried out in a Dutch family with Nance-Horan (NH) syndrome. Close linkage without recombination between NH and the Xp loci DXS207, DXS43, and DXS365 (zmax = 3.23) was observed. Multipoint linkage analysis and the analysis of recombinations in multiple informative meioses suggest the genetic order Xcen-DMD (exon 49)-DXS451-(NH, DXS207, DXS365, DXS43)-(STS, DXF30)-Xpter. These data refine the localization of the NH locus on the distal Xp.

  17. A PAX3 polymorphism (T315K) in a family exhibiting Waardenburg Syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Kim, E; Attaie, A; Smith, T N; Wilcox, E R; Lalwani, A K

    1998-02-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder phenotypically characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances. Presence of dystopia canthorum is indicative of WS type 1 and results from defects in the PAX3 gene, whereas normally located medial canthi is characteristic of type 2 WS (WS2) and is associated with defects in the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MIFT) gene. Here a neutral polymorphism is reported in the PAX3 gene (T315K) in a family with WS2. Copyright 1998 Academic Press Limited

  18. Peculiarities of family doctors' medical assistance for persons with 'Chernobyl syndrome'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margine, Le.; Tintiuc, D.; Grejdeanu, T.; Margine, Lu.; Badan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Medical and social protection and rehabilitation of patients with 'Chernobyl syndrome' is provided by legislation of the Republic of Moldova, which is reflected in a comprehensive action plan for rehabilitation and protection of this category of citizens. This plan includes such medical activities as detailed medical ambulatory and stationary examination, purchase prescription drugs, annual sanatorium treatment, annual compensation recovery in the value of 2 average monthly salaries for health improvement. The role of family doctors' medical assistance for persons suffered due to the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is very important in this plan implementation.

  19. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome: impact on the caregivers and families of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) has a major impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of the affected children as well as their caregivers. The primary caregiver in the family is generally the mother, with support from the father and siblings. The burden of care and the effects of the disease on the child necessitate adjustments in virtually all aspects of the lives of their family. These adjustments inevitably affect the physical, emotional, social, and financial health of the whole family. Numerous sources of support for families can help to ease the burden of care. Improvements in the treatment of LGS, in addition to helping the child with LGS, would likely help improve the HRQL of the family members. This pilot parent survey was designed to explore the impact of epilepsy on caregiver HRQL. Parents of children with epilepsy who had contacted the Epilepsy Information Service at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA, were sent questionnaires comprising open- and closed-ended questions. A total of 200 surveys were distributed, with a return rate of 48%. The results revealed that 74% of the parents believed that having a child with epilepsy brought them and their partner closer together. However, when the parents were asked to explain the manner in which epilepsy affected their families, answers included continuous stress, major financial distress, and lack of time to spend with other children. Information and resources for the families of children with LGS could help improve the HRQL of both the patients and their relatives.

  20. Lennox–Gastaut syndrome: impact on the caregivers and families of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson PA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patricia A Gibson Epilepsy Information Service, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS has a major impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQL of the affected children as well as their caregivers. The primary caregiver in the family is generally the mother, with support from the father and siblings. The burden of care and the effects of the disease on the child necessitate adjustments in virtually all aspects of the lives of their family. These adjustments inevitably affect the physical, emotional, social, and financial health of the whole family. Numerous sources of support for families can help to ease the burden of care. Improvements in the treatment of LGS, in addition to helping the child with LGS, would likely help improve the HRQL of the family members. This pilot parent survey was designed to explore the impact of epilepsy on caregiver HRQL. Parents of children with epilepsy who had contacted the Epilepsy Information Service at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA, were sent questionnaires comprising open- and closed-ended questions. A total of 200 surveys were distributed, with a return rate of 48%. The results revealed that 74% of the parents believed that having a child with epilepsy brought them and their partner closer together. However, when the parents were asked to explain the manner in which epilepsy affected their families, answers included continuous stress, major financial distress, and lack of time to spend with other children. Information and resources for the families of children with LGS could help improve the HRQL of both the patients and their relatives. Keywords: health-related quality of life, HRQL, epilepsy, relatives, siblings

  1. Genetic analysis of an Indian family with members affected with Waardenburg syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Saketh; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Taly, Arun B; Sinha, Sanjib; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Rani, S Vasantha; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Kumar, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects of the eye, skin, and hair. It is caused by mutations in one of the following genes: PAX3 (paired box 3), MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), EDN3 (endothelin 3), SNAI2 (snail homolog 2, Drosophila) and SOX10 (SRY-box containing gene 10). Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of WS and DMD in an Indian family with two patients: one affected with WS and DMD, and another one affected with only WS. Blood samples were collected from individuals for genomic DNA isolation. To determine the linkage of this family to the eight known WS loci, microsatellite markers were selected from the candidate regions and used to genotype the family. Exon-specific intronic primers for EDN3 were used to amplify and sequence DNA samples from affected individuals to detect mutations. A mutation in DMD was identified by multiplex PCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification method using exon-specific probes. Pedigree analysis suggested segregation of WS as an autosomal recessive trait in the family. Haplotype analysis suggested linkage of the family to the WS4B (EDN3) locus. DNA sequencing identified a novel missense mutation p.T98M in EDN3. A deletion mutation was identified in DMD. This study reports a novel missense mutation in EDN3 and a deletion mutation in DMD in the same Indian family. The present study will be helpful in genetic diagnosis of this family and increases the mutation spectrum of EDN3.

  2. Visceroptosis and the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Stephen; Sullivan, Stephen N

    2017-11-08

    The case of a patient with visceroptosis and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (RDS-HT) is reported here. The literature on this unusual but probably under-recognized complication is reviewed.

  3. Work-family spillover and metabolic syndrome indicators: Findings from a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versey, H Shellae; Tan, Mingxuan

    2018-03-01

    This study examines the link between negative work-family spillover and metabolic risk factors over a 9-year period. Data from two waves of the Midlife in the United States Survey were used to explore relationships between negative work-family spillover and four indicators of metabolic syndrome-blood pressure, triglycerides, body mass index, and glucose levels. In a sample of full-time working men and women ( N = 630), increased negative spillover at baseline significantly predicted higher body mass index nearly a decade later, with a marginally significant effect for triglyceride levels. Increases in spillover also body mass index and glucose levels at follow-up. This study extends research tying work-life spillover to health and suggests that further investigation is needed to fully understand the long-term effects of work stress.

  4. Novel association of neurofibromatosis type 1-causing mutations in families with neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekvall, Sara; Sjörs, Kerstin; Jonzon, Anders; Vihinen, Mauno; Annerén, Göran; Bondeson, Marie-Louise

    2014-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome (NFNS) is a rare condition with clinical features of both neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Noonan syndrome (NS). All three syndromes belong to the RASopathies, which are caused by dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK pathway. The major gene involved in NFNS is NF1, but co-occurring NF1 and PTPN11 mutations in NFNS have been reported. Knowledge about possible involvement of additional RASopathy-associated genes in NFNS is, however, very limited. We present a comprehensive clinical and molecular analysis of eight affected individuals from three unrelated families displaying features of NF1 and NFNS. The genetic etiology of the clinical phenotypes was investigated by mutation analysis, including NF1, PTPN11, SOS1, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, RAF1, SHOC2, SPRED1, MAP2K1, MAP2K2, and CBL. All three families harbored a heterozygous NF1 variant, where the first family had a missense variant, c.5425C>T;p.R1809C, the second family a recurrent 4bp-deletion, c.6789_6792delTTAC;p.Y2264Tfs*6, and the third family a splice-site variant, c.2991-1G>A, resulting in skipping of exon 18 and an in-frame deletion of 41 amino acids. These NF1 variants have all previously been reported in NF1 patients. Surprisingly, both c.6789_6792delTTAC and c.2991-1G>A are frequently associated with NF1, but association to NFNS has, to our knowledge, not previously been reported. Our results support the notion that NFNS represents a variant of NF1, genetically distinct from NS, and is caused by mutations in NF1, some of which also cause classical NF1. Due to phenotypic overlap between NFNS and NS, we propose screening for NF1 mutations in NS patients, preferentially when café-au-lait spots are present. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. FROM FAMILIES SYNDROMES TO GENES… THE FIRST CLINICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF HEREDITARY SYNDROMES PREDISPOSING TO CANCER: WHAT WAS THE BEGINNING?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charité Ricker, MS, LCGC

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessment for hereditary susceptibility to cancer is considered standard of care, as it impacts not only a clinician's understanding of cancer causation but also options for prevention and treatment. The roots of our current knowledge about hereditary cancer syndromes can be traced to early reports of families with striking cancer histories. The purpose of this article is to review the historical timeline of the two most commonly assessed hereditary cancer syndromes, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC and Lynch syndrome (LS. While many individuals identified with these syndromes today come from families similar to those seen in the early historical reports, our understanding of these syndromes, their expression and penetrance, has evolved over the years. In addition, the increased utilization of broad multi-gene panels continues to add to the complexity of defining associated phenotypes. These findings can lead to challenges with translating results to clinical management for patients and families, but also provide an opportunity to continue to gain understanding of the genetic underpinnings of cancer etiology.

  6. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  7. How much do family physicians involve pregnant women in decisions about prenatal screening for Down syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Susie; Labrecque, Michel; Njoya, Merlin; Rousseau, François; St-Jacques, Sylvie; Légaré, France

    2010-02-01

    To assess the extent to which family physicians (FPs) involve women in decisions about prenatal screening for Down syndrome. Based on transcripts of consultations between 41 FPs and 128 women, two raters independently assessed clinician's efforts to involve women in decisions about prenatal screening for Down syndrome using the French-language version of OPTION. Descriptive statistics of OPTION scores were calculated. Construct validity was assessed by performing a principal factor analysis and by measuring association with consultation duration and FPs sociodemograhics. Internal consistency was assessed with Cronbach's alpha and inter-rater reliability with the intraclass correlation coefficient. The overall mean OPTION score was low: 19 +/- 7 (range = 0 [no involvement] to 100 [high involvement]). One factor accounted for 80% of the variance. Both internal consistency and inter-rater reliability were very good (Cronbach's alpha = 0.73; ICC = 0.76). OPTION scores were lower for residents than for licensed FPs (17 +/- 5 vs 21 +/- 4; p = 0.02) and were positively associated with duration of consultation (r = 0.56; p women in decisions about prenatal screening for Down syndrome. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. [PAX3 gene mutation analysis for two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ families and their prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Yan, J; Qin, Z B; Wang, B

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To analyze the mutations of PAX3 gene in two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ (WS1) pedigrees and make prenatal diagnosis for the high-risk 18-week-old fetus. Methods: PAX3 gene was first analyzed by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA) for detecting pathogenic mutation of the probands of the two pedigrees. The mutations were confirmed by MLPA and Sanger in parents and unrelated healthy individuals.Prenatal genetic diagnosis for the high-risk fetus was performed by amniotic fluid cell after genotyping. Results: A heterozygous PAX3 gene gross deletion (E7 deletion) was identified in all patients from WS1-01 family, and not found in 20 healthy individuals.Prenatal diagnosis in WS1-01 family indicated that the fetus was normal. Molecular studies identified a novel deletion mutation c. 1385_1386delCT within the PAX3 gene in all affected WS1-02 family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives and 200 healthy individuals. Conclusions: PAX3 gene mutation is etiological for two WS1 families. Sanger sequencing plus MLPA is effective and accurate for making gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.

  9. Psychiatric disorders and family functioning in children and adolescents with functional abdominal pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Moaiedy, Farah; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Askani, Hamid; Haghighat, Mahmood; Dehbozorgi, Gholamreza; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen

    2008-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder. There is a heightened risk when conducting potentially dangerous and unnecessary medical investigations and procedures in children with FAPS. The aim of this study was to survey the rate of the psychiatric disorders and family functioning in children and adolescents with FAPS. The subjects were a consecutive new sample of 45 children and adolescents with FAPS, 45 with an organic abdominal pain, and 45 pain-free comparison subjects aged 5-18 years that were interviewed using the Farsi version of K-SADS. Family functioning and the severity of pain were also studied. About 51.1% of patients with FAPS suffered from at least one psychiatric disorder. Psychiatric disorders in the FAPS patients studied included general anxiety disorder (8.9%), obsessive-compulsive disorder (11.1%), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (15.6%), separation anxiety disorder (24.4%), and major depressive disorder (15.6%). Except for generalized anxiety disorder and tic disorder, the other disorders were significantly more common in the FAPS group than in the two other control groups. Family functioning scores were not significantly different between groups. There is a high rate of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents with FAPS in Iran, but our study found fewer incidences of disorders than previous reports have indicated. Family dysfunction difficulties in FAPS children are not more common than those in the control groups.

  10. A novel mutation of PAX3 in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Shu, Anli; Qian, Xueqing; Gao, Jianjun; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Yonglan; Li, Xingwang; Li, Sheng; Feng, Guoyin; He, Lin

    2006-08-28

    The molecular characterization of 34 members of a Chinese family, with 22 members in four generations, affected with Waardenburg syndrome (WS1). A detailed family history and clinical data were collected. A genome-wide scan by two-point linkage analysis using more than 400 microsatellite markers in combination with haplotype analysis was performed. Mutation screening was carried out in the candidate gene by sequencing of amplified products. A maximum two-point lod score of 6.53 at theta = 0.00 was obtained with marker D2S2248. Haplotype analysis placed the WS1 locus to a 45.74 cM region between D2S117 and D2S206, in close proximity to the PAX3 gene on chromosome 2q35. Mutation screening in PAX3 identified a 701T > C mutation which converted a highly conserved Leu to Pro. This nucleotide alteration was neither seen in unaffected members of the family nor found in 50 unrelated control subjects. The present study identified a novel 701T > C mutation in PAX3. The mutation observed in this family highlights the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder.

  11. [Reaven's metabolic syndrome X in the families of individuals with premature cerebrovascular attacks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaverková, H; Ficker, L; Vlachová, I; Chudácková, J; Novotný, D; Budíková, M

    1993-08-01

    In families of subjects with premature ischaemic cerebrovascular attacks (a total of 45 families with 190 members) the authors detected a high incidence of dyslipidaemia, arterial hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, frequently with striking cumulation. The authors investigated therefore the relationship of the insulin level as an indirect reflection of insulin resistance with these risk factors. The fasting insulin levels correlated significantly positively with triglyceride levels, apolipoprotein B, atherogenic indices and negatively with HDL-cholesterol. The probands and siblings with arterial hypertension had significantly higher fasting insulin levels, as compared with subjects without hypertension which was due to a more frequent incidence of overweight. Patients with an impaired glucose tolerance and NIDDM had significantly higher fasting insulin levels and insulin levels after two hours (the latter value was not assessed in diabetes) and unfavourable "atherogenic" lipid and lipoprotein values, as compared with subjects without glucose intolerance and the control group. Overweight (BMI > 26) had an adverse impact on all investigated indicators of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism whereby a W/H ratio > 0.85 as a manifestation of central obesity further accentuated this adverse effect. The authors draw from these results therapeutic conclusions as regards the mentioned risk factors in these families. They emphasize the importance of non-pharmacological intervention of the metabolic X syndrome by weight reduction and more physical activity not only in families of subjects with early atherosclerosis but in the entire population which has a high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. [Gene mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis of a family with Bartter syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Ma, Na; Li, Xiu-Rong; Gong, Fei; DU, Juan

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the mutation of related genes and prenatal diagnosis of a family with Bartter syndrome (BS). The high-throughput capture sequencing technique and PCR-Sanger sequencing were used to detect pathogenic genes in the proband of this family and analyze the whole family at the genomic level. After the genetic cause was clarified, the amniotic fluid was collected from the proband's mother who was pregnant for 5 months for prenatal diagnosis. The proband carried compound heterozygous mutations of c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) and c.968+2T>A in the CLCNKB gene; c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) had been reported as a pathogenic mutation, and c.968+2T>A was a new mutation. Pedigree analysis showed that the two mutations were inherited from the mother and father, respectively. Prenatal diagnosis showed that the fetus did not inherit the mutations from parents and had no mutations at the two loci. The follow-up visit confirmed that the infant was in a healthy state, which proved the accuracy of genetic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis. The compound heterozygous mutations c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) and c.968+2T>A in the CLCNKB gene are the cause of BS in the proband, and prenatal diagnosis can prevent the risk of recurrence of BS in this family.

  13. A family of oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) with a novel BCOR mutation and genomic rearrangements involving NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yukiko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Ryoo, Na-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-01

    Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) is an X-linked dominant disorder associated with male lethality, presenting with congenital cataract, dysmorphic face, dental abnormalities and septal heart defects. Mutations in BCOR (encoding BCL-6-interacting corepressor) cause OFCD. Here, we report on a Korean family with common features of OFCD including bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects in three affected females (mother and two daughters). Through the mutation screening and copy number analysis using genomic microarray, we identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.888delG, in the BCOR gene and two interstitial microduplications at Xp22.2-22.13 and Xp21.3 in all the three affected females. The BCOR mutation may lead to a premature stop codon (p.N297IfsX80). The duplication at Xp22.2-22.13 involved the NHS gene causative for Nance-Horan syndrome, which is an X-linked disorder showing similar clinical features with OFCD in affected males, and in carrier females with milder presentation. Considering the presence of bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects, which is unique to OFCD, the mutation in BCOR is likely to be the major determinant for the phenotypes in this family.

  14.  Familial Ectrodactyly Syndrome in a Nigerian Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed Adegboye

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available  Ectrodactyly, also known as Split-Hand/Split-Foot Malformation (SHFM is a rare genetic condition characterized by defects of the central elements of the autopod. It has a prevalence of 1:10,000-1:90,000 worldwide. The X-linked and autosomal dominant types have been described. It can occur as an isolated malformation or in combination with other anomalies, such as tibial aplasia, craniofacial defects, and genitourinary abnormalities. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome (EEC is an example of ectrodactyly syndrome accompanied by multiple organ defects. Ectrodactyly has been reported in Africa, especially in several families in remote areas of central Africa but there has not been any published work on ectrodactyly in Nigeria. A baby was born in Ilorin, North Central Zone of Nigeria, with an uneventful prenatal and delivery history but was noticed to have malformation of the two hands and the two lower limbs at birth which are replica of the father’s malformation. We present this case to highlight familial ectrodactyly in Nigeria and prepare us to improve upon simple prenatal diagnosis and management of the challenges associated with patients with congenital malformation in Nigeria and other developing countries.

  15. Reverse-namaskar: A new sign in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A family pedigree study of four generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is a rare group of inheritable connective tissue disorder of defective collagen. Skin, joints and blood vessels are most commonly affected. Clinical signs such as Gorlin sign and Metenier sign have been described in this syndrome. We report another new clinical sign called ′Reverse-Namaskar′ sign as an important clinical finding in EDS, based on the family pedigree study of the proband.

  16. Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: toward improving early molecular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Rebeh, Imen; Grati, Mhamed; Bonnet, Crystel; Bouassida, Walid; Hadjamor, Imen; Ayadi, Hammadi; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Petit, Christine; Masmoudi, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deaf-blindness cases. The most severe form of this syndrome, Usher syndrome type I (USH1), is characterized by profound congenital sensorineural deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six USH1 genes have been identified, MYO7A, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1C, SANS, and CIB2, encoding myosin VIIA, cadherin-23, protocadherin-15, harmonin, scaffold protein containing ankyrin repeats and a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, and calcium- and integrin-binding member 2, respectively. In the present study, we recruited four Tunisian families with a diagnosis of USH1, together with healthy unrelated controls. Affected members underwent detailed audiologic and ocular examinations. We used the North African Deafness (NADf) chip to search for known North African mutations associated with USH. Then, we selected microsatellite markers covering USH1 known loci to genotype the DNA samples. Finally, we performed DNA sequencing of three known USH1 genes: MYO7A, PCDH15, and USH1C. Four biallelic mutations, all single base changes, were found in the MYO7A, USH1C, and PCDH15 genes. These mutations consist of a previously reported splicing defect c.470+1G>A in MYO7A, three novel variants, including two nonsense (p.Arg3X and p.Arg134X) in USH1C and PCDH15, respectively, and one frameshift (p.Lys615Asnfs*6) in MYO7A. We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied families with USH1 with a variety of mutations, among which three were novel. These novel mutations will be included in the NADf mutation screening chip that will allow a higher diagnosis efficiency of this extremely genetically heterogeneous disease. Ultimately, efficient molecular diagnosis of USH in a patient's early childhood is of utmost importance, allowing better educational and therapeutic management.

  17. Fragile X syndrome in females - a familial case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stembalska, Agnieszka; Łaczmańska, Izabela; Gil, Justyna; Pesz, Karolina A

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), one of the manifestations of FMR1-related disorders, is one of the most frequent genetic causes of intellectual disability. In over 99% of all cases it results from the expansion of CGG repeats in the 5'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene and presents in males and in about 50% of the females with an FMR1 full mutation, usually with a milder phenotype. Although the morphologic and behavioral phenotype in males is a well-recognized entity, the presentation in females is variable and not as specific. The objective of this paper is to present a family with quite a severe expression of the disorder in two sisters with a full mutation. We report on a two-generation family where both males and females were found to be affected by FXS. We also present the diagnostic pathway and methods that led to the diagnosis of fragile X syndrome in the two sisters, as well as the method that explained the normal phenotype in their mother. The CGG repeats analysis in the FMR1 gene showed one normal allele and one allele with a full mutation in both sisters (probands) and their mother. A full mutation was also found in three male cousins of the probands. The analysis of the X-chromosome methylation status has shown a random X inactivation in proband 1 and 2 and a non-random one in the proband's mother, with the normal allele predominantly active. The reasons for different clinical presentations are discussed; moreover a review of the literature on females with FXS is presented. We hope that this paper will facilitate the future diagnosis of fragile X syndromes in females.

  18. Mutation spectrum and risk of colorectal cancer in African American families with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindalini, Rodrigo Santa Cruz; Win, Aung Ko; Gulden, Cassandra; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Raymond, Victoria; Stoffel, Elena; Hall, Michael; Llor, Xavier; Ukaegbu, Chinedu I; Solomon, Ilana; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Kalady, Matthew; Blanco, Amie; Terdiman, Jonathan; Shuttlesworth, Gladis A; Lynch, Patrick M; Hampel, Heather; Lynch, Henry T; Jenkins, Mark A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Kupfer, Sonia S

    2015-11-01

    African Americans (AAs) have the highest incidence of and mortality resulting from colorectal cancer (CRC) in the United States. Few data are available on genetic and nongenetic risk factors for CRC among AAs. Little is known about cancer risks and mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes in AAs with the most common inherited CRC condition, Lynch syndrome. We aimed to characterize phenotype, mutation spectrum, and risk of CRC in AAs with Lynch syndrome. We performed a retrospective study of AAs with mutations in MMR genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) using databases from 13 US referral centers. We analyzed data on personal and family histories of cancer. Modified segregation analysis conditioned on ascertainment criteria was used to estimate age- and sex-specific CRC cumulative risk, studying members of the mutation-carrying families. We identified 51 AA families with deleterious mutations that disrupt function of the MMR gene product: 31 in MLH1 (61%), 11 in MSH2 (21%), 3 in MSH6 (6%), and 6 in PMS2 (12%); 8 mutations were detected in more than 1 individual, and 11 have not been previously reported. In the 920 members of the 51 families with deleterious mutations, the cumulative risks of CRC at 80 years of age were estimated to be 36.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.5%-83.9%) for men and 29.7% (95% CI, 8.31%-76.1%) for women. CRC risk was significantly higher among individuals with mutations in MLH1 or MSH2 (hazard ratio, 13.9; 95% CI, 3.44-56.5). We estimate the cumulative risk for CRC in AAs with MMR gene mutations to be similar to that of individuals of European descent with Lynch syndrome. Two-thirds of mutations were found in MLH1, some of which were found in multiple individuals and some that have not been previously reported. Differences in mutation spectrum are likely to reflect the genetic diversity of this population. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. De novo dominant mutation of SOX10 gene in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Liu, Min; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zou, Wenting; Jiang, Hongyan

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The condition is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigment disturbances of the hair, skin, and iris. The de novo mutation in the SOX10 gene, responsible for Waardenburg syndrome type II, is rarely seen. The present study aimed to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese family. Clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. A novel SOX10 heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation was identified. Heterozygosity was not observed in the parents and sister of the proband, indicating that the mutation has arisen de novo. The novel frameshift mutation, located in exon 3 of the SOX10 gene, disrupted normal amino acid coding from Leu87, leading to premature termination at nucleotide 396 (TGA). The high mobility group domain of SOX10 was inferred to be partially impaired. The novel heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation in the SOX10 gene was considered to be the cause of Waardenburg syndrome in the proband. The clinical and genetic characterization of this family would help elucidate the genetic heterogeneity of SOX10 in Waardenburg syndrome type II. Moreover, the de novo pattern expanded the mutation data of SOX10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Speech and language abilities of children with the familial form of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

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    Rakonjac Marijana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS, which encompasses Shprintzen syndrome, DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome, is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans with an estimated incidence of approximately 1/4000 per live births. After Down syndrome, it is the second most common genetic syndrome associated with congenital heart malformations. The mode of inheritance of the 22q11.2DS is autosomal dominant. In approximately 72 - 94% of the cases the deletion has occurred de novo, while in 6 to 28% of patients deletion was inherited from a parent. As a part of a multidisciplinary study we examined the speech and language abilities of members of two families with inherited form of 22q11.2DS. The presence of 22q11.2 microdeletion was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. In one family we detected 1.5 Mb 22q11.2 microdeletion, while in the other family we found 3Mb microdeletion. Patients from both families showed delays in cognitive, socio-emotional, speech and language development. Furthermore, we found considerable variability in the phenotypic characteristics of 22q11.2DS and the degree of speech-language pathology not only between different families with 22q11.2 deletion, but also among members of the same family. In addition, we detected no correlation between the phenotype and the size of 22q11.2 microdeletion.

  1. Heterozygous Mutations in TREX1 Cause Familial Chilblain Lupus and Dominant Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian; Newman, William G.; Dean, John; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Flintoff, Kim; Robins, Peter; Harvey, Scott; Hollis, Thomas; O’Hara, Ann; Herrick, Ariane L.; Bowden, Andrew P.; Perrino, Fred W.; Lindahl, Tomas; Barnes, Deborah E.; Crow, Yanick J.

    2007-01-01

    TREX1 constitutes the major 3′→5′ DNA exonuclease activity measured in mammalian cells. Recently, biallelic mutations in TREX1 have been shown to cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome at the AGS1 locus. Interestingly, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome shows overlap with systemic lupus erythematosus at both clinical and pathological levels. Here, we report a heterozygous TREX1 mutation causing familial chilblain lupus. Additionally, we describe a de novo heterozygous mutation, affecting a critical catalytic residue in TREX1, that results in typical Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. PMID:17357087

  2. Serum vitamin D and the metabolic syndrome among osteoporotic postmenopausal female patients of a family practice clinic in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasein, Nada; Shroukh, Wejdan; Hijjawi, Razan

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency and the metabolic syndrome are two common health issues worldwide. The association between these two health problems is subject to debate. This study aims to investigate the association between vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency and the metabolic syndrome in a sample of osteoporotic postmenopausal women attending a family practice clinic in Amman-Jordan. This was an observational cross sectional study. It was carried out in the family practice clinic in Jordan University Hospital. The study included all postmenopausal osteoporotic women attending the clinic between June 2011 and May 2012, yielding a total of 326 subjects. The association between metabolic syndrome and serum vitamin D levels was investigated. Waist circumference, body mass index, triglycerides and fasting blood sugar were significantly higher among postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome, but HDL cholesterol was significantly lower (pmetabolic syndrome among all study participants was 42.9%. Triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were significantly higher among women deficiency or insufficiency (pmetabolic syndrome, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was 50.7%. Findings of the current study suggest a lack of relationship between serum vitamin D and metabolic syndrome. However, a significant inverse relationship was found between serum vitamin D levels and both serum triglycerides and LDL levels.

  3. [Constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency syndrome (CMMR-D) - a case report of a family with biallelic MSH6 mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilenčíková, D

    2012-01-01

    This work gives comprehensive information about new recessively inherited syndrome characterized by development of childhood malignancies. Behind this new described syndrome, called Constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency syndrome (CMMR-D), there are biallelic mutations in genes, which cause adult cancer syndrom termed Lynch syndrom (Hereditary non-polyposis cancer syndrom-HNPCC) if they are heterozygous mutations. Biallelic germline mutations of genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 in CMMR-D are characterized by increased risk of hematological malignancies, atypical brain tumors and early onset of colorectal cancers. An accompanying manifestation of the disease are skin spots with diffuse margins and irregular pigmentation reminiscent of Café au lait spots of NF1. This paper reports a case of a family with CMMR-D caused by novel homozygous MSH6 mutations leading to gliomatosis cerebri, T-ALL in an 11-year-old female and glioblastoma multiforme in her 10-year-old brother, both with rapid progression of the diseases. A literature review of brain tumors in CMMR-D families shows that they are treatment-resistant and lead to early death. Therefore, this work highlights the importance of early identification of patients with CMMR-D syndrome - in terms of initiation of a screening program for early detection of malignancies as well as early surgical intervention.

  4. The importance of older family members in providing social resources and promoting cancer screening in families with a hereditary cancer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Hadley, Donald W; Goergen, Andrea F; Skapinsky, Kaley F; Devlin, Hillary C; Koehly, Laura M

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluates the role of older family members as providers of social resources within familial network systems affected by an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome.  Respondents who previously participated in a study that involved genetic counseling and testing for Lynch syndrome and their family network members were invited to participate in a onetime telephone interview about family communication. A total of 206 respondents from 33 families identified 2,051 social relationships (dyads). Nineteen percent of the respondents and 25% of the network members were older (≥60 years). Younger respondents (≤59 years) were more likely to nominate older network members as providers of social resources than younger members: instrumental support (odds ratio [OR] = 1.68), emotional support (OR = 1.71), help in crisis situation (OR = 2.04), and dependability when needed (OR = 2.15). Compared with younger network members, older members were more likely to be listed as encouragers of colon cancer screening by both younger (OR = 3.40) and older respondents (OR = 1.90) independent of whether support exchange occurred in the relationship. Engaging older network members in health interventions to facilitate screening behaviors and emotional well-being of younger members within families affected by inherited conditions may be beneficial. Findings can be used to empower older individuals about their important social roles in enhancing the well-being of their family members and to inform younger individuals about their older relatives' resourcefulness to facilitate positive social interactions.

  5. Prenatal detection of congenital bilateral cataract leading to the diagnosis of Nance-Horan syndrome in the extended family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Adi; Yaron, Yuval; Burdon, Kathryn; Crystal-Shalit, Ornit; Kidron, Dvora; Malcov, Mira; Tepper, Ron

    2007-07-01

    To describe a family in which it was possible to perform prenatal diagnosis of Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS). The fetus was evaluated by 2nd trimester ultrasound. The family underwent genetic counseling and ophthalmologic evaluation. The NHS gene was sequenced. Ultrasound demonstrated fetal bilateral congenital cataract. Clinical evaluation revealed other family members with cataract, leading to the diagnosis of NHS in the family. Sequencing confirmed a frameshift mutation (3908del11bp) in the NHS gene. Evaluation of prenatally diagnosed congenital cataract should include a multidisciplinary approach, combining experience and input from sonographer, clinical geneticist, ophthalmologist, and molecular geneticist.

  6. Sleep disturbances in voltage-gated potassium channel antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Daniel A; Krieger, Ana C

    2016-05-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs) are a family of membrane proteins responsible for controlling cell membrane potential. The presence of antibodies (Ab) against neuronal VGKC complexes aids in the diagnosis of idiopathic and paraneoplastic autoimmune neurologic disorders. The diagnosis of VGKC Ab-associated encephalopathy (VCKC Ab syndrome) should be suspected in patients with subacute onset of disorientation, confusion, and memory loss in the presence of seizures or a movement disorder. VGKC Ab syndrome may present with sleep-related symptoms, and the purpose of this communication is to alert sleep and neurology clinicians of this still-under-recognized condition. In this case, we are presenting the VGKC Ab syndrome which improved after treatment with solumedrol. The prompt recognition and treatment of this condition may prevent the morbidity associated with cerebral atrophy and the mortality associated with intractable seizures and electrolyte disturbances. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Arts syndrome, and prelingual non-syndromic deafness form a disease continuum: evidence from a family with a novel PRPS1 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Synofzik, Matthis; Müller Vom Hagen, Jennifer; Haack, Tobias B.; Wilhelm, Christian; Lindig, Tobias; Beck-Wödl, Stefanie; Nabuurs, Sander B.; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.; de Brouwer, Arjan P. M.; Schöls, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 5 (CMTX5), Arts syndrome, and non-syndromic sensorineural deafness (DFN2) are allelic syndromes, caused by reduced activity of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRS-I) due to loss-of-function mutations in PRPS1. As only few families have been

  8. Familial Risks of Tourette Syndrome and Chronic Tic Disorders. A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Cols, David; Isomura, Kayoko; Pérez-Vigil, Ana; Chang, Zheng; Rück, Christian; Larsson, K Johan; Leckman, James F; Serlachius, Eva; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Tic disorders, including Tourette syndrome (TS) and chronic tic disorders (CTDs), are assumed to be strongly familial and heritable. Although gene-searching efforts are well under way, precise estimates of familial risk and heritability are lacking. Previous controlled family studies were small and typically conducted within specialist clinics, resulting in potential ascertainment biases. They were also underpowered to disentangle genetic from environmental factors that contribute to the observed familiality. Twin studies have been either very small or based on parent-reported tics in population-based (nonclinical) twin samples. To provide unbiased estimates of familial risk and heritability of tic disorders at the population level. In this population cohort, multigenerational family study, we used a validated algorithm to identify 4826 individuals diagnosed as having TS or CTDs (76.2% male) in the Swedish National Patient Register from January 1, 1969, through December 31, 2009. We studied risks for TS or CTDs in all biological relatives of probands compared with relatives of unaffected individuals (matched on a 1:10 ratio) from the general population. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate the heritability of tic disorders. The risk for tic disorders among relatives of probands with tic disorders increased proportionally to the degree of genetic relatedness. The risks for first-degree relatives (odds ratio [OR], 18.69; 95% CI, 14.53-24.05) were significantly higher than for second-degree relatives (OR, 4.58; 95% CI, 3.22-6.52) and third-degree relatives (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 2.08-4.51). First-degree relatives at similar genetic distances (eg, parents, siblings, and offspring) had similar risks for tic disorders despite different degrees of shared environment. The risks for full siblings (50% genetic similarity; OR, 17.68; 95% CI, 12.90-24.23) were significantly higher than those for maternal half siblings (25% genetic similarity; OR, 4.41; 95

  9. Genetic spectrum of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss in Pakistani families.

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    Sobia Shafique

    Full Text Available The frequency of inherited bilateral autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL in Pakistan is 1.6/1000 individuals. More than 50% of the families carry mutations in GJB2 while mutations in MYO15A account for about 5% of recessive deafness. In the present study a cohort of 30 ARNSHL families was initially screened for mutations in GJB2 and MYO15A. Homozygosity mapping was performed by employing whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping in the families that did not carry mutations in GJB2 or MYO15A. Mutation analysis was performed for the known ARNSHL genes present in the homozygous regions to determine the causative mutations. This allowed the identification of a causative mutation in all the 30 families including 9 novel mutations, which were identified in 9 different families (GJB2 (c.598G>A, p.Gly200Arg; MYO15A (c.9948G>A, p.Gln3316Gln; c.3866+1G>A; c.8767C>T, p.Arg2923* and c.8222T>C, p.Phe2741Ser, TMC1 (c.362+18A>G, BSND (c.97G>C, p.Val33Leu, TMPRSS3 (c.726C>G, p.Cys242Trp and MSRB3 (c.20T>G, p.Leu7Arg. Furthermore, 12 recurrent mutations were detected in 21 other families. The 21 identified mutations included 10 (48% missense changes, 4 (19% nonsense mutations, 3 (14% intronic mutations, 2 (9% splice site mutations and 2 (9% frameshift mutations. GJB2 accounted for 53% of the families, while mutations in MYO15A were the second most frequent (13% cause of ARNSHL in these 30 families. The identification of novel as well as recurrent mutations in the present study increases the spectrum of mutations in known deafness genes which could lead to the identification of novel founder mutations and population specific mutated deafness genes causative of ARNSHL. These results provide detailed genetic information that has potential diagnostic implication in the establishment of cost-efficient allele-specific analysis of frequently occurring variants in combination with other reported mutations in Pakistani populations.

  10. Detecting novel genetic mutations in Chinese Usher syndrome families using next-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ling-Hui; Jin, Xin; Xu, Hai-Wei; Li, Shi-Ying; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2015-02-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most common cause of combined blindness and deafness inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Molecular diagnosis is of great significance in revealing the molecular pathogenesis and aiding the clinical diagnosis of this disease. However, molecular diagnosis remains a challenge due to high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity in USH. This study explored an approach for detecting disease-causing genetic mutations in candidate genes in five index cases from unrelated USH families based on targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Through systematic data analysis using an established bioinformatics pipeline and segregation analysis, 10 pathogenic mutations in the USH disease genes were identified in the five USH families. Six of these mutations were novel: c.4398G > A and EX38-49del in MYO7A, c.988_989delAT in USH1C, c.15104_15105delCA and c.6875_6876insG in USH2A. All novel variations segregated with the disease phenotypes in their respective families and were absent from ethnically matched control individuals. This study expanded the mutation spectrum of USH and revealed the genotype-phenotype relationships of the novel USH mutations in Chinese patients. Moreover, this study proved that targeted NGS is an accurate and effective method for detecting genetic mutations related to USH. The identification of pathogenic mutations is of great significance for elucidating the underlying pathophysiology of USH.

  11. Mutation analysis of GJB2 gene and prenatal diagnosis in a non-syndromic deafness family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua CHEN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To identify the pathogenic gene in a non-syndromic deafness family, provide an accurate genetic consultation and early intervention for deaf family to reduce the incidence of congenital deafness. Methods Mutation analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction followed by DNA sequencing of coding region of GJB2 gene. The fetal DNA was extracted from the amniotic fluid cells by amniocentesis at 20 weeks during pregnancy. The genotype of the fetus was characterized for predicting the status of hearing. Results Complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp were detected in the proband of the family, heterozygous mutation 176-191del16bp was detected in the father, and 235delC was detected in the mother. Fetus carried 235delC heterozygous mutation inherited from his mother. Conclusions The proband's hearing loss is resulted from the complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp in GJB2 gene. Fetus is a heterozygous mutation 235delC carrier. Prenatal diagnosis for deafness assisted by genetic test can provide efficient guidance about offspring's hearing condition, and prevent another deaf-mute member from birth. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.07.09

  12. Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Review of Its Genetic and Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxiao Bu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare renal disease (two per one million in the USA characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Both sporadic (80% of cases and familial (20% of cases forms are recognized. The study of familial aHUS has implicated genetic variation in multiple genes in the complement system in disease pathogenesis, helping to define the mechanism whereby complement dysregulation at the cell surface level leads to both sporadic and familial disease. This understanding has culminated in the use of Eculizumab as first-line therapy in disease treatment, significantly changing the care and prognosis of affected patients. However, even with this bright outlook, major challenges remain to understand the complexity of aHUS at the genetic level. It is possible that a more detailed picture of aHUS can be translated to an improved understanding of disease penetrance, which is highly variable, and response to therapy, both in the short and long terms.

  13. Genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome: analysis of 151 families with Usher type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuto, L M; Weston, M D; Carney, C A; Hoover, D M; Cremers, C W; Wagenaar, M; Moller, C; Smith, R J; Pieke-Dahl, S; Greenberg, J; Ramesar, R; Jacobson, S G; Ayuso, C; Heckenlively, J R; Tamayo, M; Gorin, M B; Reardon, W; Kimberling, W J

    2000-12-01

    Usher syndrome type I is an autosomal recessive disorder marked by hearing loss, vestibular areflexia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six Usher I genetic subtypes at loci USH1A-USH1F have been reported. The MYO7A gene is responsible for USH1B, the most common subtype. In our analysis, 151 families with Usher I were screened by linkage and mutation analysis. MYO7A mutations were identified in 64 families with Usher I. Of the remaining 87 families, who were negative for MYO7A mutations, 54 were informative for linkage analysis and were screened with the remaining USH1 loci markers. Results of linkage and heterogeneity analyses showed no evidence of Usher types Ia or Ie. However, one maximum LOD score was observed lying within the USH1D region. Two lesser peak LOD scores were observed outside and between the putative regions for USH1D and USH1F, on chromosome 10. A HOMOG chi(2)((1)) plot shows evidence of heterogeneity across the USH1D, USH1F, and intervening regions. These results provide conclusive evidence that the second-most-common subtype of Usher I is due to genes on chromosome 10, and they confirm the existence of one Usher I gene in the previously defined USH1D region, as well as providing evidence for a second, and possibly a third, gene in the 10p/q region.

  14. Family caregiver distress with children having rare genetic disorders: a qualitative study involving Russell-Silver Syndrome in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hsin-Ju; Niu, Dau-Ming; Turale, Sue; Tsao, Lee-Ing; Shih, Fu-Jong; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Chang, Chun-Chi; Shih, Fu-Jin

    2012-01-01

    To extend nursing knowledge of distress experienced by family caregivers of children with rare genetic disorders, by exploring the perspectives of caregivers of children with Russell-Silver Syndrome in Taiwan. Caring for a child with a rare genetic disorder often has profound effects on families, especially when diagnosis and treatment is complex or not yet well developed, such as that in Russell-Silver Syndrome (or Silver-Russell syndrome). This disorder causes dwarfism and developmental difficulties, requiring long-term care planning. Previous research has focused mostly on medical care, but little is known about families' perspectives of caring difficulties, the help they need and nursing care required. An exploratory qualitative approach was used to inform this study. Family caregivers, whose children were undergoing medical care in a leading Taiwan medical centre, were invited to participate in face-to-face, in-depth interviews. Data were analysed by content analysis. Fifteen caregivers including 11 mothers, two fathers and two grandmothers participated. Five major themes and 13 sub-themes of care-giving distress were identified: endless psychological worries; the lengthy process to confirm a medical diagnosis; adjustment efforts in modifying family roles; dilemmas in deciding between Western or Chinese traditional medicine; and negative responses to society's concerns. Their primary sources of support were spouses, parents and health professionals, accordingly. Complex physio-psycho-social and decision-making distress in caring for children with a rare genetic disorder were systematically revealed from the perspectives of ethnic-Chinese family caregivers. Long-term care plans for children with a rare genetic disorder such as Russell-Silver Syndrome need to focus on positive dynamic family interactions, life-stage development and family caregiver support. Research on care-giving in rare genetic disorders is also warranted across cultures and countries to

  15. Lynch syndrome-associated extracolonic tumors are rare in two extended families with the same EPCAM deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas L; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Jane F; Hagenkord, Jill; Boland, C Richard; Rhees, Jennifer; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Boardman, Lisa A; Davies, Janine; Kuiper, Roland P; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L

    2011-10-01

    The Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited cancer syndrome showing a preponderance of colorectal cancer (CRC) in context with endometrial cancer and several other extracolonic cancers, which is due to pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. Some families were found to show a LS phenotype without an identified MMR mutation, although there was microsatellite instability and absence of MSH2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Studies of a subset of these families found a deletion at the 3' end of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EPCAM) gene, causing transcription read-through resulting in silencing of MSH2 through hypermethylation of its promoter. The tumor spectrum of such families appears to differ from classical LS. Our study of two large families (USA Family R and Dutch Family A) with an EPCAM deletion was carried out using each institution's standard family study protocol. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and EPCAM deletion analysis was performed. Both families were found to harbor the same deletion at the 3' end of EPCAM. Analysis showed that the deletion originated from a common ancestor. Family R and Family A members showed segregation of CRC with the presence of this EPCAM mutation. Compared with classic LS, there were almost no extracolonic cancers. Members of Family R and Family A, all with the same EPCAM deletion, predominantly presented with CRC but no LS-associated endometrial cancer, confirming findings seen in other, smaller, LS families with EPCAM mutations. In these EPCAM mutation carriers, cancer surveillance should be focused on CRC.

  16. [Analysis of SOX10 gene mutation in a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Yan, Yousheng; Chen, Xue; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Qinghua; Feng, Xuan; Hao, Shen

    2018-02-10

    OBJECTIVE To detect potential mutation of SOX10 gene in a pedigree affected with Warrdenburg syndrome type II. METHODS Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of the proband and his family members. Exons and flanking sequences of MITF, PAX3, SOX10, SNAI2, END3 and ENDRB genes were analyzed by chip capturing and high throughput sequencing. Suspected mutations were verified with Sanger sequencing. RESULTS A c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of the SOX10 gene was detected in the proband, for which both parents showed a wild-type genotype. CONCLUSION The c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of SOX10 gene probably underlies the ocular symptoms and hearing loss of the proband.

  17. Three cases of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 in a Korean family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joong Hyuk; Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lee, Ki Hwang; Lew, Ho Min; Chang, Yoon-Hee

    2004-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary disturbances of the skin, hair, and iris, and other developmental defects such as lateral displacement of both medial canthi and lacrimal puncta called dystopia canthorum. While mutations of the PAX3 (paired box) gene have been identified in about 99% of WS type 1 cases, WS type 2 is a heterogeneous group, with about 15% of cases caused by mutations in microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF). We have experienced three cases of typical WS type 2 in a Korean family, for whom full ocular examination and genetic studies were performed. The genetic studies revealed no mutation in either PAX3 or MITF genes. The genetic basis, as yet unknown for most cases of WS type 2, might be found with further investigation.

  18. Analysis of unstable DNA sequence in FRM1 gene in Polish families with fragile X syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milewski, Michal; Bal, Jerzy; Obersztyn, Ewa; Bocian, Ewa; Mazurczak, Tadeusz; Zygulska, Marta; Horst, Juergen; Deelen, Wout H.; Halley, Dicky J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The unstable DNA sequence in the FMR1 gene was analyzed in 85 individuals from Polish families with fragile X syndrome in order to characterize mutations responsible for the disease in Poland. In all affected individuals classified on the basis of clinical features and expression of the fragile site at X(q27.3) a large expansion of the unstable sequence (full mutation) was detected. About 5% (2 of 43) of individuals with full mutation did not express the fragile site. Among normal alleles, ranging in size from 20 to 41 CGC repeats, allele with 29 repeats was the most frequent (37%). Transmission of premutated and fully mutated alleles to the offspring was always associated with size increase. No change in repeat number was found when normal alleles were transmitted. (author). 19 refs., 4 figs, 1 tab

  19. Cushing's Syndrome caused by pigmented adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia - A familial case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Segovia, I; Gallowitsch, H J; Kresnik, E; Kumnig, G; Mikosch, P; Lind, P [Dept.of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2002-09-01

    Introduction: We present a Case of Cushing's syndrome (CS) in a 16 year old male adolescent. Adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia is a rare cause of CS. It mostly develops in the first two decades of life. In pathogenesis a stimulatory effect of circulating Immunoglobulins on adrenal steroidogenesis has been postulated. Familial cases have been reported in relation to Carney's Syndrome. We report the clinical case at first diagnosis and preoperative follow up of 1 year prior to treatment. The leading symptoms were severe bilateral (fibrotic) gynaecomastia, weight gain and growth retardation, without hypertension,but osteoporosis, secondary hypogonadism and glucose intolerance. Laboratory findings and the results of functional tests were diagnostic for CS. In addition LDH (I-131 Isotopes), CK, Lipoproteins, GPT, Androstendion, Prolactin were elevated. MRI abdomen revealed a slight enlargement of the adrenals, and suspected a bilateral micro nodular dysplasia. Iodo-cholesterol-scan under dexamethason suppression showed a diffuse bilateral Iodo-cholesterol uptake confirming the autonomous production of cortisol bilateral in the adrenals.Whole body bone scan showed a diffuse reduced diphosphonate uptake in the skeleton and the growth plates. The bone mineral density was significantly reduced.Radiologically osteoporosis was overt. The rapid increase of free urinary cortisol excretion/24h within one year of observation led to a total bilateral adrenalectomy. Postoperative 5 year follow up examinations. Documentation of the outcome and recovery of clinical signs,symptoms and laboratory findings, discussion about the most appropriate long-term substitution therapy. Familial anamnesis:affected family member was the father (micro nodular bilateral adrenocortical dysplasia), the aunt (pararenal incidentaloma, histologically lipoma) and a cousin (micro nodular adrenocortical dysplasia). Sequential analysis of the menin gene from the patient was negative.The detection of

  20. Cushing's Syndrome caused by pigmented adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia - A familial case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Segovia, I.; Gallowitsch, H.J.; Kresnik, E.; Kumnig, G.; Mikosch, P.; Lind, P.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: We present a Case of Cushing's syndrome (CS) in a 16 year old male adolescent. Adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia is a rare cause of CS. It mostly develops in the first two decades of life. In pathogenesis a stimulatory effect of circulating Immunoglobulins on adrenal steroidogenesis has been postulated. Familial cases have been reported in relation to Carney's Syndrome. We report the clinical case at first diagnosis and preoperative follow up of 1 year prior to treatment. The leading symptoms were severe bilateral (fibrotic) gynaecomastia, weight gain and growth retardation, without hypertension,but osteoporosis, secondary hypogonadism and glucose intolerance. Laboratory findings and the results of functional tests were diagnostic for CS. In addition LDH (I-131 Isotopes), CK, Lipoproteins, GPT, Androstendion, Prolactin were elevated. MRI abdomen revealed a slight enlargement of the adrenals, and suspected a bilateral micro nodular dysplasia. Iodo-cholesterol-scan under dexamethason suppression showed a diffuse bilateral Iodo-cholesterol uptake confirming the autonomous production of cortisol bilateral in the adrenals.Whole body bone scan showed a diffuse reduced diphosphonate uptake in the skeleton and the growth plates. The bone mineral density was significantly reduced.Radiologically osteoporosis was overt. The rapid increase of free urinary cortisol excretion/24h within one year of observation led to a total bilateral adrenalectomy. Postoperative 5 year follow up examinations. Documentation of the outcome and recovery of clinical signs,symptoms and laboratory findings, discussion about the most appropriate long-term substitution therapy. Familial anamnesis:affected family member was the father (micro nodular bilateral adrenocortical dysplasia), the aunt (pararenal incidentaloma, histologically lipoma) and a cousin (micro nodular adrenocortical dysplasia). Sequential analysis of the menin gene from the patient was negative.The detection of

  1. Gitelman syndrome in a South African family presenting with hypokalaemia and unusual food cravings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Pieter Du Toit; Rensburg, Megan A; Haylett, William L; Bardien, Soraya; Davids, M Razeen

    2017-01-26

    Gitelman syndrome (GS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubular disorder characterised by renal salt wasting with hypokalaemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesaemia and hypocalciuria. It is caused by mutations in SLC12A3 encoding the sodium-chloride cotransporter on the apical membrane of the distal convoluted tubule. We report a South African family with five affected individuals presenting with hypokalaemia and unusual food cravings. The affected individuals and two unaffected first degree relatives were enrolled into the study. Phenotypes were evaluated through history, physical examination and biochemical analysis of blood and urine. Mutation screening was performed by sequencing of SLC12A3, and determining the allele frequencies of the sequence variants found in this family in 117 ethnically matched controls. The index patient, her sister, father and two aunts had a history of severe salt cravings, fatigue and tetanic episodes, leading to consumption of large quantities of salt and vinegar. All affected individuals demonstrated hypokalaemia with renal potassium wasting. Genetic analysis revealed that the pseudo-dominant pattern of inheritance was due to compound heterozygosity with two novel mutations: a S546G substitution in exon 13, and insertion of AGCCCC at c.1930 in exon 16. These variants were present in the five affected individuals, but only one variant each in the unaffected family members. Neither variant was found in any of the controls. The diagnosis of GS was established in five members of a South African family through clinical assessment, biochemical analysis and mutation screening of the SLC12A3 gene, which identified two novel putative pathogenic mutations.

  2. Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Cancer Survivors and Family Members: A Study in a Health Promotion Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jin Young; Choi, Yoon Ho; Song, Yun Mi

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in cancer survivors and family members. Subjects were 48,934 adults (24,786 men, 24,148 women) aged ≥40yr who receive a routine health examination at 1 hospital from January 2010 to December 2012. There were 2468 cancer survivors, 18,211 with cancer patients in the family, and 28,255 noncancer subjects, who never experienced cancer and whose family members either. Associations between MetS and cancer experience were assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis. The odds ratio (OR) of MetS in female cancer survivors was significantly higher than noncancer subjects after adjusting for age, smoking, physical activity, and alcohol intake (OR = 1.22, 95% confidence intervals: 1.02-1.47]. However, the OR of MetS for male survivors did not differ from that of noncancer subjects. Gastric cancer survivors had a lower OR of MetS than noncancer subjects (0.37, 0.27-0.50). ORs of breast cancer (1.49, 1.00-2.23) and prostate cancer survivors (1.46, 1.07-1.99) were higher than the OR of MetS for noncancer subjects. There was no difference in the OR of MetS between the family members of cancer patients and non-cancer subjects. These findings suggest that the odds of MetS for cancer survivors may differ by cancer type and by sex.

  3. Psychological Well-Being of Mothers and Siblings in Families of Girls and Women with Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfaglione, Rina; Hastings, Richard P.; Felce, David; Clarke, Angus; Kerr, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Few published studies have reported on the psychological well-being of family members of individuals with Rett syndrome (RTT). Eighty-seven mothers of girls and women with RTT completed a questionnaire survey about their daughters' behavioral phenotype, current health, and behavior problems, and their own and a sibling's well-being. Mothers…

  4. Histomorphologic spectrum of BAP1 negative melanocytic neoplasms in a family with BAP1-associated cancer susceptibility syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušić, Zlatko; Buljan, Marija; Busam, Klaus J

    2015-06-01

    Multiple BAP1 negative melanocytic neoplasms are a hallmark of familial cancer susceptibility syndrome caused by BAP1 germline mutation. The syndrome is characterized by increased incidence of renal cell carcinoma, mesothelioma, cholangiocarcinoma, cutaneous and uveal melanoma and some other neoplasms. We report histomorphologic characteristics of six cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms with loss of BAP1 expression in two members of a family with BAP1-associated cancer susceptibility syndrome. The neoplasms were dermal melanocytic nevi characterized by a proliferation of large epithelioid (spitzoid) melanocytes, and adipocytic metaplasia. Nuclear pseudoinclusions and multinucleated melanocytes were present in most neoplasms. In two of the cases, a nodular melanoma was found associated with a dermal nevus. None of the melanomas recurred or metastasized after 6 and 3 years of follow up. We report two new cases of melanoma arising in a BAP1-deficient melanocytic nevus in the setting of familial tumor predisposition syndrome. Adipocytic metaplasia and nuclear pseudoinclusions may be additional morphologic clues to a BAP1-deficient nevus. It remains to be seen whether these features are more common in familial than sporadic lesions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and family planning: the attitude towards prenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.F. van Lier (Margot); S.E. Korsse (Susanne); E.M.H. Mathus-Vliegen (Elisabeth); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); K. Vanheusden (Kathleen); M.E. van Leerdam (Monique); A. Wagner (Anja)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPeutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a hereditary disorder caused by LKB1 gene mutations, and is associated with considerable morbidity and decreased life expectancy. This study was conducted to assess the attitude of PJS patients towards family planning, prenatal diagnosis (PND) and

  6. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and family planning: the attitude towards prenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lier, Margot G. F.; Korsse, Susanne E.; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Vanheusden, Kathleen; van Leerdam, Monique E.; Wagner, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a hereditary disorder caused by LKB1 gene mutations, and is associated with considerable morbidity and decreased life expectancy. This study was conducted to assess the attitude of PJS patients towards family planning, prenatal diagnosis (PND) and pregnancy

  7. Clinical and oral findings in an Afro-Brazilian family with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Pierro, Viviane Santos; Marins, Marcello Roter; Borges de Oliveira, Renata Cabral; Cortezzi, Wladimir; Janini, Maria Elisa; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) seems to be unusual in black persons. The authors present an Afro-Brazilian family case report of GGS. The main complaint of the index case was a painless swelling of the left mandible, which was diagnosed as an odontogenic keratocyst. Further classical features of the Syndrome were present in this patient. Other two family members were diagnosed as cases of GGS and one of them presented 11 clinical findings characteristic of the syndrome. From the three cases reported, two of them presented five major diagnostic criteria for the GGS, and the diagnosis was only made because of an oral complaint. This case series emphasizes the importance of carefully examining the patient and close relatives for signs of GGS, even if they belong to an ethnic group in which this diagnosis is unusual. © 2014 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  9. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  10. CDH23 mutation and phenotype heterogeneity: a profile of 107 diverse families with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuto, L M; Bork, J M; Weston, M D; Askew, J W; Fields, R R; Orten, D J; Ohliger, S J; Riazuddin, S; Morell, R J; Khan, S; Riazuddin, S; Kremer, H; van Hauwe, P; Moller, C G; Cremers, C W R J; Ayuso, C; Heckenlively, J R; Rohrschneider, K; Spandau, U; Greenberg, J; Ramesar, R; Reardon, W; Bitoun, P; Millan, J; Legge, R; Friedman, T B; Kimberling, W J

    2002-08-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deafness. Specific CDH23 mutational defects have been identified that differentiate these two phenotypes. Only missense mutations of CDH23 have been observed in families with nonsyndromic deafness, whereas nonsense, frameshift, splice-site, and missense mutations have been identified in families with Usher syndrome. In the present study, a panel of 69 probands with Usher syndrome and 38 probands with recessive nonsyndromic deafness were screened for the presence of mutations in the entire coding region of CDH23, by heteroduplex, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and direct sequence analyses. A total of 36 different CDH23 mutations were detected in 45 families; 33 of these mutations were novel, including 18 missense, 3 nonsense, 5 splicing defects, 5 microdeletions, and 2 insertions. A total of seven mutations were common to more than one family. Numerous exonic and intronic polymorphisms also were detected. Results of ophthalmologic examinations of the patients with nonsyndromic deafness have found asymptomatic RP-like manifestations, indicating that missense mutations may have a subtle effect in the retina. Furthermore, patients with mutations in CDH23 display a wide range of hearing loss and RP phenotypes, differing in severity, age at onset, type, and the presence or absence of vestibular areflexia.

  11. CDH23 Mutation and Phenotype Heterogeneity: A Profile of 107 Diverse Families with Usher Syndrome and Nonsyndromic Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuto, L. M.; Bork, J. M.; Weston, M. D.; Askew, J. W.; Fields, R. R.; Orten, D. J.; Ohliger, S. J.; Riazuddin, S.; Morell, R. J.; Khan, S.; Riazuddin, S.; Kremer, H.; van Hauwe, P.; Moller, C. G.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.; Ayuso, C.; Heckenlively, J. R.; Rohrschneider, K.; Spandau, U.; Greenberg, J.; Ramesar, R.; Reardon, W.; Bitoun, P.; Millan, J.; Legge, R.; Friedman, T. B.; Kimberling, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deafness. Specific CDH23 mutational defects have been identified that differentiate these two phenotypes. Only missense mutations of CDH23 have been observed in families with nonsyndromic deafness, whereas nonsense, frameshift, splice-site, and missense mutations have been identified in families with Usher syndrome. In the present study, a panel of 69 probands with Usher syndrome and 38 probands with recessive nonsyndromic deafness were screened for the presence of mutations in the entire coding region of CDH23, by heteroduplex, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and direct sequence analyses. A total of 36 different CDH23 mutations were detected in 45 families; 33 of these mutations were novel, including 18 missense, 3 nonsense, 5 splicing defects, 5 microdeletions, and 2 insertions. A total of seven mutations were common to more than one family. Numerous exonic and intronic polymorphisms also were detected. Results of ophthalmologic examinations of the patients with nonsyndromic deafness have found asymptomatic RP–like manifestations, indicating that missense mutations may have a subtle effect in the retina. Furthermore, patients with mutations in CDH23 display a wide range of hearing loss and RP phenotypes, differing in severity, age at onset, type, and the presence or absence of vestibular areflexia. PMID:12075507

  12. A novel mutation of the adrenocorticotropin receptor (ACTH-R) gene in a family with the syndrome of isolated glucocorticoid deficiency, but no ACTH-R abnormalities in two families with the triple A syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsigos, C.; Arai, K.; Latronico, A.C. [National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Isolated glucocorticoid deficiency (IGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary adrenocortical insufficiency, usually without mineralocorticoid deficiency. Occasionally, the disorder is associated with alacrima and achalasia of the esophagus (triple A syndrome), suggesting potential heterogeneity in its etiology. Mutations in the ACTH receptor gene have been reported in several families with IGD. We have amplified and directly sequenced the entire intronless ACTH receptor gene in 1 other family with IGD and 2 famlies with triple A syndrome. The proband with IGD was a homozygote for an A {r_arrow}G substitution, changing tyrosine 254 to cysteine in the third extracellular loop of the receptor protein, probably interfering with ligand binding. Both of her parents were heterozygotes for this mutation, which was not detected in 100 normal alleles. No mutations were identified in the entire coding area of the ACTH receptor in the 2 families with triple A syndrome, supporting the idea of a developmental or postreceptor defect in this syndrome. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Mental retardation in Nance-Horan syndrome: clinical and neuropsychological assessment in four families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutain, A; Ayrault, A D; Moraine, C

    1997-08-22

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked condition comprising congenital cataract with microcornea, distinctive dental, and evocative facial anomalies. Intellectual handicap was mentioned in seven published NHS patients. We performed a clinical study focused on psychomotor development, intellectual abilities, and behavior in 13 affected males in four NHS families, and present the results of a neuropsychological evaluation in 7 of them. Our study confirms that mental retardation (MR) can be a major component of the NHS. Combining our data with those from the literature leads to a frequency of MR in NHS of around 30%. In most cases, MR is mild or moderate (80%) and not associated with motor delay. Conversely, a profound mental handicap associated with autistic traits may be observed. MR has intra- and inter-familial variability but does not appear to be expressed in carriers. Awareness of MR in NHS may be of importance in the management of the patients, especially in terms of education. Cloning and characterization of the gene and analysis of mutations will be an important step towards understanding the molecular basis of mental deficiency in NHS, and in delineation from the other XLMR conditions at Xp22.

  14. Does family history of metabolic syndrome affect the metabolic profile phenotype in young healthy individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipińska, Anna; Koczaj-Bremer, Magdalena; Jankowski, Krzysztof; Kaźmierczak, Agnieszka; Ciurzyński, Michał; Ou-Pokrzewińska, Aisha; Mikocka, Ewelina; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Demkow, Urszula; Pruszczyk, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Early identification of high-risk individuals is key for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to assess the potential impact of a family history of metabolic syndrome (fhMetS) on the risk of metabolic disorders (abnormal body mass, lipid profile, glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and blood pressure) in healthy young individuals. We studied CVD risk factors in 90 healthy volunteers, aged 27-39 years; of these, 78 had fhMetS and 12 were without fhMetS (control group). Fasting serum lipids, glucose, and insulin levels were assayed, and anthropometric parameters and blood pressure using, an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring system, were measured. Nutritional and physical activity habits were assessed. Despite similar nutritional and physical activity habits, abnormal body mass was found in 53.2% of the fhMetS participants and 46.1% of the control participants (p = 0.54). The occurrence of obesity was 19.4% and 0%, respectively (p = 0.69). Compared to the control participants, fhMetS was associated with significantly higher total cholesterol (5.46 mmol/L vs. 4.69 mmol/L, p family history of MetS.

  15. Facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome and Bell's palsy: familial history and recurrence tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baochun; Zhou, Chengyong; Han, Zeli

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare genetic predilection and recurrence tendency between facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome (MRS) and Bell's palsy We carried out an investigation on patients with facial palsy in MRS and those with Bell's palsy who visited the outpatient department in our hospital between February 2009 and February 2013. They were asked about familial history and whether it was the first episode, with the results recorded and compared. There were 16 patients with facial palsy in MRS and 860 patients with Bell's palsy involved in the study. Familial history was positive in 5 of 16 patients (31.3%) with facial palsy in MRS and 56 of 860 patients (6.5%) with Bell's palsy (P palsy in MRS and 88 of 860 cases (10.2%) with Bell's palsy had a history of facial palsy in the past (P Bell's palsy, facial palsy in MRS has an obvious genetic predilection and recurrence tendency. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. A classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome family with incomplete presentation diagnosed by molecular testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Marina; Dordoni, Chiara; Cinquina, Valeria; Venturini, Marina; Ritelli, Marco

    2018-01-01

    The 2017 EDS revised nosology indicates that minimal criteria suggestive for classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS) are skin hyperextensibility plus atrophic scarring together with either generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM) and/or at least three minor criteria that include cutaneous features and gJHM complications. Confirmatory molecular testing is obligatory to reach a final diagnosis. Although the large majority of the patients presents with these clinical features, some do not and might remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Here we describe a family with 2 affected members, a 23-year-old proposita and her 51-year-old mother, who presented subtle cutaneous signs, including a variable degree of skin hyperextensibility without extensive widened atrophic scars that apparently better fitted with the overlapping hypermobile EDS. The proposita also presented gastrointestinal symptoms secondary to aberrant mast cells mediators release, making the clinical picture even more puzzling. Both patients were diagnosed by molecular testing that revealed a COL5A1 splice mutation. This report highlights the relevance of molecular analysis in patients presenting rather mild signs of EDS, especially in familial cases, and the importance of clinical expertise to make such a diagnosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Founder Fukutin mutation causes Walker-Warburg syndrome in four Ashkenazi Jewish families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wendy; Winder, Thomas L; LeDuc, Charles A; Simpson, Lynn L; Millar, William S; Dungan, Jeffrey; Ginsberg, Norman; Plaga, Stacey; Moore, Steven A; Chung, Wendy K

    2009-06-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is a genetically heterogeneous congenital muscular dystrophy caused by abnormal glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) that is associated with brain malformations and eye anomalies. The Fukutin (FKTN) gene, which causes autosomal recessively inherited WWS is most often associated with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy in Japan. We describe the clinical features of four nonconsanguinous Ashkenazi Jewish families with WWS and identify the underlying genetic basis for WWS. We screened for mutations in POMGnT1, POMT1, POMT2, and FKTN, genes causing WWS, by dideoxy sequence analysis. We identified an identical homozygous c.1167insA mutation in the FKTN gene on a common haplotype in all four families and identified 2/299 (0.7%) carriers for the c.1167insA mutation among normal American Ashkenazi Jewish adults. These data suggest that the c.1167insA FKTN mutation described by us is a founder mutation that can be used to target diagnostic testing and carrier screening in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Targeted exome sequencing identified novel USH2A mutations in Usher syndrome families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Feng Huang

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is a leading cause of deaf-blindness in autosomal recessive trait. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneities in USH make molecular diagnosis much difficult. This is a pilot study aiming to develop an approach based on next-generation sequencing to determine the genetic defects in patients with USH or allied diseases precisely and effectively. Eight affected patients and twelve unaffected relatives from five unrelated Chinese USH families, including 2 pseudo-dominant ones, were recruited. A total of 144 known genes of inherited retinal diseases were selected for deep exome resequencing. Through systematic data analysis using established bioinformatics pipeline and segregation analysis, a number of genetic variants were released. Eleven mutations, eight of them were novel, in the USH2A gene were identified. Biparental mutations in USH2A were revealed in 2 families with pseudo-dominant inheritance. A proband was found to have triple mutations, two of them were supposed to locate in the same chromosome. In conclusion, this study revealed the genetic defects in the USH2A gene and demonstrated the robustness of targeted exome sequencing to precisely and rapidly determine genetic defects. The methodology provides a reliable strategy for routine gene diagnosis of USH.

  19. Dermal Ultrastructure in Low Beighton Score Members of 17 Families with Hypermobile-Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Reginster, Marie-Annick; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Delvenne, Philippe; Piérard, Gérald E.; Manicourt, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The distinction between the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobile type (EDSH) and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare skin ultrastructural abnormalities of EDSH and BJHS among different families. Skin of 23 EDSH, 27 BJHS, and 41 asymptomatic subjects from 17 families was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Similar ultrastructural abnormalities were found irrespective of the Beighton score. Flower-like collagen fibrils represented the key change and elastic fibers were altered as well. Beighton score is a clinical parameter rating joint mobility that appeared unrelated to quantitative and qualitative collagen ultrastructural alterations in the skin. Some EDSH family members fit with BJHS diagnosis. BJHS possibly represents a mild variant of EDSH. PMID:23091361

  20. Dermal Ultrastructure in Low Beighton Score Members of 17 Families with Hypermobile-Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinh Hermanns-Lê

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobile type (EDSH and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare skin ultrastructural abnormalities of EDSH and BJHS among different families. Skin of 23 EDSH, 27 BJHS, and 41 asymptomatic subjects from 17 families was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Similar ultrastructural abnormalities were found irrespective of the Beighton score. Flower-like collagen fibrils represented the key change and elastic fibers were altered as well. Beighton score is a clinical parameter rating joint mobility that appeared unrelated to quantitative and qualitative collagen ultrastructural alterations in the skin. Some EDSH family members fit with BJHS diagnosis. BJHS possibly represents a mild variant of EDSH.

  1. Controlled family study of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: evidence of shared liability and transmission of partial syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, M; Freeman, R; Lampert, C; Diamond, J; Kaye, W

    2000-03-01

    Lifetime rates of full and partial anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were determined in first-degree relatives of diagnostically pure proband groups and relatives of matched, never-ill comparison subjects. Rates of each eating disorder were obtained for 1,831 relatives of 504 probands on the basis of personal structured clinical interviews and family history. Best-estimate diagnoses based on all available information were rendered without knowledge of proband status and pedigree identity. Only definite and probable diagnoses were considered. Whereas anorexia nervosa was rare in families of the comparison subjects, full and partial syndromes of anorexia nervosa aggregated in female relatives of both anorexic and bulimic probands. For the full syndrome of anorexia nervosa, the relative risks were 11.3 and 12.3 in female relatives of anorexic and bulimic probands, respectively. Bulimia nervosa was more common than anorexia nervosa in female relatives of comparison subjects, but it, too, aggregated in the families of ill probands; the corresponding relative risks for bulimia nervosa were 4.2 and 4.4 for female relatives of anorexic and bulimic probands, respectively. When partial syndromes of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were considered, relative risks fell by one-half in each group of ill probands. Both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are familial. Their cross-transmission in families suggests a common, or shared, familial diathesis. The additional observation that familial aggregation and cross-transmission extend to milder phenotypes suggests the validity of their inclusion in a continuum of familial liability.

  2. Analysis of four families with the Stickler syndrome by linkage studies. Identification of a new premature stop codon in the COL2A1 gene in a family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaventure, J.; Lasselin, C. [Hopital Necker, Paris (France); Toutain, A. [CHU Bretonneau, Tours (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy which associates progressive myopia with vitreal degeneration and retinal detachment. Cleft palate, cranio-facial abnormalities, deafness and osteoarthritis are often associated symptoms. Genetic heterogeneity of this autosomal dominant disease was consistent with its large clinical variability. Linkage studies have provided evidence for cosegregation of the disease with COL2A1, the gene coding for type II collagen, in about 50% of the families. Four additional families are reported here. Linkage analyses by using a VNTR located in the 3{prime} region of the gene were achieved. In three families, positive lod scores were obtained with a cumulative maximal value of 3.5 at a recombination fraction of 0. In one of these families, single strand conformation analysis of 25 exons disclosed a new mutation in exon 42. Codon for glutamic acid at position a1-803 was converted into a stop codon. The mutation was detected in DNA samples from all the affected members of the family but not in the unaffected. This result confirms that most of the Stickler syndromes linked to COL2A1 are due to premature stop codons. In a second family, an abnormal SSCP pattern of exon 34 was detected in all the affected individuals. The mutation is likely to correspond to a splicing defect in the acceptor site of intron 33. In one family the disease did not segregate with the COL2A1 locus. Further linkage studies with intragenic dimorphic sites in the COL10A1 gene and highly polymorphic markers close to the COL9A1 locus indicated that this disorder did not result from defects in these two genes.

  3. A novel heterozygous germline deletion in MSH2 gene in a five generation Chinese family with Lynch syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Bin; Ji, Wuyang; Liang, Shengran; Ling, Chao; You, Yan; Xu, Lai; Zhong, Min-Er; Xiao, Yi; Qiu, Hui-Zhong; Lu, Jun-Yang; Banerjee, Santasree

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is one of the most common familial forms of colorectal cancer predisposing syndrome with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. LS is caused by the germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes including MSH2, MLH1, MSH6 and PMS2. Clinically, LS is characterized by high incidence of early-onset colorectal cancer as well as endometrial, small intestinal and urinary tract cancers, usually occur in the third to fourth decade of the life. Here we describe a five ge...

  4. A Turkish family with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome caused by a novel ALDH3A2 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS is an inherited neurocutaneous disorder caused by mutations in the aldehyde dehydrogenase family 3 member A2 (ALDH3A2 gene that encodes fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase. Affected patients display ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia. More than 70 mutations in ALDH3A2 have been discovered in SLS patients. We diagnosed two brothers age of 12 and 20 years with characteristic features of this rare syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed demyelinating disease in both of them. We described a novel homozygous, c. 835 T > A (p.Y279N mutation in exon 6 in two patients.

  5. Unusual presentation of Kallmannn syndrome with contiguous gene deletion in three siblings of a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Venkat Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of 3 brothers aged 34, 24, and 22 years, unmarried, who presented to our endocrinology clinic with absence of secondary sexual characters. There was no such history in other siblings, but their maternal uncle had similar complaints. On examination, all 3 had pre-pubertal appearance, voice, and genitalia along with anosmia and bimanual synkinesia. Cryptorchidism was noticed in 2 while third person had small hypoplastic testes. It was also noted that all 3 patients had icthyosis mainly involving trunk, back, and limbs. The hormonal assays were consistent with isolated hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. IQ testing revealed mental retardation in the 2 patients. Ultrasound showed ectopic right kidney in one patient, atrophic right kidney in the second patient while the third patient had normal kidneys. MRI brain of all the patients showed poorly visualized olfactory tract and bulb. Kallmann syndrome (KS was diagnosed based on hormonal evaluation and MRI results. Of the four types of KS: Synkinesia, renal anomaly, and X-linked pedigree pattern in our patients pointed towards X-linked type 1 KS as the possible cause. But, icthyosis and mental retardation are not usual presentation of type 1 KS. They are usually seen as a result of contiguous gene deletion of KAL1, steroid sulfatase (STS, and mental retardation (MRX gene on X chromosome. Hence, the possible gene defect in our cases is inherited defect in contiguous gene deletion. The contiguous gene deletion as the cause of KS in 3 patients of same family is very rare and worth reporting. Also, the significance of phenotype-genotypic association in Kallmann syndrome is discussed

  6. Concomitant mutation and epimutation of the MLH1 gene in a Lynch syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cini, Giulia; Carnevali, Ileana; Quaia, Michele; Chiaravalli, Anna Maria; Sala, Paola; Giacomini, Elisa; Maestro, Roberta; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Viel, Alessandra

    2015-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited predisposition cancer syndrome, typically caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. In the last years, a role for epimutations of the same genes has also been reported. MLH1 promoter methylation is a well known mechanism of somatic inactivation in tumors, and more recently, several cases of constitutional methylation have been identified. In four subjects affected by multiple tumors and belonging to a suspected LS family, we detected a novel secondary MLH1 gene epimutation. The methylation of MLH1 promoter was always linked in cis with a 997 bp-deletion (c.-168_c.116+713del), that removed exon 1 and partially involved the promoter of the same gene. Differently from cases with constitutional primary MLH1 inactivation, this secondary methylation was allele-specific and CpGs of the residual promoter region were totally methylated, leading to complete allele silencing. In the colon tumor of the proband, MLH1 and PMS2 expression was completely lost as a consequence of a pathogenic somatic point mutation (MLH1 c.199G>A, p.Gly67Arg) that also abrogated local methylation by destroying a CpG site. The evidences obtained highlight how MLH1 mutations and epimutations can reciprocally influence each other and suggest that an altered structure of the MLH1 locus results in epigenetic alteration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Chocolate consumption and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the NHLBI Family Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokede, Oluwabunmi A; Ellison, Curtis R; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Hunt, Steven C; Kraja, Aldi T; Arnett, Donna K; Djoussé, Luc

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that cocoa products, which are rich sources of flavonoids, may lower blood pressure, serum cholesterol, fasting blood glucose and improve endothelial function. However, it is unclear whether consumption of cocoa products including chocolate influences the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS). In a cross-sectional design, we sought to examine the association between chocolate consumption and the prevalence of MetS. We studied 4098 participants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Family Heart Study aged 25-93 years. Chocolate consumption was assessed using a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. MetS was defined using the NCEP III criteria. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate prevalence odds ratios of MetS according to frequency of chocolate intake. Of the 4098 participants (mean age 51.7 y) included in the analyses, 2206 (53.8%) were female. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our population was 30.2%. Compared with those who did not consume any chocolate, multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for MetS were 1.26 (0.94, 1.69), 1.15 (0.85, 1.55), and 0.99 (0.66, 1.51) among women who reported chocolate consumption of 1-3 times/ month, 1-4 times/week, and 5+ times/week, respectively. Corresponding values for men were: 1.13 (0.82, 1.57), 1.02 (0.74, 1.39), and 1.21 (0.79, 1.85). These data do not support an association between chocolate intake and the prevalence of MetS in US adult men and women.

  8. A novel missense mutation of the paired box 3 gene in a Turkish family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Filiz; Ozturk, A Taylan; Adibelli, Hamit; Unal, Nurettin; Tukun, Ajlan

    2013-01-01

    Screening of mutations in the paired box 3 (PAX3) gene in three generations of a Turkish family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). WS1 was diagnosed in a 13-month-old girl according to the WS Consortium criteria. Detailed family history of the proband revealed eight affected members in three generations. Routine clinical and audiological examination and ophthalmologic evaluation were performed on eight affected and five healthy members of the study family. Dystopia canthorum was detected in all affected patients; however, a brilliant blue iris was present in five patients who also had mild retinal hypopigmentation. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of affected and unaffected individuals in the family as well as 50 unrelated healthy volunteers. All coding exons and adjacent intronic regions of PAX3 were sequenced directly. A novel missense heterozygous c.788T>G mutation was identified in eight patients. This nucleotide alteration was not found in unaffected members of the study family or in the 50 unrelated control subjects. The mutation causes V263G amino-acid substitution in the homeodomain of the PAX3 protein, which represents the 45(th) residue of helix 3. We identified a novel missense c.788T>G mutation in PAX3 in a family with Waardenburg syndrome with intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity.

  9. Heterogeneous response to X-ray and ultraviolet light irradiations of cultured skin fibroblasts in two families with Gardner's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; Little, J.B.; Nove, J.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Li, F.P.; Meyer, R.J.; Marchetto, D.J.; Patterson, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    A heterogeneous response to X-ray and far UV (254 nm) light irradiations was found in cultured skin fibroblast lines from 2 separate families with Gardner's syndrome. When compared to 2 normal control cultures and cultures from 2 patients with nonfamilial colon cancer, cultures from 4 clinically affected members of family 1 showed increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of both X-ray and UV light irradiations. These cells also showed a delayed pattern of X-ray potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and absent UV PLDR. In contrast, cultures from 3 members of family 2 (2 of whom were clinically affected) showed a normal response of survival and PLDR to both X-ray and UV light irradiations. Thus increased sensitivity of cultured skin fibroblasts to X-ray and UV light irradiations was not a consistent in vitro finding in patients with Gardner's syndrome. However, in families with Gardner's syndrome who demonstrate in vitro radiosensitivity, additional studies are needed to assess the usefulness of these techniques in detecting affected individuals prior to the development of colon carcinoma and other manifestations

  10. Next-generation sequencing for genetic testing of familial colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Agostini, Marco; Pedrazzani, Corrado; Bedin, Chiara; Urso, Emanuele D; Nitti, Donato; Turri, Giona; Scardoni, Maria; Fassan, Matteo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screening in families with high risk to develop colorectal cancer (CRC) prevents incurable disease and permits personalized therapeutic and follow-up strategies. The advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has revolutionized the throughput of DNA sequencing. A series of 16 probands for either familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 8 cases) or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; 8 cases) were investigated for intragenic mutations in five CRC familial syndromes-associated genes (APC, MUTYH, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6) applying both a custom multigene Ion AmpliSeq NGS panel and conventional Sanger sequencing. Fourteen pathogenic variants were detected in 13/16 FAP/HNPCC probands (81.3 %); one FAP proband presented two co-existing pathogenic variants, one in APC and one in MUTYH. Thirteen of these 14 pathogenic variants were detected by both NGS and Sanger, while one MSH2 mutation (L280FfsX3) was identified only by Sanger sequencing. This is due to a limitation of the NGS approach in resolving sequences close or within homopolymeric stretches of DNA. To evaluate the performance of our NGS custom panel we assessed its capability to resolve the DNA sequences corresponding to 2225 pathogenic variants reported in the COSMIC database for APC, MUTYH, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6. Our NGS custom panel resolves the sequences where 2108 (94.7 %) of these variants occur. The remaining 117 mutations reside inside or in close proximity to homopolymer stretches; of these 27 (1.2 %) are imprecisely identified by the software but can be resolved by visual inspection of the region, while the remaining 90 variants (4.0 %) are blind spots. In summary, our custom panel would miss 4 % (90/2225) of pathogenic variants that would need a small set of Sanger sequencing reactions to be solved. The multiplex NGS approach has the advantage of analyzing multiple genes in multiple samples simultaneously, requiring only a reduced number of Sanger sequences to resolve

  11. Unreported manifestations in two Dutch families with Bartsocas-Papas syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra-Knol, HE; Kleibeuker, A; Timmer, A; ten Kate, LP; van Essen, AJ

    2003-01-01

    Bartsocas-Papas syndrome (BPS) is a severe autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by neonatal or intrauterine death in most cases, severe popliteal webbing, oligosyndactyly, genital abnormalities, and typical face with short palpebral fissures, ankylo-blepharon, hypoplastic nose, orofacial

  12. Six uneventful pregnancy outcomes in an extended vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Annette F; Spiering, Wilko; Moll, Frans L; Page-Christiaens, Lieve; Beenakkers, Ingrid C M; Dooijes, Dennis; Vonken, Evert-Jan P A; van der Smagt, Jasper J; Knoers, Nine V; Koenen, Steven V; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj

    2017-02-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (vEDS) is caused by heterozygous mutations in COL3A1 and is characterized by fragile vasculature and hollow organs, with a high risk of catastrophic events at a young age. During pregnancy and delivery, maternal mortality rates up until 25% have been reported. However, recent pedigree analysis reported a substantial lower pregnancy-related mortality rate of 4.9%. Here, we describe an extended vEDS family with multiple uneventful pregnancy outcomes. In the proband, a 37-year-old woman, DNA-analysis because of an asymptomatic iliac artery dissection revealed a pathogenic mutation in COL3A1 (c.980G>A; p. Gly327Asp). She had had three uneventful vaginal deliveries. At the time of diagnosis, her 33-year-old niece was 25 weeks pregnant. She had had one uneventful vaginal delivery. Targeted DNA-analysis revealed that she was carrier of the COL3A1 mutation. Ultrasound detected an aneurysm in the abdominal aorta with likely a dissection. An uneventful elective cesarean section was performed at a gestational age of 37 weeks. The 40-year-old sister of our proband had had one uneventful vaginal delivery and an active pregnancy wish. Cascade DNA-screening showed her to carry the COL3A1 mutation. Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) of her aorta revealed a type B dissection with the most proximal entry tear just below the superior mesenteric artery. Pregnancy was therefore discouraged. This familial case illustrates the complexity and challenges of reproductive decision-making in a potentially lethal condition as vEDS, and highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach. Moreover, it suggests that previous pregnancy-related risks of vEDS may be overestimated. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Family members and health professionals' perspectives on future life planning of ageing people with Down syndrome: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covelli, Venusia; Raggi, Alberto; Paganelli, Chiara; Leonardi, Matilde

    2017-08-08

    To address the way in which primary caregivers of people over 45 with Down syndrome describe daily life activities and context and foresee their future. Thirteen family members and 15 health professionals participated to four focus groups. Meaningful concepts were identified and linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health using established linking rules. A total of 258 relevant concepts were identified and linked to 75 categories of the classification: 38 were from activity and participation and 17 from environmental factors domains. The most commonly reported issues were mental functions (b117-intellectual functions and b152-emotional functions), community life activities (d910-community life and d920-recreation and leisure) and environmental factors (e310-support of immediate family, e355-support from health professionals and e555-associations and organizational services). Information on the daily life and health of ageing people with Down syndrome is important to plan social and health care interventions tailored to deal with problems that they may encounter in older age. Considering the interaction between health and environment and maintaining a continuity of daily routines were reported as the most relevant topics for managing daily lives of persons with Down syndrome in older ages. Implications for rehabilitation Pay more attention to the interaction between environmental factors and health condition in ageing people with Down syndrome. Information about the life contest are important in order to plan present and future social-health care interventions. Future planning for people with Down syndrome is a great concern for family members.

  14. Identification of a novel NHS mutation in a Chinese family with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aijun; Li, Bingzhen; Wu, Lemeng; Yang, Liping; Chen, Ningning; Ma, Zhizhong

    2015-04-01

    To identiy the disease causing mutation in a Chinese family presenting with early-onset cataract and dental anomalies. A specific Hereditary Eye Disease Enrichment Panel (HEDEP) (personalized customization by MyGenostics, Baltimore, MD) based on targeted exome capture technology was used to collect the protein coding regions of 30 early-onset cataract associated genes, and high throughput sequencing was done with Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The identified variant was confirmed with Sanger sequencing. A novel deletion in exon 4 (c.852delG) of NHS gene was identified; the identified 1 bp deletion altered the reading frame and was predicted to result in a premature stop codon after the addition of twelve novel amino acid (p.S285PfsX13). This mutation co-segregated in affected males and obligate female carriers, but was absent in 100 matched controls. Our findings broaden the spectrum of NHS mutations causing Nance-Horan syndrome and phenotypic spectrum of the disease in Chinese patients.

  15. Family History of Type 2 Diabetes is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Female Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ticiana Costa Rodrigues

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the family history (FH of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MetS in a group of non-diabetic obese female subjects. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 239 female patients with obesity, regularly attending the Internal Medicine Division’s outpatient clinic (Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Brazil. The inclusion criteria were patients with body mass index ?30 kg/m2 and absence of type 2 diabetes. The FH was considered positive if a first degree relative had a diagnosis of diabetes. Seventy-four of 239 patients evaluated (30% had a positive FH for type 2 diabetes. Patients with positive FH had higher waist/hip ratio and MetS more often than patients with negative FH. FH of type 2 diabetes was associated with MetS in this sample of non-diabetic obese female patients. Waist/hip ratio and fasting plasma glucose, markers of insulin resistance, were also associated with FH of type 2 diabetes. The simple question: “Do you have a FH of type 2 diabetes?” may help to identify the obese patients that should be better evaluated and intensively treated with the objective of preventing type 2 diabetes.

  16. Exacerbation of Behçet's syndrome and familial Mediterranean fever with menstruation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzelant, Gul; Ozguler, Yesim; Esatoglu, Sinem Nihal; Karatemiz, Guzin; Ozdogan, Huri; Yurdakul, Sebahattin; Yazici, Hasan; Seyahi, Emire

    2017-01-01

    Menstruation triggers several conditions such as migraine, recurrent aphthous stomatitis and acne vulgaris in healthy individuals. There is evidence that Behçet's syndrome (BS) and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) may exacerbate during menstruation. The aim is to assess whether BS and FMF patients experience menstrual flares. Females of reproductive age with BS and FMF seen consecutively at the outpatient clinic of Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty at Istanbul, as well as apparently healthy hospital workers were studied using a standardised questionnaire. BS patients were asked whether they experienced increased skin-mucosa lesions during the menstrual period. A similar questionnaire assessing this time the frequency of abdominal pain, chest pain and fever attacks was given to the patients with FMF. The healthy controls received both questionnaires. A total of 200 BS patients, 240 FMF patients and 250 healthy controls were studied. The most commonly reported symptom among both BS patients (51%) and healthy controls (62%) was the acneiform lesion. At least 79% patients with FMF reported attacks with menstruation, notably abdominal pain which, majority thought, could be differentiated from dysmenorrhea. Additionally, 76% of healthy controls reported having abdominal pain consistent most probably with dysmenorrhea. This survey showed that, in 68% of the patients with BS at least one skin mucosa lesion was exacerbated with menstruation, this was most commonly acneiform lesion. Menstruation had a slightly stronger effect on FMF, triggering at least one symptom in 79%. The main limitation of the study was the self-reported assessment methodology.

  17. Cockayne syndrome: report of a Brazilian family with confirmation of impaired RNA synthesis after UV-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Simone M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dwarfism, growth deficiency, neurological deterioration, skin photosensitivity and a characteristic progressive facial appearance. In the present study we report the first Brazilian CS family in which diagnosis was confirmed by the demonstration of decreased RNA synthesis in cultured fibroblasts exposed to UV-C radiation. Despite the progressive course of the disease and the unavailability of an effective treatment, diagnosis may be very important for the benefits to be gained by the afflicted family from genetic counseling and/or prenatal diagnosis.

  18. Ala397Asp mutation of myosin VIIA gene segregating in a Spanish family with type-Ib Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinós, C; Millán, J M; Sánchez, F; Beneyto, M; Nájera, C

    1998-06-01

    In the current study, 12 Spanish families affected by type-I Usher syndrome, that was previously linked to chromosome 11q, were screened for the presence of mutations in the N-terminal coding portion of the motor domain of the myosin VIIA gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the first 14 exons. A mutation (Ala397Asp) segregating with the disease was identified, and several polymorphisms were also detected. It is presumed that the other USHIB mutations in these families could be located in the unscreened regions of the gene.

  19. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling in a case of spina bifida in a family with Waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujat, Annegret; Veith, Veit-Peter; Faber, Renaldo; Froster, Ursula G

    2007-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS I) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder with an incidence of 1:45,000 in Europe. Mutations within the PAX3 gene are responsible for the clinical phenotype ranging from mild facial features to severe malformations detectable in prenatal diagnosis. Here, we report a four-generation family with several affected members showing various symptoms of WS I. We diagnosed the syndrome first in a pregnant young woman; she was referred because of a spina bifida in prenatal diagnosis. We performed clinical genetic investigations and molecular genetic analysis in all available family members. The phenotype displays a wide intra-familial clinical variability of pigmentary disturbances, facial anomalies and developmental defects. Molecular studies identified a novel splice site mutation within the PAX3 gene in intron 5 in all affected family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives. This case demonstrates the prenatal diagnosis of spina bifida in a fetus which leads to the initial diagnosis of WS I. Further studies could identify a private splice site mutation within the PAX3 gene responsible for the phenotype in this family.

  20. A large deletion in GPR98 causes type IIC Usher syndrome in male and female members of an Iranian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgert, N; Kahrizi, K; Dieltjens, N; Bazazzadegan, N; Najmabadi, H; Smith, R J H; Van Camp, G

    2009-04-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. The three recognised clinical phenotypes (types I, II and III; USH1, USH2 and USH3) are caused by mutations in nine different genes. USH2C is characterised by moderate to severe hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa and normal vestibular function. One earlier report describes mutations in GPR98 (VLGR1) in four families segregating this phenotype. To detect the disease-causing mutation in an Iranian family segregating USH2C. In this family, five members had a phenotype compatible with Usher syndrome, and two others had nonsyndromic hearing loss. Mutation analysis of all 90 coding exons of GPR98. Consistent with these clinical findings, the five subjects with USH carried a haplotype linked to the USH2C locus, whereas the two subjects with nonsyndromic hearing loss did not. We identified a new mutation in GPR98 segregating with USH2C in this family. The mutation is a large deletion g.371657_507673del of exons 84 and 85, presumably leading to a frameshift. A large GPR98 deletion of 136 017 bp segregates with USH2C in an Iranian family. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of a GPR98 mutation, and the first report on male subjects with USH2C and a GPR98 mutation.

  1. A possible new syndrome with double endocrine tumors in association with an unprecedented type of familial heart-hand syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamagishi Masakazu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The combination of a pituitary prolactinoma and an aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, double endocrine tumors in association with heart-hand syndrome have not previously been reported. Case presentation A 21-year-old Japanese woman presented with galactorrhea and decreased visual acuity. A large pituitary adenoma with an increased level of serum prolactin was apparent by computed tomography. She additionally showed mild hypertension (136/90 mmHg accompanied by hypokalemia. The plasma aldosterone concentration was increased. Computed tomography showed a mass in the right adrenal gland. No other tumors were found despite extensive imaging studies. Physical and radiographic examinations showed skeletal malformations of the hands and feet, including hypoplasia of the first digit in all four limbs. An atrial septal defect was demonstrated by echocardiography. Similar digital and cardiac abnormalities were detected in our patient's father, and a clinical diagnosis of hereditary heart-hand syndrome was made. Conclusion No established heart-hand syndrome was wholly compatible with the family's phenotype. Her father had no obvious endocrine tumors, implying that the parent of transmission determined variable phenotypic expression of the disease: heart-hand syndrome with multiple endocrine tumors from the paternal transmission or no endocrine tumor from the maternal transmission. This suggests that the gene or genes responsible for the disease may be under tissue-specific imprinting control.

  2. Imerslund-Grasbeck syndrome in a Chinese family with distinct skin lesions refractory to vitamin B12.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, S H; Sourial, N A; Lu, K C; Hsueh, E J

    1994-01-01

    Two brothers in a Chinese family with selective malabsorption of vitamin B12 associated with proteinuria (Imerslund-Grasbeck syndrome) presented with widespread mottled skin pigmentation, termed poikiloderma. In contrast to anaemia, this pigmentary disturbance remained unresponsive to vitamin B12 replacement. This is different from the reported hyperpigmentation sometimes seen in vitamin B12 deficiency which is reversible following treatment. As far as is known, an irreversible and persistent...

  3. Identification of two novel compound heterozygous mutations of ADGRV1 in a Chinese family with Usher syndrome type IIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nian; Wang, Juan; Liu, Shuting; Liu, Mugen; Jiang, Fagang

    2018-06-08

    To describe the clinical and genetic findings in a Chinese family with three sibs diagnosed with Usher syndrome type IIC. Four members received ophthalmic and otologic tests to ascertain the clinical characteristics. According to the clinical phenotype, we focused attention on a total of 658 genes associated with them. We screened the possible pathogenic mutation sites, used Sanger to exclude the false positive and verified whether there were co-segregated among the family members. Typical fundus features found in the proband supported the diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Audiometric test indicated moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairment while the vestibular function was normal. Whole-exome sequencing identified the presence of two novel compound heterozygous mutations in ADGRV1, a known gene responsible for Usher syndrome type IIC. Mutationc.15008delG/p.Gly5003AlafsTer13 was inherited from the mother while c.18383_18386dupACAG/p.His6130GlnfsTer84 was inherited from the father, and they were co-segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. The mutations found in our study not only broaden the mutation spectrum of ADGRV1, but also provide assistances for future genetic diagnosis and treatment for Usher syndrome patients.

  4. Metabolic syndrome-related composite factors over 5 years in the STANISLAS family study: genetic heritability and common environmental influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbeth, Bernard; Samara, Anastasia; Ndiaye, Coumba; Marteau, Jean-Brice; Berrahmoune, Hind; Siest, Gérard; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2010-06-03

    We estimated genetic heritability and common environmental influences for various traits related to metabolic syndrome in young families from France. At entrance and after 5 years, nineteen traits related to metabolic syndrome were measured in a sample of families drawn from the STANISLAS study. In addition, 5 aggregates of these traits were identified using factor analysis. At entrance, genetic heritability was high (20 to 44%) for plasma lipids and lipoproteins, uric acid, fasting glucose, and the related clusters "risk lipids" and "protective lipids". Intermediate or low genetic heritability (less than 20%) was shown for triglycerides, adiposity indices, blood pressure, hepatic enzyme activity, inflammatory makers and the related clusters: "liver enzymes", "adiposity/blood pressure" and "inflammation". Moreover, common environmental influences were significant for all the parameters. With regard to 5-year changes, polygenic variance was low and not statistically significant for any of the individual variables or clusters whereas shared environment influence was significant. In these young families, genetic heritability of metabolic syndrome-related traits was generally lower than previously reported while the common environmental influences were greater. In addition, only shared environment contributed to short-term changes of these traits. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Undifferentiated seronegative spondyloarthritis with inflammatory bowel disease and a family history of psoriasis. Sicca syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Marigliano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Seronegative spondyloarthritis is characterized by the presence of subcutaneous nodules, asymmetrical peripheral arthritis, sacroileitis with or without spondylitis, and rheumatoid-factor negativity. Other common clinical manifestations include oral ulcers, conjunctivitis, and cutaneous lesions such as psoriasis. Familial aggregation has also been described. According to the 1986 classification, corresponding clinical entities include ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, Reiter’s syndrome, arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis. The disease is also frequently associated with the HLA B27 antigen. From the clinical point of view, there are often incomplete forms of spondyloarthritis, such as reactive arthritis triggered by asymptomatic infections, psoriatic arthritis without psoriasis itself, initial phases of specific forms of spondyloarthritis or the phase of ankylosing spondylitis characterized by sacroiliac lesions, and all forms that remain undifferentiated for long periods of time. Moreover, there are close relations between arthropathy and IBDs, such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and Whipple’s syndrome. Recently, microscopic inflammatory bowel lesions and psoriatic arthritis have been described. Case report: A 30-year-old man (HLA B27-negative who had been vaccinated against TBC and HBV presented with a 6-year history of recurrent episodes of predominantly left-sided sciatica. The pain was worse at night and during rest. He was suffering from bilateral sacroileitis without spondylitis. Three to five times a day, usually after eating, he passed watery feces containing mucous and small amounts of bright red blood. Colonoscopy revealed pancolitis with histological evidence of chronic inflammation interspersed with areas of acute inflammation, edema, hyperemia, and glandular distortion. One year later, the clinical manifestations and histological

  6. Association between the Eating Family Meal and the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Using Data from Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Ae; Park, Woo-Chul; Kwon, Yu-Jin; Shim, Jae-Yong

    2017-05-01

    Several studies have shown that family meals promote a well-balanced and healthier diet and weight status. Metabolic syndrome is related to eating behavior. This study investigated the association between eating family meals and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. This cross-sectional study included 4,529 subjects who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV and V (2007-2012). A self-reported questionnaire was used to assess dietary status. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the guidelines of the modified version of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. We compared the overall quality of dietary intake in family meal. Nutritional adequacy ratios for energy, protein, calcium, vitamin A, vitamin B 1 , vitamin B 2 , vitamin C, niacin, and potassium, and the mean adequacy ratio were significantly higher in the family meal group (Pmetabolic syndrome was lower in the family meal group (Pfamily meals and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. This study demonstrated that eating family meals appeared to be associated with nutrient adequacy. However, we observed no significant differences in prevalence of metabolic syndrome between the 2 groups.

  7. Association between the Eating Family Meal and the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Using Data from Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007–2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Ae; Park, Woo-Chul; Kwon, Yu-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that family meals promote a well-balanced and healthier diet and weight status. Metabolic syndrome is related to eating behavior. This study investigated the association between eating family meals and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Methods This cross-sectional study included 4,529 subjects who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV and V (2007–2012). A self-reported questionnaire was used to assess dietary status. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the guidelines of the modified version of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. We compared the overall quality of dietary intake in family meal. Results Nutritional adequacy ratios for energy, protein, calcium, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin C, niacin, and potassium, and the mean adequacy ratio were significantly higher in the family meal group (Pmetabolic syndrome was lower in the family meal group (Pfamily meals and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Conclusion This study demonstrated that eating family meals appeared to be associated with nutrient adequacy. However, we observed no significant differences in prevalence of metabolic syndrome between the 2 groups. PMID:28572888

  8. A novel mutation in the PAX3 gene causes Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayyeb; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Sensorineural hearing impairment (HI) is one of the most frequent congenital defects, with a prevalence of 1 in 500 among neonates. Although there are over 400 syndromes involving HI, most cases of HI are nonsyndromic (70%), 20% of which follow autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Waardenburg syndrome (WS) ranks first among autosomal dominant syndromic forms of HI. WS is characterized by sensorineural hearing impairment, pigmentation abnormalities of hair and skin and hypoplastic blue eyes or heterochromia iridis. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4. WS1 is diagnosed by the presence of dystopia canthorum and PAX3 is the only gene involved. This study aims to determine the pathogenic mutation in a large Iranian pedigree affected with WS1 in order to further confirm the clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a family segregating HI was ascertained in a genetic counseling center. Upon clinical inspection, white forelock, dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys, characteristic of WS1 were evident. In order to clarify the genetic etiology and confirm the clinical data, primers were designed to amplify exons and exon-intron boundaries of the responsible gene, PAX3 with 10 exons, followed by the Sanger DNA sequencing method. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed a novel mutation in PAX3 (c.1024_1040 del AGCACGATTCCTTCCAA). Our data provide genotype-phenotype correlation for the mutation in PAX3 and WS1 in the studied family, with implications for genetic counseling, which necessitates detailed clinical inspection of HI patients to distinguish syndromic HI from the more common non-syndromic cases. Our results reveal the value of phenotype-directed genetic analysis and could further expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Heritability and genetic correlation between GERD symptoms severity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammation markers in families living in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding-Bernal, Arturo; Sánchez-Pedraza, Valentin; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Sobrino-Cossio, Sergio; Tejero-Barrera, María Elizabeth; Burguete-García, Ana Isabel; León-Hernández, Mireya; Serratos-Canales, María Fabiola; Duggirala, Ravindranath; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the heritability (h2) and genetic correlation (ρG) between GERD symptoms severity, metabolic syndrome components, and inflammation markers in Mexican families. Methods Cross-sectional study which included 32 extended families resident in Mexico City. GERD symptoms severity was assessed by the ReQuest in Practice questionnaire. Heritability and genetic correlation were determined using the Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines software. Results 585 subjects were included, the mean age was 42 (±16.7) years, 57% were women. The heritability of the severity of some GERD symptoms was h2 = 0.27, 0.27, 0.37, and 0.34 (p-value metabolic syndrome components ranged from 0.40 for fasting plasma glucose to 0.61 for body mass index and diabetes mellitus. The heritability for fibrinogen and C-reactive protein was 0.64 and 0.38, respectively. Statistically significant genetic correlations were found between acidity complaints and fasting plasma glucose (ρG = 0.40); sleep disturbances and fasting plasma glucose (ρG = 0.36); acidity complaints and diabetes mellitus (ρG = 0.49) and between total ReQuest score and fasting plasma glucose (ρG = 0.43). The rest of metabolic syndrome components did not correlate with GERD symptoms. Conclusion Genetic factors substantially explain the phenotypic variance of the severity of some GERD symptoms, metabolic syndrome components and inflammation markers. Observed genetic correlations suggest that these phenotypes share common genes. These findings suggest conducting further investigation, as the determination of a linkage analysis in order to identify regions of susceptibility for developing of GERD and metabolic syndrome. PMID:28582452

  10. Comparison of clinical features between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome in Japanese patients with colorectal cancer: a cross-sectional study conducted by the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuro; Furukawa, Yoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsubara, Nagahide; Ishikawa, Hideki; Arai, Masami; Tomita, Naohiro; Tamura, Kazuo; Sugano, Kokichi; Ishioka, Chikashi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Moriya, Yoshihiro; Ishida, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2015-02-01

    The characteristics of familial colorectal cancer type X are poorly defined. Here we aimed to clarify the differences in clinical features between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome in Japanese patients. We performed germline mutation analyses of mismatch repair genes in 125 patients. Patients who met the Amsterdam Criteria I but lacked mismatch repair gene mutations were diagnosed with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X. We identified 69 patients with Lynch syndrome and 25 with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X. The frequencies of gastric and extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancers were lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The number of organs with Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The cumulative incidence of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. We estimated that the median cancer risk in 60-year-old patients with Lynch syndrome was 89, 36 and 24% for colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancers, respectively. Analyses of family members, including probands, revealed that the median age at diagnosis of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly older with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The frequency of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. A significant difference in extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was evident between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Prevalence and management of familial hypercholesterolaemia in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanchen, David; Gencer, Baris; Auer, Reto; Räber, Lorenz; Stefanini, Giulio G; Klingenberg, Roland; Schmied, Christian M; Cornuz, Jacques; Muller, Olivier; Vogt, Pierre; Jüni, Peter; Matter, Christian M; Windecker, Stephan; Lüscher, Thomas F; Mach, François; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2015-09-21

    We aimed to assess the prevalence and management of clinical familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) among patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We studied 4778 patients with ACS from a multi-centre cohort study in Switzerland. Based on personal and familial history of premature cardiovascular disease and LDL-cholesterol levels, two validated algorithms for diagnosis of clinical FH were used: the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network algorithm to assess possible (score 3-5 points) or probable/definite FH (>5 points), and the Simon Broome Register algorithm to assess possible FH. At the time of hospitalization for ACS, 1.6% had probable/definite FH [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-2.0%, n = 78] and 17.8% possible FH (95% CI 16.8-18.9%, n = 852), respectively, according to the Dutch Lipid Clinic algorithm. The Simon Broome algorithm identified 5.4% (95% CI 4.8-6.1%, n = 259) patients with possible FH. Among 1451 young patients with premature ACS, the Dutch Lipid Clinic algorithm identified 70 (4.8%, 95% CI 3.8-6.1%) patients with probable/definite FH, and 684 (47.1%, 95% CI 44.6-49.7%) patients had possible FH. Excluding patients with secondary causes of dyslipidaemia such as alcohol consumption, acute renal failure, or hyperglycaemia did not change prevalence. One year after ACS, among 69 survivors with probable/definite FH and available follow-up information, 64.7% were using high-dose statins, 69.0% had decreased LDL-cholesterol from at least 50, and 4.6% had LDL-cholesterol ≤1.8 mmol/L. A phenotypic diagnosis of possible FH is common in patients hospitalized with ACS, particularly among those with premature ACS. Optimizing long-term lipid treatment of patients with FH after ACS is required. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The humanistic and economic burden of Dravet syndrome on caregivers and families: Implications for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Brunklaus, Andreas; Dorris, Liam; Zuberi, Sameer M; Knupp, Kelly G; Galer, Bradley S; Gammaitoni, Arnold R

    2017-05-01

    We reviewed the current literature with respect to the humanistic and financial burdens of Dravet Syndrome (DS) on the caregivers of children with DS, in order to (1) identify key unanswered questions or gaps in knowledge that need to be addressed and then, based on these knowledge gaps, (2) propose a research agenda for the scientific community to address in the coming decade. The findings support the conclusion that caring for a child with DS is associated with significant humanistic burden and direct costs. However, due in part to the paucity of studies, as well as the lack of measures of specific burden domains, there remains much that is not known regarding the burden of caregiving for children with DS. To address the significant knowledge gaps in this area, research is needed that will: (1) identify the specific domains of caregivers' lives that are impacted by caring for a child with DS; (2) identify or, if needed, develop measures of caregiving impact in this area; (3) identify the factors that influence DS caregiving burden; (4) develop and evaluate the efficacy of treatments for reducing the negative impact of DS and its comorbidities on DS caregivers; (5) quantify the direct medical costs associated with DS and DS comorbidities and identify the factors that influence these costs; and (6) quantify and fully explore the indirect costs of DS. Research that addresses these goals will provide the empirical foundation needed for improving the quality of life of children with DS and their families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cardiovascular Effects of Energy Drinks in Familial Long QT Syndrome: A Randomized Cross-Over Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Belinda; Ingles, Jodie; Medi, Caroline; Driscoll, Timothy; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-03-15

    Caffeinated energy drinks may trigger serious cardiac effects. The aim of this study was to determine the cardiovascular effects of caffeinated energy drink consumption in patients with familial long QT syndrome (LQTS). From 2014-2016, 24 LQTS patients aged 16-50 years were recruited to a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study of energy drink (ED) versus control (CD) with participants acting as their own controls (one week washout). The primary study outcome was an increase in corrected QT interval (QTc) by >20ms. Secondary outcomes were changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. In 24 patients with LQTS (no dropout), mean age was 29±9 years, 13/24 (54%) were female, and 8/24 (33%) were probands. Intention to treat analysis revealed no significant change in QTc with ED compared with CD (12±28ms vs 16±27ms, 3% vs 4%, p=0.71). The systolic and diastolic blood pressure significantly increased with ED compared to CD (peak change 7±16mmHg vs 1±16mmHg, 6% vs 0.8%, p=0.046 and 8±10 vs 2±9mmHg, 11% vs 3% p=0.01 respectively). These changes correlated with significant increases in serum caffeine (14.6±11.3 vs 0.5±0.1μmol/L, penergy drink consumption. Caffeinated energy drinks have significant haemodynamic effects in patients with LQTS, especifically an acute increase in blood pressure. Since dangerous QTc prolongation was seen in some LQTS patients, we recommend caution in young patients with LQTS consuming energy drinks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel syndrome of lethal familial hyperekplexia associated with brain malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidahmed Mohammed

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperekplexia (HPX is a rare non-epileptic disorder manifesting immediately after birth with exaggerated persistent startle reaction to unexpected auditory, somatosensory and visual stimuli, and non-habituating generalized flexor spasm in response to tapping of the nasal bridge (glabellar tap which forms its clinical hallmark. The course of the disease is usually benign with spontaneous amelioration with age. The disorder results from aberrant glycinergic neurotransmission, and several mutations were reported in the genes encoding glycine receptor (GlyR α1 and β subunits, glycine transporter GlyT2 as well as two other proteins involved in glycinergic neurotransmission gephyrin and collybistin. Methods The phenotype of six newborns, belonging to Saudi Arabian kindred with close consanguineous marriages, who presented with hyperekplexia associated with severe brain malformation, is described. DNA samples were available from two patients, and homozygosity scan to determine overlap with known hyperkplexia genes was performed. Results The kindred consisted of two brothers married to their cousin sisters, each with three affected children who presented antenatally with excessive fetal movements. Postnatally, they were found to have microcephaly, severe hyperekplexia and gross brain malformation characterized by severe simplified gyral pattern and cerebellar underdevelopment. The EEG was normal and they responded to clonazepam. All of the six patients died within six weeks. Laboratory investigations, including metabolic screen, were unremarkable. None of the known hyperkplexia genes were present within the overlapping regions of homozygosity between the two patients for whom DNA samples were available. Conclusions We present these cases as a novel syndrome of lethal familial autosomal recessive hyperekplexia associated with microcephaly and severe brain malformation.

  15. The feeling of family success and the professional burnout syndrome among penitentiary staff (a draft of a research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Barczykowska

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutual relations between family and professional life have been for many years one of the most important fields of research in economics, sociology and, more and more often, pedagogy, which focuses on searching for factors protecting from the development of burnout syndrome and aims at increasing the effectiveness of pedagogic efforts. Due to the above, this article, being a draft of a research project, is dedicated to the facilitating effect of family life on professional life of the penitentiary staff. The authors take a stance that the feeling of satisfaction from family life can not only significantly neutralize the feeling of failure but, primarily, contribute to the search for more and more innovative forms of work.

  16. Truncating mutation in the NHS gene: phenotypic heterogeneity of Nance-Horan syndrome in an asian Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasad, Vedam Lakshmi; Thool, Alka; Murugan, Sakthivel; Nancarrow, Derek; Vyas, Prateep; Rao, Srinivas Kamalakar; Vidhya, Authiappan; Ravishankar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2005-01-01

    A four-generation family containing eight affected males who inherited X-linked developmental lens opacity and microcornea was studied. Some members in the family had mild to moderate nonocular clinical features suggestive of Nance-Horan syndrome. The purpose of the study was to map genetically the gene in the large 57-live-member Asian-Indian pedigree. PCR-based genotyping was performed on the X-chromosome, by using fluorescent microsatellite markers (10-cM intervals). Parametric linkage analysis was performed by using two disease models, assuming either recessive or dominant X-linked transmission by the MLINK/ILINK and FASTLINK (version 4.1P) programs (http:www.hgmp.mrc.ac.uk/; provided in the public domain by the Human Genome Mapping Project Resources Centre, Cambridge, UK). The NHS gene at the linked region was screened for mutation. By fine mapping, the disease gene was localized to Xp22.13. Multipoint analysis placed the peak LOD of 4.46 at DSX987. The NHS gene mapped to this region. Mutational screening in all the affected males and carrier females (heterozygous form) revealed a truncating mutation 115C-->T in exon 1, resulting in conversion of glutamine to stop codon (Q39X), but was not observed in unaffected individuals and control subjects. conclusions. A family with X-linked Nance-Horan syndrome had severe ocular, but mild to moderate nonocular, features. The clinical phenotype of the truncating mutation (Q39X) in the NHS gene suggests allelic heterogeneity at the NHS locus or the presence of modifier genes. X-linked families with cataract should be carefully examined for both ocular and nonocular features, to exclude Nance-Horan syndrome. RT-PCR analysis did not suggest nonsense-mediated mRNA decay as the possible mechanism for clinical heterogeneity.

  17. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for Waardenburg syndrome type I and II in Chinese families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Qin, Litao; Li, Tao; Liu, Hongjian; Ma, Lingcao; Li, Wan; Wu, Dong; Wang, Hongdan; Guo, Qiannan; Guo, Liangjie; Liao, Shixiu

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory‑pigmentary disorder with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation. The present study aimed to investigate the underlying molecular pathology and provide a method of prenatal diagnosis of WS in Chinese families. A total of 11 patients with WS from five unrelated Chinese families were enrolled. A thorough clinical examination was performed on all participants. Furthermore, patients with WS underwent screening for mutations in the following genes: Paired box 3 (PAX3), melanogenesis associated transcription factor (MITF), SRY‑box 10, snail family transcriptional repressor 2 and endothelin receptor type B using polymerase chain reaction sequencing. Array‑based comparative genomic hybridization was used for specific patients whose sequence results were normal. Following identification of the genotype of the probands and their parents, prenatal genetic diagnosis was performed for family 01 and 05. According to the diagnostic criteria for WS, five cases were diagnosed as WS1, while the other six cases were WS2. Genetic analysis revealed three mutations, including a nonsense mutation PAX3 c.583C>T in family 01, a splice‑site mutation MITF c.909G>A in family 03 and an in‑frame deletion MITF c.649_651delGAA in family 05. To the best of the authors' knowledge the mutations (c.583C>T in PAX3 and c.909G>A in MITF) were reported for the first time in Chinese people. Mutations in the gene of interest were not identified in family 02 and 04. The prenatal genetic testing of the two fetuses was carried out and demonstrated that the two babies were normal. The results of the present study expanded the range of known genetic mutations in China. Identification of genetic mutations in these families provided an efficient way to understand the causes of WS and improved genetic counseling.

  18. First description of mutational analysis of MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 in Algerian families with suspected Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziada-Bouchaar, H; Sifi, K; Filali, T; Hammada, T; Satta, D; Abadi, N

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the early onset of colorectal cancer (CRC) linked to germline defects in Mismatch Repair (MMR) genes. We present here, the first molecular study of the correlation between CRC and mutations occurring in these genes performed in twenty-one unrelated Algerian families. The presence of germline mutations in MMR genes, MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was tested by sequencing all exons plus adjacent intronic sequences and Multiplex ligand-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for testing large genomic rearrangements. Pathogenic mutations were identified in 20 % of families with clinical suspicion on HNPCC. Two novel variants described for the first time in Algerian families were identified in MLH1, c.881_884delTCAGinsCATTCCT and a large deletion in MSH6 gene from a young onset of CRC. Moreover, the variants of MSH2 gene: c.942+3A>T, c.1030C>T, the most described ones, were also detected in Algerian families. Furthermore, the families HNPCC caused by MSH6 germline mutation may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations. In this study, we confirmed that MSH2, MLH1, and MSH6 contribute to CRC susceptibility. This work represents the implementation of a diagnostic algorithm for the identification of Lynch syndrome patients in Algerian families.

  19. Point mutation in the MITF gene causing Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, A K; Attaie, A; Randolph, F T; Deshmukh, D; Wang, C; Mhatre, A; Wilcox, E

    1998-12-04

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant neural crest cell disorder phenotypically characterized by hearing impairment and disturbance of pigmentation. A presence of dystopia canthorum is indicative of WS type 1, caused by loss of function mutation in the PAX3 gene. In contrast, type 2 WS (WS2) is characterized by normally placed medial canthi and is genetically heterogeneous; mutations in MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor) associated with WS2 have been identified in some but not all affected families. Here, we report on a three-generation Indian family with a point mutation in the MITF gene causing WS2. This mutation, initially reported in a Northern European family, creates a stop codon in exon 7 and is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking the HLH-Zip or Zip structure necessary for normal interaction with its target DNA motif. Comparison of the phenotype between the two families demonstrates a significant difference in pigmentary disturbance of the eye. This family, with the first documented case of two unrelated WS2 families harboring identical mutations, provides additional evidence for the importance of genetic background on the clinical phenotype.

  20. A Severe Case of Pigmentary Glaucoma in a Child With a Family History of Pigment Dispersion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragno, Vittoria; Zeboulon, Pierre; Baudouin, Christophe; Labbé, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    To report a case of severe pigmentary glaucoma (PG) in a 13-year-old boy of a family affected by pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS). A 13-year-old child was referred to our hospital for severe bilateral glaucoma. A complete ophthalmologic evaluation including refraction, intraocular pressure, central corneal thickness, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, gonioscopy, fundus examination, and ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed. Family members were also examined and a family pedigree was obtained. Ophthalmologic examination revealed a severe bilateral PG with Krukenberg spindle and a widely open heavily pigmented iridocorneal angle. Ultrasound biomicroscopy showed a deep anterior chamber with pronounced iris concavity in both eyes. Within his family, his 15-year-old sister and 7-year-old brother were both affected by PDS diagnosed on gonioscopy findings. We report for the first time a severe case of pediatric PG with a family history of PDS. This case demonstrates that accurate screening is necessary in cases of familial PDS and PG, even in the pediatric population.

  1. Differential expression of CK20, β-catenin, and MUC2/5AC/6 in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, Stefan; Klarskov, Louise; Nilbert, Mef

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer comprises Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Differences in genetics, demographics and histopathology have been extensively studied. The purpose of this study is to characterize their immunoprofile of markers other...... than MMR proteins. METHODS: We compared the expression patterns of cytokeratins (CK7 and CK20), mucins (MUC2/5 AC/6), CDX2 and β-catenin in Lynch syndrome and FCCTX. RESULTS: Differences were identified for CK20 and nuclear β-catenin, which were significantly more often expressed in FCCTX than in Lynch...... syndrome (p Lynch syndrome tumors compared with FCCTX tumors (p = 0.001,

  2. (GPR98) gene in an Iranian family with Usher syndrome type II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-04

    Dec 4, 2014 ... Genetics Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran 1985713834, Iran. [Kahrizi K. ... Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disease .... missense variants on the protein structures, pathogen severity .... genes to a Spanish Usher syndrome type 2 cohort.

  3. Outcome in Adult Life for People with Williams Syndrome Results from a Survey of 239 Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, P.; Udwin, O.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although there has been considerable research into the genotype and phenotype of Williams syndrome, there have been relatively few studies of long-term prognosis. As a preliminary to a more detailed investigation of adults with Williams syndrome, a parental questionnaire was distributed to members of the UK Williams Syndrome…

  4. Stress, Locus of Control, and Family Cohesion and Adaptability in Parents of Children with Down, Williams, Fragile X, and Prader-Willi Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Silvia; Vianello, Renzo

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzes differences in parental stress in families of children with Down, Williams, Fragile X, and Prader-Willi syndromes, exploring factors that influence parental stress, such as child's characteristics, parental locus of control, and family cohesion and adaptability. Differences between mothers and fathers are also…

  5. Genetic counseling for a three-generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II associated with a rare SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The SOX10 mutation related with Waardenburg syndrome type II is rare in Chinese. This study aimed to uncover the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation family to improve genetic counseling. Complete clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a three-generation Han Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. Targeted genetic counseling was provided to this family. We identified a rare heterozygous dominant mutation c.621C>A (p.Y207X) in SOX10 gene in this family. The premature termination codon occurs in exon 4, 27 residues downstream of the carboxyl end of the high mobility group box. Bioinformatics prediction suggested this variant to be disease-causing, probably due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Useful genetic counseling was given to the family for prenatal guidance. Identification of a rare dominant heterozygous SOX10 mutation c.621C>A in this family provided an efficient way to understand the causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II and improved genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A family with unusual Waardenburg syndrome type I (WSI), cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease is not linked to PAX 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierpont, J W; St Jacques, D; Seaver, L H; Erickson, R P

    1995-03-01

    An unusual family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WSI), cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease is not linked to the PAX 3 gene since there is an obligate crossover which has occurred between PAX 3 DNA markers and the disorder in this family. This family may also have anticipation of the WSI traits as the proband's grandmother is nonpenetrant, his mother has dystopia canthorum, and severe cleft lip (palate), while the proband has dystopia canthorum, severe cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease. Thus, a locus other than PAX 3 is implicated in this Waardenburg-like syndrome with Hirschsprung disease and cleft lip (palate).

  7. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family reveals a novel non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation locus on 11p15-tel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Shoaib ur; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Eiberg, Hans

    2011-01-01

    done in all sampled individuals in the family. The nuclear central loop in the five generation family showed homozygosity for a 6-Mb telomeric region on 11p15, whereas all other linkage regions were excluded by calculation of logarithm of odds (LOD) for the SNP microarray data. A maximum LOD score of Z......Autosomal recessive inherited mental retardation is an extremely heterogeneous disease and accounts for approximately 25% of all non-syndromic mental retardation cases. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family revealed a novel locus for non-syndromic autosomal recessive...

  8. A novel fibrillin-1 mutation in an egyptian marfan family: A proband showing nephrotic syndrome due to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Al-Haggar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS, the founding member of connective tissue disorder, is an autosomal dominant disease; it is caused by a deficiency of the microfibrillar protein fibrillin-1 (FBN1 and characterized by involvement of three main systems; skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular. More than one thousand mutations in FBN1 gene on chromosome 15 were found to cause MFS. Nephrotic syndrome (NS had been described in very few patients with MFS being attributed to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis secondary to infective endocarditis. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS had been reported in NS in conjunction with MFS without confirming the diagnosis by mutational analysis of FBN1. We hereby present an Egyptian family with MFS documented at the molecular level; it showed a male proband with NS secondary to FSGS, unfortunately, we failed to make any causal link between FBN dysfunction and FSGS. In this context, we review the spectrum of renal involvements occurring in MFS patients.

  9. Expansion of the clinical ocular spectrum of Wolfram Syndrome in a family carrying a novel WFS1 gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Oscar; Arce-Gonzalez, Rocio; Granillo-Alvarez, Mariella; Flores-Limas, Sanjuanita; Ramírez, Magdalena; Zenteno, Juan C

    2013-12-01

    To present the results of the clinical and molecular analyses of a familial case of Wolfram Syndrome (WFS) associated with a novel ocular anomaly. Full ophthalmologic examination was performed in two WFS siblings. Visante OCT imaging was used for assessing anterior segment anomalies. Genetic analysis included PCR amplification and exon-by-exon nucleotide sequencing of the WFS1 gene. Ocular anomalies in both affected siblings included congenital cataract, glaucoma, and optic atrophy. Interestingly, microspherophakia, a feature that has not been previously associated with WFS, was observed in both siblings. Genetic analysis disclosed a novel c.1525_1539 homozygous deletion in exon 8 of WFS1 in DNA from both affected patients. The recognition of microspherophakia in two siblings carrying a novel WFS1 mutation expands the clinical and molecular spectrum of Wolfram syndrome.

  10. A novel mutation in the NOD2 gene associated with Blau syndrome: a Norwegian family with four affected members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N; Ursin, K; Rødevand, E

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blau syndrome is a chronic granulomatous disease with an autosomal dominant trait characterized by the triad granulomatous dermatitis, arthritis, and uveitis. It is caused by mutations in the NOD2 gene, also termed the CARD15 gene. OBJECTIVE: To report a novel mutation in the NOD2 gen...... with an autosomal dominant heritage. Most likely the mutation has arisen de novo in the proband. Genetic counselling and antenatal diagnostics should be available to the involved families....... associated with Blau syndrome. METHODS AND RESULTS: The proband was a 68-year-old ethnic Norwegian male who had uveitis and arthritis since 10 years of age followed by lifelong recurrent arthritis and chronic eye involvement. Genetic analysis showed a heterozygous c.1814 C>A, T605N mutation in NOD2 that has...

  11. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenkraft, Arik; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Goldstein, Nurit; Shpirer, Zvi; van Bokhoven, Hans; Anikster, Yair

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish descent, in which the index patient presented with a persistent scalp skin lesion, dystrophic nails and light thin hair. Further evaluation revealed over 10 affected individuals in the kindred, over four generations, exhibiting varying degrees of ectodermal involvement. Analysis of the TP63 gene from four of the patients and from two healthy individuals of the same family was performed. Gene sequencing of the patients revealed a nonsense mutation leading to a premature termination codon (PTC) (p.Gln16X). The same mutation was found in all tested affected individuals in the family, but gave rise to marked phenotypic variability with minor clinical manifestations in some individuals, underscoring the clinical heterogeneity associated with the recently described PTC-causing mutations.

  12. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A Associated with Usher syndrome 1 in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue; Wang, Guo-Jian; Yuan, Yong-Yi; Xin, Feng; Han, Ming-Yu; Lu, Jing-Qiao; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Fei; Xu, Jin-Cao; Zhang, Mei-Guang; Dong, Jiang; Lin, Xi; Dai, Pu

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, age-dependent retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and occasionally vestibular dysfunction. The most severe form is Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1). Mutations in the MYO7A gene are responsible for USH1 and account for 29-55% of USH1 cases. Here, we characterized a Chinese family (no. 7162) with USH1. Combining the targeted capture of 131 known deafness genes, next-generation sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis, we identified two deleterious compound heterozygous mutations in the MYO7A gene: a reported missense mutation c.73G>A (p.G25R) and a novel nonsense mutation c.462C>A (p.C154X). The two compound variants are absent in 219 ethnicity-matched controls, co-segregates with the USH clinical phenotypes, including hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and age-dependent penetrance of progressive RP, in family 7162. Therefore, we concluded that the USH1 in this family was caused by compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A.

  13. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A Associated with Usher syndrome 1 in a Chinese family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gao

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, age-dependent retinitis pigmentosa (RP, and occasionally vestibular dysfunction. The most severe form is Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1. Mutations in the MYO7A gene are responsible for USH1 and account for 29-55% of USH1 cases. Here, we characterized a Chinese family (no. 7162 with USH1. Combining the targeted capture of 131 known deafness genes, next-generation sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis, we identified two deleterious compound heterozygous mutations in the MYO7A gene: a reported missense mutation c.73G>A (p.G25R and a novel nonsense mutation c.462C>A (p.C154X. The two compound variants are absent in 219 ethnicity-matched controls, co-segregates with the USH clinical phenotypes, including hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and age-dependent penetrance of progressive RP, in family 7162. Therefore, we concluded that the USH1 in this family was caused by compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A.

  14. Mothers and fathers of young Dutch adolescents with Down syndrome: Health related quality of life and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Jan Pieter; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; van Trotsenburg, A S Paul; Grootenhuis, Martha A

    2016-12-01

    Like any child, children with Down syndrome (DS) affect the lives of their families. Most studies focus on the adaptation of parents and families of young children with DS, while relatively few studies include the perspective of fathers. To determine 1) whether mothers and fathers of 11 to 13-year-olds with DS differ from reference parents in health related quality of life (HRQoL) and family functioning, and 2) whether HRQoL in parents of children with DS changes over time, from when the child was 6-8 years old to when the child was 11-13 years old. 80 mothers and 44 fathers completed HRQoL and family functioning questionnaires. 58 parents (53 mothers) had completed the HRQoL-questionnaire in a previous study. Mothers differed from reference mothers in one HRQoL-domain (Sexuality), while fathers' HRQoL did not significantly differ from reference fathers. Both mothers and fathers scored in the (sub)clinical range more frequently than reference parents in Total family functioning, and in the domains Partner relation and Social network. Furthermore, fathers scored in the (sub)clinical range more frequently than reference parents in Responsiveness and Organization. HRQoL showed no significant change over time. Our findings indicate frequent family functioning problems but few HRQoL problems in parents and families of children with DS. In offering care, a family based approach with special attention for partner relation and social functioning is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic analysis of a four generation Indian family with Usher syndrome: a novel insertion mutation in MYO7A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Babu, Mohan; Kimberling, William J; Venkatesh, Conjeevaram P

    2004-11-24

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by deafness and retinitis pigmentosa. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic cause of USH in a four generation Indian family. Peripheral blood samples were collected from individuals for genomic DNA isolation. To determine the linkage of this family to known USH loci, microsatellite markers were selected from the candidate regions of known loci and used to genotype the family. Exon specific intronic primers for the MYO7A gene were used to amplify DNA samples from one affected individual from the family. PCR products were subsequently sequenced to detect mutation. PCR-SSCP analysis was used to determine if the mutation segregated with the disease in the family and was not present in 50 control individuals. All affected individuals had a classic USH type I (USH1) phenotype which included deafness, vestibular dysfunction and retinitis pigmentosa. Pedigree analysis suggested an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of USH in the family. Haplotype analysis suggested linkage of this family to the USH1B locus on chromosome 11q. DNA sequence analysis of the entire coding region of the MYO7A gene showed a novel insertion mutation c.2663_2664insA in a homozygous state in all affected individuals, resulting in truncation of MYO7A protein. This is the first study from India which reports a novel MYO7A insertion mutation in a four generation USH family. The mutation is predicted to produce a truncated MYO7A protein. With the novel mutation reported here, the total number of USH causing mutations in the MYO7A gene described to date reaches to 75.

  16. Novel mutations of MYO7A and USH1G in Israeli Arab families with Usher syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizel, Leah; Safieh, Christine; Shalev, Stavit A; Mezer, Eedy; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Chervinsky, Elena; Briscoe, Daniel; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the genetic basis for Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) in four consanguineous Israeli Arab families. Haplotype analysis for all known USH1 loci was performed in each family. In families for which haplotype analysis was inconclusive, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. For mutation analysis, specific primers were used to PCR amplify the coding exons of the MYO7A, USH1C, and USH1G genes including intron-exon boundaries. Mutation screening was performed with direct sequencing. A combination of haplotype analysis and genome-wide homozygosity mapping indicated linkage to the USH1B locus in two families, USH1C in one family and USH1G in another family. Sequence analysis of the relevant genes (MYO7A, USH1C, and USH1G) led to the identification of pathogenic mutations in all families. Two of the identified mutations are novel (c.1135-1147dup in MYO7A and c.206-207insC in USH1G). USH1 is a genetically heterogenous condition. Of the five USH1 genes identified to date, USH1C and USH1G are the rarest contributors to USH1 etiology worldwide. It is therefore interesting that two of the four Israeli Arab families reported here have mutations in these two genes. This finding further demonstrates the unique genetic structure of the Israeli population in general, and the Israeli Arab population in particular, which due to high rates of consanguinity segregates many rare autosomal recessive genetic conditions.

  17. Identification of a novel mutation in a Chinese family with Nance-Horan syndrome by whole exome sequencing*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nan; Chen, Yan-hua; Xie, Chen; Xu, Bai-sheng; Huang, Hui; Li, Xin; Yang, Yue-qing; Huang, Ying-ping; Deng, Jian-lian; Qi, Ming; Gu, Yang-shun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital nuclear cataracts, dental anomalies, and craniofacial dysmorphisms. Mental retardation was present in about 30% of the reported cases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic and clinical features of NHS in a Chinese family. Methods: Whole exome sequencing analysis was performed on DNA from an affected male to scan for candidate mutations on the X-chromosome. Sanger sequencing was used to verify these candidate mutations in the whole family. Clinical and ophthalmological examinations were performed on all members of the family. Results: A combination of exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing revealed a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in exon 1 of NHS gene, co-segregating with the disease in the family. The nonsense mutation led to the conversion of glutamic acid to a stop codon (E108X), resulting in truncation of the NHS protein. Multiple sequence alignments showed that codon 108, where the mutation (c.322G>T) occurred, was located within a phylogenetically conserved region. The clinical features in all affected males and female carriers are described in detail. Conclusions: We report a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in a Chinese family with NHS. Our findings broaden the spectrum of NHS mutations and provide molecular insight into future NHS clinical genetic diagnosis. PMID:25091991

  18. Identification of a novel mutation in a Chinese family with Nance-Horan syndrome by whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nan; Chen, Yan-hua; Xie, Chen; Xu, Bai-sheng; Huang, Hui; Li, Xin; Yang, Yue-qing; Huang, Ying-ping; Deng, Jian-lian; Qi, Ming; Gu, Yang-shun

    2014-08-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital nuclear cataracts, dental anomalies, and craniofacial dysmorphisms. Mental retardation was present in about 30% of the reported cases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic and clinical features of NHS in a Chinese family. Whole exome sequencing analysis was performed on DNA from an affected male to scan for candidate mutations on the X-chromosome. Sanger sequencing was used to verify these candidate mutations in the whole family. Clinical and ophthalmological examinations were performed on all members of the family. A combination of exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing revealed a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in exon 1 of NHS gene, co-segregating with the disease in the family. The nonsense mutation led to the conversion of glutamic acid to a stop codon (E108X), resulting in truncation of the NHS protein. Multiple sequence alignments showed that codon 108, where the mutation (c.322G>T) occurred, was located within a phylogenetically conserved region. The clinical features in all affected males and female carriers are described in detail. We report a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in a Chinese family with NHS. Our findings broaden the spectrum of NHS mutations and provide molecular insight into future NHS clinical genetic diagnosis.

  19. Parent training education program: a pilot study, involving families of children with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodra, Yllka; Kondili, Loreta A; Ferraroni, Alessia; Serra, Maria Antonietta; Caretto, Flavia; Ricci, Maria Antonietta; Taruscio, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by severe hypotonia during the neonatal period and the first two years of life, the onset of hyperphagia with a risk of obesity during infancy and adulthood, learning difficulties and behavioral or severe psychiatric problems. This complex disease has severe consequences and difficult management issues also for patients' families. Parents of children with PWS need appropriate psychoeducational intervention in order to better manage their children with PWS. The purpose of this study was the implementation and evaluation of a PWS psychoeducational parent training program. The Italian National Center for Rare Diseases implemented a pilot parent training program offered to parents of children with PWS. The intervention's effects was evaluated using questionnaires comprised of 11 items rated on a 7 point Likert scale. The intervention was offered to 43 parents. The behavior problems management, dietary restrictions, autonomy and relationships were indicated by parents as the priority topics which needed to be addressed. Evaluations, immediately post-intervention and after 6 months, were reported by parents, fulfilling specific questionnaires. 90% of parents involved in the study, appreciated the methodology, 86% felt more informed about PWS, 47-62% felt more capable to better approach behaviour's problems, 20-25% felt better about the child's health situation and future expectations. Feeling more capable to help the child autonomy and relationships were reported in 62% and 63% of parents respectively, which decreased significantly (p < 0.05) according to the evaluation 6 months after the intervention. Younger age of parents (< 44 years of age) was significantly correlated with better understanding on how to help the child's autonomy (OR: 0.05; CI: 0.04-0.8) and to better collaborate with the child's teachers (OR: 0.02; CI: 0.001-0.9). Parent training is a promising intervention for parents of children

  20. Association of adiponectin promoter variants with traits and clusters of metabolic syndrome in Arabs: family-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadjali, F; Al-Yahyaee, S; Hassan, M O; Albarwani, S; Bayoumi, R A

    2013-09-25

    Plasma levels of adiponectin are decreased in type 2 diabetes, obesity and hypertension. Our aim was to use a family-based analysis to identify the genetic variants of the adiponectin (ADIPOQ) gene that are associated with obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, among Arabs. We screened 328 Arabs in one large extended family for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of the ADIPOQ gene. Two common SNPs were detected: rs17300539 and rs266729. Evidences of association between traits related to the metabolic syndrome and the SNPs were studied by implementing quantitative genetic association analysis. Results showed that SNP rs266729 was significantly associated with body weight (p-value=0.001), waist circumference (p-value=0.037), BMI (p-value=0.015) and percentage of total body fat (p-value=0.003). Up to 4.1% of heritability of obesity traits was explained by the rs266729 locus. Further cross-sectional analysis showed that carriers of the G allele had significantly higher values of waist circumference, BMI and percentage of total body fat (p-values 0.014, 0.004 and 0.032, respectively). No association was detected between SNP rs266729 and other clusters of metabolic syndrome or their traits except for HOMA-IR and fasting plasma insulin levels, p-values 0.035 and 0.004, respectively. In contrast, both measured genotype and cross-sectional analysis failed to detect an association between the SNP rs17300539 with traits and clusters of metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, we showed family-based evidence of association of SNP rs266729 at ADIPOQ gene with traits defining obesity in Arab population. This is important for future prediction and prevention of obesity in population where obesity is in an increasing trend. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Support of positive association in family-based genetic analysis between COL27A1 and Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiguo; Yu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Quanchen; Cui, Jiajia; Yi, Mingji; Zhang, Xinhua; Ge, Yinlin; Ma, Xu

    2015-08-03

    Recently, a genome-wide association study has indicated associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Collagen Type XXVII Alpha 1 gene (COL27A1) and Tourette syndrome in several ethnic populations. To clarify the global relevance of the previously identified SNPs in the development of Tourette syndrome, the associations between polymorphisms in COL27A1 and Tourette syndrome were assessed in Chinese trios. PCR-directed sequencing was used to evaluate the genetic contributions of three SNPs in COL27A1(rs4979356, rs4979357 and rs7868992) using haplotype relative risk (HRR) and transmission disequilibrium tests (TDT) with a total of 260 Tourette syndrome trios. The family-based association was significant between Tourette syndrome and rs4979356 (TDT: χ2 = 4.804, P = 0.033; HRR = 1.75, P = 0.002; HHRR = 1.32, P = 0.027), and transmission disequilibrium was suspected for rs4979357 (TDT: χ2 = 3.969, P = 0.053; HRR = 1.84, P = 0.001; HHRR = 1.29, P = 0.044). No statistically significant allele transfer was found for rs7868992 (TDT: χ2 = 2.177, P = 0.158). Although the TDT results did not remain significant after applying the conservative Bonferroni correction (p = 0.005), the significant positive HRR analysis confirmed the possibility of showing transmission disequilibrium, which provides evidence for an involvement of COL27A1in the development of TS. However, these results need to be verified with larger datasets from different populations.

  2. Clinical features and growth hormone receptor gene mutations of patients with Laron syndrome from a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yan-Qin; Wei, Hong; Cao, Li-Zhi; Lu, Juan-Juan; Luo, Xiao-Ping

    2007-08-01

    Laron syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects of growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene. It is characterized by severe postnatal growth retardation and characteristic facial features as well as high circulating levels of growth hormone (GH) and low levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). This report described the clinical features and GHR gene mutations in 2 siblings with Laron syndrome in a Chinese family. Their heights and weights were in the normal range at birth, but the growth was retarded after birth. When they presented to the clinic, the heights of the boy (8 years old) and his sister (11 years old) were 80.0 cm (-8.2 SDS) and 96.6 cm (-6.8 SDS) respectively. They had typical appearance features of Laron syndrome such as short stature and obesity, with protruding forehead, saddle nose, large eyes, sparse and thin silky hair and high-pitched voice. They had higher basal serum GH levels and lower serum levels of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and growth hormone binding protein (GHBP) than normal controls. The peak serum GH level after colonidine and insulin stimulations in the boy was over 350 ng/mL. After one-year rhGH treatment, the boy's height increased from 80.0 cm to 83.3 cm. The gene mutation analysis revealed that two patients had same homozygous mutation of S65H (TCA -->CCA) in exon 4, which is a novel gene mutation. It was concluded that a definite diagnosis of Laron syndrome can be made based on characteristic appearance features and serum levels of GH, IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and GHBP. The S65H mutation might be the cause of Laron syndrome in the two patients.

  3. A genetic Assay of Three Patients in the Same Family with Holt-Oram Syndrome; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ebrahimzadeh-Vesal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS is a developmental disorder inherited in an autosomal-dominant pattern. Affected organs are the heart and forelimbs with upper extremity skeletal defects and congenital heart malformation. In this study we present three cases of HOS in the same family. In one of these three individuals we detected a transition of C to T (CTG-GTT, V205V in exon 7 of the TBX5 gene. This nucleotide change causes no amino acid change and potential pathologic effects remain unknown.

  4. The cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: third report of familial occurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.; Beemer, F. A.; Huijbers, W. A.; Hustinx, P. A.; van Sprang, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two male sibs with cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome and spina bifida are described. The parents are physically and radiologically normal. A short review of the pertinent literature is given with special emphasis on the mode of inheritance

  5. Dusart Syndrome in a Scandinavian family characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis at young age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanathan, Ramshanker; Gram, Jørgen; Feddersen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dysfibrinogenemia is a rare group of qualitative fibrinogen disorders caused by structural abnormalities in the fibrinogen molecule. The laboratory diagnosis of dysfibrinogenemia is controversial. Fibrinogen Paris V, clinically termed Dusart Syndrome, is a dysfibrinogenemia caused...

  6. Is thyroidectomy necessary in RET mutations carriers of the familial medullary thyroid carcinoma syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H S; Torring, H; Godballe, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The results and consequences of genetic testing in a family with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) are described. METHODS: In the screening of relatives, serum calcitonin is replaced by RET mutation analysis that was performed in families suspected of hereditary medullary th...

  7. 3M Syndrome: A Report of Four Cases in Two Families

    OpenAIRE

    G?ven, Ayla; Cebeci, Ay?e Nurcan

    2011-01-01

    3M syndrome is a rare entity characterized by severe growth retardation, dysmorphic features and skeletal changes as its major components. It is differentiated from other types of dwarfism by its clinical features and by the typical slender long bones and foreshortened vertebral bodies that can be visualized radiographically. 3M syndrome has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. An early diagnosis is important for genetic counseling. In this report, we present four children (3 males, 1 ...

  8. How Do Families of Children with Down Syndrome Perceive Speech Intelligibility in Turkey?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Toğram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood verbal apraxia has not been identified or treated sufficiently in children with Down syndrome but recent research has documented that symptoms of childhood verbal apraxia can be found in children with Down syndrome. But, it is not routinely diagnosed in this population. There is neither an assessment tool in Turkish nor any research on childhood verbal apraxia although there is a demand not only for children with Down syndrome but also for normally developing children. The study examined if it was possible to determine oral-motor difficulties and childhood verbal apraxia features in children with Down syndrome through a survey. The survey was a parental report measure. There were 329 surveys received. Results indicated that only 5.6% of children with Down syndrome were diagnosed with apraxia, even though many of the subject children displayed clinical features of childhood verbal apraxia. The most frequently reported symptoms of childhood verbal apraxia in literature were displayed by the children with Down syndrome in the study. Parents could identify childhood verbal apraxia symptoms using parent survey. This finding suggests that the survey can be developed that could serve as a screening tool for a possible childhood verbal apraxia diagnosis in Turkey.

  9. All in the family: Clueing into the link between metabolic syndrome and hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, Reem; Dalovisio, Andrew; Borgia, Jeffrey A; Venugopal, Parameswaran; Kim, Brian W; Grant-Szymanski, Kelly; Hari, Parameswaran; Lazarus, Hillard

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome constitutes a constellation of findings including central obesity, insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), dyslipidemia and hypertension. Metabolic syndrome affects 1 in 4 adults in the United States and is rapidly rising in prevalence, largely driven by the dramatic rise in obesity and insulin resistance/DM. Being central to the development of metabolic syndrome and its other related diseases, much focus has been placed on identifying the mitogenic effects of obesity and insulin resistance/DM as mechanistic clues of the link between metabolic syndrome and cancer. Pertinent mechanisms identified include altered lipid signaling, adipokine and inflammatory cytokine effects, and activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR and RAS/RAF/MAPK/ERK pathways via dysregulated insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling. Through variable activation of these multiple pathways, obesity and insulin resistance/DM pre-dispose to hematologic malignancies, imposing the aggressive and chemo-resistant phenotypes typically seen in cancer patients with underlying metabolic syndrome. Growing understanding of these pathways has identified druggable cancer targets, rationalizing the development and testing of agents like PI3K inhibitor idelalisib, mTOR inhibitors everolimus and temsirolimus, and IGF-1 receptor inhibitor linsitinib. It has also led to exploration of obesity and diabetes-directed therapies including statins and oral hypoglycemic for the management of metabolic syndrome-related hematologic neoplasms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome in an adult Indian male-case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika C G Raj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome (FAMMMS is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by multiple melanocytic nevi, usually more than 50, and a family history of melanoma. It is known to be associated with carcinoma of pancreas and other malignancies involving gastrointestinal tract, breast, lung, larynx, and skin in the kindred. There is no published report of FAMMMS in dark-skinned individuals. We report a case of FAMMMS in a dark-skinned adult Indian male, who had multiple extensive nevi all over the body and oral mucosa; associated with malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (Marjolin′s ulcer, and carcinoma of pancreas. His father had died of carcinoma of lung and his sister had a partial phenotypic expression. The clinical presentation of the case is discussed with review of literature.

  11. Familial gigantism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. de Herder (Wouter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractFamilial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  12. Familial gigantism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter W. de Herder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  13. A novel variant in the SLC12A1 gene in two families with antenatal Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breinbjerg, Anders; Siggaard Rittig, Charlotte; Gregersen, Niels; Rittig, Søren; Hvarregaard Christensen, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Bartter syndrome is an autosomal-recessive inherited disease in which patients present with hypokalaemia and metabolic alkalosis. We present two apparently nonrelated cases with antenatal Bartter syndrome type I, due to a novel variant in the SLC12A1 gene encoding the bumetanide-sensitive sodium-(potassium)-chloride cotransporter 2 in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. Blood samples were received from the two cases and 19 of their relatives, and deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted. The coding regions of the SLC12A1 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction, followed by bidirectional direct deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing. Each affected child in the two families was homozygous for a novel inherited variant in the SLC12A1gene, c.1614T>A. The variant predicts a change from a tyrosine codon to a stop codon (p.Tyr538Ter). The two cases presented antenatally and at six months of age, respectively. The two cases were homozygous for the same variant in the SLC12A1 gene, but presented clinically at different ages. This could eventually be explained by the presence of other gene variants or environmental factors modifying the phenotypes. The phenotypes of the patients were similar to other patients with antenatal Bartter syndrome. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Phenotype of Usher syndrome type II assosiated with compound missense mutations of c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T in MYO7A in a Chinese Usher syndrome family

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Wei; Jin, Xin; Gong, Yan; Qu, Ling-Hui; Zhao, Chen; Li, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To identify the pathogenic mutations in a Chinese pedigree affected with Usher syndrome type II (USH2).METHODS:The ophthalmic examinations and audiometric tests were performed to ascertain the phenotype of the family. To detect the genetic defect, exons of 103 known RDs -associated genes including 12 Usher syndrome (USH) genes of the proband were captured and sequencing analysis was performed to exclude known genetic defects and find potential pathogenic mutations. Subsequently, candidate...

  15. Reproductive aspects and knowledge of family planning among women with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ivana Cristina Vieira de; Cunha, Maria da Conceição Dos Santos Oliveira; Cunha, Gilmara Holanda da; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz

    2017-05-25

    To analyze the reproductive aspects and knowledge of family planning among women with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Cross-sectional and descriptive study carried out from January to December, 2015, in the outpatient care of infectious disease unit in a hospital located in Fortaleza, Ceará. Data were collected through a form applied by interview in a private setting. 102 women participated in the study. Most were aware that they were serologically positive with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during prenatal care (96.1%) and did not intend to have more children (63.7%). Women who were less than 39 years of age, had a higher educational level, and a shorter time of antiretroviral therapy had better chances of having children (p≤0.05). Having a steady partner increased the chance of desiring to have children, while tubal ligation was higher among women that did not receive counseling on family planning. Knowledge of family planning was limited because of lack of assistance provided by health professionals. Analisar aspectos reprodutivos e conhecimento sobre planejamento familiar de mulheres com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida (Aids). Estudo transversal, descritivo, realizado de janeiro a dezembro de 2015, no ambulatório de infectologia de um hospital em Fortaleza, Ceará. Os dados foram coletados por meio de formulário, aplicado por entrevista em ambiente privativo. Participaram do estudo 102 mulheres. A maioria delas teve conhecimento da sorologia positiva para vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV) durante o pré-natal (96,1%), e estas não pretendiam mais ter filhos (63,7%). Mulheres com idade menor que 39 anos, maior escolaridade e menor tempo de terapia antirretroviral tiveram maiores chances de ter filhos (p≤0,05). Mulheres com idade menor que 39 anos e maior escolaridade tiveram maiores chances de ter informações corretas sobre ter filhos na vigência do HIV (p≤0,05). Ter parceiro fixo aumentou a chance de desejar ter

  16. [Identification of novel compound heterozygous mutations of USH2A gene in a family with Usher syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiou; Ge, Chuanqin; Wang, Yiwang; Tang, Genyun; Quan, Qingli

    2015-06-01

    To identify potential mutations in a Chinese family with Usher syndrome type II. Genomic DNA was obtained from two affected and four unaffected members of the family and subjected to amplification of the entire coding sequence and splicing sites of USH2A gene. Mutation detection was conducted by direct sequencing of the PCR products. A total of 100 normal unrelated individuals were used as controls. The patients were identified to be a compound heterozygote for two mutations: c.8272G>T (p.E2758X) in exon 42 from his mother and c.12376-12378ACT>TAA(p.T4126X) in exon 63 of the USH2A gene from his father. Both mutations were not found in either of the two unaffected family members or 100 unrelated controls, and had completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Neither mutation has been reported in the HGMD database. The novel compound heterozygous mutations c.8272G>T and c.12376-12378ACT>TAA within the USH2A gene may be responsible for the disease. This result may provide new clues for molecular diagnosis of this disease.

  17. Diversity of genetic events associated with MLH1 promoter methylation in Lynch syndrome families with heritable constitutional epimutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Julie; Flament, Cathy; Lovecchio, Tonio; Delattre, Lucie; Ait Yahya, Emilie; Baert-Desurmont, Stéphanie; Burnichon, Nelly; Bronner, Myriam; Cabaret, Odile; Lejeune, Sophie; Guimbaud, Rosine; Morin, Gilles; Mauillon, Jacques; Jonveaux, Philippe; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Frébourg, Thierry; Porchet, Nicole; Buisine, Marie-Pierre

    2018-04-12

    PurposeConstitutional epimutations are an alternative to genetic mutations in the etiology of genetic diseases. Some of these epimutations, termed secondary, correspond to the epigenetic effects of cis-acting genetic defects transmitted to the offspring following a Mendelian inheritance pattern. In Lynch syndrome, a few families with such apparently heritable MLH1 epimutations have been reported so far.MethodsWe designed a long-range polymerase chain reaction next-generation sequencing strategy to screen MLH1 entire gene and applied it to 4 French families with heritable epimutations and 10 additional patients with no proven transmission of their epimutations.ResultsThis strategy successfully detected the insertion of an Alu element in MLH1 coding sequence in one family. Two previously unreported MLH1 variants were also identified in other epimutation carriers: a nucleotide substitution within intron 1 and a single-nucleotide deletion in the 5'-UTR. Detection of a partial MLH1 duplication in another family required multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technology. We demonstrated the segregation of these variants with MLH1 methylation and studied the functional consequences of these defects on transcription.ConclusionThis is the largest cohort of patients with MLH1 secondary epimutations associated with a broad spectrum of genetic defects. This study provides further insight into the complexity of molecular mechanisms leading to secondary epimutations.GENETICS in MEDICINE advance online publication, 12 April 2018; doi:10.1038/gim.2018.47.

  18. Duplication of 20p12.3 associated with familial Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kimberly I; Anderson, Jacqueline; Levy, Philip T; Cole, F Sessions; Silva, Jennifer N A; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shinawi, Marwan

    2013-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is caused by preexcitation of the ventricular myocardium via an accessory pathway which increases the risk for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. The condition is often sporadic and of unknown etiology in the majority of cases. Autosomal dominant inheritance and association with congenital heart defects or ventricular hypertrophy were described. Microdeletions of 20p12.3 have been associated with WPW syndrome with either cognitive dysfunction or Alagille syndrome. Here, we describe the association of 20p12.3 duplication with WPW syndrome in a patient who presented with non-immune hydrops. Her paternal uncle carries the duplication and has attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and electrocardiographic findings consistent with WPW. The 769 kb duplication was detected by the Affymetrix Whole Genome-Human SNP Array 6.0 and encompasses two genes and the first two exons of a third gene. We discuss the potential role of the genes in the duplicated region in the pathogenesis of WPW and possible neurobehavioral abnormalities. Our data provide additional support for a significant role of 20p12.3 chromosomal rearrangements in the etiology of WPW syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Síndrome de Alport: estudo de uma família Alport's syndrome: a family study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antônio de Macedo Leal

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: A síndrome de Alport caracteriza-se por nefropatia hereditária, geralmente associada à surdez neurossensorial (Alport, 1927 e alterações oculares (Sohar, 1954. Estudaram-se as manifestações da síndrome em membros de uma mesma família, considerando aspectos clínicos e genéticos. Pacientes e Método: Foram submetidos a exame oftalmológico quinze indivíduos de uma família, dos quais quatro apresentavam síndrome de Alport. Os exames foram realizados na Clínica Oftalmológica do Hospital Getúlio Vargas - Universidade Federal do Piauí (HGV/UFPI. Resultados: Revelaram-se quatro indivíduos afetados pela síndrome de Alport, dos quais três apresentavam surdez moderada, lenticone anterior bilateral e nefropatia crônica, e um tinha manifestação renal isolada. Todos os pacientes eram brancos, do sexo masculino, com idade entre 12 e 25 anos. A acuidade visual dos olhos com lenticone variou de 20/50 a 20/100. Conclusões: A análise da família identificou três casos confirmados e um suspeito, sugerindo padrão de herança recessiva ligada ao X, não sendo possível afastar a herança autossômica dominante com penetrância incompleta.Purpose: Alport's Syndrome is characterized by hereditary nephritis, usually associated with neurosensitve deafness (Alport, 1927 and ocular disease (Sohar, 1954. Thus we intended to analize manifestations of the syndrome in a family, regarding clinical and genetical aspects. Patients and method: Fifteen patients of the same family of which four had Alport´s syndrome were submitted to ophthalmologic examination. The examinations were performed at the Ophthalmologic Clinic of HGV/UFPI. Results: Four patients with Alport´s syndrome were revealed, of which three had moderate deafness, anterior lenticonus and chronic nephropathy, and one of them had renal disease alone. All the patients were white, male aged 12 to 25 years. The visual acuity of eyes with lenticonus varied between 20/50 and 20

  20. Screening for germline phosphatase and tensin homolog-mutations in suspected Cowden syndrome and Cowden syndrome-like families among uterine cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    TZORTZATOS, GERASIMOS; ARAVIDIS, CHRISTOS; LINDBLOM, ANNIKA; MINTS, MIRIAM; THAM, EMMA

    2015-01-01

    Cowden syndrome (CS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple hamartomas in the breast, thyroid and endometrium, with a prevalence of 1 per 250,000. Females with CS have a 21–28% lifetime risk of developing uterine cancer. Germline mutations in the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene, a tumor suppressor gene, are responsible for 30–80% of CS cases. PTEN is a nine-exon gene, located on chromosome 10q23.3, which encodes the 403 amino acid PTEN protein. It negatively regulates the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, affecting various cellular processes and signaling pathways. The present study examined whether PTEN mutations are present in CS-like families with uterine cancer (UC). UC patients underwent surgery at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden (2008–2012). Pedigrees were analyzed and 54 unrelated CS-like families were identified. CS-like families were defined as having at least one occurrence of uterine cancer and one of breast cancer, as well as at least one additional Cowden-associated tumor (uterine, breast, thyroid, colon or kidney cancer) in the same individual or in first-degree relatives. Genomic DNA was amplified using polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing analysis of all nine exons of the PTEN gene was conducted. No germline PTEN mutations or polymorphisms were identified. Germline PTEN mutations are rare in CS-like families with uterine cancer, therefore, genetic screening must be restricted to patients that meet the strict National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. Gynecologists must be aware of the CS criteria and identify potential cases of CS in females where uterine cancer is the sentinel cancer. PMID:25789042

  1. The first missense mutation of NHS gene in a Tunisian family with clinical features of NHS syndrome including cardiac anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chograni, Manèl; Rejeb, Imen; Jemaa, Lamia Ben; Châabouni, Myriam; Bouhamed, Habiba Chaabouni

    2011-08-01

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) or X-linked cataract-dental syndrome is a disease of unknown gene action mechanism, characterized by congenital cataract, dental anomalies, dysmorphic features and, in some cases, mental retardation. We performed linkage analysis in a Tunisian family with NHS in which affected males and obligate carrier female share a common haplotype in the Xp22.32-p11.21 region that contains the NHS gene. Direct sequencing of NHS coding exons and flanking intronic sequences allowed us to identify the first missense mutation (P551S) and a reported SNP-polymorphism (L1319F) in exon 6, a reported UTR-SNP (c.7422 C>T) and a novel one (c.8239 T>A) in exon 8. Both variations P551S and c.8239 T>A segregate with NHS phenotype in this family. Although truncations, frame-shift and copy number variants have been reported in this gene, no missense mutations have been found to segregate previously. This is the first report of a missense NHS mutation causing NHS phenotype (including cardiac defects). We hypothesize also that the non-reported UTR-SNP of the exon 8 (3'-UTR) is specific to the Tunisian population.

  2. Heterozygous deletion at the SOX10 gene locus in two patients from a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzhi, He; Ruijin, Wen; Jieliang, Li; Xiaoyan, Ma; Haibo, Liu; Xiaoman, Wang; Jiajia, Xian; Shaoying, Li; Shuanglin, Li; Qing, Li

    2015-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disease characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigment disturbance. To date, almost 100 mutations have been reported, but few reports on cases with SOX10 gene deletion. The inheritance pattern of SOX10 gene deletion is still unclear. Our objective was to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a two-generation Chinese family. Clinical evaluations were conducted in both of the patients. Microarray analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were performed to identify disease-related copy number variants (CNVs). DNA sequencing of the SOX10, MITF and SNAI2 genes was performed to identify the pathogenic mutation responsible for WS2. A 280kb heterozygous deletion at the 22q13.1 chromosome region (including SOX10) was detected in both of the patients. No mutation was found in the patients, unaffected family members and 30 unrelated healthy controls. This report is the first to describe SOX10 heterozygous deletions in Chinese WS2 patients. Our result conform the thesis that heterozygous deletions at SOX10 is an important pathogenicity for WS, and present as autosomal dominant inheritance. Nevertheless, heterozygous deletion of the SOX10 gene would be worth investigating to understand their functions and contributions to neurologic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis and Muir-Torre syndrome linked to compound biallelic constitutional MYH gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G; Ponz de Leon, M; Maffei, S; Pedroni, M; Losi, L; Di Gregorio, C; Gismondi, V; Scarselli, A; Benatti, P; Roncari, B; Seidenari, S; Pellacani, G; Varotti, C; Prete, E; Varesco, L; Roncucci, L

    2005-11-01

    Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis and Muir-Torre syndrome linked to compound biallelic constitutional MYH gene mutations.Peculiar dermatologic manifestations are present in several heritable gastrointestinal disorders. Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is a genodermatosis whose peculiar feature is the presence of sebaceous gland tumors associated with visceral malignancies. We describe one patient in whom multiple sebaceous gland tumors were associated with early onset colon and thyroid cancers and attenuated polyposis coli. Her family history was positive for colonic adenomas. She had a daughter presenting with yellow papules in the forehead region developed in the late infancy. Skin and visceral neoplasms were tested for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical status of mismatch repair (MMR), APC and MYH proteins. The proband colon and skin tumors were microsatellite stable and showed normal expression of MMR proteins. Cytoplasmic expression of MYH protein was revealed in colonic cancer cells. Compound heterozygosity due to biallelic mutations in MYH, R168H and 379delC, was identified in the proband. The 11-year-old daughter was carrier of the monoallelic constitutional mutation 379delC in the MYH gene; in the sister, the R168H MYH gene mutation was detected. This report presents an interesting case of association between MYH-associated polyposis and sebaceous gland tumors. These findings suggest that patients with MTS phenotype that include colonic polyposis should be screened for MYH gene mutations.

  4. A clinical case study of a Wolfram syndrome-affected family: pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials and electroretinography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Broniek-Kowalik, Karina; Szulborski, Kamil

    2012-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS), or DIDMOAD, is a rare (1/100 000 to 1/770 000), progressive neurodegenerative disorder. In its early stages, it is characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and loss of sensorineural hearing-this is followed by diabetes insipidus, progressive neurological abnormalities and other endocrine abnormalities, which occur in later years. The aim of this study was to report on the clinical and electrophysiological findings from a family with the WFS1 mutation. The five family members were subjected to a complete ophthalmic examination, which included a flash full-field electroretinogram and pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) performed according to ISCEV standards. Optic atrophy was confirmed in two homozygotic patients, where P100 latencies were significantly delayed-up to 146 ms in PVEP. P100 latencies were normal in the three heterozygotic patients we examined. Curve morphology abnormalities were observed in all five patients we examined. No literature describing the morphology of PVEP in Wolfram syndrome patients was found. In flash electroretinography, scotopic and photopic responses appeared in normal morphology and value. Diabetic retinopathy was not observed in the diabetes mellitus patients.

  5. MSH6 and PMS2 mutation positive Australian Lynch syndrome families: novel mutations, cancer risk and age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talseth-Palmer, Bente A; McPhillips, Mary; Groombridge, Claire; Spigelman, Allan; Scott, Rodney J

    2010-05-21

    Approximately 10% of Lynch syndrome families have a mutation in MSH6 and fewer families have a mutation in PMS2. It is assumed that the cancer incidence is the same in families with mutations in MSH6 as in families with mutations in MLH1/MSH2 but that the disease tends to occur later in life, little is known about families with PMS2 mutations. This study reports on our findings on mutation type, cancer risk and age of diagnosis in MSH6 and PMS2 families. A total of 78 participants (from 29 families) with a mutation in MSH6 and 7 participants (from 6 families) with a mutation in PMS2 were included in the current study. A database of de-identified patient information was analysed to extract all relevant information such as mutation type, cancer incidence, age of diagnosis and cancer type in this Lynch syndrome cohort. Cumulative lifetime risk was calculated utilising Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. MSH6 and PMS2 mutations represent 10.3% and 1.9%, respectively, of the pathogenic mutations in our Australian Lynch syndrome families. We identified 26 different MSH6 and 4 different PMS2 mutations in the 35 families studied. We report 15 novel MSH6 and 1 novel PMS2 mutations. The estimated cumulative risk of CRC at age 70 years was 61% (similar in males and females) and 65% for endometrial cancer in MSH6 mutation carriers. The risk of developing CRC is different between males and females at age 50 years, which is 34% for males and 21% for females. Novel MSH6 and PMS2 mutations are being reported and submitted to the current databases for identified Lynch syndrome mutations. Our data provides additional information to add to the genotype-phenotype spectrum for both MSH6 and PMS2 mutations.

  6. MSH6 and PMS2 mutation positive Australian Lynch syndrome families: novel mutations, cancer risk and age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talseth-Palmer Bente A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 10% of Lynch syndrome families have a mutation in MSH6 and fewer families have a mutation in PMS2. It is assumed that the cancer incidence is the same in families with mutations in MSH6 as in families with mutations in MLH1/MSH2 but that the disease tends to occur later in life, little is known about families with PMS2 mutations. This study reports on our findings on mutation type, cancer risk and age of diagnosis in MSH6 and PMS2 families. Methods A total of 78 participants (from 29 families with a mutation in MSH6 and 7 participants (from 6 families with a mutation in PMS2 were included in the current study. A database of de-identified patient information was analysed to extract all relevant information such as mutation type, cancer incidence, age of diagnosis and cancer type in this Lynch syndrome cohort. Cumulative lifetime risk was calculated utilising Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results MSH6 and PMS2 mutations represent 10.3% and 1.9%, respectively, of the pathogenic mutations in our Australian Lynch syndrome families. We identified 26 different MSH6 and 4 different PMS2 mutations in the 35 families studied. We report 15 novel MSH6 and 1 novel PMS2 mutations. The estimated cumulative risk of CRC at age 70 years was 61% (similar in males and females and 65% for endometrial cancer in MSH6 mutation carriers. The risk of developing CRC is different between males and females at age 50 years, which is 34% for males and 21% for females. Conclusion Novel MSH6 and PMS2 mutations are being reported and submitted to the current databases for identified Lynch syndrome mutations. Our data provides additional information to add to the genotype-phenotype spectrum for both MSH6 and PMS2 mutations.

  7. Relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support and job satisfaction to burnout syndrome among medical workers in southwest China: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shujuan; Liu, Danping; Liu, Hongbo; Zhang, Juying; Duan, Zhanqi

    2017-01-01

    Background Burnout is a psychosomatic syndrome widely observed in Chinese medical workers due to the increasing cost of medical treatment, excessive workload, and excessive prescribing behavior. No studies have evaluated the interrelationship among occupational burnout, work-family conflict, social support, and job satisfaction in medical workers. The aim of this study was to evaluate these relationships among medical workers in southwest China. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2013 and December 2013, and was based on the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS). A total of 1382 medical workers were enrolled in the study. Pearson correlation analysis and general linear model univariate analysis were used to evaluate the relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction with burnout syndrome in medical workers. Results We observed that five dimensions of job satisfaction and self-reported social support were negatively associated with burnout syndrome, whereas three dimensions of work-family conflict showed a positive correlation. In a four-stage general linear model analysis, we found that demographic factors accounted for 5.4% of individual variance in burnout syndrome (F = 4.720, Pjob satisfaction accounted for 2.6% (F = 5.93, Pburnout syndrome, and medical workers without administrative duties had more serious burnout syndrome than those with administrative duties. Conclusions In conclusion, the present study suggests that work-family conflict and self-reported social support slightly affect the level of burnout syndrome, and that job satisfaction is a much stronger influence on burnout syndrome in medical workers of southwest China. PMID:28207821

  8. Prenatal diagnosis and a donor splice site mutation in fibrillin in a family with Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, M.; Vandemark, N.; Wang, M.; Han, J.; Rao, V.H. (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha (United States)); Velinov, M.; Tsipouras, P. (Univ. of Connecticut Health Sciences Center, Farmington (United States)); Wargowski, D.; Becker, J.; Robertson, W.; Droste, S. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The Marfan syndrome, an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder, is manifested by abnormalities in the cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. Recently, fibrillin, an elastic-associated microfibrillar glycoprotein, has been linked to the Marfan syndrome, and fibrillin mutations in affected individuals have been documented. In this study, genetic linkage analysis with fibrillin-specific markers was used to establish the prenatal diagnosis in an 11-wk-gestation fetus in a four-generation Marfan kindred. At birth, skeletal changes suggestive of the Marfan syndrome were observed. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification of the fibrillin gene mRNA detected a deletion of 123 bp in one allele in affected relatives. This deletion corresponds to an exon encoding an epidermal growth factor-like motif. Examination of genomic DNA showed a G[yields]C transversion at the +1 consensus donor splice site. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Unsolicited information letters to increase awareness of Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer: reactions and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Lautrup, Charlotte Kvist; Lindberg, Lars Joachim; Ladelund, Steen; Nilbert, Mef

    2018-04-12

    Dissemination of information on a genetically increased risk should according to guidelines primarily be family-mediated. Incomplete and incorrect information spread has, however, been documented and implies missed possibilities for prevention. In Denmark, the national HNPCC register has been granted an exception to send unsolicited letters with information on hereditary colorectal cancer and an invitation to genetic counseling to members of families with familial and hereditary colorectal cancer. To evaluate this approach, we investigated reactions and attitudes to unsolicited letters in 708 members of families with genetic predisposition and in 1600 individuals from the general population. Support for information letters was expressed by 78% of the family members and by 82% of the general population. Regarding route of information, 90% of family members preferred a letter to no information, 66% preferred information from the hospital rather than from family members and 40% preferred to obtain information from a close family member. Our results suggest that use of unsolicited information letters from the health care system may be a feasible and highly acceptable strategy to disseminate information to families at high risk of colorectal cancer.

  10. Whole-exome sequencing analysis of Waardenburg syndrome in a Chinese family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dezhong; Zhao, Na; Wang, Jing; Li, Zhuoyu; Wu, Changxin; Fu, Jie; Xiao, Han

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a dominantly inherited, genetically heterogeneous auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by non-progressive sensorineural hearing loss and iris discoloration. By whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified a nonsense mutation (c.598C>T) in PAX3 gene, predicted to be disease causing by in silico analysis. This is the first report of genetically diagnosed case of WS PAX3 c.598C>T nonsense mutation in Chinese ethnic origin by WES and in silico functional prediction methods. PMID:28690861

  11. Whole-exome sequencing analysis of Waardenburg syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dezhong; Zhao, Na; Wang, Jing; Li, Zhuoyu; Wu, Changxin; Fu, Jie; Xiao, Han

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a dominantly inherited, genetically heterogeneous auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by non-progressive sensorineural hearing loss and iris discoloration. By whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified a nonsense mutation (c.598C>T) in PAX3 gene, predicted to be disease causing by in silico analysis. This is the first report of genetically diagnosed case of WS PAX3 c.598C>T nonsense mutation in Chinese ethnic origin by WES and in silico functional prediction methods.

  12. Relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support and job satisfaction to burnout syndrome among medical workers in southwest China: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shujuan; Liu, Danping; Liu, Hongbo; Zhang, Juying; Duan, Zhanqi

    2017-01-01

    Burnout is a psychosomatic syndrome widely observed in Chinese medical workers due to the increasing cost of medical treatment, excessive workload, and excessive prescribing behavior. No studies have evaluated the interrelationship among occupational burnout, work-family conflict, social support, and job satisfaction in medical workers. The aim of this study was to evaluate these relationships among medical workers in southwest China. This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2013 and December 2013, and was based on the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS). A total of 1382 medical workers were enrolled in the study. Pearson correlation analysis and general linear model univariate analysis were used to evaluate the relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction with burnout syndrome in medical workers. We observed that five dimensions of job satisfaction and self-reported social support were negatively associated with burnout syndrome, whereas three dimensions of work-family conflict showed a positive correlation. In a four-stage general linear model analysis, we found that demographic factors accounted for 5.4% of individual variance in burnout syndrome (F = 4.720, Pfamily conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction accounted for 2.6% (F = 5.93, Pfamily conflict and self-reported social support slightly affect the level of burnout syndrome, and that job satisfaction is a much stronger influence on burnout syndrome in medical workers of southwest China.

  13. Differential expression of CK20, β-catenin, and MUC2/5AC/6 in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsson, Stefan; Klarskov, Louise; Nilbert, Mef; Bernstein, Inge; Bonde, Jesper; Holck, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer comprises Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Differences in genetics, demographics and histopathology have been extensively studied. The purpose of this study is to characterize their immunoprofile of markers other than MMR proteins. We compared the expression patterns of cytokeratins (CK7 and CK20), mucins (MUC2/5 AC/6), CDX2 and β-catenin in Lynch syndrome and FCCTX. Differences were identified for CK20 and nuclear β-catenin, which were significantly more often expressed in FCCTX than in Lynch syndrome ( p  Lynch syndrome tumors compared with FCCTX tumors ( p  = 0.001, Lynch syndrome with a more sporadic-like profile in the former group and a more distinct profile with frequent MUC6 positivity in the latter group.

  14. Predictive factors for familiality in a Danish clinical cohort of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Nanette M M M; Hjalgrim, Helle; Skov, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    have examined a large Danish clinical cohort of children with TS (N=307). Validated diagnostic instruments were used to assess the presence of co-morbidities in the children with TS. A three-generation pedigree was drawn for all the probands and through reports from the family, a family history...

  15. Marfan Syndrome: A Study of a Nigerian Family and Review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Marfan's syndrome is a connective tissue disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder. It causes a myriad of distinct clinical problems, of which the musculoskeletal, cardiac, and ocular system problems predominate. Nearly 50 percent of patients have to undergo aortic surgery in their lifetime ...

  16. Prune belly syndrome in a set of twins, a family tragedy: Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report prune belly syndrome, a rare congenital malformation, in a set of twins delivered to a young couple with a history of three previous first trimester spontaneous abortions, discordant HIV seropositivity and antenatal ultrasound report that indicated renal abnormalities in only one of the twins. The challenges of ...

  17. USH2A mutation analysis in 70 Dutch families with Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Brinke, H. te; Weston, M.D.; Claassen, A.M.W.; Orten, D.J.; Weekamp, H.; Aarem, A. van; Huygen, P.L.M.; Deutman, A.F.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kimberling, W.J.; Kremer, J.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is characterised by moderate to severe high-frequency hearing impairment, progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa and intact vestibular responses. Three loci are known for USH2, however, only the gene for USH2a (USH2A) has been identified. Mutation analysis

  18. Apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome: report of one family with three affected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Taiba; Al-Shaikh, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    The syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypertension, hypokalemia, low renin, and hypoaldosteronism. It is caused by deficiency of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, which results in a defect of the peripheral metabolism of cortisol to cortisone. As a consequence, the serum cortisol half-life (T½) is prolonged, ACTH is suppressed, and serum cortisol concentration is normal. The hormonal diagnosis of the disorder is made by the increased ratio of urine-free cortisol to cortisone. In patients with AME, this ratio is 5-18, while in normal individuals it is syndrome of AME. We report three siblings - two female and one male - with the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess who presented with hypertension, hypokalemia, low renin, and low aldosterone levels. The finding of abnormally high ratios of 24-h urine-free cortisol to cortisone in our three patients (case 1, 8.4; case 2, 25; and case 3, 7.5) confirmed the diagnosis of apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome in these children. They were treated with oral potassium supplements. The addition of spironolactone resulted in a decrease in blood pressure, rise in serum potassium and a gradual increase in plasma renin activity in all three. In this study, the genetic testing of those three siblings with the typical clinical features of AME has detected missense mutation c.662C>T (p.Arg208Cys) in exon 3 of the HSD11B2 gene in the homozygous state.

  19. Informing family members of individuals with Lynch syndrome: a guideline for clinical geneticists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menko, Fred H.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Henneman, Lidewij; Stol, Yrrah; Wijdenes, Miranda; Otten, Ellen; Ploegmakers, Marleen M. J.; Legemaate, Johan; Smets, Ellen M. A.; de Wert, Guido M. W. R.; Tibben, Aad

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can lead to the prevention of colorectal cancer through periodic colonoscopies and removal of premalignant lesions in susceptible individuals. Therefore, predisposed individuals identified by mutation analysis are advised to inform their at-risk relatives about the

  20. Informing family members of individuals with Lynch syndrome : a guideline for clinical geneticists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menko, Fred H.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Henneman, Lidewij; Stol, Yrrah; Wijdenes, Miranda; Otten, Ellen; Ploegmakers, Marleen M. J.; Legemaate, Johan; Smets, Ellen M. A.; de Wert, Guido M. W. R.; Tibben, Aad

    The diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can lead to the prevention of colorectal cancer through periodic colonoscopies and removal of premalignant lesions in susceptible individuals. Therefore, predisposed individuals identified by mutation analysis are advised to inform their at-risk relatives about the

  1. The phenotypic spectrum of Schaaf-Yang syndrome : 18 new affected individuals from 14 families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fountain, Michael D.; Aten, Emmelien; Cho, Megan T.; Juusola, Jane; Walkiewicz, Magdalena A.; Ray, Joseph W.; Xia, Fan; Yang, Yaping; Graham, Brett H.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Potocki, Lorraine; van Haeringen, Arie; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A. L.; Mancias, Pedro; Northrup, Hope; Kukolich, Mary K.; Weiss, Marjan M.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Levesque, Sebastien; Meeks, Naomi; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Lemke, Danielle; Hamosh, Ada; Lewis, Suzanne K.; Race, Simone; Stewart, Laura L.; Hay, Beverly; Lewis, Andrea M.; Guerreiro, Rita L.; Bras, Jose T.; Martins, Marcia P.; Derksen-Lubsen, Gerarda; Peeters, Els; Stumpel, Connie; Stegmann, Sander; Bok, Levinus A.; Santen, Gijs W. E.; Schaaf, Christian P.

    Purpose: Truncating mutations in the maternally imprinted, paternally expressed gene MAGEL2, which is located in the Prader-Willi critical region 15q11-13, have recently been reported to cause Schaaf -Yang syndrome, a Prader-Willi-like disease that manifests as developmental delay/intellectual

  2. [Dent's syndrome. Nephrology follow-up of four patients of the same family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, G; Babinet, F; Champion, G

    2012-04-01

    Dent's syndrome is a rare inherited tubulopathy. Factors influencing renal function in this disease are not well known. The aim of our study is to investigate the evolution of the Dent's syndrome in renal plan. The study was retrospective and conducted in 2006, concerning four brothers. The genetic defect was a mutation S244L missense in exon 6 of gene CLCN5. Various parameters were studied. Patients were 8.5 to 21-years-old at the beginning of the follow-up. Two of them had chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) which evolved, at least 7 years of moderate to terminal stage. Tubular signs were made of hypokalemia, hypercalciuria, hypophosphatemia and proteinuria mostly β2 microglobulin. Improvement of these abnormalities was obtained with symptomatic treatment which has not always been well tolerated. A case of beginner nephrocalcinosis was observed. There was size and weight delay at the beginning of patient monitoring. Dent's syndrome may be complicated by CRI. It seems to appear in the second decade of life and hypercalciuria would contribute to it. Our CRI patients had significant bone disease. The hypercalciuria and proteinuria are factors over which we try to act. Clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy of treatment on the reduction of CRI or its progression by reducing these factors in patients with Dent's syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Health care needs of children with Down syndrome and impact of health system performance on children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Randall A; Pinter, Joseph D; Lollar, Donald J; Medlen, Joan Guthrie; Bethell, Christina D

    2012-04-01

    The functional, financial, and social impact on families of children with Down syndrome (DS) in the United States and the role of the US health care system in ameliorating these impacts have not been well characterized. We sought to describe the demographic characteristics and functional difficulties of these children and to determine whether children with DS, compared with children with "intellectual disability" (ID) generally, and compared with other "children and youth with special health care needs" (CYSHCN), are more or less likely to receive health care that meets quality standards related to care coordination and to have their health care service needs met. This study analyzed data from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (n = 40,723). Children and youth aged 0 to 17 years with special health care need (CYSHCN) who experience DS (n = 395) and/or IDs (n = 4252) were compared with each other and other CYSHCN on a range of functioning, family impact, and health care quality variables using bivariate and multivariate methods. Data were weighted to represent all CYSHCN in the United States. Compared with CYSHCN without DS, children with DS were significantly less likely to receive comprehensive care within a medical home (29.7% vs 47.3%; p work due to their child's health needs (23.5% vs 55.1%; p performance was poorer for children with DS compared with those with ID and no DS after adjustment for family income, prevalence on most aspects of quality of care and family impacts evaluated were similar for these 2 groups. In this study, the families of children with DS, and ID generally, are burdened disproportionately when compared with other CYSHCN, reflecting the combination of impairments intrinsic to DS and ID and impacts of suboptimal medical care coordination and social support.

  4. Senior-Loken syndrome: A novel NPHP5 gene mutation in a family from Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makia J Marafie

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Identification of this pathogenic mutation helped in confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in providing a proper pre-marital genetic counselling and testing for a couple embarking on marriage from this highly consanguineous high-risk family.

  5. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of a familial duplication of chromosome 13q: A recognizable syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, Inge B.; Hoovers, Jan M. N.; Mul, Adri N. P. M.; Man, Hai-Yen; Ket, Jan L.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a family with six persons in three generations who have mild mental retardation, behavioral problems, seizures, hearing loss, strabismus, dental anomalies, hypermobility, juvenile hallux valgus, and mild dysmorphic features. Classical cytogenetic analysis showed a partial duplication of

  6. A consanguineous family with Hirschsprung disease, microcephaly, and mental retardation (Goldberg-Shprintzen syndrome)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooks, AS; Breuning, MH; Osinga, J; Van der Smagt, JJ; Catsman, CE; Buys, CHCM; Meijers, C; Hofstra, RMW

    Hirschsprung disease, mental retardation, microcephaly, and specific craniofacial dysmorphism were observed in three children from a large, consanguineous, Moroccan family. A fourth child showed similar clinical features, with the exception of Hirschsprung disease. The association of these

  7. A Turkish family with Nance-Horan Syndrome due to a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tug, Esra; Dilek, Nihal F; Javadiyan, Shahrbanou; Burdon, Kathryn P; Percin, Ferda E

    2013-08-01

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked syndrome characterized by congenital cataract which leads to profound vision loss, characteristic dysmorphic features and specific dental anomalies. Microcornea, microphthalmia and mild or moderate mental retardation may accompany these features. Heterozygous females often manifest similarly but with less severe features than affected males. We describe two brothers who have the NHS phenotype and their carrier mother who had microcornea but not cataract. We identified a previously unreported frameshift mutation (c.558insA) in exon 1 of the NHS gene in these patients and their mother which is predicted to result in the incorporation of 11 aberrant amino acids prior to a stop codon (p.E186Efs11X). We also discussed genotype-phenotype correlation according to relevant literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Phenotypic discordance in a family with monozygotic twins and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyszynski, D.F. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lewanda, A.F. [Johnson Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Children`s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Beaty, T.H. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Balitomre, MD (United States)

    1996-12-30

    Despite considerable research, the cause of non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is still an enigma. Case-control and cohort studies have searched for environmental factors that might influence the development of this common malformation, such as maternal cigarette smoking, periconceptional supplementation of folic acid and multivitamins, agricultural chemical use, and place of residence, among others. However, these studies are subject to numerous biases, and their results have often been contradictory and inconclusive. 41 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Forensic and family psychiatry in abuse dwarfism: Munchausen's syndrome by proxy, atonement, and addiction to abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, J; Annecillo, C; Hutchison, J W

    1985-01-01

    The syndrome of abuse dwarfism is characterized by gross impairment of statural and intellectual growth and social maturation while the abused child remains in the domicile of abuse. The parents collude as child abusers, and are medical impostors regarding the symptoms of abuse. The syndrome as a whole is appropriately named Munchausen's syndrome by proxy. Though the mother typically initiates abuse, she cannot give a rational explanation for doing so. In her own history there is a sin that is expiated or atoned for symbolically by the sacrifice of the child--explainable in terms of the theory of opponent-process learning. In the two cases presented, the sin was the mother's own birth out of wedlock, in one case as a sequel to incest. The child's addiction to abuse is a challenge to the program of rehabilitation. With respect to parents at risk, the data of this paper are relevant to the prevention of a predisposition toward, or the actual implementation of child abuse, though a program of prevention needs still to be formulated. The sexological relevance of this paper is that the data demonstrate that the effects of sexual abuse may be transmitted to the next generation and manifested as child abuse which is not necessarily sexual in content.

  10. Case Report: Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome: Two Cases from One Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Karim-Zadeh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren–Larsson Syndrome (SLS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by generalized Ichthyosis, mental retardation, spastic diplegia or tetraplegia and epilepsy. This is a rare syndrome that caused by mutation in the ALDH3A2 gene, on chromosome 17p11.2. That encodes fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FAIDH, an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of medium – long chain aldehydes derived from lipid metabolism. Neuroimaging (MRI shows retardation of myelination and a mild myelin deficit. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS shows the peak of lipids that accumulate because of fatty alchohols. We report two cases that they are siblings from relative parents. The Brother is 4 years old and his sister is 3 years old. , The clinical findings are developmental delay, mental retardation, spastic Tetraplegia and refractory seizure. The most important finding in these two siblings was generalized Icthyosis. MRI showed hyper signality in white matter and MRS showed the peak of accumulated lipids that confirmed the diagnosis of "Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome".

  11. Mutational analysis of the Wolfram syndrome gene in two families with chromosome 4p-linked bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, K L; Lawson, D; Meitinger, T; Blackwood, D H; Porteous, D J

    2000-04-03

    Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) is a complex disease with a significant genetic component. Heterozygous carriers of Wolfram syndrome (WFS) are at increased risk of psychiatric illness. A gene for WFS (WFS1) has recently been cloned and mapped to chromosome 4p, in the general region we previously reported as showing linkage to BPAD. Here we present sequence analysis of the WFS1 coding sequence in five affected individuals from two chromosome 4p-linked families. This resulted in the identification of six polymorphisms, two of which are predicted to change the amino acid sequence of the WFS1 protein, however none of the changes segregated with disease status. Am. J. Med. Genet. (Neuropsychiatr. Genet.) 96:158-160, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Ambras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Malwade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambras syndrome, a form of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, is extremely rare in neonates. It is characterized by typical pattern of hair distribution, dysmorphic facial features and a familial pattern of inheritance. We report a case of Ambras syndrome in a preterm neonate with history of consanguinity and positive family history.

  13. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A in a Chinese family with Usher syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Li, Pengcheng; Liu, Ying; Li, Weirong; Wong, Fulton; Du, Rong; Wang, Lei; Li, Chang; Jiang, Fagang; Tang, Zhaohui; Liu, Mugen

    2013-01-01

    To identify the disease-causing mutation(s) in a Chinese family with autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1). An ophthalmic examination and an audiometric test were conducted to ascertain the phenotype of two affected siblings. The microsatellite marker D11S937, which is close to the candidate gene MYO7A (USH1B locus), was selected for genotyping. From the DNA of the proband, all coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of MYO7A were sequenced to identify the disease-causing mutation(s). Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was performed to exclude the alternative conclusion that the mutations are non-pathogenic rare polymorphisms. Based on severe hearing impairment, unintelligible speech, and retinitis pigmentosa, a clinical diagnosis of Usher syndrome type 1 was made. The genotyping results did not exclude the USH1B locus, which suggested that the MYO7A gene was likely the gene associated with the disease-causing mutation(s) in the family. With direct DNA sequencing of MYO7A, two novel compound heterozygous mutations (c.3742G>A and c.6051+1G>A) of MYO7A were identified in the proband. DNA sequence analysis and RFLP analysis of other family members showed that the mutations cosegregated with the disease. Unaffected members, including the parents, uncle, and sister of the proband, carry only one of the two mutations. The mutations were not present in the controls (100 normal Chinese subjects=200 chromosomes) according to the RFLP analysis. In this study, we identified two novel mutations, c.3742G>A (p.E1248K) and c.6051+1G>A (donor splice site mutation in intron 44), of MYO7A in a Chinese non-consanguineous family with USH1. The mutations cosegregated with the disease and most likely cause the phenotype in the two affected siblings who carry these mutations compound heterozygously. Our finding expands the mutational spectrum of MYO7A.

  14. PHOX2B mutation-confirmed congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in a Chinese family: presentation from newborn to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peilin; Su, Yi-Ning; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Huey-Dong

    2009-02-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is characterized by compromised chemoreflexes resulting in sleep hypoventilation. We report a Chinese family with paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B) mutation-confirmed CCHS, with a clinical spectrum from newborn to adulthood, to increase awareness of its various manifestations. After identifying central hypoventilation in an adult man (index case), clinical evaluation was performed on the complete family, which consisted of the parents, five siblings, and five offspring. Pulmonary function tests, overnight polysomnography, arterial blood gas measurements, hypercapnia ventilatory response, and PHOX2B gene mutation screening were performed on living family members. Brain MRI, 24-h Holter monitoring, and echocardiography were performed on members with clinically diagnosed central hypoventilation. The index patient and four offspring manifested clinical features of central hypoventilation. The index patients had hypoxia and hypercapnia while awake, polycythemia, and hematocrit levels of 70%. The first and fourth children had frequent cyanotic spells, and both died of respiratory failure. The second and third children remained asymptomatic until adulthood, when they experienced impaired hypercapnic ventilatory response. The third child had nocturnal hypoventilation with nadir pulse oximetric saturation of 59%. Adult-onset CCHS with PHOX2B gene mutation of the + 5 alanine expansions were confirmed in the index patient and the second and third children. The index patient and the third child received ventilator support system bilevel positive airway pressure treatment, which improved the hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and polycythemia without altering their chemosensitivity. Transmission of late-onset CCHS is autosomal-dominant. Genetic screening of family members of CCHS probands allows for early diagnosis and treatment.

  15. A novel potential biomarker for metabolic syndrome in Chinese adults: Circulating protein disulfide isomerase family A, member 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chu-Yen; Hung, Yi-Jen; Shieh, Yi-Shing; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Lu, Chieh-Hua; Lin, Fu-Huang; Su, Sheng-Chiang; Lee, Chien-Hsing

    2017-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family members are specific endoplasmic reticulum proteins that are involved in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and obesity. However, the metabolic effects of PDIA4 remain unclear in humans. The aims of this study were to investigate the associations of serum PDIA4 with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in Chinese adults. A total of 669 adults (399 men and 270 women) were recruited. Serum PDIA4 concentrations and biochemical variables were recorded. Insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were examined by homeostasis model assessment. MetS was defined based on the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for Asia Pacific. The participants with MetS had significantly higher serum PDIA4 levels than those without MetS (Pmetabolic syndrome were 67 and 72%, respectively, in male patients and 60 and 78%, respectively, in female patients. Finally, the result showed that PDIA4 had a significantly higher area under the curve compared with blood pressure to detect MetS using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Serum PDIA4 concentrations are closely associated to MetS and its components in Chinese adults.

  16. A novel mutation in the endothelin B receptor gene in a moroccan family with shah-waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubaj, Yassamine; Pingault, Véronique; Elalaoui, Siham C; Ratbi, Ilham; Azouz, Mohamed; Zerhouni, Hicham; Ettayebi, Fouad; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2015-02-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a neurocristopathy disorder combining sensorineural deafness and pigmentary abnormalities. The presence of additional signs defines the 4 subtypes. WS type IV, also called Shah-Waardenburg syndrome (SWS), is characterized by the association with congenital aganglionic megacolon (Hirschsprung disease). To date, 3 causative genes have been related to this congenital disorder. Mutations in the EDNRB and EDN3 genes are responsible for the autosomal recessive form of SWS, whereas SOX10 mutations are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. We report here the case of a 3-month-old Morrocan girl with WS type IV, born to consanguineous parents. The patient had 3 cousins who died in infancy with the same symptoms. Molecular analysis by Sanger sequencing revealed the presence of a novel homozygous missense mutation c.1133A>G (p.Asn378Ser) in the EDNRB gene. The proband's parents as well as the parents of the deceased cousins are heterozygous carriers of this likely pathogenic mutation. This molecular diagnosis allows us to provide genetic counseling to the family and eventually propose prenatal diagnosis to prevent recurrence of the disease in subsequent pregnancies.

  17. A de novo deletion mutation in SOX10 in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong; Zhu, Yaowu; Shen, Na; Peng, Jing; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Haiyi; Lu, Yanjun

    2017-01-27

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) or Waardenburg-Shah syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with a prevalence of <1/1,000,000 and characterized by the association of congenital sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities, and intestinal aganglionosis. There are three types of WS4 (WS4A-C) caused by mutations in endothelin receptor type B, endothelin 3, and SRY-box 10 (SOX10), respectively. This study investigated a genetic mutation in a Chinese family with one WS4 patient in order to improve genetic counselling. Genomic DNA was extracted, and mutation analysis of the three WS4 related genes was performed using Sanger sequencing. We detected a de novo heterozygous deletion mutation [c.1333delT (p.Ser445Glnfs*57)] in SOX10 in the patient; however, this mutation was absent in the unaffected parents and 40 ethnicity matched healthy controls. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional modelling of the SOX10 protein confirmed that the c.1333delT heterozygous mutation was pathogenic, indicating that this mutation might constitute a candidate disease-causing mutation.

  18. Hereditary familial polyposis and Gardner's syndrome: contribution of the odonto-stomatology examination in its diagnosis and a case description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; Pascual, Montserrat; Blanco, Ignacio; Finestres, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and its phenotype variant, Gardner's syndrome, constitute a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder. They are characterised by the development, generally during the second and third decades of life, of multiple adenomatous polyps in the colon and rectum. These polyps have a high risk of subsequently becoming malignant, which normally occurs in the third and fourth decades of life. The phenotypical features of FAP can be very variable. As well as colorectal polyps, these individuals can present with extra-colonic symptoms, among which are particularly: gastro-duodenal polyps, dermoid and epidermoid cysts, desmoid tumours, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, disorders of the maxillary and skeletal bones and dental anomalies. In this paper the most important aspects of this syndrome are reviewed, showing an example based on a well documented clinical case. The importance of odonto-stomatological examinations should be pointed out, among others, as a means of reaching a presumptive diagnosis, whose confirmation is vital to the patient.

  19. Seven novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in Chinese families with nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa and Usher syndrome Type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjun; Dai, Hanjun; Lu, Tingting; Zhang, Xiaohui; Dong, Bing; Li, Yang

    2011-01-01

    To describe the clinical and genetic findings in one Chinese family with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) and in three unrelated Chinese families with Usher syndrome type II (USH2). One family (FR1) with arRP and three unrelated families (F6, F7, and F8) with Usher syndrome (USH), including eight affected members and seven unaffected family individuals were examined clinically. The study included 100 normal Chinese individuals as normal controls. After obtaining informed consent, peripheral blood samples from all participants were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Genotyping and haplotyping analyses were performed on the known genetic loci for arRP with a panel of polymorphic markers in family FR1. In all four families, the coding region (exons 2-72), including the intron-exon boundary of the USH2A (Usher syndrome type -2A protein) gene, was screened by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. Whenever substitutions were identified in a patient, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, or high resolution melt curve analysis (HRM) was performed on all available family members and on the 100 normal controls. The affected individuals presented with typical fundus features of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), including narrowing of the vessels, bone-spicule pigmentation, and waxy optic discs. The electroretinogram (ERG) wave amplitudes of the available probands were undetectable. Audiometric tests in the affected individuals in family FR1 were normal, while indicating moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairment in the affected individuals in families F6, F7, and F8. Vestibular function was normal in all patients from all four families. The disease-causing gene in family FR1 was mapped to the USH2A locus on chromosome 1q41. Seven novel mutations (two missenses, one 7-bp deletion, two small deletions, and two nonsenses) were detected in the four families after sequencing analysis of

  20. A nonsense mutation in the COL4A5 collagen gene in a family with X-linked juvenile Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Heiskari, N; Zhou, J

    1995-01-01

    diagnosis on chorionic villi tissue, obtained from one of the female carriers in the family, revealed a male fetus hemizygous for the mutated allele. A subsequent prenatal test in her next pregnancy revealed a normal male fetus. Prenatal diagnosis of Alport syndrome has not previously been reported....

  1. A putative Lynch syndrome family carrying MSH2 and MSH6 variants of uncertain significance-functional analysis reveals the pathogenic one

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantelinen, Jukka; Hansen, Thomas V O; Kansikas, Minttu

    2011-01-01

    Inherited pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 predispose to Lynch syndrome (LS). However, the finding of a variant or variants of uncertain significance (VUS) in affected family members complicates the risk assessment. Here, we describe a putative LS...

  2. Familiality of Tourette Syndrome, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Heritability Analysis in a Large Sib-Pair Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Carol A.; Grados, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a genetic component that is highly comorbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic relations between these disorders have not been clearly elucidated. This study examined the familial relations among TS,…

  3. Two Siblings with Familial Chylomicronemia Syndrome: Disease Course and Effectiveness of Early Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan AL Azkawi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are no adequate data that evaluate the safety and effectiveness of lowering triglyceride levels in very young children. The authors report a family with two male siblings, 7 and 4 years old, affected by familial hyperchylomicronemia. The oldest was diagnosed at birth during evaluation of jaundice, and the youngest showed asymptomatic hypertriglyceridemia by 6 months of age. Due to high triglyceride levels, Gemfibrozil (a fibric acid derivative was started at diagnosis. Close clinical followup and laboratory monitoring of these children showed no side effects from the drug, and the risk of acute pancreatitis was significantly reduced.

  4. Population-based family case-control proband study on familial aggregation of metabolic syndrome: finding from Taiwanese people involved in Keelung community-based integrated screening (KCIS no. 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yueh-Hsia; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Po-En; Chen, Yao-Der; Wang, Ting-Ting; Warwick, Jane; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2007-03-01

    A population-based case-control proband study was undertaken to elucidate familial aggregation, independent environmental factors, and the interaction between them. A total of 7308 metabolic syndrome (MET-S) cases were identified from the Keelung community-based integrated screening programme between 1999 and 2002. The study has a case-control/family sampling design. A total of 1417 case probands were randomly selected from 3225 metabolic syndrome cases and the corresponding 2458 controls selected from 16,519 subjects without metabolic syndrome by matching on sex, age (+/-3 years) and place of residence. The generalized estimation equation model was used to estimate odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The risk for having metabolic syndrome among family members for cases versus control probands was 1.56-fold (1.29-1.89) after controlling for significant environmental factors. Higher risk of metabolic syndrome was found in parents than spouse. Low education against high education had 2.06-fold (1.36-3.13) risk for metabolic syndrome. Betel quid chewing was positively associated with the risk of MET-S, with 1.99-fold (1.13-3.53) risk for 1-9 pieces and 1.76-fold (0.96-3.23) risk for >or=10 pieces compared with non-chewer. Moderate and high intensity of non-occupational exercise led to 21.0% (OR=0.79 (0.63-0.98)) and 26.0% (OR=0.74 (0.59-0.94)) reduction in the risk for metabolic syndrome, respectively. The frequent consumption of vegetable reduced 24.0% (OR=0.76 (0.62-0.92)) risk for MET-S. The frequent consumption of coffee was associated the increased risk for metabolic syndrome (OR=1.32 (1.07-1.64)). The present study confirmed the risk of metabolic syndrome not only has the tendency towards familial aggregation but is affected by independent effect of environmental or individual correlates.

  5. Lesch-Nyhan variant syndrome: variable presentation in 3 affected family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafoglou, Kyriakie; Grosse-Redlinger, Krista; Boys, Christopher J; Charnas, Laurence; Otten, Noelle; Broock, Robyn; Nyhan, William L

    2010-06-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is an inborn error of purine metabolism that results from deficiency of the activity of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). The heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes seen in HPRT deficiency corresponds to an inverse relationship between HPRT enzyme activity and clinical severity. With rare exception, each mutation produces a stereotypical pattern of clinical disease; onset of neurologic symptoms occurs during infancy and is thought to be nonprogressive. To document a family in which a single HPRT gene mutation has led to 3 different clinical and enzymatic phenotypes. Case report. Settings A university-based outpatient metabolic clinic and a biochemical genetics laboratory. Patients Three males (2 infants and their grandfather) from the same family with Lesch-Nyhan variant, including one of the oldest patients with Lesch-Nyhan variant at diagnosis (65 years). Clinical and biochemical observations. Sequencing of 5 family members revealed a novel mutation c.550G>T in exon 7 of the HPRT gene. The considerably variable clinical phenotype corresponded with the variable enzymatic activity in the 3 males, with the grandfather being the most severely affected. The different phenotypes encountered in the enzymatic analysis of cultured fibroblasts from a single mutation in the same family is unprecedented. The significant decrease in the grandfather's HPRT enzymatic activity compared with that of his grandchildren could be a function of the Hayflick Limit Theory of cell senescence.

  6. Unsolicited information letters to increase awareness of Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Lautrup, Charlotte Kvist

    2018-01-01

    Dissemination of information on a genetically increased risk should according to guidelines primarily be family-mediated. Incomplete and incorrect information spread has, however, been documented and implies missed possibilities for prevention. In Denmark, the national HNPCC register has been gra...

  7. Screening for urinary tract cancer with urine cytology in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myrhøj, T; Andersen, M-B; Bernstein, I

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate if Urine Cytology (UC) is an appropriate screening procedure for detecting urinary tract neoplasia at an early stage in persons at risk in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer families. METHOD: In the National Danish HNPCC-register persons at risk ...

  8. Family history of type 2 diabetes, abdominal adipocyte size and markers of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthanont, P; Ramos, P; Jensen, M D; Hames, K C

    2017-11-01

    A major risk factor of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a positive family history of diabetes. First degree relatives (FDR) of patients with T2DM are more insulin resistant and are reported to have larger abdominal subcutaneous adipocytes than adults without a family history. Our objectives were to assess whether FDR of T2DM are associated with larger abdominal adipocytes independent of age, sex and abdominal subcutaneous fat and to assess whether a family history of T2DM is also independently related to femoral adipocyte size, as well as visceral fat and fasting plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations. We extracted adipocyte size, body composition, plasma TG and demographic data of non-diabetic research participants of previous studies conducted in our laboratory. We ascertained the family history of T2DM from the electronic medical records. Multivariate regression analysis was used to assess whether FDR of T2DM are more likely to have other risk factors after adjusting for known covariates. Of 604 participants, 148 were FDR of T2DM. Although abdominal and femoral adipocyte size was greater in FDR of T2DM than those without a family history (0.74±0.33 vs 0.63±0.33 μg lipid per cell, Phistory of T2DM was a significant predictor of abdominal adipocyte size after adjustment for age and body fat distribution parameters in females (total R 2 =0.5, Phistory of T2DM was not independently predictive of femoral adipocyte size, visceral fat area or TG. Female FDR of T2DM have larger abdominal, but not femoral, adipocytes, even after accounting for age and body fat distribution.

  9. Subjective face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility, sleeping disturbances and aberrant eating habits in families with Asperger syndrome

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    Källman Tiia

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether a set of clinical features, which are not included in the DSM-IV or ICD-10 for Asperger Syndrome (AS, are associated with AS in particular or whether they are merely a familial trait that is not related to the diagnosis. Methods Ten large families, a total of 138 persons, of whom 58 individuals fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for AS and another 56 did not to fulfill these criteria, were studied using a structured interview focusing on the possible presence of face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility and eating habits and sleeping disturbances. Results The prevalence for face recognition difficulties was 46.6% in individuals with AS compared with 10.7% in the control group. The corresponding figures for subjectively reported presence of aberrant sensibilities were 91.4% and 46.6%, for sleeping disturbances 48.3% and 23.2% and for aberrant eating habits 60.3% and 14.3%, respectively. Conclusion An aberrant processing of sensory information appears to be a common feature in AS. The impact of these and other clinical features that are not incorporated in the ICD-10 and DSM-IV on our understanding of AS may hitherto have been underestimated. These associated clinical traits may well be reflected by the behavioural characteristics of these individuals.

  10. Whole-exome sequencing identifies USH2A mutations in a pseudo-dominant Usher syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sui-Lian; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Lin, Zhen-Lang; Kang, Qian-Yan

    2015-10-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive (AR) multi-sensory degenerative disorder leading to deaf-blindness. USH is clinically subdivided into three subclasses, and 10 genes have been identified thus far. Clinical and genetic heterogeneities in USH make a precise diagnosis difficult. A dominant‑like USH family in successive generations was identified, and the present study aimed to determine the genetic predisposition of this family. Whole‑exome sequencing was performed in two affected patients and an unaffected relative. Systematic data were analyzed by bioinformatic analysis to remove the candidate mutations via step‑wise filtering. Direct Sanger sequencing and co‑segregation analysis were performed in the pedigree. One novel and two known mutations in the USH2A gene were identified, and were further confirmed by direct sequencing and co‑segregation analysis. The affected mother carried compound mutations in the USH2A gene, while the unaffected father carried a heterozygous mutation. The present study demonstrates that whole‑exome sequencing is a robust approach for the molecular diagnosis of disorders with high levels of genetic heterogeneity.

  11. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for a Chinese family with autosomal recessive Meckel-Gruber syndrome type 3 (MKS3.

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    Yanping Lu

    Full Text Available Meckel-Gruber syndrome type 3 is an autosomal recessive genetic defect caused by mutations in TMEM67 gene. In our previous study, we have identified a homozygous TMEM67 mutation in a Chinese family exhibiting clinical characteristics of MKS3, which provided a ground for further PGD procedure. Here we report the development and the first clinical application of the PGD for this MKS3 family. Molecular analysis protocol for clinical PGD procedure was established using 50 single cells in pre-clinical set-up. After whole genomic amplification by multiple displacement amplification with the DNA from single cells, three techniques were applied simultaneously to increase the accuracy and reliability of genetic diagnosis in single blastomere, including real-time PCR with Taq Man-MGB probe, haplotype analysis with polymorphic STR markers and Sanger sequencing. In the clinical PGD cycle, nine embryos at cleavage-stage were biopsied and subjected to genetic diagnosis. Two embryos diagnosed as free of TMEM67 mutation were transferred and one achieving normal pregnancy. Non-invasive prenatal assessment of trisomy 13, 18 and 21 by multiplex DNA sequencing at 18 weeks' gestation excluded the aneuploidy of the analyzed chromosomes. A healthy boy was delivered by cesarean section at 39 weeks' gestation. DNA sequencing from his cord blood confirmed the result of genetic analysis in the PGD cycle. The protocol developed in this study was proved to be rapid and safe for the detection of monogenic mutations in clinical PGD cycle.

  12. Linkage analysis in a family with Stickler syndrome leads to the exclusion of the COL2A1 locus

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    Mottes, M.; Zolezzi, F.; Pignatti, P.F. [Univ. of Verona (Italy)

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary arthro-ophtalmopathy (AO) or Stickler Syndrome (MIM No. 10830) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by vitro-retinal degeneration and other connective tissue disturbances. Mutations in the COL2A1 gene, coding for type II collagen chains, have been described in a few patients. The wide spectrum of clinical manifestations is presumably due to genetic heterogeneity, since only about 50% of the Stickler families so far studied show cosegregation of the disease with the COL2A1 locus. We have investigated a large pedigree (19 individuals of whom 9 are affected) in which severe myopia with vitro-retinal degeneration consegregated with joint laxity, recurrent inguinal hernias, and degenerative changes of the hip and the knee. The 3{prime} end COL2A1 VNTR polymorphism was utilized for linkage analysis. In order to get the maximum informativity, we have analyzed the allelic microheterogeneity of this VNTR, due to the repeat sequence variation, by means of a single strand polymorphism. Mendelian inheritance of the different single strands was observed as expected. Discordance of segregation between the disease and the COL2A1 locus was thus established inequivocally in this family.

  13. Clinical heterogeneity in a family with DKC1 mutation, dyskeratosis congenita and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome in first cousins

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    Cristina Olivieri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis congenita (DC is an inherited bone marrow failure disorder characterized by mucocutaneous features (skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and oral leukoplakia, pulmonary fibrosis, hematologic and solid malignancies. Its severe form, recognized as Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS, also includes cerebellar hypoplasia, microcephaly, developmental delay and prenatal growth retardation. In literature phenotypic variability among DC patients sharing the same mutation is wellknown. To our knowledge this report describes for the first time a family of DC patients, characterized by a member with features of classic DC and another one with some features of HHS, both with the same mutation in DKC1. Our family confirms again that one mutation can be associated with different phenotypes and different hematological manifestations. It’s possible to speculate that there are likely to be patients who do not clinically fit neatly into either classical DC or HHS, but whose clinical features are due to mutations in DKC1 or in genes responsible for autosomal DC/HHS.

  14. Relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support and job satisfaction to burnout syndrome among medical workers in southwest China: A cross-sectional study.

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    Shujuan Yang

    Full Text Available Burnout is a psychosomatic syndrome widely observed in Chinese medical workers due to the increasing cost of medical treatment, excessive workload, and excessive prescribing behavior. No studies have evaluated the interrelationship among occupational burnout, work-family conflict, social support, and job satisfaction in medical workers. The aim of this study was to evaluate these relationships among medical workers in southwest China.This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2013 and December 2013, and was based on the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS. A total of 1382 medical workers were enrolled in the study. Pearson correlation analysis and general linear model univariate analysis were used to evaluate the relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction with burnout syndrome in medical workers.We observed that five dimensions of job satisfaction and self-reported social support were negatively associated with burnout syndrome, whereas three dimensions of work-family conflict showed a positive correlation. In a four-stage general linear model analysis, we found that demographic factors accounted for 5.4% of individual variance in burnout syndrome (F = 4.720, P<0.001, R2 = 0.054, and that work-family conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction accounted for 2.6% (F = 5.93, P<0.001, R2 = 0.080, 5.7% (F = 9.532, P<0.001, R2 = 0.137 and 17.8% (F = 21.608, P<0.001, R2 = 0.315 of the variance, respectively. In the fourth stage of analysis, female gender and a lower technical title correlated to a higher level of burnout syndrome, and medical workers without administrative duties had more serious burnout syndrome than those with administrative duties.In conclusion, the present study suggests that work-family conflict and self-reported social support slightly affect the level of burnout syndrome, and that job satisfaction is a much stronger influence on burnout syndrome

  15. Identification and verification of a pathogenic MLH1 mutation c.1145dupA in a Lynch syndrome family

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    Huang Feifei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS, an autosomal-dominant disorder with an increased risk of predominantly colorectal and endometrial cancers, is caused by germ-line mutations in mismatch repair genes. The identification of germ-line mutations that predispose to cancer is important to further our understanding of tumorigenesis, guide patient management and inform the best practice for healthcare. A 45-year-old woman with atypical endometrial hyperplasia who suffered colon cancer at the age of 30 years underwent hysterectomy and genetic counseling. Pedigree analysis revealed her family fulfilling the Amsterdam I criteria. Next-generation sequencing was offered to the patient. A mutation in the MLH1 gene, c.1145dupA, was identified and verified by Sanger sequencing. In addition, her nine family members were tested for the mutation. Two were affected (colon cancer at the age of 43 years and 45 years and one healthy relative carried the same mutation in the MLH1 gene. The mutation resulted in a frame-shift (p.Met383Aspfs*12 located in exon12, as well as a polypeptide truncation of 393 amino acids by the formation of a premature stop codon. An immunohistochemistry analysis of endometrial hyperplasia tissues revealed defects in MLH1 and PMS2 protein expression in the patient. Based on the 2015 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG guideline, we report this MLH1 c.1145dupA variation to be a pathogenic mutation that contributes to a strongly increased cancer risk in this LS family. Proper screening suggestions were offered to the three affected patients and the healthy carrier. To the best of our knowledge, this germ-line mutation of MLH1 was previously submitted to the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD database, but no comprehensive evidence or supporting observations were reported previously in the literature. The present report found a single nucleotide insertion in exon12 of the MLH1 gene, which can be considered causative of Lynch phenotype

  16. Family physician-led, team-based, lifestyle intervention in patients with metabolic syndrome: results of a multicentre feasibility project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Heyland, Daren K; Leung, Roger; Day, Andrew G; Brauer, Paula; Royall, Dawna; Tremblay, Angelo; Mutch, David M; Pliamm, Lew; Rhéaume, Caroline; Klein, Doug

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a medical condition with major complications and health care costs. Previous research has shown that diet and exercise can improve and reverse this condition. The goal of this study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of implementing the Canadian Health Advanced by Nutrition and Graded Exercise (CHANGE) program into diverse family medicine practices to improve MetS. In this longitudinal before-after study, 305 adult patients with MetS were recruited from 3 diverse family medicine team-based organizations to the CHANGE personalized diet and exercise program. Participants were followed for 12 months. Primary outcomes included feasibility and reversal of MetS. Secondary outcomes included improvement in MetS components, changes in diet quality, aerobic fitness and cardiovascular risk. Participants attended 76% and 90% of the kinesiologist and dietitian visits, respectively. At 12 months, 19% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI] 14%-24%) showed reversal of MetS, VO2max increased by 16% (95% CI 13%-18%), and Healthy Eating Index and Mediterranean Diet Scores improved by 9.6% (95% CI 7.6%-11.6%) and 1.4% (1.1%-1.6%), respectively. In addition, the Prospective Cardiovascular Munster (PROCAM) 10-year risk of acute coronary event decreased by 1.4%, from a baseline of 8.6%. A team-based program led by the family physician that educates patients about the risks of MetS, and with a dietitian and kinesiologist, empowers them to undertake an individualized supervised program of diet modification and exercise, is feasible, improves aerobic capacity and diet quality, reverses MetS and improves MetS components at 12 months.

  17. A New Role for LOC101928437 in Non-Syndromic Intellectual Disability: Findings from a Family-Based Association Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaohe; Shi, Zhangyan; Cui, Meng; Li, Junlin; Ma, Zhe; Shi, Yuanyu; Zheng, Zijian; Zhang, Fuchang; Jin, Tianbo; Geng, Tingting; Chen, Chao; Guo, Yale; Zhou, Jianping; Huang, Shaoping; Guo, Xingli; Gao, Lin; Gong, Pingyuan; Gao, Xiaocai; Zhang, Kejin

    2015-01-01

    Non-syndromic intellectual disability (NSID) is mental retardation in persons of normal physical appearance who have no recognisable features apart from obvious deficits in intellectual functioning and adaptive ability; however, its genetic etiology of most patients has remained unknown. The main purpose of this study was to fine map and identify specific causal gene(s) by genotyping a NSID family cohort using a panel of markers encompassing a target region reported in a previous work. A total of 139 families including probands, parents and relatives were included in the household survey, clinical examinations and intelligence tests, recruited from the Qinba mountain region of Shannxi province, western China. A collection of 34 tagged single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) spanning five microsatellite marker (STR) loci were genotyped using an iPLEX Gold assay. The association between tSNPs and patients was analyzed by family-based association testing (FBAT) and haplotype analysis (HBAT). Four markers (rs5974392, rs12164331, rs5929554 and rs3116911) in a block that showed strong linkage disequilibrium within the first three introns of the LOC101928437 locus were found to be significantly associated with NSID (all P<0.01) by the FBAT method for a single marker in additive, dominant and recessive models. The results of haplotype tests of this block also revealed a significant association with NSID (all P<0.05) using 2-window and larger HBAT analyses. These results suggest that LOC101928437 is a novel candidate gene for NSID in Han Chinese individuals of the Qinba region of China. Although the biological function of the gene has not been well studied, knowledge about this gene will provide insights that will increase our understanding of NSID development.

  18. A New Role for LOC101928437 in Non-Syndromic Intellectual Disability: Findings from a Family-Based Association Test.

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    Shaohe Zhou

    Full Text Available Non-syndromic intellectual disability (NSID is mental retardation in persons of normal physical appearance who have no recognisable features apart from obvious deficits in intellectual functioning and adaptive ability; however, its genetic etiology of most patients has remained unknown. The main purpose of this study was to fine map and identify specific causal gene(s by genotyping a NSID family cohort using a panel of markers encompassing a target region reported in a previous work. A total of 139 families including probands, parents and relatives were included in the household survey, clinical examinations and intelligence tests, recruited from the Qinba mountain region of Shannxi province, western China. A collection of 34 tagged single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs spanning five microsatellite marker (STR loci were genotyped using an iPLEX Gold assay. The association between tSNPs and patients was analyzed by family-based association testing (FBAT and haplotype analysis (HBAT. Four markers (rs5974392, rs12164331, rs5929554 and rs3116911 in a block that showed strong linkage disequilibrium within the first three introns of the LOC101928437 locus were found to be significantly associated with NSID (all P<0.01 by the FBAT method for a single marker in additive, dominant and recessive models. The results of haplotype tests of this block also revealed a significant association with NSID (all P<0.05 using 2-window and larger HBAT analyses. These results suggest that LOC101928437 is a novel candidate gene for NSID in Han Chinese individuals of the Qinba region of China. Although the biological function of the gene has not been well studied, knowledge about this gene will provide insights that will increase our understanding of NSID development.

  19. A novel COL4A3 mutation causes autosomal-recessive Alport syndrome in a large Turkish family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzak, Asli Subasioglu; Tokgoz, Bulent; Dundar, Munis; Tekin, Mustafa

    2013-03-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder that is characterized by hematuria, progressive renal failure typically resulting in end-stage renal disease, sensorineural hearing loss, and variable ocular abnormalities. Only 15% of cases with AS are autosomal recessive and are caused by mutations in the COL4A3 or COL4A4 genes, encoding type IV collagen. Clinical data in a large consanguineous family with four affected members were reviewed, and genomic DNA was extracted. For mapping, 15 microsatellite markers flanking COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5 in 16 family members were typed. For mutation screening, all coding exons of COL4A3 were polymerase chain reaction- amplified and Sanger-sequenced from genomic DNA. The disease locus was mapped to chromosome 2q36.3, where COL4A3 and COL4A4 reside. Sanger sequencing revealed a novel mis-sense mutation (c.2T>C; p.M1T) in exon 1 of COL4A3. The identified nucleotide change was not found in 100 healthy ethnicity-matched controls via Sanger sequencing. We present a large consanguineous Turkish family with AS that was found to have a COL4A3 mutation as the cause of the disease. Although the relationship between the various genotypes and phenotypes in AS has not been fully elucidated, detailed clinical and molecular analyses are helpful for providing data to be used in genetic counseling. It is important to identify new mutations to clarify their clinical importance, to assess the prognosis of the disease, and to avoid renal biopsy for final diagnosis.

  20. Psychotherapeutic assistance to adolescent siblings in families with a Down syndrome member

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    M.A. (Counselling Psychology) Sibling interaction is often an overlooked aspect of family functioning. For many years there has been an overemphasis on the importance of parental influences on children, yet common sense dictates that brothers and sisters must have some effect on each other even though this effect may not always be obvious. The sibling relationship is a life-long process, and is therefore highly influential throughout the life cycle ...

  1. Predictive factors for familiality in a Danish clinical cohort of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Nanette M M M; Hjalgrim, Helle; Skov, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a chronic, neurobiological disease, characterized by the presence of motor and vocal tics and it is often accompanied by associated symptoms. The two best-known co-morbidities are Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD...... and the frequency of affected relatives was noted. The rates of tics, symptoms of OCD, and ADHD among relatives are similar to the rates found in other countries and are higher than in the general population. Although the role of sex in determining the phenotype has to be examined more thoroughly, we found...... that male relatives were more likely to have tics and female relatives were more likely to have symptoms of OCD. When comparing the relatives to male patients with relatives to female patients, there were no differences in the rates of symptoms, apart from symptoms of ADHD that were more frequent in second...

  2. A Rating Scale for the Functional Assessment of Patients with Familial Dysautonomia (Riley Day Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B.; Rolnitzky, Linda; von Simson, Gabrielle Gold; Berlin, Dena; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop a reliable rating scale to assess functional capacity in children with familial dysautonomia, evaluate changes over time and determine whether severity within a particular functional category at a young age affected survival. Study design Ten functional categories were retrospectively assessed in 123 patients with familial dysautonomia at age 7 years ± 6 months. Each of the ten Functional Severity Scale (FuSS) categories (motor development, cognitive ability, psychological status, expressive speech, balance, oral coordination, frequency of dysautonomic crisis, respiratory, cardiovascular and nutritional status) was scored from 1 (worst or severely affected) to 5 (best or no impairment). Changes over time were analyzed further in 22 of the 123 patients who were also available at ages 17 and 27 years. Results Severely impaired cardiovascular function and high frequency of dysautonomic crisis negatively affected survival (p<0.005 and p<0.001, respectively). In the 22 individuals followed up to age 27 years, psychological status significantly worsened (p=0.01), and expressive speech improved (p=0.045). From age 17 to 27 years, balance worsened markedly (p =0.048). Conclusion The FuSS scale is a reliable tool to measure functional capacity in patients with familial dysautonomia. The scale may prove useful in providing prognosis and as a complementary endpoint in clinical trials. PMID:22727867

  3. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and associated factors in women aged 35 to 65 years who were enrolled in a family health program in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ana Carolina Basso; Cardoso, Maria Regina Alves; Lopes, Heno; Pereira, Wendry Maria Paixão; Pereira, Elaine Cristina; de Rezende, Debora Aparecida Paccola; Guarizi, Rubia Guibo; Dellu, Mayra Cecilia; Oliveira, Jéssica de Moura; Flauzino, Erika; Blümel, Juan E; Aldrighi, José Mendes

    2013-04-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among women aged 35 to 65 years and to identify associated factors. This was a cross-sectional study. We randomly selected 581 women (aged 35-65 y) from among those enrolled in a family health program in the city of Pindamonhangaba, Brazil. Metabolic syndrome was identified in accordance with the definition of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. Health conditions and lifestyle habits were evaluated by a survey, and anthropometric measurements were obtained. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was estimated, and Poisson regression was used to evaluate the associations between metabolic syndrome `and the factors investigated. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 42.2% (95% CI, 38.1-46.2). The most common metabolic syndrome component was abdominal obesity (60.6%), followed by low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (51.3%), high levels of triglycerides (41.4%), high blood pressure (31.7%), and diabetes (13.9%). The following factors were associated with metabolic syndrome: the 45- to 54-year age group (prevalence ratio, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.08-2.01), the 55- to 65-year age group (prevalence ratio, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.49-3.10), hyperuricemia (prevalence ratio, 2.95; 95% CI, 1.15-1.86), and sleep apnea risk (prevalence ratio, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.16-1.82). We found an inverse association between metabolic syndrome and having had more than 5 years of schooling (prevalence ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.65-1.04). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is high, and the associated clinical factors are hyperuricemia and risk of sleep apnea.

  4. The Association of Arsenic Exposure and Arsenic Metabolism with the Metabolic Syndrome and its Individual Components: Prospective Evidence from the Strong Heart Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratlen, Miranda J; Grau-Perez, Maria; Best, Lyle G; Yracheta, Joseph; Lazo, Mariana; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Balakrishnan, Poojitha; Gamble, Mary V; Francesconi, Kevin A; Goessler, Walter; Cole, Shelley A; Umans, Jason G; Howard, Barbara V; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2018-03-15

    Inorganic arsenic exposure is ubiquitous and both exposure and inter-individual differences in its metabolism have been associated with cardiometabolic risk. The association between arsenic exposure and arsenic metabolism with metabolic syndrome and its individual components, however, is relatively unknown. We used poisson regression with robust variance to evaluate the association between baseline arsenic exposure (urine arsenic levels) and metabolism (relative percentage of arsenic species over their sum) with incident metabolic syndrome and its individual components (elevated waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL, hypertension, elevated fasting plasma glucose) in 1,047 participants from the Strong Heart Family Study, a prospective family-based cohort in American Indian communities (baseline visits in 1998-1999 and 2001-2003, follow-up visits in 2001-2003 and 2006-2009). 32% of participants developed metabolic syndrome over follow-up. An IQR increase in arsenic exposure was associated with 1.19 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.41) greater risk for elevated fasting plasma glucose but not with other individual components or overall metabolic syndrome. Arsenic metabolism, specifically lower MMA% and higher DMA% was associated with higher risk of overall metabolic syndrome and elevated waist circumference, but not with any other component. These findings support there is a contrasting and independent association between arsenic exposure and arsenic metabolism with metabolic outcomes which may contribute to overall diabetes risk.

  5. Characterization of a rare variant (c.2635-2A>G) of the MSH2 gene in a family with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariola, Filomena; Disciglio, Vittoria; Valentini, Anna M; Lotesoriere, Claudio; Fasano, Candida; Forte, Giovanna; Russo, Luciana; Di Carlo, Antonio; Guglielmi, Floranna; Manghisi, Andrea; Lolli, Ivan; Caruso, Maria L; Simone, Cristiano

    2018-04-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations in one of the mismatch repair genes ( MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) or in the EPCAM gene. Lynch syndrome is defined on the basis of clinical, pathological, and genetic findings. Accordingly, the identification of predisposing genes allows for accurate risk assessment and tailored screening protocols. Here, we report a family case with three family members manifesting the Lynch syndrome phenotype, all of which harbor the rare variant c.2635-2A>G affecting the splice site consensus sequence of intron 15 of the MSH2 gene. This mutation was previously described only in one family with Lynch syndrome, in which mismatch repair protein expression in tumor tissues was not assessed. In this study, we report for the first time the molecular characterization of the MSH2 c.2635-2A>G variant through in silico prediction analysis, microsatellite instability, and mismatch repair protein expression experiments on tumor tissues of Lynch syndrome patients. The potential effect of the splice site variant was revealed by three splicing prediction bioinformatics tools, which suggested the generation of a new cryptic splicing site. The potential pathogenic role of this variant was also revealed by the presence of microsatellite instability and the absence of MSH2/MSH6 heterodimer protein expression in the tumor cells of cancer tissues of the affected family members. We provide compelling evidence in favor of the pathogenic role of the MSH2 variant c.2635-2A>G, which could induce an alteration of the canonical splice site and consequently an aberrant form of the protein product (MSH2).

  6. Mutation of CDH23, encoding a new member of the cadherin gene family, causes Usher syndrome type 1D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolz, H; von Brederlow, B; Ramírez, A; Bryda, E C; Kutsche, K; Nothwang, H G; Seeliger, M; del C-Salcedó Cabrera, M; Vila, M C; Molina, O P; Gal, A; Kubisch, C

    2001-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I (USH1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction and visual impairment due to early onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP). So far, six loci (USH1A-USH1F) have been mapped, but only two USH1 genes have been identified: MYO7A for USH1B and the gene encoding harmonin for USH1C. We identified a Cuban pedigree linked to the locus for Usher syndrome type 1D (MIM 601067) within the q2 region of chromosome 10). Affected individuals present with congenital deafness and a highly variable degree of retinal degeneration. Using a positional candidate approach, we identified a new member of the cadherin gene superfamily, CDH23. It encodes a protein of 3,354 amino acids with a single transmembrane domain and 27 cadherin repeats. In the Cuban family, we detected two different mutations: a severe course of the retinal disease was observed in individuals homozygous for what is probably a truncating splice-site mutation (c.4488G-->C), whereas mild RP is present in individuals carrying the homozygous missense mutation R1746Q. A variable expression of the retinal phenotype was seen in patients with a combination of both mutations. In addition, we identified two mutations, Delta M1281 and IVS51+5G-->A, in a German USH1 patient. Our data show that different mutations in CDH23 result in USH1D with a variable retinal phenotype. In an accompanying paper, it is shown that mutations in the mouse ortholog cause disorganization of inner ear stereocilia and deafness in the waltzer mouse.

  7. Pigmentary Markers in Danes--Associations with Quantitative Skin Colour, Nevi Count, Familial Atypical Multiple-Mole, and Melanoma Syndrome.

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    Peter Johansen

    Full Text Available To investigate whether pigmentation genes involved in the melanogenic pathway (melanogenesis contributed to melanoma predisposition, we compared pigmentary genetics with quantitative skin pigmentation measurements, the number of atypical nevi, the total nevus count, and the familial atypical multiple mole and melanoma (FAMMM syndrome. We typed 32 pigmentary SNP markers and sequenced MC1R in 246 healthy individuals and 116 individuals attending periodic control for malignant melanoma development, 50 of which were diagnosed with FAMMM. It was observed that individuals with any two grouped MC1R variants (missense, NM_002386:c. 456C > A (p.TYR152*, or NM_002386:c.83_84insA (p.Asn29Glnfs*14 had significantly (p<0.001 lighter skin pigmentation of the upper-inner arm than those with none or one MC1R variant. We did not observe any significant association of the MC1R variants with constitutive pigmentation measured on the buttock area. We hypothesize that the effect of MC1R variants on arm pigmentation is primarily reflecting the inability to tan when subjected to UVR. A gender specific effect on skin pigmentation was also observed, and it was found that the skin pigmentation of females on average were darker than that of males (p<0.01. We conclude that MC1R variants are associated with quantitative skin colour in a lightly pigmented Danish population. We did not observe any association between any pigmentary marker and the FAMMM syndrome. We suggest that the genetics of FAMMM is not related to the genetics of the pigmentary pathway.

  8. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome in a father and daughter from a large highly inbred family: a 16-year follow-up of 59 living members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Shyamal Kumar; Kaul, Kanwar K; Hussein, Akhtar; Wilroy, Robert S; Agarwal, Kisan; Sohel, Saira

    2013-08-01

    To report the autosomal dominant inheritance of the Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome in a highly inbred family, the initiation of Torsades de Pointes, and the natural history of the syndrome based on a 16-year follow-up of the kindred. A family tree was constructed that included 66 blood relatives from three successive generations. Electrocardiograms were obtained from 59 living members including the proband, four members from a nuclear family, and 54 from the extended family. Evoked response audiometry was recorded for the proband and the nuclear family. All 59 family members were followed up regularly for 16 years. A total of 24 living members were affected--QTc: 480-680 ms. The proband had long QTc, bilateral high-tone sensorineural deafness, recurrent syncope, and Torsades de Pointes. The asymptomatic father had long QTc and unilateral high-tone sensorineural deafness that involved specifically the left ear. One asymptomatic sibling of the proband had long QTc and normal hearing. The mother and another sibling were asymptomatic; QTc and hearing were normal in both. A total of 21 affected members from the extended family had only long QTc, and all were asymptomatic. There were three congenitally deaf first cousins who had recurrent syncope and adrenergic-triggered sudden death. In all, seven of 10 parents had consanguineous marriage to a first cousin. Each affected offspring had at least one affected parent. The severely symptomatic proband who received only β-blocker therapy and the 23 affected members without antiadrenergic therapy, all remained asymptomatic throughout the 16-year follow-up period. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome was inherited as autosomal dominant in this kindred. The majority of the affected members had a mild phenotype. The severity of auditory and cardiac phenotypes corresponded.

  9. Familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome are different manifestations of the same disease: novel missense mutations in GALNT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Leo; Joseph, Selvanayagam; Hing, Sandra N.; Idowu, Bernadine D.; Delaney, David; Presneau, Nadege; O'Donnell, Paul; Diss, Tim; Flanagan, Adrienne Margaret

    2010-01-01

    To report on the biochemistry and clinical and genetic findings of two siblings, the younger sister presenting with recurrent bone pain of the radius and ulna, and medullary sclerosis, and the older brother with soft tissue calcific deposits (tumoral calcinosis) but who later developed bone pain. Both were found to be hyperphosphaturic. The index family comprised four individuals (father, mother, brother, sister). The affected siblings were the offspring of a non-consanguineous Indian family of Tamil origin. Bidirectional sequencing was performed on the DNA from the index family and on 160 alleles from a population of 80 unrelated unaffected control individuals of Tamil extraction and 72 alleles from individuals of non-Tamil origin. Two symptomatic siblings were found to harbour previously unreported compound heterozygous missense UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 (GalNAc-transferase; GALNT3) mutations in exon 4 c.842A>G and exon 5 c.1097T>G. This sequence variation was not detected in the control DNA. This is the first report of siblings exhibiting stigmata of familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome with documented evidence of autosomal recessive missense GALNT3 mutations. The findings from this family add further evidence to the literature that familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome are manifestations of the same disease and highlight the importance of appropriate metabolic and genetic investigations. (orig.)

  10. Familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome are different manifestations of the same disease: novel missense mutations in GALNT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Leo; Joseph, Selvanayagam [Vinodhagan Memorial Hospital and Dr. Joseph' s Ortho Clinic, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Thanjavur (India); Hing, Sandra N.; Idowu, Bernadine D.; Delaney, David [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Histopathology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Presneau, Nadege [University College London (UCL), Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom); O' Donnell, Paul [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London (UCL), Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, Stanmore (United Kingdom); University College London (UCL), The Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, London (United Kingdom); Diss, Tim [University College London Hospital (UCLH) NHS Trust, Rockefeller Building, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Flanagan, Adrienne Margaret [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Histopathology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London (UCL), Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital (UCLH) NHS Trust, Rockefeller Building, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); University College London (UCL), Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    To report on the biochemistry and clinical and genetic findings of two siblings, the younger sister presenting with recurrent bone pain of the radius and ulna, and medullary sclerosis, and the older brother with soft tissue calcific deposits (tumoral calcinosis) but who later developed bone pain. Both were found to be hyperphosphaturic. The index family comprised four individuals (father, mother, brother, sister). The affected siblings were the offspring of a non-consanguineous Indian family of Tamil origin. Bidirectional sequencing was performed on the DNA from the index family and on 160 alleles from a population of 80 unrelated unaffected control individuals of Tamil extraction and 72 alleles from individuals of non-Tamil origin. Two symptomatic siblings were found to harbour previously unreported compound heterozygous missense UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 (GalNAc-transferase; GALNT3) mutations in exon 4 c.842A>G and exon 5 c.1097T>G. This sequence variation was not detected in the control DNA. This is the first report of siblings exhibiting stigmata of familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome with documented evidence of autosomal recessive missense GALNT3 mutations. The findings from this family add further evidence to the literature that familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome are manifestations of the same disease and highlight the importance of appropriate metabolic and genetic investigations. (orig.)

  11. Two co-existing germline mutations P53 V157D and PMS2 R20Q promote tumorigenesis in a familial cancer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuoyun; Sun, Yihua; Gao, Bin; Lu, Yi; Fang, Rong; Gao, Yijun; Xiao, Tian; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Pao, William; Zhao, Yun; Chen, Haiquan; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations are responsible for familial cancer syndromes which account for approximately 5-10% of all types of cancers. These mutations mainly occur at tumor suppressor genes or genome stability genes, such as DNA repair genes. Here we have identified a cancer predisposition family, in which eight members were inflicted with a wide spectrum of cancer including one diagnosed with lung cancer at 22years old. Sequencing analysis of tumor samples as well as histologically normal specimens identified two germline mutations co-existing in the familial cancer syndrome, the mutation of tumor suppressor gene P53 V157D and mismatch repair gene PMS2 R20Q. We further demonstrate that P53 V157D and/or PMS2 R20Q mutant promotes lung cancer cell proliferation. These two mutants are capable of promoting colony formation in soft agar as well as tumor formation in transgenic drosophila system. Collectively, these data have uncovered the important role of co-existing germline P53 and PMS2 mutations in the familial cancer syndrome development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inherited STING-activating mutation underlies a familial inflammatory syndrome with lupus-like manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremiah, Nadia; Neven, Bénédicte; Gentili, Matteo; Callebaut, Isabelle; Maschalidi, Sophia; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Goudin, Nicolas; Frémond, Marie-Louis; Nitschke, Patrick; Molina, Thierry J; Blanche, Stéphane; Picard, Capucine; Rice, Gillian I; Crow, Yanick J; Manel, Nicolas; Fischer, Alain; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2014-12-01

    Innate immunity to viral infection involves induction of the type I IFN response; however, dysfunctional regulation of this pathway leads to inappropriate inflammation. Here, we evaluated a nonconsanguineous family of mixed European descent, with 4 members affected by systemic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, including lupus, with variable clinical expression. We identified a germline dominant gain-of-function mutation in TMEM173, which encodes stimulator of type I IFN gene (STING), in the affected individuals. STING is a key signaling molecule in cytosolic DNA-sensing pathways, and STING activation normally requires dimerization, which is induced by 2'3' cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) produced by the cGAMP synthase in response to cytosolic DNA. Structural modeling supported constitutive activation of the mutant STING protein based on stabilized dimerization. In agreement with the model predictions, we found that the STING mutant spontaneously localizes in the Golgi of patient fibroblasts and is constitutively active in the absence of exogenous 2'3'-cGAMP in vitro. Accordingly, we observed elevated serum IFN activity and a type I IFN signature in peripheral blood from affected family members. These findings highlight the key role of STING in activating both the innate and adaptive immune responses and implicate aberrant STING activation in features of human lupus.

  13. Familial recurrence of SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome: phenotypically normal mother with two affected daughters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Adele; Bardakjian, Tanya M; Zhou, Jie; Hughes, Nkecha; Keep, Rosanne; Dorsainville, Darnelle; Kherani, Femida; Katowitz, James; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Hummel, Marybeth; Fitzpatrick, David R; Young, Terri L

    2008-11-01

    The SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome is emerging as a clinically recognizable disorder that has been identified in 10-15% of individuals with bilateral anophthalmia. Extra-ocular anomalies are common. The majority of SOX2 mutations identified appear to arise de novo in probands ascertained through the presence of anophthalmia or microphthalmia. In this report, we describe two sisters with bilateral anophthalmia/microphthalmia, brain anomalies and a novel heterozygous SOX2 gene single-base pair nucleotide deletion, c.551delC, which predicts p.Pro184ArgfsX19. The hypothetical protein product is predicted to lead to haploinsufficient SOX2 function. Mosaicism for this mutation in the SOX2 gene was also identified in their clinically unaffected mother in peripheral blood DNA. Thus it cannot be assumed that all SOX2 mutations in individuals with anophthalmia/microphthalmia are de novo. Testing of parents is indicated when a SOX2 mutation is identified in a proband. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. High incidence of large deletions in the PMS2 gene in Spanish Lynch syndrome families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea-Fernández, A J; Cameselle-Teijeiro, J M; Alenda, C; Fernández-Rozadilla, C; Cubiella, J; Clofent, J; Reñé, J M; Anido, U; Milá, M; Balaguer, F; Castells, A; Castellvi-Bel, S; Jover, R; Carracedo, A; Ruiz-Ponte, C

    2014-06-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by germline mutations in one of the four mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Defects in this pathway lead to microsatellite instability (MSI) in DNA tumors, which constitutes the molecular hallmark of this disease. Selection of patients for genetic testing in LS is usually based on fulfillment of diagnostic clinical criteria (i.e. Amsterdam criteria or the revised Bethesda guidelines). However, following these criteria PMS2 mutations have probably been underestimated as their penetrances appear to be lower than those of the other MMR genes. The use of universal MMR study-based strategies, using MSI testing and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, is being one proposed alternative. Besides, germline mutation detection in PMS2 is complicated by the presence of highly homologous pseudogenes. Nevertheless, specific amplification of PMS2 by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the improvement of the analysis of large deletions/duplications by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) overcome this difficulty. By using both approaches, we analyzed 19 PMS2-suspected carriers who have been selected by clinical or universal strategies and found five large deletions and one frameshift mutation in PMS2 in six patients (31%). Owing to the high incidence of large deletions found in our cohort, we recommend MLPA analysis as the first-line method for searching germline mutations in PMS2. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [Prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome in 4 family practices in Leiden].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, R G; de Waal, M W; Opmeer, C; Petri, H; Springer, M P

    1997-08-02

    To determine the prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in general practice. Descriptive. General practice and primary health care centres in Leyden region, the Netherlands. RNUH-LEO is a computerized database which contains the anonymous patient information of one general practice (with two practitioners) and four primary health care centres. The fourteen participating general practitioners were asked what International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC) code they used to indicate a patient with chronic fatigue or with CFS. With these codes and with the code for depression patients were selected from the database. It then was determined whether these patients met the criteria of CFS by Holmes et al. The general practitioners used 10 codes. Including the code for depression a total of 601 patients were preselected from a total of 23,000 patients in the database. Based on the information from the patients' records in the database, 42 of the preselected patients were selected who might fulfill the Holmes' criteria of CFS. According to the patients' own general practitioner, 25 of the 42 patients would fulfil the Holmes' criteria. The men:women ratio was 1:5. The prevalence of CFS in the population surveyed was estimated to be at least 1.1 per 1,000 patients.

  16. A novel mutation in the MYO7A gene is associated with Usher syndrome type 1 in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoguang; Peng, Qi; Li, Siping; Zhu, Pengyuan; Wu, Chunqiu; Rao, Chunbao; Lin, Jingqi; Lu, Xiaomei

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the genetic causes of hearing loss in a Chinese proband with autosomal recessive congenital deafness. The targeted capture of 159 known deafness genes and next-generation sequencing were performed to study the genetic causes of hearing loss in the Chinese family. Sanger sequencing was employed to verify the variant mutations in members of this family. The proband harbored two mutations in the MYO7A gene in the form of compound heterozygosity. She was found to be heterozygous for a novel insertion mutation c.3847_3848 ins TCTG (p.N1285LfsX24) in exon 30 and for the known mutation c.2239_2240delAG (p.R747S fsX16)in exon 19. The novel mutation was absent in the 1000 Genomes Project. These variants were carried in the heterozygous state by the parents and were therefore co-segregated with the genetic disease. Clinical re-assessment, including detailed audiologic and ocular examinations, revealed congenital deafness and retinitis pigmentosa in the proband. Collectively, the combination of audiometric, ophthalmologic and genetic examinations successfully confirmed the phenotype of Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1). This study demonstrates that the novel mutation c.3847_3848insTCTG (p. N1285LfsX24) in compound heterozygosity with c.2239_2240delAG in the MYO7A gene is the main cause of USH1 in the proband. Our study expands the mutational spectrum of MYO7A and provides a foundation for further investigations elucidating the MYO7A-related mechanisms of USH1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Single TCR-Vβ2 evaluation discloses the circulating T cell clone in Sezary syndrome: one family fits all!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Enrico; Abeni, Damiano; Pomponi, Debora; Russo, Nicoletta; Russo, Giandomenico; Narducci, Maria Grazia

    2015-08-01

    Sézary Syndrome (SS/L-CTCL) is a rare but aggressive variant of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), characterized by erythroderma, lymphadenopathy, and the presence of a circulating memory CD4(+) T cell malignant clone with a skin homing behavior, lacking CD26 and CD49d and over-expressing CD60. The availability of a panel of monoclonal antibodies recognizing distinct TCR-Vβ families, allows to typify the clone by flow cytometry in about 70 % of cases. The TCR-Vβ repertoire of 533 individuals, comprising 308 patients affected by CTCL, 50 healthy donors, and subjects affected by various non-neoplastic dermatological affections was evaluated by flow cytometry. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical software package for Microsoft Windows (SPSS, version 21, Chicago, IL). TCR-Vβ2 levels below 5.4 % or above 39.5 %, within total CD4(+) T cells, showed the best balance between sensitivity (98.1 %) and specificity (96 %) to identify the presence of a clone in the peripheral blood of patients affected by SS. Based on this observation, a "two-step" procedure in the detection of the malignant T cell clone in CTCLs is herein suggested. TCR-Vβ2 assessment in all cases (first step). In the case of TCR-Vβ2 levels above 39.5 %, the presence of a clonal expansion of this family is suggested, deserving further confirmation by means of T cell gene rearrangement evaluation. In patients having a TCR-Vβ2 reactivity below 5.4 % (second step), the entire TCR-Vβ repertoire should be evaluated to typify the expanded clone. In conclusion, the single TCR-Vβ2 expression check, instead of the entire repertoire assessment, represents an easy and cost-effective method for the recognition of CTCL aggressive leukemic variant.

  18. [Metabolic syndrome prevalence in Chilean children and adolescent with family history of chronic noncommunicable diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Raquel; Atalah, Eduardo; Leiva, Laura; Rojas, Pamela; Maza, María Pía de la; Vásquez, Fabian; Lera, Lydia; Díaz, Erick

    2012-06-01

    Family history (FH+) of non transmisible chronic diseases (NTCD) increase MetS risk. In Chile, the MetS affects 27% of overweight children, and fasting hyperglycemia is very low prevalent (4,0%). The objective was to study the prevalence of MetS and the cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in overweight children with a family background of NTCD and analyze its association with the number of relatives witth NTCD and with parental history (PH). In 183 overweight children (BMI > or = p85) mean age 11,8 +/- 1,8 (86 males) with a FH+ (parental or grandparental) of NTCD, were assessed the BMI z (CDC / NCHS), waist circumference, blood arterial pressure, fasting Glucose and Insulin (RIA), triglycerides, HDL chol. The MetS and the CVRF were diagnosed using the Cook phenotype and the insulin resistance (IR) through the HOMA-IR. Chi2, ANOVA, t Student and Willcoxon test were performed. The frequency of FH+ of DM2, hypertension and dyslipidemia were 81,4%, 88,0% and 71,6 % respectively. The MeTS prevalence was 46,5 % associated to overweight magnitude an parental history of NTCD. The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia was 54,6%, while fasting hyperglycemia affected 31,4% of the sample. There was no association between number of relatives with NTCD and CV risk profile. We conclude that in overweight children with FH+ of NTCD, the prevalence of MetS, dyslipidemia and fasting hyperglycemia are significantly higher, than those observed in the general population of obese children.

  19. CDH23 Mutation and Phenotype Heterogeneity: A Profile of 107 Diverse Families with Usher Syndrome and Nonsyndromic Deafness

    OpenAIRE

    Astuto, L. M.; Bork, J. M.; Weston, M. D.; Askew, J. W.; Fields, R. R.; Orten, D. J.; Ohliger, S. J.; Riazuddin, S.; Morell, R. J.; Khan, S.; Riazuddin, S.; Kremer, H.; van Hauwe, P.; Moller, C. G.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deaf...

  20. CDH23 mutation and phenotype heterogeneity: a profile of 107 diverse families with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic deafness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astuto, L.M.; Bork, J.M.; Weston, M.D.; Askew, J.W.; Fields, R.R.; Orten, D.J.; Ohliger, S.J.; Riazuddin, S.; Morell, R.J.; Khan, S.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Hauwe, P. van; Moller, C.G.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Ayuso, C.; Heckenlively, J.R.; Rohrschneider, K.; Spandau, U.; Greenberg, J.; Ramesar, R.S.; Reardon, W.; Bitoun, P.; Millan, J.; Legge, R.; Friedman, T.B.; Kimberling, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness

  1. Insulin-resistance and metabolic syndrome are related to executive function in women in a large family-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuur, M; Henneman, P; van Swieten, J C; Zillikens, M C; de Koning, I; Janssens, A C J W; Witteman, J C M; Aulchenko, Y S; Frants, R R; Oostra, B A; van Dijk, K Willems; van Duijn, C M

    2010-08-01

    While type 2 diabetes is well-known to be associated with poorer cognitive performance, few studies have reported on the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and contributing factors, such as insulin-resistance (HOMA-IR), low adiponectin-, and high C-reactive protein (CRP)-levels. We studied whether these factors are related to cognitive function and which of the MetS components are independently associated. The study was embedded in an ongoing family-based cohort study in a Dutch population. All participants underwent physical examinations, biomedical measurements, and neuropsychological testing. Linear regression models were used to determine the association between MetS, HOMA-IR, adiponectin levels, CRP, and cognitive test scores. Cross-sectional analyses were performed in 1,898 subjects (mean age 48 years, 43% men). People with MetS had significantly higher HOMA-IR scores, lower adiponectin levels, and higher CRP levels. MetS and high HOMA-IR were associated with poorer executive function in women (P = 0.03 and P = 0.009). MetS and HOMA-IR are associated with poorer executive function in women.

  2. A novel mutation of the MITF gene in a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 2: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfang; Li, Xiaozhou; Ju, Duan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiuling; Zhang, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with varying degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, and accumulation of pigmentation in hair, skin and iris. There are four types of WS (WS1-4) with differing characteristics. Mutations in six genes [paired box gene 3 ( PAX3 ), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor ( MITF ), endothelin 3 ( END3 ), endothelin receptor type B ( EDNRB ), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 10 ( SOX10 ) and snail homolog 2 ( SNAI2 )] have been identified to be associated with the various types. This case report describes the investigation of genetic mutations in three patients with WS2 from a single family. Genomic DNA was extracted, and the six WS-related genes were sequenced using next-generation sequencing technology. In addition to mutations in PAX3, EDNRB and SOX10, a novel heterozygous MITF mutation, p.Δ315Arg (c.944_946delGAA) on exon 8 was identified. This is predicted to be a candidate disease-causing mutation that may affect the structure and function of the enzyme.

  3. Caspase Activation and Aberrant Cell Growth in a p53+/+ Cell Line from a Li-Fraumeni Syndrome Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki A. Sherif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild-type p53 is well known to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis to block aberrant cell growth. However, p53’s unique role in apoptosis and cell proliferation in Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS has not been well elucidated. The aim of this study is to characterize the activity of wild-type p53 protein in LFS family dominated by a germline negative mutant p53. As expected, etoposide-treated wild-type p53-containing cell lines, LFS 2852 and control Jurkat, showed a greater rate of caspase- and annexin V-induced apoptotic cell death compared to the p53-mutant LFS 2673 cell line although mitochondrial and nuclear assays could not detect apoptosis in these organelles. The most intriguing part of the observation was the abnormal proliferation rate of the wild-type p53-containing cell line, which grew twice as fast as 2673 and Jurkat cells. This is important because apoptosis inducers acting through the mitochondrial death pathway are emerging as promising drugs against tumors where the role of p53 is not only to target gene regulation but also to block cell proliferation. This study casts a long shadow on the possible dysregulation of p53 mediators that enable cell proliferation. The deregulation of proliferation pathways represents an important anticancer therapeutic strategy for patients with the LFS phenotype.

  4. Genetic syndromes in the family : child characteristics and parenting stress in Angelman, CHARGE, Cornelia de Lange, Prader-Willi, and Rett syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulffaert, Josette

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the dissertation: To expand the knowledge on the behavioural phenotypes, level of parenting stress and the relationship between child characteristics and parenting stress in five genetic syndromes. The included syndromes are Angelman, CHARGE, Cornelia de Lange, Prader-Willi, and Rett

  5. Family-based risk reduction of obesity and metabolic syndrome: an overview and outcomes of the Idaho Partnership for Hispanic Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Rachel; Powell, Linda; Keifer, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Mexican American women have the highest incidence of metabolic syndrome among all U.S. demographic groups. This paper details an innovative approach to reducing the risks for metabolic syndrome among Hispanic families in rural Idaho. Compañeros en Salud (CeS) is a promotora-led wellness program and community-based participatory research project from the Idaho Partnership for Hispanic Health. As behavior change is the first line of prevention and treatment of obesity and metabolic syndrome, the program aimed to improve nutrition and physical activity behaviors as well as increase community support and infrastructure for healthy living. CeS has demonstrated substantial improvement in health outcomes, with statistically significant reductions in weight, BMI, metabolic syndrome risk, A1c, glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol, from pre-intervention to post-intervention and/or pre-intervention to one-year follow-up. These outcomes suggest the CeS model as a promising best practice for effecting individual and family-level physiologic and behavioral outcomes for obesity prevention.

  6. Rapidly progressive renal disease as part of Wolfram syndrome in a large inbred Turkish family due to a novel WFS1 mutation (p.Leu511Pro).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuca, Sevil Ari; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Boulahbel, Houda; Lodahl, Marianne; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Cesur, Yasar; Dogan, Murat; Yilmaz, Cahide; Akgun, Cihangir; Acikgoz, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome, also named "DIDMOAD" (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness), is an inherited association of juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy as key diagnostic criteria. Renal tract abnormalities and neurodegenerative disorder may occur in the third and fourth decade. The wolframin gene, WFS1, associated with this syndrome, is located on chromosome 4p16.1. Many mutations have been described since the identification of WFS1 as the cause of Wolfram syndrome. We identified a new homozygous WFS1 mutation (c.1532T>C; p.Leu511Pro) causing Wolfram syndrome in a large inbred Turkish family. The patients showed early onset of IDDM, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, sensorineural hearing impairment and very rapid progression to renal failure before age 12 in three females. Ectopic expression of the wolframin mutant in HEK cells results in greatly reduced levels of protein expression compared to wild-type wolframin, strongly supporting that this mutation is disease-causing. The mutation showed perfect segregation with disease in the family, characterized by early and severe clinical manifestations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Two family members with a syndrome of headache and rash caused by human parvovirus B19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos M. Pereira

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 infection can cause erythema infectiosum (EI and several other clinical presentations. Central nervous system (CNS involvement is rare, and only a few reports of encephalitis and aseptic meningitis have been published. Here, we describe 2 cases of B19 infection in a family presenting different clinical features. A 30 year old female with a 7-day history of headache, malaise, myalgias, joint pains, and rash was seen. Physical examination revealed a maculopapular rash on the patient's body, and arthritis of the hands. She completely recovered in 1 week. Two days before, her 6 year old son had been admitted to a clinic with a 1-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and vomiting. On admission, he was alert, and physical examination revealed neck stiffness, Kerning and Brudzinski signs, and a petechial rash on his trunk and extremities. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal. He completely recovered in 5 days. Acute and convalescent sera of both patients were positive for specific IgM antibody to B19. Human parvovirus B19 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis, particularly during outbreaks of erythema infectiosum. The disease may mimic meningococcemia and bacterial meningitis.

  8. Report of Chinese family with severe dermatitis, multiple allergies and metabolic wasting syndrome caused by novel homozygous desmoglein-1 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ruhong; Yan, Ming; Ni, Cheng; Zhang, Jia; Li, Ming; Yao, Zhirong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, homozygous mutations in the desmoglein-1 (DSG1) gene and heterozygous mutation in the desmoplakin (DSP) gene have been demonstrated to be associated with severe dermatitis, multiple allergies and metabolic wasting (SAM) syndrome (Mendelian Inheritance in Man no. 615508). We aim to identify the molecular basis for a Chinese pedigree of SAM syndrome. A Chinese pedigree of SAM syndrome was subjected to mutation detection in the DSG1 gene. Sequence analysis of the DSG1 gene and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis for gene expression of DSG1 using cDNA derived from the epidermis of patients and controls were both performed. Skin biopsies were also taken from patients for pathological study and transmission electron microscopy observation. Novel homozygous splicing mutation c.1892-1delG in the exon-intron border of the DSG1 gene has been demonstrated to be associated with SAM syndrome. We report a new family of SAM syndrome of Asian decent and expand the spectrum of mutations in the DSG1 gene. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  9. Familial Investigations of Childhood Cancer Predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-03

    Acute Leukemia; Adenomatous Polyposis; Adrenocortical Carcinoma; AML; BAP1 Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Carney Complex; Choroid Plexus Carcinoma; Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; DICER1 Syndrome; Dyskeratosis Congenita; Emberger Syndrome; Familial Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Fanconi Anemia; Familial Cancer; Familial Wilms Tumor; Familial Neuroblastoma; GIST; Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma-Pheochromocytoma Syndrome; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Juvenile Polyposis; Li-Fraumeni Syndrome; Lynch Syndrome; MDS; Melanoma Syndrome; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2; Neuroblastoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1; Neurofibromatosis Type II; Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome; Non Hodgkin Lymphoma; Noonan Syndrome and Other Rasopathy; Overgrowth Syndromes; Pancreatic Cancer; Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome; Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma; PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome; Retinoblastoma; Rhabdoid Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome; Tuberous Sclerosis; Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

  10. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person cured of Cushing’s syndrome might have some memory loss and slight mental decline. But the change is ... Categories: Family Health, Infants and Toddlers, Kids and Teens, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: acth, adenomas, hormone, sickness September ...

  11. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to abnormal development of the vestibular hair cells, sensory cells that detect gravity and head movement. RP ... 3 Ben-Rebeh, I., et al. (2016). Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: ...

  12. Burnout Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Panov, Nenad; Stojanov, H; Sumanov, Gorgi; Panova, Blagica; Stojanovski, Angel; Nikolovska, Lence; Jovevska, Svetlana; Trajanovski, D; Asanova, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing work responsibilities, allocation of duties, loss of energy and motivation in everyday activities, emotional exhaustion, lack of time for themselves, insuffi cient time for rest and recreation, dissatisfaction in private life. All these symptoms can be cause of Burnout Syndrome. Aim: To see the importance of this syndrome, the consequences of job dissatisfaction, the environment, family and expression in drastic chan...

  13. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type, Is Linked to Chromosome 8p22-8p21.1 in an Extended Belgian Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delfien Syx

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint hypermobility is a common, mostly benign, finding in the general population. In a subset of individuals, however, it causes a range of clinical problems, mainly affecting the musculoskeletal system. Joint hypermobility often appears as a familial trait and is shared by several heritable connective tissue disorders, including the hypermobility subtype of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS-HT or benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS. These hereditary conditions provide unique models for the study of the genetic basis of joint hypermobility. Nevertheless, these studies are largely hampered by the great variability in clinical presentation and the often vague mode of inheritance in many families. Here, we performed a genome-wide linkage scan in a unique three-generation family with an autosomal dominant EDS-HT phenotype and identified a linkage interval on chromosome 8p22-8p21.1, with a maximum two-point LOD score of 4.73. Subsequent whole exome sequencing revealed the presence of a unique missense variant in the LZTS1 gene, located within the candidate region. Subsequent analysis of 230 EDS-HT/BJHS patients resulted in the identification of three additional rare variants. This is the first reported genome-wide linkage analysis in an EDS-HT family, thereby providing an opportunity to identify a new disease gene for this condition.

  14. A novel mutation in the MITF may be digenic with GJB2 mutations in a large Chinese family of Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xukun; Zhang, Tianyu; Wang, Zhengmin; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Yan; Wang, Hongyan; Ma, Duan; Wang, Lei; Li, Huawei

    2011-12-20

    Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) is associated with syndromic deafness. A subset of WS2, WS2A, accounting for approximately 15% of patients, is attributed to mutations in the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene. We examined the genetic basis of WS2 in a large Chinese family. All 9 exons of the MITF gene, the single coding exon (exon 2) of the most common hereditary deafness gene GJB2 and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 12S rRNA were sequenced. A novel heterozygous mutation c.[742_743delAAinsT;746_747delCA] in exon 8 of the MITF gene co-segregates with WS2 in the family. The MITF mutation results in a premature termination codon and a truncated MITF protein with only 247 of the 419 wild type amino acids. The deaf proband had this MITF gene heterozygous mutation as well as a c.[109G>A]+[235delC] compound heterozygous pathogenic mutation in the GJB2 gene. No pathogenic mutation was found in mtDNA 12S rRNA in this family. Thus, a novel compound heterozygous mutation, c.[742_743delAAinsT;746_747delCA] in MITF exon 8 was the key genetic reason for WS2 in this family, and a digenic effect of MITF and GJB2 genes may contribute to deafness of the proband. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Families with children with Down syndrome in a situation of economic crisis and social and moralchange [Rodziny z dzieckiem z zespołem Downa w sytuacji kryzysu ekonomicznego, przemian społecznych i obyczajowych

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Maria MINCZAKIEWICZ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of this comparison is an attempt to present the life situation and the quality of the functioning of families with a child with Down syndrome against the background of the statistical situation of Polish families raising a child with normal development of a comparable age. The aim of the study was to answer the following questions: — Are there impacts and, if so, to what extent of the coming into the world and the existence of a family of a child with Down syndrome on the organization and the standard of living and in the family ties and cohesion among its members? — Whether and to what extent the situation of families with a child with Down syndrome is different from that of ordinary, contemporary Polish families? As a basis for these studies the diagnostic survey method was used, which was subordinated to the techniques of observation, targeted interviews and intelligence. The empirical material was collected using several tools (mostly drawn from the planned research program. The study included 186 families, including 86 (46.2% of families with a child with Down’s syndrome (primary group – P and 100 (53.8% of families statistical reference (control group – K. The results were empirical and statistical verification in order to develop on the basis of their importance to the practice of generalizations and conclusions.

  16. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization and Treatment of a Cohort with Familial Tumoral Calcinosis/Hyperostosis-Hyperphosphatemia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnitz, Mary Scott; Gourh, Pravitt; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Wodajo, Felasfa; Ichikawa, Shoji; Econs, Michael J.; White, Kenneth; Molinolo, Alfredo; Chen, Marcus Y.; Heller, Theo; Del Rivero, Jaydira; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; Arabshahi, Bita; Jackson, Malaka B.; Hatab, Sarah; McCarthy, Edward; Guthrie, Lori C.; Brillante, Beth A.; Gafni, Rachel I.; Collins, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Familial tumoral calcinosis (FTC)/hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome (HHS) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the genes encoding fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 (GALNT3), or KLOTHO. The result is functional deficiency of, or resistance to, intact FGF23 (iFGF23), causing hyperphosphatemia, increased renal tubular reabsorption of phosphorus (TRP), elevated or inappropriately normal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), ectopic calcifications and/or diaphyseal hyperostosis. Eight subjects with FTC/HHS were studied and treated. Clinical manifestations varied, even within families, ranging from asymptomatic to large, disabling calcifications. All subjects had hyperphosphatemia, increased TRP, and elevated or inappropriately normal 1,25D. C-terminal FGF23 was markedly elevated while iFGF23 was comparatively low, consistent with increased FGF23 cleavage. Radiographs ranged from diaphyseal hyperostosis to massive calcification. Two subjects with severe calcifications also had overwhelming systemic inflammation and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP). GALNT3 mutations were identified in 7 subjects; no causative mutation was found in the eighth. Biopsies from 4 subjects showed ectopic calcification and chronic inflammation, with areas of heterotopic ossification observed in 1 subject. Treatment with low phosphate diet, phosphate binders, and phosphaturia-inducing therapies was prescribed with variable response. One subject experienced complete resolution of a calcific mass after 13 months of medical treatment. In the 2 subjects with systemic inflammation, interleukin-1 (IL-1) antagonists significantly decreased CRP levels with resolution of calcinosis cutis and peri-lesional inflammation in one subject and improvement of overall well-being in both subjects. This cohort expands the phenotype and genotype of FTC/HHS and demonstrates the range of clinical manifestations despite similar biochemical profiles and genetic mutations

  17. The metabolic syndrome and risk of myocardial infarction in familial hypertension (hypertension heredity in Malmö evaluation study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorowski, Artur; Burri, Philippe; Hulthén, Lennart; Melander, Olle

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether three main definitions of the metabolic syndrome (MetS)--WHO, National Cholesterol Education Program--Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation--identify the same individuals and are able to predict incident myocardial infarction (MI) in families with essential hypertension. The tested definitions were prospectively related to data on MI in a cohort of approximately 1700 individuals with overt essential hypertension and their normotensive first-degree relatives. At baseline, 616 participants had MetS, yet only 209 of them (33.9%) were identified by all definitions, and compatibility rate for each pair of definitions was approximately 50%. During follow-up (Tmean approximately 6.6 years) 53 participants developed MI and they were generally older and more dysmetabolic than the rest of the cohort. There were also more men, smokers and diabetic individuals in this group. After adjustment for all conventional cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension and diabetes, only the National Cholesterol Education Program definition could predict the increased risk of MI [odds ratio (OR) = 2.2, confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-4.0, P = 0.01]. Among individual MetS components, incident MI was independently associated with three of them: low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (OR = 2.03, CI = 1.09-3.78, P = 0.025) insulin resistance (OR = 2.02, CI = 1.08-3.78, P = 0.028) and increased albumin excretion rate (OR = 1.24, CI = 0.99-1.55, P = 0.060). The presence of MetS in hypertensive and genetically hypertension prone individuals may signal the increased risk of future MI. However, only the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria appear to have a sufficient predictive accuracy.

  18. Epidemiological study of metabolic syndrome and risk of diabetes mellitus in a rural family medicine practice in Bacau County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaa, Alamir; Popa, Elena; Bacusca, Agnes; Traian, Maria Gabriela; Petrovanu, Rodica; Coman, Adorata Elena

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive epidemiological study included 615 subjects investigated by their family doctor in the interval October 2011- August 2012. Patients were selected according to 2012 IDF diagnostic criteria resulting 304 patients. There was a Gaussian distribution of waist circumference (WC) with a maximum in age-group 70-80 years (46.3%), followed by age- groups 50-60 years (37.8%) and 60-70 years (41.6%). Waist circumference measurement showed an average of 100.76 +/- 11.59 cm, ranges 72 cm - 134 cm, without statistical significance. Mean body mass index (BMI) was 28.25 +/- 4.72 kg/m2 vs. 27.79 +/- 4.48 kg/m2. The difference is statistically significant (p = 0.05). Considering categorical the patients with hypertension (AHT) according to the definition, we found that only 7 cases did not have AHT (4.4%) as compared to a prevalence of AHT of 13.7% in the MS (metabolic syndrome) group. Mean serum triglyceride level was 123.11 +/- 68.55 mg/dl versus 113.75 +/- 65.62 mg/dl in the MS group, significantly higher (p < 0.003). Mean HDL cholesterol was 57.58 +/- 17.11 mg/dl versus 58.54 +/- 15.02 mg/dl, statistically significant difference (p < 0.05). The prevalence of glucoregulation disorders is higher in the MS group. Proportional relationships were found between BMI, WC, and SBP and high blood glucose. Comparison of blood glucose levels at baseline and at 1 year follow up showed significant differences.

  19. Diversity of metabolic syndrome criteria in association with cardiovascular diseases--a family medicine-based investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezić-Lalić, Dragica; Bergman Marković, Biserka; Kranjčević, Ksenija; Kern, Josipa; Vrdoljak, Davorka; Vučak, Jasna

    2013-07-12

    This study compared the association between the 3 definitions of metabolic syndrome (MetS) suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO), National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCEP ATP III), and International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and shows the prevalence and characteristics of persons with MetS in continental vs. coastal regions and rural vs. urban residence in Croatia. A prospective multicenter study was conducted on 3245 participants≥40 years, who visited general practices from May to July 2008 for any reason. This was a cross-sectional study of the Cardiovascular Risk and Intervention Study in Croatia-family medicine project (ISRCTN31857696). All analyzed MetS definitions showed an association with CVD, but the strongest was shown by NCEP ATP III; coronary disease OR 2.48 (95% CI 1.80-3.82), cerebrovascular disease OR 2.14 (1.19-3.86), and peripheral artery disease OR 1.55 (1.04-2.32), especially for age and male sex. According to the NCEP ATP III (IDF), the prevalence was 38.7% (45.9%) [15.9% (18.6%) in men, and 22.7% (27.3%) in women, and 28.4% (33.9%) in the continental region, 10.2% (10.9%) in the coastal region, 26.2% (31.5%) in urban areas, and 12.4% (14.4%) in rural areas. Older age, male sex, and residence in the continental area were positively associated with MetS diagnosis according to NCEP ATP III, and current smoking and Mediterranean diet adherence have protective effects. The NCEP ATP III definition seems to provide the strongest association with CVD and should therefore be preferred for use in this population.

  20. Prevention of cold-associated acute inflammation in familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome by interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Hal M; Rosengren, Sanna; Boyle, David L; Cho, Jae Y; Nayar, Jyothi; Mueller, James L; Anderson, Justin P; Wanderer, Alan A; Firestein, Gary S

    Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by recurrent episodes of rash, arthralgia, and fever after cold exposure. The genetic basis of this disease has been elucidated. Cryopyrin, the protein that is altered in FCAS, is one of the adaptor proteins that activate caspase 1, resulting in release of interleukin 1. An experimental cold challenge protocol was developed to study the acute inflammatory mechanisms occurring after a general cold exposure in FCAS patients and to investigate the effects of pretreatment with an antagonist of interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1Ra). ELISA, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry were used to measure cytokine responses. After cold challenge, untreated patients with FCAS developed rash, fever, and arthralgias within 1-4 h. Significant increases in serum concentrations of interleukin 6 and white-blood-cell counts were seen 4-8 h after cold challenge. Serum concentrations of interleukin 1 and cytokine mRNA in peripheral-blood leucocytes were not raised, but amounts of interleukin 1 protein and mRNA were high in affected skin. IL-1Ra administered before cold challenge blocked symptoms and increases in white-blood-cell counts and serum interleukin 6. The ability of IL-1Ra to prevent the clinical features and haematological and biochemical changes in patients with FCAS indicates a central role for interleukin 1beta in this disorder. Involvement of cryopyrin in activation of caspase 1 and NF-kappaB signalling suggests that it might have a role in many chronic inflammatory diseases. These findings support a new therapy for a disorder with no previously known acceptable treatment. They also offer insights into the role of interleukin 1beta in more common inflammatory diseases.

  1. Prevalence, management, and outcomes of familial hypercholesterolemia in patients with acute coronary syndromes in the Arabian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Almahmeed, Wael; Rashed, Wafa; Ridha, Mustafa; Santos, Raul D; Zubaid, Mohammad

    2018-02-14

    Information on the epidemiology of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in the Arabian Gulf region, which has an elevated rate of consanguinity and type II diabetes, is scarce. To assess the prevalence of FH, its management, and impact on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) outcomes in a multicenter cohort of Arabian Gulf patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Patients (N = 3224) hospitalized with ACS were studied. FH was diagnosed using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network criteria. A composite endpoint of nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischemic attack, and mortality between the "probable/definite" and the "unlikely" FH patients was assessed after 1 year. Analyses were performed using univariate and multivariate statistical techniques. At admission, the proportion of "probable/definite", "possible", and "unlikely" FH in ACS patients was 3.7% (n = 119), 28% (n = 911), and 68% (n = 2194), respectively. Overall, 54% (n = 1730) of patients had diabetes, whereas 24% (n = 783) were current smokers. The "probable/definite" FH group was younger (50 vs 63 years; P definite" FH cohort had worse lipid control (13% vs 23%; P < .001) and presented with a greater association with the composite ASCVD endpoint when compared with the "unlikely" FH group (odds ratio: 1.85; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-3.38; P = .047) after multivariable adjustment. In Arabian Gulf citizens, FH was common in ACS patients, was undertreated, and was associated with a worse 1-year prognosis. Copyright © 2018 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple loss-of-function mechanisms contribute to SCN5A-related familial sick sinus syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhong Gui

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify molecular mechanisms underlying SCN5A-related sick sinus syndrome (SSS, a rare type of SSS, in parallel experiments we elucidated the electrophysiological properties and the cell surface localization of thirteen human Na(v1.5 (hNa(v1.5 mutant channels previously linked to this disease.Mutant hNa(v1.5 channels expressed by HEK293 cells and Xenopus oocytes were investigated by whole-cell patch clamp and two-microelectrode voltage clamp, respectively. HEK293 cell surface biotinylation experiments quantified the fraction of correctly targeted channel proteins. Our data suggested three distinct mutant channel subtypes: Group 1 mutants (L212P, P1298L, DelF1617, R1632H gave peak current densities and cell surface targeting indistinguishable from wild-type hNa(v1.5. Loss-of-function of these mutants resulted from altered channel kinetics, including a negative shift of steady-state inactivation and a reduced voltage dependency of open-state inactivation. Group 2 mutants (E161K, T220I, D1275N gave significantly reduced whole-cell currents due to impaired cell surface localization (D1275N, altered channel properties at unchanged cell surface localization (T220I, or a combination of both (E161K. Group 3 mutant channels were non-functional, due to an almost complete lack of protein at the plasma membrane (T187I, W1421X, K1578fs/52, R1623X or a probable gating/permeation defect with normal surface localisation (R878C, G1408R.This study indicates that multiple molecular mechanisms, including gating abnormalities, trafficking defects, or a combination of both, are responsible for SCN5A-related familial SSS.

  3. Simultaneous Occurence of an Autosomal Dominant Inherited MSX1 Mutation and an X-linked Recessive Inherited EDA Mutation in One Chinese Family with Non-syndromic Oligodontia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao Xia; Wong, Sing Wai; Han, Dong; Feng, Hai Lan

    2015-01-01

    To describe the simultaneous occurence of an autosomal dominant inherited MSX1 mutation and an X-linked recessive inherited EDA mutation in one Chinese family with nonsyndromic oligodontia. Clinical data of characteristics of tooth agenesis were collected. MSX1 and EDA gene mutations were detected in a Chinese family of non-syndromic oligodontia. Mild hypodontia in the parents and severe oligodontia in the son was recorded. A novel missense heterozygous mutation c.517C>A (p.Arg173Ser) was detected in the MSX1 gene in the boy and the father. A homozygous missense mutation c.1001G>A (p.Arg334His) was detected in the EDA gene in the boy and the same mutant occurred heterozygously in the mother. Simultaneous occurence of two different gene mutations with different inheritence patterns, which both caused oligodontia, which occurred in one subject and in one family, was reported.

  4. Screening of the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 in a Greek cohort of Lynch syndrome suspected families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thodi, Georgia; Fountzilas, George; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fostira, Florentia; Sandaltzopoulos, Raphael; Nasioulas, George; Grivas, Anastasios; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Mylonaki, Maria; Panopoulos, Christos; Magic, Mirjana Brankovic

    2010-01-01

    Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes predispose to Lynch syndrome, thus conferring a high relative risk of colorectal and endometrial cancer. The MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutational spectrum reported so far involves minor alterations scattered throughout their coding regions as well as large genomic rearrangements. Therefore, a combination of complete sequencing and a specialized technique for the detection of genomic rearrangements should be conducted during a proper DNA-testing procedure. Our main goal was to successfully identify Lynch syndrome families and determine the spectrum of MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutations in Greek Lynch families in order to develop an efficient screening protocol for the Greek colorectal cancer patients' cohort. Forty-two samples from twenty-four families, out of which twenty two of Greek, one of Cypriot and one of Serbian origin, were screened for the presence of germline mutations in the major mismatch repair genes through direct sequencing and MLPA. Families were selected upon Amsterdam criteria or revised Bethesda guidelines. Ten deleterious alterations were detected in twelve out of the twenty-four families subjected to genetic testing, thus our detection rate is 50%. Four of the pathogenic point mutations, namely two nonsense, one missense and one splice site change, are novel, whereas the detected genomic deletion encompassing exon 6 of the MLH1 gene has been described repeatedly in the LOVD database. The average age of onset for the development of both colorectal and endometrial cancer among mutation positive families is 43.2 years. The mutational spectrum of the MMR genes investigated as it has been shaped by our analysis is quite heterogeneous without any strong indication for the presence of a founder effect

  5. Psychosocial impact on families with an infant with a hypoplastic left heart syndrome during and after the interstage monitoring period - a prospective mixed-method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Gaby; Spirig, Rebecca; Stiasny, Brian; Bernet, Vera; Dave, Hitendu; Knirsch, Walter

    2017-11-01

    To investigate parents' experiences, coping ability and quality of life while monitoring their sick child with hypoplastic left heart syndrome at home. Interstage home monitoring for children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome reduces interstage mortality between Norwood stages I and II. Little is known about the psychosocial impact of interstage home monitoring. Prospective mixed-method study. This study assessed the psychosocial impact on parents during interstage home monitoring. This contains for quantitative assessment the Short Form Health Survey questionnaire and the Impact of Family Scale administered one and five weeks following discharge before and after stage II. For qualitative assessment, semi-structured interviews focussing on the postdischarge coping strategies were conducted twice, five weeks after hospital discharge before and after stage II. Ten infants (eight males) with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (n = 7) or other types of univentricular heart malformations (n = 3), and their parents (nine mother/father two-parent households, one single mother) were included. There were no interstage deaths. Mental Health Composite Summary scores were low in both parents (mothers: 40·45 ± 9·07; fathers: 40·58 ± 9·69) and lowest for the item 'vitality' (mothers: 37·0 ± 19·46; fathers: 43·12 ± 25·9) before and after stage II. Impact of Family Scale values showed higher daily and social burdens for mothers. 'Becoming a family' was the most important task as coping strategy to equilibrate the fragile emotional balance. The parents judged interstage home monitoring as a protective intervention. Although psychosocial burden before and after stage II remains high, becoming a family is an essential experience for parents and confirms their parenthood. Healthcare professionals must be aware of parents' needs during this vulnerable interstage period and to provide psychosocial and nursing support. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Smoking and colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome: Results from the Colon Cancer Family Registry and The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Mala; Lynch, Patrick M.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Gallinger, Steve; Haile, Robert W.; LeMarchand, Loic; Lindor, Noralane M.; Campbell, Peter T.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Baron, John A.; Frazier, Marsha L.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Lynch syndrome family members with inherited germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have a high risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and cases typically have tumors that exhibit a high level of microsatellite instability (MSI). There is some evidence that smoking is a risk factor for CRCs with high MSI, but the association of smoking with CRC among those with Lynch syndrome is unknown. Experimental Design A multicentered retrospective cohort of 752 carriers of pathogenic MMR gene mutations was analyzed, using a weighted Cox regression analysis, adjusting for sex, ascertainment source, the specific mutated gene, year of birth, and familial clustering. Results Compared with never smokers, current smokers had a significantly increased CRC risk (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.62; 95% CI, 1.01 – 2.57) and former smokers who had quit smoking for 2 or more years were at decreased risk (HR = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.35 – 0.82). CRC risk did not vary according to age at starting. However, light smoking (Lynch syndrome may be at increased risk of CRC if they smoke regularly. Although our data suggest that former smokers, short-term and light smokers are at decreased CRC risk, these findings need further confirmation, preferably using prospective designs. PMID:20145170

  7. Lynch syndrome-associated extracolonic tumors are rare in two extended families with the same EPCAM deletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, H.T.; Riegert-Johnson, D.L.; Snyder, C.; Lynch, J.F.; Hagenkord, J.; Boland, C.R.; Rhees, J.; Thibodeau, S.N.; Boardman, L.A.; Davies, J.; Kuiper, R.P.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited cancer syndrome showing a preponderance of colorectal cancer (CRC) in context with endometrial cancer and several other extracolonic cancers, which is due to pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. Some

  8. Mixed Bartter-Gitelman syndrome: an inbred family with a heterogeneous phenotype expression of a novel variant in the CLCNKB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shibli, Amar; Yusuf, Madinah; Abounajab, Issam; Willems, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    Patients with renal diseases associated with salt-losing tubulopathies categorized as Gitelman and classic form of Bartter syndrome have undergone genetic screening for possible mutation capture in two different genes: SLC12A3 and CLCNKB. Clinical symptoms of these two diseases may overlap. Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome are autosomal recessive salt-losing tubulopathies with hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperreninemia, hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus, hyperaldosteronism, and, in some patients, hypomagnesemia. Here we describe four patients from an inbred family with a novel missense variant in the CLCNKB gene. All of patients are asymptomatic; yet they have the typical metabolic abnormality of salt losing tubulopathies. One of those patients had hypomagnesaemia while others not. Clinical and laboratory data of all patients was described. All 4 patients have a homozygous c.490G > T missense variant in exon 5 of the CLCNKB gene. This variant alters a glycine into a cysteine on amino acid position 164 of the resulting protein (p.Gly164Cys). The c.490G > T variant is a novel variant not previously described in other patients nor controls. Polyphen analysis predicts the variation to be possibly damaging. Analysis of SLC12A3 was normal. Here in we are describing a novel homozygous c.490G > T missense variation was identified in exon 5 of the CLCNKB gene was identified in an Emirati patients with a mild manifestation of Bartter - Gitelman syndrome.

  9. Flecainide provocation reveals concealed brugada syndrome in a long QT syndrome family with a novel L1786Q mutation in SCN5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, Jørgen K.; Yuan, Lei; Hedley, Paula L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in SCN5A can result in both long QT type 3 (LQT3) and Brugada syndrome (BrS), and a few mutations have been found to have an overlapping phenotype. Long QT syndrome is characterized by prolonged QT interval, and a prerequisite for a BrS diagnosis is ST elevation in the right...... interval. The proband presented with an aborted cardiac arrest, and his mother died suddenly and unexpectedly at the age of 65. Flecainide treatment revealed coved ST elevation in all mutation carriers. Electrophysiological investigations of the mutant in HEK293 cells indicated a reduced peak current...

  10. Significant expressivity of Wolfram syndrome: phenotypic assessment of two known and one novel mutation in the WFS1 gene in three Iranian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rajab, Asadollah; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness) is a rare neurodegenerative autosomal recessive disorder. There is evidence of variable expressivity both in patients and heterozygous carriers. In this study, we describe three Persian Wolfram syndrome families with differences in the age of onset, signs and symptoms of the disease. We clinically evaluated affected families for verifying WS clinical diagnosis. After linkage analysis via 5 STR markers, molecular analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing for patients and available family members. Three homozygous mutations were identified including c.1885 C>T, c.2205C>A both in exon 8 and c.460+1G>A in intron 4. The mutation c.2205C>A was found to be novel. We report interesting phenotype-genotype correlations: homozygous c.1885C>T and c.2205C>A variants were correlated with quite different disease severity and onset in the siblings. We report a rare case of WS with homozygous c.1885C>T who is married and has a healthy child. c.460+1G>A showed a possible partial dominant inheritance put forth by a heterozygous parent showing partial WS symptoms while her daughter displayed typical WS symptoms. Due to variable expressivity, detailed clinical examination and molecular diagnostics should be used to confirm WS and a more exact recurrence risk data.

  11. Familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism/hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome caused by germline gross deletion or point mutations of CDC73 gene in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jing; Wang, Ou; Nie, Min; Shi, Jie; Hu, Yingying; Jiang, Yan; Li, Mei; Xia, Weibo; Meng, Xunwu; Xing, Xiaoping

    2014-08-01

    Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome (HPT-JT) and familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) are two subtypes of familial primary hyperparathyroidism, which are rarely reported in Chinese population. Here, we reported three FIHP families and one HPT-JT family with long-term follow-up and genetic analysis. A total of 22 patients, from four FIHP/HPT-JT families of Chinese descent, were recruited and genomic DNA was extracted from their peripheral blood lymphocytes. Direct sequencing for MEN1, CDC73, CASR gene was conducted. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to study the effect of splice site mutations and gross deletion mutations. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyse parafibromin expression in parathyroid tumours. Genotype-phenotype correlations were assessed through clinical characteristics and long-term follow-up data. Genetic analysis revealed four CDC73 germline mutations that were responsible for the four kindreds, including two novel point mutation (c.157 G>T and IVS3+1 G>A), one recurrent point mutation (c.664 C>T) and one deletion mutation (c.307+?_513-?del exons 4, 5, 6). RT-PCR confirmed that IVS3+1 G>A generated an aberrant transcript with exon3 deletion. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated reduced nuclear parafibromin expression in tumours supporting the pathogenic effects of these mutations. This study supplies information on mutations and phenotypes of HPT-JT/FIHP syndrome in Chinese. Screening for gross deletion and point mutations of the CDC73 gene is necessary in susceptible subjects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Non-invasive diagnosis of sweat gland dysplasia using optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy in a family with anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholz, M; Gauglitz, G G; Giehl, K; Braun-Falco, M; Schwaiger, H; Schauber, J; Ruzicka, T; Berneburg, M; von Braunmühl, T

    2016-04-01

    Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (AED) is an inherited syndrome, which originates mainly from genetic alteration of the ectodysplasin A (EDA) gene. It regularly affects the adnexa of the skin which results in a characteristic phenotype of the patients including hypo- or anhidrosis leading to severe disturbances in the regulation of body temperature. To prevent the development of the symptoms in early childhood promising therapeutic approaches are currently under clinical investigation. In this context, timely diagnosis of this genetic syndrome is crucial. The purpose of our study was the investigation of modern non-invasive imaging methods such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) in the immediate diagnosis of AED. We examined a 3-year-old boy with the suspicion for an AED syndrome and his family members with RCM and OCT to document presence and characteristic features of sweat glands in comparison to non-affected individuals. The patient and the affected brother showed significantly reduced sweat glands in the imaging compared to the controls. The genetic analysis revealed a mutation of the EDA gene for hemizygosity previously associated with AED and the mother was revealed as the conductor of the genetic alteration. With the help of non-invasive imaging, we were able to detect sweat gland dysplasia in the affected family members without performing a biopsy which led us to the diagnosis of an AED. The application of modern dermatological imaging techniques might serve as valuable supplementary tools in the immediate, non-invasive diagnosis of genetic syndromes especially in newborns when early therapeutic approaches are planned. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  13. The presence of two rare genomic syndromes, 1q21 deletion and Xq28 duplication, segregating independently in a family with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyungsoo; Shen, Yiping; Graves, Tyler; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2016-01-01

    1q21 microdeletion syndrome is a rare contiguous gene deletion disorder with de novo or autosomal dominant inheritance patterns and its phenotypic features include intellectual disability, distinctive facial dysmorphism, microcephaly, cardiac abnormalities, and cataracts. MECP2 duplication syndrome is an X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, global developmental delay, and other neurological complications including late-onset seizures. Previously, these two different genetic syndromes have not been reported segregating independently in a same family. Here we describe two siblings carrying either a chromosome 1q21 microdeletion or a chromosome Xq28 duplication. Using a comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array, we identified a 1.24 Mb heterozygous deletion at 1q21 resulting in the loss of 9 genes in a girl with learning disability, hypothyroidism, short stature, sensory integration disorder, and soft dysmorphic features including cupped ears and a unilateral ear pit. We also characterized a 508 kb Xq28 duplication encompassing MECP2 in her younger brother with hypotonia, poor speech, cognitive and motor impairment. The parental CGH and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses revealed that the 1q21 deletion in the elder sister is de novo , but the Xq28 duplication in the younger brother was originally inherited from the maternal grandmother through the mother, both of whom are asymptomatic carriers. RT-qPCR assays revealed that the affected brother has almost double the amount of MECP2 mRNA expression compared to other family members of both genders including maternal grandmother and mother who have the same Xq28 duplication with no phenotype. This suggests the X chromosome with an Xq28 duplication in the carrier females is preferentially silenced. From our understanding, this would be the first report showing the independent segregation of two genetically unrelated syndromes, 1q21 microdeletion and Xq28 duplication

  14. Family Environment and the Metabolic Syndrome: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study (SCAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penedo, Frank J; Brintz, Carrie E; LLabre, Maria M; Arguelles, William; Isasi, Carmen R; Arredondo, Elva M; Navas-Nacher, Elena L; Perreira, Krista M; González, Hector M; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Daviglus, Martha; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Very limited work has evaluated associations of sociocultural processes with prevalence of the MetS. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate associations between family environment (cohesion/conflict) and the MetS, in a multi-site sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. A total of 3278 participants from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos underwent a clinical exam and completed psychosocial measures including family environment (cohesion and conflict) as part of the Sociocultural Ancillary Study. The association between family environment and the MetS was moderated by sex. Among all women, higher family conflict was associated with MetS prevalence. Results by ancestry group showed that only among Cuban women, higher conflict was associated with the MetS, whereas only among Dominican men, greater cohesion was associated with the MetS. The family context may be a sociocultural protective or risk factor among Hispanics/Latinos in terms of MetS risk, but these associations may vary by sex and Hispanic background.

  15. A splice-site mutation affecting the paired box of PAX3 in a three generation family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaie, A; Kim, E; Wilcox, E R; Lalwani, A K

    1997-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary disturbances and other developmental defects, is the most frequent form of congenital deafness in humans. Mutations in the PAX3 gene, a transcription factor expressed during embryonic development, is associated with WS types I and III. Here we report the identification of a novel acceptor splice site mutation (86-2 A-->G) in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene causing WS type I in a three generation family.

  16. Abnormal sensitivity of diploid skin fibroblasts from a family with Gardner's syndrome to the lethal effects of X-irradiation, ultraviolet light and mitomycin-C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.; Nove, J.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts isolated from two members of the same family with the cancer-prone disease Gardner's Syndrome (intestinal polyposis, colon cancer, bone and soft tissue tumors) showed enhanced sensitivity to the lethal effects of X-irradiation, ultraviolet light and mitomycin-C. These cells showed no liquid-holding type recovery following UV-irradiation of confluent cultures, but were normal in their capacity for UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. UV survival was not influenced by post-irradiation incubation with caffeine. (orig.)

  17. Síndrome de Waardenburg. Variabilidad en una familia en Sandino, Pinar del Río, Cuba Waardenburg syndrome: variability in a Sandino family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidel Castro Pérez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de Waardenburg es una enfermedad infrecuente, autosómica y dominante que cursa con cierto grado de discapacidad cuando aparece la hipoacusia neurosensorial, sin embargo, se ha detectado en Sandino, Pinar del Río, Cuba, una familia con 26 individuos vivos portadores del síndrome. Se describe por primera vez el estudio general de la familia desde el primer portador, y se demuestra la variabilidad individual en los portadores.Waardenburg Syndrome (WS is a non-frequent autosomal dominant disease, showing a certain degree of disability when neurosensitive hypoacusia appears; however, in Sandino, Pinar de Río, Cuba a family, from whom 26 alive relatives show WS. The general study of this family from the first ill relative, and the individual variability is showed.

  18. A putative Lynch syndrome family carrying MSH2 and MSH6 variants of uncertain significance-functional analysis reveals the pathogenic one

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantelinen, Jukka; Hansen, Thomas V O; Kansikas, Minttu

    2011-01-01

    Inherited pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 predispose to Lynch syndrome (LS). However, the finding of a variant or variants of uncertain significance (VUS) in affected family members complicates the risk assessment. Here, we describe a putative LS...... and the tumor pathological data suggested that the missense variation in MSH2, the more common susceptibility gene in LS, would be the predisposing alteration. However, MSH2 VUS was surprisingly found to be MMR proficient in an in vitro MMR assay and a tolerant alteration in silico. By supplying evidence...... identified VUS before predictive gene testing and genetic counseling are offered to a family....

  19. A Microdeletion of Chromosome 9q33.3 Encompasses the Entire LMX1B Gene in a Chinese Family with Nail Patella Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujuan Jiang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nail patella syndrome (NPS is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by nail malformations, patellar apoplasia, or patellar hypoplasia. Mutations within the LMX1B gene are found in 85% of families with NPS; thus, this gene has been characterized as the causative gene of NPS. In this study, we identified a heterozygous microdeletion of the entire LMX1B gene using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA in a Chinese family with NPS. The determination of the deletion breakpoints by Illumina genome-wide DNA analysis beadchip showed that the deletion was located in chromosome 9q33.3 and spanned about 0.66 Mb in size. This heterozygous deletion provides strong evidence for haploinsufficiency as the pathogenic mechanism of NPS.

  20. Identification of five novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in Chinese families with Usher syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hanjun; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhao, Xin; Deng, Ting; Dong, Bing; Wang, Jingzhao; Li, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is the most common form of Usher syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by moderate to severe hearing loss, postpuberal onset of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and normal vestibular function. Mutations in the USH2A gene have been shown to be responsible for most cases of USH2. To further elucidate the role of USH2A in USH2, mutation screening was undertaken in three Chinese families with USH2. Three unrelated Chinese families, consisting of six patients and 10 unaffected relatives, were examined clinically, and 100 normal Chinese individuals served as controls. Genomic DNA was extracted from the venous blood of all participants. The coding region (exons 2-72), including the intron-exon boundary of USH2A, was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products amplified from the three probands were analyzed using direct sequencing to screen sequence variants. Whenever substitutions were identified in a patient, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, or single strand conformation polymorphism analysis was performed on all available family members and the control group. Fundus examination revealed typical fundus features of RP, including narrowing of the vessels, bone-speckle pigmentation, and waxy optic discs. The ERG wave amplitudes of three probands were undetectable. Audiometric tests indicated moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairment. Vestibular function was normal. Five novel mutations (one small insertion, one small deletion, one nonsense, one missense, and one splice site) were detected in three families after sequence analysis of USH2A. Of the five mutations, four were located in exons 22-72, specific to the long isoform of USH2A. The mutations found in our study broaden the spectrum of USH2A mutations. Our results further indicate that the long isoform of USH2A may harbor even more mutations of the USH2A gene.